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Sample records for facial nerve schwannoma

  1. Facial nerve schwannoma in revision stapedotomy surgery.

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    Schmerber, Sébastien; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre

    2004-05-01

    We describe a male patient who presented a progressive conductive unilateral hearing loss 20 years after otosclerosis surgery. Computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggested a facial schwannoma in its tympanic segment. At the time of revision surgery, a facial schwannoma was found to originate at the tympanic segment, pushing the prosthesis out of the oval window fenestration. The Teflon-piston was repositioned with difficulties in the central platinotomy, and the facial schwannoma was left intact.

  2. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

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    Kim, Keum Won [Pohang Medical Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hae Kwan [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis.

  3. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management

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    Murat Damar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Management of intraparotid FNS is troublesome because of the facial nerve paralysis. In this report we presented a case of intraparotid schwannoma in a 55-year-old male patient complaining of a painless mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy in left parotid gland. Clinical features, preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis, and difficulties during management are discussed with the review of the literature.

  4. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

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    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  5. Using an end-to-side interposed sural nerve graft for facial nerve reinforcement after vestibular schwannoma resection. Technical note.

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    Samii, Madjid; Koerbel, Andrei; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Di Rocco, Federico; Samii, Amir; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2006-12-01

    Increasing rates of facial and cochlear nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma surgery have been achieved in the last 30 years. However, the management of a partially or completely damaged facial nerve remains an important issue. In such a case, several immediate or delayed repair techniques have been used. On the basis of recent studies of successful end-to-side neurorrhaphy, the authors applied this technique in a patient with an anatomically preserved but partially injured facial nerve during vestibular schwannoma surgery. The authors interposed a sural nerve graft to reinforce the facial nerve whose partial anatomical continuity had been preserved. On follow-up examinations 18 months after surgery, satisfactory cosmetic results for facial nerve function were observed. The end-to-side interposed nerve graft appears to be a reasonable alternative in cases of partial facial nerve injury, and might be a future therapeutic option for other cranial nerve injuries.

  6. Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: Report of two cases

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    Seyyed Basir Hashemi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra parotid facial nerve schowannoma is a rare tumor. Case report: In this article we presented two cases of intra parotid facial nerve schowannoma. In two cases tumor presented with asymptomatic parotid mass that mimic pleomorphic adenoma. No preoperative facial nerve dysfunction in cases is detected. Diagnostic result and surgical management are discussed in this paper.  

  7. Removal of vestibular schwannoma and facial nerve preservation using small suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy

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    CHEN Ling; CHEN Li-hua; LING Feng; LIU Yun-sheng; Madjid Samii; Amir Samii

    2010-01-01

    Background Vestibular schwannoma, the commonest form of intracranial schwannoma, arises from the Schwann cells investing the vestibular nerve. At present, the surgery for vestibular schwannoma remains one of the most complicated operations demanding for surgical skills in neurosurgery. And the trend of minimal invasion should also be the major influence on the management of patients with vestibular schwannomas. We summarized the microsurgical removal experience in a recent series of vestibular schwannomas and presented the operative technique and cranial nerve preservation in order to improve the rates of total tumor removal and facial nerve preservation.Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 145 patients over a 7-year period who suffered from vestibular schwannomas that had been microsurgicaily removed by suboccipital retrosigmoid transmeatus approach with small craniotomy. CT thinner scans revealed the tumor size in the internal auditory meatus and the relationship of the posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus to the bone labyrinths preoperatively. Brain stem evoked potential was monitored intraoperatively. The posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus was designedly drilled off. Patient records and operative reports, including data from the electrophysiological monitoring, follow-up audiometric examinations, and neuroradiological findings were analyzed.Results Total tumor resection was achieved in 140 cases (96.6%) and subtotal resection in 5 cases. The anatomical integrity of the facial nerve was preserved in 91.0% (132/145) of the cases. Intracranial end-to-end anastomosis of the facial nerve was performed in 7 cases. Functional preservation of the facial nerve was achieved in 115 patients (Grade Ⅰ and Grade Ⅱ, 79.3%). No patient died in this series. Preservation of nerves and vessels were as important as tumor removal dudng the operation. CT thinner scan could show the relationship between the posterior wall of the internal

  8. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Influencing Facial Nerve Outcome following Microsurgical Resection of Vestibular Schwannoma.

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    Torres, Renato; Nguyen, Yann; Vanier, Antoine; Smail, Mustapha; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Kalamarides, Michel; Bernardeschi, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    Objective To assess through multivariate analysis the clinical pre- and intraoperative factors of facial nerve outcomes at day 8 and 1-year recovery of facial palsy, as compared with day 8 status among patients who underwent total resection of unilateral vestibular schwannoma. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods This study included 229 patients with preoperative normal facial function and anatomic preservation of the facial nerve. Clinical, radiologic, and intraoperative factors were assessed according to facial nerve function at day 8 and 1 year. Results We observed that 74% and 84% of patients had good facial function (House-Brackmann [HB] I-II) at day 8 and 1 year, respectively. Of 60 patients, 26 (43%) who had impaired facial function (HB III-VI) at day 8 recovered good facial function (HB I-II) 1 year after surgery. A structured equation model showed that advanced tumor stage and strong facial nerve adhesion were independently associated with facial nerve conduction block at day 8. No predictive factor of impaired facial function recovery was seen at 1 year. In terms of the extracanalicular diameter of the tumor, the cutoff point to minimize the risk of impaired facial function was 16 mm. Conclusion At day 8 after vestibular schwannoma resection, facial function was impaired in the case of large tumors or strong facial nerve adhesion to the tumor. After 1 year, less than half of the patients recovered good facial function, and no predictive factor was found to be associated with this possible recovery.

  9. Surgical outcomes of lateral approach for jugular foramen schwannoma: postoperative facial nerve and lower cranial nerve functions.

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    Cho, Yang-Sun; So, Yoon Kyoung; Park, Kwan; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Jeong, Han-Sin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The lateral surgical approach to jugular foramen schwannomas (JFS) may result in complications such as temporary facial nerve palsy (FNP) and hearing loss due to the complicated anatomical location. Ten patients with JFS surgically treated by variable methods of lateral approach were retrospectively reviewed with emphasis on surgical methods, postoperative FNP, and lower cranial nerve status. Gross total removal of the tumors was achieved in eight patients. Facial nerves were rerouted at the first genu (1G) in six patients and at the second genu in four patients. FNP of House-Brackmann (HB) grade III or worse developed immediately postoperatively in six patients regardless of the extent of rerouting. The FNP of HB grade III persisted for more than a year in one patient managed with rerouting at 1G. Among the lower cranial nerves, the vagus nerve was most frequently paralyzed preoperatively and lower cranial nerve palsies were newly developed in two patients. The methods of the surgical approach to JFS can be modified depending on the size and location of tumors to reduce injury of the facial nerve and loss of hearing. Careful manipulation and caution are also required for short facial nerve rerouting as well as for long rerouting to avoid immediately postoperative FNP.

  10. Results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the treatment of facial nerve paralysis after failed stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.

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    Dziedzic, Tomasz A; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    Vestibular schwannoma treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) carries a risk of facial nerve (CNVII) palsy that is lower than that with microneurosurgery. The results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HHFA) have not been described yet in CNVII palsy after failed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Here we report a case series of the first four consecutive patients (three women; average age 58.5, age range: 46-74), who underwent HHFA due to failed SRS. All patients were admitted because of progressive peripheral facial nerve palsy. Three patients received retrosigmoid craniotomy due to tumor enlargement that resulted in facial nerve paralysis. All patients achieved satisfactory (House-Brackmann grade III) CNVII regeneration. No or minimal tongue atrophy occurred on the side of the anastomosis. Patients reported no problems with phonation or swallowing, except for the patients with preexisting lower cranial nerve deficits. HHFA effectively treats facial palsy after failed SRS with minimal risk of tongue atrophy and minimal morbidity. The results of the treatment are comparable to those achieved with patients without previous SRS.

  11. Gamma Knife surgery for patients with facial nerve schwannomas: a multiinstitutional retrospective study in Japan.

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    Hasegawa, Toshinori; Kato, Takenori; Kida, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Motohiro; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Sato, Mitsuya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Kano, Tadashige; Osano, Seiki; Nagano, Osamu; Nakazaki, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs). This study was a multiinstitutional retrospective analysis of 42 patients with FNSs treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) at 1 of 10 medical centers of the Japan Leksell Gamma Knife Society (JLGK1301). The median age of the patients was 50 years. Twenty-nine patients underwent GKS as the initial treatment, and 13 patients had previously undergone surgery. At the time of the GKS, 33 (79%) patients had some degree of facial palsy, and 21 (50%) did not retain serviceable hearing. Thirty-five (83%) tumors were solid, and 7 (17%) had cystic components. The median tumor volume was 2.5 cm(3), and the median prescription dose to the tumor margin was 12 Gy. The median follow-up period was 48 months. The last follow-up images showed partial remission in 23 patients and stable tumors in 19 patients. Only 1 patient experienced tumor progression at 60 months, but repeat GKS led to tumor shrinkage. The actuarial 3- and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 100% and 92%, respectively. During the follow-up period, 8 patients presented with newly developed or worsened preexisting facial palsy. The condition was transient in 3 of these patients. At the last clinical follow-up, facial nerve function improved in 8 (19%) patients, remained stable in 29 (69%), and worsened in 5 (12%; House-Brackmann Grade III in 4 patients, Grade IV in 1 patient). With respect to hearing function, 18 (90%) of 20 evaluated patients with a pure tone average of ≤ 50 dB before treatment retained serviceable hearing. GKS is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with either primary or residual FNSs. All patients, including 1 patient who required repeat GKS, achieved good tumor control at the last follow-up. The incidence of newly developed or worsened preexisting facial palsy was 12% at the last clinical follow-up. In addition, the risk of hearing

  12. Facial myokymia as a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma.

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    Joseph B

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Facial myokymia is a rare presenting feature of a vestibular schwannoma. We present a 48 year old woman with a large right vestibular schwannoma, who presented with facial myokymia. It is postulated that facial myokymia might be due to a defect in the motor axons of the 7th nerve or due to brain stem compression by the tumor.

  13. Outcome on hearing and facial nerve function in microsurgical treatment of small vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

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    Ginzkey, Christian; Scheich, Matthias; Harnisch, Wilma; Bonn, Verena; Ehrmann-Müller, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf

    2013-03-01

    Encouraging results regarding hearing preservation and facial nerve function as well as increasing understanding of the natural behaviour of vestibular schwannomas have led to the recommendation of an early treatment in small VS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate current data on functional outcome of patients with small VS treated by middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. A retrospective chart study of all cases treated by MCF approach between October 2007 and September 2011 was performed. Records were analyzed regarding demographical data, tumor size, hearing status, vestibular function and facial nerve function. Facial nerve function was classified according to the House-Brackmann scale (HB). Hearing status was classified according to the American Association of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and a modified classification of Gardner and Robertson (GR). Eighty-nine patients were included in the study; 41 % of VS was classified as intracanalicular (stage 1) and 59 % as stage 2. From 65 patients with a preoperative hearing status according to AAO-HNS A or B, 74 % still presented with A or B after surgery. Using a modified GR classification, from 70 patients categorized as class I or II prior to surgery, 70 % were still class I or II. Looking to the facial nerve function 1 week after surgery, 82 % of patients presented with HB 1 or 2. Three to twelve months later, 96 % demonstrated HB 1 or 2. A persisting facial palsy was recorded in four patients. Preoperative hearing status was evaluated as a prognostic factor for postoperative hearing, whereas no influence was detected in ABR, vestibular function and tumor length. Early diagnosis of small VS due to high-sensitive MRI requires the management of this tumor entity. Natural behaviour of VS in many cases demonstrates an increase of tumor size over time with deterioration of hearing status. The presented data underline the recommendation of an early surgical treatment in small VS as a valuable

  14. Combined use of diffusion tensor tractography and multifused contrast-enhanced FIESTA for predicting facial and cochlear nerve positions in relation to vestibular schwannoma.

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    Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Ito, Akihiro; Saito, Toki; Nakagawa, Daichi; Ino, Kenji; Kamada, Kyousuke; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-12-01

    The authors assessed whether the combined use of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and contrast-enhanced (CE) fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) could improve the accuracy of predicting the courses of the facial and cochlear nerves before surgery. The population was composed of 22 patients with vestibular schwannoma in whom both the facial and cochlear nerves could be identified during surgery. According to DTT, depicted fibers running from the internal auditory canal to the brainstem were judged to represent the facial or vestibulocochlear nerve. With regard to imaging, the authors investigated multifused CE-FIESTA scans, in which all 3D vessel models were shown simultaneously, from various angles. The low-intensity areas running along the tumor from brainstem to the internal auditory canal were judged to represent the facial or vestibulocochlear nerve. For all 22 patients, the rate of fibers depicted by DTT coinciding with the facial nerve was 13.6% (3/22), and that of fibers depicted by DTT coinciding with the cochlear nerve was 63.6% (14/22). The rate of candidates for nerves predicted by multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the facial nerve was 59.1% (13/22), and that of candidates for nerves predicted by multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the cochlear nerve was 4.5% (1/22). The rate of candidates for nerves predicted by combined DTT and multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the facial nerve was 63.6% (14/22), and that of candidates for nerves predicted by combined DTT and multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the cochlear nerve was 63.6% (14/22). The rate of candidates predicted by DTT coinciding with both facial and cochlear nerves was 0.0% (0/22), that of candidates predicted by multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with both facial and cochlear nerves was 4.5% (1/22), and that of candidates predicted by combined DTT and multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with both the facial and cochlear nerves was 45.5% (10/22). By using a combination of

  15. Prediction of facial nerve position in large vestibular schwannomas using diffusion tensor imaging tractography and its intraoperative correlation

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    Sachin Anil Borkar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study validates the reliability of facial nerve DTI-based fiber tracking for prediction of the facial nerve position in patients with large VSs. The reliable preoperative visualization of facial nerve location in relation to the VS will allow surgeons to plan tumor removal accordingly and may increase the safety of surgery.

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tracking for prediction of the position of the facial nerve in relation to large vestibular schwannomas.

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    Gerganov, Venelin M; Giordano, Mario; Samii, Madjid; Samii, Amir

    2011-12-01

    The reliable preoperative visualization of facial nerve location in relation to vestibular schwannoma (VS) would allow surgeons to plan tumor removal accordingly and may increase the safety of surgery. In this prospective study, the authors attempted to validate the reliability of facial nerve diffusion tensor (DT) imaging-based fiber tracking in a series of patients with large VSs. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the potential of this visualization technique to predict the morphological shape of the facial nerve (tumor compression-related flattening of the nerve). Diffusion tensor imaging and anatomical images (constructive interference in steady state) were acquired in a series of 22 consecutive patients with large VSs and postprocessed with navigational software to obtain facial nerve fiber tracking. The location of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) part of the nerve in relation to the tumor was recorded during surgery by the surgeon, who was blinded to the results of the fiber tracking. A correlative analysis was performed of the imaging-based location of the nerve compared with its in situ position in relation to the VS. Fibers corresponding to the anatomical location and course of the facial nerve from the brainstem to the internal auditory meatus were identified with the DT imaging-based fiber tracking technique in all 22 cases. The location of the CPA segment of the facial nerve in relation to the VS determined during surgery corresponded to the location of the fibers, predicted by the DT imaging-based fiber tracking, in 20 (90.9%) of the 22 patients. No DT imaging-based fiber tracking correlates were found with the 2 morphological types of the nerve (compact or flat). The current study of patients with large VSs has shown that the position of the facial nerve in relation to the tumor can be predicted reliably (in 91%) using DT imaging-based fiber tracking. These are preliminary results that need further verification in a larger series.

  17. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

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    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  18. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

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    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  19. Facial nerve function after vestibular schwannoma surgery following failed conservative management

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    Kaltoft, Mikkel; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: As only a limited proportion of vestibular schwannomas display growth following diagnosis, an increasing number of patients are managed conservatively. Tumor growth during "wait and scan" may, however, necessitate surgery. In these cases, increased tumor size is likely to increase th...

  20. Cerebellopontine angle facial schwannoma relapsing towards middle cranial fossa

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    Takafumi Nishizaki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve schwannomas involving posterior and middle fossas are quite rare. Here, we report an unusual case of cerebellopontine angle facial schwannoma that involved the middle cranial fossa, two years after the first operation. A 53-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of a progressive left side hearing loss and 6-month history of a left facial spasm and palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed 4.5 cm diameter of left cerebellopontine angle and small middle fossa tumor. The tumor was subtotally removed via a suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. The tumor relapsed towards middle cranial fossa within a two-year period. By subtemporal approach with zygomatic arch osteotomy, the tumor was subtotally removed except that in the petrous bone involving the facial nerve. In both surgical procedures, intraoperative monitoring identified the facial nerve, resulting in preserved facial function. The tumor in the present case arose from broad segment of facial nerve encompassing cerebellopontine angle, meatus, geniculate/labyrinthine and possibly great petrosal nerve, in view of variable symptoms. Preservation of anatomic continuity of the facial nerve should be attempted, and the staged operation via retrosigmoid and middle fossa approaches using intraoperative facial monitoring, may result in preservation of the facial nerve.

  1. [Peripheral facial nerve palsy].

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    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Ballivet de Régloix, S; Champagne, C; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Kossowski, M

    2013-06-01

    Facial palsy can be defined as a decrease in function of the facial nerve, the primary motor nerve of the facial muscles. When the facial palsy is peripheral, it affects both the superior and inferior areas of the face as opposed to central palsies, which affect only the inferior portion. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The prognosis is good in most cases. In cases with significant cosmetic sequelae, a variety of surgical procedures are available (such as hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, temporalis myoplasty and Tenzel external canthopexy) to rehabilitate facial aesthetics and function.

  2. Parapharyngeal space schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

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    Surya Kanta Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms located in a difficult anatomical region. Most of them are asymptomatic and some presents late. Neurological deficit is a late finding, and it occurs only when the lesion is very large and compresses contiguous structures. Computed tomography (CT guided fine needle aspiration cytology along with preoperative CT and magnetic resonance imaging can detect and diagnose it correctly and helps in proper planning and management. Total surgical excision is the treatment of choice. The approach is different as per the site, but trans-cervical approach is preferred. Recurrence is rare after complete excision. We are presenting a very rare parapharyngeal schwannoma arising from the hypoglossal nerve that was excised by trans-cervical approach without any complications and less morbidity as compared to other described approaches.

  3. THREE YEARS STUDY OF SCHWANNOMAS OF PERIPHERAL NERVES

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    Subha Dhua

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In this paper authors present three cases of schwannomas including a case of multiple schwannomas without the features of neurofibromatosis (NF. There was no family history of neurofibromatosis. All the patients underwent surgical excision and improved from the symptomatic lesions. Histopathology confirmed these lesions as schwannomas. The authors recommend surgery for symptomatic lesions. Asymptomatic tumours can be monitored. Regular follow up is essential as they may develop fresh lesions at any time. The relevant literature is discussed. • Malignant transformation of the schwannomas is rare and has poor prognosis. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of schwannomas. • We should distinguish between “ancient schwannoma” and malignant transformation of schwannoma since treatment and prognosis vary. • Imaging is not entirely reliable in differentiating benign from malignant peripheral nerve tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS All the patients underwent surgical excision and improved from the symptomatic lesions. Histopathology confirmed these lesions as schwannomas. The authors recommend surgery for symptomatic lesions. RESULTS The histopathological studies confirmed the lesion as Flexi Schwannoma and surgery was considered to be the best option. CONCLUSION Schwannomas and meningiomas are usually benign tumours curable by complete removal. They occur either as single sporadic tumors in otherwise healthy individuals in the fourth to sixth decades of life or as multiple tumours at an early age as part of the autosomal dominant genetic disorder neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2. The hallmark feature of NF2 is bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Multiplicity, a lobular growth pattern, and invasiveness are typical features of NF2 schwannomas. The diagnosis of NF2 is difficult in a group of heterogeneous and poorly defined patients who do not have BVSs but present with other features suggestive of NF2, namely (1 multiple

  4. A large dumbbell glossopharyngeal schwannoma involving the vagus nerve: a case report and review of the literature

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    Zhao Hongyu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Schwannoma arising from the glossopharyngeal nerve is a rare intracranial tumor. Fewer than 40 cases have been reported. Accurate pre-operative diagnosis and optimal treatment are still difficult. Case presentation We present one case of schwannoma originating from the ninth cranial nerve with palsies of the trigeminal nerve, facial-acoustic nerve complex, and vagus nerve in addition to ninth nerve dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging showed tumors located in the cerebellopontine angle with extracranial extension via the jugular foramen, with evident enhancement on post-contrast scan. Surgical management single-staged with the help of gamma knife radiosurgery achieved total removal. Conclusion Glossopharyngeal schwannoma is devoid of clinical symptoms and neurological signs. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging may play a key role as an accurate diagnostic tool. A favorable option of approach and appropriate planning of surgical strategy should be the goal of operation for this benign tumor.

  5. A rare Cervical Nerve Root, C2-C3 Schwannoma

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    Nilesh Chordia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas, neurilemmomas or neurinomas are benign nerve sheath tumors deriving from Schwann cells that occur in the head and neck region in 25-45% of cases 1 .About 10% of schwannoma that occur in the head and neck region generally originate from the vagus or sympathetic nervous system, those arising from C2 nerve root are extremely rare. 2 Preoperative imaging studies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT are used to distinguish its location and origin. The treatment of schwannoma is surgical resection, with several surgical modalities have been introduced to preserve the neurological function. We present a rare case of Cervical nerve (C2-C3 root schwannoma of 70 years old male who presented with lateral neck swelling with no neurological deficit ,swelling which also had intervertebral part was removed successfully through neck incision with no post-operative neurological symptoms

  6. Osteoplastic maxillotomy approach for infraorbital nerve schwannoma, a case report.

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    Karkas, Alexandre A; Schmerber, Sébastien A; Bettega, Georges V; Reyt, Emile P; Righini, Christian A

    2008-03-01

    Extracranial schwannomas can readily occur in the head and neck region and rarely involve the trigeminal nerve. As a rule, their treatment is surgical and dictated by the location of the tumor and nerve of origin. We describe a case of a 14-year-old boy with a mass invading right nasal fossa, maxillary sinus, orbital floor, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa. The diagnosis of a nerve sheath tumor was evoked after angiography showed no vascular blush. The tumor was removed through a Weber-Fergusson incision with subciliary extension followed by maxillozygomatic osteotomy. This approach showed the tumor to be coming from the infraorbital nerve and allowed complete tumor exposure and removal. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma. We describe the osteoplastic maxillotomy approach which we felt most appropriate for removal of the infraorbital schwannoma and discuss other possible surgical options for this type of tumor. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 2008.

  7. Intraosseous schwannoma originating in inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Kenichiro; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Ohata, Hitoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Takano, Nobuo; Shibahara, Takahiko; Eguchi, Jun; Murakami, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign neoplasms derived from Schwann cells of the neurilemma and appear most frequently on the auditory nerve or peripheral nerves of the skin. They arise in the oral and maxillofacial region infrequently, and very rarely in the center of the jaw. We herein present a case of a rare mandibular intraosseous schwannoma derived from the main trunk of the inferior alveolar nerve in a 33-year-old man. Fusiform expansion in the mandibular canal was observed and a mass showing the target sign in the mandibular canal was confirmed on T2-weighted and Gd contrastenhanced T1-weighted MRI. Based on these findings, an inferior alveolar nerve-derived schwannoma or other benign nervous system neoplasm was diagnosed. A buccal side cortical bone flap in the mandibular molar region was removed to expose the mass, which was then peeled away from the nerve fibers and completely removed. Some inferior alveolar nerve fibers that were connected to the mass were removed at the same time, but the remaining nerve fiber bundle was preserved. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma with Antoni type A and Antoni type B regions. Although the patient experienced extremely mild paresthesia in the skin over the mental region and mental foramen at immediately after surgery, this had almost entirely disappeared at 7 years and 4 months later, and there has been no tumor recurrence.

  8. Concurrent spinal nerve root schwannoma and meningioma mimicking single-component schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamizo, Akira; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Shimogawa, Takafumi; Amano, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Tomio

    2012-04-01

    We present a first case of concurrent tumors consisting of schwannoma and meningioma arising at the same spinal level in a patient without neurofibromatosis. A 49-year-old man without clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis presented with a 5-month history of right neck pain. MRI demonstrated an extradural tumor involving the right-sided C2 nerve root with a small intradural component. T1- and T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced MRI could not differentiate the intradural tumor as different from the extradural tumor. Total removal of the tumors was performed. No contiguity of the extradural tumor with the intradural tumor was seen. The intradural tumor attached strongly to the dura mater around the C2 nerve root exits. Intraoperative pathological diagnosis confirmed the extradural tumor as schwannoma and the intradural tumor as meningioma. We therefore thoroughly coagulated the dura mater adjacent to the intradural tumor and resected the dura mater around the nerve root exits together with the tumor. Pathological examination revealed that the resection edge of the extradural component consisted of a spinal nerve with thickened epineurium and was free of neoplastic cells. No schwannoma component was evident in the intradural tumor. No obvious transition thus existed between the extra- and intradural tumors. Distinguishing these tumors prior to surgery is critical for determining an optimal surgical plan, as schwannoma and meningioma require different surgical procedures. We therefore recommend a careful review of preoperative imaging with the possibility of concurrent tumors in mind. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  9. Isolated trochlear nerve schwannoma presenting with diplopia: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Samadian

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Trochlear nerve schwannoma is a rare type of schwannoma and in almost all of the cases is diagnosed intraoperatively. There are three types of trochlear nerve schwannoma according to the classification proposed for trigeminal schwannoma: cisternal type—confined to the precavernous segment of the trochlear nerve; cistocavernous type—invading the cavernous sinus and the retroclival and retropetrosal cistern; cavernous type—located in the middle cranial fossa on the cavernous or paracavernous segment of the fourth cranial nerves, with or without cavernous sinus invasion. The cisternal type was the most common type encountered in previous studies. The clinical signs and symptoms of trochlear nerve schwannoma are similar to the trigeminal schwannoma and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma.

  10. Pediatric facial nerve rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-11-01

    Facial paralysis is a rare but severe condition in the pediatric population. Impaired facial movement has multiple causes and varied presentations, therefore individualized treatment plans are essential for optimal results. Advances in facial reanimation over the past 4 decades have given rise to new treatments designed to restore balance and function in pediatric patients with facial paralysis. This article provides a comprehensive review of pediatric facial rehabilitation and describes a zone-based approach to assessment and treatment of impaired facial movement.

  11. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  12. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  13. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  14. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2009-01-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  15. Tandem intercostal thoracic schwannomas resected using a thoracoscopic nerve-sparing technique: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantwerker, Brian R; Dickman, Curtis A

    2011-07-01

    To describe a novel nerve-sparing technique for the resection of intercostal nerve schwannomas. This case demonstrates that intercostal neuralgia can be caused by intercostal schwannomas and that it can be relieved by their removal. A young woman with schwannomatosis had progressively worsening intercostal neuralgia caused by compression of the intercostal nerve against the rib by tandem intercostal schwannomas. After the tumors were removed, her symptoms were completely relieved. A thoracoscopic technique was used to define the involved fascicles and to facilitate removal of the tumors while sparing the uninvolved nerve. The patient's radicular pain was relieved completely by the tumor resection. Thoracoscopic surgery offers a safe and minimally invasive technique for removal of intercostal schwannomas and is a valid alternative to open thoracotomy. Removal of thoracic schwannomas can relieve intercostal neuralgia.

  16. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be seen ...

  17. Facial Nerve Palsy In Secondary Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuria B.L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary syphilis with right facial nerve palsy is reported. A 28 year old unmarried male presented with diffuse maculopapular rash and facial nerve palsy. He had elevated while cells and protein in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were positive for VDRL and TPHA tests. Facial nerve palsy and maculopapular rash improved with penicillin therapy.

  18. Mandibular nerve schwannoma resection using sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Laith; Demian, Nagi; Weinstock, Yitzchak E; Weissferdt, Annikka

    2013-11-01

    A case is presented of a unique presentation and treatment of a mandibular nerve schwannoma. Its uniqueness stems from the fact that it consisted of 2 distinct tumors along the same nerve: one within the body of the mandible and the other within the ipsilateral pterygomandibular space. Rather than the standard approach of lip split and hemimandibulectomy, a unique approach of a sagittal split ramus osteotomy was used that allowed access to the 2 lesions and avoided the added morbidity of the former approach. The 2 portions of the lesion were successfully removed and the patient was satisfied with the result. Recurrence has not been detected after 6 months. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  20. A Review of Facial Nerve Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    An intimate knowledge of facial nerve anatomy is critical to avoid its inadvertent injury during rhytidectomy, parotidectomy, maxillofacial fracture reduction, and almost any surgery of the head and neck. Injury to the frontal and marginal mandibular branches of the facial nerve in particular can lead to obvious clinical deficits, and areas where these nerves are particularly susceptible to injury have been designated danger zones by previous authors. Assessment of facial nerve function is no...

  1. A review of facial nerve anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myckatyn, Terence M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2004-02-01

    An intimate knowledge of facial nerve anatomy is critical to avoid its inadvertent injury during rhytidectomy, parotidectomy, maxillofacial fracture reduction, and almost any surgery of the head and neck. Injury to the frontal and marginal mandibular branches of the facial nerve in particular can lead to obvious clinical deficits, and areas where these nerves are particularly susceptible to injury have been designated danger zones by previous authors. Assessment of facial nerve function is not limited to its extratemporal anatomy, however, as many clinical deficits originate within its intratemporal and intracranial components. Similarly, the facial nerve cannot be considered an exclusively motor nerve given its contributions to taste, auricular sensation, sympathetic input to the middle meningeal artery, and parasympathetic innervation to the lacrimal, submandibular, and sublingual glands. The constellation of deficits resulting from facial nerve injury is correlated with its complex anatomy to help establish the level of injury, predict recovery, and guide surgical management.

  2. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anatomical considerations to prevent facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaeian, Jason; Rohrich, Rod J; Stuzin, James M

    2015-05-01

    Injury to the facial nerve during a face lift is a relatively rare but serious complication. A large body of literature has been dedicated toward bettering the understanding of the anatomical course of the facial nerve and the relative danger zones. Most of these prior reports, however, have focused on identifying the location of facial nerve branches based on their trajectory mostly in two dimensions and rarely in three dimensions. Unfortunately, the exact location of the facial nerve relative to palpable or visible facial landmarks is quite variable. Although the precise location of facial nerve branches is variable, its relationship to soft-tissue planes is relatively constant. The focus of this report is to improve understanding of facial soft-tissue anatomy so that safe planes of dissection during surgical undermining may be identified for each branch of the facial nerve. Certain anatomical locations more prone to injury and high-risk patient parameters are further emphasized to help minimize the risk of facial nerve injury during rhytidectomy.

  4. SCHWANNOMA OF THE CERVICAL VAGUS NERVE: A RARE BENIGN NEUROGENIC TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce SIMSEK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A schwannoma, also known as an acoustic neuroma, is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of schwann cells, which normally produce the insulating myelin sheath covering the peripheral nerves. Schwannoma, originating from the cervical vagus nerve, is an extremely rare neoplasm that usually occurs in men between the 3rd and 6th decades of life. The most common presentation is a painless, slow-growing, lateral neck mass;this appears in a large proportion of cases. Complete surgical resection with care to protect the nerve of origin is the recommended treatment of choice. Here, we report a case of cervical vagal schwannoma in a 55-year-old male who admitted with the complaint of a firm and painless mass lesion on the right side of the neck. The management of the case is discussed along with the relevant literature.

  5. Immunobiology of Facial Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN Shi-ming; GAO Zhi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Immunobiological study is a key to revealing the important basis of facial nerve repair and regeneration for both research and development of clinic treatments. The microenvironmental changes around an injuried facial motoneuron, i.e., the aggregation and expression of various types of immune cells and molecules in a dynamic equilibrium, impenetrate from the start to the end of the repair of an injured facial nerve. The concept of "immune microenvironment for facial nerve repair and regeneration", mainly concerns with the dynamic exchange between expression and regulation networks and a variaty of immune cells and immune molecules in the process of facial nerve repair and regeneration for the maintenance of a immune microenvironment favorable for nerve repair.Investigation on microglial activation and recruitment, T cell behavior, cytokine networks, and immunological cellular and molecular signaling pathways in facial nerve repair and regeneration are the current hot spots in the research on immunobiology of facial nerve injury. The current paper provides a comprehensive review of the above mentioned issues. Research of these issues will eventually make immunological interventions practicable treatments for facial nerve injury in the clinic.

  6. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  7. [Lingual schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulkü, Cağatay Han; Demir, Hilal; Yeşildemir, Huri Sultan; Esen, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign, slow growing, solitary and encapsulated neuroectodermal tumors arising from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Twenty-five percent of all extracranial schwannomas are seen in the head and neck region. Intra-oral schwannomas are rare and commonly seen at the tongue base. In this article, a 20-year-old female case with lingual schwannoma as a rare clinical condition and characteristics of the disease were summarized in the lights of the literature.

  8. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  9. Schwannoma of the vagus nerve, a rare middle mediastinal neurogenic tumor: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroulis Christophoros N

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Schwannoma originating from the vagus nerve within the mediastinum is a rare, usually benign tumor. A 44-year old male was presented with chest pain. Chest radiography, CT scan and MRI showed a well circumscribed mass, 5 × 4 cm located in the aortopulmonary window. The mass was found at surgery to be in close proximity with the aortic arch and the left pulmonary hilum, alongside the left vagus nerve. The encapsulated tumor was completely resected through a left thoracotomy incision and it was found to be a benign schwannoma in pathology. The patient is free of recurrence 6 years after surgery.

  10. Intratemporal Hemangiomas Involving the Facial Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanjaya; Karmarkar, Sandeep; Calabrese, V.; Landolfi, Mauro; Taibah, Abdelkader; Russo, Alessandra; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1995-01-01

    Intratemporal vascular tumors involving the facial nerve are rare benign lesions. Because of their variable clinical features, they are often misdiagnosed preoperatively. This study presents a series of 21 patients with such lesions managed from 1977 to 1994. Facial nerve dysfunction was the most common complaint, present in 60% of the cases, followed by hearing loss, present in 40% of cases. High-resolution computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium, and a high index of clinical suspicion is required for preoperative diagnosis of these lesions. Early surgical resection of these tumors permits acceptable return of facial nerve function in many patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17170963

  11. Schwannoma of the 6th nerve: case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Jingjun Li; Jing Li; Zhen Wu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Schwannomas of the 6th nerve are extremely rare.Only 22 cases of intracranial schwannomas of the 6th cranial nerve pathologically confirmed have been reported.Case Presentation: Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl who presented with isolated progressive 6th nerve palsy.A cisternal type of schwannomawas found from neuro-imaging.Subtotal removal of the tumor was performed by a routine left subtemporal craniotomy with an petrosectomy.The attachment to the 6th nerve was found.After surgery, the patient's 6th nerve palsy remained.Histological images revealed a cellular schwannoma.Then the classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, operation, stereotactic radiosurgery are reviewed.Conclusions: The location and the attachment to the 6th nerve is the key for diagnosis.Most cases are treated surgically.It looks like it is not easy to completely remove for CA type because of invasion of the cavernous sinus or firm adherence to the nerves.The 6th nerve function seldom completely recovered postoperatively.The direction of further research is to improve the diagnosis and therapy to have better nerve recovery.

  12. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma Treated with Gamma Knife after Excision: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takuro; Shima, Ayako; Hirai, Hisao; Suzuki, Fumio; Matsuda, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannomas are extremely rare. We present a surgically excised case of trochlear nerve schwannoma followed by Gamma Knife (ELEKTA, Stockholm, Sweden) after histologic confirmation. A 52-year-old man presented with diplopia, gait disturbance, and sensory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large cystic mass at ambient cistern on the right side. Subtotal excision followed by Gamma Knife surgery was undertaken. His neurologic symptoms disappeared with radiologic reduction in size at 15-month follow-up. Because Gamma Knife can manage trochlear nerve schwannomas well, surgical excision should be reserved for large ones and limited to subcapsular or subtotal removal with the expectation of possible recovery of neurologic dysfunction.

  13. Pontine extension of a tentorial schwannoma without cranial nerve involvement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Urso Pietro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intracranial schwannomas unrelated to the cranial nerves are uncommon. We report a new case of tentorial schwannoma unrelated to the cranial nerves, with extension into the pons. A literature review with discussion of the most relevant pathogenetic aspects is also performed. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man was admitted with right-sided paresthesias and weakness of his upper and lower extremities. The neurological examination revealed right hemiparesis and hemi-hypoesthesia. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a cerebellopontine lesion, arising from the left free edge of the tentorium, and extending into his pons. A piecemeal removal was performed through a retrosigmoid approach. The lesion was not found to be associated with any cranial nerves. The histological examination revealed a schwannoma Antoni type A. His postoperative course was uneventful. At one year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact and the magnetic resonance imaging of his brain performed at that time showed complete removal without signs of recurrence. Conclusion Tentorial schwannomas are rare clinical entities. Knowledge of their clinical, radiological and anatomical characteristics is very important for the correct diagnosis and management.

  14. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    A total of 779 patients operated on for vestibular schwannoma mostly by the translabyrinthine approach in Denmark during the period 1976-2000 answered a questionnaire about various postoperative consequences. In this paper we describe the patients' facial function evaluated by professionals one...... year postoperatively and self-evaluated by each patient according to the House-Brackmann scale at the time of the questionnaire. The patients' self-evaluation was more pessimistic than that of the professionals with 26% reporting House-Brackmann grade IV-VI, compared with 20%. One hundred and seventeen...... (15%) of 779 patients considered their facial palsy to be a big problem and 125 patients (16%) were interested in surgical treatment for the sequelae of facial palsy. Seventy-eight (10%) had already had some kind of operation, usually the VII-XII coaptation. Thirty-three of 61 patients who had already...

  15. 3 dimensional volume MR imaging of intratemporal facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hyun Ung; Moon, Woong Jae [Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of 3 dimensional volume MR imaging technique for demonstrating the facial nerves and to describe MR findings in facial palsy patients and evaluate the significance of facial nerve enhancement. We reviewed the MR images of facial nerves obtained with 3 dimensional volume imaging technique before and after intravenous administration of Gadopentetate dimeglumine in 13 cases who had facial paralysis and 33 cases who had no facial palsy. And we analyzed the detectability of ananatomical segments of intratemporal facial nerves and facial nerve enhancement. When the 3 dimensional volume MR images of 46 nerves were analyzed subjectively, the nerve courses of 43(93%) of 46 nerves were effectively demonstrated on 3 dimensional volume MR images. Internal acoustic canal portions and geniculate ganglion of facial nerve were well visualized on axial images and tympanic and mastoid segments were well depicted on oblique sagittal images. 10 of 13 patients(77%) were visibly enhanced along at least one segment of the facial nerve with swelling or thickening, and nerves of 8 of normal 33 cases(24%) were enhanced without thickening or swelling. MR findings of facial nerve parelysis is asymmetrical thickening of facial nerve with contrast enhancement. The 3 dimensional volume MR imaging technique should be a useful study for the evaluation of intratemporal facial nerve disease.

  16. Malignant schwannoma of the upper mediastinum originating from the vagus nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiyama Kenichi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant schwannoma of the upper mediastinum originating from the vagus nerve is extremely rare. Case presentation A 46-year-old female was admitted for a left cervical mass which was associated with both hoarseness and Horner's syndrome. Chest computed tomography showed a mass extending from the left upper mediastinum to the left supraclavicular area. A fine needle aspiration cytological examination suggested primary lung cancer stage IIIB large cell carcinoma. After administering induction chemo-radiotherapy, a complete surgical resection was performed. The tumor was found to involve both the left vagus nerve and the left sympathetic nerve. Histological examination of the resected specimen revealed the tumor to be malignant schwannoma. Conclusion Despite incorrect preoperative diagnosis, the multimodality treatment administered in this case, including induction chemo-radiotherapy and surgery, proved to be effective.

  17. [Schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve presenting as a syndrome of Collet-Sicard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Escrivà, A; Pampliega Pérez, A; Martín-Estefania, C; Botella, C

    2005-01-01

    Collet-Sicard is a rare syndrome that consists of the palsy of all the lower four cranial nerves. We describe this entity in relation with a schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve. A 45 year-old-patient was admitted to the hospital referring hoarseness and difficulty in swallowing for two weeks. On neurological examination, the patient exhibited palsy of the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth nerves. This is a syndrome of Collet-Sicard. The cranial MRI revealed a small intracranial and extracranial tumor adjacent to the hypoglossal foramen. The tumor involved the jugular foramen and was moderately enhanced with gadolinium The patient underwent surgical removal. The pathologic examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve. We have carried out a research of the Collet-Sicard syndrome and of its aetiology. Although schwannoma the hypoglossal nerve is a rare disorder we consider that this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of the Collet-Sicard syndrome.

  18. Facial nerve palsy and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Solé, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Facial nerve lesions are usually benign conditions even though patients may present with emotional distress. Facial palsy usually resolves in 3-6 weeks, but if axonal degeneration takes place, it is likely that the patient will end up with a postparalytic facial syndrome featuring synkinesis, myokymic discharges, and hemifacial mass contractions after abnormal reinnervation. Essential hemifacial spasm is one form of facial hyperactivity that must be distinguished from synkinesis after facial palsy and also from other forms of facial dyskinesias. In this condition, there can be ectopic discharges, ephaptic transmission, and lateral spread of excitation among nerve fibers, giving rise to involuntary muscle twitching and spasms. Electrodiagnostic assessment is of relevance for the diagnosis and prognosis of peripheral facial palsy and hemifacial spasm. In this chapter the most relevant clinical and electrodiagnostic aspects of the two disorders are reviewed, with emphasis on the various stages of facial palsy after axonal degeneration, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various features of hemifacial spasm, and the cues for differential diagnosis between the two entities.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  20. Schwannoma del nervio facial intraparotídeo. Un dilema terapéutico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Barba-Recreo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Los schwannomas del nervio facial intraparotídeos son tumores benignos poco frecuentes, suponiendo frecuentemente un reto diagnóstico y terapéutico. La mayoría de los pacientes presentan una masa parotídea asintomática y las pruebas de imagen y la punción con aguja fina no suelen ser concluyentes en el diagnóstico. Tras la revisión de la literatura a propósito de un caso, pretendemos proporcionar cierta guía para el tratamiento de esta rara patología.

  1. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  2. Connections between the facial and trigeminal nerves: Anatomical basis for facial muscle proprioception

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    J.L. Cobo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception is a quality of sensibility that originates in specialized sensory organs (proprioceptors that inform the central nervous system about static and dynamic conditions of muscles and joints. The facial muscles are innervated by efferent motor nerve fibers and typically lack proprioceptors. However, facial proprioception plays a key role in the regulation and coordination of the facial musculature and diverse reflexes. Thus, facial muscles must be necessarily supplied also for afferent sensory nerve fibers provided by other cranial nerves, especially the trigeminal nerve. Importantly, neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated that facial proprioceptive impulses are conveyed through branches of the trigeminal nerve to the central nervous system. The multiple communications between the facial and the trigeminal nerves are at the basis of these functional characteristics. Here we review the literature regarding the facial (superficial communications between the facial and the trigeminal nerves, update the current knowledge about proprioception in the facial muscles, and hypothesize future research in facial proprioception.

  3. Taking it to the next level: lumbar radiculopathy from thoracic nerve schwannoma

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    Anene Ukaigwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve and its branches, the common fibular and tibial nerves, causes sciatica which is a common syndrome characterized most often by radiating pain from the lower back down the legs and also manifesting as sensory and motor deficits. Sciatica is a common presentation of lumbosacral disc prolapse and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in ambulatory settings. Schwannomas rarely cause sciatica; hence, it is seldom considered in evaluation of a patient with radiculopathy. Our patient presented with lumbar radiculopathy, mild degenerative changes on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan, and failed conservative treatment. Myelopathy was confirmed with electromyogram (EMG. Thoracolumbar spine MRI revealed the schwannoma in the thoracic region. He recovered neurologic function after tumor excision. This case highlights the diagnostic challenge that may arise in evaluating a patient with lumbar radiculopathy, negative lumbosacral spine imaging, and failure of conservative therapy.

  4. Altered prosaposin expression in the rat facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve transection and repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Wenlong Luo; Cuiying Zhou; Jingjing Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that damaged facial nerves synthesize prosaposin to promote repair of facial neurons.OBJECTIVE: To observe time-course changes of prosaposin expression in the facial nerve nucleus of Sprague Dawley rats following facial nerve transection and repair.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized control neuropathological animal experiment was performed in Chongqing Medical University between March 2007 and September 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 48 adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided into transection and transection + end-to-end anastomosis groups (n =24). Rabbit anti-rat prosaposin antibody, instant SABC immunohistochemical kit, and antibody dilution solution were purchased from Wuhan Uscn Science Co., Ltd., China.METHODS: In the transection group, the nerve trunk of the distal retroauricular branch of the left facial nerves was ligated in Sprague Dawley rats, and a 5-mm nerve trunk at the distal end of the ligation site was removed. In the transection + end-to-end anastomosis group, epineurial anastomosis was performed immediately following transection of the left facial nerves. The right facial nerves in the two groups sewed as the normal control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of prosaposin-positive neurons, as well as intensity of immunostaining in facial nerve nucleus, following transection and end-to-end anastomosis were determined by immunohistochemistry at 1,3, 7, 14, 21, and 35 days after injury.RESULTS: Transection group: transection of facial nerves resulted in increased number of prosaposin-positive neurons and immunoreactivity intensity in the facial nucleus on day 1. These values significantly increased by day 3. Expression was greater than in the control side. The peak of the reduction was reached at 7 days post-surgery. Transection + end-to-end anastomosis group: the number of prosaposin-positive neurons and immunoreactivity intensity was reduced in the facial nerve nucleus following

  5. The Angle at Which the Facial Nerve Leaves the Mastoid

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Some skull base procedures require extensive dissection of the facial nerve. This can be difficult at the mastoid tip, where the nerve is approximated to soft tissues. The nerve was dissected in this area in 15 cadaver specimens. The mean angle at which the facial nerve leaves the mastoid tip in 117°. This information should aid the skull base surgeon in the identification of the facial nerve at the mastoid tip.

  6. Schwannoma of the descending loop of the hypoglossal nerve: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Pasqua, Rocco; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Schwannomas of the descending loop of the hypoglossal nerve are very rare. They are slow-growing tumors that may masquerade a carotid body tumor. A 60-year-old female was referred for a latero-cervical mass appearing as a chemodectoma at CT-scan. At operation, a 2cm mass arising from the descending loop of the hypoglossal nerve was resected en bloc with the loop itself and a functional lymphadenectomy was associated. Post-operative course was uneventful and the patient is free from disease recurrence at one year follow-up. En bloc resection remains the real curative treatment of Schwannomas, ensuring unlimited freedom from disease, although causing functional impairment which may be significant. Nonetheless recurrence should be prevented as, beside requiring reintervention, it may harbor a malignant evolution towards sarcoma. Schwannomas of the descending lop of the hypoglossal nerve may masquerade a chemodectoma of the carotid bifurcation and can be curatively resected without any functional impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Lingual schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoz, Murat; Suoglu, Yusufhan; Ilhan, Ridvan

    2006-01-01

    Schwannomas or neurilemmomas are benign, slow growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumor, originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Intraoral schwannoma accounts for 1% of head and neck region and are commonly seen at the base region of tongue. Most of the few such reports in the literature, have described schwannomas that occurred in the tongue. In this article, we report a rare case of lingual schwannoma involving the anterior of tongue, in a young individual, in whom the lesion was completely excised via an intra oral approach.

  8. Schwannoma of the vagus nerve masquerading as a carotid body tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Daniela J; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Sharma, Gopesh K

    2009-01-01

    A 45-year-old male presented with increasing hoarseness and swelling of his right neck over 5 months. He was noted to have right vocal cord paralysis and hemiatrophy of his tongue. He was found to have a schwannoma of the vagus nerve with compression of the right hypoglossal nerve. One month after his surgery, the patient's tongue mobility was improving, he was not aspirating, his voice was better and his right vocal cord remained abducted. A discussion of this case is followed by a review of the literature surrounding this rare disease and this unique presentation.

  9. Nerve repair and cable grafting for facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, J David

    2008-05-01

    Facial nerve injury and facial paralysis are devastating for patients. Although imperfect, primary repair is currently the best option to restore facial nerve function. Cable, or interposition, nerve grafting is an acceptable alternative when primary repair is not possible. Several donor nerves are at the surgeon's disposal. Great auricular, sural, or medial and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves are all easily obtained. Both primary repair and interposition grafting typically result in better facial function than do other dynamic and static rehabilitation strategies. Proficient anastomotic technique and, when necessary, selection of an appropriate interposition graft will optimize patient outcomes. Promising research is under way that will enhance future nerve repair and grafting efforts.

  10. Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the treatment of abducens nerve schwannomas: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Govindaraju Lakshmi; Sharma, Manish Singh; Kale, Shashank S; Agrawal, Deepak; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Of the intracranial schwannomas, those arising from the vestibular nerves are the most common. Abducens nerve (AN) schwannomas are very rare, and there is limited literature on their optimal management. Therapeutic options include surgery and/or stereotactic radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in these sixth cranial nerve (CN) schwannomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients who had undergone GKRS for intracranial tumors at their institute in the period from 2003 to 2010. Inclusion criteria were as follows: isolated AN paresis on presentation, a lesion along the course of the sixth CN, and imaging features characteristic of a schwannoma. Patients with other CN deficits and neurofibromatosis Type 2 were excluded. Symptomatic improvement was defined as the resolution of or an improvement in diplopia noted on a subjective basis or as an improvement in lateral eyeball excursion noted objectively on follow-up. A reduction in tumor volume by at least 20%, as noted by comparing the pre- and post-GKRS images, was deemed significant. RESULTS Six patients with a mean age of 37.1 years (range 17-55 years) underwent primary GKRS. There were 2 prepontine cistern, 3 cavernous sinus, and 1 cisterno-cavernous tumor. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.1 months (range 3-12 months). The mean tumor volume was 3.3 cm(3) (range 1.5-4.8 cm(3)). The mean tumor margin radiation dose was 12.5 Gy (range 12-14 Gy), while the median margin dose was 12 Gy (50% isodose line). The median number of isocenters used was 5 (range 4-8). The brainstem received an average 8.35-Gy radiation dosage (range 5.5-11 Gy). The mean follow-up duration was 44.3 months (range 24-78 months). Symptoms remained stable in 1 patient, improved in 3, and resolved in 2 (total improvement 83%). Magnetic resonance imaging at the last follow-up showed a stable tumor size in 3 patients (50%) and a reduction in the other 3

  11. Traumatic facial nerve palsy: CT patterns of facial nerve canal fracture and correlation with clinical severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Cheol; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Hyun Min; Lee, Young Suk; Lee, Jee Young [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To analyse the patterns of facial nerve canal injury seen at temporal bone computed tomography (CT) in patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy and to correlate these with clinical manifestations and outcome. Thirty cases of temporal bone CT in 29 patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy were analyzed with regard to the patterns of facial nerve canal involvement. The patterns were correlated with clinical grade, the electroneurographic (ENoG) findings, and clinical outcome. For clinical grading, the House-Brackmann scale was used, as follows:grade I-IV, partial palsy group; grade V-VI, complete palsy group. The electroneuronographic findings were categorized as mild to moderate (below 90%) or severe (90% and over) degeneration. In 25 cases, the bony wall of the facial nerve canals was involved directly (direct finding): discontinuity of the bony wall was onted in 22 cases, bony spicules in ten, and bony wall displacement in five. Indirect findings were canal widening in nine cases and adjacent bone fracture in two. In one case, there were no direct or indirect findings. All cases in which there was complete palsy (n=8) showed one or more direct findings including spicules in six, while in the incomplete palsy group (n=22), 17 cases showed direct findings. In the severe degeneration group (n=13), on ENog, 12 cases demonstrated direct findings, including spicules in nine cases. In 24 patients, symptoms of facial palsy showed improvement at follow up evaluation. Four of the five patients in whom symptoms did not improve had spicules. Among ten patients with spicules, five underwent surgery and symptoms improved in four of these; among the five patients not operated on , symptoms did not improve in three. In most patients with facial palsy after temporal bone injury, temporal bone CT revealed direct or indirect facial nerve canal involvement, and in complete palsy or severe degeneration groups, there were direct findings in most cases. We believe that meticulous

  12. Facial nerve involvement in pseudotumor cerebri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi S

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available A woman with history of bifrontal headache, vomiting and loss of vision was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri based on clinical and MRI findings. Bilateral abducens and facial nerve palsies were detected. Pseudotumor cerebri in this patient was not associated with any other illness or related to drug therapy. Treatment was given to lower the raised intracranial pressure to which the patient responded.

  13. Masseteric nerve for reanimation of the smile in short-term facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-02-01

    Our aim was to describe our experience with the masseteric nerve in the reanimation of short term facial paralysis. We present our outcomes using a quantitative measurement system and discuss its advantages and disadvantages. Between 2000 and 2012, 23 patients had their facial paralysis reanimated by masseteric-facial coaptation. All patients are presented with complete unilateral paralysis. Their background, the aetiology of the paralysis, and the surgical details were recorded. A retrospective study of movement analysis was made using an automatic optical system (Facial Clima). Commissural excursion and commissural contraction velocity were also recorded. The mean age at reanimation was 43(8) years. The aetiology of the facial paralysis included acoustic neurinoma, fracture of the skull base, schwannoma of the facial nerve, resection of a cholesteatoma, and varicella zoster infection. The mean time duration of facial paralysis was 16(5) months. Follow-up was more than 2 years in all patients except 1 in whom it was 12 months. The mean duration to recovery of tone (as reported by the patient) was 67(11) days. Postoperative commissural excursion was 8(4)mm for the reanimated side and 8(3)mm for the healthy side (p=0.4). Likewise, commissural contraction velocity was 38(10)mm/s for the reanimated side and 43(12)mm/s for the healthy side (p=0.23). Mean percentage of recovery was 92(5)mm for commissural excursion and 79(15)mm/s for commissural contraction velocity. Masseteric nerve transposition is a reliable and reproducible option for the reanimation of short term facial paralysis with reduced donor site morbidity and good symmetry with the opposite healthy side.

  14. Kawasaki disease with facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Margarita; Santos-Muñoz, Andrea; Rutiman, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a multisystem disorder with varying clinical expression. We describe an instance of facial nerve paralysis in a patient with KD. A 5-month-old boy developed fever, irritability, and diarrhea, treated 8 days later with cefaclor and ibuprofen. Three days later a confluent, erythematous and papular rash appeared, his lips were reddened and swollen, and his white blood count and platelet count were 20,900/mm(3) and 558,000/mm(3), respectively. He was admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of KD, and an echocardiogram showed a right coronary aneurysm. The patient then developed an acute, right-sided, facial nerve peripheral paralysis that resolved over the next 6 weeks. He was treated with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) 2 g/kg and aspirin 100 mg/kg/day with improvement of signs and symptoms. This report documents facial nerve paralysis as an uncommon complication of KD and points out that it may be a marker of increased risk of cardiovascular disease in this disorder.

  15. Malignant transformation in a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma: Addition to the spectrum of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rekhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign nerve sheath tumors include schwannomas, neurofibromas and perineuriomas. The malignant counterpart of a nerve sheath tumor is designated as a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST. Lately, benign nerve sheath tumors comprising more than one component have been described, including hybrid schwannomas/perineuriomas. However, malignant transformation in a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma has not been documented so far. Herein, we present a rare case of a young adult male who presented with a soft tissue mass in his right thigh that was excised elsewhere and submitted to us for histopathological review. One of the tissue sections displayed histopathological features of a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma, including alternate arrangement of benign schwann and perineurial cells, reinforced with S100-P and epithelial membrane antigen positivity, respectively, along with low MIB1 and negative p53 immunostaining. The other two tissue sections showed a spindly sarcomatous tumor that was immunohistochemically positive for S100-P, CD34, p53 and exhibited high MIB1 (30-40%. Diagnosis of a MPNST arising in a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma was made. This unusual case forms yet another addition to the spectrum of a MPNST.

  16. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Nathan; O'Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Elliott, Devlin; Gochee, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively.

  17. Isolated spinal accessory neuropathy and intracisternal schwannomas of the spinal accessory nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Al-Ajmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a 40-year-old female patient presenting with isolated left spinal accessory neuropathy that developed insidiously over 6 years. She complained of ill-defined deep neck and shoulder pain. On examination, prominent sternocleidomastoid and trapezoid muscle weakness and atrophy, shoulder instability, and lateral scapular winging were observed. MRI identified a small mass of the cisternal portion of the spinal accessory nerve. Its appearance was typical of schwannoma. Surgical treatment was not offered because of the small tumor size, lack of mass effect and the questionable functional recovery in the presence of muscular atrophy.

  18. Facial nerve stimulation after cochlear implantation: our experience

    OpenAIRE

    BERRETTINI, S.; De Vito, A.; Bruschini, L.; PASSETTI, S.; Forli, F.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-implantation facial nerve stimulation is one of the best known and most frequent complications of the cochlear implant procedure. Some conditions, such as otosclerosis and cochlear malformations, as well as high stimulation levels that may be necessary in patients with long auditory deprivation, expose patients to a higher risk of developing post-implant facial nerve stimulation. Facial nerve stimulation can frequently be resolved with minimal changes in speech processor fitting ...

  19. Tongue schwannoma: clinicopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfamo, Luciano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Nava, Carla; Familiari, Elena; Petrocelli, Marzia; Iudicello, Valeria; Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; De Ponte, Francesco Saverio

    2011-05-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Approximately 25% of extracranial schwannomas are located in the head and neck district, but only 1% shows an intraoral origin. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient with a tongue schwannoma. Morphologic analysis and immunohistochemical findings strongly support the diagnosis. Surgical treatment is discussed.

  20. Whisking recovery after automated mechanical stimulation during facial nerve regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiss, I.J.; Knox, C.J.; Malo, J.S.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hadlock, T.A.; Heaton, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Recovery from facial nerve transection is typically poor, but daily mechanical stimulation of the face in rats has been reported to remarkably enhance functional recovery after facial nerve transection and suture repair. This phenomenon needs additional investigation because of its import

  1. Facial nerve function in carcinoma of the parotid gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhaard, Chris; Lubsen, Herman; Tan, Bing; Merkx, Thijs; van der Laan, Bernard; Jong, Rob Baatenburg-de; Manni, Hans; Kneght, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To analyse, for patients with carcinoma of the parotid gland, the prognostic value for treatment outcome of the function of the facial nerve (NVII), and determining facial nerve dysfunction after treatment. Methods and materials: In a retrospective study of the Dutch head and Neck cooperative g

  2. Transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after local anesthetic procedure

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rosmaninho; Lobo, I.; Caetano, M.; Taipa, R; Magalhães, M.; Costa, V; Selores, M.

    2012-01-01

    Complications may arise after laser therapy of the face. The most common ones are bleeding and infections; facial nerve paresis or paralysis is rarely reported. We describe a case of a transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after laser therapy of an epidermal verrucous nevus localized at the left preauricular area.

  3. Modern concepts in facial nerve reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantel Mira

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructive surgery of the facial nerve is not daily routine for most head and neck surgeons. The published experience on strategies to ensure optimal functional results for the patients are based on small case series with a large variety of surgical techniques. On this background it is worthwhile to develop a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment of patients asking for facial rehabilitation. Conclusion A standardized approach is feasible: Patients with chronic facial palsy first need an exact classification of the palsy's aetiology. A step-by-step clinical examination, if necessary MRI imaging and electromyographic examination allow a classification of the palsy's aetiology as well as the determination of the severity of the palsy and the functional deficits. Considering the patient's desire, age and life expectancy, an individual surgical concept is applicable using three main approaches: a early extratemporal reconstruction, b early reconstruction of proximal lesions if extratemporal reconstruction is not possible, c late reconstruction or in cases of congenital palsy. Twelve to 24 months after the last step of surgical reconstruction a standardized evaluation of the therapeutic results is recommended to evaluate the necessity for adjuvant surgical procedures or other adjuvant procedures, e.g. botulinum toxin application. Up to now controlled trials on the value of physiotherapy and other adjuvant measures are missing to give recommendation for optimal application of adjuvant therapies.

  4. Total Facial Nerve Decompression for Severe Traumatic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of 10 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of traumatic facial nerve disorders is challenging. Facial nerve decompression is indicated if 90–95% loss of function is seen at the very early period on ENoG or if there is axonal degeneration on EMG lately with no sign of recovery. Middle cranial or translabyrinthine approach is selected depending on hearing. The aim of this study is to present retrospective review of 10 patients with sudden onset complete facial paralysis after trauma who underwent total facial nerve decompression. Operation time after injury is ranging between 16 and105 days. Excitation threshold, supramaximal stimulation, and amplitude on the paralytic side were worse than at least %85 of the healthy side. Six of 11 patients had HBG-II, one patient had HBG-I, 3 patients had HBG-III, and one patient had HBG-IV recovery. Stretch, compression injuries with disruption of the endoneurial tubules undetectable at the time of surgery and lack of timely decompression may be associated with suboptimal results in our series.

  5. Facial nerve image enhancement from CBCT using supervised learning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping Lu; Barazzetti, Livia; Chandran, Vimal; Gavaghan, Kate; Weber, Stefan; Gerber, Nicolas; Reyes, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    Facial nerve segmentation plays an important role in surgical planning of cochlear implantation. Clinically available CBCT images are used for surgical planning. However, its relatively low resolution renders the identification of the facial nerve difficult. In this work, we present a supervised learning approach to enhance facial nerve image information from CBCT. A supervised learning approach based on multi-output random forest was employed to learn the mapping between CBCT and micro-CT images. Evaluation was performed qualitatively and quantitatively by using the predicted image as input for a previously published dedicated facial nerve segmentation, and cochlear implantation surgical planning software, OtoPlan. Results show the potential of the proposed approach to improve facial nerve image quality as imaged by CBCT and to leverage its segmentation using OtoPlan.

  6. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  7. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at the Wrist and Palmar Regions of the Hand: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Kütahya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are also known as neurolemmas that are usually originated from Schwann cells located in the peripheric nerve sheaths. They are the most common tumours of the hand (0.8–2%. They usually present solitary swelling along the course of the nerve however multiple lesions may be present in cases of NF type 1, familial neurofibromatosis, and sporadic schwannomatosis. Schwannomas are generally represented as an asymptomatic mass; however pain, numbness and fatigue may take place with the increasing size of the tumour. EMG (electromyelography, MRI (magnetic resonance imagination, and USG (ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. In this paper, we present a 24-year-old male referred to our clinic for a lump located at the volar side of the left wrist and a lump located in his left palm and numbness at his 3rd and 4th fingers. Total excision was performed for both lesions. Histopathological examination of the masses revealed typical features of schwannoma. At the 6th-month followup the patient was symptom-free except for slight paresthesia of the 3rd and the 4th fingers. For our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature presenting wrist and palm involvement of the median nerve schwannoma.

  8. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  9. Mandibular branch of the facial nerve in wistar rats: new experimental model to assess facial nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-07-01

    Introduction The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies.

  10. Delayed presentation of traumatic facial nerve (CN VII) paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Anthony M; Panagos, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (Cranial Nerve VII, CN VII) can be a disfiguring disorder with profound impact upon the patient. The etiology of facial nerve paralysis may be congenital, iatrogenic, or result from neoplasm, infection, trauma, or toxic exposure. In the emergency department, the most common cause of unilateral facial paralysis is Bell's palsy, also known as idiopathic facial paralysis (IFP). We report a case of delayed presentation of unilateral facial nerve paralysis 3 days after sustaining a traumatic head injury. Re-evaluation and imaging of this patient revealed a full facial paralysis and temporal bone fracture extending into the facial canal. Because cranial nerve injuries occur in approximately 5-10% of head-injured patients, a good history and physical examination is important to differentiate IFP from another etiology. Newer generation high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly demonstrating these fractures. An understanding of this complication, appropriate patient follow-up, and early involvement of the Otolaryngologist is important in management of these patients. The mechanism as well as the timing of facial nerve paralysis will determine the proper evaluation, consultation, and management for the patient. Patients with total or immediate paralysis as well as those with poorly prognostic audiogram results are good candidates for surgical repair.

  11. Radiation-Induced Peripheral Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumor Arising from Vestibular Schwannoma after Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiation Therapy: A Case Report and Review of Literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putipun Puataweepong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the use of stereotactic radiation for vestibular schwannomas has increased worldwide. However, malignant transformation associated with radiation, although uncommon, has been reported in recent publications. We present a case of the 34 year-old female who had left vestibular schwannoma and who underwent surgery and postoperative stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, hypofraction in 2005. At 6 years after SRT, the patient came with left facial palsy and severe headache. CT brain revealed progression in size with cystic and hemorrhagic changes of the preexisting tumor at left CPA with new obstructive hydrocephalus. Partial tumor removal was done, and the pathological report was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST. Regarding the uncertainty of carcinogenesis risk, we should still practice radiation therapy with caution, especially in the young patient with tumor predisposition syndrome. Because of low incidence of MPNST after radiation, it should not be a major decision about giving radiotherapy. However, with the poor prognosis of MPNST, this possibility should be explained to the patient before radiation treatment option.

  12. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  13. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  14. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T

    2001-11-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  15. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nofal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion:  Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis.

  16. High resolution computed tomography for peripheral facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, O.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution computer tomographic examinations of the petrous bones were performed on 19 patients with confirmed peripheral facial nerve paralysis. High resolution CT provides accurate information regarding the extent, and usually regarding the type, of pathological process; this can be accurately localised with a view to possible surgical treatments. The examination also differentiates this from idiopathic paresis, which showed no radiological changes. Destruction of the petrous bone, without facial nerve symptoms, makes early suitable treatment mandatory.

  17. Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis as First Presentation of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Hamouri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is rare, and its precise incidence is unknown. It is associated with a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies. To complicate its diagnosis, the clinical presentation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can be variable. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with bilateral facial nerve paralysis as first presentation of lung adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the only case describing bilateral facial nerve palsy as the first and only manifestation of lung adenocarcinoma.

  18. SCHWANNOMA TONGUE - CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A schwannoma (also known as an "neurilemmomma (1, is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of Schwann cells , which normally produce the insulating myelin sheath covering peripheral nerves .

  19. Facial Nerve Paralysis seen in Pseudomonas sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Ozdemir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which is created by pseudomonas auriginosa. Peripheral facial paralysis and mastoiditis as a rare complication of otitis media induced by pseudomonas auriginosa.In this study, 4 months child who has ecthyma gangrenosum and facial nerve paralysis was reported. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 126-130

  20. Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Rare Complication of Parotid Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Benign parotid neoplasm and inflammatory processes of the parotid resulting in facial paralysis are extremely rare. We report a 72-year-old Malay female with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus who presented with a painful right parotid swelling associated with right facial nerve palsy. The paralysis (Grade VI, House and Brackmann classification) remained after six months.

  1. Extratemporal Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumor of Facial Nerve with Coexistent Intratemporal Neurofibroma Mimicking Malignant Intratemporal Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiko Nakahira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an extremely unusual case of an extratemporal facial nerve malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST arising from preexistent intratemporal neurofibroma, illustrating a difficulty in discriminating between perineural spread of the MPNST and the preexistent intratemporal neurofibroma on preoperative radiographic images. The most interesting point was that preoperative CT scan and MR images led to misinterpretation that MPNST extended proximally along the facial nerve canal. It is important to recognize that the intratemporal perineural spread of neurofibromas and MPNST share common imaging characteristics. This is the first report (to our knowledge of these 2 lesions coexisting in the facial nerve, leading to misinterpretation on preoperative images.

  2. Intraosseous Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Nayal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous schwannomas are rare and benign neoplasms originating from the nerve sheath cells. We present two such cases, one located in the ninth thoracic vertebrae and the other involving the sacrum. Clinicoradiological diagnosis in both the cases was a primary bone tumour. Histopathological examination revealed characteristic morphology of schwannoma which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These two cases highlight the importance of clinical, radiological and histopathological correlation in the diagnosis of these uncommon bone tumors. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(2.000: 74-77

  3. Application of Shape Memory Alloys in Facial Nerve Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vloeberghs

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Facial Nerve can be damaged at a peripheral level by a stroke or, for example by trauma or infection within the faceor the ear. In these cases the facial muscles are paralysed with little or no chance of spontaneous recovery. This research focuses on the potential utilisation of a Shape Memory Alloy(SMA to replace the function of the Facial Nerve, which willallow in conjunction with passive reconstructive methods, a patient to regain limited but active movement of the mouthcorner. Paralysis of the mouth corner is a very disabling bothfunctionally and cosmetically, speech and swallowing are hampered and the patient loses saliva, with presents a social problem.

  4. Facial nerve neuromas: MR imaging. Report of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, N. (G.H. Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Neuroradiology); Sterkers, O. (Hospital Beaujon, Clichy (France). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology); Mompoint, D.; Nahum, H. (Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-02-01

    Four cases of facial nerve neuroma were evaluated by computed tomographic (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The extension of the tumor in the petrous bone or the parotid gland was well defined by MRI in all cases. CT scan was useful to demonstrate bone erosions and the relation of the tumor to inner ear structures. In cases of progressive facial palsy, CT and MRI should be combined to detect a facial neuroma and to plan the surgical approach for tumor removal and nerve grafting. (orig.).

  5. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithzel Maria Villarreal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons.   Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended.   Conclusion:  It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury.  Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site.  Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal

  6. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Rodríguez-Valiente, Antonio; Castelló, Jose Ramon; Górriz, Carmen; Montero, Oscar Alvarez; García-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended. Conclusion: It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury. Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh) flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site. Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal compared with the time of a single

  7. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Liu; Weisheng Wen; Min Hu; Wenting Bi; Lijie Chen; Sanxia Liu; Peng Chen; Xinying Tan

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as wel as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. Electro-physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation il ustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits com-bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits.

  8. [Facial nerve function and hearing preservation experience in middle fossa approach removal of small acoustic tumor surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jue-bo; Wu, Hao; Huang, Qi; Yang, Jun; Wang, Zhao-yan; Lü, Jing-rong

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hearing and facial nerve preservation in the middle fossa approach surgery for the removal of small acoustic tumor (vestibular schwannomas, VS). A prospective database was established, and data were retrospectively reviewed. Between January 2004 and February 2013, 13 patients with acoustic tumor underwent surgery via middle fossa approach for hearing preservation. The patients consisted of six men and seven women with a mean age of 48 years. Tumor size ranged from 0.8 cm to 1.5 cm. Hearing loss was categorized as American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) class A, class B, class C and class D. Facial nerve function was evaluated according to House-Brackmann (HB) Grade I-VI. Gross-total resection was accomplished in 12 of 13 patients. Preoperative hearing as class A in ten, class B in two, and class C in one patient respectively. Postoperatively, hearing was graded as class A in eight patients, class B in 3, and class C in 2 patients. Facial nerve function was House-Brackmann (HB) grade I in twelve patients, grade II in one patient preoperatively. Postoperatively, facial nerve function was HB Grade I in twelve patients and Grade III in one patient. The overall hearing preservation rate was at least 80% (8/10) and HB Grade I facial nerve outcome of 100% (12/12) . All cases were followed up for 0.5 to 5 years, no complications were observed. The middle fossa approach for the resection of small VS with hearing preservation is a viable and relatively option. It should be considered among the various options available for the management of small and growing VS.

  9. An unusual cause of trochlear nerve palsy and brainstem compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma originates from the Schwann cells at the Obersteiner-Redlich zone, which marks the junction of central and peripheral myelin of the cranial nerves. Most frequently affected are the vestibular, trigeminal, and facial nerves followed by the lower cranial nerves. Trochlear schwannoma in the absence of neurofibromatosis is a rare entity. The purpose of this report is to serve as a reminder to consider trochlear nerve schwannoma in the list of differential diagnosis of such tumors as the outcome is far better than the intraaxial tumor in that location.

  10. [Peripheral paralysis of facial nerve in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steczkowska-Klucznik, Małgorzata; Kaciński, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral facial paresis is one of the most common diagnosed neuropathies in adults and also in children. Many factors can trigger facial paresis and most frequent are infectious, carcinoma and demyelinisation diseases. Very important and interesting problem is an idiopathic facial paresis (Bell's palsy). Actually the main target of scientific research is to assess the etiology (infectious, genetic, immunologic) and to find the most appropriate treatment.

  11. [Application of fibrin glue in facial nerve repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinying; Hua, Qingquan; Wang, Shenqing

    2007-06-01

    This animal experiment was aimed to apply fibrin in facial nerve repair and to quest for technical improvements in facial surgery. In each of 15 healthy large ear white rabbits, a unilateral 5 mm intratemporal facial nerve gap was created, the proximal and distal stumps were inserted into chitin tube, 1 ml autologous fibrin glue was applied around the anastomotic zone, and no suture was employed. At 3 months and 5 months after opertion, electrophysioligical study was performed. Compared with normal nerves, the regenerating nerves in both the chitin tube bridged group and the perineurium suture group had longer incubation period, lower amplitude, slower nerve-muscle conduction velocity at 3 months postoperatively. The differences were distinctly significant (P < 0.01). Although being decreased at 5 months after operation, the differences were still statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the chitin tube bridged group and perineurium suture group at 3 months and 5 months, respectively. The study suggests that facial nerve repair using fibrin glue and chitin tube has the advantages of being easier,faster and more stable.

  12. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Betka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225 removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI was observed in 124 cases (45% immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33% on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%, headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery.

  13. Mime therapy improves facial symmetry in people with long-term facial nerve paresis: a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, C.H.G.; Heymans, P.G.

    2006-01-01

    QUESTION: What is the effect of mime therapy on facial symmetry and severity of paresis in people with facial nerve paresis? DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: 50 people recruited from the Outpatient department of two metropolitan hospitals with facial nerve paresis for more than nin

  14. Unusual complication of otitis media with effusion: facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Gorur, Kemal; Ozcan, Cengiz; Korlu, Savaş

    2011-07-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (FNP) is a very rare complication of otitis media with effusion (OME). There are few patients with OME and FNP in the literature. A 5-year-old girl was admitted to our department with right facial weakness. Right FNP and right OME were diagnosed on the examination. After medical treatment and ventilation tube insertion, FNP completely resolved. The symptoms, signs, and management of this patient are presented.

  15. Amblyopia Associated with Congenital Facial Nerve Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamura, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sawamura, Hiromasa; Baba, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The association between congenital facial paralysis and visual development has not been thoroughly studied. Of 27 pediatric cases of congenital facial paralysis, we identified 3 patients who developed amblyopia, a visual acuity decrease caused by abnormal visual development, as comorbidity. These 3 patients had facial paralysis in the periocular region and developed amblyopia on the paralyzed side. They started treatment by wearing an eye patch immediately after diagnosis and before the critical visual developmental period; all patients responded to the treatment. Our findings suggest that the incidence of amblyopia in the cases of congenital facial paralysis, particularly the paralysis in the periocular region, is higher than that in the general pediatric population. Interestingly, 2 of the 3 patients developed anisometropic amblyopia due to the hyperopia of the affected eye, implying that the periocular facial paralysis may have affected the refraction of the eye through yet unspecified mechanisms. Therefore, the physicians who manage facial paralysis should keep this pathology in mind, and when they see pediatric patients with congenital facial paralysis involving the periocular region, they should consult an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [Submucosal lingual schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Bülent; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ersoy Çallıoğlu, Elif; Kutluhan, Ahmet; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a slow growing, solitary, and encapsulated benign tumor originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. Lingual schwannomas are rare. A 46-year-old male patient admitted with a complaint of swelling on the right half of the tongue for one year. An approximately 1x1 cm submucosal mass was detected on the right side of the tongue. The submucosal mass was totally excised under local anesthesia. Pathological examination was consistent with schwannoma. Lingual schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  17. Facial Nerve in Foetal Cadavers: An Anatomical Study with Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotian SR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Facial nerve paralysis is a major complication of parotid surgery and is widely reported. Little attention is paid to the facial nerve trunk in children. The facial nerve trunk in children and infants can be easily injured since they lie close to the surface. The present study therefore intends to describe the variability in the facial nerve trunk and its branching pattern in foetuses. Methods: The study was done bilaterally in 30 formalin-fixed foetuses (15 females, 15 males, age ranging from 21.0 to 35.5 weeks of gestation. The length of the facial nerve trunk was measured and bifurcation and trifurcation of the trunk was examined. Variability in the branching pattern was also noted. Results: The most common facial nerve trunk branching type was bifurcation (53.33%, followed by trifurcation (33.33%. Multiple branching of the facial nerve was also observed in 13.34% of the cases. Other variations related to the facial nerve were also noted. The mean length of the facial nerve trunk was 7.15 ± 2.12 mm. There was no significant difference between the right and left sides and in case of males and female foetuses. Conclusion: Facial nerve injury during parotid surgery is a main cause of paediatric facial paralysis. The length of the facial nerve trunk therefore must be accurately known in any surgical procedure planned in the area. The main furcation of the facial nerve should also receive special attention.

  18. Surgical outcome in cystic vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Suresh; Baldawa, Sachin S.; Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Menon, Girish; Vikas, Vazhayil; Sudhir, Jayanand B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cystic vestibular schwannomas (VS) form a rare subgroup that differs from the solid variant clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. These tumors also vary in their surgical outcome and carry a different risk of post-operative complications. We analyzed our series of 64 patients with cystic VS and discuss the technical difficulties related to total excision of these tumors and focus on complication avoidance. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of cystic VS surgically managed over a span of 11 years. The case records were evaluated to record the clinical symptoms and signs, imaging findings, surgical procedure, complications, and follow-up data. Post-operative facial nerve palsy was analyzed with respect to tumor size and tumor type. Results: Progressive hearing impairment was the most common initial symptom (76.6%). Atypical initial symptoms were present in 15 patients (23.4%). Preoperatively, 78% patients had good facial nerve function (HB grade 1, 2) and 22% had intermediate (HB grade 3, 4) to poor (HB grade 5 and 6) function. Mean tumor size was 4.1 cm. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 53 patients (83%). The facial nerve was anatomically intact but thinned out after tumor excision in 38 patients (59.4%). Ninety percent patients had either intermediate or poor facial nerve function at follow-up. Poor facial nerve outcome was associated with giant tumors and peripherally located, thin-walled cystic tumors. Conclusion: Resection of cystic VS is complicated by peritumoral adhesions of the capsule to the nerve. Extensive manipulation of the nerve in order to dissect the tumor–nerve barrier results in worse facial nerve outcome. The outcome is worse in peripherally located, thin-walled cystic VS as compared to centrally located, thick-walled cystic tumors. Subtotal excision may be justified, especially in tumors with dense adhesion of the cyst wall to the facial nerve in order to preserve nerve integrity. PMID:27366248

  19. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis after upper third molar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakarer, Sirmahan; Can, Taylan; Cankaya, Burak; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Yazici, Sinem; Ayintap, Emre; Özden, Ali Veysel; Keskin, Cengizhan

    2010-11-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis (PFNP) after mandibular interventions has been reported in the literature. In most cases, paralysis begins immediately after the injection of the mandibular anesthesia, and duration of facial weakness is less than 12 hours. However, there are few documented cases of PFNP after maxillary dental or surgical procedures. A variety of mechanisms have been associated to PFNP, including viral reactivation, demyelination, edema, vasospasm, and trauma. The purpose of this presentation was to report a rare case of facial paralysis that occurred after an upper third molar extraction. The cause of the PFNP and the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in the management are emphasized.

  20. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  1. Facial nerve palsy: Providing eye comfort and cosmesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsuhaibani Adel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of facial nerve palsy (FNP may lead to dramatic change in the patient′s facial function, expression, and emotions. The ophthalmologist may play an important role in the initial evaluation, and the long-term management of patients with new-onset of FNP. In patients with expected temporary facial weakness, no efforts should be wasted to ensure proper corneal protection. Patients with permanent functional deficit may require combination of surgical procedures tailored to the patient′s clinical findings that may require good eye comfort and cosmesis.

  2. Facial Nerve Palsy: Providing Eye Comfort and Cosmesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H.

    2010-01-01

    Development of facial nerve palsy (FNP) may lead to dramatic change in the patient's facial function, expression, and emotions. The ophthalmologist may play an important role in the initial evaluation, and the long-term management of patients with new-onset of FNP. In patients with expected temporary facial weakness, no efforts should be wasted to ensure proper corneal protection. Patients with permanent functional deficit may require combination of surgical procedures tailored to the patient's clinical findings that may require good eye comfort and cosmesis. PMID:20616921

  3. Laser facial nerve welding in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jason D; Bleier, Benjamin S; Goldstein, Stephen A; Carniol, Paul J; Palmer, James N; Cohen, Noam A

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of laser tissue welding for repair of facial nerve injury. In a prospective in vivo animal survival surgery model, rabbit facial nerve injury was followed by either standard suture neurorrhaphy or laser tissue welding using a diode laser (808 ± 1 nm) to weld biological solder. Rabbits were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks by facial videography and electromyography. Histopathological analysis of the repair was performed at 4 and 16 weeks. Videographic analysis demonstrated the laser tissue welding repair trended toward superior outcomes compared with suture neurorrhaphy at all 4 time points. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated similar or better results, with statistically significant improvement at week 16 (P laser nerve repair created a greater initial inflammatory reaction. An analysis of operative time demonstrated significantly decreased time and ease of use for laser tissue welding. This pilot study demonstrates that laser nerve welding may be an expedient, feasible, and safe method for facial nerve repair in a rabbit model. Further experiments with larger numbers are needed to provide additional evidence that laser tissue welding produces a neurorrhaphy that has functional, electrophysiological, and histological results that could rival traditional suture neurorrhaphy.

  4. Masseteric-facial nerve transposition for reanimation of the smile in incomplete facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete facial paralysis occurs in about a third of patients with Bell's palsy. Although their faces are symmetrical at rest, when they smile they have varying degrees of disfigurement. Currently, cross-face nerve grafting is one of the most useful techniques for reanimation. Transfer of the masseteric nerve, although widely used for complete paralysis, has not to our knowledge been reported for incomplete palsy. Between December 2008 and November 2013, we reanimated the faces of 9 patients (2 men and 7 women) with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis with transposition of the masseteric nerve. Sex, age at operation, cause of paralysis, duration of denervation, recipient nerves used, and duration of follow-up were recorded. Commissural excursion, velocity, and patients' satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. The mean (SD) age at operation was 39 (±6) years and the duration of denervation was 29 (±19) months. There were no complications that required further intervention. Duration of follow-up ranged from 6-26 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement in both commissural excursion and velocity of more than two thirds in 6 patients, more than one half in 2 patients and less than one half in one. Qualitative evaluation showed a slight or pronounced improvement in 7/9 patients. The masseteric nerve is a reliable alternative for reanimation of the smile in patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Its main advantages include its consistent anatomy, a one-stage operation, and low morbidity at the donor site.

  5. Exacerbation of facial motoneuron loss after facial nerve axotomy in CCR3-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3−/− mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2−/− (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3−/− mice, but not in CCR3−/− mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  6. Exacerbation of Facial Motoneuron Loss after Facial Nerve Axotomy in CCR3-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3–/– mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2 –/– (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3–/– mice, but not in CCR3–/– mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  7. Rat whisker movement after facial nerve lesion: Evidence for autonomic contraction of skeletal muscle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heaton, J.T.; Sheu, S.H.; Hohman, M.H.; Knox, C.J.; Weinberg, J.S.; Kleiss, I.J.; Hadlock, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervati

  8. 3D-FT MRI of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. (Neuroradiology, Hopital Nord, 13 Marseille (France)); Raybaud, C. (Neuroradiology, Hopital Nord, 13 Marseille (France)); Poncet, M. (Neuroradiology, Hopital Nord, 13 Marseille (France))

    1994-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced 3D-FT MRI of the intrapetrous facial nerve was obtained in 38 patients with facial nerve disease, using a 1.0 T magnet and fast gradient-echo acquisition sequences. Contiguous millimetric sections were obtained, which could be reformatted in any desired plane. Acutely ill patients, were examined within the first 2 months, included: 24 with Bell's palsy and 6 with other acute disorders (Herpes zoster, trauma, neuroma, meningeal metastasis, middle ear granuloma). Six patients investigated more than a year after the onset of symptoms included 3 with congenital cholesteatoma, 2 with neuromas and one with a chronic Bell's palsy. The lesion was found incidentally in two cases (a suspected neurofibroma and a presumed drop metastasis from an astrocytoma). Patients with tumours had nodular, focally-enhancing lesions, except for the leptomeningeal metastasis in which the enhancement was linear. Linear, diffuse contrast enhancement of the facial nerve was found in trauma, and in the patient with a middle ear granuloma. Of the 24 patients with an acute Bell's palsy 15 exhibited linear contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. Three of these were lost to follow-up, but correlation of clinical outcome and contrast enhancement showed that only 4 of the 11 patients who made a complete recovery and all 10 patients with incomplete recovery demonstrated enhancement. Possible explanations for these findings are suggested by pathological data from the literature. 3D-FT imaging of the facial nerve thus yields direct information about the of the nerve condition and defines the morphological abnormalities. It can also demonstrate contrast enhancement which seems to have some prognostic value in acute idiopathic Bell's palsy. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve transposition with a cross-facial nerve graft and muscle transplant for the rehabilitation of facial paralysis using the facial clima method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Vila, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    To compare quantitatively the results obtained after hemihypoglossal nerve transposition and microvascular gracilis transfer associated with a cross facial nerve graft (CFNG) for reanimation of a paralysed face, 66 patients underwent hemihypoglossal transposition (n = 25) or microvascular gracilis transfer and CFNG (n = 41). The commissural displacement (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) in the two groups were compared using the system known as Facial clima. There was no inter-group variability between the groups (p > 0.10) in either variable. However, intra-group variability was detected between the affected and healthy side in the transposition group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively). The transfer group had greater symmetry in displacement of the commissure (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) than the transposition group and patients were more satisfied. However, the transposition group had correct symmetry at rest but more asymmetry of CCV and CD when smiling.

  10. Risk factors associated with vestibulocochlear nerve schwannoma: systematic review Fatores de risco associados ao Schwannoma do nervo vestibular: revisão sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Corona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulocochlear nerve schwannoma (VS is a benign tumor that stems from the edge of the Schwann´s sheath. It is considered the most frequent intracranial benign tumor, of low lethality rate and unknown etiology. AIM: to identify risk factors associated with VS. STUDY DESIGN: systematic review. METHODS: electronic search of studies using the following key words: "risk", "schwannoma", "vestibular", "neuroma" and "acoustic". All original articles on epidemiological studies published in Portuguese, English or Spanish describing measures of association were included. RESULTS: twenty case-control studies were found, most of them published in the United States. The analysis of those studies shows educational level, household income, occupation, exposure to ionizing radiation and noise, allergic diseases as well as the use of both cellular and cordless phones as risk factors for the VS. CONCLUSION: methodological limitations and lack of precision in the findings impose limits to definitive conclusions concerning those risk factors. The current study contributes with information which can subsidize decisions related to the methodology to be used, having in mind new investigations on risk factors for VS. Therefore, it is of great help for knowledge improvement in this field.O Schwannoma do nervo vestibular (SV é um tumor benigno que se origina da bainha de Schwann do VIII par craniano. É o tumor benigno intracraniano mais frequente, de baixa letalidade e etiologia obscura. OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores de risco associados ao SV. DESENHO DO ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Identificação de estudos em bases de dados eletrônicos utilizando as palavras-chaves "risk", "risco", "schwannoma", "vestibular", "neuroma" e "acoustic". Incluíram-se artigos originais de pesquisa epidemiológica publicados em português, espanhol ou inglês, que referiam alguma medida de associação. Foram comparados e analisados aspectos metodológicos e

  11. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy.

  12. Intra—Operative Facial Nerve Monitoring in Acoustic Neurinoma Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGZhengming; ZHANGZhifeng; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the method and significance of facial nerve preservation during acoustic neurinoma surgery by intra-operative facial nerve monitoring(IFNM).Methods 62 patients were randomly assigned to the IFNM or the control group.Facial nerve function(FNF)was assessed by a modified House-Brackmann grading(HB)before the operation,10 days and every two months after surgery and com,pared between the two groups. Results Ten days after surgery,26/32 patients in the IFNM group and 15/30 patients in the control group had FNF HB grade,Ⅰ-Ⅲ;FNF HB gradeⅣ-Ⅴ was prestent in 6/32 in the IFNM group and 15/30 in the control group.During follow-up,29/32 patients in the IFNM group and 20/20 patients in the control group had FNF HB gradeⅠ-Ⅲ;FNF HB gradeⅣ-Ⅴ was present in 3/32 in the IFNM group and 10/30 in the control group.All differnces were statistcally significant.Conclusion IFNM significantly improved anatomic and functional facial nerve preservation as well as the quality of life.

  13. Normal and pathological findings for the facial nerve on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Noury, K., E-mail: Kalnoury@kau.edu.sa [Department of Otolaryngology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Lotfy, A. [Radiology Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital and International Medical Centre, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the enhanced radiological anatomy and common pathological conditions of the facial nerve by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the MRI findings of the facial nerve of 146 patients who visited a tertiary academic referral center was conducted. Results: The radiological anatomy of the facial nerve was well illustrated using MRI, as were most of the common pathological conditions of the facial nerve. Conclusions: Enhancement of the facial nerve in MRI should be correlated with the clinical data. Normal individuals can show enhancement of the tympanic or vertical segments of the facial nerve. Enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the nerve is almost diagnostic of Bell's palsy. No specific enhancement patterns were observed for tumours or for infections of the middle or external ear. A larger population study is required for the accurate assessment of facial nerve enhancement in multiple sclerosis patients.

  14. A schwannoma of the S1 dural sleeve was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved using a microscope. Report of a case with early MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Uchida, K; Kokubo, Y; Yayama, T; Nakajima, H; Inukai, T; Nomura, E; Baba, H

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we describe a small schwannoma of the dural sleeve and mention that it is often difficult to differentiate this tumor from lumbar disc herniation, especially a sequestered hernia, or a discal cyst. Gadolinium-enhanced MR images were a useful preoperative examination modality for differentiating this lesion from other diseases. Microscopically, the intradural tumor was successfully removed. The dura mater of the S1 nerve root was opened microsurgically, allowing the nerve fibers involved in the tumor to be identified. The involved fibers were cut around the tumor, and the lesion was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved. Based on histological examination of the resected specimen, the tumor was diagnosed as a schwannoma with multilocular cystic degeneration. Microsurgery allowed the tumor to be removed with minimal impairment from cutting of nerve fibers in the nerve root.

  15. Lateral skull base chondroblastoma resected with facial nerve posterior transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnot, J; Langlois, O; Tollard, E; Crahes, M; Auquit-Auckbur, I; Marie, J-P

    2017-05-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare tumor that can involve the temporal bone. Because it is a benign tumor, functional surgery must be proposed. We report a case of a patient with a massive chondroblastoma operated on with preservation of the facial nerve, and description of the surgical technique. A 37-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of a growing left pre-auricular mass and hearing loss. Neuroimaging showed an osteolytic mass invading the temporal bone and temporomandibular joint. Excision was performed via a transpetrosal and transcochlear approach with posterior transposition of the facial nerve. EMG monitoring was effective in preventing facial palsy. Four years later, no sign of recurrence was observed. Chondroblastoma is a locally aggressive tumor, especially when located in the petrous bone and temporomandibular joint. The suggested treatment is a complete excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors Associated with Abducens Nerve Recovery in Patients Undergoing Surgical Resection of Sixth Nerve Schwannoma: A Systematic Review and Case Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai; Sharma, Kanika; Kalakoti, Piyush; Thakur, Jai Deep; Patra, Devi Prasad; Konar, Subhas; Maiti, Tanmoy; Akbarian-Tefaghi, Hesam; Bollam, Papireddy; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2017-08-01

    Limited or no literature exists identifying factors associated with functional nerve recovery in patients undergoing resection of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) schwannomas. A systematic review of literature was performed on CN VI schwannomas that were treated surgically. Synthesizing the findings pooled from the literature, we investigated associations of patient demographics and clinical characteristics with postsurgical CN VI functional recovery in multivariable regression models. In addition, we present the findings of an adolescent woman surgically managed for intracavernous CN VI schwannoma. Complete encasement of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery is unique to our case. We synthesized data of 32 patients from 29 studies, and our index case. Overall, the mean age of the patients was 44.0 ± 16.5 years, and approximately 52% (n = 17) were female. Most tumors were left-sided (n = 18; 54.5%), with an average size of 3.46 ± 1.71 cm. The most common location was cisternal (n = 11; 33%), followed by cavernous sinus (CS) proper (n = 9; 27%), cisterocavernous (n = 8; 24%), orbital (n = 4; 12%) and caverno-orbital (n = 1; 3%). CN VI recovery was reported in less than half the cohort (n = 14; 45%). Tumor extension in the CS was significantly associated with lesser likelihood (odds ratio [OR], 0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.98; P = 0.048) of postsurgical CN VI recovery. Although female gender (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.07-10.09; P = 0.906), large tumor size (>2.5 cm) (OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.07-2.89; P = 0.397), and solid consistency (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.03-4.19; P = 0.421) were associated with lesser odds for recovery, these were not statistically significant. Likewise, although gross total resection (OR, 6.28; 95% CI, 0.33-118.25; P = 0.220) was associated with higher odds of nerve recovery, the estimates were statistically insignificant. CS involvement is associated with lesser odds for functional nerve recovery in patients undergoing

  17. Facial reanimation with gracilis muscle transfer neurotized to cross-facial nerve graft versus masseteric nerve: a comparative study using the FACIAL CLIMA evaluating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2013-06-01

    Longstanding unilateral facial paralysis is best addressed with microneurovascular muscle transplantation. Neurotization can be obtained from the cross-facial or the masseter nerve. The authors present a quantitative comparison of both procedures using the FACIAL CLIMA system. Forty-seven patients with complete unilateral facial paralysis underwent reanimation with a free gracilis transplant neurotized to either a cross-facial nerve graft (group I, n=20) or to the ipsilateral masseteric nerve (group II, n=27). Commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were measured using the FACIAL CLIMA system. Postoperative intragroup commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity means of the reanimated versus the normal side were first compared using the independent samples t test. Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters were compared between the groups using the independent samples t test. Significant differences of mean commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity between the reanimated side and the normal side were observed in group I (p=0.001 and p=0.014, respectively) but not in group II. Intergroup comparisons showed that both commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were higher in group II, with significant differences for commissural displacement (p=0.048). Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters was higher in group II, with significant differences for commissural displacement (p=0.042). Free gracilis muscle transfer neurotized by the masseteric nerve is a reliable technique for reanimation of longstanding facial paralysis. Compared with cross-facial nerve graft neurotization, this technique provides better symmetry and a higher degree of recovery. Therapeutic, III.

  18. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  19. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  20. What Is Expected of the Facial Nerve in Michel Aplasia? Anatomic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We sought better understanding about the facial nerve anatomy in the rare inner ear Michel anomaly to help better define this aplasia and prevent potential complications in surgery on these patients. The data from computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance images of six Michel aplastic ears (three patients) were evaluated for a facial nerve course. Facial nerve course and anatomic landmarks were noted. Based on data obtained from this group of very rare patients, three different facial ...

  1. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Katibeh P. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter;8(1:69-71.ObjectiveThis case study is about an 11-year-old girl with bilateral facial weakness, abnormal taste sensation, and deep tendon reflexes of both knees and ankles were absent. However, the muscle power of the lower and upper extremities across all muscle groups was normal. After 2 days, she developed paresthesia and numbness in the lower extremities. Other neurologic examinations, such as fundoscopic evaluation of the retina were normal with the muscle power of both upper- and lower-extremities intact. A lumbar puncture revealed albumincytological dissociation. EMG and NCV were in favor of Guillain-Barre syndrome, for which IVIG was prescribed and the abnormal sensations in the lower limbs rapidly improved. Bilateral facial diplegia without weakness and paresthesia is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome that mostly presents withacute onset, rapid progression with or without limb weakness, paresthesia, and decreased or absent DTR and albumin-cytological dissociation.References:Barbi F, Ariatti A, Funakoshi K, Meacci M, Odaka M, Galassi G. Parvovirus B19 infection antedating Guillain-Barre’ syndrome variant with prominent facial diplegia. J Neurol 2011 Aug; 258(8:1551-2. doi: 10.1007/s00415-011-5949-5. Epub 2011 Feb 15.Yardimci N, Avci AY, Kayhan E, Benli S. Bilateral facial nerve enhancement demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Neurol Sci 2009 Oct; 30(5:431-3. doi:10.1007/s10072-009-0120-0.Lim TC, Yeo WS, Loke KY, Quek SC. Bilateral facial nerve palsy in Kawasaki disease. Ann Acad Med Singapore 2009; 38(8:737-8.Quintas E, Silva A, Sarmento A. Bilateral facial palsy in a young patient after meningococcal meningitis, associated to herpetic infection. Arq Neuro-Psiquiatr 2009; 67(3a: 712-14.Jain V, Deshmukh A, Gollomp S. Bilateral facial

  2. Rabbit facial nerve regeneration in NGF-containing silastic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J G; Lee, P; Derby, A; Frierdich, G E; Neises, G; Roufa, D G

    1993-05-01

    Previous reports suggest that exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) enhanced nerve regeneration in rabbit facial nerves. Rabbit facial nerve regeneration in 10-mm Silastic tubes prefilled with NGF was compared to cytochrome C (Cyt. C), bridging an 8-mm nerve gap. Three weeks following implantation, NGF-treated regenerates exhibited a more mature fascicular organization and more extensive neovascularization than cytochrome-C-treated controls. Morphometric analysis at the midtube of 3- and 5-week regenerates revealed no significant difference in the mean number of myelinated or unmyelinated axons between NGF- and cytochrome-C-treated implants. However, when the number of myelinated fibers in 5-week regenerates were compared to their respective preoperative controls, NGF-treated regenerates had recovered a significantly greater percentage of myelinated axons than cytochrome-C--treated implants (46% vs. 18%, respectively). In addition, NGF-containing chambers reinnervated a higher percentage of myelinated axons in the distal transected neural stumps (49% vs. 34%). Behavioral and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated spontaneous and induced activities in the target muscles when approximately one third of the myelinated axons were recovered in the midchamber (1280 axons). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) studies demonstrated retrograde axonal transport to the midchamber and proximal transected neural stump. PC12 bioassay demonstrated persistent NGF activity in the intrachamber fluids at 3 (5:1 dilution) and 5 (2:1 dilution) weeks of entubation. Electrophysiologic tests demonstrated a slow conduction velocity of a propagated electrical impulse (43.5 m/s-1 vs. 67 m/s-1) and shallow wide compound action potential. In wider defects (15-mm chambers) and longer entubation periods (7 weeks), no regeneration or NGF activity was seen. Therefore, exogenous NGF provides an early but limited neurotrophic effect on the regeneration of the rabbit buccal division of the facial nerve and a

  3. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  4. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    (15%) of 779 patients considered their facial palsy to be a big problem and 125 patients (16%) were interested in surgical treatment for the sequelae of facial palsy. Seventy-eight (10%) had already had some kind of operation, usually the VII-XII coaptation. Thirty-three of 61 patients who had already...... been operated on for facial palsy were interested in further surgical treatment. One hundred and ninety-five patients (25%) had some kind of operation on the eye, mostly (88%) a tarsorrhaphy. Reanimation procedures such as a palpebral gold weight or a spring, apparently still have a small place...

  5. Clinicopathological variables of sporadic schwannomas of peripheral nerve in 291 patients and expression of biologically relevant markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D; Ingram, Davis; Metcalf-Doetsch, William; Khan, Dilshad; Al Sannaa, Ghadah; Le Loarer, Francois; Lazar, Alexander J F; Slopis, John; Torres, Keila E; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2017-09-08

    OBJECTIVE While sporadic peripheral schwannomas (SPSs) are generally well treated with surgery, their biology is not well understood. Consequently, treatment options are limited. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of SPS. The authors describe clinicopathological features and treatment outcomes of patients harboring these tumors, and they assess expression of biomarkers using a clinically annotated tissue microarray. Together, these data give new insight into the biology and management of SPS. METHODS Patients presenting with a primary SPS between 1993 and 2011 (n = 291) were selected from an institutional registry to construct a clinical database. All patients underwent follow-up, and short- and long-term outcomes were assessed. Expression of relevant biomarkers was assessed using a new tissue microarray (n = 121). RESULTS SPSs were generally large (mean 5.5 cm) and frequently painful at presentation (55%). Most patients were treated with surgery (80%), the majority of whom experienced complete resolution (52%) or improvement (18%) of their symptoms. Tumors that were completely resected (85%) did not recur. Some patients experienced short-term (16%) and long-term (4%) complications postoperatively. Schwannomas expressed higher levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (2.1) than malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) (1.5, p = 0.004) and neurofibromas (1.33, p = 0.007). Expression of human epidural growth factor receptor-2 was greater in SPSs (0.91) than in MPNSTs (0.33, p = 0.002) and neurofibromas (0.33, p = 0.026). Epidural growth factor receptor was expressed in far fewer SPS cells (10%) than in MPNSTs (58%, p SPSs more frequently expressed cytoplasmic survivin (66% of tumor cells) than normal nerve (46% of cells), but SPS expressed nuclear survivin in fewer tumor cells than in MPNSTs (24% and 50%, respectively; p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS Complete resection is curative for SPS. Left untreated, however, these

  6. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  7. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland: Anastamosis of the facial nerve with the great auricular nerve after radical parotidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir Osman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland is a rare and slowly growing, but highly malignant tumor. Surgical resection of a malignant parotid tumor should include resection of the facial nerve when the nerve is involved in the tumor. Facial nerve reconstruction is required after nerve resection. A 14 year-old female presented with complaints of painless enlargement of the right parotid gland and facial asymmetry. Physical examination revealed a firm mass in the region of the parotid gland as well as right facial paralysis. Biopsy obtained from the mass showed an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland. A radical parotidectomy with a modified radical neck dissection was carried out. Grafting material for the facial reconstruction was harvested from the great auricular nerve. The proximal main trunk and each distal branch of the facial nerve were coapted with the greater auricular nerve. The patient received radiotherapy after surgery and was seen to achieve grade IV facial function one year after surgery. Thus, the great auricular nerve is appropriate grafting material for coaptation of each distal branch of the facial nerve.

  8. [Clinical-electroneuromyographical characteristics of facial nerve paralysis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, N P; Galitskaia, O S

    2009-01-01

    A clinical-electroneuromyographical study of 40 children (32 (80%) of them aged from 12 to 17 years, mean age 13,9+/-1,8 years, and 8 (20%) - from 1 to 8 years, mean age 4,4+/-2,1 years) were studied in the acute period of facial nerve paralysis (FNP). Six (15%) children had FNP in the anamnesis. Among precipitating factors were the cold exposure the day before disease onset (20 (50%) patients), symptoms of flu (13 (32,5%) patients) and psycho-emotional tension (3 (7,5%) patients). No precipitation was noted in 4 (10%) children. The degree of muscle paresis was 81,9+/-7% that corresponded to clinical stages III-IV according to K. Rosler. An electroneuromyographical analysis of motor ortho- and antidromic response to the facial nerve stimulation on the side of paresis and on the contralateral side in patients and controls revealed the presence of proximal axon- and myelinopathy of facial nerve with the involvement of its own motorneurons and brain stem interneurons. The maintenance of wink reflex and F-wave blocks in the period over 3 weeks are prognostically unfavorable factors for restoration of mimic muscle function in the early stage of disease.

  9. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF LARGE AMPLITUDE ACTION POTENTIAL OF THE SUFFERED FACIAL MUSCLES IN INTRATEMPORAL FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任重; 惠莲

    1999-01-01

    Objctive. To testify the phenomenon that large amplitude action potential appears at the early stage oil facial paralysis, and to search for the mechanism through clinical and experimental studies. Patients(aninmls) and methods. The action potentials of the orbicular ocular and oral museles were recorded in 34 normal persons by electromyogram instrtiments. The normal range of amplitude percentage was found out according to the normal distribution, One hundred patients with facial paralysis were also studied. The action potentials of facial muscles were recorded ia 17 guinea pigs before and after the facial nerve was comp~ and the facial nerve was examined under electromicroscope before and after the compression.Results. The amplitude percentage of the suffered side to the healthy side was more than 153 percent in 6 of the 100 patients. Large amplitude action potential occured in 35 per cent guinea pigs which were performed the experiment of facial nerve compression. Electromicroscopic examination revealed separation of the lammae of the facial nerve's myelin sheath in the guinea pigs which exhibited large amplitude action potential Conclusion. The facial nerve exhibited a temporary over-excitability at the early stage of facial nerve injury in scane patients and guinea pigs. If the injury was limited in the myelin sheath, the prognods was relatively good.

  10. The Trigeminal (V) and Facial (VII) Cranial Nerves: Head and Face Sensation and Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    There are close functional and anatomical relationships between cranial nerves V and VII in both their sensory and motor divisions. Sensation on the face is innervated by the trigeminal nerves (V) as are the muscles of mastication, but the muscles of facial expression are innervated mainly by the facial nerve (VII) as is the sensation of taste. This article briefly reviews the anatomy of these cranial nerves, disorders of these nerves that are of particular importance to psychiatry, and some ...

  11. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 1; Experimental study on the enhancement mechanism used in viewing vascular permeability of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    Although there have recently been numerous reports of enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy, the mechanism of enhancement remains largely unknown. In the present study, animal models with experimentally induced facial paralysis were prepared, and the vascular permeabilities of normal and damaged facial nerves were assessed using Evans blue albumin (EBA) as a tracer. The Gd-DTPA contents in normal and compressively damaged facial nerves were also investigated. In the normal intratemporal facial nerve, EBA remained in the vessels, and did not leak into the endoneurium. In contrast, vascular permeability was very high in the epineurium and the geniculate ganglion which showed leakage of large amounts of EBA from vessels. At the site of compression in the damaged nerve, EBA leakage was also seen in the endoneurism, indicating accentuated vascular permeability. This accentuation of vascular permeability shifted toward the distal side. However, no EBA leakage was seen on the side proximal to the site of compression. Significantly higher Gd-DTPA contents were obtained in the facial nerve on the paralytic side than in that on the normal side (p<0.001). As for differences between the distal and proximal sides, the distal side had a significantly higher Gd-DTPA content (p<0.01). Assessment of vascular permeability with EBA revealed accentuated vascular permeability on the side distal to the site of compression. These results showed the presence of a blood nerve barrier (BNB) in the facial nerve. Furthermore, the present findings suggest that the enhancement of the facial nerve on the affected side is caused by BNB destruction due to nerve damage and subsequent Gd-DTPA leakage from the vessels. Furthermore, it is suggested that the facial nerve enhancement appears to occur mainly on the distal side of the damaged portion of the nerve. (author).

  12. LINGUAL SCHWANNOMA: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesa A Mirza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in oral cavity. The case of a 15 yr old male is presented who had a 4 months history of swelling on right lateral border of tongue associated with disturbance in mastication. Examination revealed a 2x2 cm globular and smooth swelling on right lateral border of tongue. Complete excision with primary closure was carried out. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen was consistent with schwannoma.

  13. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF LARGE AMPLITUDE ACTION POTENTIAL OF THE SUFFERED FACIAL MUSCLES IN INTRATEMPORAL FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ojective. To testify the phenomenon that large amplitude action potential appears at the early stage of facial paralysis, and to search for the mechanism through clinical and experimental studies. Patients(animals) and methods. The action potentials of the orbicular ocular and oral muscles were recorded in 34 normal persons by electromyogram instruments. The normal range of amplitude percentage was found out according to he normal distribution. One hundred patients with facial paralysis were also studied. The action potentials of facial muscles were recorded in 17 guinea pigs before and after the facial nerve was compressed and the facial nerve was examined under electromicroscope before and after the compression.Results. The amplitude percentage of the suffered ide to the healthy side was more than 153 percent in 6 of the 100 patients. Lare amplitude action potential ocured in 35 per cent guinea pigs which were performed the experiment of facial nrve compression. Electromicroscopic examination revealed separation of the lammae of the facial nerve's myelin sheath in the guinea pigs which exhibited large amplitude action potential.Conclusion. The facial nerve exhibited a temporary over-exciability at the early stage of facial nerve injury in some patients and guinea pigs. If the injury waslimited in the myelin sheath, te prognosis was relatively good.

  14. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  15. Homozygous hemoglobin S (HbSS) presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ogundunmade, Babatunde Gbolahan; Jasper, Unyime Sunday

    2014-01-01

    Background Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a relatively rare presentation and often points to a serious underlying medical condition. Several studies have reported presentation of bilateral facial nerve palsy in association with Lyme disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, human immunodeficiency virus, sarcoidosis, diabetes and Hanson disease. While unilateral facial nerve palsy is sometimes associated with hemiplegia in sickle cell patients, no case of bilateral facia...

  16. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    OpenAIRE

    Atolini Junior, Nédio; Jorge Junior, José Jarjura; Gignon, Vinícius de Faria; Kitice, Adriano Tomio; Prado, Letícia Suriano de Almeida; Santos, Vânia Gracia Wolff

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the y...

  17. Middle ear osteoma causing progressive facial nerve weakness: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Kate; Bance, Manohar; Carter, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facial nerve weakness is most commonly due to Bell’s palsy or cerebrovascular accidents. Rarely, middle ear tumor presents with facial nerve dysfunction. Case presentation We report a very unusual case of middle ear osteoma in a 49-year-old Caucasian woman causing progressive facial nerve deficit. A subtle middle ear lesion was observed on otoscopy and computed tomographic images demonstrated an osseous middle ear tumor. Complete surgical excision resulted in the partial recovery...

  18. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle.

  19. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2003-01-01

    been operated on for facial palsy were interested in further surgical treatment. One hundred and ninety-five patients (25%) had some kind of operation on the eye, mostly (88%) a tarsorrhaphy. Reanimation procedures such as a palpebral gold weight or a spring, apparently still have a small place...

  20. Preauricular transparotid approach to mandibular condylar fractures without dissecting facial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Tetsuji; Tsuda, Tomoyuki; Hirose, Shunsuke; Ozawa, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Preauricular transparotid approach without dissecting the facial nerve was used for surgical treatment of 15 condylar fractures in 14 patients. The parotid fascia was opened just above the fracture site, and by dissecting the parotid gland and masseter muscle, the fracture was directly exposed. The facial nerve itself was not dissected expressly. All fractures could be reduced accurately and fixed firmly with miniplates. A direct approach just above the fracture site provided good vision of the fracture, avoiding facial nerve palsy caused by strong retraction. Moreover, by not dissecting the facial nerve, the operation time was shortened. This approach was useful for surgical treatment of both condylar neck and subcondylar fractures.

  1. Degeneration and regeneration of motor and sensory nerves: a stereological study of crush lesions in rat facial and mental nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghash, Ziad; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Al-Bishri, Awad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degeneration and regeneration of a sensory nerve and a motor nerve at the histological level after a crush injury. Twenty-five female Wistar rats had their mental nerve and the buccal branch of their facial nerve compressed unilaterally against a glass rod...... in the degenerative pattern; however, at day 19 the buccal branch had regenerated to the normal number of axons, whereas the mental nerve had only regained 50% of the normal number of axons. We conclude that the regenerative process is faster and/or more complete in the facial nerve (motor function) than...... for 30 s. Specimens of the compressed nerves and the corresponding control nerves were dissected at 3, 7, and 19 days after surgery. Nerve cross-sections were stained with osmium tetroxide and toluidine blue and analysed using two-dimensional stereology. We found differences between the two nerves both...

  2. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Bo He; Chun-Jiang Yu; Hong-Ming Ji; Yan-Ming Qu; Ning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS),as a method for predicting hearing prognosis,has not been systematically considered.The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN).This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test,and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation.Methods:A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively.Each patient received a caloric test,vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test,and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week,3,and 6 months,postoperatively.All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach.During the operation,the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon.Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.Results:The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106,35.80%).These patients were not subsequently evaluated.In 26 patients (nine females,seventeen males),tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females,24 males),tumors arose from the IVN.Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors,the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study.Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors,whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors.Conclusions:Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN.These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery.Using this information,we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients.

  3. Artificial facial nerve reflex restores eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujuan Wang; Keyong Li; Jingquan Liu; Dongyue Xu; Yuefeng Rui; Chunsheng Yang

    2010-01-01

    To date, treatment of peripheral facial paralysis has focused on preservation of facial nerve integrity. However, with seriously damaged facial nerve cases, it is difficult to recover anatomical and functional integrity using present therapies. Therefore, the present study utilized artificial facial nerve reflex to obtain orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) electromyography signals on the uninjured side through the use of implanted recording electrodes. The implanted electrical chips analyzed facial muscle motion on the uninjured side and triggered an electrical stimulator to emit current pulses, which resulted in stimulation of injured OOM contraction and maintained bilateral symmetry and consistency. Following signal recognition, extraction, and computer analysis, electromyography signals in the uninjured OOM resulted in complete eyelid closure, which was consistent with the voltage threshold for eye closure. These findings suggested that artificial facial nerve reflex through the use of implanted microelectronics in unilateral peripheral facial paralysis could restore eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation.

  4. A polylactic acid non-woven nerve conduit for facial nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumine, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    This study developed a biodegradable nerve conduit with PLA non-woven fabric and evaluated its nerve regeneration-promoting effect. The buccal branch of the facial nerve of 8 week-old Lewis rats was exposed, and a 7 mm nerve defect was created. A nerve conduit made of either PLA non-woven fabric (mean fibre diameter 460 nm), or silicone tube filled with type I collagen gel, or an autologous nerve, was implanted into the nerve defect, and their nerve regenerative abilities were evaluated 13 weeks after the surgery. The number of myelinated neural fibres in the middle portion of the regenerated nerve was the highest for PLA tubes (mean ± SD, 5051 ± 2335), followed by autologous nerves (4233 ± 590) and silicone tubes (1604 ± 148). Axon diameter was significantly greater in the PLA tube group (5.17 ± 1.69 µm) than in the silicone tube group (4.25 ± 1.60 µm) and no significant difference was found between the PLA tube and autograft (5.53 ± 1.93 µm) groups. Myelin thickness was greatest for the autograft group (0.65 ± 0.24 µm), followed by the PLA tube (0.54 ± 0.18 µm) and silicone tube (0.38 ± 0.12 µm) groups, showing significant differences among the three groups. The PLA non-woven fabric tube, composed of randomly-connected PLA fibres, is porous and has a number of advantages, such as sufficient strength to maintain luminal structure. The tube has demonstrated a comparable ability to induce peripheral nerve regeneration following autologous nerve transplantation.

  5. Repair of ocular-oral synkinesis of postfacial paralysis using cross-facial nerve grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Chuan; Wang, Wei; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    We present the surgical techniques and results of cross-facial nerve grafting that have been developed in the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis. Eleven patients with ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis underwent the cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve transposition at a tertiary academic hospital between 2003 and 2009. The patient selection for the study was based on the degree of disfigurement and facial function parameter rating using the Toronto Facial Grading System. The procedures used were surgeries done in two stages. All cases were followed up for 2 months to 6 years after the second surgery. The degree of improvement was evaluated at 6 to 7 months after the procedures. Six of the patients were followed up for more than 2 years after the stage-two surgery and demonstrated significant reduction in the ocular-oral synkinetic movements. The Toronto Facial Grading System scores from the postoperative follow-ups increased an average of 16 points (28%), and the patients had achieved symmetrical facial movement. We concluded that cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve branch transposition is effective and can be considered as an option for the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis in select patients.

  6. Schwannoma of the nasal septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karatas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign and slow growing tumors originating from the Schwann cells of peripheral nerve sheath. Schwannomas of sinonasal origin are rare (4% however septal schwannomas are much more rarer. We presented a 31 year old female patient. At physical examination a pale gray, smooth polypoid lesion obstructing the right nasal cavity was detected. Midfacial degloving and endoscopic approach were combined for surgical treatment. The tumor was originating from posteromedial area of the septal nasal cartilage, close to the bony cartilaginous junction. Postoperative histological examination of the specimen showed a benign tumoral growth consisting of spindle shaped cells and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor proved septal schwannoma.

  7. Solitary eyelid schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu M Magdum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rare benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves that form the neural sheath. While there have been reports of such tumors in the orbit, solitary schwannomas arising from the eyelids are very rare. There are reports of schwannomas being erroneously diagnosed as chalazion, inclusion cysts or even eyelid malignancy. We are reporting a case of a 20-year-old female who presented with a painless, non-tender, slow-growing mass in the upper eyelid of the right eye. The external appearance of the mass was suggestive of an implantation cyst of the eyelid and it could be completely excised as it had a well-defined capsule. Histopathological examination showed characteristic hypercellular and hypocellular areas with fusiform nuclei that tended to form palisades. The purpose of reporting this case of schwannoma in a young female is to recommend the inclusion of this entity as a differential diagnosis of well-defined lid tumors.

  8. Recovery of Facial Nerve Paralysis After Temporal Nerve Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emamhadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Facial paralysis is common following accidents, trauma, viral infection or tumors. Case Presentation A 24-year-old male patient was referred to us with a history of sharp penetrating trauma to the right temporal region causing unilateral paralysis of the muscles of the right forehead. He was unable to scowl or elevate his right eyebrow and there were no folds on his right forehead. Anastomosis of branches of the temporal nerve was done one month after trauma following regular physical therapy sessions, outcome was good and paralysis of the muscles of the right forehead improved after several months. Conclusions Immediate repair of the facial nerve injury will improve the process of recovery and rehabilitation of the face and forehead muscles and may play a very important role in the patient’s mental satisfaction and improve their quality of life.

  9. Long-term subjective and objective outcome after primary repair of traumatic facial nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijters, Erik; Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2008-08-01

    Although traumatic facial nerve paralysis is a severe handicap, there are no follow-up studies evaluating outcome after primary repair of traumatic facial nerve injuries. From May 1988 to August 2005, 27 patients (mean age, 27 years) were operated for traumatic facial nerve lesions (mean number of affected branches, 2.2). End-to-end facial nerve repair was always performed. All patients were invited to our outpatient clinic for standardized questionnaires (Facial Disability Index, Short Form-36 Health Survey), physical examination (Sunnybrook Facial Grading System), and clinical photographs. Sixteen patients participated in the follow-up study (mean, 9.2 years). Mean Facial Disability Index Physical and Social scores were 86 and 81, respectively, indicating good subjective facial functioning. The mean Sunnybrook Facial Grading System score was 74 indicating adequate facial functioning. Mean physical and mental health scores (Short Form-36 Health Survey) were comparable with normative data. Primary end-to-end repair of traumatic facial nerve injuries results in good long-term objective and subjective functional and emotional outcome.

  10. The Dilator Naris Muscle as a Reporter of Facial Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinberg, J.S.; Kleiss, I.J.; Knox, C.J.; Heaton, J.T.; Hadlock, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many investigators study facial nerve regeneration using the rat whisker pad model, although widely standardized outcomes measures of facial nerve regeneration in the rodent have not yet been developed. The intrinsic whisker pad "sling" muscles producing whisker protraction, situated at t

  11. What is expected of the facial nerve in michel aplasia? Anatomic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarandy, Masoud Motasaddi; Kouhi, Ali; Kashany, Shervin Sharif; Rabiei, Sohrab; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Rabbani-Anari, Mahtab

    2010-11-01

    We sought better understanding about the facial nerve anatomy in the rare inner ear Michel anomaly to help better define this aplasia and prevent potential complications in surgery on these patients. The data from computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance images of six Michel aplastic ears (three patients) were evaluated for a facial nerve course. Facial nerve course and anatomic landmarks were noted. Based on data obtained from this group of very rare patients, three different facial nerve anatomies were encountered. The first patient had normal-looking mastoid cells, normal middle ear ossicles, and a completely formed facial nerve canal through the middle ear. The second patient had pneumatized mastoid air cells despite an anomalous ossicular chain. This patient also had a facial nerve canal but not through the middle ear. In the third patient, although mastoid cells were present, neither ossicles nor a definite facial nerve canal could be detected. With guidance provided by the anatomy of the other parts of the ear, such as air cells and the ossicular chain, the danger zones posing a high probability of facial nerve injury can be predicted. Although all Michel aplasias may have aplastic petrous bone in common, there are some degrees of variation.

  12. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Soroor INALOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Katibeh P. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter;8(1:69-71. Objective This case study is about an 11-year-old girl with bilateral facial weakness, abnormal taste sensation, and deep tendon reflexes of both knees and ankles were absent. However, the muscle power of the lower and upper extremities across all muscle groups was normal. After 2 days, she developed paresthesia and numbness in the lower extremities. Other neurologic examinations, such as fundoscopic evaluation of the retina were normal with the muscle power of both upper- and lower-extremities intact. A lumbar puncture revealed albumincytological dissociation. EMG and NCV were in favor of Guillain-Barre syndrome, for which IVIG was prescribed and the abnormal sensations in the lower limbs rapidly improved. Bilateral facial diplegia without weakness and paresthesia is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome that mostly presents with acute onset, rapid progression with or without limb weakness, paresthesia, and decreased or absent DTR and albumin-cytological dissociation.

  13. Characteristics of the perception for unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sue Jean; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Yoonjoong; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-11-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy (FNP) are actually evaluated by other people rather than doctors or the patients themselves. This study was performed to investigate the characteristics of the perception of unilateral FNP in Korean people. A questionnaire using photographs of four patients with four different grades (House-Brackmann) of FNP was given to two hundred people with no FNP. Subjects of each gender, ranging from 20 to 69 years of age, participated. The questionnaire, showing facial expressions of resting, smiling, whistling, eye closing, and frowning, consisted of questions concerning the identification and the involved side of FNP, the unnatural areas of the face, and the unnaturalness of the facial expressions. The overall identification rate of FNP was 75.0%. The identification rate increased according to the increase in the grade of the patient's FNP (p FNP according to education level. However, the overall detection rate of the involved side was higher in the high-education group (p FNP was lower than the rate of identification of FNP and was significantly low in the middle-aged/elderly and low-education level groups.

  14. Anatomical study of the variations in innervation of the orbicularis oculi by the facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, D; Vacher, C; de Vasconcellos, J-J Accioli; Kassanyou, S; Gnanazan, G; N'Guessan, B

    2004-02-01

    While the divisions of the facial nerve in the face are well known, the innervation of the orbicularis oculi by the different distal branches of the facial nerve is poorly described. To determine which branches of the facial nerve play a role in this innervation, the facial nerve was dissected in 30 fresh cadavers. The innervation of this muscle was in the form of two plexuses, a superior one, most often (93%) formed by the union of the temporal and superior zygomatic branches, and an inferior one, usually formed (63%) by the union of the inferior zygomatic and superior buccal branches. This new mode of innervation explains how, without damage to both plexuses, innervation of orbicularis oculi by the facial nerve remains functional. It also explains the often unsatisfactory results of treatment of primary blepharospasm, and the unusual character of palsies of this muscle in cervicofacial lifts.

  15. Rare Presentation of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Zygomycosis: Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Alireza Mohebbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date.

  16. Multiple dental anomalies accompany unilateral disturbances in abducens and facial nerves: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Talatahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the oral rehabilitation of an 8-year-old girl with extensively affected primary and permanent dentition. This report is unique in which distinct dental anomalies including enamel hypoplasia, irregular dentin formation, taurodontism, hpodontia and dens in dente accompany unilateral disturbance of abducens and facial nerves which control the lateral eye movement, and facial expression, respectively.   Keywords: enamel hypoplasia; irregular dentin formation; taurodontism; hypodontia; dens in dente; abducens and facial nerves;

  17. Facial nerve neurinoma presenting as middle cranial fossa and cerebellopontine angle mass : a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi B

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve neurinomas are rare. The tumours arising from the geniculate ganglion may grow anteriorly and superiorly and present as a mass in the middle cranial fossa. Only a few cases of facial nerve neurinomas presenting as middle cranial fossa mass have so far been reported. These tumours present with either long standing or intermittent facial palsy along with cerebellopontine angle syndrome.

  18. Facial nerve intra parotid neuromas. Report of 2 cases; Tumeurs neurogenes intraparotidiennes du nerf facial. Interet de l`IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch-Ponsot, C.; Sigal, R.; Schmutz, G.; Dacher, J.N.; Brazeau-Lamontagne, L.; Marchand, F.; Dorion, D. [Centre Universitaire de sante de l`Estrie, Shebrooke (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    Facial nerve intra-parotid neuromas are rare. We report two cases with no facial paralysis. In the first case, the clinical protocol for the evaluation of a parotid mass did not suggest the intra-mastoid tumor extension. This tumor extension was shown by CT and MRI and confirmed by gross and microscopic appearance. In the second case, no intrapretrous extension was observed with MRI. The diagnosis of neuroma was made during surgery. With a literature review, we discuss the diagnostic difficulties encountered in the investigation of parotid facial nerve tumors, emphasizing on the usefulness of CT and MRI in its diagnosis. (authors). 14 refs.

  19. Nicotine effects on muscarinic receptor-mediated free Ca[Formula: see text] level changes in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dawei; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Anbing; Sun, Wenhai; Zhang, Hongmei; Tang, Limin

    2016-06-01

    It was suggested that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca[Formula: see text] levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. It is assumed that, following facial nerve injury, the interactions of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in facial nerve nucleus may negatively regulate free Ca[Formula: see text] concentrations in the facial nerve nucleus, which provide important information for the repair and regeneration of the facial nerve. The present study investigated the regulatory effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury at 7, 30, and 90 days following facial nerve injury using laser confocal microscopy. The dose-dependent regulation of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus may decrease the range of free Ca[Formula: see text] increases following facial nerve injury, which is important for nerve cell regeneration. It is concluded that the negative effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptors are related to the [Formula: see text] subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  20. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  1. Comparison of hemihypoglossal nerve versus masseteric nerve transpositions in the rehabilitation of short-term facial paralysis using the Facial Clima evaluating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marré, Diego

    2012-11-01

    Masseteric and hypoglossal nerve transfers are reliable alternatives for reanimating short-term facial paralysis. To date, few studies exist in the literature comparing these techniques. This work presents a quantitative comparison of masseter-facial transposition versus hemihypoglossal facial transposition with a nerve graft using the Facial Clima system. Forty-six patients with complete unilateral facial paralysis underwent reanimation with either hemihypoglossal transposition with a nerve graft (group I, n = 25) or direct masseteric-facial coaptation (group II, n = 21). Commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were measured using the Facial Clima system. Postoperative intragroup commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity means of the reanimated versus the normal side were first compared using a paired sample t test. Then, mean percentages of recovery of both parameters were compared between the groups using an independent sample t test. Onset of movement was also compared between the groups. Significant differences of mean commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity between the reanimated side and the normal side were observed in group I but not in group II. Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters did not differ between the groups. Patients in group II showed a significantly faster onset of movement compared with those in group I (62 ± 4.6 days versus 136 ± 7.4 days, p = 0.013). Reanimation of short-term facial paralysis can be satisfactorily addressed by means of either hemihypoglossal transposition with a nerve graft or direct masseteric-facial coaptation. However, with the latter, better symmetry and a faster onset of movement are observed. In addition, masseteric nerve transfer avoids morbidity from nerve graft harvesting. Therapeutic, III.

  2. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  3. Bilateral abducens nerve and right facial nerve palsy occuring after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ismail Boyraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the nervus abducens, the 6th cranial nerve tend to be rare, usually occur suddenly following head injuries. A 43-year-old male patient presented with a history of fall from a height due to an occupational accident on the date of 11.01.2014. Cranial tomography demonstrated bilateral epidural hematoma. The epidural hematoma was drained during the operation. After the surgery, eye examination showed no vision loss, except limited bilateral lateral gaze. When the patient was unable to walk due to diplopia, he was advised to close one eye. On the right side, there were findings suggesting central facial paralysis. There may be multiple cranial nerve damage following head injury. Therefore, all cranial nerves should be thoroughly examined. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(2.000: 110-113

  4. Decompression of the facial nerve in cases of hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Kettel

    1954-12-01

    Full Text Available Among 11 patients a complete cure was obtained in one case, a fair result in 4 cases, while in 6 cases the effect of the operation has only been temporary and full recurrence has taken place. Even if decompression has thus resulted in a few recoveries and improvements, the results in the majority of cases have been disappointing. Everything points to hemifacial spasm being due to a disorder of the lower motor neuron. Intracranial lesions in the vicinity of the facial nerve are known to have resulted in irritation and spasm. It may be perfectly true that the majority of cases of hemifacial spasm are due to a lesion, the nature of which may vary, in the Fallopian canal near the stylomastoid foramen, not least the postparalytic following Bell's palsy. But the disappointing results of decompression seems to indicate that at the time of operation irreparable damage to the nerve has in the majority of cases been already done. Consequently I gave up decompression in cases of hemifacial spasm some years ago. Good results from injections of alcohol into the nerve have been reported13 but I prefer selective sections of the branches to the muscles involved as described by German and Greenwood8.

  5. Iatrogenic facial nerve palsy "Prevention is better than cure": Analysis of four cases

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    Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic facial nerve palsy in mastoid surgery is considered a crime or a taboo in the present scenario of medical science. But one has to accept the fact that every otologist encounters this entity at some point in his/her career. Hence it is of prime importance to be equipped to detect and to manage these cases. The obvious and disfiguring facial deformity it causes makes this a dreaded complication. Our article here discusses our experience in managing four cases of iatrogenic facial palsy. The etiology in all the cases was mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma. The detection of the site and repair was performed by the same surgeon in all cases. The facial nerve was transected completely in three cases, and in one case there was partial loss (>50% of fibers. Cable nerve grafting was utilized in three patients. There was grade 4 improvement in three patients who underwent cable nerve grafting, and one patient had grade 2 recovery after end-to-end anastomosis. A good anatomical knowledge and experience with temporal bone dissection is of great importance in preventing facial nerve injury. If facial nerve injury is detected, it should be managed as early as possible. An end-to-end anastomosis provides better results in final recovery as opposed to cable nerve grafting for facial nerve repair.

  6. Schwannoma of the palatine tonsil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, H T; Gowda, B V Chandre; Lakshmi, S; Niveditha, S R

    2005-07-01

    Schwannoma is a solitary, benign tumour arising from the neural sheath Schwann cells of the peripheral, cranial or autonomic nerves. In the head and neck region, it occurs most commonly in association with the acoustic nerve within the skull and is rarely found in oral structures. When it is found in oral structures, the tongue is reported to be the favoured site. Schwannoma of the tonsil is extremely rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. We report what is, to our knowledge, the third case of schwannoma of the tonsil, diagnosed by histopathology.

  7. Intracochlear schwannoma

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    Manoj Manikoth Puthiyaparambil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracochlear schwannoma is rarely diagnosed. We report the case of a 27-year-old woman with intracochlear schwannoma who presented with 7 years history of hearing impairment. Audiological tests and imaging studies revealed a possibility of intracochlear schwannoma. Excision of the tumor was done by transcochlear approach. The histologic diagnosis was schwannoma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. We present this rare case and discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and management options in such cases.

  8. Multicentric fibromyxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor (multicentric schwannoma) in a dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius): morphopathological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Khordadmehr, M

    2011-11-01

    During postslaughter inspection of a 4-year-old male dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), numerous small nodules to large masses up to 4 cm in diameter were found on the serosal surfaces of forestomachs, large intestines, mesentery, liver, and spleen. Grossly, the masses were discrete, round, smooth, and white to gray that bulged from the serosal layer. Cut surfaces of the masses were discrete, round, white, and relatively homogeneous without any necrotic foci. Histopathologically, the masses were encapsulated and composed of a mixture of round and spindle-shaped cells in loose whorls of neoplastic cells with small elongated hyperchromatic wavy nuclei and a small amount of pale eosinophilic, poorly defined cytoplasm. Masson's trichrome staining showed mild amounts of collagen fibers forming an irregular, loose stroma. In immunohistochemistry, immunoreactivity for the Schwann cell marker (S100) was diffusely positive in the neoplastic cells. The immunoreactivity for CK, c-kit, and CD34 were negative. Ultrastructural examination confirmed the tumor was entirely formed of neoplastic Schwann cells. On the basis of the histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings, the tumors were diagnosed as multicentric fibromyxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor (multicentric schwannoma). This tumor has not been previously recorded in camel worldwide.

  9. Giant Plexiform Schwannoma of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Nisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and neck region is a relatively common location for schwannomas, but tongue schwannomas are considered to be rare and pose the problem of both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  10. Giant plexiform schwannoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa, Lluís; von Büren, Toni; Tiab, Amine; Giger, Roland

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and neck region is a relatively common location for schwannomas, but tongue schwannomas are considered to be rare and pose the problem of both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  11. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve: anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Vasilios; Nalbadian, Meri; Psifidis, Anestis; Themelis, Christos; Kouloulas, Athanasios

    2009-04-01

    There is a conroversy in the literature about the length of the proximal tympanic segment of the facial nerve (PTSFN). The objective of the current study is to measure the length of the tympanic segment of the facial nerve (TSFN) and of its proximal (PTSFN) and distal (DTSFN) segments, in normal human temporal bones. Moreover, we will explore if these lengths are correlated. If a form of a functional relationship can be established, it could offer insights in partially predicting or estimating the length of the TSFN as well as of its proximal and distal portions. Direct measurements were obtained in 40 normal human temporal bones, which were examined by surgical dissection. Relationships between these measurements were established using Pearson's correlation method (two-tailed). The length of the TSFN was on average 10.97 mm. The length of the PTSFN was on average 5.25 mm and of the DTSFN was 5.72 mm. No significant statistical differences according to gender or side (right or left) were detected. It was determined that the length of the TSFN was in linear correlation with positive direction with its proximal (PTSFN) and distal (DTSFN) segments. Also the PTSFN length was in linear correlation with positive direction with the DTSFN length. The length of the PTSFN comprises about one-half of the TSFN length. The existence of a definite correlation between the lengths of the TSFN, PTSFN, and DTSFN implies the existence of a form of functional interrelationship. This could facilitate prediction and identification of the TSFN and PTSFN lengths from the easily identifiable DTSFN length during surgery.

  12. EXPRESSION OF CALCITONIN GENE-RELATED PEPTIDE IN FACIAL NERVE OF HEMIFACIAL SPASM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the immunoreactivity of Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the facial nerve when Hemifacial Spasm is occurring. Methods The electrophysiological technique was used to explore abnormal muscle response (AMR) which was characteristic of Hemifacial Spasm.The animal models of Hemifacial Spasm in New Zealand white rabbits were established by compressing the main trunk of artificial demyelinated facial nerve with the temporal superficial artery. At 6 weeks after surgery, the facial nerves were taken from the experimental group and control one, the immunohistochemistry for CGRP using polyclonal antibody with ABC kit was performed in the facial nerves; at the same time, the observation for the facial nerves of light and transmission electron microscope was performed. Results The facial nerve demyelinated and the axons retrogressively changed, CGRP immunoreactive positive fibers were significantly detected in experimental groups; whereas this phenomenon was not found in control group. Conclusion CGRP can nutrien the injured facial nerve and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Hemifacial Spasm.

  13. [Correlation between facial nerve functional evaluation and efficacy evaluation of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhang-ling; Li, Cheng-xin; Jiang, Yue-bo; Zuo, Cong; Cai, Yun; Wang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    To assess and grade facial nerve dysfunction according to the extent of facial paralysis in the clinical course of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy, and to observe the interrelationship between the grade, the efficacy and the period of treatment, as well as the effect on prognosis. The authors employed the House-Brackmann scale, a commonly used evaluation scale for facial paralysis motor function, and set standards for eye fissure and lips. According to the improved scale, the authors assessed and graded the degree of facial paralysis in terms of facial nerve dysfunction both before and after treatment. The grade was divided into five levels: mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe dysfunction and complete paralysis. The authors gave acupuncture treatment according to the state of the disease without artificially setting the treatment period. The observation was focused on the efficacy and the efficacy was evaluated throughout the entire treatment process. Fifty-three cases out of 68 patients with Bell's palsy were cured and the overall rate of efficacy was 97%. Statistically significant differences (Pfacial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy was correlated with the damage level of the disease (correlation coefficient r=0.423, Pfacial nerve dysfunction (Pfacial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy is reduced in correlation with an increase in facial nerve dysfunction, and the period of treatment varies in need of different levels of facial nerve dysfunction. It is highly necessary to assess and grade patients before observation and treatment in clinical study, and choose corresponding treatment according to severity of damage of the disease.

  14. Relations of Facial Nerve With Retromandibular Vein in Human Fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvan, Özlem; Gilan, Yağmurhan; Beger, Orhan; Bobuş, Alev; Tezer, Mesut; Aktekin, Mustafa

    2017-06-01

    The relationship of facial nerve (FN) and its branches with the retromandibular vein (RMV) has been described in adults, whereas there is no data in the literature regarding this relationship in fetuses. The study was conducted to evaluate the anatomic relationships of these structures on 61 hemi-faces of fetuses with a mean age of 26.5 ± 4.9 weeks with no visible facial abnormalities. The FN trunk was identified at its emergence at the stylomastoid foramen. It was traced till its ramification within the parotid gland. In 46 sides, FN trunk ramified before crossing RMV and ran lateral to it, while in 8 sides FN trunk ramified on the lateral aspect of the RMV. In 3 sides, FN trunk ramified after crossing the RMV at its medial aspect. In only 1 side, FN trunk trifurcated as superior, middle, and inferior divisions and RMV lied anterior to FN trunk, lateral to superior division, medial to middle and inferior divisions. In 2 sides, FN trunk bifurcated as superior and inferior divisions. Retromandibular vein was located anterior to FN trunk, medial to superior division, lateral to inferior division in both of them. In 1 side, RMV ran medial to almost all branches, except the cervical branch of FN. Variability in the relationship of FN and RMV in fetuses as presented in this study is thought to be crucial in surgical procedures particularly in early childhood.

  15. Degeneration and regeneration of motor and sensory nerves: a stereological study of crush lesions in rat facial and mental nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghash, Z; Larsen, J O; Al-Bishri, A; Kahnberg, K-E

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degeneration and regeneration of a sensory nerve and a motor nerve at the histological level after a crush injury. Twenty-five female Wistar rats had their mental nerve and the buccal branch of their facial nerve compressed unilaterally against a glass rod for 30s. Specimens of the compressed nerves and the corresponding control nerves were dissected at 3, 7, and 19 days after surgery. Nerve cross-sections were stained with osmium tetroxide and toluidine blue and analysed using two-dimensional stereology. We found differences between the two nerves both in the normal anatomy and in the regenerative pattern. The mental nerve had a larger cross-sectional area including all tissue components. The mental nerve had a larger volume fraction of myelinated axons and a correspondingly smaller volume fraction of endoneurium. No differences were observed in the degenerative pattern; however, at day 19 the buccal branch had regenerated to the normal number of axons, whereas the mental nerve had only regained 50% of the normal number of axons. We conclude that the regenerative process is faster and/or more complete in the facial nerve (motor function) than it is in the mental nerve (somatosensory function).

  16. Microanatomy and histological features of central myelin in the root exit zone of facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Gi-Taek; Yoo, Chan-Jong; Han, Seong-Rok; Choi, Chan-Young

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microanatomy and histological features of the central myelin in the root exit zone of facial nerve. Forty facial nerves with brain stem were obtained from 20 formalin fixed cadavers. Among them 17 facial nerves were ruined during preparation and 23 root entry zone (REZ) of facial nerves could be examined. The length of medial REZ, from detach point of facial nerve at the brain stem to transitional area, and the thickness of glial membrane of central myelin was measured. We cut brain stem along the facial nerve and made a tissue block of facial nerve REZ. Each tissue block was embedded with paraffin and serially sectioned. Slices were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), periodic acid-Schiff, and glial fibrillary acid protein. Microscopy was used to measure the extent of central myelin and thickness of outer glial membrane of central myelin. Thickness of glial membrane was examined at two different points, the thickest area of proximal and distal REZ. Special stain with PAS and GFAP could be differentiated the central and peripheral myelin of facial nerve. The length of medial REZ was mean 2.6 mm (1.6-3.5 mm). The glial limiting membrane of brain stem is continued to the end of central myelin. We called it glial sheath of REZ. The thickness of glial sheath was mean 66.5 µm (40-110 µm) at proximal REZ and 7.4 µm (5-10 µm) at distal REZ. Medial REZ of facial nerve is mean 2.6 mm in length and covered by glial sheath continued from glial limiting membrane of brain stem. Glial sheath of central myelin tends to become thin toward transitional zone.

  17. Rat whisker movement after facial nerve lesion: evidence for autonomic contraction of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, James T; Sheu, Shu Hsien; Hohman, Marc H; Knox, Christopher J; Weinberg, Julie S; Kleiss, Ingrid J; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-18

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ⩾18weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (Pwhisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation of skeletal muscle after motor nerve lesion, which not only has implications for interpreting facial nerve reinnervation results, but also calls into question whether autonomic-mediated innervation of striated muscle occurs naturally in other forms of neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Undifferentiated and differentiated adipose-derived stem cells improve nerve regeneration in a rat model of facial nerve defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Sasaki, Ryo; Matsumine, Hajime; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2017-02-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the current procedure used for repairing facial nerve gaps. As an alternative to this method, tissue engineering cell-based therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells, Schwann cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells has been proposed. However, these cells have major problems, including tumorigenesis in induced pluripotent stem cells and invasiveness and limited tissue associated with harvesting for the other cells. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), which can be harvested easily and repeatedly by a minimally invasive liposuction procedure. The ASCs had characteristics of mesenchymal tissue lineages and could differentiate into Schwann-like cells that were relatively simple to isolate and expand in culture. In an in vivo study, a silicone conduit containing undifferentiated ASCs, differentiated ASCs or Schwann cells were transplanted, embedded in a collagen gel and the efficacy of repair of a 7 mm-gap in the rat facial nerve examined. Morphometric quantification analysis of regenerated facial nerves after a regeneration period of 13 weeks showed that undifferentiated ASCs, differentiated ASCs, and Schwann cells had similar potential for nerve regeneration. Furthermore, the functional recovery of facial nerve regeneration using a rat facial palsy scoring system in the three groups was close to that in autologous nerve graft positive controls. These findings suggest that undifferentiated and differentiated ASCs may both have therapeutic potential in facial nerve regeneration as a source of Schwann cells in cell-based therapy performed as an alternative to autologous nerve grafts. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongzhi; Feng, Shuwei; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Jie; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhong, Zhendong; Li, Ying; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP). However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6) and Hegu (LI4) in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  20. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6 and Hegu (LI4 in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  1. Schwannoma in the Upper Limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Yuk Kwan Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are the commonest tumours of peripheral nerves. Despite the classical description that schwannomas are well encapsulated and can be completely enucleated during excision, a portion of them have fascicular involvement and could not be completely shelled out. A retrospective review for 8 patients was carried out over 10 years. 75% of schwannoma occurred over the distal region of upper limb (at elbow or distal to it. It occurs more in the mixed nerve instead of pure sensory or motor nerve. 50% of patients had mixed nerve involvement. Fascicular involvement was very common in schwannoma (75% of patients. Removal of the tumour with fascicles can cause functional deficit. At present, there is no method (including preoperative MRI which can predict the occurrence of fascicular involvement; the authors therefore proposed a new system to stratify patients who may benefit from interfascicular nerve grafts. In this group of patients, the authors strongly recommend that the possibility and option of nerve graft should be discussed with patients prior to schwannoma excision, so that nerve grafting could be directly proceeded with patient consent in case there is fascicular involvement of tumour found intraoperatively.

  2. Reanimation of reversible facial paralysis by the double innervation technique using an intraneural-dissected sural nerve graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko; Yano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    In treating reversible facial paralysis, cross-facial nerve grafting offers voluntary and emotional reanimation. In contrast, rapid re-innervation and strong neural stimulation can be obtained with hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover. In this article, we describe the method of a combination of these techniques as a one-stage procedure. A 39-year-old man presented with facial paralysis due to nerve avulsion within the stylomastoid foramen. The sural nerve was harvested and two branches were created at its distal end by intraneural dissection. One branch was anastomosed to the contralateral facial nerve, and the other branch was used for hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover, followed by connecting the proximal stump of the graft to the trunk of the paralysed facial nerve in an end-to-end fashion. At 9 months postoperatively, almost complete facial symmetry and co-ordinated movements of the mimetic muscles were obtained with no obvious tongue atrophy. Since our method can efficiently gather neural inputs from the contralateral facial nerve and the ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve, it may become a good alternative for reanimation of reversible facial paralysis when the ipsilateral facial nerve is not available.

  3. Contrast enhancement of the facial nerve on MRI: normal or pathological?

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    Martin-Duverneuil, N. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Sola-Martinez, M.T. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Miaux, Y. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Cognard, C. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Weil, A. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Mompoint, D. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Chiras, J. [Neuroradiologie Charcot, La Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-03-01

    We prospectively analysed the normal contrast-enhanced MRI features of the facial nerve and determined criteria for pathological contrast enhancement. We studied 31 patients with clinically normal facial nerves with T1-weighted images before and after contrast medium. The intensity, thickness and right-left symmetry of enhancement were assessed in each segment and correlated with MRI features observed in abnormal facial nerves. Enhancement along at least one segment of the facial nerve was seen in 98% of cases, but only within the facial canal: Labyrinthine segment: 78.2%; geniculate ganglion: 96.9%; tympanic: 88.4%; mastoid: 66.6%. Marked (++) to intense (+++) enhancement was seen in the labyrinthine segment in 17.4%, the geniculate ganglion in 36.3%, and the tympanic (25.6%) and mastoid (7.1%) segments, whereas intense enhancement was only seen in the geniculate ganglion (6%) and the tympanic segment (11.6%). A right-left asymmetry was noted in 69% of cases. No correlation was found between enhancement and the thickness of the nerve. No enhancement of the eighth nerve was seen. We suggest three criteria for pathological enhancement: Enhancement outside the facial canal; extension of enhancement to the eighth nerve; and intense enhancement in the labyrinthine and/or mastoid segments. (orig.)

  4. Sensitivity and specificity of vestibular bed-side examination in detecting VIII cranial nerve schwannoma with sensorineural sudden unilateral hearing loss as presenting symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, L; Salafia, F; Melillo, M G; Mazzone, S

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify signs of vestibular nerve suffering through a bedside vestibular examination protocol in case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss without spontaneous signs of vestibular impairment and to propose a bed-side vestibular examination based protocol for the focused execution of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only if a vestibular schwannoma is suspected. 96 patients, 52 men, 44 women, mean age 57.73 +/- 12.85 years, suffering from sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, which presented neither vertigo nor spontaneous nystagmus, were enrolled. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, measurement of acoustic reflexes and Anderson test to detect adaptation, bedside vestibular examination through head shaking test, vibration test, head impulse test, hyperventilation test and detection of nystagmus in supine and lateral decubitus to search for signs of vestibular impairment were performed. Patients with signs of vestibular impairment and pure tone audiometry threshold at high frequencies better than 70 dB nHL were subjected to auditory brainstem responses. Gadolinium enhanced MRI centred on internal acoustic canals was carried out in all patients with sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss. Main outcome measures were signs of vestibular impairment at vestibular bedside examination and presence of vestibular schwannoma on MRI. Signs of vestibular impairment were detected in 22/96 cases (22.9%); a vestibular schwannoma was detected by MRI in 5/96 cases (5.2%), always when vestibular impairment was present. In case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, vestibular bedside examination seems to be useful to restrict the suspicion of a vestibular schwannoma to cases with signs of vestibular impairment, reducing the number of MRI exams, with considerable economic savings. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  5. The truth is in the water: metastatic prostate cancer presenting as an intermittent facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooles, N; Gupta, S; Wilkin-Crowe, H; Juratli, A

    2015-04-24

    An elderly man presented to the acute ear, nose and throat (ENT) services with a history of intermittent, self-limiting facial nerve palsy. Full ENT examination was normal, with all cranial nerves and peripheral neurology intact. Multiple imaging modalities suggested an aggressive bony lesion, secondary to locally advanced prostate malignancy with extensive metastatic infiltration. Prostate cancer is known to preferentially metastasise to bone and has been known to cause multiple cranial nerve palsies and ophthalmoplegia. This is the first case described in the literature of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with intermittent facial nerve palsy.

  6. Comparison of rabbit facial nerve regeneration in nerve growth factor-containing silicone tubes to that in autologous neural grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J G; Lee, P; Derby, A; Roufa, D G

    1995-11-01

    Previous reports suggest that nerve growth factor (NGF) enhanced nerve regeneration in rabbit facial nerves. We compared rabbit facial nerve regeneration in 10-mm silicone tubes prefilled with NGF or cytochrome C (Cyt C), bridging an 8-mm nerve gap, to regeneration of 8-mm autologous nerve grafts. Three weeks following implantation, NGF-treated regenerates exhibited a more mature fascicular organization and more extensive neovascularization than Cyt C-treated controls. Morphometric analysis at the middle of the tube of 3- and 5-week regenerates revealed no significant difference in the mean number of myelinated or unmyelinated axons between NGF- and Cyt C-treated implants. However, when the numbers of myelinated fibers in 5-week regenerates were compared to those in their respective preoperative controls, NGF-treated regenerates had recovered a significantly greater percentage of myelinated axons than Cyt C-treated implants (46% versus 18%, respectively). The number of regenerating myelinated axons in the autologous nerve grafts at 5 weeks was significantly greater than the number of myelinated axons in the silicone tubes. However, in the nerve grafts the majority of the axons were found in the extrafascicular connective tissue (66%). The majority of these myelinated fibers did not find their way into the distal nerve stump. Thus, although the number of regenerating myelinated axons within the nerve grafts is greater than that of axons within silicone tube implants, functional recovery of autologous nerve graft repairs may not be superior to that of intubational repairs.

  7. The masseteric nerve: a versatile power source in facial animation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, B; Ferri, A; Ferrari, S; Copelli, C; Salvagni, L; Sesenna, E

    2014-03-01

    The masseteric nerve has many advantages including low morbidity, its proximity to the facial nerve, the strong motor impulse, its reliability, and the fast reinnervation that is achievable in most patients. Reinnervation of a neuromuscular transplant is the main indication for its use, but it has been used for the treatment of recent facial palsies with satisfactory results. We have retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who had facial animation procedures using the masseteric nerve during the last 10 years. The patients included those with recent, and established or congenital, unilateral and bilateral palsies. The masseteric nerve was used for coaptation of the facial nerve either alone or in association with crossfacial nerve grafting, or for the reinnervation of gracilis neuromuscular transplants. Reinnervation was successful in all cases, the mean (range) time being 4 (2-5) months for facial nerve coaptation and 4 (3-7) months for neuromuscular transplants. Cosmesis was evaluated (moderate, n=10, good, n=30, and excellent, n=20) as was functional outcome (no case of impairment of masticatory function, all patients able to smile, and achievement of a smile independent from biting). The masseteric nerve has many uses, including in both recent, and established or congenital, cases. In some conditions it is the first line of treatment. The combination of combined techniques gives excellent results in unilateral palsies and should therefore be considered a valid option.

  8. Facial nerve palsy as a primary presentation of advanced carcinoma of the prostate: An unusual occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdulkadir

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Facial nerve palsy as a primary presentation of advanced cancer of the prostate is unusual, thus, a high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis. ADT provided adequate palliation.

  9. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

  10. Facial nerve palsy: analysis of cases reported in children in a suburban hospital in Nigeria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Folayan, M O; Arobieke, R I; Eziyi, E; Oyetola, E O; Elusiyan, J

    2014-01-01

    The study describes the epidemiology, treatment, and treatment outcomes of the 10 cases of facial nerve palsy seen in children managed at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile...

  11. Facial nerve regeneration after facial allotransplantation: A longitudinal clinical and electromyographic follow-up of lip movements during speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Letter, Miet; Vanhoutte, Sarah; Aerts, Annelies; Santens, Patrick; Vermeersch, Hubert; Roche, Nathalie; Stillaert, Filip; Blondeel, Philip; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2017-06-01

    Facial allotransplantation constitutes a reconstructive option after extensive damage to facial structures. Functional recovery has been reported but remains an issue. A patient underwent facial allotransplantation after a ballistic injury with extensive facial tissue damage. Speech motor function was sequentially assessed clinically, along with repeated electromyography of lip movements during a follow-up of 3 years. Facial nerve recovery could be demonstrated within the first month, followed by a gradual increase in electromyographic amplitude and decrease in reaction times. These were accompanied by gradual improvement of clinical assessments. Axonal recovery starts early after transplantation. Electromyographic testing is sensitive in demonstrating this early recovery, which ultimately results in clinical improvements. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Superiority of resection over enucleation for schwannomas of the cervical vagus nerve: A retrospective cohort study of 22 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Minni, Antonio; Masci, Federica; Ciamberlano, Bernardo; Pasqua, Rocco; Calio, Francesco G; Vietri, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Schwannoma of the cervical vagus nerve is rare. Treatment options include intracapsular enucleation and en bloc resection. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of enucleation and resection in terms of postoperative mortality and morbidity, freedom from vocal cord palsy, freedom from local recurrence, quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) and vocal handicap index (VHI). Twentytwo consecutive patients were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 9) underwent intracapsular enucleation, whereas patients in Group B (n = 13) underwent en bloc resection. Main endpoints of the study were postoperative mortality and morbidity, freedom from vocal cord palsy, freedom from local recurrence and quality of life. The quality of life after surgery was assessed according to the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) EQ-5D-5L methodology, and calculation of the voice handicap index (VHI). Postoperative mortality was nil. Morbidity included 1 wound dehiscence in group A and 2 transitory dysphagias in group B. Freedom from vocal cord palsy was 22% in group A and zero in group B (p = 0.15). Operation-specific local recurrence rate was 33% (3/9 patients) in group A and nil in group B (0/23 patients) (p = 0.05). QALYs was 0.55 in group A and 0.54 in group B (p = 1.0). VHI was 23.77 in group A and 26.15 in group B (p = 1.00). Resection is superior to enucleation in terms of freedom from local recurrence. Functional results are comparable for both techniques. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Electromyographic monitoring of facial nerve under different levels of neuromuscular blockade during middle ear microsurgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yi-rong; XU Jing; CHEN Lian-hua; CHI Fang-lu

    2009-01-01

    Background The evoked electromyography (EMG) is frequently used to identify facial nerve in order to prevent its damage during surgeries. Partial neuromuscular blockade (NMB) has been suggested to favor EMG activity and insure patients' safety. The aim of this study was to determine an adequate level of NMB correspondent to sensible facial nerve identification by evaluating the relationship between facial EMG responses and peripheral NMB levels during the middle ear surgeries.Methods Facial nerve evoked EMG and NMB monitoring were performed simultaneously in 40 patients who underwent tympanoplasty. Facial electromyographic responses were recorded by insertion of needle electrodes into the orbicularis oris and orbicularis oculi muscles after electrical stimulation on facial nerve. The NMB was observed objectively with the hypothenar muscle's twitching after electrical stimulation of ulnar nerve, and the intensity of blockade was adjusted at levels of 0, 25%, 50%, 75%, 90%, and 100% respectively with increased intravenous infusion of Rocuronium (muscle relaxant).Results All of the patients had detectable EMG responses at the levels of NMB ≤50%. Four out of forty patients had no EMG response at the levels of NMB ≥75%. A significant linear positive correlation was present between stimulation thresholds and NMB levels while a linear negative correlation was present between EMG amplitudes and NMB levels.Conclusions The facial nerve monitoring via facial electromyographic responses can be obtained when an intraoperative partial neuromuscular blockade is induced to provide an adequate immobilization of the patient. The 50% NMB should be considered as the choice of anesthetic management for facial nerve monitoring in otologic microsurgery based on the relationship of correlation.

  14. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks.

  15. The surgical anatomy of the cervical distribution of the facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziarah, H A; Atkinson, M E

    1981-09-01

    In an attempt to improve the safety of the submandibular approach to the mandible and submandibular anatomical dissections of 100 facial halves were undertaken. Observations were made on the course of the cervical branch of the facial nerve in relation to bony and soft tissue landmarks and fascial planes. The course of the nerve and its relation to the platysma muscle and investing fascia dictate the placement and depth of incision used for the submandibular approach.

  16. An imaging study of the facial nerve canal in congenital aural atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shouqin; Han, Demin; Wang, Zhenchang; Li, Jie; Qian, Yanni; Ren, Yuanyuan; Dong, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to investigate the abnormalities of the facial nerve canal in patients with congenital aural atresia by computed tomography (CT). Our study population was made up of 99 patients--68 males and 31 females, aged 6 to 22 years (mean: 13.5)--who had unilateral congenital aural atresia without any inner ear malformations. We compared our findings in these patients with those in 50 controls-33 males and 17 females, aged 5 to 22 years (mean: 15.0)-who had normal ears. We classified the congenital aural atresia patients into three groups (A, B, and C) according to their Jahrsdoerfer grading scale score (≥8; 6 or 7; and ≤5, respectively). The course of the facial nerve canal in both the controls and the study patients was determined by temporal bone CT with multiplanar reconstruction. The distances from different parts of the facial nerve canal to surrounding structures were also measured. The course of the facial nerve canal in the normal ears did not vary much, and there were no statistically significant differences according to head side and sex. In groups B and C, the tympanic segment, mastoid segment, and angle of the second genu of the facial nerve canal were all significantly smaller than those of the controls (p < 0.01 in all cases). Statistically, the tympanic segment of the facial nerve canal in patients with congenital aural atresia was downwardly displaced. The mastoid segment of the facial nerve canal in these patients was more anterior than that of the controls. We conclude that congenital aural atresia is often accompanied by abnormalities of the facial nerve canal, especially in the tympanic segment, the mastoid segment, and the second genu. We found that the lower the Jahrsdoerfer score was, the shorter the tympanic segment was and the more forward the mastoid segment was.

  17. Post-traumatic acute bilateral facial nerve palsy - a management dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute bilateral facial nerve paralysis is a rare clinical entity, and its management remains very controversial (operative or conservative. Here we are presenting a case of acute onset bilateral facial nerve palsy following head injury with bilateral temporal bone fracture with clinico-radiographic contrary. Patient was managed conservatively with complete recovery. By this article, authors want to stress on combining clinical examination and radiological findings for decision making of this rare entity and tried to evaluate the management.

  18. AN INTERESTING CASE OF ANCIENT SCHWANNOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Schwannoma is a common benign tumour of nerve sheath. Degenerating type of schwannoma is called ancient schwannoma. Ancient schwannomas of scalp are rare and are often misdiagnosed as sebaceous cyst or dermoid cyst. CASE REPORT : We present a thirty two year old male presented with scalp swel ling of eight years duration. X - ray showed no intracranial extension. He underwent excision of the tumour and histopathology was reported as ancient schwannoma. DISCUSSION : Histopathologically , ancient schwannomas charecterised by cellular Antoni type A ar eas and less cellular Antoni type - B areas. 9 th , 7 th , 11 th , 5 th and 4 th cranial nerves are often affected and may be associated with multiple neuro fibramatosis (Von - Recklinghausen’s disease. Impact : Case is presented for its rarity and possible pre - operative misdiagnosis

  19. Schwannoma of the tongue in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukšić, Ivica; Müller, Danko; Virag, Mišo; Manojlović, Spomenka; Ostović, Karmen Trutin

    2011-09-01

    A schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a benign, slow growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumour originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Approximately 25-40% of all schwannomas are seen in the soft tissues of the head and neck, often originate from the acoustic nerve. Intraoral schwannomas are rare and account for 1% of schwannomas of the head and neck region. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed with a schwannoma of the tongue. The purpose of this report is to emphasize the possibility of diagnosing schwannoma among all other lingual lesions in children. The disease itself was diagnosed histologically after complete surgical excision. Five years after surgical treatment, the patient is without signs of recurrence. This paper highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of this very rare entity.

  20. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Saluja Paramveer; Manandhar Lochana; Agarwal Rishi; Grandhi Bala

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred...

  1. Facial nerve palsy: Analysis of cases reported in children in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-28

    Feb 28, 2013 ... Methodology: This was a retrospective cohort review of pediatric cases of facial ... Key words: Children, facial nerve, malaria, mumps, Nigeria, palsy ... Lyme disease has surpassed otitis media as a cause of the ..... reactions and unknown infectious agents. .... The associated fever makes this a possibility.

  2. Bilateral facial nerve palsy in a newly diagnosed diabetic patient with associated herpes labialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a very rare condition, usually following neurologic, neoplastic, traumatic, infective or metabolic causes. We present here a case of 29-year-old male, diagnosed on admission as diabetic with herpes labialis and bilateral facial paralysis. As the differentials are extensive, diagnostic workup and subsequent treatment should be done keeping various etiological factors in mind.

  3. Schwannoma of the hard palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isildak, Huseyin; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Ibrahimov, Metin; Aslan, Mehmet; Karaman, Emin; Enver, Ozgun

    2010-01-01

    About half of all neurogenic tumors are seen in the head and neck region. The types of neurogenic tumors must be distinguished. Schwannomas originate from Schwann cells of the neural sheath and are solitary, well-encapsulated, slow-growing adjacent to the parental nerve but extrinsic to the nerve fascicles.Approximately 25% to 45% of all schwannomas are seen in the head and neck region and are found rarely in the oral cavity. Most of the intraoral schwannomas are located in the tongue. Other less common locations are the buccal mucosa, palate, base of the mouth, gingiva, and lips.In this study, we report a rare case of schwannoma of the hard palate, which was excised intraorally.

  4. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles.

  5. Sigmoid schwannoma: A rare case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Constantine I. Fotiadis; Ilias A. Kouerinis; Ioannis Papandreou; George C. Zografos; George Agapitos

    2005-01-01

    Schwannomas are rare tumors derived from the cells of Schwann that form the neural sheath. When located in the gastrointestinal tract, they constitute together with leiomyoma, leiomyoblastoma, and leiomyosarcoma, the gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent 2-6% GIST with most common location, the stomach and the small intestine. Schwannomas of the colon and rectum are extremely rare and radical excision with wide margins is mandatory, due to their tendency to recur locally and become malignant, if left untreated. In the present study, we report a rare case of a sigmoid schwannoma, which was successfully treated in our department and reviewed the literature.

  6. Collagen scaffolds modified with CNTF and bFGF promote facial nerve regeneration in minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Lu, Chao; Meng, Danqing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Hou, Xianglin; Ding, Wenyong; Kou, Depeng; Yao, Yao; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jiayin; Pan, Juli; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-09-01

    Most experiments of peripheral nerve repair after injury have been conducted in the rodent model but the translation of findings from rodent studies to clinical practice is needed partly because the nerve regeneration must occur over much longer distances in humans than in rodents. The reconstruction of long distance nerve injuries still represents a great challenge to surgeons who is engaged in peripheral nerve surgery. Here we used the functional nerve conduit (collagen scaffolds incorporated with neurocytokines CNTF and bFGF) to bridge a 35 mm long facial nerve gap in minipig models. At 6 months after surgery, electrophysiology assessment and histological examination were conducted to evaluate the regeneration of peripheral facial nerves. Based on functional and histological observations, the results indicated that the functional collagen scaffolds promoted nerve reconstruction. The number and arrangement of regenerated nerve fibers, myelination, and nerve function reconstruction was better in the CNTF + bFGF conduit group than the single factor CNTF or bFGF conduit group. The functional composite conduit, which exhibited favorable mechanical properties, may promote facial nerve regeneration in minipigs effectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation

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    Volkan İnce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannoma is a benign neoplasm that originates from sheet of nerve cell in stomach. Differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, (GISTs which have malign potential, than these tumors, which definite diagnosis is determined by histopathological and immunohistochemical methods have clinical significance due to gastric schwannomas have excellent progress after surgical resection. We presented a case of gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation with guide of literature in this study.

  8. Schwannomas of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign encapsulated nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells. Malignant change in head and neck schwannomas is rare, with the incidence varying between 8 and 13.9%. In this review, we discuss the presentation and the management of head and neck schwannomas. The issues and difficulties based on our own experience as well as the experience of published reports from the literature are presented.

  9. Giant Plexiform Schwannoma of the Tongue

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and ...

  10. Glossopharyngeal schwannoma : a case report and review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of glossopharyngeal schwannoma whose clinical presentation and the radiological work up suggested an acoustic schwannoma. The diagnosis was made at surgery, once attachment to ninth cranial nerve was seen. The clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical findings of the glossopharyngeal schwannoma are presented along with the review of literature.

  11. SCHWANNOMA PRESENTING AS PAPILLOMA – A DIAGNOSTIC DILEMMA

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    Sourabh Mandwariya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are slow growing benign nerve sheath tumors. They are notcommonly seen in the oral cavity and the tongue is the most common site of schwannomas found there. Here, we report a case of a tongue swelling presenting asa Papilloma clinically, which was histopathologically diagnosed as Schwannoma(Neurilemmoma and discuss its clinical presentation, histological features andmanagement.

  12. Iatrogenic cushing syndrome to facial nerve palsy: via intracranial tuberculoma-an interesting journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    Isolated Facial nerve palsy is a less common neurological manifestation of intracranial tuberculoma. Again, tuberculoma can arise following development of Cushing syndrome after prolonged intake of steroids due to origin of immunosuppressed state. Thus exogenous steroid administration leading to iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome which again causing tuberculoma, with facial nerve palsy developing as a manifestation of tuberculoma is not unnatural but definitely a unique scenario. The author reports an interesting case where a patient developed left sided facial palsy following development of intracranial tuberculoma from iatrogenic Cushing syndrome after longterm intake of Dexamethasone as a treatment for low back pain. This situation is rarely reported before.

  13. [Anterior skull-base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Miranda, Miguel; De la O Ríos, Elier; Vargas-Valenciano, Emmanuelle; Moreno-Medina, Eva

    2017-06-24

    Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours that originate in Schwann cells. They are usually solitary and sporadic and manifest on peripheral, spinal or cranial nerves. Intracranial schwannomas tend to manifest on the eighth cranial nerve, particularly in patients with neurofibromatosis type2. Anterior skull-base schwannomas represent less than 1% of all intracranial schwannomas. They are more frequent in young people and are typically benign. These tumours represent a diagnostic challenge due to their rarity and difficult differential diagnosis, and numerous theories have been postulated concerning their origin and development. In this article, we present the case of a 13-year-old male with a single anterior cranial-base tumour not associated with neurofibromatosis who presented with headache, papilloedema, eye pain and loss of visual acuity. Complete resection of the tumour was performed, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. The patient made a complete clinical recovery with abatement of all symptoms. We conducted a review of the literature and found 66 cases worldwide with this diagnosis. We describe the most relevant epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this kind of tumour and its relation with the recently discovered and similar olfactory schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Agmatine promotes expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in brainstem facial nucleus in the rat facial nerve injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Wenlong Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that agmatine can reduce inhibition of neuronal regeneration by increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of morphine-dependent rats. The hypothesis that agmatine exerts similar effects on facial nerve injury deserves further analysis.OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of peritoneal agmatine injection on BDNF levels in the rat brainstem after facial nerve injury.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A controlled animal experiment was performed at the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing University of Medical Sciences (Chongqing, China), between October and December in 2007.MATERIALS: Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control, a lesion, and an agmatine treatment group, with eight rats in each group. Bilateral facial nerve anastomosis was induced in the lesion and agmatine treatment groups, while the control group remained untreated. A rat BDNF Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit was used to measure BDNF levels in the brainstem facial nucleus.METHODS: Starting on the day of lesion, the agmatine group received a peritoneal injection of 100 mg/kg agmatine, once per day, for a week, whereas rats in the lesion group received saline injections.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: BDNF levels in the brainstem containing facial nucleus were measured by ELISA.RESULTS: Twenty-four rats were included in the final analysis without any loss. Two weeks after lesion, BDNF levels were significantly higher in the lesion group than in the control group (P<0.01). A significant increase was noted in the agmatine group compared to the lesion group (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Agmatine can substantially increase BDNF levels in the rat brainstem after facial nerve injury.

  15. Vitamin D3 potentiates myelination and recovery after facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montava, Marion; Garcia, Stéphane; Mancini, Julien; Jammes, Yves; Courageot, Joël; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Feron, François

    2015-10-01

    Roles of vitamin D on the immune and nervous systems are increasingly recognized. Two previous studies demonstrated that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) or cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) induced functional recovery and increased myelination in a rat model of peroneal nerve transection. The current report assessed whether cholecalciferol was efficient in repairing transected rabbit facial nerves. Animals were randomized into two groups of rabbits with an unilateral facial nerve surgery: the vitamin D group included animals receiving a weekly oral bolus of vitamin D3 (200 IU/kg/day), from day 1 post-surgery; the control group included animals receiving a weekly oral bolus of vehicle (triglycerides). Contralateral unsectioned facial nerves from all experimental animals were used as controls for the histological study. The facial functional index was measured every week while the inner diameter of myelin sheath and the G ratio were quantified at the end of the 3 month experiment. The current report indicates that cholecalciferol significantly increases functional recovery and myelination, after 12 weeks of treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the therapeutic benefit of vitamin D supplementation in an animal model of facial paralysis. It paves further the way for clinical trials based on the administration of this steroid in individuals with injured facial nerves.

  16. [Neuroanatomy of the optic, trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The intracranial and intraorbital course of the optic nerve is described concisely, the intracanicular one in full details. Apart from the wide and small sections of the optic canal, its axis opposite to the cranial planes, the coating of the canal and the adjacency to the paranasal sinuses and arteries are exactly described. 2. At the trigeminal nerve the trigeminal ganglion, its roots and also the mandibular nerve have great importance in the practical medicine considering thermo-coagulation or surgery of the trigeminal nerve. This segments and also the adjacency of the fifth nerve to the internal carotid artery and subarachinoid brain vessels are exactly, the nuclei areas and central tracts are briefly explained. 3. The nuclei of the facial nerve the intracerebral and intracisternal course and its development, the facial canal and its narrow passes are described. Also the position of the internal acoustic pore in the skull, the dimensions of the internal acoustic meatus and the relations between nerves and vessels are explained. In addition to the geniculate ganglion and the chorda tympani the communications of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone, the tympanic intumescentia (ganglion) and the nervus intermedius, also the petrosal nerves are included in the description. The sheaths of the segments of the seventh cranial nerve and also the fasciculation are exactly, the somatotopic organization is briefly described. 4. The extracranial course of the glossopharyngeal nerve is briefly, its intracranial sections are included exactly in the investigation. 5. The nuclei of the vagus nerve and the intra- und extracranial course are described. 6. The accessory nerve, its nucleus and the intra- and extracranial course are concisely explained. 7. The hypoglossal nerve, its nucleus, the emergence of the fibres and also the relations of nerves and vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are described. The hypoglossal canal and also the extracranial course are

  17. Concomitant abducens and facial nerve palsies following blunt head trauma associated with bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Jeong; Han, Sang-Beom; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-07-15

    A 22-year-old man was referred for horizontal diplopia that worsened on left gaze. He had been admitted for a head trauma caused by a traffic accident. Brain CT scan showed a longitudinal fracture of the left temporal bone with extension to the left carotid canal and central skull base, including sphenoid lateral wall and roof, and left orbit medial wall non-displaced fracture. Prism cover test revealed 20 prism diopters of esotropia and abduction limitation in the left eye. Hess screening test results were compatible with left abducens nerve paralysis. Symptoms suggesting complete lower motor neuron palsy of the left facial nerve, such as unilateral facial drooping, inability to raise the eyebrow and difficulty closing the eye, were present. As there was no improvement in facial paralysis, the patient received surgical intervention using a transmastoidal approach. Three months postoperatively, prism cover test showed orthotropia, however, the facial nerve palsy persisted.

  18. Palpebral spring in the management of lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Frueh, Bartley R

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a palpebral spring, a dynamic facial reanimation technique, in the management of lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy. A palpebral spring was placed in 29 eyelids of 28 patients with symptomatic facial nerve palsy. Preoperative and postoperative symptoms, upper eyelid margin to midpupil distance, lagophthalmos, and exposure keratopathy were evaluated. At an average of 83 months follow-up, preoperative symptoms improved or resolved in 26 (90%) eyes. The upper eyelid margin to midpupil distance decreased and lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy significantly improved after palpebral spring placement (p lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy in patients with facial nerve palsy who do not receive adequate relief from the static procedures of lower eyelid tightening and upper eyelid lowering. This technique significantly improved symptoms and signs in these patients while allowing some of the blink reflex.

  19. Branch facial nerve trauma after superficial temporal artery biopsy: a case report

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    Rison Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant cell arteritis is an emergency requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Superficial temporal artery biopsy is the gold diagnostic standard. Complications are few and infrequent; however, facial nerve injury has been reported, leaving an untoward cosmetic outcome. This case report is to the best of our knowledge only the fourth one presented in the available literature so far regarding facial nerve injury from superficial temporal artery biopsy. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian woman presented for neurological evaluation regarding eyebrow and facial asymmetry after a superficial temporal artery biopsy for presumptive giant cell arteritis-induced cephalalgia. Conclusion Damage to branches of the facial nerve may occur after superficial temporal artery biopsy, resulting in eyebrow droop. Although an uncommon and sparsely reported complication, all clinicians of various specialties involved in the care of these patients should be aware of this given the gravity of giant cell arteritis and the widespread use of temporal artery biopsy.

  20. Intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation for preservation of facial nerve function in patients with large acoustic neuroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bai-yun; TIAN Yong-ji; LIU Wen; LIU Shu-ling; QIAO Hui; ZHANG Jun-ting; JIA Gui-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various monitoring techniques have been used routinely in the treatment of the lesions in the skull base, iatrogenic facial paresis or paralysis remains a significant clinical problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation on preservation of facial nerve function.Method From January to November 2005, 19 patients with large acoustic neuroma were treated using intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation (TCEMEP) for preservation of facial nerve function. The relationship between the decrease of MEP amplitude after tumor removal and the postoperative function of the facial nerve was analyzed.Results MEP amplitude decreased more than 75% in 11 patients, of which 6 presented significant facial paralysis (H-B grade 3), and 5 had mild facial paralysis (H-B grade 2). In the other 8 patients, whose MEP amplitude decreased less than 75%, 1 experienced significant facial paralysis, 5 had mild facial paralysis, and 2 were normal.Conclusions Intraoperative TCEMEP can be used to predict postoperative function of the facial nerve. The decreased MEP amplitude above 75 % is an alarm point for possible severe facial paralysis.

  1. A successful double-layer facial nerve repair: A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Dadaci

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The best method to repair the facial nerve is to perform the primary repair soon after the injury, without any tension in the nerve ends. We present a case of patient who had a full-thickness facial nerve cut at two different levels. The patient underwent primary repair, recovered almost completely in the fourth postoperative month, and had full movement in mimic muscles. Despite lower success rates in double-level cuts, performing appropriate primary repair at an appropriate time can reverse functional losses at early stages, and lead to recovery without any complications. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 24-27

  2. Autogenous standard versus inside-out vein graft to repair facial nerve in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jie; WANG Xue-mei; HU Jing; LUO En; QI Meng-chun

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate autogenous vein grafts and inside-out vein grafts as conduits for the defects repair in the rabbit facial nerves.Methods:The 10 mm segments of buccal division of facial nerve were transected for 48 rabbits in this study.Then the gaps were immediately repaired by autogenous vein grafts or inside-out vein grafts in different groups. All the animals underwent the whisker movement test and electrophysiologic test during the following 16 weeks at different time points postoperatively. Subsequently,the histological examination was performed to observe the facial nerve regeneration morphologically.Results:At 8 weeks after operation,the facial nerve regeneration has significant difference between the experimental group and the control group in electrophysiologic test and histological observation. However,at the end of this study,16 weeks after operation,there was no significant difference between inside-out vein grafts and standard vein grafts in enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration.Conclusion:This study suggest that both kinds of vein grafts play positive roles in facial nerve regeneration after being repaired immediately,but the autogenous inside-out vein grafts might accelerate and facilitate axonal regeneration as compared with control.

  3. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2011-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  4. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2012-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  5. Stem cells and related factors involved in facial nerve function regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The facial nerve (VII is one of the most important cranial nerves for head and neck surgeons. Its function is closely related to facial expressions that are individual for every person. After its injury or palsy, its functions can be either impaired or absent. Because of the presence of motor, sensory and parasympathetic fibers, the biology of its repair and function restoration depends on many factors. In order to achieve good outcome, many different therapies can be performed in order to restore as much of the nerve function as possible. When rehabilitation and physiotherapy are not sufficient, additional surgical procedures and therapies are taken into serious consideration. The final outcome of many of them is discussable, depending on nerve damage etiology. Stem cells in facial nerve repair are used, but long-term outcomes and results are still not fully known. In order to understand this therapeutic approach, clinicians and surgeons should understand the immunobiology of nerve repair and regeneration. In this review, potential stem cell usage in facial nerve regeneration procedures is discussed.

  6. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  7. Congenital plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegane, Rooh A; Alaee, Mohammadreza S; Khanicheh, Elham

    2008-04-01

    Schwannomas are slow-growing nerve sheet neoplasms which are rarely found in the female genital system. In this article, we present a patient with Antony A congenital plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris. A 6-year-old girl was brought to our hospital with the history of a firm non-cystic clitoral mass from birth, which had been growing more rapidly during the previous year. The patient was scheduled for surgery. Histological studies revealed plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris post-operatively. Therefore, schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of clitoral masses.

  8. Orthodromic Transfer of the Temporalis Muscle in Incomplete Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Ho Aum

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Temporalis muscle transfer produces prompt surgical results with a one-stage operation in facial palsy patients. The orthodromic method is surgically simple, and the vector of muscle action is similar to the temporalis muscle action direction. This article describes transferring temporalis muscle insertion to reconstruct incomplete facial nerve palsy patients.Methods Between August 2009 and November 2011, 6 unilateral incomplete facial nerve palsy patients underwent surgery for orthodromic temporalis muscle transfer. A preauricular incision was performed to expose the mandibular coronoid process. Using a saw, the coronoid process was transected. Three strips of the fascia lata were anchored to the muscle of the nasolabial fold through subcutaneous tunneling. The tension of the strips was adjusted by observing the shape of the nasolabial fold. When optimal tension was achieved, the temporalis muscle was sutured to the strips. The surgical results were assessed by comparing pre- and postoperative photographs. Three independent observers evaluated the photographs.Results The symmetry of the mouth corner was improved in the resting state, and movement of the oral commissure was enhanced in facial animation after surgery.Conclusions The orthodromic transfer of temporalis muscle technique can produce prompt results by applying the natural temporalis muscle vector. This technique preserves residual facial nerve function in incomplete facial nerve palsy patients and produces satisfying cosmetic outcomes without malar muscle bulging, which often occurs in the turn-over technique.

  9. Different sensitivities to rocuronium of the neuromuscular junctions innervated by normal/damaged facial nerves and somatic nerve in rats: the role of the presynaptic acetylcholine quantal release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun-liang; LI Shao-qin; CHI Fang-lu; CHEN Lian-hua; LI Shi-tong

    2012-01-01

    Background Muscles present different responses to muscle relaxants,a mechanism of importance in surgeries requiring facial nerve evoked electromyography under general anaesthesia.The non-depolarizing muscle relaxants have multiple reaction formats in the neuromuscular junction,in which pre-synaptic quantal release of acetylcholine was one of the important mechanisms.This study was to compare the pre-synaptic quantal release of acetylcholine from the neuromuscular junctions innervated by normal/damaged facial nerves and somatic nerve under the effect of rocuronium in rats in vitro.Methods Acute right-sided facial nerve injury was induced by nerve crush axotomies.Both sided facial nerve connected orbicularis oris strips and tibial nerve connected gastrocnemius strips were isolated to measure endplate potentials (EPP) and miniature endplate potentials (MEPP) using an intracellular microelectrode gauge under different rocuronium concentrations.Then,the pre-synaptic quantal releases of acetylcholine were calculated by the ratios of the EPPs and the MEPPs,and compared among the damaged or normal facial nerve innervated orbicularis oris and tibial nerve innervated gastrocnemius.Results The EPP/MEPP ratios of the three neuromuscular junctions decreased in a dose dependent manner with the increase of the rocuronium concentration.With the concentrations of rocuronium being 5 μg/ml,7.5 μg/ml and 10 μg/ml,the decrease of the EPP/MEPP ratio in the damaged facial nerve group was greater than that in the normal facial nerve group.The decrease in the somatic nerve group was the biggest,with significant differences.Conclusions Rocuronium presented different levels of inhibition on the pre-synaptic quantal release of acetylcholine in the three groups of neuromuscular junctions.The levels of the inhibition showed the following sequence:somatic nerve >damaged facial nerve > normal facial nerve.The difference may be one of the reasons causing the different sensitivities to

  10. The Relationship of the Facial Nerve to the Condylar Process: A Cadaveric Study with Implications for Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, H P; Collister, P; Eusterman, V D; Terella, A M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The mandibular condyle is the most common site of mandibular fracture. Surgical treatment of condylar fractures by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) demands direct visualization of the fracture. This project aimed to investigate the anatomic relationship of the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Materials and Methods. Twelve fresh hemicadavers heads were used. An extended retromandibular/preauricular approach was utilized, with the incision being based parallel to the posterior edge of the ramus. Measurements were obtained from the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Results. The temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve was encountered during each approach, crossing the mandible at the condylar neck. The mean tissue depth separating the facial nerve from the condylar neck was 5.5 mm (range: 3.5 mm-7 mm, SD 1.2 mm). The upper division of the facial nerve crossed the posterior border of the condylar process on average 2.31 cm (SD 0.10 cm) anterior to the tragus. Conclusions. This study suggests that the temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve will be encountered in most approaches to the condylar process. As visualization of the relationship of the facial nerve to condyle is often limited, recognition that, on average, 5.5 mm of tissue separates condylar process from nerve should help reduce the incidence of facial nerve injury during this procedure.

  11. The Relationship of the Facial Nerve to the Condylar Process: A Cadaveric Study with Implications for Open Reduction Internal Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Barham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mandibular condyle is the most common site of mandibular fracture. Surgical treatment of condylar fractures by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF demands direct visualization of the fracture. This project aimed to investigate the anatomic relationship of the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Materials and Methods. Twelve fresh hemicadavers heads were used. An extended retromandibular/preauricular approach was utilized, with the incision being based parallel to the posterior edge of the ramus. Measurements were obtained from the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Results. The temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve was encountered during each approach, crossing the mandible at the condylar neck. The mean tissue depth separating the facial nerve from the condylar neck was 5.5 mm (range: 3.5 mm–7 mm, SD 1.2 mm. The upper division of the facial nerve crossed the posterior border of the condylar process on average 2.31 cm (SD 0.10 cm anterior to the tragus. Conclusions. This study suggests that the temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve will be encountered in most approaches to the condylar process. As visualization of the relationship of the facial nerve to condyle is often limited, recognition that, on average, 5.5 mm of tissue separates condylar process from nerve should help reduce the incidence of facial nerve injury during this procedure.

  12. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 2; Investigation of enhanced nerve portions in patients with facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    We performed enhanced MRI using Gd-DTPA in 84 patients with facial palsy. After assessing enhancement of the normal facial nerve, we examined enhancement in patients with Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. In 95% of patients with Bell's palsy, enhancement was obtained in the distal IAC and labyrinthine portions. In 72%, enhancement was significant from the distal IAC portion through the vertical portion. In some of the patients who underwent enhanced MRI twice, increased signal intensity was observed in distal portions such as the vertical portion. In many cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, enhancement was seen extensively in the IAC portion through the vertical portion. In the subjects with internal auditory symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, enhancement of the IAC portion was seen not only in the facial nerve but also in the vestibular and the cochlear nerves. These results suggest that the vascular permeability of lesions in Bell's palsy may be increased from the distal IAC portion to the vertical portion. Judging from the present findings with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, symptoms related to the enhanced portions suggest that accompanying internal auditory symptoms occur due to inflammation of the IAC portions of cochlear and vestibular nerves. (author).

  13. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  14. Occipital nerve block is effective in craniofacial neuralgias but not in idiopathic persistent facial pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgens, T. P.; Müller, P.; Seedorf, H; Regelsberger, J; May, A

    2012-01-01

    Occipital nerve block (ONB) has been used in several primary headache syndromes with good results. Information on its effects in facial pain is sparse. In this chart review, the efficacy of ONB using lidocaine and dexamethasone was evaluated in 20 patients with craniofacial pain syndromes comprising 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 6 with trigeminal neuropathic pain, 5 with persistent idiopathic facial pain and 1 with occipital neuralgia. Response was defined as an at least 50% reduction...

  15. Gd-DTPA enhancement of the facial nerve in Ramsay Hunt's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Tsutomu; Yanagida, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Yasuo (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)) (and others)

    1992-10-01

    A total of 21 MR images in 16 Ramsay Hunt's syndrome were evaluated. In all images, the involved side of peripheral facial nerve were enhanced in intensity after Gd-DTPA. However, 2 cases had recovered facial palsy when MR images were taken. Nine of 19 cases with the enhancement of internal auditory canal portion had vertigo or tinnitus. Thus, it was suggested that the enhancement of internal auditory canal portion and clinical feature are closely related. (author).

  16. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  17. Evaluation of facial nerve and its landmarks in adult temporal bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Soheilipour

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to identify variations of different segments of facial nerve in temporal bone. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study that conducted on drilled bones in the temporal bone center of the Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, the landmarks of facial nerve in temporal bone were identified as separate variables and their distances from outer cortex of temporal bone and Henles spine and distances between different segments of nerve were recorded. Results: In the 50 temporal bones dissected, the distance between the tip of incus short process to the cortex was 14.2±1.96 mm, the distance between the facial recess from the facial nerve to the cortex was 14.5±2.58 mm, the distance between the stylomastoid foramen to the cortex was 20.6±2.49 mm, the distance between the lateral semicircular canal to the cortex was 15.9±2.31 mm and the distance between the sigmoid sinus dome to the cortex was 14.08±2.83 mm. The mean length of tympanic and mastoid segments (2nd and 3rd segments of facial nerve were 11.35±0.68 mm and 13.28±1.11mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean lengths of segment of facial nerve and distant of landmarks from outer cortex of temporal bone are partially similar compared to those described in the western literature and text books, but different compared to eastern researches.

  18. Facial Nerve Neuroma in the Mastoid Segment of the Temporal Bone: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishehgar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Facial nerve neuroma is a rare disease that comprises less than 1% of all intrapetrous mass lesions. Diagnosis of the lesions of the tumor is difficult, as these tumors have relationships with other structures of the lateral skull base, such as nerves. In addition, surgical treatment is difficult because the risk of injury after the intervention is high. In this case report, we describe the clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of a 55-year-old man with facial nerve neuroma in the mastoid portion, a rare type of neuroma who underwent surgical operation at Khalili Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. Case Presentation In this report, we describe a rare facial nerve neuroma in the mastoid portion in a 55-year-old man with a history of hypertension (HTN and diabetes mellitus (DM. The patient also had otalgia related to the periauricular area, otorrhea, and tympanic membrane retraction on the left side. In addition, the patient had facial palsy (Brackmann grade V and often suffered from headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with contrast, biopsy from the external ear canal region, and tympanometry were carried out. Then, the patient underwent surgical treatment, and the mass was successfully totally removed. The result of the patient’s pathology test was margin free. At a recent follow-up, the patient was still symptom-free (otalgia and headache. Conclusions In surgery for facial nerve neuroma in the mastoid segment, it is better not to rely on imaging alone; all facial nerves from the geniculate ganglion to the styloid foramen become exposed for tumor removal.

  19. Efficacy of glial growth factor and nerve growth factor on the recovery of traumatic facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mucahit; Karlidag, Turgut; Yalcin, Sinasi; Ozogul, Candan; Keles, Erol; Alpay, Hayrettin Cengiz; Yanilmaz, Muhammed

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Glial growth factor (GGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on nerve regeneration in facial nerve anastomosis. In this study, approximately a 1-mm segment was resected from the facial nerve and the free ends were anastomosed. All animals underwent the same surgical procedure and 30 rabbits were grouped randomly in three groups. Control group, the group without any medications; NGF group, the group receiving 250 ng/0.1 ml NGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis; GBF group, the group receiving 500 ng/0.1 ml GGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis. Medications were given at the time of surgery, and at 24 and 48 h postoperatively. After 2 months, the sites of anastomosis were excised and examined using the electron microscope. It was found that the best regeneration was in the group receiving GGF as compared to the control group in terms of nerve regeneration. Schwann cell and glial cell proliferation were found to be significantly higher in the group receiving GGF as compared to the group receiving NGF. Besides, the number of myelin debris, an indicator of degeneration, was significantly lower in the group with GGF as compared to NGF and control groups (p NGF in order to increase regeneration after nerve anastomosis in experimental traumatic facial nerve paralysis may be a hopeful alternative treatment option in the future. However, further studies on human studies are required to support these results.

  20. Sir Charles Alfred Ballance (1856-1936) and the introduction of facial nerve crossover anastomosis in 1895

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Graaf, Robert C.; Ijpma, Frank F. A.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.

    2009-01-01

    Sir Charles Ballance (1856-1936) was the first surgeon in history to perform a facial nerve crossover anastomosis in 1895. Although, recently, several papers on the history of facial nerve surgery have been published, little is known about this historically important operation, the theoretical reaso

  1. Unusual Clinical Presentation of Ethylene Glycol Poisoning: Unilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eray Eroglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene glycol (EG may be consumed accidentally or intentionally, usually in the form of antifreeze products or as an ethanol substitute. EG is metabolized to toxic metabolites. These metabolites cause metabolic acidosis with increased anion gap, renal failure, oxaluria, damage to the central nervous system and cranial nerves, and cardiovascular instability. Early initiation of treatment can reduce the mortality and morbidity but different clinical presentations can cause delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Herein, we report a case with the atypical presentation of facial paralysis, hematuria, and kidney failure due to EG poisoning which progressed to end stage renal failure and permanent right peripheral facial nerve palsy.

  2. Unusual clinical presentation of ethylene glycol poisoning: unilateral facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Eray; Kocyigit, Ismail; Bahcebasi, Sami; Unal, Aydin; Sipahioglu, Murat Hayri; Kocyigit, Merva; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) may be consumed accidentally or intentionally, usually in the form of antifreeze products or as an ethanol substitute. EG is metabolized to toxic metabolites. These metabolites cause metabolic acidosis with increased anion gap, renal failure, oxaluria, damage to the central nervous system and cranial nerves, and cardiovascular instability. Early initiation of treatment can reduce the mortality and morbidity but different clinical presentations can cause delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Herein, we report a case with the atypical presentation of facial paralysis, hematuria, and kidney failure due to EG poisoning which progressed to end stage renal failure and permanent right peripheral facial nerve palsy.

  3. Schwannoma (Neurilemmoma) on the Base of the Tongue: A Rare Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 20 Final Diagnosis: Schwannoma of the tongue Symptoms: Dysarthria • dysphagia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Excision of the mass via trans-oral approach Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Schwannomas are slow-growing benign tumors. They can arise from any peripheral nerve, including the cranial nerves (except the olfactory and optic nerves), spinal nerves, and autonomic nerves. Schwannomas of the head and neck account for 25–40% of all cases. However, ...

  4. Post Traumatic Delayed Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy (FNP): Diagnostic Dilemma of Expressionless Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy [FNP] is a rare condition. Mostly it is idiopathic. Post traumatic bilateral FNP is even more rare and having unique neurosurgical considerations. Post traumatic delayed presentation of bilateral FNP is socially debilitating and also having diagnostic challenge. Due to lack of facial asymmetry as present in unilateral facial paralysis, it is difficult to recognize. We are presenting a case of delayed onset bilateral FNP who developed FNP after 12 days of head injury with a brief discussion of its diagnostic dilemma and management along with literature review.

  5. Laryngeal schwannoma: a case report with emphasis on sonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira de, E-mail: luisronan@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFTM), Uberaba, MG (Brazil); De Nicola, Harley; Yamasaki, Rosiane; Pedroso, Jose Eduardo; Brasil, Osiris de Oliveira Campones do; Yamashita, Helio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-05-15

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells, which normally produce the insulating myelin sheath covering peripheral, cranial and autonomic nerves. Twenty-five to forty-five percent of all schwannomas occur in the head and neck region, but location of such tumors in the larynx is rarely observed. The present report is aimed at describing a clinical case of laryngeal schwannoma, with emphasis on sonographic findings. (author)

  6. [A rare case of schwannoma of the tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Author described a rare case of lingual Schwannoma in 20 years old female. After complete surgical excision she has not shown recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. Schwannomas are peripheral nerve tumors of nerve sheath origin. Extracranial schwannoma in the head and neck region comprise 25-45% of all shwannomas, but only 1% are located intraoral and usually present as slow growing mass of long duration, producing few symptoms. The treatment is surgical excision.

  7. Constriction of the buccal branch of the facial nerve produces unilateral craniofacial allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Susannah S; Grace, Peter M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-12-18

    Despite pain being a sensory experience, studies of spinal cord ventral root damage have demonstrated that motor neuron injury can induce neuropathic pain. Whether injury of cranial motor nerves can also produce nociceptive hypersensitivity has not been addressed. Herein, we demonstrate that chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the buccal branch of the facial nerve results in long-lasting, unilateral allodynia in the rat. An anterograde and retrograde tracer (3000MW tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated dextran) was not transported to the trigeminal ganglion when applied to the injury site, but was transported to the facial nucleus, indicating that this nerve branch is not composed of trigeminal sensory neurons. Finally, intracisterna magna injection of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist reversed allodynia, implicating the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by facial nerve CCI. These data extend the prior evidence that selective injury to motor axons can enhance pain to supraspinal circuits by demonstrating that injury of a facial nerve with predominantly motor axons is sufficient for neuropathic pain, and that the resultant pain has a neuroimmune component.

  8. Fluorescently labeled peptide increases identification of degenerated facial nerve branches during surgery and improves functional outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Hussain

    Full Text Available Nerve degeneration after transection injury decreases intraoperative visibility under white light (WL, complicating surgical repair. We show here that the use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding probe (F-NP41 can improve intraoperative visualization of chronically (up to 9 months denervated nerves. In a mouse model for the repair of chronically denervated facial nerves, the intraoperative use of fluorescent labeling decreased time to nerve identification by 40% compared to surgeries performed under WL alone. Cumulative functional post-operative recovery was also significantly improved in the fluorescence guided group as determined by quantitatively tracking of the recovery of whisker movement at time intervals for 6 weeks post-repair. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an injectable probe that increases visibility of chronically denervated nerves during surgical repair in live animals. Future translation of this probe may improve functional outcome for patients with chronic denervation undergoing surgical repair.

  9. 带蒂筋膜管的耳大神经移植治疗面神经缺失性损伤%Treating defective damage of facial nerve with great auricular nerve grafting covered by pediculated fascial tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋立新

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the curative effect of grafting great auricular nerve with pediculated fascial tube in defective damage of facial nerve.Method All the patients in the study were treated by grafting great auricular nerve which was covered by pediculated fascial tube near facial nerve trunk.Result The 3 otogenic fascial paralysis patients had grade III recovery of facial nerve function(30% ~ 38% ) 2.0 to 2.5 years after the nerve grafting operation; 2 post- traumatic facial paralysis patients had grade II recovery of facial nerve function (69% ~ 71% ) 2.5 to 3.5 years after the nerve grafting operation.Conclusion The grafting of pediculated fascial tube surrounded great auricular nerve can provide a biological environment with excellent blood supply for the plerosis and regeneration of nerves and can accelerate the functional recovery of nerves after the nerve grafting.

  10. A Case Report of Schwannoma Presenting as Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Afshar Fard

    2012-08-01

    The patient underwent operation and sciatic nerve explored via posterior tight and unique neural branch of mass dissociated of sciatic and mass resected. Pathology report confirmed Schwannoma in the patient. Conclusion: In patients with sciatic pain, schwannoma nerve is one of the differential diagnosis and it needs to be considered in assessing of patients.

  11. Functional recovery after facial nerve cable grafting in a rodent model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohman, M.H.; Kleiss, I.J.; Knox, C.J.; Weinberg, J.S.; Heaton, J.T.; Hadlock, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Cable grafting is widely considered to be the preferred alternative to primary repair of the injured facial nerve; however, quantitative comparison of the 2 techniques has not been previously undertaken in a rodent model. OBJECTIVE: To establish functional recovery parameters after inter

  12. Müllerectomy for upper eyelid retraction and lagophthalmos due to facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Adam S; Frueh, Bartley R; Elner, Victor M

    2005-09-01

    Facial nerve palsy often results in symptoms of ocular irritation due to inadequate eyelid closure. Weakened protractor function results in relative upper eyelid retraction and contributes to lagophthalmos. To evaluate the role of müllerectomy in the comprehensive surgical treatment of ocular exposure due to facial nerve palsy. Thirty-four patients with chronic facial nerve palsy underwent unilateral transconjunctival removal of Müller muscle and were followed up for an average of 20 months postoperatively. Other procedures were performed to treat lower eyelid retraction, as required. Preoperative and postoperative ocular exposure symptoms, upper eyelid position, lagophthalmos, and keratopathy were compared. Of the 59 preoperative symptoms, 15 (25%) resolved and 39 (66%) improved. Upper eyelid position was lowered by an average of 1.35 mm (PLagophthalmos (P = .002) and corneal exposure (P<.001) were significantly improved. Three patients required levator aponeurosis repair, 2 for preexisting dehiscence and 1 for inadvertent aponeurosis transection. Müllerectomy is a rapid, safe, and reproducible surgical method for lowering the upper eyelid and reducing ocular exposure symptoms and signs due to chronic facial nerve palsy.

  13. Experimental considerations concerning the use of stem cells and tissue engineering for facial nerve regeneration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler de Souza Lucena, Eudes; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Lopes de Paiva Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo; Galvão Barboza, Carlos Augusto; Silva do Nascimento Júnior, Expedito; Cavalcante, Jeferson de Sousa

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for repair in experimental models. The authors investigated the source and delivery method of stem cells in experimental outcomes, seeking to clarify whether stem cells must be differentiated in the injured facial nerve and improve the regenerative process. The following key terms were used: nervous regeneration, nerve regeneration, facial nerve regeneration, stem cells, embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells, facial nerve, facial nerve trauma, and facial nerve traumatism. The search was restricted to experimental studies that applied stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for nerve repair. Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Different sources of stem and precursor cells were explored (bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, dental pulp cells, and neural stem cells) for their potential application in the scenario of facial nerve injuries. Different material conduits (vases, collagen, and polyglycolic acid) were used as bridges. Immunochemistry and electrophysiology are the principal methods for analyzing regenerative effects. Although recent studies have shown that stem cells can act as a promising bridge for nerve repair, considerable optimization of these therapies will be required for their potential to be realized in a clinical setting. Based on these studies, the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results related to facial nerve regeneration and produces effective functional results. The use of tubes also optimizes nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intraosseous Schwannoma of the Petrous Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kohno, Maya; Kameyama, Kaori; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2015-07-01

    Background and Importance Intraosseous schwannoma is a relatively rare clinical entity that typically arises in vertebral and mandibular bone. Intraosseous schwannoma located entirely within the petrous bone is exceedingly rare, and only two cases have been reported to date. Clinical Presentation A 47-year-old Asian man was referred to our hospital with a chief complaint of double vision. Neurologic examination revealed left abducens nerve palsy. Radiologic imaging showed a 35-mm osteolytic expansive lesion located in the left petrous apex. We made a preoperative diagnosis of chondrosarcoma and performed surgical resection. Surgery was performed via a left subtemporal epidural approach with anterior petrosectomy. The histopathologic diagnosis of the tumor was schwannoma. Schwannoma arising from cranial nerves was excluded from intraoperative findings in conjunction with the results for cranial nerves, and intraosseous schwannoma was diagnosed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and abducens nerve palsy resolved immediately after surgery. Conclusion The differential diagnosis of intraosseous schwannoma should be considered for an osteolytic mass lesion within the petrous apex. Subcapsular tumor removal was considered ideal in terms of preservation of the cranial nerves and vessels around the tumor.

  15. Lyme disease presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, G D

    1990-09-01

    Facial palsy bilateral, or recurrent, suggests a myriad of diagnostic possibilities. An 11-year-old boy is described whose diagnosis remained elusive for several months. Clinical evolution and subsequent laboratory studies confirmed that he had Lyme disease. Literature review suggests that this disorder is ubiquitous in its manifestations. The diagnosis should be remembered in unexplained neurologic disorders, particularly in cranial and peripheral neuropathies.

  16. Supramaximal stimulation during intraoperative facial nerve monitoring as a simple parameter to predict early functional outcome after parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamelle, Elisabeth; Bernat, Isabelle; Pichon, Soizic; Granger, Benjamin; Sain-Oulhen, Charlotte; Lamas, Georges; Tankéré, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    A supramaximal stimulation at 2 mA during intraoperative electromyographic (EMG) facial nerve monitoring appears to be a simple and effective parameter to predict immediate postoperative injury. To assess the role of systematic intraoperative facial nerve monitoring in predicting the early functional outcomes obtained after parotidectomy. Data were collected from patients who underwent parotidectomy. Intraoperative EMG monitoring of the facial nerve was performed by registering two parameters, event intensity (>100 μV) and amplitude of response after a supramaximal stimulation at 2 mA, at the beginning and end of gland removal. Early postoperative clinical functional facial nerve disorder was assessed at day 2. Overall, 50 patients were included and an early facial dysfunction was detected in 27 cases (54%). The maximal response amplitude after supramaximal stimulation at the trunk of the facial nerve was higher in patients with normal facial function compared with those with poor outcomes at the end of surgery (p stimulation thresholds, were indicative of a nerve conduction block and were significantly lower in the patient group with a poor outcome compared with the group with a normal facial outcome (p < 0.02).

  17. Facial nerve damage in the treatment of tumours of the parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampling, R.; Catterall, M. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit)

    1984-12-01

    The treatment of malignant parotid gland tumours by either surgery or X-radiotherapy alone results in unacceptably high rates of local recurrence. This has led to a combined management, with radiation given either before or after surgery. In the best series this gives an 85% control rate but with severence of the facial nerve in a high proportion of cases. Fast neutron therapy was given for much more advanced tumours and gave the same control rate. Where the facial nerve had been damaged by the tumour, paralysis was lessened substantially in four of nine cases. However neutrons were the apparent course of damage to the nerve in three cases. Two of these had previously received surgery and X-ray therapy.

  18. Effectiveness of C5 or C6-Cz assembly in predicting immediate post operative facial nerve deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verst, Silvia Mazzali; Sucena, Andrea Caivano; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfat; Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires

    2013-10-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring (IOM) is a valuable tool in cerebellopontine angle (CPA) surgeries posing risk to the cranial nerves. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) for cranial nerves has been performed in the last 7 years, for obtaining the facial nerve motor evoked potential (MEP), using either C3/C4-Cz or C3-C4 (or inverse) stimulating points, which have been correlated with facial nerve functional outcome. Intraoperative surgical and electrophysiological findings were documented prospectively. Patient files were reviewed for clinical data. We studied 23 patients undergoing CPA tumor resection using C5 or C6-Cz montage for TES, and were able to determine the correlation between facial nerve functional outcome and the amplitude drop of facial MEP above 50 %. Patients were evaluated for immediate facial nerve outcome and 6 months after the surgery. Follow-up was performed by structured telephone interviews with local physicians. The sensibility of the studied parameters was 92.8 % for amplitude drop of facial nerve MEP, with positive predictive value of 81.2 %. The absence of changes during IOM has shown a negative predictive value of 100 %. In this series, the used montage was effective in predicting new facial deficit.

  19. Preservation of facial, cochlear, and other nerve functions in acoustic neuroma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterkers, J M; Morrison, G A; Sterkers, O; El-Dine, M M

    1994-02-01

    Between March 1966 and September 1992, 1400 acoustic neuromas were treated in Paris, France, by surgical excision. The findings over the last 7 years are presented. The translabyrinthine approach has been used in more than 85% of cases. Where hearing preservation is attempted, the middle fossa approach has been adapted for intracanilicular tumors and the retrosigmoid approach for small tumors extending into the cerebellopontine angle, in which the fundus of the internal meatus is free of tumor. The main goal is to achieve a grade I or II result in facial function within 1 month of surgery. Results improved during 1991 after the introduction of continuous facial nerve monitoring and the use of the Beaver mini-blade for dissection of tumor from nerve. With these techniques, facial function of grade I or II at 1 month improved from 20% to 52% for large tumors (larger than 3 cm), from 42% to 81% for medium tumors (2 to 3 cm). and from 70% to 92% for small tumors (up to and including 2 cm extracanalicular). The facial nerve was at greater risk using the retrosigmoid or middle fossa approaches than by the translabyrinthine route. Since 1985, success in hearing preservation has changed little, with useful hearing being preserved in 38.2% of cases operated on by means of the retrosigmoid route and a 36.4% of cases after the middle fossa approach. In older patients with good hearing and small tumors, observation with periodic MRI scanning is recommended. Despite earlier diagnosis, the number of patients suitable for hearing preservation surgery remains very limited and careful selection is required. Trigeminal nerve signs were present in 20% of cases preoperatively, in 10% postoperatively, and recovered spontaneously. Palsies of the other cranial nerves after surgery were much rarer and were as follows: sixth nerve (abducens), 0.5%; ninth nerve (glossopharyngeal), 1.4%; and tenth nerve (vagus), 0.7%. The importance of preservation of function of the nervus intermedius of

  20. Solitary Schwannoma in the breast: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yun Jung; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Kyeong Mee; Han, Se Hwan; Kim, Soung Hee; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Soo Hyun [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    Schwannoma (neurilemoma) is a benign nerve tumor derived from the nerve sheath. The most common locations are the flexor surfaces of the extremities, and the head and the neck. Schwannoma of the breast is unusual. To our knowledge, few studies have reported the radiologic appearance of Schwannoma in the breast and there has been only one report from Korea (1-3). This tumor can be clinically and radiologically considered to be fibroadenoma, which is a common benign tumor of the breast. We describe the mammographic and sonographic findings of a case of Schwannoma in the breast.

  1. Management of Facial Nerve in Surgical Treatment of Previously Untreated Fisch Class C Tympanojugular Paragangliomas: Long-Term Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciu, Andrea; Ait Mimoune, Hassan; D'Orazio, Flavia; Vitullo, Francesca; Russo, Alessandra; Sanna, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term facial nerve outcome according to management of the facial nerve in patients undergoing surgery for Fisch class C tympanojugular paragangliomas. The study population consisted of 122 patients. The infratemporal type A approach was the most common surgical procedure. The facial nerve was left in place in 2 (1.6%) of the 122 patients, anteriorly rerouted in 97 (79.5%), anteriorly rerouted with segmental resection of the epineurium in 7 (5.7%), and sacrificed and reconstructed in 15 (12.3%). One patient underwent cross-face nerve grafting. At last follow-up, House-Brackmann grade I to II was achieved in 51.5% of patients who underwent anterior rerouting and in 28.5% of those who underwent anterior rerouting with resection of the epineurium. A House-Brackmann grade III was achieved in 73.3% of patients who underwent cable nerve graft interposition. The two patients in whom the facial nerve was left in place experienced grade I and grade III, respectively. The patient who underwent cross-face nerve grafting had grade III. Gross total resection was achieved in 105 cases (86%). Management of the facial nerve in tympanojugular paraganglioma surgery can be expected to ensure satisfactory facial function long-term outcome. PMID:24498582

  2. A Cadaveric Study of the Communication Patterns Between the Buccal Trunks of the Facial Nerve and the Infraorbital Nerve in the Midface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Phanchart, Piyaporn; Chinnawong, Dawinee; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn; Sahraoui, Yasmina M E

    2016-01-01

    Most nerve communications reported in the literature were found between the terminal branches. This study aimed to clarify and classify patterns of proximal communications between the buccal branches (BN) of the facial nerve and the infraorbital nerve (ION).The superficial musculoaponeurotic system protects any communication sites from conventional dissections. Based on this limitation, the soft tissues of each face were peeled off the facial skull and the facial turn-down flap specimens were dissected from the periosteal view. Dissection was performed in 40 hemifaces to classify the communications in the sublevator space. Communication site was measured from the ala of nose.A double communication was the most common type found in 62.5% of hemifaces. Triple and single communications existed in 25% and 10% of 40 hemiface specimens, respectively. One hemiface had no communication. The most common type of communication occurred between the lower trunk of the BN of the facial nerve and the lateral labial (fourth) branch of the ION (70% in 40 hemifaces). Communication site was deep to the levator labii superioris muscle at 16.2 mm from the nasal ala. Communications between the motor and the sensory nerves in the midface may be important to increase nerve endurance and to compensate functional loss from injury.Proximal communications between the main trunks of the facial nerve and the ION in the midface exist in every face. This implies some specific functions in normal individuals. Awareness of these nerves is essential in surgical procedure in the midface.

  3. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the rabbits using laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding of hypoglossal-facial nerve to microsurgical suturing and a result of immediate and delayed repair, and to evaluate the effectiveness of laser nerve welding in reanimation of facial paralysis of the rabbit models. The first group of 5 rabbits underwent immediate hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (HFA) by microsurgical suturing and the second group of 5 rabbits by CO2 laser welding. The third group of 5 rabbits underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing and the fourth group of 5 rabbits by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of 5 rabbits sustained intact hypoglossal and facial nerve as control. In all rabbits of the 4 different groups, cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative sixth week and in normal hypoglossal nerve in the 5 rabbits of control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1416 +/- 118 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1429 +/- 90 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.75). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1503 +/- 66 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1207 +/- 68 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). Difference was significant (P = 0.009). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.208), but some significant difference was observed between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.016). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1970 +/- 165. No dehiscence was seen on the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis in all the rabbits as re-exploration was done for injection of CTb. This study shows that regeneration of the anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by either

  4. Application of a venous conduit as a stent for repairing rabbit facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recently,many investigators have tried to use natural biomaterials,such as,artery,vein,decalcified bone,etc.,as conduits for nerve repair.However,immunological rejection of conduits made of natural biomaterials limits their application.Therefore,it is essential to identify more suitable types of biomaterials.OBJECTIVE:To observe the characteristics of a bioengineering processing method using venous conduit as a stent for repairing facial nerve injury.DESIGN:A controlled observational experiment.SETTING:Animal Laboratories of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and the 157 Hospital.MATERIALS:Thirty-three male New Zealand rabbits of pure breed,weighing 1.5 to 2.0 kg,were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Room of Sun Yat-sen University.The protocol was carried out in accordance with animal ethics guidelines for the use and care of animals.Venous conduits and autogenous nerves were transplanted into the left and right cheeks,respectively.Eleven animals were chosen for anatomical observations at 5,10 and 15 weeks after surgery.METHODS:This experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratories of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and the 157 Hospital between May and November 2006.After animals were anesthetized,15 mm of retromandibular vein was harvested for preparing a venous conduit.Approximately 3 cm of low buccal branch of facial nerve was exposed.A segment of 1.2 cm nerve was resected from the middle,and a gap of 1.5 cm formed due to bilateral retraction.The prepared venous conduit of 1.5 cm was sutured to the outer membrane of the severed ends of the nerve.Muscle and skin were sutured layer by layer.Using the same above-mentioned method,the low buccal branch of right autogenous facial nerve was resected,and the left facial nerve segment from the same animal was transplanted using end-to-end neurorrhaphy for control.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Post-operatively,food intake,vibrissae activity and wound healing of

  5. Intrathoracic Schwannoma Presented with Hemothorax

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    Alkin Yazicioglu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic schwannomas are typically benign and asymptomatic tumors that originate from the Schwann cells of a neural sheath. Hemorrhage from intrathoracic schwannomas is an uncommon finding. We present the case of a 17 year-old girl who had dyspnea and numbness of the right arm. Chest x%u2013ray showed a right-sided massive pleural effusion and exploratory puncture showed hemothorax. After tube thoracostomy and drainage of the bloody effusion, a mass was observed in the right upper hemithorax. Chest tomography revealed a 76x104 mm mass arising from the fourth intercostal nerve. The tumor was successfully resected and, on histopathologic examination it was reported as a schwannoma. After resection, the patient has remained problem-free for fourteen months.

  6. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  7. Surgical approaches for tongue base schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Binbin; Zhu, Songsong; Qiao, Yang; Ye, Weimin; Maimaiti, Abdikerimjian; Hu, Jingzhou; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign nerve sheath tumor originating from Schwann cells. They are well circumscribed and rarely infiltrate and metastasize. Schwannomas of the head and neck commonly occur in the tongue followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, and mandible. Tongue base schwannomas could extend to the pharyngeal cavity or the floor of the mouse, and it is difficult to differentiate between tumors of the lingual, hypoglossal, and glossopharyngeal nerves.Surgical treatment of tongue base schwannomas is difficult because of limited operative exposure. Although mandibulotomy with lip splitting could obtain good exposure, surgeons might strike a balance between exposure obtaining and morbidity following because there are intricate neurovascular anatomical relationships in this region, and mandibulotomy with lip splitting would cause significant morbidity. Surgical approach options are important for tongue base schwannoma removal. From March 2008 to March 2010, 8 patients were clinically and pathologically diagnosed with tongue base schwannomas in our department, and all underwent surgical treatment. In our experience, transoral approach was used for tongue base schwannomas extending to the floor of the mouse and suprahyroid pharyngotomy approach for those extending to the pharyngeal cavity. Follow-up was made until now. One patient who experienced transoral excision still experienced numbness in the region of the lateral tongue tip, and the other 7 patients had no postoperative long-term complications.

  8. Schwannoma of the tongue: one case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevio, E; Gorini, E; Lenzi, A; Migliorini, L

    2002-01-01

    The schwannomas are nervous tissue tumours that arise from Schwann cells; they are uncommon in peripheral nerves and rare in the tongue. After, a review of the literature, we present a case of schwannoma which arose in the ventral part of the body of the tongue. The tumour presented as a slowly growing mass producing few symptoms. The diagnosis of schwannoma is usually made post-operatively by histological identification although modern imaging techniques can provide useful indications. The treatment is exclusively surgical and usually enucleation of the mass is uncomplicated. There are no reports of malignant transformation.

  9. [Peculiar features of mastoiditis in a brest-fed infant with the "exposed" facial nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, I G

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the clinical case of mastoiditis in a 5-month old child in whom an unusual localization of the totally "naked" facial nerve outside of the bone canal in the mastoid part was discovered intraoperatively. This finding was quite unexpected because nerves are not visible on CT scanograms. The author emphasizes that the clinical course of otitis media in the breast- fed infants and young children is characterized by a number of peculiarities due to specific anatomical, physiological, and immunological features of the child's organism. She also notes that the number of antromastoidotomies for the treatment of mastoiditis has increased in Tatarstan during the recent years.

  10. Thixotropy of levator palpebrae as the cause of lagophthalmos after peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramideh, M; Koelman, J H T M; Devriese, P P; Speelman, J D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W

    2002-05-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy are at risk of developing corneal ulceration because of lagophthalmos (incomplete closure of the affected eyelid). Lagophthalmos could result from thixotropy of the levator palpebrae muscle--that is, the formation of tight crossbridges between the actin and myosin filaments of the muscle fibres causing stiffness of the muscle--rather than from paralysis of the orbicularis occuli muscle as previously supposed. This possibility was investigated in 13 patients with a peripheral facial nerve palsy in a prospective open study. The levator muscle of the affected eyelid was stretched by manipulation and downward movement of the passively closed upper eyelid for approximately 15 seconds. The amount of lagophthalmos was measured before and immediately after this manoeuvre. In all patients except one there was a clear reduction in lagophthalmos (mean reduction 72%; range 60-100%). Thus in this setting the lagophthalmos appears to be caused by thixotropy of the levator palpebrae muscle, which has implications for treatment.

  11. Effect of endoscopic brow lift on contractures and synkinesis of the facial muscles in patients with a regenerated postparalytic facial nerve syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran, Gregor M; Börjesson, Pontus K E; Boahene, Kofi D; Gosepath, Jan; Lohuis, Peter J F M

    2014-01-01

    Delayed recovery after facial palsy results in aberrant nerve regeneration with symptomatic movement disorders, summarized as the postparalytic facial nerve syndrome. The authors present an alternative surgical approach for improvement of periocular movement disorders in patients with postparalytic facial nerve syndrome. The authors proposed that endoscopic brow lift leads to an improvement of periocular movement disorders by reducing pathologically raised levels of afferent input. Eleven patients (seven women and four men) with a mean age of 54 years (range, 33 to 85 years) and with postparalytic facial nerve syndrome underwent endoscopic brow lift under general anesthesia. Patients' preoperative condition was compared with their postoperative condition using a retrospective questionnaire. Subjects were also asked to compare the therapeutic effectiveness of endoscopic brow lift and botulinum toxin type A. Mean follow-up was 52 months (range, 22 to 83 months). No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. During follow-up, patients and physicians observed an improvement of periorbital contractures and oculofacial synkinesis. Scores on quality of life improved significantly after endoscopic brow lift. Best results were obtained when botulinum toxin type A was adjoined after the endoscopic brow lift. Patients described a cumulative therapeutic effect. These findings suggest endoscopic brow lift as a promising additional treatment modality for the treatment of periocular postparalytic facial nerve syndrome-related symptoms, leading to an improved quality of life. Even though further prospective investigation is needed, a combination of endoscopic brow lift and postsurgical botulinum toxin type A administration could become a new therapeutic standard.

  12. 44 Cases of Peripheral Facial Paralysis Treated by the SXDZ-100 Nerve and Muscle Stimulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-sheng; CUI Cheng-bin; GAO Xin-yan; ZHU Bing; RONG Pei-jing

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effects of the Hua Tuo Manual Acupuncture Therapeutic Stimulator for peripheral facial paralysis.Methods:87 patients with peripheral facial paralysis were divided randomly into the SXDZ-100 Nerve and Muscle Stimulator treatment group (44 cases) and the G6805 Electric Stimulator control group (43 cases).The acupoints selected for both the two groups were local points as well as distal points as Hegu (LI 4), Waiguan (TE 5), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Taichong (LR 3).Effectiveness was compared between the two groups.Results:Both groups had a total effective rate of 100%.But the cure rate was 90.9% in the treatment group, and 73.0% in the control group, indicating a significant difference (P<0.05).No side effects were found in either of the two groups.Conclusion:The SXDZ-100 stimulator is more effective than the G6805 electroacupuncture stimulator for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis.

  13. Spontaneous acute hemorrhage of intraspinal canal cellular schwannoma with paraplegia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng-Zhu; Li, Yuping; Han, Yang; Wang, Xiaodong; She, Lei; Yan, Zhengcun; Dong, Lun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular schwannoma, an unusual histological subtype of schwannoma, is a benign hypercellular variant of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. We report a 48-year-old woman with sudden onset of paraplegia. The complete surgical resection was achieved. This is the first report about intraspinal canal cellular schwannoma following spontaneous acute hemorrhage and paraplegia.

  14. A Case of Wegener’s Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Roy Ujjawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wegener’s granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener’s granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature.

  15. Evaluation of variation in the course of the facial nerve, nerve adhesion to tumors, and postoperative facial palsy in acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameshima, Tetsuro; Morita, Akio; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Fukushima, Takanori; Friedman, Allan H; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    Objective To investigate the variation in the course of the facial nerve (FN) in patients undergoing acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery, its adhesion to tumors, and the relationship between such adhesions and postoperative facial palsy. Methods The subjects were 356 patients who underwent AN surgery in whom the course of the FN could be confirmed. Patients were classified into six groups: ventro-central surface of the tumor (VCe), ventro-rostral (VR), ventro-caudal (VCa), rostral (R), caudal (C), and dorsal (D). Results The FN course was VCe in 185 cases, VR in 137, VCa in 19, R in 10, C in 4, and D in one. For tumors  3.0 cm, there was an increasing tendency for the FN to adhere strongly to the tumor capsule, and postoperative facial palsy was more severe in patients with stronger adhesions. Conclusions The VCe pattern was most common for small tumors. Strong or less strong adhesion to the tumor capsule was most strongly associated with postoperative FN palsy.

  16. Hypoglossal Nerve-Facial Nerve Transfer in the Treatment of Peripheral Facial Paralysis%舌下神经-面神经转接术治疗周围性面瘫研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡小康

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨舌下神经-面神经转接术治疗周围性面瘫的临床效果.方法:对17例面瘫患者给予舌下神经一面神经转接术,在术后2个月、半年以及一年随访观察其临床效果和并发症.结果:17例患者面部表情肌活动术后逐步恢复,不同程度的显现效果;17例患者均未出现舌肌萎缩及伸舌偏斜等并发症.结论:面神经损伤导致的面瘫,经过神经电生理学检查确定该损伤不可逆后通过舌下神经一面神经转接术治疗确有效果,且未见明显不良反应.%Objective:To evaluate the clinical effects of hypoglossal nerve-facial nerve transfer in the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. Methods: 17 patients with facial paralysis were treated with hypoglossal nerve-facial nerve transfer surgery,2 months after surgery, six months and one year follow-up observation of clinical effects and complications. Results: 17 patients after facial muscle activity gradually restored,show varying degrees of effectiveness;genioglossus occurred in 17 patients no complications such as atrophy and Shenshe skew. Conclusions:Facial nerve injury caused by facial paralysis, after a neurological examination to determine the electrophysiological adopted after irreversible injury hypoglossal nerve-facial nerve transfer surgery does have effect, and no significant adverse reactions.

  17. Burkitt's non-Hodgkins lymphoma presenting as facial nerve palsy in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, H; Nelson, M

    2011-02-01

    An isolated facial nerve palsy is rare as the presentation of a central nervous system lymphoma. In this case series, we present the clinical features of three HIV-positive patients presenting with facial nerve palsies due to HIV-associated Burkitt's lymphoma. These patients had a non-resolving facial paralysis, which occurred during a late stage of HIV. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed a lymphocytosis with elevated protein and low glucose levels. The diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma was made on histology which showed the characteristic 'starry sky' appearance due to scattered tangible body-laden macrophages. The patients were commenced on the intensive chemotherapy regimen of CODOX-M/IVAC. Two patients died of disease progression and the third patient died of chemotherapy toxicity. This case series highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for underlying malignancy when a patient presents with a persistent facial paralysis in the later stages of HIV infection.

  18. Peripheral nerve field stimulation for trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain, and persistent idiopathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johann; Sandi-Gahun, Sahr; Schackert, Gabriele; Juratli, Tareq A

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) is a promising modality for treatment of intractable facial pain. However, evidence is sparse. We are therefore presenting our experience with this technique in a small patient cohort. Records of 10 patients (five men, five women) with intractable facial pain who underwent implantation of one or several subcutaneous electrodes for trigeminal nerve field stimulation were retrospectively analyzed. Patients' data, including pain location, etiology, duration, previous treatments, long-term effects and complications, were evaluated. Four patients suffered from recurrent classical trigeminal neuralgia, one had classical trigeminal neuralgia and was medically unfit for microvascular decompression. Two patients suffered from trigeminal neuropathy attributed to multiple sclerosis, one from post-herpetic neuropathy, one from trigeminal neuropathy following radiation therapy and one from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Average patient age was 74.2 years (range 57-87), and average symptom duration was 10.6 years (range 2-17). Eight patients proceeded to implantation after successful trial. Average follow-up after implantation was 11.3 months (range 5-28). Using the visual analog scale, average pain intensity was 9.3 (range 7-10) preoperatively and 0.75 (range 0-3) postoperatively. Six patients reported absence of pain with stimulation; two had only slight constant pain without attacks. PNFS may be an effective treatment for refractory facial pain and yields high patient satisfaction. © International Headache Society 2015.

  19. Iatrogenic facial nerve injuries during chronic otitis media surgery: a multicentre retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, T; Mulazimoglu, S; El Hadi, T; Darrouzet, V; Ayache, D; Somers, T; Schmerber, S; Vincent, C; Mondain, M; Lescanne, E; Bonnard, D

    2017-06-01

    To give an insight into why, when and where iatrogenic facial nerve (FN) injuries may occur and to explain how to deal with them in an emergency setting. Multicentre retrospective study in eight tertiary referral hospitals over 17 years. Twenty patients with partial or total FN injury during surgery for chronic otitis media (COM) were revised. Indication and type of surgery, experience of the surgeon, intra- and postoperative findings, value of CT scanning, patient management and final FN outcome were recorded. In 12 cases, the nerve was completely transected, but the surgeon was unaware in 11 cases. A minority of cases occurred in academic teaching hospitals. Tympanic segment, second genu and proximal mastoid segments were the sites involved during injury. The FN was not deliberately identified in 18 patients at the time of injury, and nerve monitoring was only applied in one patient. Before revision surgery, CT scanning correctly identified the lesion site in 11 of 12 cases and depicted additional lesions such as damage to the lateral semicircular canal. A greater auricular nerve graft was interposed in 10 cases of total transection and in one partially lesioned nerve: seven of them resulted in an HB III functional outcome. In two of the transected nerves, rerouting and direct end-to-end anastomosis was applied. A simple FN decompression was used in four cases of superficially traumatised nerves. We suggest checklists for preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management to prevent and treat iatrogenic FN injury during COM surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atolini Junior, Nédio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the years of 2007 and 2008 were analysed retrospectively. Results: From the 54 patients analysed, 55,5% were male, median age of 40,6 years and had the right side of the face acomitted in 66,6%. Parestesia of the accomited side in 51,85% and increased tears in 66,6% of the patients were observed as associated symptoms. Bell´s palsy was the most frequent ethiology (53,7%, follwed by: traumatic (24%, Ramsay Hunt syndrome (9,2%, Cholesteatoma (5,5%, malignant otitis media (3,7% and acute otits media (3,7%. Three cases of Bell´s palsy during pregancy was also seen in this series. Conclusion: The data found are similiar of the most of the literature, showing that Bell´s palsy is still the most frequent, followed by traumatic causes and others. There is an equilibrium concerning to the gender, with a slight prevalence for males and for the right side of the face.

  1. The feasibility of sugammadex for general anesthesia and facial nerve monitoring in patients undergoing parotid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I-Cheng; Chang, Pi-Ying; Su, Miao-Pei; Chen, Po-Nien; Chen, Hsiu-Ya; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Wu, Che-Wei

    2017-08-01

    The use of neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) during anesthesia may interfere with facial nerve monitoring (FNM) during parotid surgery. Sugammadex has been reported to be an effective and safe reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block (NMB) during surgery. This study investigated the feasibility and clinical effectiveness of sugammadex for NMB reversal during FNM in Parotid surgery. Fifty patients undergoing parotid surgery were randomized allocated into conventional anesthesia group (Group C, n = 25) and sugammadex group (Group S, n = 25). Group C did not receive any NMBA. Group S received rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg at anesthesia induction and sugammadex 2 mg/kg at skin incision. The intubating condition and influence on FNM evoked EMG results were compared between groups. The intubation condition showed significantly better in group S patients than C group patients (excellent in 96% v.s. 24%). In group S, rapid reverse of NMB was found and the twitch (%) recovered from 0 to >90% within 10 min. Positive and high EMG signals were obtained in all patients at the time point of initial facial nerve stimulation in both groups. There was no significant difference as comparing the EMG amplitudes detected at the time point of initial and final facial nerve stimulation in both groups. Implementation of sugammadex in anesthesia protocol is feasible and reliable for successful FNM during parotid surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  2. Sciatica due to Schwannoma at the Sciatic Notch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Haspolat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rarely seen on the sciatic nerve and can cause sciatica. In this case report we aimed to present an unusual location of schwannoma along sciatic nerve that causes sciatica. A 60-years-old-man was admitted to us with complaints of pain on his thigh and paresthesia on his foot. Radiography of the patient revealed a solitary lesion on the sciatic nerve. The lesion was excised and the symptoms resolved after surgery.

  3. 面神经减压治疗周围性面瘫的临床分析%Facial Nerve Decompression for Peripheral Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂智樱; 毛弈韬; 彭安全; 谢鼎华; 伍伟景

    2014-01-01

    目的:总结各种原因所致周围性面瘫行面神经减压术的经验和疗效。方法回顾分析37例周围性面瘫的临床资料、面神经减压的手术方式及疗效。结果37例中,包括颞骨骨折、中耳乳突手术后、中耳乳突炎、面神经瘤、听神经瘤及中耳癌等不同原因。术后随访3月至4年,其中25例面神经功能恢复至House-BrackmannⅠ、Ⅱ级(68%)。面瘫病程2月者。结论面神经减压术是治疗周围性面瘫的有效手段,对保守治疗恢复不满意、有手术指征的患者,应尽早行面神经减压术。%Objective To report efficacy of facial nerve decompression in treating peripheral facial paralysis of differ-ent causes. Methods The clinical data of 37 cases of peripheral facial paralysis, and surgical approaches as well as efficacy of facial nerve decompression were retrospectively analyzed. Results Causes of facial paralyhsis included temporal bone fracture, post-operative infection, middle ear cholesteatoma, facial neuroma, acoustic neuroma and middle ear carcinoma, etc. Among the 37 cases, 25 demonstrated satisfactory facial nerve recovery of House-Brackmann grade I-II during the fol-low-up period of three months to four years. The facial nerve recovery after decompression in patients with facial paralysis duration of less than two months was obviously better than in patients with facial paralysis duration of greater than two months. Conclusions Facial nerve decompression is an effective method for peripheral facial paralysis. Early decompression in patients with dissatisfied recovery during observation is recommended.

  4. Fourth Ventricular Schwannoma: Identical Clinicopathologic Features as Schwann Cell-Derived Schwannoma with Unique Etiopathologic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany R. Hodges

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case in the literature of fourth ventricular schwannoma. The etiology and natural history of intraventricular schwannomas is not well understood. A thorough review of potential etiopathogenic mechanisms is provided in this case report. Case Description. A 69-year-old man presented with an incidentally found fourth ventricular tumor during an evaluation for generalized weakness, gait instability, and memory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a heterogeneously enhancing lesion in the fourth ventricle. A suboccipital craniotomy was performed to resect the lesion. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma (WHO grade I. Conclusions. Schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular tumors. Although the embryologic origins may be different from nerve sheath-derived schwannomas, the histologic, clinical, and natural history appear identical and thus should be managed similarly.

  5. SCHWANNOMA IN A YOUNG MALE BREAST: A DIFFICULT DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

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    Minakshi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A benign tumour of Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath is called Schwannoma, also called as neurilemoma or neurinoma. Most breast cancers and other breast tumors have an epithelial cell origin, with stromal and myoepithelial cell tumors being less common. A nerve sheath tumor arising from neural crest-derived Schwann cells within the breast is rarer still. For unknown reasons, these cells can sometimes grow in a neoplastic fashion which results in a benign tumor termed as schwannoma. Neurilemoma, neurinoma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor and schwannoma are considered to be synonymous though the term schwannoma appears to be more precise than the others as this tumour is believed to arise from schwan cells. Schwannoma are commonly slow growing solitary lesions which rarely show malignant transformation. The clinical significance of this benign tumor is that it may clinically and radiographically simulate malignant neoplasm.

  6. Acute pathological changes of facial nucleus and expressions of postsynaptic density protein-95 following facial nerve injury of varying severity A semi-quantitative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Li; Wenlong Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is widely distributed in the central nervous system and is related to the development of the CNS and sensory signal transmission as well as acute or chronic nerve cell death following ischemic brain injury.OBJECTIVE: To semi-quantitatively determine the pathological changes of apoptotic facial neurons and the expression of PSD-95 in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury of varying extents using immunohistochemical staining methods.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled animal experiments were performed in the Ultrasonic Institute of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences from September to December 2007.MATERIALS: Sixty-five healthy, adult, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, both male and female, were used for this study. Rabbit anti-rat PSD-95 polyclonal antibody was purchased from Beijing Biosynthesis Biotechnology Co., Ltd.METHODS: SD rats were randomly assigned into a control group with five rats and three injured groups with 20 rats per group. Exposure, clamp and cut for bilateral facial nerve trunks were performed in the rats of the injury groups, and no injury was inflicted on the rats of the control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The brainstems of all the rats were excised on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 post injury, and then the facial nuclei were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to observe any pathological changes due to apoptosis in facial neurons. PSD-95 expression in facial nuclei was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the number of PSD-95 positive cells was counted under a light microscope.RESULTS: The expression of PSD-95 in the facial nucleus and morphology of the facial neuron within the exposure group had no obvious changes at various points in time tested (P>0.05). However, the expressions of PSD-95 in the facial nucleus of the clamp group and cut group increased on day 1 post injury (Pclamp group>exposure group

  7. Solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension causing proptosis and vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sharma, Arvind; Singh, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slowly growing, well capsulated, benign tumors. Involvement of vestibular nerve is most commonly followed by trigeminal nerve. Trigeminal schwannoma is rare entity, and cystic degeneration with intraorbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma is even rarer. These tumors occur in fourth and fifth decades of life and patients have variable presentation depending on which cranial compartment is involved. Orbital schwannoma usually presents with proptosis with or without vision loss. We are reporting such a rare case of solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension through superior orbital fissure that was removed surgically. PMID:27695572

  8. Location of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve according to the neck position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Ki, Sae Hwi; Nam, Yong Seok; Han, Seung Ho

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the exact location of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve according to different neck positions. Twenty-two hemifaces of 11 fresh human cadavers were used (age range, 53-89 y; mean age, 72.3 ± 10.5 y; 8 men and 3 women). Working through skin windows, the distance from the mandibular border to the mandibular branch of the facial nerve (border-nerve distance or BND) was measured at 3 points: (1) the mandible angle (gonion or Go point), (2) the point where the mandibular branch of the facial nerve crosses the facial artery (FA point), and (3) the one-fourth point from the gonion to the menton (1/4 point). Threads were hung on the skin windows along the mandibular border. With the neck in the neutral position and then full flexion (15 degrees), extension (15 degrees), and left and right rotations (30 degrees), the distance of the mandibular branch from the thread of the mandibular border was measured using calipers. In the neutral position, the mandibular branch was 3.50 ± 2.82 mm above the mandibular border at the Go point, 5.34 ± 2.98 mm above the mandibular border at the FA point, and 5.28 ± 1.86 mm above the mandibular border at the 1/4 point. At all 3 points, flexion or extension of the neck did not significantly move the mandibular branch. At the Go point and FA point, there was no significant difference between the ipsilateral rotation position and the contralateral rotation. Yet at the 1/4 point, the BND decreased (4.32 ± 2.60 mm) with the neck in ipsilateral rotation and the BND increased (5.97 ± 2.62 mm) with the neck in contralateral rotation. There was a significant difference between the ipsilateral rotation position and the contralateral rotation position (P = 0.020, t-test). Surgeons should keep in mind that at the 1/4 point, the mandibular branch of the facial nerve moves downward 1.10 ± 1.42 mm with the neck in ipsilateral rotation and moves upward 0.49 ± 1.84 mm with the neck in contralateral

  9. [Case report and review of the literature: a perineal schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravier, E; Lopez, J-G; Augros, M; Romy, P; Pugeat, G

    2011-05-01

    Schwannoma is a rare and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from Schwann cells. Perineal localisation is exceptional. It is most frequently isolated but can be associated with neurofibromatosis 2 or schwannomatosis. This article describes a case of perineal schwannoma, its management and update diagnosis modality and treatment of this tumor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Schwannoma of the tongue: An unusual presentation in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Giridhar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in the oral cavity. In contrast to the earlier reports in the literature, a confounding case of a lingual schwannoma presenting as a symptomatic and exophytic growth on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 12-year-old boy is discussed here.

  11. Schwannoma of the tongue: an unusual presentation in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Giridhar S; Sinha, Samindra Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in the oral cavity. In contrast to the earlier reports in the literature, a confounding case of a lingual schwannoma presenting as a symptomatic and exophytic growth on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 12-year-old boy is discussed here.

  12. Cross-face nerve grafting for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative outcomes using the FACIAL CLIMA system and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Although in most cases Bell palsy resolves spontaneously, approximately one-third of patients will present sequela including facial synkinesis and paresis. Currently, the techniques available for reanimation of these patients include hypoglossal nerve transposition, free muscle transfer, and cross-face nerve grafting (CFNG). Between December 2008 and March 2012, eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with two-stage CFNG. Gender, age at surgery, etiology of paralysis denervation time, donor and recipient nerves, presence of facial synkinesis, and follow-up were registered. Commissural excursion and velocity and patient satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. Mean age at surgery was 33.8 ± 11.5 years; mean time of denervation was 96.6 ± 109.8 months. No complications requiring surgery were registered. Follow-up period ranged from 7 to 33 months with a mean of 19 ± 9.7 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement of both commissural excursion and velocity greater than 75% in 4 patients, greater than 50% in 2 patients, and less than 50% in the remaining two patients. Qualitative evaluation revealed a high grade of satisfaction in six patients (75%). Two-stage CFNG is a reliable technique for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis with a high grade of patient satisfaction.

  13. Transient total facial nerve paralysis: an unusual complication of transoral endoscopic-assisted management of subcondylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Young Man

    2012-05-01

    Endoscopic-assisted repair of subcondylar fractures is an additional tool for management; however, there is a steep learning curve. Generally, this technique allows good visualization of the fracture site for reduction through an incision with an acceptable cosmetic result. Recently, the surgical techniques and technology as well as the indications for endoscopic facial fracture repair are in development; there are few available data in the literature regarding detail complications and recovery processes following endoscopic fracture treatment. The purpose of this article was to reveal unusual complication following endoscopic repair of subcondylar fracture in terms of radiographic, photographic, and recovering orders of the facial nerve and facial reanimations. In our case, no damage to the facial nerve was observed intraoperatively, but the patient had total facial paralysis, immediately postoperatively. At long-term follow-up, the facial nerve function was recovered well within 6 months. The authors consider that transoral endoscopic-assisted open reduction constitutes a valid alternative to a transcutaneous approach for the reduction and fixation of subcondylar fractures. It provides the benefits of open reduction and internal fixation without the permanent complications, such as facial nerve injury.

  14. Facial nucleus up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA following electroacupuncture treatment in a rabbit model of facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Gao; Bangyu Ju; Guohua Jiang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of acupuncture treatment on peripheral facial nerve injury is generally accepted. However, the mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To validate the effect of acupoint electro-stimulation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the facial nucleus of rabbits with facial nerve injury, with the hypothesis that acupuncture treatment efficacy is related to BDNE DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Peripheral facial nerve injury, in situ hybridization, and randomized, controlled, animal trial. The experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Anatomy, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine from March to September 2005. MATERIALS: A total of 120 healthy, adult, Japanese rabbits, with an equal number of males and females were selected. Models of peripheral facial nerve injury were established using the facial nerve pressing method. METHODS: The rabbits were randomly divided into five groups (n = 24): sham operation, an incision to the left facial skin, followed by suture; model, no treatment following facial nerve model establishment; western medicine, 10 mg vitamin B1, 50 μg vitamin B12, and dexamethasone (2 mg/d, reduced to half every 7 days) intramuscular injection starting with the first day following lesion, once per day; traditional acupuncture, acupuncture at Yifeng, Quanliao, Dicang, Jiache, Sibai, and Yangbai acupoints using a acupuncture needle with needle twirling every 10 minutes, followed by needle retention for 30 minutes, for successive 5 days; electroacupuncture, similar to the traditional acupuncture group, the Yifeng (negative electrode), Jiache (positive electrode), Dicang (negative electrode), and Sibai (positive electrode) points were connected to an universal pulse electro-therapeutic apparatus for 30 minutes per day, with disperse-dense waves for successive 5 days, and resting for 2 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Left hemisphere brain stem tissues were harvested on post-operative days 7, 14

  15. Early and continued manual stimulation is required for long-term recovery after facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosheva, Maria; Rink, Svenja; Jansen, Ramona; Bendella, Habib; Pavlov, Stoyan P; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Angelov, Doychin N; Dunlop, Sarah A

    2017-02-18

    We previously have shown that manual stimulation (MS) of vibrissal muscles for 2 months after facial nerve injury in rats improves whisking and reduces motor end plate polyinnervation. Here, we seek to determine whether discontinuing or delaying MS after facial-facial anastomosis (FFA) leads to similar results. Rats were subjected to FFA and received MS for (1) 4 months (early and continued), (2) the first but not the last 2 months (discontinued), or (3) the last 2 months (delayed). Intact animals and those not receiving MS (no MS) were also examined. Early and continued MS restored whisking amplitude to 43°, a value significantly higher compared with the discontinued, delayed, and no MS groups (32°, 24°, and 10°, respectively). Motor end plate polyinnervation occurred in all experimental groups but was significantly higher in the delayed group. Early and continued MS results in better recovery than when it is either discontinued or delayed. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Management of Synkinesis and Asymmetry in Facial Nerve Palsy: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali pourmomeny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The important sequelae of facial nerve palsy are synkinesis, asymmetry, hypertension and contracture; all of which have psychosocial effects on patients. Synkinesis due to mal regeneration causes involuntary movements during a voluntary movement. Previous studies have advocated treatment using physiotherapy modalities alone or with exercise therapy, but no consensus exists on the optimal approach. Thus, this review summarizes clinical controlled studies in the management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy.   Materials and Methods: Case-controlled clinical studies of patients at the acute stage of injury were selected for this review article. Data were obtained from English-language databases from 1980 until mid-2013.   Results: Among 124 articles initially captured, six randomized controlled trials involving 269 patients were identified with appropriate inclusion criteria. The results of all these studies emphasized the benefit of exercise therapy. Four studies considered electromyogram (EMG biofeedback to be effective through neuromuscular re-education.   Conclusion:  Synkinesis and inconsistency of facial muscles could be treated with educational exercise therapy. EMG biofeedback is a suitable tool for this exercise therapy.

  17. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  18. Recovery of Facial Nerve Paralysis After Temporal Nerve Reconstruction: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Emamhadi; Mahmoudi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Facial paralysis is common following accidents, trauma, viral infection or tumors. Case Presentation A 24-year-old male patient was referred to us with a history of sharp penetrating trauma to the right temporal region causing unilateral paralysis of the muscles of the right forehead. He was unable to scowl or elevate his right eyebrow and there were no folds on his right forehead. Anastomosis of branches of the tempo...

  19. Occipital nerve block is effective in craniofacial neuralgias but not in idiopathic persistent facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, T P; Müller, P; Seedorf, H; Regelsberger, J; May, A

    2012-04-01

    Occipital nerve block (ONB) has been used in several primary headache syndromes with good results. Information on its effects in facial pain is sparse. In this chart review, the efficacy of ONB using lidocaine and dexamethasone was evaluated in 20 patients with craniofacial pain syndromes comprising 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 6 with trigeminal neuropathic pain, 5 with persistent idiopathic facial pain and 1 with occipital neuralgia. Response was defined as an at least 50% reduction of original pain. Mean response rate was 55% with greatest efficacy in trigeminal (75%) and occipital neuralgia (100%) and less efficacy in trigeminal neuropathic pain (50%) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (20%). The effects lasted for an average of 27 days with sustained benefits for 69, 77 and 107 days in three patients. Side effects were reported in 50%, albeit transient and mild in nature. ONBs are effective in trigeminal pain involving the second and third branch and seem to be most effective in craniofacial neuralgias. They should be considered in facial pain before more invasive approaches, such as thermocoagulation or vascular decompression, are performed, given that side effects are mild and the procedure is minimally invasive.

  20. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  1. Nasal Schwannoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Navarro YJ, Pérez-Carbajal AJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Schwannomas are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells peripheral nerves sheath. About 25-45% occur in the head and neck and only 4% of these tumors involve the sinunasal tract.Objective: To provide, through a clinic case and lecture review, the clinical and radiopatology findings of a bening and unusual tumors, as are the Nasal schwannomas. Case Report: We report a case of a young woman with nasal schwannoma, who complain of left nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, which after subsequent imaging studies, surgical and pathology analisis, diagnosis was found. Sustained a favorable clinical evolution.Results and Discussion: The clinic and radiologic findings are nonspecific, depend upon the location or size of the tumor and subsequent involvement of surrounding structures, but generally present as a mass with less agressive behavior. The elective treatment is surgery, confirming this disease by microscopic and immunohistochemistry studies.Conclusion: Given these aspects must be considered nasal schwannomas within the differential diagnosis of a tumor with less aggressive behavior, clinical-radiological, because implies good results for the patient and unusual recurrence after surgery.

  2. Hormonal shifts and intensity of free radical oxidation in the blood of patients with facial nerve neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Govorova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathochemical characteristic features of facial nerve neuropathy (FNN have been more accurately defined. Heterogeneous patochemical pattern of facial nerve neuropathy has been shown to be dependent on the severity of the disease, intensity of free radical oxidation processes, and hormonal status of the patient. We have found reliable distinctions in dynamics of free radical oxidation processes, and hormo-nal status in the blood of the patients with moderately severe and severe forms of facial nerve neuropathies. In facial nerve neuropathies we observed regulatory effects of cortisol and somatotropic hormone; in facial nerve neuropathywith moderate severity the hormones of thyroid group were seen to be switching off, falling out the processes regulating metabolism. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH were found to have regulating effects, especially in the acute phase of the disease. Different dynamics of the hormones in patients with high and low free radical oxidation levels suggests that the oxidative stress intensity could be associated with regulatory effects of the hormones . The results of correlation analysis confirm the reliable distinctions in free radical oxidation characteristics andand cortisole levels, STH, FSH and LH levels.

  3. Ultraestrutura do nervo facial intratemporal em pacientes com paralisia facial idiopática: estudo de evidências de infecção viral Intratemporal facial nerve ultrastructure in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis: viral infection evidence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Aló Maluza Florez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A etiologia da paralisia facial periférica idiopática (PFPI ainda é uma incógnita, no entanto, alguns autores aventam a possibilidade de ser uma infecção viral. OBJETIVO: Analisar a ultraestrutura do nervo facial procurando evidências virais que possam nos fornecer dados etiológicos. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram estudados 20 pacientes com PFP, com graus de moderado a severo, de ambos os sexos, entre 18-60 anos, provenientes de Ambulatório de Distúrbios do Nervo Facial. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: Estudo, onze pacientes com PFPI e Controle, nove pacientes com Paralisia Facial Periférica Traumática ou Tumoral. Foram estudados fragmentos de bainha do nervo facial ou fragmentos de seus cotos, que durante a cirurgia de reparação do nervo facial, seriam desprezados ou encaminhados para estudo anatomopatológico. O tecido foi fixado em glutaraldeído 2% e analisado em Microscopia Eletrônica de Transmissão. RESULTADO: Observamos no grupo estudo atividade celular intensa de reparação com aumento de fibras colágenas, fibroblastos com organelas desenvolvidas, isentos de partículas virais. No grupo controle esta atividade de reparação não foi evidente, mas também não foram observadas partículas virais. CONCLUSÃO: Não foram encontradas partículas virais, no entanto, houve evidências de intensa atividade de reparação ou infecção viral.The etiology of idiopathic peripheral facial palsy (IPFP is still uncertain; however, some authors suggest the possibility of a viral infection. AIM: to analyze the ultrastructure of the facial nerve seeking viral evidences that might provide etiological data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy (PFP, with moderate to severe FP, of both genders, between 18-60 years of age, from the Clinic of Facial Nerve Disorders. The patients were broken down into two groups - Study: eleven patients with IPFP and Control: nine patients with trauma or tumor

  4. Tongue base schwannoma: report, review, and unique surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Raja; Carron, Michael A; Mathog, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    Base of tongue schwannomas are exceedingly rare and therefore often are not immediately included in the differential diagnosis and treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. After a thorough review of the English literature, we found only 6 previously reported cases of tongue base schwannomas. We are contributing a report of a 37-year-old woman with progressive dysphagia, dysarthria, and large tongue base schwannoma. Diagnosis was confirmed by imaging studies and biopsy followed by surgical excision designed to preserve nerve function. A number of surgical approaches have been described for tongue base schwannomas. Each has its own degree of postoperative morbidity. The use of a unilateral transcervical incision with blunt dissection was simple and quickly accomplished with protection of nearby nerves. Histologic identification of Antoni A and B areas along with strong and diffuse staining with S-100 stain pathologically completed the diagnosis of schwannoma.

  5. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Toffola, Elena; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XIIVII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable.

  6. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  7. Variant Anterior Digastric Muscle Transfer for Marginal Mandibular Branch of Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Zdilla, DC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve (MMBFN palsy is a common consequence of head and neck surgeries. MMBFN palsy results in paralysis of muscles which depress the inferior lip. Current management of MMBFN palsy involves ruination of normal neuromuscular anatomy and physiology to restore symmetry to the mouth. The article outlines the possibility to transfer variant anterior digastric musculature to accomplish reanimation of the mouth without adversely affecting normal nonvariant anatomy. The procedure may have the additional cosmetic benefit of correcting asymmetrical muscular bulk in the submental region.

  8. Techniques for Preservation of the Frontotemporal Branch of Facial Nerve during Orbitozygomatic Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kaare

    2015-01-01

    arch directly, whereas the subfascial dissection requires an additional cut on the DTF to expose the zygomatic arch. Proper subperiosteal dissection on the zygomatic arch is another important step in FTB preservation. Conclusion Detailed understanding of the complex relationship of the tissue planes...... of the facial nerve was dissected and followed in its tissue planes on fresh-frozen cadaver heads. The interfascial and subfascial dissections were performed, and every step was photographed and examined. Results The interfascial dissection is safe to be started from the most anterior part of the superior...

  9. Single session of brief electrical stimulation immediately following crush injury enhances functional recovery of rat facial nerve

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    Eileen M. Foecking, PhD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries lead to a variety of pathological conditions, including paresis or paralysis when the injury involves motor axons. We have been studying ways to enhance the regeneration of peripheral nerves using daily electrical stimulation (ES following a facial nerve crush injury. In our previous studies, ES was not initiated until 24 h after injury. The current experiment tested whether ES administered immediately following the crush injury would further decrease the time for complete recovery from facial paralysis. Rats received a unilateral facial nerve crush injury and an electrode was positioned on the nerve proximal to the crush site. Animals received daily 30 min sessions of ES for 1 d (day of injury only, 2 d, 4 d, 7 d, or daily until complete functional recovery. Untreated animals received no ES. Animals were observed daily for the return of facial function. Our findings demonstrated that one session of ES was as effective as daily stimulation at enhancing the recovery of most functional parameters. Therefore, the use of a single 30 min session of ES as a possible treatment strategy should be studied in human patients with paralysis as a result of acute nerve injuries.

  10. Intrasellar malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayenbühl, N; Heppner, F; Yonekawa, Y; Bernays, R L

    2007-02-01

    Intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) and intrasellar schwannomas are rare tumors. We describe a case of an intrasellar schwannoma with progression to a MPNST, a finding that, although very rare, extends the differential diagnosis of intrasellar lesions.

  11. Measurement of cochlea to facial nerve canal with thin-section computed tomographic image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Liu, Xiangliang; Yao, Jihang; Tian, Yong; Xia, Changli; Li, Youqiong; Fu, Yan; Luo, Qi

    2013-03-01

    Facial nerve (FN) paralysis is a rare but devastating complication of cochlear implant surgery. This study aimed to measure the cupula of the cochlea to the tympanic segment of the FN canal, cupula of the cochlea to the mastoid segment of the FN canal, and the geniculate ganglion to provide a more secure and accurate orientation of the FN canal and to facilitate operation on the cochlea by avoiding potential damage to FN. Using computed tomography, we scanned skulls of 120 volunteers who suffer no cases of skull base lesions. Multiplane reconstruction images were prepared with high-resolution computed tomography. Preoperative evaluation of the FN anatomy within the temporal bone by high-resolution computed tomography helps in minimizing surgical trauma to the nerve, and these results can help guide clinical surgery on the cochlea.

  12. [Schwannoma located in the tongue. A clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallesio, C; Berrone, S

    1992-12-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma and neurofibroma are two tumors of the peripheral nerves originating in the nerve sheaths. Schwannoma account for just over 1% of benign tumors reported in the oral cavity. The tongue is unanimously considered the most frequent site at this level; however, the tip is the least affected part of the organ. The case of schwannoma reported here is the third observed with a lingual localization in 18 years by the Division of Maxillo-Facial Surgery of The Odontostomatological Clinic of the University of Turin. The case is of interest due the rarity of this pathology and the presence of non-significant symptoms for a presumed initial diagnosis. CASE REPORT. A 21-year-old woman was referred to our attention following the appearance two years earlier of a slowly growing swelling on the tip of the tongue. The patient complained of the fastidious presence, disturbance to mastication and phonation and occasional paresthesia of the tip of the tongue. The small mass, which was clearly evident on examination, was covered with normal mucosa. On palpation it had a hard-elastic consistency; it was slightly painful, smooth and partial mobile on surrounding levels. The patient underwent the surgical removal of the neoplasia under anesthesia. The mass was well capsulated and a good cleavage plane was easily found. The neoformation was yellowy grey, oval bean-shaped, measuring 1.9 x 1.3 x 1.1 cm. The histological diagnosis, confirmed by immunohistochemical tests, was benign Antoni's, type A schwannoma. The postoperative period was good an there was no recidivation during the course of a one-year follow-up. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS. Benign schwannoma, which are relatively rare in the oral cavity, represent a pathology which are often not taken into account during clinical practice. Symptoms which take the form of slight hypoesthesia and vague paresthesia may lead to the suspected diagnosis of this type of neoplasia. The final diagnosis is always made after a

  13. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of facial nerve: Presenting as parotid mass

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    Bageshri P Gogate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST is very uncommon tumor of parotid gland and it is an uncommon spindle cell sarcoma accounting for approximately 5% of all soft-tissue sarcoma. There is strong association between MPNSTs and neurofibromatosis (NF-1 and previous irradiation. Structural abnormality of chromosome 17 is associated with NF-1 and so MPNST. We present a case of a 78-year-old male presenting with slowly growing parotid mass who underwent tumor resection.

  14. Symptomatic pericardial schwannoma treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Po-Jen; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Li, Yao-Feng; Chang, Hung; Lee, Shih-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic schwannomas are neurogenic tumors derived from the Schwann cells of the nerve sheath, most often seen in the posterior mediastinum with anatomical correlations to nerves. Although they are typically benign, a malignant transformation can occur, and thoracotomy instead of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is required to achieve a complete resection. Only a few cases of pericardial schwannoma have been reported so far. We present a rare case of pericardial schwannoma confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic resection. PMID:27162698

  15. Hemiatrophy of the tongue due to hypoglossal schwannoma shown by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, A; Shigemori, M; Abe, T; Yamashita, M; Kojima, K; Noguchi, S

    1994-04-01

    Schwannomas account for 8.5% of all intracranial tumours; more than 90% arise from the 8th cranial nerve. Only 42 cases of schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve have been reported. A 59 year-old woman developed right hemiatrophy of the tongue, clearly demonstrated on MRI, as was a small hypoglossal schwannoma. High signal was seen in the atrophic side of the tongue on both T1- and T2-weighted images, as described in the literature.

  16. Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy in Acute B Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Shiraj; Gupta, Arjun; Friedman, Paul; Naina, Harris V

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a haematological malignancy that can involve the central nervous system (CNS). Less than 10 % of patients with ALL have CNS involvement at presentation. The cranial nerve most commonly affected is cranial nerve VII although bilateral involvement is rare. Management and outcomes of these patients are not well understood. Moreover bilateral Bells palsy as a presenting symptom of ALL is extremely uncommon. We report a very unusual presentation of ALL with bilateral facial nerve palsy, and discuss the management strategies and outcomes for patients with ALL that present with cranial nerve palsies.

  17. Schwann Cells Overexpressing FGF-2 Alone or Combined with Manual Stimulation Do Not Promote Functional Recovery after Facial Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Haastert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs overexpressing different isoforms of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 combined with manual stimulation (MS of vibrissal muscles improves recovery after facial nerve transection in adult rat. Procedures. Transected facial nerves were entubulated with collagen alone or collagen plus naïve SCs or transfected SCs. Half of the rats received daily MS. Collateral branching was quantified from motoneuron counts after retrograde labeling from 3 facial nerve branches. Quality assessment of endplate reinnervation was combined with video-based vibrissal function analysis. Results. There was no difference in the extent of collateral axonal branching. The proportion of polyinnervated motor endplates for either naïve SCs or FGF-2 over-expressing SCs was identical. Postoperative MS also failed to improve recovery. Conclusions. Neither FGF-2 isoform changed the extent of collateral branching or polyinnervation of motor endplates; furthermore, this motoneuron response could not be overridden by MS.

  18. Scala tympani drill-out technique for oval window atresia with malformed facial nerve:A report of three cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liu a; Feng Yang b

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To report a scala tympani drill-out technique for managing malformed facial nerve covering the entire oval window (OW). Methods:Data from three cases with OW atresia, malformed stapes and abnormal facial nerve courses were reported, in which a scala tympani drill-out technique was employed with a TORP between the tympanic membrane and scala tympani fenestration for hearing reconstruction. Results: Air conduction hearing improved in two of the three cases following surgery. In the third case, there was no improvement in air conduction hearing following a canal wall up mastoidectomy and tympanoplasty. There were no vertigo, tinnitus or sensorineural hearing loss in the three cases. Conclusion:The scala tympani drill-out technique, which is basically fenestration at the initial part of the basal turn, provides a choice in hearing reconstruction when the OW is completely covered by abarrently coursed facial nerve.

  19. Hearing preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma: experience with the middle fossa approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMonte, Franco; Gidley, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    In the early 1960s William F. House developed the middle fossa approach for the removal of small vestibular schwannomas (VSs) with the preservation of hearing. It is the best approach for tumors that extend laterally to the fundus of the internal auditory canal, although it does have the potential disadvantage of increased facial nerve manipulation, especially for tumors arising from the inferior vestibular nerve. The aim of this study was to monitor the hearing preservation and facial nerve outcomes of this approach. A prospective database was constructed, and data were retrospectively reviewed. Between December 2004 and January 2012, 30 patients with small VSs underwent surgery via a middle fossa approach for hearing preservation. The patients consisted of 13 men and 17 women with a mean age of 46 years. Tumor size ranged from 7 to 19 mm. Gross-total resection was accomplished in 25 of 30 patients. Preoperative hearing was American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) Class A in 21 patients, Class B in 5, Class C in 3, and undocumented in 1. Postoperatively, hearing was graded as AAO-HNS Class A in 15 patients, Class B in 7, Class C in 1, Class D in 2, and undocumented in 5. Facial nerve function was House-Brackmann (HB) Grade I in all patients preoperatively. Postoperatively, facial nerve function was HB Grade I in 28 patients, Grade III in 1, and Grade IV in 1. There were 3 complications: CSF leakage in 1 patient, superficial wound infection in 1, and extradural hematoma (asymptomatic) in 1. The overall hearing preservation rate of at least 73% and HB Grade I facial nerve outcome of 93% in this cohort are in keeping with other contemporary reports. The middle fossa approach for the resection of small VSs with hearing preservation is a viable and relatively safe option. It should be considered among the various options available for the management of small, growing VSs.

  20. [The use of botulinum toxin type a in the acute phase of facial nerve injury after neurosurgical surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, O R; Akulov, M A; Usachev, D Iu; Taniashin, S V; Zakharov, V O; Saksonova, E V; Mingazova, L R; Surovykh, S V

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the role of botulinum toxin type A in the acute phase of facial nerve injury after neurosurgical surgery. The study involved 55 patients with acute facial muscle paresis caused by facial nerve injury during surgery on the posterior cranial fossa and cerebello-pontine angle (CPA). The first group consisted of 35 patients (mean age, 48.14±1.26 years) who were administered botulinum toxin type A (xeomin) at a dose of 2-3 U per point in muscles of the intact side of the face. The control group included 20 patients (mean age, 49.85±1.4 years) who underwent standard rehabilitation treatment of this pathology. The treatment efficacy was evaluated using the House-Brackmann Scale, the Yanagihara facial grading system, the Facial Disability Index (FDI), and the Sunnybrook Facial Grading (SFG) Scale. Before treatment, patients of both groups experienced severe dysfunction according to the House-Brackmann Scale. A month after the botulinium toxin type A therapy had been started, a significant improvement in the group of patients who received botulinum toxin was observed at all scales (p<0.05), whereas improvement in the facial nerve function in the second group was observed only by the 3rd month of rehabilitation treatment (p<0.05). The number of synkineses in the patients who did not receive botulinum toxin was 46% higher than that in the first group (p=0.019) one year after the surgery, and it was higher by 91% after 2 years (p<0.001). The use of botulinum toxin type A is reasonable in acute facial nerve injury and should be mandatory in combined therapy of these patients.

  1. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Saito

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL. We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs, which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The aim of this study is the application of the 3D Sk-MSC transplantation system to the reconstitution of facial complex nerve-vascular networks after severe damage. Mouse experiments were performed for histological analysis and rats were used for functional examinations. The Sk-MSC sheet-pellets were prepared from GFP-Tg mice and SD rats, and were transplanted into the facial resection model (ST. Culture medium was transplanted as a control (NT. In the mouse experiment, facial-nerve-palsy (FNP scoring was performed weekly during the recovery period, and immunohistochemistry was used for the evaluation of histological recovery after 8 weeks. In rats, contractility of facial muscles was measured via electrical stimulation of facial nerves root, as the marker of total functional recovery at 8 weeks after transplantation. The ST-group showed significantly higher FNP (about three fold scores when compared to the NT-group after 2-8 weeks. Similarly, significant functional recovery of whisker movement muscles was confirmed in the ST-group at 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, engrafted GFP+ cells formed complex branches of nerve-vascular networks, with differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, Sk-MSC sheet-pellet transplantation is potentially useful for functional reconstitution therapy of large defects in facial nerve-vascular networks.

  2. Temporal branch of facial nerve: a normative study of nerve conduction Ramo temporal do nervo facial: um estudo normativo da condução nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fabiana Sobral da Silva

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The temporal branch of the facial nerve is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injuries during surgical procedures. It may also be affected in clinical conditions. Electrodiagnostic studies may add additional information about the type and severity of injuries, thus allowing prognostic inferences. The objective of the present study was to develop and standardize an electrophysiological technique to specifically evaluate the temporal branch of the facial nerve. METHOD: Healthy volunteers (n=115 underwent stimulation of two points along the nerve trajectory, on both sides of the face. The stimulated points were distal (on the temple, over the temporal branch and proximal (in retro-auricular region. Activities were recorded on the ipsilateral frontalis muscle. The following variables were studied: amplitude (A, distal motor latency (DML and conduction velocity (NCV. RESULTS: Differences between the sides were not significant. The proposed reference values were: A >0.4 mV, DML 40 m/s. Variation between hemifaces should account for less than 60% for amplitudes and latency, and should be inferior to 20% for conduction velocity. CONCLUSION: These measurements are an adequate way for proposing normative values for the electrophysiological evaluation of the temporal branch.O ramo temporal do nervo facial é particularmente vulnerável a lesões traumáticas nos procedimentos cirúrgicos. Também pode ser acometido em várias condições clínicas. Estudos eletrodiagnósticos podem acrescentar informações quanto ao tipo e severidade das lesões. A pesquisa visa aperfeiçoar técnica eletrofisiológica para avaliação específica daquele ramo. MÉTODO: Voluntários (n=115 foram submetidos a estimulação eletroneurográfica em dois pontos, nas duas hemifaces. Estímulo distal na têmpora, estímulo proximal na região retroauricular. Foram registradas distâncias dos pontos de estímulo até pontos anatômicos da face; assim como vari

  3. Schwannoma of tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Carlos; Pons-García, María Asunción; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-06-01

    The schwannomas are nervous tissue tumors. We report a case of schwannoma of oral tongue. Because schwannomas are quite rare in the oral cavity, they are often not immediately included in the differential diagnosis of oropharyngeal masses, causing delay in identification and treatment. The definitive diagnosis requires histopathologic examination.

  4. Lingual schwannoma in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Francesco; Barbi, Egidio; Murru, Flora; Bussani, Rossana

    2012-09-01

    We present the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented to our emergency department because of a soft lesion growing on the back of his tongue. On examination, a vegetant mass on the posteromidline lingual part of the body of the tongue was noticed: it was not painful, even if the boy reported discomfort because of its size; there was no bleeding or signs of infection. The magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion as trilobated and capsulated, but was not diriment to define a diagnosis; excisional biopsy was performed under general anesthesia, and the mass was identified as a schwannoma. Schwannoma, or neurilemmoma, is a benign tumor originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath surrounding peripheral nerves. It is slow-growing, usually solitary, and encapsulated. Intraoral schwannomas are rare and account for 1% of lesions of the head and neck region. There is no sex predilection. The symptoms depend on size and location of the tumor. Recurrence is rare after complete surgical resection. The present study aimed to retrospectively describe our experience with a case of neurilemmoma of the tongue presenting in childhood, the diagnostic methods used, the surgical decision, and the treatment outcome and to analyze the data and review the literature available on this type of tumor. The etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and management are discussed.

  5. Nerve Transfer for Facial Paralysis Under Intravenous Sedation and Local Analgesia for the High Surgical Risk Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Carlos; Cardenas Mejia, Alexander; Cavadas, Pedro Carlos; Thione, Alessandro; Aramburo Garcia, Rigoberto; Rozen, Shai

    2016-07-01

    This case report describes an 86-year-old woman with complete peripheral right-sided facial paralysis resulting from resection of a cervical lipoma 14 months before surgery. Because of the high anesthetic risk, a masseter to facial nerve transfer was performed under combined light sedation and local anesthetic. Good functional and aesthetic outcomes were noted without complications. To our knowledge, nerve transfers under light sedation and local anesthesia have not been described in the literature and may be useful in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The feasibility of sugammadex for general anesthesia and facial nerve monitoring in patients undergoing parotid surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Cheng Lu

    2017-08-01

    Fifty patients undergoing parotid surgery were randomized allocated into conventional anesthesia group (Group C, n = 25 and sugammadex group (Group S, n = 25. Group C did not receive any NMBA. Group S received rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg at anesthesia induction and sugammadex 2 mg/kg at skin incision. The intubating condition and influence on FNM evoked EMG results were compared between groups. The intubation condition showed significantly better in group S patients than C group patients (excellent in 96% v.s. 24%. In group S, rapid reverse of NMB was found and the twitch (% recovered from 0 to >90% within 10 min. Positive and high EMG signals were obtained in all patients at the time point of initial facial nerve stimulation in both groups. There was no significant difference as comparing the EMG amplitudes detected at the time point of initial and final facial nerve stimulation in both groups. Implementation of sugammadex in anesthesia protocol is feasible and reliable for successful FNM during parotid surgery.

  7. A case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyake T

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomoko Miyake,1 Shota Kojima,1 Tetsuya Sugiyama,2 Mari Ueki,1 Jun Sugasawa,1 Hidehiro Oku,1 Kensuke Tajiri,1 Yuka Shigemura,3 Koichi Ueda,3 Atsuko Harada,4 Mami Yamasaki,4 Takumi Yamanaka,4 Hidetsuna Utsunomiya,5 Tsunehiko Ikeda1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki City, 2Nakano Eye Clinic of Kyoto Medical Co-operative, Kyoto, 3Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki City, 4Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Takatsuki General Hospital, Takatsuki City, 5Department of Radiological Science, International University of Health and Welfare, Graduate School, Fukuoka, Japan Introduction: The incidence of facial cleft is rare and ranges between 1.43 and 4.85 per 100,000 births. To date, there have been few reports of detailed ophthalmologic examinations performed in cases of facial cleft. Here, we report a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft. Case report: A 9-day-old female infant was delivered by cesarian section at 34 weeks of gestational age (the second baby of twins and weighed 2,276 g upon presentation. She had a facial cleft and ectrodactyly at birth. Right eye-dominant blepharophimosis was obvious. Examination of the right eye revealed inferior corneal opacity with vascularization, downward corectopia, and optic-nerve hypoplasia. The corneal diameter was 8 mm in both eyes, and tonometry by use of a Tono-Pen® XL (Reichert Technologies, Depew, NY, USA handheld applanation tonometer revealed that her intraocular pressure was 11–22 mmHg (Oculus Dexter and 8 mmHg (Oculus Sinister. B-mode echo revealed no differences in axial length between her right and left eyes. When she was 15–16 months old, we attempted to examine her eyes before she underwent plastic surgery under general anesthesia. She had a small optic disc in both eyes and the right-eye disc was tilted. After undergoing canthotomy, gonioscopy and ultrasound

  8. Rehabilitation of long-standing facial nerve paralysis with percutaneous suture-based slings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Long-standing facial paralysis creates significant functional and aesthetic problems for patients affected by this deficit. Traditional approaches to correct this problem have involved aggressive open procedures such as unilateral face-lifts and sling procedures using fascia and implantable materials. Unfortunately, our results with these techniques over the last 5 years have been suboptimal. The traditional face-lift techniques did not address the nasolabial fold to our satisfaction, and suture-based techniques alone, while offering excellent short-term results, failed to provide a long-term solution. This led to the development of a novel percutaneous technique combining the minimally invasive approach of suture-based lifts with the long-term efficacy of Gore-Tex-based slings. We report our results with this technique for static facial suspension in patients with long-standing facial nerve paralysis and our surgical outcomes in 13 patients. The procedure offers re-creation of the nasolabial crease and suspension of the oral commissure to its normal anatomic relationships. The recovery time is minimal, and the operation is performed as a short outpatient procedure. Long-term 2-year follow-up has shown effective preservation of the surgical results.

  9. Effect of postoperative brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy on functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair after radical parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Qiu, Shan-Shan; Marré, Diego

    2014-01-01

    There is much controversy regarding the effect of radiotherapy on facial nerve regeneration. However, the effect of brachytherapy has not been studied. Fifty-three patients underwent total parotidectomy of which 13 were radical with immediate facial nerve repair with sural nerve grafts. Six patients (group 1) did not receive adjuvant treatment whereas 7 patients (group 2) received postoperative brachytherapy plus radiotherapy. Functional outcomes were compared using Facial Clima. Mean percentage of blink recovery was 92.6 ± 4.2 for group 1 and 90.7 ± 5.2 for group 2 (p = .37). Mean percentage of commissural excursion restoration was 78.1 ± 3.5 for group 1 and 74.9 ± 5.9 for group 2 (p = .17). Mean time from surgery to first movement was 5.7 ± 0.9 months for group 1 and 6.3 ± 0.5 months for group 2 (p = .15). Brachytherapy plus radiotherapy does not affect the functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair with nerve grafts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intraoperative monitoring during surgery for hypoglossal schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Kusaka, Gen; Takashima, Kouichi; Kamochi, Haruna; Shinoda, Soji

    2010-08-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with an intracranial schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve between the medulla and the left hypoglossal canal. The condylar fossa approach was used with intra-operative electromyography (EMG) monitoring of the lower cranial nerves. The tumor was then removed carefully without decreasing the tongue EMG responses. EMG monitoring enabled us to remove the tumor while maintaining the function of the hypoglossal nerve. Tongue EMG was easily recorded by stimulating the hypoglossal nerve fibers, which was useful in identifying the hypoglossal nerve and evaluating its function. This suggests that tongue EMG is a useful monitoring tool to enhance neurological outcome following removal of tumors in this region.

  11. Regeneração pós-traumática do nervo facial em coelhos Posttraumatic facial nerve regeneration in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi Costa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial periférica traumática constitui-se em afecção freqüente. OBJETIVO: estudo da regeneração pós-traumática do nervo facial em coelhos, por avaliação funcional histológica dos nervos traumatizados comparados aos normais contralaterais. METODOLOGIA: Vinte coelhos foram submetidos à compressão do tronco do nervo facial esquerdo e sacrificados após duas (grupo AL, quatro (BL e seis (CL semanas da lesão. A comparação entre os grupos foi feita pelas densidades total e parcial de axônios mielinizados. ESTUDO ESTATÍSTICO: método de Tukey (p Posttraumatic facial paralysis is a frequent disease. This work studies posttraumatic regeneration of the facial nerve in rabbits. Functional and histological analysis compared injured and normal nerves on opposite sides. The left facial nerve trunk of twenty rabbits were subjectedto compression lesion, and sacrificed after two (subgroup AL, four (BL and six (CL weeks. Comparison between groups was made by analysing total and partial densities of myelinated axons. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Tukey Method (p<0.05. RESULTS:There was partial functional recovery after two weeks, and complete recovery after five weeks. Qualitative analysis demonstrated a degenerative pattern in the AL group, with an increased tissue inflammatory process. Evident regeneration signs were observed in the BL group, and almost complete regeneration was seen in the CL group. Normal nerves (N had an average TD of 15705.59 and average PD of 21800.75. The BL group had an average TD of 10818.55 and an average PD of 15340.56. The CL group had an average TD of 13920.36 and an average PD of 16589.15. The BL group had an average TD of N equal to 68.88%, and the CL group had an average TD of N equal to 88,63% (statistically significant. N showed a significant higher PD than injured nerves. However, this was not statistically different between BL and CL subgroups. Nerve DT was a more reliable method than PD in this study.

  12. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  13. Spontaneous expulsion of schwannoma of epiglottis

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of spontaneous expulsion of schwannoma of epiglottis is being reported. These are neurogenic tumours arising from the schwan sheath of peripheral, cranial and sympathetic nerves. The great majority of these neurogenic tumours originate from aryepiglottic fold or false vocal cords. However the neurofibroma of the epiglottis are quite uncommon.

  14. Surgical management of vestibular schwannomas after failed radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Watanabe, Kentaro; Friedman, Allan H; Cunningham, Calhoun D; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2016-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) have been treated with focused-beam stereotactic radiation treatment (SRT) including Gamma knife, CyberKnife, X-knife, Novalis, or proton beam therapy. The purpose of this study was to document the incidence of tumor regrowth or symptoms that worsened or first developed following SRT and to discuss surgical strategies for patients who have failed SRT for VS. A consecutive series of 39 patients with SRT failed VS were surgically treated. Clinical symptoms, tumor regrowth at follow-up, intraoperative findings, and surgical outcome were evaluated. There were 15 males and 24 females with a mean age of 51.8 years. Thirty-six patients (92.3%) demonstrated steady tumor growth after SRT. Two (5.1%) patients with slight increase of the mass underwent surgical resection because of development of unbearable facial pain. Symptoms that worsened or newly developed following SRT in this series were deafness (41%), dizziness (35.9%), facial numbness (25.6%), tinnitus (20.5%), facial nerve palsy (7.7%), and facial pain (7.7%). Intraoperative findings demonstrated fibrous changes of the tumor mass, cyst formation, and brownish-yellow or purple discoloration of the tumor capsule. Severe adhesions between the tumor capsule and cranial nerves, vessels, and the brainstem were observed in 69.2%. Additionally, the facial nerve was more fragile and irritable in all cases. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 33.3% of patients, near-total resection (NTR) in 35.9%, and subtotal resection (STR) in 30.8% of patients. New facial nerve palsy was seen in seven patients (19.4%) postoperatively. Our findings suggest that patients with VS who fail SRT with either tumor progression or worsening of clinical symptoms will have an increased rate of adhesions to the neurovascular structures and may have radiation-influenced neuromalacia. Salvage surgery of radiation-failed tumors is more difficult and will have a higher risk of

  15. 咬肌神经-面神经吻合:跨面神经移植手术的有效补充%Masseter-Facial Nerve Coaptation: An Supplemental Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王炜; 杨川

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the feasibility of the procedure of Masseter-Facial Nerve coaptation. Methods Two patients suffered from acoustic neuroma resection were performed cross-facial nerve grafting combined with partial Masseter-Facial Nerve coaptation. Results Both of them had an natural smile and eye closure when biting. No mastication disorder and depression on face were found. Conclusion It is an effective procedure to re-innervate the paralytic muscle quickly and is an augmentation for Cross-facial nerve grafting.%目的 初步阐述咬肌神经-面神经吻合手术的方法和疗效.方法 2例听神经瘤术后完全性面瘫患者,进行跨面神经移植术和患侧部分咬肌神经-面神经吻合手术.结果 术后3个月,患者咬牙后可将口角上提和闭合眼睛,咀嚼功能没有影响,面部未出现凹陷畸形.结论 咬肌神经-面神经吻合可以有效、快速地重建面部肌肉的神经支配,是跨面神经移植手术的有效补充.

  16. Comparison of trophic factors' expression between paralyzed and recovering muscles after facial nerve injury. A quantitative analysis in time course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosheva, Maria; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schwarz, Alisa; Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gordon, Tessa; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-05-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, recovery of motor performance negatively correlates with the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) due to excessive sprouting of the terminal Schwann cells. Denervated muscles produce short-range diffusible sprouting stimuli, of which some are neurotrophic factors. Based on recent data that vibrissal whisking is restored perfectly during facial nerve regeneration in blind rats from the Sprague Dawley (SD)/RCS strain, we compared the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), insulin growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF) between SD/RCS and SD-rats with normal vision but poor recovery of whisking function after facial nerve injury. To establish which trophic factors might be responsible for proper NMJ-reinnervation, the transected facial nerve was surgically repaired (facial-facial anastomosis, FFA) for subsequent analysis of mRNA and proteins expressed in the levator labii superioris muscle. A complicated time course of expression included (1) a late rise in BDNF protein that followed earlier elevated gene expression, (2) an early increase in FGF2 and IGF2 protein after 2 days with sustained gene expression, (3) reduced IGF1 protein at 28 days coincident with decline of raised mRNA levels to baseline, and (4) reduced NGF protein between 2 and 14 days with maintained gene expression found in blind rats but not the rats with normal vision. These findings suggest that recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve injury is due, at least in part, to a complex regulation of lesion-associated neurotrophic factors and cytokines in denervated muscles. The increase of FGF-2 protein and concomittant decrease of NGF (with no significant changes in BDNF or IGF levels) during the first week following FFA in SD/RCS blind rats possibly prevents the distal branching of regenerating axons resulting in reduced poly-innervation of motor endplates.

  17. Outcome of patients presenting with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in a tertiary centre--a five year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, I P; Lee, S C; Shashinder, S; Raman, R

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective study. The objective of this study is to review the factors influencing the outcome of treatment for the patients presented with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. The demographic data, clinical presentation and management of 84 patients with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) were collected from the medical record office, reviewed and analyzed from 2000 to 2005. Thirty-four (72.3%) out of 47 patients who were treated with oral prednisolone alone, fully recovered from Bell's palsy meanwhile 36 (97%) out of 37 patients who were treated with combination of oral prednisolone and acyclovir fully recovered. The difference was statistically significant. 42 (93.3%) out of 45 patients who presented within three days to our clinic, fully recovered while 28 (71.8%) out of 39 patients presented later then three days had full recovery from Bell's palsy. The difference was statistically significant. The outcome of full recovery is better with the patients treated with combined acyclovir and prednisolone compared with prednisolone alone. The patients who were treated after three days of clinical presentation, who were more than 50 years of age, who had concurrent chronic medical illness and facial nerve paralysis HB Grade IV to VI during initial presentation have reduced chance of full recovery of facial nerve paralysis.

  18. Congenital oval or round window anomaly with or without abnormal facial nerve course: surgical results for 15 ears.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomeer, H.G.; Kunst, H.P.; Verbist, B.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the audiometric results in a consecutive series of patients with congenital ossicular aplasia (Class 4a) or dysplasia of the oval and/or round window (Class 4b), which might include a possible anomalous course of the facial nerve. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart study.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy in large sporadic vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Brian A; Carlson, Matthew L; O'Byrne, Megan M; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Driscoll, Colin L W; Link, Michael J

    2017-01-13

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence, presentation, and treatment outcomes of trigeminal nerve-mediated symptoms secondary to large vestibular schwannomas (VSs) with trigeminal nerve contact. Specifically, the symptomatic results of pain, paresthesias, and numbness after microsurgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were examined. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of a database for concomitant diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) or trigeminal neuropathy and VS between 1994 and 2014 at a tertiary academic center. All patients with VS with TN or neuropathy were included, with the exception of those patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and patients who elected observation. Patient demographic data, symptom evolution, and treatment outcomes were collected. Population data were summarized, and outcome comparisons between microsurgery and SRS were analyzed at last follow-up. RESULTS Sixty (2.2%) of 2771 total patients who had large VSs and either TN or neuropathy symptoms met inclusion criteria. The average age of trigeminal symptom onset was 53.6 years (range 24-79 years), the average age at VS diagnosis was 54.4 years (range 25-79 years), and the average follow-up for the microsurgery and SRS groups was 30 and 59 months, respectively (range 3-132 months). Of these patients, 50 (83%) had facial numbness, 16 (27%) had TN pain, and 13 (22%) had paresthesias (i.e., burning or tingling). Subsequently, 50 (83%) patients underwent resection and 10 (17%) patients received SRS. Treatment of VS with SRS did not improve trigeminal symptoms in any patient. This included 2 subjects with unimproved facial numbness and 4 patients with worsened numbness. Similarly, SRS worsened TN pain and paresthesias in 5 patients and failed to improve pain in 2 additional patients. The Barrow Neurological Institute neuralgia and hypesthesia scale scores were significantly worse for patients undergoing SRS compared with microsurgery

  20. Dilde Schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Schwannoma, sinir kılıflarının Schwan hücrelerinden kaynaklanan, nöroektodermden ori jin alan, sert, düzgün sınırlı, kapsüllü, yavaş büyüyen ve genellikle sarımtırak renkte iyi huylu bir tümördür. Etiyolojisi bilinmemektedir. En sık baş ve boyun bölgesinde görülür. İntrakranial olguların büyük bir bölümü 8. kran ial sinirden kaynaklanmaktadır. Oral kavitede ve özellikle dilde oldukça nadir görülür. Tedavisi kitlenin cerrahi olarak çıkarılmasıdır. İngilizce literatürde dilde yerleşimli sadece ...

  1. Facial nerve paralysis and frey syndrome in an infant following removal of an internal mandibular distraction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Sameer Mehbub; Golinko, Michael Samuel; Williams, Joseph Kerwin

    2013-05-01

    Mandibular distraction using an implantable device has become a widely accepted and utilized procedure for the treatment of retrognathia. Although excellent results have been reported and observed with distraction osteogenesis, complications such as facial nerve injury have been previously reported. Often, this injury is usually temporary and corrects over the course of time. Frey syndrome has been classically described as an injury or severance of the auricotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve. It is commonly seen as a complication of parotid surgery and has never been reported in association with mandibular distraction. The authors report a unique case of both facial nerve paralysis and Frey syndrome in a patient following the removal of an internal mandibular distraction device. A review of the literature along with diagnosis and management are discussed.

  2. Multimodality Management of Trigeminal Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ajay; Barnett, Samuel; Anand, Vijay; Agazzi, Siviero

    2016-08-01

    Patients presenting with trigeminal schwannomas require multimodality management by a skull base surgical team that can offer expertise in both transcranial and transnasal approaches as well as radiosurgical and microsurgical strategies. Improvement in neurologic symptoms, preservation of cranial nerve function, and control of mass effect are the primary goals of management for trigeminal schwannomas. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice but may not be possible in all cases. Radiosurgery is an option as primary management for small- to moderate-sized tumors and can be used for postoperative residuals or recurrences. Planned surgical resection followed by SRS for residual tumor is an effective option for larger trigeminal schwannomas. The endoscopic resection is an excellent approach for patients with an extradural tumor or tumors isolated to the Meckel cave. A detailed analysis of a tumor and its surroundings based on high-quality imaging can help better estimate the expected outcome from each treatment. An expert skull base team should be able to provide precise counseling for each patient's situation for selecting the best option.

  3. Schwannoma of the adrenal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anunayi Jeshtadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Visceral schwannomas are extremely rare and are usually discov-ered incidentally on USG/CT-Scan. Primary schwannomas of the adrenal gland are extremely uncommon. It has been theorized that they originate from Schwann cells that insulate the nerve fi-bers innervating the adrenal medulla. Histopathological examina-tion coupled with immunohistochemistry provides the definitive diagnosis. A 55 year old normotensive female presented with pain in the right loin since 5 months. Her renal parameters were normal. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen showed a well delineated 6.5 x 5cms mass at upper pole of her right kidney. 24-hour urinary metanephrine was slightly elevated (3.07mg/24hrs. A decline in Serum cortisol levels was observed following a dexamethasone suppression test (18.89nmol/l. Histopathological examination revealed a spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed strong and diffuse positive staining for S-100 with negative expression for CD-117, desmin, CD-34, HMB-45, synaptophysin, chromogranin, cytokeratin, and SMA. Ki-67 index was 2%.A diagnosis of cellular schwannoma of adrenal gland was confirmed.

  4. Radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannomas (VS are benign tumours arising from the 8 th cranial nerve. There are various treatment options for these tumours, which depend upon the tumour size and patient age. However, the surgical treatment has been the conventional method of management of these tumours, since they are frequently detected when quite large in size, especially in our country. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS is frequently reserved for young patients with small and medium-sized VS (<3 cm and few symptoms. The tumour control dose is the most important consideration in GKRS, with higher doses having a risk for cranial nerve palsies, whereas lower doses leading to non-treatment of the tumour. The accepted tumour control dose ranges from 12 to 16 Gy among the various series with the tumour control rates of from 87% to 98% considered generally acceptable. The preservation of hearing is an issue worthwhile to be taken into account in GKRS and various series reporting this to range from 40% to 80%. The comparison between microsurgery and GKRS is still debatable because of different indications for both forms of therapies. Microsurgery is chosen for large tumours and GKRS for relatively smaller tumours.

  5. Effects of erythropoietin on the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and Bax after facial nerve axotomy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Shengyu Lü; Ziying Yu; Ming Bi; Bin Sun

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effect of high-dose erythropoietin (EPO; 5 000 IU/kg) on the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Bax in the facial nucleus after facial nerve transection in rats. A total of 42 Wistar rats of both genders were used in this study, and 40 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: EPO group and model group. The EPO group was treated with EPO once a day for 5 days at a dose of 5 000 IU/kg body weight. The model group was treated with saline of the same amount. At day 3 after EPO (or saline) treatment, the right facial nerves of the 40 rats were transected at the level of the stylomastoid foramen, with the left sides untreated. The remaining 2 rats that did not undergo axotomy served as the control group. The surviving motor neurons in operated rats were counted in coronal paraffin sections of the facial nucleus. The expression of TNF-α and Bax in the facial nucleus was detected by immunohistochemical staining at days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after axotomy. At days 14, 21, and 28 after facial nerve axotomy, a significantly greater proportion of facial motor neurons survived in the EPO group than in the model group. After axotomy, the expression of TNF-α and Bax increased in motor neurons in both the EPO and the model groups. TNF-α expression reached its peak level at day 14 after axotomy, while Bax expression reached its peak level at day 21. TNF-α expression was much lower in the EPO group than in the model group at all time points. No significant difference in Bax expression was found between the EPO and the model groups. These results indicate that high-dose EPO treatment attenuates the increase in TNF-α expression in the facial nucleus and reduces the loss of motor neurons after facial nerve transection in rats. However, high-dose EPO treatment has little effect on Bax expression.

  6. Èlectroneuromyographiс parameters as prognostic criteria in facial nerve palsy outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Savitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article we present the results of the retrospective clinico-electrophysiological analysis of 182 patients suffering from the idiopathic neuropathy of the facial nerve (Bell`s palsy. The comparison of the most common electromyographical (ENMG predictors of outcomes was made. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive method in the acutest period (less then 5 days is the level of excitability of the nerve, in the acute period (less then 14 days – estimation of M-answer amplitude loss, and from the 21st day – the presence of denervation in muscles. The most specific electromyographical approach to estimate the therapy efficiency is an analysis of the M-answer amplitude and latency. In conclusion, neurologists have the possibility to predict the outcome and to control the therapy efficiency in any period of the disease. The correlation dynamics ÈNMG sensitivity settings – NLN on different dates can be used to determine the volume of ÈNMG – the NLN study depending on the timing for the treatment of patients.

  7. Facial nerve paralysis after super-selective intra-arterial chemotherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, S; Iwai, T; Oguri, S; Koizumi, T; Mitsudo, K; Tohnai, I

    2017-02-10

    Facial nerve paralysis (FNP) after super-selective intra-arterial chemotherapy (SSIAC) is a relatively rare local side effect of SSIAC to the maxillary artery (MA) or the middle meningeal artery (MMA). The incidence and prognosis of FNP after SSIAC in 381 patients with oral cancer (133 with catheterization of the MA, 248 without) was investigated retrospectively. Only three patients (two male and one female) had FNP, for an incidence of 0.8%. All patients with FNP had undergone catheterization of the MA, and the incidence of FNP in this group was 2.3% (3/133). One of the three patients with FNP had paralysis of the third branch of the trigeminal nerve. FNP occurred a mean of 8.7 days (range 5-11 days) after initial SSIAC, and the mean total dose of cisplatin was 55.8mg (range 42.5-67.2mg) and of docetaxel was 25.4mg (range 17.0-33.6mg). FNP resolved completely a mean of 12.7 months (range 6-19 months) after onset. Because the administration of anticancer agents via the MA or MMA carries a risk of FNP, this information will be useful when obtaining informed consent from patients before treatment.

  8. Schwannoma of the conus medullaris: a rare case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suat Canbay; Askin Esen Hasturk; Fatma Markoc; Sukru Caglar

    2011-01-01

    Intradural schwannoma of the conus medullaris is a rare form of spinal neoplasm,which commonly occurs in the lumbar region.Conus medullaris level is unusual for schwannomas.A 49-year-old woman presented with chronic sciatica,mild bladder dysfunction,and paresthesia in the buttocks.Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed a mass lesion in the conus medullaris region with nerve compression.The tumor was completely resected and diagnosed histologically as schwannoma.The patient recovered after surgery.Clinical and radiologic features of this rare tumor are reviewed and are accompanied by literature findings.

  9. Plexiform Schwannoma of the Stomach in Neurofibromatosis Type 2: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Pathology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Dong Heon; Cho, Hyun Sun; Cho, Woo Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Plexiform schwannoma is a relatively rare benign subepithelial tumor arising from the peripheral nerve sheath, and associated with Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). There are a few reports of plexiform schwannomas arising from the gastrointestinal tract, and to our knowledge, there is no report of it arising from the stomach in a patient with NF2. Here we present the first case of a plexiform schwannoma of the stomach in an NF2 patient a submucosal tumor on radiologic finding.

  10. Schwannoma of the Tongue in a Paediatric Patient: A Case Report and 20-Year Review

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas (Neurilemmomas) are benign, encapsulated, slow-growing, and usually solitary tumours originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath with uncertain etiology. Approximately 25–48% of cases are seen in the head and neck region, of which 1% appears in the oral cavity. Lingual schwannoma can affect all age groups with peak incidence between the third and sixth decade. We report a rare case of lingual schwannoma in a 14-year-old girl complaining of asymptomatic swelling o...

  11. Conduction velocity of the rabbit facial nerve: a noninvasive functional evaluation Velocidade de condução no nervo facial do coelho: uma avaliação funcional não invasiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito Vasconcelos

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate standardized conduction velocity data for uninjured facial nerve and facial nerve repaired with autologous graft nerves and synthetic materials. An evaluation was made measuring the preoperative differences in the facial nerve conduction velocities on either side, and ascertaining the existence of a positive correlation between facial nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons regenerated postoperatively. In 17 rabbits, bilateral facial nerve motor action potentials were recorded pre- and postoperatively. The stimulation surface electrodes were placed on the auricular pavilion (facial nerve trunk and the recording surface electrodes were placed on the quadratus labii inferior muscle. The facial nerves were isolated, transected and separated 10 mm apart. The gap between the two nerve ends was repaired with autologous nerve grafts and PTFE-e (polytetrafluoroethylene or collagen tubes. The mean of maximal conduction velocity of the facial nerve was 41.10 m/s. After 15 days no nerve conduction was evoked in the evaluated group. For the period of 2 and 4 months the mean conduction velocity was approximately 50% of the normal value in the subgroups assessed. A significant correlation was observed between the conduction velocity and the number of regenerated axons. Noninvasive functional evaluation with surface electrodes can be useful for stimulating and recording muscle action potentials and for assessing the functional state of the facial nerve.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar os dados padronizados de velocidade de condução para o nervo facial não lesado e o nervo facial reparado com enxerto autógeno e com materiais sintéticos. Na avaliação foram medidas as diferenças pré-operatórias de velocidade de condução do nervo facial em cada lado e verificada a existência de uma correlação positiva entre a velocidade de condução do nervo facial e o número de axônios regenerados no p

  12. Results achieved in the treatment of patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freigang, Bernd; Rudolf, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Personal experience gathered with the treatment of 264 vestibular schwannoma (VS) at the Magdeburg University ENT Hospital is analysed. ABR Audiometry is useful as a screening, even though it yielded false-negative values in 12.7% (n = 33) for intrameatal VS and 16.9% for all VS, despite accurate evaluation. Latency increases of Waves I, III and V and their intraaural comparison exhibited a statistically significant difference for the VS levels proposed by TOS. The mean of intrameatal VS too was found to have longer latencies compared with the normal-hearing ears of the patients. In the individual case, with threshold hearing normal, anamnestic findings as well as otoneurological evidence provide an early indication for enhanced MRI, CISS imaging, or individual 3D reconstruction of the pontocerebellar cisterna. Adopting intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve and the cochlea as well as the Pars acustica by means of far-field and near-field electrodes, a good facial 'mobility' was achieved in 95.3%, and a useful audition (AAO-HNS Types A and B) in 60%. Monitoring is beneficial as it enhances the reliability and improves the subtle preparation during surgery. The power of hearing improved postoperatively within six months and remained at a good level over two years. From our perspective, otorhinolaryngologists are the right specialists to attend to VS.

  13. Seizure and unilateral facial nerve paralysis in a newborn with Dandy-Walker malformation – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a rare posterior fossa malformation. It can have a varied presentation depending on the age. A newborn presenting with neonatal seizure along with unilateral facial nerve palsy is rather a rare presentation of DWS and very few such cases were reported in the past. We are reporting a case of a newborn male baby presenting with neonatal seizure within 48 hrs of birth along with right sided LMN type facial nerve palsy which on due course of investigation revealed as a case of Dandy–Walker malformation. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 48-51 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9673

  14. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radi Shahien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radi Shahien, Abdalla BowirratDepartment of Neurology, Ziv Medical Center, Zfat, IsraelAbstract: We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24-year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy.Keywords: facial nerve paralysis, partial brachial plexopathy, epidural blood patch

  15. Pediatric cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma with Horner syndrome: a rare case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Sanjeev; Varshney, Saurabh; Bist, Sampan S; Gupta, Nitin

    2014-03-01

    Schwannomas are rare, benign, slowly growing neurogenic tumors that originate in peripheral, spinal, or cranial nerves other than the optic and olfactory nerves. In the head and neck, these tumors usually arise from the vagus nerve and the cervical sympathetic chain in the parapharyngeal space. Cervical sympathetic chain schwannomas represent a rare subgroup of schwannomas; fewer than 60 cases have been reported in the literature. These tumors are rarely seen in children and adolescents. Because patients typically present with an asymptomatic neck mass and vague complaints, clinical suspicion is important in making the diagnosis. Neural deficits at presentation are uncommon. The presence of features of Horner syndrome before excision is very rare, having been previously reported in only 10 cases of cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma. We report an extremely rare case of a cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma in a child who presented with Horner syndrome. The lesion was successfully excised.

  16. Evidence Suggesting that the Buccal and Zygomatic Branches of the Facial Nerve May Contain Parasympathetic Secretomotor Fibers to the Parotid Gland by Means of Communications from the Auriculotemporal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn

    2015-12-01

    The auriculotemporal nerve is one of the peripheral nerves that communicates with the facial nerve. However, the function of these communications is poorly understood. Details of how these communications form and connect with each other are still unclear. In addition, a reliable anatomical landmark for locating these communications during surgery has not been sufficiently described. Microdissection was performed on 20 lateral hemifaces of 10 soft-embalmed cadavers to investigate facial-auriculotemporal nerve communications with emphasis on determining their function. The auriculotemporal nerve was identified in the retromandibular space and traced towards its terminations. The communicating branches were followed and the anatomical relationships to surrounding structures observed. The auriculotemporal nerve is suspended above the maxillary artery in the dense retromandibular fascia behind the mandibular ramus. It forms a knot and fans out, providing multiple branches in all directions in the sagittal plane. Inferiorly, it connects the maxillary periarterial plexus, while minute branches supply the temporomandibular joint anteriorly. The larger branches mainly communicate with the branches of the temporofacial division of the facial nerve, and the auricular branches enter the fascia of the auricular cartilage posteriorly. The temporal branches and occasionally the zygomatic branches arise superiorly to distribute within the temporoparietal fascia. The auriculotemporal nerve forms the parotid retromandibular plexus through two types of communication. It sends one to three branches to join the zygomatic and buccal branches of the facial nerve at the branching area of the temporofacial division. It also communicates with the periarterial plexus of the superficial temporal and maxillary arteries. This plexus continues anteriorly along the branches of the facial nerve and the periarterial plexus of the transverse facial artery as the parotid periductal autonomic plexus

  17. The Relationship of the Facial Nerve to the Condylar Process: A Cadaveric Study with Implications for Open Reduction Internal Fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Barham, H. P.; Collister, P.; V. D. Eusterman; Terella, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The mandibular condyle is the most common site of mandibular fracture. Surgical treatment of condylar fractures by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) demands direct visualization of the fracture. This project aimed to investigate the anatomic relationship of the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Materials and Methods. Twelve fresh hemicadavers heads were used. An extended retromandibular/preauricular approach was utilized, with the incision being based pa...

  18. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  19. Soft Tissue Schwannomas of the Hard Palate and the Mandibular Mentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cennet Neslihan Eroglu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign, slow growing, encapsulated tumours that originate from the Schwann cells. Intraoral schwannomas are rare, and most of these tumours involve the tongue. They are rarely located in the hard palate or in the facial soft tissue. Herein, we present the clinical and histological features as well as the prognoses of two male patients with schwannoma, one of which was localized to the hard palate and the other to the facial soft tissue around the mandibular mentum and caused swelling.

  20. Intraosseous schwannoma in schwannomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashima, T.G.; Gibbons, M.R.J.P.; Whitwell, D.; Gibbons, C.L.M.H.; Bradley, K.M.; Ostlere, S.J.; Athanasou, N.A. [University of Oxford, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Pathology, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    This study investigates the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of two cases of intraosseous schwannoma that arose in patients with multiple soft tissue schwannomas. In both cases, the patients were adult females and the tibial bone was affected. Vestibular schwannomas were not identified, indicating that these were not cases of neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2). Radiographs showed a well-defined lytic lesion in the proximal tibia; in one case, this was associated with a pathological fracture. Histologically, both cases showed typical features of benign schwannoma. Molecular analysis of one of the excised tumors showed different alterations in the NF2 gene in keeping with a diagnosis of schwannomatosis. Our findings show for the first time that intraosseous schwannomas can occur in schwannomatosis. (orig.)

  1. Hypoglossal-Facial Nerve Reconstruction Using a Y-Tube-Conduit Reduces Aberrant Synkinetic Movements of the Orbicularis Oculi and Vibrissal Muscles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The facial nerve is the most frequently damaged nerve in head and neck trauma. Patients undergoing facial nerve reconstruction often complain about disturbing abnormal synkinetic movements of the facial muscles (mass movements, synkinesis which are thought to result from misguided collateral branching of regenerating motor axons and reinnervation of inappropriate muscles. Here, we examined whether use of an aorta Y-tube conduit during reconstructive surgery after facial nerve injury reduces synkinesis of orbicularis oris (blink reflex and vibrissal (whisking musculature. The abdominal aorta plus its bifurcation was harvested (N = 12 for Y-tube conduits. Animal groups comprised intact animals (Group 1, those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end coaptation alone (HFA; Group 2, and those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube (HFA-Y-tube, Group 3. Videotape motion analysis at 4 months showed that HFA-Y-tube group showed a reduced synkinesis of eyelid and whisker movements compared to HFA alone.

  2. Epineurial repair of an iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis after total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy in a dog with concurrent cranio-mandibular osteopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Calvo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old male entire West Highland white terrier was referred to the Small Animal Hospital at the University of Glasgow for bilateral, chronic, medically unresponsive otitis media and externa. A history of cranio-mandibular osteopathy was also reported. Bilateral total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy was performed with the aid of a pneumatic burr. Extensive bone proliferation was present bilaterally originating from the caudal mandibular ramus and tympanic bulla which incorporated the horizontal canal on each side. The right facial nerve was identified leaving the stylomastoid foramen and running in a cranial direction through a 1.5 cm diameter cuff of bone surrounding the horizontal canal and external acoustic meatus. Despite careful dissection, a facial nerve neurotmesis ensued which required microsurgical epineurial repair. Neurologic examination performed 12 h post-operatively revealed abnormalities consistent with right facial nerve paralysis. At 3 months, the facial nerve function was found to have improved significantly and was assessed to be normal four months after surgery. To the authors’ knowledge, this clinical communication described the first reported clinical case where unilateral facial nerve paralysis resulting from iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis was successfully treated by microsurgical epineurial repair.

  3. Schwannoma of the sino-nasal tract: a rare clinico-pathological entity revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadia Shirazi; Saurabh Varshney; Meena Harsh; S. S Bisht

    2012-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign neoplasms arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral, cranial and autonomic nerves. We report a case of schwannoma in the sino-nasal tract, a very rare site of tumour origin with unusual pseudoangiomatous histopathological changes, which we came across in a 22 years male with progressive nasal obstruction.

  4. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy following intranasal delivery of a genetically detoxified mutant of Escherichia coli heat labile toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J M Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An association was previously established between facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy and intranasal administration of an inactivated influenza virosome vaccine containing an enzymatically active Escherichia coli Heat Labile Toxin (LT adjuvant. The individual component(s responsible for paralysis were not identified, and the vaccine was withdrawn. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects participating in two contemporaneous non-randomized Phase 1 clinical trials of nasal subunit vaccines against Human Immunodeficiency Virus and tuberculosis, both of which employed an enzymatically inactive non-toxic mutant LT adjuvant (LTK63, underwent active follow-up for adverse events using diary-cards and clinical examination. Two healthy subjects experienced transient peripheral facial nerve palsies 44 and 60 days after passive nasal instillation of LTK63, possibly a result of retrograde axonal transport after neuronal ganglioside binding or an inflammatory immune response, but without exaggerated immune responses to LTK63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While the unique anatomical predisposition of the facial nerve to compression suggests nasal delivery of neuronal-binding LT-derived adjuvants is inadvisable, their continued investigation as topical or mucosal adjuvants and antigens appears warranted on the basis of longstanding safety via oral, percutaneous, and other mucosal routes.

  5. Ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa: an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia and atypical facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Antoun; Kendall, Mark C; De Oliveria, Gildasio S; Chen, Jeffry Q; Vanderby, Brooke; Rosenow, Joshua M; Bendok, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with facial pain often have ineffective pain relief with medical therapy. Cases refractory to medical management are frequently treated with surgical or minimally invasive procedures with variable success rates. We report on the use of ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa in patients following refractory medical and surgical treatment. To present the immediate and long-term efficacy of ultrasound-guided injections of local anesthetic and steroids in the pterygopalatine fossa in patients with unilateral facial pain that failed pharmacological and surgical interventions. Academic pain management center. Prospective case series. Fifteen patients were treated with ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block with local anesthetic and steroids placed into the pterygopalatine fossa. All patients achieved complete sensory analgesia to pin prick in the distribution of the V2 branch of the trigeminal nerve and 80% (12 out of 15) achieved complete sensory analgesia in V1, V2, V3 distribution within 15 minutes of the injection. All patients reported pain relief within 5 minutes of the injection. The majority of patients maintained pain relief throughout the 15 month study period. No patients experienced symptoms of local anesthetic toxicity or onset of new neurological sequelae. Prospective case series. We conclude that the use of ultrasound guidance for injectate delivery in the pterygopalatine fossa is a simple, free of radiation or magnetization, safe, and effective percutaneous procedure that provides sustained pain relief in trigeminal neuralgia or atypical facial pain patients who have failed previous medical interventions.

  6. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP).MethodsWe enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted.ResultsSixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1-12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29-31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32-33), respectively, Pcontracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision.

  7. Bupivacaine Injection for Management of Lagophthalmos Due to Long-Standing Idiopathic Facial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shadravan, Mahla; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of bupivacaine injection into the orbicularis oculi muscle to treat lagophthalmos in patients with long-standing Bell palsy. In this prospective interventional case series, bupivacaine, 5 ml of a 0.750% solution, was injected into the preseptal and pretarsal area of the orbicularis oculi in each of 10 patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy. The measures of vertical eyelid apertures during open and closed eyes were made before the procedure and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. A total of 10 eyes including 2 men and 8 women with an average age of 43 years (26-64 years) were studied. The mean amount of lagophthalmos before injection and after 6 months of follow up were 3.9 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively (p = 0.01)). The mean amount of corneal exposure before injection and after 6 months of follow up was 1.05 mm and 0.25 mm, respectively (p lagophthalmos and epiphora.

  8. 面神经血管瘤诊断及治疗%Diagnosis and treatment of facial nerve hemangioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭良蓉; 李健东

    2015-01-01

    目的研究面神经血管瘤的临床特点及影像学表现。方法收集2006年1月~2011年12月在北京世纪坛医院面神经研究室诊治的5例面神经血管瘤患者临床资料。男2例,女3例,年龄29~44岁;5例面神经血管瘤患者,4例均行颞骨高分辨率CT(high resolution CT,HRCT)及面神经增强MRI检查,1例仅行面神经增强MRI。结果5例患者均以突发单侧面瘫起病;左侧4例,右侧1例;5例患者均有面神经膝节段受累;面神经血管瘤在HRCT上主要表现为膝状神经节及邻近迷路段、水平段面神经骨管扩大,周围骨质边缘不连续、欠规则。较典型者呈点状或针状高密度类似蜂窝状结构;MRI上主要表现为以膝状神经节为中心的软组织结节影,伴邻近节段面神经增粗。平扫呈混杂T1、不均匀稍长T2异常信号,边界欠清,增强扫描后异常强化。结论详细病史、结合颞骨HRCT及多平面重建、面神经增强MRI等辅助检查,有助于面神经血管瘤术前诊断;根据患者听力情况、肿瘤范围、累及部位选择适宜的手术径路,在尽可能保留面神经完整性的基础上切除肿瘤。%[ABSTRACT]OBJECTIVETo study clinical features and imaging manifestations of facial nerve hemangioma. METHODSClinical data of 5 cases with facial nerve hemangioma, who were diagnosed and treated in facial lab of Beijing Shijitan hospital between January 2006 and December 2011, were collected. There were 2 male and 3 female. The age ranged from 29-44 years. Among the 5 cases with facial nerve hemangioma, both HRCT of temporal bone and facial nerve enhancement MRI were performed on 4 cases, and one case underwent facial nerve enhancement MRI examination only.RESULTSAll the 5 cases firstly presented with sudden unilateral facial palsy. Facial palsy affected the left and right side in 4 cases and 1 case, respectively. Geniculate ganglion was affected in all cases. Local bony canal

  9. 颞骨骨折导致的双侧周围性面瘫%Facial Nerve Decompression for Bilateral Facial Paralysis in Temporal Bone Fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 刘菲; 王若雅; 韩维举

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this rieview is to study management of bilateral facial nerve paralysis in temporal bone fracture. Methods This is a retrospective review of 8 cases of bilateral facial paralysis after bilateral temporal bone frac-ture that were treated with facial nerve decompression on at least one side. High-resolution computed tomography, audiomet-rictests and electromyogram (EMG) were obtained. Evaluation of the facial nerve function according to the House-Brackmann (H-B) grading scale. The decision for surgery was based mainly on the results of afore mentioned evaluations. Timing and the efficacy of surgical intervention were evaluated by pre-vs. post-operative facial nerve function assessments, as well as com-parison between the operation side and the opposite side. Results All the 8 patients were male, aged between 19 and 49 years. Traffic accident was the most commom cause (5/8). Fracture was longitudinal in all 16 temporal bones, with immediate onset of facial paralysis. Preoperative facial nerve function is between gradesⅤ and Ⅵ, in H-B scale, and with l patient showing bilateral conductive hearing loss, 4 Ratients showing bilateral lugh-frequency sensorineural deafness and 3 Ratients showing normal hearing. Among 8 patients, Facial nerve decompression was performed in 11 ears. H-B gradeⅠ-Ⅱfacial nerve function were aclueved in all cases at follow up (more than l year in some). The only patient with bilateral conductive hearing loss also received bilateral ossicular reconstruction, followed by recovery to normal hearing. Conclusions Traffic crash continues to be themain cause of temporal bone fracture and hilaterd faial paralysis and hilaterd faial paralysis. Facial paralysis caused by tempo-ral bone trauma can be satisfactorily treated with decompression.%目的:探讨外伤后双侧颞骨纵形骨折致双侧周围性面瘫行面神经减压手术的适应症、手术时机及疗效。方法回顾性收集外伤后双侧颞骨骨折

  10. 面神经功能评定方法%Approaches of Facial Nerve Function Evaluation (review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒湘宁; 马跃文

    2015-01-01

    面神经功能评定在特发性面神经麻痹诊疗过程中有至关重要的作用,是评估预后的主要工具。基于易掌握、易推广、成本低等因素,主观评估系统是目前使用最广泛的方法。客观评估系统在指标量化、可重复性、评价者间一致性等方面具有明显的优势,即使受限于技术、成本等因素,也会成为未来应用的主流,具有广阔的开发前景。本文回顾不同时期和类型的面神经功能评估系统在面神经功能评定中的临床应用,对现有各种面神经功能评价方法进行总结,为科学、合理地在特发性面神经麻痹疾病中制定、筛选和应用面神经功能评价系统提供参考与借鉴。%Facial nerve grading system (FNG) plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis, and also serves as a primary tool for prognosis. Subjective grading systems are currently the most widely used methods due to their easy accessibility, popularization and low costs. Objective grading systems, which have obvious advantages in terms of index quantization, repeatability and consistency between evaluators, will become the mainstream in future application and possess development prospect despite their limitation of technology and cost. This article reviewd the clinical application of different types of FNGs in facial nerve grading among different peri-ods, and made a summarization of currently-existing facial nerve grading methods. It may provide a scientific and reasonable reference to the constitution, filter and application of facial nerve grading systems in treating idiopathic facial paralysis.

  11. Breast schwannoma in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salihoglu Ayse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Schwannomas are mostly benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of the nerve sheaths. Breast schwannomas are very rare and account for only 2.6% of cases. As far as we know this is the first reported case of breast schwannoma discovered in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The breast schwannoma was evaluated with positron emission tomography and it exhibited moderate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. Case presentation We present the case of a breast schwannoma in a 63-year-old Caucasian woman who was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion Imaging modalities including positron emission tomography-computed tomography failed to distinguish breast schwannoma from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involvement of the breast.

  12. Intracochlear Schwannoma: Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve are benign tumors that usually occur in the internal auditory canal or the cerebellopontine angle cistern. Rarely, these tumors may originate from the neural elements within the vestibule, cochlea, or semicircular canals and are called intralabyrinthine schwannomas. Intracochlear schwannomas (ICSs represent a small percentage of these tumors, and their diagnosis is based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Objectives To report the clinical and radiologic features and audiometric testing results of an ICS in a 48-year-old man after a 22-month follow-up period. Resumed Report A patient with an 8-year history of persistent tinnitus in his right ear, combined with ipsilateral progressive hearing loss and aural fullness. Audiometry revealed normal hearing in the left ear and a moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear, with decreased speech reception threshold and word recognition score, compared with the exam performed 5 years previously. MRI showed a small intracochlear nodular lesion in the modiolus, isointense on T1 with a high contrast enhancement on T1 postgadolinium images. During the follow-up period, there were no radiologic changes on imaging studies. Thus, a wait-and-scan policy was chosen as the lesion remained stable with no considerable growth and the patient still presents with residual hearing. Conclusions Once diagnosed, not all ICS patients require surgery. Treatment options for ICS include stereotactic radiotherapy and rescanning policy, depending on the tumor's size, evidence of the tumor's growth, degree of hearing loss, intractable vestibular symptoms, concern about the pathologic diagnosis, and the patient's other medical conditions.

  13. Intracochlear schwannoma: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Ikari, Liliane Satomi; Burke, Patrick Rademaker; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Santiago; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve are benign tumors that usually occur in the internal auditory canal or the cerebellopontine angle cistern. Rarely, these tumors may originate from the neural elements within the vestibule, cochlea, or semicircular canals and are called intralabyrinthine schwannomas. Intracochlear schwannomas (ICSs) represent a small percentage of these tumors, and their diagnosis is based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objectives To report the clinical and radiologic features and audiometric testing results of an ICS in a 48-year-old man after a 22-month follow-up period. Resumed Report A patient with an 8-year history of persistent tinnitus in his right ear, combined with ipsilateral progressive hearing loss and aural fullness. Audiometry revealed normal hearing in the left ear and a moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear, with decreased speech reception threshold and word recognition score, compared with the exam performed 5 years previously. MRI showed a small intracochlear nodular lesion in the modiolus, isointense on T1 with a high contrast enhancement on T1 postgadolinium images. During the follow-up period, there were no radiologic changes on imaging studies. Thus, a wait-and-scan policy was chosen as the lesion remained stable with no considerable growth and the patient still presents with residual hearing. Conclusions Once diagnosed, not all ICS patients require surgery. Treatment options for ICS include stereotactic radiotherapy and rescanning policy, depending on the tumor's size, evidence of the tumor's growth, degree of hearing loss, intractable vestibular symptoms, concern about the pathologic diagnosis, and the patient's other medical conditions.

  14. Anastomose do nervo facial de coelhos com cola de fibrina: estudo da velocidade de condução nervosa Rabbit facial nerve anastomosis with fibrin glue: nerve conduction velocity evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Aurelio Lucchesi Sandrini

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo tem o objetivo de avaliar através da velocidade de condução nervosa com eletrodos de superfície a utilização da cola de fibrina na anastomose nervosa. MÉTODOS: Neste experimento, foram avaliadas as diferenças entre as velocidades de condução nervosa pré e pós-operatória do nervo facial esquerdo de 12 coelhos. Foi verificada a existência de correlação entre a velocidade de condução nervosa e o número de axônios regenerados no pós-operatório. Os nervos transeccionados foram unidos com cola de fibrina. O potencial de ação motora foi obtido com o uso de eletrodos de superfície. O eletrodo de estimulação foi colocado imediatamente à frente do pavilhão auditivo (tronco do nervo facial e o eletrodo de gravação foi colocado no músculo quadrado do lábio inferior. RESULTADOS: A média normal da velocidade de condução nervosa foi de 36,53 m/seg. Ao final do período, a velocidade de condução nervosa atingiu um valor de aproximadamente 81% do valor normal. Não foi observada correlação significativa entre a velocidade de condução nervosa pós-operatória e o número de axônios regenerados (p=0,146. CONCLUSÃO: A anastomose com cola de fibrina pode ser utilizada para anastomose nervosa no modelo animal e nervo estudados.AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of fibrin glue on nerve anastomosis, and study conduction velocity obtained by surface electrodes. METHODS: In this experimental model we evaluated nerve conduction velocity differences in the preoperative and postoperative periods, for the left facial nerve of 12 rabbits. Then, we evaluated whether there were correlations between conduction velocity and the number of postoperative regenerated axons. The sectioned nerves were anastomosed with fibrin glue. The muscle action potentials were obtained from surface electrodes. The stimulation electrode was placed immediately before the ear pinna (facial nerve trunk and the recording

  15. 3D-FIESTA MRI at 3 T demonstrating branches of the intraparotid facial nerve, parotid ducts and relation with benign parotid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanting; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhenzhen; Wu, Lebin

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) fast imaging employing steady state precession (FIESTA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 T in evaluating the intraparotid components of the facial nerve and parotid ducts, and to compare the MRI images with surgical findings. Thirty-one cases of benign parotid tumours were studied with conventional and 3D FIESTA MRI sequences at 3T using a head coil. The most clinically useful 3D FIESTA images were acquired at parameters of 4.9 ms repetition time (TR); 1.5 effective echo time (TEeff); a flip of 55°, a field of view of 18 to 20 cm, a matrix of 512 × 320, an axial plane, no gaps, and a section thickness of 1 mm. Post-processed multiplanar images were obtained with an Advantage Windows (AW sdc 4.3) workstation. Parotid ducts, facial nerves, and tumours were identified on these images. The relationship of the tumours to the facial nerves and parotid ducts was confirmed at surgery. The facial nerves appeared as linear structures of low intensity. The main trunk of the facial nerve was identified bilaterally in 93.5% of the 3D-FIESTA sequence images. Parotid ducts appeared as structures of high intensity on multiplanar 3D-FIESTA images (100%). The relationships of the tumours with the cervicofacial and temporofacial divisions of the facial nerve were correctly diagnosed in 26 of 31 cases (83.9%) using 3D-FIESTA sequence images. 3D-FIESTA MRI at 3 T depicted the main trunk, cervicofacial and temporofacial divisions of the facial nerve, and the main parotid duct. It is useful for preoperative evaluation of parotid gland tumours. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Atypical sinonasal Schwannomas: a difficult diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacopo, Galli; Micaela, Imperiali; Italo, Cantore; Luigi, Corina; Larocca, Luigi M; Gaetano, Paludetti

    2009-08-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumours arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. They are relatively frequent in the head and neck region (25-45%) but rarely involve in the sinonasal tract (4%). The authors outline the diagnostic difficulties and the problems in choosing the best surgical approach in two atypical cases of sinonasal Schwannomas. In the first case reported clinical data, sex and age of the patient, nasal endoscopy and angio-MRI led us to suspect an angiofibroma; therefore, we approached the case without a biopsy performing a preoperative selective embolization followed by an endoscopic resection. In the second case, due to initial visual symptoms and to the ethmoid-orbital compartment involvement, we performed a sinonasal endoscopy and collected a biopsy which resulted to be fundamental in the diagnostic assessment. Tumour excision was then obtained throughout an intracranial/endonasal approach. The two presented cases revealed the presence of cystic Schwannomas. In the first case, diagnosis was made only post-operatively after histological examination. Patients underwent complete surgical excision by means of an endoscopic sinonasal approach, in the second case associated to a left frontal craniotomy. The patients showed no signs of recurrence at a 9 months follow-up. Nasal endoscopy was extremely important in making the diagnosis, allowing an accurate assessment of the tumour extension and a biopsy. The diagnosis of sinonasal Schwannomas remains challenging; sometimes, clinical behaviour and modern imaging may be misleading. The diagnostic and therapeutic importance of sinonasal endoscopy is emphasised in the two presented cases.

  17. Ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Schwannomas are benign slow-growing nerve sheath tumors, which can develop in any peripheral or central nerve that contains Schwann cells. Schwannomas located near the olfactory groove are extremely rare and radiological diagnosis can be difficult. Moreover, ancient schwannoma is an uncommon variant, and radiologic findings are rarely reported. Herein, we reported a surgically confirmed case of ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove in a 44-year-old woman presenting with headache and visual disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a solid and cystic extra-axial mass located in the subfrontal area mimicking an olfactory groove meningioma. Histopathologic diagnosis of ancient schwannoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining for S100, CD56, vimentin, and other markers. Furthermore, we described the clinical manifestations, MRI characteristics, and histopathologic findings of the case, and presented a review of related literature.

  18. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP). Methods We enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted. Results Sixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1–12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29–31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32–33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision. PMID:26939561

  19. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  20. Upregulation of Nav1.8 in demyelinated facial nerves might be relevant to the generation of hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhong, Jun; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Yong-Nan; Liu, Ming-Xing; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Li, Shi-Ting

    2014-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the abnormal muscle response could vanish when the ipsilateral superior cervical ganglion was removed and reappear when norepinephrine was dripped at the neurovascular conflict site. Evidentially, we believed that the mechanism of hemifacial spasm should involve emersion of ectopical action potential in the compressed facial nerve fibers. As the action potential is ignited by ion channel opening, we focused on Nav1.8 that has been found overexpressed in peripheral nerve while damaged. In this study, Moller model was adopted, 20 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent drip of norepinephrine, and the abnormal muscle response wave was monitored in 14 rats. Antibodies against unique epitopes of the α subunit of sodium channel isoforms were used to detect the Nav1.8 neuronal isoforms, and the immunohistochemistry showed strong staining in 13 rats, which were all in the abnormal muscle response positive group (P spasm is an ectopic action potential that emerged on the damaged facial nerve, which might be coupled by Nav1.8.

  1. Pelvic schwannoma in the right parametrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machairiotis N

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Machairiotis,4 Paul Zarogoulidis,3 Aikaterini Stylianaki,1 Eleni Karatrasoglou,4 Georgia Sotiropoulou,4 Alvin Floreskou,4 Eleana Chatzi,4 Athanasia Karamani,4 Georgia Liapi,5 Eleni Papakonstantinou,5 Nikolaos Katsikogiannis,1 Nikolaos Courcoutsakis,2 Christodoulos Machairiotis4 1Surgery Department, 2Radiology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 3Pulmonary Department, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 4Obstetric Gynecology Department, 5Pathology Department, Thriasio General Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Neurilemomas are benign usually encapsulated nerve sheath tumors derived from the Schwann cells. These tumors commonly arise from the cranial nerves as acoustic neurinomas but they are extremely rare in the pelvis and the retroperitoneal area (less than 0.5% of reported cases, unless they are combined with von Recklinghausen disease (type 1 neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 58-year-old female with pelvic schwannoma, 6.5 × 5.5 cm in size, in the right parametrium. This is the first case reported in the literature. Based on the rarity of this tumor and in order to ensure optimum treatment and survival for our patient, we performed laparotomy with total abdominal hysterectomy and en-block tumor excision. A frozen section was taken during the surgery before complete resection of the mass, which was ambiguous. Because of the possibility of malignancy, complete excision of the mass was performed, with pelvic blunt dissection. Histological examination showed a benign neoplasm, originating from the cells of peripheral nerve sheaths; diagnosis was a schwannoma. There were degenerative areas, including cystic degeneration, hemorrhagic infiltrations, ischemic foci with pycnotic cells, and collagen replacement. Pelvic schwannomas are rare neoplasms that can be misdiagnosed. Laparoscopy is a safe

  2. Tongue base schwannoma: differential diagnosis and imaging features with a case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slow growing, encapsulated neoplasms that arise from the nerve sheath. A vast majority of these benign neoplasms occur in the head and neck region, most commonly involving the 8th cranial nerve. Schwannomas arising from the base of tongue are very rare and, thus, can easily escape the list of differential diagnosis for a posterior tongue mass. A systematic approach is recommended for diagnosis of a posterior tongue mass, with neoplastic, infectious, and congenital categories. ...

  3. Vestibular schwannoma: anatomical, medical and surgical perspective

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    Ashfaq Ul Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "acoustic" is a misnomer, as the tumor rarely arises from the acoustic (or cochlear division of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The correct medical term is vestibular schwannoma, because it involves the vestibular portion of the 8th cranial nerve. They are benign, rather rare tumors. They expand in size and grow larger; they can push against the brain. While the tumor does not actually invade the brain, the pressure of the tumor can displace brain tissue. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 178-182

  4. Comprehensive approach in surgical reconstruction of facial nerve paralysis: a 10-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Eyal; Stahl, Shy; Barnea, Yoav; Leshem, David; Zaretski, Arik; Amir, Aharon; Meilik, Beni; Miller, Ehud; Shapira, Eyal; Abu Jabel, Amin; Weiss, Jerry; Arad, Ehud

    2010-04-01

    Facial paralysis presents diverse functional and aesthetic abnormalities. Reconstruction may be achieved by several methods. We reviewed the management and outcome of facial paralysis patients to establish principles on which a comprehensive reconstructive approach may be based. Records were reviewed of all patients operated for facial paralysis at our institution between 1998 and 2007. Ninety-five patients were included, of which 15 patients had static reconstruction alone, and 80 patients had dynamic reconstruction. Presented is our experience in reconstruction of facial paralysis over the past decade, delineating a comprehensive approach to this condition. Various surgical techniques are described.

  5. Electrical response grading versus House-Brackmann scale for evaluation of facial nerve injury after Bell’s palsy:a comparative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Huang; Zhang-ling Zhou; Li-li Wang; Cong Zuo; Yan Lu; Yong Chen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are no convenient techniques to evaluate the degree of facial nerve injury during a course of acupuncture treatment for Bell’s palsy. Our previous studies found that observing the electrical response of specific facial muscles provided reasonable correlation with the prognosis of electroacupuncture treatment. Hence, we used the new method to evaluate the degree of facial nerve injury in patients with Bell’s palsy in comparison with the House-Brackmann scale. The relationship between therapeutic effects and prognosis was analyzed to explore an objective method for evaluating Bell’s palsy. METHODS: The facial nerve function of 68 patients with Bell’s palsy was assessed with both electrical response grading and the House-Brackmann scale before treatment. Then differences in evaluation results of the two methods were compared. All enrolled patients received electroacupuncture treatment with disperse-dense wave at 1/100 Hz for 4 weeks. After treatment, correlation analysis was conducted to ifnd the relationship between electrical response and therapeutic effects or prognosis. RESULTS: Checking consistency between electrical response grading and House-Brackmann scale: Kappa value 0.028 (P = 0.578). Correlation analysis: the two methods were correlated with the prognosis, and electrical response grading (rER= 0.789) was better than the House-Brackmann scale (rHB= 0.423). CONCLUSION: Electrical response grading is superior to the House-Brackmann scale in efficacy and reliability, and can conveniently assess the degree of facial nerve injury. The House-Brackmann scale is suitable for the patients with mild facial nerve injury, but its evaluation quality for severe facial nerve injury is poor.

  6. Predictive Factors of Unfavorable Events After Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hee; Jung, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jong Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Chang, Won Seok

    2017-08-04

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS) introduces risks to the facial nerve and auditory perception, and may involve post-treatment complications such as pseudoprogression, hydrocephalus, and other cranial neuropathies. This study of patients with VS who underwent GKS investigated radiosurgical results, focusing on post-treatment complications and identifying the factors that predict such complications. We undertook a retrospective review of all VS patients treated with the Perfexion Leksell gamma knife between November 2007 and October 2010 at our institution. Patients who underwent at least 12 months of clinical and radiological assessments before and after GKS were included. All 235 patients were included in the analyses reported here. The 5-year serviceable hearing and facial nerve preservation values were 73.9% and 94.3%, respectively. Following GKS, 43 patients (18.30%) showed pseudoprogression, 15 (6.38%) exhibited hydrocephalus, 22 (9.36%) showed trigeminal neuropathy, 14 (5.96%) showed vertigo, and 25 (10.64%) showed facial myokymia. According to multivariate analysis, solid tumor nature was significantly associated with pseudoprogression and patient age was significantly associated with hydrocephalus. Patients receiving margin dose ≥ 13 Gy had a significantly higher probability of loss of serviceable hearing. Patients with smaller tumors had a trigeminal nerve preservation rate comparable to patients harboring larger tumors. Patients receiving margin dose < 13 Gy or older patients had a significantly higher probability of vestibular nerve dysfunction. Further prospective studies should be designed to provide further insight into the exact relationship between the predictive factors we investigated and post-treatment complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic Schwannoma. Early effects and preservation of hearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masaru; Ohye, Chihiro; Hirato, Junko [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Shibazaki, Tohru; Andou, Yoshitaka

    1995-10-01

    The effects of relatively low dose gamma knife irradiation on acoustic Schwannoma were evaluated. The signal intensity change and tumor shrinkage on magnetic resonance (MR) images, change in hearing, and complications in 28 patients (mean age 47.0{+-}13.6 yrs) were studied. Three patients had bilateral tumors. Six were already deaf when treated. The maximum tumor diameter was 35 mm. The mean dose delivered to the tumor was 12.1{+-}1.6 Gy at the periphery, and 25.2{+-}4.3 Gy at the center. The mean follow-up time was 16 months and the longest 24 months. Lowering of the MR signal intensity in the tumor center appeared after 3 months at earliest but generally after 6 months. Signs of tumor shrinkage appeared within 12 months on average. Cyst in the tumor enlarged rapidly after treatment in two patients. The percentage of hearing preservation was 85% (17/20) at 3 months, 80% (16/20) at 6 months, 72% (13/18) at 9 months, 75% (12/16) at 12 months, 67% (8/12) at 15 months, 60% (6/10) at 18 months, and 50% (2/4) at 24 months. Subtle changes in hearing were detected by speech tone audiometry. Temporary facial numbness and weakness was seen in one patient each. No patient had lower cranial nerve paresis. Relatively low dose gamma knife radiosurgery is effective in suppressing growth of acoustic Schwannoma with preservation of hearing. (author).

  8. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Ju; Park, In Suh; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Choi, Suk Jin; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Woo Chul; Han, Jun Gu; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic correlation and to determine whether these schwannomas share the imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves. The MRIs of 17 cases of pathologically proven spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were reviewed retrospectively, and cystic changes, enhancement, and intratumoral hemorrhage of the tumors were evaluated. Imaging features known to be common findings of schwannoma in the peripheral nerves, such as encapsulation, the target sign, the fascicular sign, and visualization of entering or exiting nerve rootlets, were also evaluated. The histopathology of the tumors was correlated with the MRI findings. Cystic changes were detected in 14 cases by MRI and in 16 cases by pathology. The most common pattern of enhancement was a thick peripheral septal pattern (70.59%). Intratumoral hemorrhage was detected in four cases on MRI, but in all cases on pathology. Encapsulation was observed in all cases. The fascicular sign was seen in only four cases, and thickening of an exiting rootlet was visualized in one case. None of the cases showed the target sign. Spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were typical encapsulated cystic tumors and had few imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves.

  9. Schwannoma in the midline of hard palate: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Sabetmehr, Omid; Mahmoudi, Seyyed Mostafa; Kouhsoltani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign encapsulated slow-growing tumor that originates from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. It usually occurs in the head and neck; however, it is rare in the oral cavity. The tongue is the most common site of intraoral schwannomas, followed by the floor of the mouth, palate, gingiva, vestibular mucosa, lips and mental nerve area. We report a rare case of schwannoma in the midline of hard palate with ulcerated surface in a 21-year-old male with a two-month history of a painless swelling on his palate. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological features along with differential diagnosis and treatment are also discussed.

  10. Schwannoma of tongue base treated with transoral carbon dioxide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzad, H; Persaud, R; Papadimitriou, N; Kaniyur, S; Mochloulis, G

    2006-12-01

    Schwannomas are benign slow growing solitary tumours of nerve sheath origin and can arise from any myelinated nerve. They have been reported to occur in most parts of the body with the highest incidence (25%) in the head and neck region, although tongue base lesions are rare. The tumour is resistant to radiotherapy, and therefore, the treatment of choice is surgery. We present a case of a tongue base schwannoma which was completely extirpated with a carbon dioxide laser via the transoral approach. The patient experienced virtually no morbidity from the use of the laser. Whilst tongue base schwannoma has been documented, we could not find an earlier report in the English literature describing our method of treatment. We conclude that transoral carbon dioxide laser can be added to the surgical armamentarium for the management of other similar cases in the future.

  11. Anatomic research of suboccipito-retrosigmoidal approach for minimally invasive exposure of facial-acoustic nerve complex utilizing virtual reality skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke TANG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss microanatomy features of facial-acoustic nerve complex in suboccipito-retrosigmoidal minimally invasive approach based on virtual reality image model. Methods CT and MRI scans were performed to 5 adult cadaver heads, and then, image data was inputted into Vitrea virtual reality system to establish three-dimensional anatomy model of facial-acoustic nerve complex. Suboccipito-retrosigmoidal approach was simulated by selecting osseous landmark points on the calvaria and skull base. Anatomic exposures in surgical trajectory were observed and measured following minimally invasive design. Statistical comparison was launched by paired t test. Results Routes simulating suboccipito-retrosigmoidal approach for exposure of facial-acoustic nerve complex passed under the inferior edge of transverse sinus. Spacial sequence of nerves and vessels in the route was displayed clearly. Vertebral artery and posterior inferior cerebellar artery did not show in the route. Cerebella, lower cranial nerves, anterior inferior cerebellar artery, facial-acoustic nerve complex were exposed successively in route before minimally invasive design. Then, lower cranial nerves pierced the jugular foramen at the site between the jugular bulb and inferior petrosal sinus. Minimally invasive route was higher than that before minimally invasive design and involved cerebella, anterior inferior cerebellar artery and facial-acoustic nerve complex successively. Lower cranial nerves and jugular bulb were not shown in minimally invasive route. Measure and comparative analysis showed that volumes of route (t = 36.331, P = 0.000 and cerebella (t = 16.775, P = 0.000 involved before minimally invasive design were more than that after minimally invasive design with statistically significant difference. Comparison did not show significant differences for the volumes of facial-acoustic nerve complex (t = 1.680, P = 0.127 and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (t = 1.278, P = 0

  12. Modelo experimental comportamental e histológico da regeneração do nervo facial em ratos Behavioral and histologic experimental model of facial nerve regeneration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Borin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O estabelecimento de modelos experimentais é o passo inicial para estudos de regeneração neural. OBJETIVO: Estabelecer modelo experimental de regeneração do nervo facial. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar com secção completa e sutura do tronco do nervo facial extratemporal, com análise comportamental e histológica até 9 semanas. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo prospectivo experimental. RESULTADOS: Progressiva recuperação clínica e histológica dos animais. CONCLUSÃO: Estabelecemos um método aceitável para o estudo de regeneração do nervo facial em ratos.To setup an experimental model is the first step to study neural regeneration. AIM: Setting up an experimental model on facial nerve regeneration. MATERIAL AND METHODS Wistar rats with complete sectioning and suturing of the extratemporal facial nerve trunk; with a behavioral and histological analysis for 9 weeks. STUD DESIGN: Experimental prospective study. RESULTS: Progressive clinical and histological recovery of the animals. CONCLUSION: Our method is acceptable to study facial nerve regeneration in rats.

  13. 面神经减压术治疗外伤性周围性面瘫62例%Treatment of traumatic peripheral facial paralysis with facial nerve decompression ( 62 cases report)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋刈; 刘云亮; 刘昉; 陈娟

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the curative effect of facial nerve decompression in the treatment of traumatic peripheral facial paralysis. Methods 62 patients with traumatic peripheral facial paralysis, admitted into Fujian Provincial Hospital from 2000 to 2010, were reviewed. The therapeutic management and prognosis were summarized. Results Within a 3 months to 2 years' follow-up, the facial nerve function were improved to a varying degree in 57 patients, but not in the other 5 patients. Conclusion The facial nerve decompression is an effective management for traumatic facial paralysis.%目的 探讨面神经减压术治疗外伤性周围性面瘫疗效,总结面神经减压术治疗经验.方法 回顾性分析62例外伤性周围性面瘫患者的病历资料,总结治疗及预后情况.结果 随访3个月~2年,除5例无明显效果外,其他57例患者均有不同程度的恢复.结论 面神经减压术是治疗外伤性面瘫的有效手段.

  14. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Shigeki; Mizuno, Kosaku [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  15. A columellar deformity caused by a congenital schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Bouihi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve. It very rarely located in the nasal tip. We report two cases of congenital schwannoma of the nasal columella and discuss the surgical approach of such tumor.Case report: Case 1: An 18 year-old female was referred to us for a very slow growing tumor of the columella. The deformity had been present since the birth. The patient underwent an excision of its tumor using an open rhinoplasty approach. The histological examination revealed a schwannoma. No recurrence was found within 2 years of follow up.Case 2: A 4 month male baby presenting a congenital tumor of his columella. He underwent an excision using open rhinoplasty approach. The histological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma.Discussion: Schwannoma of the nasal tip is a benign tumor that gradually causes aesthetic and functional disorders. Congenital schwannoma of columella is an extremely rare clinical situation. Its diagnosis and treatment can pose certain challenges. The treatment is surgical excision and histological analysis of the specimen. Open rhinoplasty approach provided a good surgical exploration and a good cosmetic result on this nasal tip tumor.

  16. 两种激光并超短波治疗周围性面神经麻痹的疗效%Effect of two kinds of laser combined with ultrashort wave on peripheral facial nerve paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘青

    2002-01-01

    Background: Peripheral facial nerve paralysis referred to injury of peripheral nerve trunk and its branches due to direct or indirect force.Physiotherapy could decrease ischemia.Swelling of nerve tissue and degeneration of myelin sheath and axon.Helium neon laser.Semiconductor laser and ultrashort wave were adopted in this group of peripheral nerve paralysis, effect was obvious.

  17. Predicting Nonauditory Adverse Radiation Effects Following Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Volume and Dosimetric Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Bernstein, Mark; Gentili, Fred [Gamma Knife Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa; Tsao, May [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Schwartz, Michael [Radiation Oncology Program and Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Prooijen, Monique van [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Millar, Barbara-Ann; Menard, Cynthia [Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V. [Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto (Canada); Laperriere, Norm [Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: Gelareh.Zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Gamma Knife Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric predictors of nonauditory adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma treated with a 12 Gy prescription dose. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our experience of vestibular schwannoma patients treated between September 2005 and December 2009. Two hundred patients were treated at a 12 Gy prescription dose; 80 had complete clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 24 months (median, 28.5 months). All treatment plans were reviewed for target volume and dosimetry characteristics; gradient index; homogeneity index, defined as the maximum dose in the treatment volume divided by the prescription dose; conformity index; brainstem; and trigeminal nerve dose. All adverse radiation effects (ARE) were recorded. Because the intent of our study was to focus on the nonauditory adverse effects, hearing outcome was not evaluated in this study. Results: Twenty-seven (33.8%) patients developed ARE, 5 (6%) developed hydrocephalus, 10 (12.5%) reported new ataxia, 17 (21%) developed trigeminal dysfunction, 3 (3.75%) had facial weakness, and 1 patient developed hemifacial spasm. The development of edema within the pons was significantly associated with ARE (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, only target volume is a significant predictor of ARE (p = 0.001). There is a target volume threshold of 5 cm3, above which ARE are more likely. The treatment plan dosimetric characteristics are not associated with ARE, although the maximum dose to the 5th nerve is a significant predictor of trigeminal dysfunction, with a threshold of 9 Gy. The overall 2-year tumor control rate was 96%. Conclusions: Target volume is the most important predictor of adverse radiation effects, and we identified the significant treatment volume threshold to be 5 cm3. We also established through our series that the maximum tolerable dose to the 5th nerve is 9 Gy.

  18. [A case of tongue base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huishan; Yang, Feng; Zhuo, Mingying

    2013-09-01

    Published reports of benign nerve sheath tumors of the oropharynx especially at tongue base are extremely rare. They may slowly growing but represent a potential threat to the airway, prompt diagnosis and treatment are vital. To our knowledge, this case presents the rare clinical condition and the first giant one. Due to the rarity, awareness of the possibility of a schwannoma in various otolaryngological conditions is an important step in making a correct clinical diagnosis. Here we represent a rare case of a giant schwannoma that arose from valleculae projecting to supraglottis to cause swallowing difficult but no breathing problem. The mass was completely removed, and no recurrence during next 2 years follow-up.

  19. 神经组织工程支架或异种神经移植在面神经缺损中的应用%Nerve tissue engineering scaffolds or heterologous nerve grafts in facial nerve defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁丽娜; 熊杰

    2011-01-01

    背景:了解面神经损伤的修复方法,以及各种组织支架的特性与优势,对于修复方法与材料的合理选择是十分必要的.目的:总结神经组织工程支架或异种神经移植在面神经缺损中的应用进展.方法:应用计算机检索PubMed数据库及CNKI数据库,在标题和摘要中以"组织工程支架,神经移植,面神经,修复"或"tissue engineering scaffolds,nerve transplantation,facial,repair"为检索词进行检索.根据纳入标准选择21篇文献进行综述.结果与结论:面神经缺损后立即直接缝合神经的断端是最好的修复方法.自体神经移植受神经移植体来源之限,常造成供区失神经支配;以及产生束外有髓和无髓轴突无规则生长会导致神经纤维错向再生,造成严重的联带运动的不足.异体或异种神经移植法虽然取得了一定的效果,但仍处于动物实验的研究阶段,尚难以应用于临床.%BACKGROUND: It is necessary for proper selection of repair methods and scaffold materials to understand repair methods of facial nerve injury and features and benefits of various scaffolds.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the progress in nerve tissue engineering scaffolds or heterologous nerve grafts for repair of facial nerve defects.METHODS: A computer search of PubMed and CNKI databases were performed using keyword of “tissue engineering scaffold, nerve transplantation, facial, repair” in Chinese and English. Totally 21 articles were reviewed.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: It is the best method to directly suture nerve stump immediately after facial nerve defects. Autologous nerve grafting is limited by implant sources, which often result in denervation of the donor site. Irregular growth of extrapyramidal myelinated and non-myelinated axons can lead to the fault regeneration of nerve fibers, causing serious shortcomings associated with the movement. Allogeneic or xenogeneic neural transplantation has yielded some results, but it is still used in

  20. Ressecção de schwannoma mediastinal por cirurgia torácica videoassistida Resection of a mediastinal schwannoma using video-assisted thoracoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ortigara

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Os schwannomas são tumores em sua maioria benignos, derivados das células de Schwann (células da glia pertencentes ao sistema nervoso periférico que ajudam a separar e isolar neurônios de estruturas adjacentes, normalmente localizados em nervos intracranianos, principalmente no VIII par (neuroma acústico. Quando extradurais, sua apresentação mais comum é através de massas tumorais que podem comprimir estruturas adjacentes, tornando-se sintomático, como é o caso dos schwannomas intratorácicos (presentes mais comumente no mediastino posterior. Este trabalho apresenta o relato de caso de um schwannoma tratado por videotoracoscopia e uma revisão literária sobre o assunto.Schwannomas are tumors that are typically benign. They are derived from Schwann cells (glial cells of the peripheral nervous system that serve to separate and isolate nerve cells from adjacent structures. The most common type of schwannoma is a benign tumor of cranial nerve VIII and is referred to as an acoustic neuroma. When extradural, such tumors usually present as masses that can invade adjacent structures, thereby becoming symptomatic, as in the case of intrathoracic schwannomas (typically found in the posterior mediastinum. Herein, we present a case of a schwannoma treated through video-assisted thoracoscopy, and we review the literature on the subject.

  1. Reversal of moderate and intense neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium with low doses of sugammadex for intraoperative facial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat López, J; Porta Vila, G; Martin-Flores, M

    2013-10-01

    We report two cases in which moderate and intense rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block was reversed intraoperatively with low sugammadex doses in order to facilitate electromyographic evaluation of facial nerve function during surgery of the parotid gland and the middle ear. Acceleromyography was used to assess reversal of neuromuscular block before starting electromyography monitoring. Rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block was reversed with sugammadex 0.22mgkg(-1) when the TOF ratio was 0.14 in the first patient, and with sugammadex 2mgkg(-1) during intense block (PTC 0) in the second patient. In each case, appropriate neuromuscular function (TOF ratio≥0.9) was established soon after sugammadex administration, and electromyographic evaluation of facial nerve was successfully conducted. The use of rocuronium and sugammadex, coupled with objective neuromuscular monitoring with acceleromyography, assured complete restoration of neuromuscular function and created the optimal conditions for the surgical team. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Non surgical treatment of vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Leoncio; Chust, María L; Menéndez, Antonio; Arana, Estanislao; Vendrell, Juan B; Crispín, Vicente; Pesudo, Carmen; Mengual, José L; Mut, Alejandro; Arribas, Mar; Guinot, José L

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results of local control and complications in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma treated with radiation. A retrospective study of 194 patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma, treated consecutively with radiation (either stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated radiotherapy) from 1997 to 2012. We analyze the local control of tumors, as well as secondary complications to treatment with radiation. A total of 132 (68%) tumors 68% are grade I-II tumors of the Koos classification, 40 (19%) are grade III, and 22 (13%) are grade IV. The tumors associated with neurofibromatosis (NF2), are 3.6% (6 tumors in 4 patients). The tumor control for the overall serie is 97% at 5 years, with a median follow-up of 80.4 months. For large tumors the local control is 91% at 5 years. Free survival of chronic complications is 89% at 5 years. Additionally, 50 tumors were subjected to regular follow-up with MRI without treatment, and 28 (58%) did not experienced tumor growth. Radiation and follow up with MRI, are an alternative to surgery in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma, with a low level of complications inside of multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  3. A new idea of electro-acupuncture treatment for peripheral facial paralysis and the nerve-endocrine hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Yong Wu; Guang-Fu Wu; Xin-Yu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the traditional Chinese medicine treatment of peripheral facial paralysis (PFP), this paper presents a new method of PFP. According to facial nerve distribution and innervation of the muscle, 10 points were selected and the intermittent wave of electro-acupuncture was performed for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. It is speculated that the possible mechanism of action is mainly dependent on the regulation of neuroendocrine system.%#摘要在传统中医治疗周围性面瘫的基础上,本文提出了一种针灸治疗周围性面瘫的新方法,根据面神经分布及其支配的肌肉进行选穴定位,共设计了10个穴,并以断续波行电针刺激治疗周围性面瘫;推测其可能的作用机制主要是依赖于神经-内分泌系统的调节作用。

  4. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  5. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Gupta; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  6. MRI-based diagnostic imaging of the intratemporal facial nerve; Die kernspintomographische Darstellung des intratemporalen N. facialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B.; Baehren, W. [Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie

    2001-07-01

    Detailed imaging of the five sections of the full intratemporal course of the facial nerve can be achieved by MRI and using thin tomographic section techniques and surface coils. Contrast media are required for tomographic imaging of pathological processes. Established methods are available for diagnostic evaluation of cerebellopontine angle tumors and chronic Bell's palsy, as well as hemifacial spasms. A method still under discussion is MRI for diagnostic evaluation of Bell's palsy in the presence of fractures of the petrous bone, when blood volumes in the petrous bone make evaluation even more difficult. MRI-based diagnostic evaluation of the idiopatic facial paralysis currently is subject to change. Its usual application cannot be recommended for routine evaluation at present. However, a quantitative analysis of contrast medium uptake of the nerve may be an approach to improve the prognostic value of MRI in acute phases of Bell's palsy. (orig./CB) [German] Die detaillierte kernspintomographische Darstellung des aus 5 Abschnitten bestehenden intratemporalen Verlaufes des N. facialis gelingt mit der MRI unter Einsatz von Duennschichttechniken und Oberflaechenspulen. Zur Darstellung von pathologischen Vorgaengen ist die Gabe von Kontrastmittel notwendig. Die Untersuchung in der Diagnostik von Kleinhirnbrueckenwinkeltumoren und der chronischen Facialisparese ist etabliert, ebenso wie die Diagnostik des Hemispasmus facialis. In der Diskussion ist die MRI zur Dokumentation der Facialisparese bei Felsenbeinfrakturen, wobei die Einblutungen im Felsenbein die Beurteilung erschweren. Die kernspintomographische Diagnostik der idiopathischen Facialisparese befindet sich im Wandel. In der herkoemmlichen Form wird sie nicht zur Routinediagnostik empfohlen. Die quantitative Analyse der Kontrastmittelaufnahme im Nerv koennte jedoch die prognostische Bedeutung der MRI in der Akutphase der Bell's palsy erhoehen. (orig.)

  7. A Usual Schwannoma at an Unusual Site-The Mesorectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Manchanda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present a rare case of mesorectal schwannoma diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology in a 36 year old man. Schwannomas are benign encapsulated tumors arising from Schwann cells of motor and peripheral nerves. They commonly present on the head, neck and trunk and on rare occasion arise in the retroperitoneum and in the lumbosacral region. It is however quite uncommon for a schwanomma to originate in the mesorectum. In evaluating such cases, FNAC provides a safe and effective method to resolve the great diagnostic dilemma.

  8. Use of an infrared camera to improve the outcome of facial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Emily K

    2008-03-01

    Intraoperative cranial nerve neuromonitoring (IONM) has significantly reduced morbidity historically associated with skull-base procedures. It provides the surgeon with immediate feedback to preserve both anatomic and physiologic function of monitored nerves. However, when the surgeon cauterizes tissue near the nerve, the monitoring equipment is saturated by the cautery signal, eliminating IONM information at a critical time. The use of an infrared camera under the drapes to observe the face for movement due to nerve stimulation is an invaluable adjunct to traditional IONM. Monitoring may also be improved by contralateral electrode placement to help identify artifact from nerve stimulation, using the microscope's video output to compare the surgeon's hand movements to recorded activity, and learning basic anatomy of the inner ear and skull base in order to know when heightened attention is important.

  9. Preoperative identiifcation of facial nerve and cochlear nerve in patients with acoustic neuroma%听神经瘤患者术前面神经及耳蜗神经显影技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡林彬; 杨军

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic neuroma is the most common benign tumor in cerebellopontine angle region. Surgical treatment of acoustic neuroma carries a risk of facial nerve dysfunction and hearing loss, which can be reduced by preoperative identification of facial nerve and cochlear nerve.This article reviews recent advances in imaging of intracranial nerve and mainly fouces on facial nerve and cochlear nerve in patients with acoustic neuroma.%听神经瘤是最常见的桥小脑角良性肿瘤,手术可引起面瘫、听力下降等并发症,术前定位面神经、耳蜗神经可降低其发生率。本文对近年来发展的颅内神经显影技术做一综述,主要集中于听神经瘤患者的面神经、耳蜗神经定位手段。

  10. Facial Nerve Neuromas:Diagnosis and management%面神经肿瘤的诊断及治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萌萌; 韩维举; 王若雅; 吴军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss on clinical features, radiological characteristics, differential diagnosis and surgical approaches in treating facial nerve tumors and repairing the nerve, as well as treatment outcomes. Methods Cases of facial nerve tumor cases reported after 2002 in Pubmed, Medline, LWW, Elsevier, Springer, CKNI and CQVIP were reviewed in comparison to cases treated by the authors. Results A total of 23 reports were identified covering a total of 354 cases. The average onset age 43.90 years and sex ratio was 1:1.1. Facial palsy, hearing loss and tinnitus were the most common present-ing symptoms. In 271 of the 354 cases, facial nerve function before operation were reported (normal=113, House-Brackman grade II=30, H-B grade III=38, H-B grade IV=29, H-B grade V=29, H-B grade VI=32. The horizontal segment and geniculate ganglion were the most location of involvement. Surgical approach selection depended on tumor location and hear-ing level before operation. Mastoid and labyrinthine approach were commonly used. Facial nerve repairing method was dictat-ed by the length of facial nerve defect and the availability of facial nerve stump . Greater auricular nerve grafts were the most common material used to repair facial nerve in our cases. Of the 208 cases with followed-up data, facial function reached H-B grade I in 34 cases, H-B grade II in 27 cases, H-B grade III in 76 cases, H-B grade IV in 48 case s, H-B grade V in 6 cases and H-B grade VI in 17 cases. Conclusion Facial palsy, hearing loss and tinnitus are the most common symptoms in facial nerve tumors. The seemingly impossible facial nerve tumors must be considered in patients with facial palsy. The hori-zontal segment and geniculate ganglion are most often involved in facial nerve tumors. Selection of operation approach is de-termined by the location and site of the tumor and if residual hearing is to be preserved. Facial nerve repair should be consid-ered unless examination indicates complete loss of facial

  11. Ancient Schwannoma of the Thumb Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Matsumine, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A 21-year-old woman had become aware of a mass on the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx of her left thumb 11 years earlier. Her medical history was unremarkable, with no traumatic injury of the left thumb. Initial examination revealed a hard but elastic, immovable tumor of 30 × 25 mm on the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx of the left thumb, with an ulcer formed at the center. No pain, sensory disturbance, or motor dysfunction was noted. The patient underwent punch biopsy at the outpatient clinic, and the tumor was histopathologically diagnosed as benign schwannoma. Total excision of the tumor was performed with digital nerve block under surgical microscope. Histopathological findings revealed a fibrous capsule covering the tumor, directional growth of tightly organized spindle-shaped cells, and mixed Antoni A and B patterns. The tumor also contained many various sized cysts and showed histological degenerative changes not observed in ordinary schwannoma, such as hemorrhage and prominent blood vessels with hyalinized walls. The S-100 stain was positive. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having ancient schwannoma. There was no evidence of infection, pain, complications such as ulcer formation, or recurrent tumor at 6 months postoperative.

  12. Unusual cause of non-discogenic sciatica: Foraminal lumbar root schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Karekezi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schwannomas are tumors of peripheral nerves that develop from the nerve sheath. Foraminal schwannomas are rare and account for 1-5% of all spinal schwannomas. The lumbosacral root schwannoma is a rare cause of sciatica and may raise confusion in diagnosis with late discovery of the tumor. Case Description: We report the case of a patient 30 years of age with chronic left sciatica in whom lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a  tumor involving the S1 nerve root. The excision of the tumor was simple. Histological examination revealed a benign schwannoma. The evolution was favorable postoperative with no neurological deficit, which confirms the good prognosis of this tumor. Conclusion: Nerve root schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica, especially when signs and symptoms of sciatica cannot be simply explained by prolapsed disc syndrome, which can often delay the diagnosis. Through this case presentation, the authors try to discuss the clinical and radiological features of this condition.

  13. Clinical analysis of 182 cases with facial nerve injury%面神经损伤182例临床资料回顾性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于国霞; 蔡志刚; 卢旭光; 施晓健; 彭歆; 俞光岩

    2008-01-01

    目的 分析颌面部外周性面神经损伤后功能恢复的规律和相关影响因素.方法 回顾分析182例面神经损伤患者的病历资料,分析损伤部位、损伤方式、损伤后治疗时间及治疗方式对于面神经功能恢复结果的影响.结果 口腔颌面部面神经损伤以分支损伤为主.神经损伤方式、部位、患者年龄、修复时间等因素均对面神经功能恢复结果有影响.随访至最终有完整记录的解剖性损伤49例中,45例(92%)在6个月内完全恢复;断裂损伤59例中,53例(90%)于6个月内开始恢复;12个月内,神经吻合35例中33例(94%)面神经功能开始恢复;8例神经移植病例中5例(62%)完全恢复.结论 口腔颌面部手术中应尽量降低对神经的损伤,尽早修复受损神经,这样能够更好地保存面神经功能.%Objective To investigate the recovery patterns and the influencing factors of facial nerve injury in maxillofacial surgery by retrospective analysis of a serial clinical data.Methods A total of 182 patients with facial nerve injury were reviewed.The cause of injury,the initial facial nerve function after trauma,the treatment, the initial recovery time of facial nerve function and the total recovery time were recorded.The factors that influenced the outcome of facial nerve function were analyzed.Results The facial nerve branch injury was common in maxillofacial injury.The injury pattern, location,age and reconstruction time all had effects on the function recovery of the facial nerve.Within 6 months,45 of 49(92%) anatomic injured patients completely recovered in 6 months;53 of 59 patients(90%)began to recoverwhen nerve had been ruptured.In 12 months,33 of 35 patients (94%) after nerve anastomosed and 5 of 8 patients (62%)with nerve transplantation got complete recovery.Conclusions Preserving the facial nerve during surgery is very important.If the facial nerve is injured,reconstructive surgery should be applied as soon as possible.

  14. Facial nerve paralysis due to intra-aural Hyalomma tick infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Müzeyyen; Devge, Cem; Tanrıöver, Ozlem; Pata, Yavuz Selim; Sönmezoğlu, Meral

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 33 year-old man from a village of the north-eastern part of central Anatolia admitted to the otolaryngology department of Yeditepe University Hospital with right facial asymmetry and pain on the right ear. A tick of the genus Hyalomma was observed in the external auditory canal of the right ear and it was removed with fine cup forceps under otomicroscopy. We are of the opinion that in patients presenting with sudden acute ear pain and facial palsy, the ear canal should be examined to exclude an infestation by ticks.

  15. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  16. The image variations in mastoid segment of facial nerve and sinus tympani in congenital aural atresia by HRCT and 3D VR CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Hou, Qian; Wang, Pu; Sun, Zhaoyong; Fan, Yue; Wang, Yun; Xue, Huadan; Jin, Zhengyu; Chen, Xiaowei

    2015-09-01

    To find the variations of middle ear structures including the spatial pattern of mastoid segment of facial nerve and the shapes of the sinus tympani in patients with congenital aural atresia (CAA) by using the high-resolution (HR) CT and 3D volume rendered (VR) CT images. HRCT was performed in 25 patients with congenital aural atresia including six bilateral atresia patients (n=25, 21 males, 4 females, mean age 13.8 years, range 6-19). Along the long axis of the posterior semicircular canal ampulla, the oblique axial multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) was set to view the depiction of the round window and the mastoid segment of facial nerve. Volumetric rending technique was used to demonstrate the morphologic features. HRCT and 3D VR findings in atresia ears were compared with those in 19 normal ears of the unilateral ears of atresia patients. On the basic plane, the horizontal line distances between the mastoid segment of the facial nerve and the round window (h-RF) in atresia ears significantly decreased compared to the control ears (PVR CT images. HRCT and 3D VR CT could help a better understanding of different kinds of variations in mastoid segment of facial nerve and sinus tympani in CAA ears. And it may further help surgeons to make the correct decision for hearing rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 3-Dimensional visualization study of angle nerve of facial nerve%面神经的角神经三维可视化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柠泽; 苏晓玮; 王志军; 王滨; 吕宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To validate the previous anatomic study result about angle nerve of facial nerve through 3-dimensional(3-D) visualization technique,so as to provide theory basis for clinic treatment of nerve loss.Method The full-thickness soft tissue at internal side of inner canthus was harvested from adult cadaveric head.The skin was 3cm in length and l cm in width,with 2 prarelled cut lines as location markers.The specimen was sliced continuously into 120 slices,with 10μm in thickness for every slice,0.25 mm apart. The slices underwent HE staining and 2-D digital image was gained by high resolution scanner.Then 3-D reconstruction was performed.Results ① It showed the 3-D structures and routes of angle nerve,as well as the relationship between angle nerve and angle arteriovenous.All the reconstructed structures can be displayed together or separately,also from any angles.② It confirmed the accuracy of microscopic anatomy study about angle nerve. ③ The 3-D reconstruction of angle nerve,as well as the surrounding structure could be very useful for clinical application.Conclusion Based on the histologic study and computer technology,the 3-D reconstruction of angle nerve could provide accurate basis for the feasibility of clinic treatment of angle nerve loss.%目的 通过三维可视化技术,验证前期解剖学研究结果,并为失神经支配手术提供一定的理论依据.方法 取自愿捐献的甲醛固定的成人尸头,切取内眦角内侧全层软组织长3 cm、宽1 cm,以皮肤表面2平行刀痕为定位线,连续横断石蜡切片,片厚10 μm,切片间距0.25 mm,共切取120张切片.采用HE组织化学染色,高分辨率扫描仪获取二维数码图像后进行三维重建.结果 ①真实再现了角神经的三维立体结构及角神经与内眦动静脉的三维立体行径,且重建结构不但能单独或搭配显示,并可从任意角度显示.②证实了角神经显微解剖学研究的正确性.③角神经毗邻关系的三维重

  18. 咬肌神经-面神经转位术对听神经瘤术后面瘫的治疗效果观察%Therapeutic Effect of the Masseter Nerve and Facial Nerve Transposition of Acoustic Neuroma Postoperative Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the curative effect of masseter nerve and facial nerve transposition of facial paralysis after acoustic neuroma surgery.Methods Selected in our hospital to acoustic neuroma surgery patients with facial paralysis after 79 cases,al patients were to be masseter nerve and facial nerve transposition in the treatment of,for the observation of the therapeutic effect of patients.ResultsPatients after treatment,folow-up 1 year facial lip functions were significantly better than those before treatment,another 61 cases good action smile,10 subjects with mild to moderate recovery,8 cases of poor recovery,the 3 patients appeared parotid masseteric region of subsidence,but chewing function has not lost.Conclusion Masseter nerve and facial nerve transposition of auditory neuroma after operation,the effect of treatment of facial paralysis is good.%目的:探讨咬肌神经-面神经转位术对听神经瘤术后面瘫的治疗效果。方法选取听神经瘤术后面瘫患者79例,均予以咬肌神经-面神经转位术治疗,观察患者的治疗效果。结果患者治疗后、随访1年内面肌上唇上提功能均优于治疗前;61例微笑动作良好,10例中等程度恢复,8例恢复较差;其中3例患者出现腮腺咬肌区下陷,但是咀嚼功能并未丧失。结论咬肌神经-面神经转位术对听神经瘤术后面瘫的治疗效果好。

  19. Computer-assisted cytogenetic analysis of 51 malignant peripheral-nerve-sheath tumors : Sporadic vs. neurofibromatosis-type-1-associated malignant schwannomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaat, B E; Molenaar, W M; Mastik, M F; Hoekstra, H J; te Meerman, G J; van den Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in small groups of patients with malignant peripheral-nerve-sheath tumors (MPNST) revealed complex karyotypes with no consistent changes. A computer-assisted cytogenetic analysis using a cytogenetic database was performed to determine recurrent cytogenetic alterations in 51 MPNST

  20. Intraoral schwannoma--a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Seema; Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Krishnan, Nitin; Nair, Preeti P

    2012-07-09

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are uncommon neoplasms, derived from schwann cells. These neoplasms, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of slow growing tumour masses of the oral cavity. The growth of these tumours sometimes causes displacement and compression of the nerve of origin, giving rise to clinical signs and symptoms. It can develop at any age and there is no sex predilection. Intraorally, the tongue is the most common site followed by the palate, floor of the mouth, buccal mucosa, lips and jaws. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for schwannomas, with few reports of recurrence or malignant transformation. In this paper, the authors report two cases of patients with intraoral schwannoma, where the preoperative clinical diagnosis was inconclusive and final diagnosis was established based on radiographic and histopathological examination.

  1. Ancient Schwannoma of the hard palate. An uncommon case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria L; Eguía-Del Valle, Asier; Martínez-Conde, Rafael; Coca-Meneses, Juan C; Aguirre-Urizar, José M

    2013-02-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma is an infrequent benign tumor in the oral cavity that originates from the Schwann cells on the neural sheath of the peripheral nerves. Schwannomas are frequently located in the soft tissues of head and neck region, but only a 1 to 12% of them are located in the oral cavity. Some histological variants of schwannoma have been described including the cellular, plexiform, epithelioid, ancient, and melanocytic types. The "ancient schwannoma" is an uncommon variant of this tumor that shows specific histological characteristics, and is rare in the oral cavity with less than 15 cases described on the literature. Most of them were located in the tongue or in the floor of the mouth, being the hard palate an extremely rare localization. We present a new clinical case of an ancient schwannoma with a long time of evolution, arising from the nasopalatine nerve, and located in the hard palate of a 35 year old female. We also review the main clinical and histological characteristics of this pathology. Key words:Ancient schwannoma, neurilemmoma, palate, schwannoma.

  2. Plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Jung, Shih-Ming; Hsueh, Swei

    2007-07-01

    Only three cases of clitoral schwannoma have been reported in the English language literature, with none of them being a plexiform schwannoma. Here we report the first plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris. A 41-year-old woman without neurofibromatosis presented with a 2 x 2 cm, slowly growing, painless tumor of the clitoris. Simple excision of the tumor was performed, and pathological examination revealed a plexiform schwannoma. No evidence of recurrence was noted after 2 years of follow-up. Despite its rarity, a schwannoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a clitoral enlargement or mass. Our case, despite its unique plexiform growth pattern, has clinical features similar to those of other reported cases of clitoral schwannoma.

  3. Cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès Nacef

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nerve tumors arising from the sympathetic chain are uncommon slow-growing tumors and represent a diagnosis challenge. Their malignant degeneration is rare. Definitive pre-operative diagnosis may be difficult as investigations are not usually helpful. We report the case of a 23-year old woman who presented with an asymptomatic solitary left cervical swelling. She was evaluated with sonography and computed tomography. Complete surgical excision of the lesion was carried out and histologic examination revealed a schwannoma. Post-operatively, the patient showed clinical findings of Horner’s syndrome. Pathologic and radiological evaluation, differential diagnosis of this neoplasm and its management are discussed.

  4. Clinical experience with Leksell gamma knife in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG En-min; PAN Li; ZHANG Nan; ZHOU Liang-fu; WANG Bing-jiang; DONG Ya-fei; DAI Jia-zhong; CAI Pei-wu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal nerve schwannomas, which are rare, slowly growing, benign tumors, account for 0.2% to 1.0% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8.0% of intracranial schwannomas.1-5 These tumors are treated surgically.1-4 The development of microsurgery and skull base surgery has made complete resection possible in most patients. Nevertheless, cranial nerve sequelae appear after complete resection of these tumors because they are located close to the cavernous sinus and usually adhere to the vital vascular and neural structures. As an alternative to microsurgical resection, Leksell gamma knife (LGK) radiosurgery has been performed for patients with intracranial schwannomas to minimize the treatment-related morbidity and achieve a long-term control of tumor growth.6,7 In this report, we describe our 6-year experience in the treatment of 38 patients with trigeminal schwannomas by LGK.

  5. Gastric schwannoma: a benign tumor often misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva S. Shah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that arise from the nerve plexus of gut wall. They present with nonspecific symptoms and are often detected incidentally. Preoperative investigation is not pathognomic and many are therefore misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report a rare case of a 37-year old woman who underwent laparotomy for complex bilateral ovarian cyst with resection of gastric-gastrointestinal stromal tumor preoperatively, but confirmed to have a gastric schwannomas postoperatively. This case underscores the differential diagnosis of submucosal, exophytic gastric mass as schwannoma.

  6. Rare occurrence of intraosseous schwannoma in a young child, its review and its pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign, encapsulated, perineural tumor that arises from the Schwann cells. Approximately 25% of the reported cases originate from the head and neck region. Of these, approximately 1-12% occurs intraorally. The intrabony lesion accounts for less than 1% of the central neoplasms. We report a rare case of intraosseous schwannoma in an 8-year-old male patient characteristically originating from the mental nerve. Radiographic examination followed by histopathological evaluation was further confirmed by immunohistochemical markers, S-100 protein, and GFAP that stained intensely positive for the tumor. Thus, confirming the diagnosis of intraosseous schwannoma.

  7. Three cases of retroperitoneal schwannoma diagnosed by EUS-FNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taiki Kudo; Hiroshi Kawakami; Masaki Kuwatani; Nobuyuki Ehira; Hiroaki Yamato; Kazunori Eto; Kanako Kubota; Masahiro Asaka

    2011-01-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve tumors that are typically solitary and benign. Their diagnosis is largely based on surgically resected specimens. Recently, a number of case reports have indicated that retroperitoneal schwannomas could be diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration(EUS-FNA)We report the diagnosis of three cases of schwannoma using EUS-FNA. Subjects weree two males and one fe-twomale,ages 22, 40, and 46 years, respectively, all of whom were symptom-free. Imaging findings showed well-circumscribed round tumors.However, as the tumors could not be diagnosed using these findings alone, EUS-FNA was performed. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of the resulting tissue fragments revealed bland spindle cells with nuclear palisading. There was no disparity in nuclear sizes.Immunostaining revealed S-100 protein positivity and all cases were diagnosed as schwannomas. Ki-67 indexes were 3%-15%,2%-3%,and 3%, respectively. No case showed any signs of malignancy.As most schwannomas are benign tumors and seldom become malignant, we observed these patients without therapy. All tumors demonstrated no enlargement and no change in characteristics.Schwannomasa are almost always benign and can be observed following diagnosis by EUS-FNA.

  8. Results of Facial Nerve Microsurgery for Peripheral Facial Palsy in 15 Patients%面神经减压术治疗周围性面瘫15例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方瑾; 李海同; 潘军燕; 陈晓红; 周水洪; 柴亮; 杨雪明; 王媚; 鲍洋洋; 钱林荣

    2014-01-01

    Objcetive To report results of facial nerve decompression for peripheral facial palsy caused by different facial never diseases.Methods Etiologies in this group included trauma (n=9), Bell’s palsy (n=3) and cholesteatoma in middle ear (n=3).All patients were treated with facial nerve decompression via transmastoid, subtemporal or supralabyrinthine approach-es.The House-Brackmann facial nerve grade was assessed during the 0.5 to 2 years follow up.Results Among the 9 traumat-ic facial palsy patients caused by temporal bone fracture, 5 received surgery within 2 to 4 weeks and achieved grade I (n=4) or II (n=1) facial function;3 received surgery within 5 to 8 weeks and achieved gradeⅡ(n=2) orⅢ(n=1) facial function;and 1 received the operation within 9 to 12 weeks after the injury and achieved only gradeⅣfacial function.Two patients with Bell ’s palsy were operated on within 9 to12 weeks and achieved grade I or II facial function. One Bell’s palsy patient achieved gradeⅢfacial function after receiving surgery 12 weeks after disease onset. The 3 cases of middle ear cholesteatoma were oper-ated upon in 1 to 2 weeks and all achieved grade I facial function. Conclusions Appropriate timing and facial nerve decom-pression operations based on the etiologies can lead to good facial function results.%目的:探讨不同面神经疾病致周围性面瘫行面神经减压手术的疗效。方法对9例外伤性面瘫、3例贝尔氏面瘫及3例中耳胆脂瘤所致的周围性面瘫,经乳突-颞下迷路上隐窝进路面神经显微减压手术,术后随访0.5~2年,按面瘫H-B分级法评估面神经功能恢复程度。结果9例颞骨骨折面瘫(Ⅳ级2例,V级6例,Ⅵ级1例),伤后2~4周手术5例,术后面神经功能恢复I级4例,Ⅱ级1例;伤后5~8周手术3例,面神经功能恢复Ⅱ级2例,Ⅲ级1例;伤后9~12周手术1例,恢复Ⅳ级。3例贝尔面瘫(Ⅳ级1例,V级2例),9~12周手术2

  9. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  10. Initial assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on motion analysis using an optical flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, Wan Syahirah W; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, Amirozi; Salleh, Hasriah

    2016-01-01

    An initial assessment method that can classify as well as categorize the severity of paralysis into one of six levels according to the House-Brackmann (HB) system based on facial landmarks motion using an Optical Flow (OF) algorithm is proposed. The desired landmarks were obtained from the video recordings of 5 normal and 3 Bell's Palsy subjects and tracked using the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) method. A new scoring system based on the motion analysis using area measurement is proposed. This scoring system uses the individual scores from the facial exercises and grades the paralysis based on the HB system. The proposed method has obtained promising results and may play a pivotal role towards improved rehabilitation programs for patients.

  11. Large Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm: Initial Presentation with Reproducible Facial Pain Without Cranial Nerve Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie Zelman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Unruptured posterior communicating artery (PCOM aneurysms can be difficult to diagnose and, when large (≥ 7mm, represent a substantial risk to the patient. While most unruptured PCOM aneurysms are asymptomatic, when symptoms do occur, clinical manifestations typically include severe headache (HA, visual acuity loss, and cranial nerve deficit. This case report describes an atypical initial presentation of a large unruptured PCOM aneurysm with symptoms mimicking trigeminal neuralgia, without other associated cranial nerve palsies or neurologic deficits. The patient returned to the emergency department four days later with a HA, trigeminal neuralgia, and a new cranial nerve III palsy. After appropriate imaging, she was found to have a large PCOM aneurysm, which was treated with surgical clipping with significant improvement in patient’s symptoms.

  12. Surgical treatment of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ritvik P

    2009-03-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (facial paralysis (3 weeks to 2 yr) and chronic facial paralysis (>2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgical therapies are facial nerve decompression and facial nerve repair. For facial paralysis of intermediate duration, nerve transfer procedures are appropriate. For chronic facial paralysis, treatment typically requires regional or free muscle transfer. Static techniques of facial reanimation can be used for acute, intermediate, or chronic facial paralysis as these techniques are often important adjuncts to the overall management strategy.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Extracranial Head and Neck Schwannomas: A Review of 27 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Yasumatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Clinical records of 27 patients with extracranial head and neck schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. Methods. Ultrasonography (US was performed in all cases. Seven patients underwent CT. Twenty-five patients underwent MRI. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC was performed for 12 of the 27 patients. Clinical history, surgical data, and postoperative morbidity were analyzed. Results. The images of US showed a well-defined, hypoechoic, primarily homogeneous solid mass. At CT, only one of 7 cases (14% was able to suggest the diagnosis of schwannoma. At MRI, twenty of 25 cases (80% suggested the diagnosis of schwannoma. Only three of 12 cases (25% displayed a specific diagnosis of schwannoma rendered on FNAC. The distribution of 27 nerves of origin was 10 (37% vagus nerves, 6 (22% sympathetic trunks, 5 (19% cervical plexuses, 3 (11% brachial plexuses, 2 (7% hypoglossal nerves, and 1 (4% accessory nerve. Complete tumor resection was performed in 11 patients, and intracapsular enucleation of the tumor was performed in 16 patients. The rate of nerve palsy was 100 (11/11 and 31% (5/16. Conclusions. MRI is sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of schwannoma. Intracapsular enucleation was an effective and feasible method for preserving the neurological functions.

  14. Schwannoma located in the palate: clinical case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carriches, Carmen; Baca-Pérez-Bryan, Rafael; Montalvo-Montero, Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Schwannoma is a benign tumor that originates from the presence of Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. They are usually asymptomatic, do not recur, and malignant transformation is rare. The preoperative diagnosis is often difficult, and although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are very helpful, in the majority of cases, the diagnosis can only be made during surgery and by histological study. The immunohistochemistry reveals that the Schwannoma cells test positive for S-100 protein. We describe a clinical case of Schwannoma located in the palate of a 15-year-old patient. It is important to highlight that the Schwannoma is usually found in the head and neck, and rarely in the oral cavity. When it does occur in this area, it is more likely to be found in the tongue. Other locations in the oral cavity include: the floor of the mouth, palate, gingiva, vestibular mucosa, lips and mental nerve area, listed from most common to least common. There has been no sign of recurrence two years after surgery.

  15. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study t...... targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored....

  16. [Infraorbital schwannoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Ríos, Laura Evelyn; Ríos Y Valles-Valles, Dolores; Flores-Estrada, José Javier; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el schwannoma infraorbitario es un tumor benigno de la vaina nerviosa periférica compuesto por células de Schwann. Suele aparecer entre los 20 y 70 años de edad, asintomático y producir proptosis progresiva e indolora durante su crecimiento. Caso clínico: paciente masculino de 32 años de edad que ingresó al hospital debido a un tumor no doloroso de crecimiento lentamente progresivo sobre el saco lagrimal izquierdo. A la exploración oftalmológica el tumor era de consistencia ahulada y estaba firmemente adherido a las estructuras vecinas. La transiluminación resultó negativa. El ultrasonido modo B mostró un ojo fáquico y un tumor infraorbitario homogéneo, bien circunstrito, con diámetro mayor de 19.7 mm, sin afectación de la vía lagrimal. El ultrasonido modo A mostró una reflectividad media-alta, con escasa vascularidad interna. La tomografía computada mostró un tumor de densidad homogénea, bien circunscrito a la región anterior y por debajo del globo ocular, sin erosión ósea. El tumor se extirpó mediante una incisión subdérmica. El diagnóstico histopatológico fue: schwannoma infraorbitario. Conclusiones: el schwannoma es un tumor benigno, poco frecuente en la órbita. Su diagnóstico definitivo se establece con base en los hallazgos histopatológicos, como: cápsula verdadera, áreas hiper e hipocelulares, engrosamiento y hialinización de las paredes vasculares. Sin esos hallazgos puede confundirse con tumores fusocelulares benignos. Se informa un nuevo caso de schwannoma infraorbitario y se compara con los casos previamente reportados.

  17. Safety profile of bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in the rehabilitation of patients with posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis-a novel modality (phase one trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sushil Kumar; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Modi, Manish; Gupta, Rijuneeta; Marwaha, Neelam

    2012-08-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the safety profile and role of mononuclear stem cells in the rehabilitation of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis not improving with conventional treatment. Study Design This is a prospective nonrandomized controlled trial. Study Setting This study is conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh between July, 2007 and December, 2008. Patients We included eight patients of either sex aged between 18 and 60 years of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis not improving with conventional treatment presented to PGIMER, Chandigarh between July 2007 and December 2008. Methods All patients underwent preoperative electroneuronography (ENoG), clinical photography, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) temporal bone. All patients then underwent facial nerve decompression and stem cell implantation. Stem cells processing was done in well-equipped bone marrow laboratory. Postoperatively, all patients underwent repeat ENoG and clinical photography at 3 and 6 months to assess for objective and clinical improvement. Clinical improvement was graded according to modified House-Brackmann grading system. Intervention Done All patients of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis who were not improving with conventional surgical treatment were subjected to facial nerve decompression and stem cell implantation. Main Outcome Measures All patients who were subjected to stem cell implantation were followed up for 6 months to assess for any adverse effects of stem cell therapy on human beings; no adverse effects were seen in any of our patients after more than 6 months of follow-up. Results Majority of the patients were male, with motor vehicle accidents as the most common cause of injury in our series. Majority had longitudinal fractures on HRCT temporal bone. The significant improvement in ENoG amplitude was seen between preoperative and postoperative amplitudes on

  18. Intraosseous schwannoma of the humerus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutema, George K. [Department of Pathology, University of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sorger, Joel [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Intraosseous schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms of the bone, of which fewer than 200 cases have been described in the world literature. These tumors are well-defined, lytic lesions, rarely associated with pathologic fracture. The mandible is the most frequently involved bone. We present only the third case of an intraosseous schwannoma involving the humerus. (orig.)

  19. Parietal intraparenchymal Schwannoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    We report a case of an intraparenchymal schwannoma of the left parietal lobe. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of intermittent headaches. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images revealed a 1.3 cm sized intra-axial homogeneous enhancing mass in the left parietal lobe. The lesion was pathologically confirmed to be a schwannoma.

  20. Audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a rare, but important cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Patients with asymmetric hearing loss, or unilateral tinnitus should be evaluated expeditiously, to prevent further neurological damage. Audiologic diagnostics Audiologic diagnostics represents the basic diagnosis for early detection of vestibular schwannoma. Patients with vestibular schwannomas may present with a variety of clinical features, including retrocochlear pattern of sensorineural hearing loss. Supraliminary audiometry, tympano- metry, stapedius reflex and otoacoustic emissions as well as vestibular response to caloric testing are methods for selection of patients with suspicion of this tumor. Conclusion The golden standard for audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma is BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials. Patients with pathological findings of BAEP should undergo MRI of the posterior fossa. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is the best and final tool for making a diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma.

  1. Bilateral hypoglossal schwannoma: a radiologic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş, Devrim; Caylan, Refik

    2004-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented with a complaint of a sore throat. Examination showed a left-sided atrophy of the tongue. Upon protrusion, the tongue deviated to the left, suggestive of a unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy. Computed tomography revealed enlarged hypoglossal canals. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated bilateral hypoglossal canal masses, with enhancement following gadolinium administration. Magnetic resonance angiography and MRI with fat suppression revealed nonvascular masses in both hypoglossal canals. Radiological diagnosis of bilateral hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made and the patient was scheduled for MRI monitoring with six-month intervals. The size of the masses and the clinical manifestations remained unchanged during a two-year follow-up period.

  2. [Gold weight implants for lagophthalmos correction in chronic facial nerve paralysis (late results)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusha, Y O; Fedorov, A A; Iskusnykh, N S; Bogacheva, N V; Kobzova, M V; Novikov, I A; Fettser, E I; Shchegoleva, T A

    2016-01-01

    Upper eyelid weigh gold implant is the widely accepted standard for the treatment of paralytic lagophthalmos (PL). To evaluate late outcomes of PL correction with chain gold implants. Chain gold implants were inserted in the upper eyelids of 70 patients with lagophthalmos due to chronic facial paralysis. A comprehensive ophthalmic examination was performed prior to surgery and then at months 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36. The results obtained prove the method highly effective. None of the patients developed any severe complications. Cases of implant removal were few. Some of the studied biometric parameters decreased significantly after surgery, while the upper eyelid excursion increased. The implant had no effect on the inner surface of the cornea and its peripheral thickness. Efficacy of the proposed eyelid implant has been convincingly demonstrated; late complications have been analyzed.

  3. 大鼠面神经损伤后神经元型一氧化氮合酶的表达变化%Expression of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Facial Nucleus after Facial Nerve Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏; 臧晓燕; 张引成

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the variation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression in injured facial nerve tissue. Method: 20 adult male SD rats were used in this study, among them , 5 rats were normal controls. In experiment group, a compression injury was applied at one branch of bilateral facial nerve. Every 3 rats in experiment group were sacrified for nNOS immunostaining in a period of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 weeks respectively. Results:In normal facial nerve tissue, nNOS expression was not detected. In the injured facial nerve neurons, nNOS immunostaining expression was positive, and lasting up till the fifth weeks. Conclusion: After the nerve injury, the expressing of nNOS was observed in the facial nucleus, which may be related to the death of neuron.%目的:通过观察面神经损伤后神经元型一氧化氮合酶(neuronal NOS, nNOS)在面神经核团中的表达,探讨NO在面神经损伤后的作用。方法:健康成年SD大白鼠20只,其中5只作为正常对照。其余15只为面神经损伤组,在双侧面神经下颊支制作挤压伤。术后1、2、3、4、5周各取3只损伤组大鼠作面神经核团nNOS表达的免疫组化观察。结果:正常情况下面神经元不表达nNOS。面神经损伤后,出现运动神经元变性,其神经元细胞nNOS免疫染色为阳性,并持续至损伤后第5周。结论:面神经损伤后其运动神经元的核团中会出现nNOS的表达。

  4. Outcome after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    outcome (House-Brackmann grade 1 or 2). The chance of a good outcome was related to tumor size with a higher the chance the smaller the tumor, but not to the degree of tumor removal. In ~78% of the patients with facial paresis at discharge the paresis improved over time, in ~42% from a poor to a good...... and in ~85% the nerve was intact during surgery. During 33 years, 12 patients died from complications to surgery and ~14% had cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Before surgery, 74 patients had facial paresis and 46% of these improved after surgery. In patients with normal facial function, overall ~70% had a good...... function. The translabyrinthine approach is generally efficient in tumor control and with satisfactory facial nerve outcome. With larger tumors the risk of a poor outcome is evident and more data on patients managed with alternative strategies are warranted....

  5. FGF-2 is required to prevent astrogliosis in the facial nucleus after facial nerve injury and mechanical stimulation of denervated vibrissal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizay, Arzu; Seitz, Mark; Grosheva, Maria; Sinis, Nektarios; Kaya, Yasemin; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we have shown that manual stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles after facial-facial anastomosis reduced the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions and restored vibrissal whisking. Using gene knock outs, we found a differential dependence of manual stimulation effects on growth factors. Thus, insulin-like growth factor-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are required to underpin manual stimulation-mediated improvements, whereas FGF-2 is not. The lack of dependence on FGF-2 in mediating these peripheral effects prompted us to look centrally, i.e. within the facial nucleus where increased astrogliosis after facial-facial anastomosis follows "synaptic stripping". We measured the intensity of Cy3-fluorescence after immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as an indirect indicator of synaptic coverage of axotomized neurons in the facial nucleus of mice lacking FGF-2 (FGF-2(-/-) mice). There was no difference in GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence (pixel number, gray value range 17-103) between intact wildtype mice (2.12±0.37×10(7)) and their intact FGF-2(-/-) counterparts (2.12±0.27×10(7)) nor after facial-facial anastomosis +handling (wildtype: 4.06±0.32×10(7); FGF-2(-/-): 4.39±0.17×10(7)). However, after facial-facial anastomosis, GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence remained elevated in FGF-2(-/-)-animals (4.54±0.12×10(7)), whereas manual stimulation reduced the intensity of GFAP-immunofluorescence in wild type mice to values that were not significantly different from intact mice (2.63±0.39×10). We conclude that FGF-2 is not required to underpin the beneficial effects of manual stimulation at the neuro-muscular junction, but it is required to minimize astrogliosis in the brainstem and, by implication, restore synaptic coverage of recovering facial motoneurons.

  6. Olfactory region schwannoma: Excision with preservation of olfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Salunke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory region schwannomas are rare, but when they occur, they commonly arise from the meningeal branches of the trigeminal nerve and may present without involvement of the olfaction. A 24 year old lady presented with hemifacial paraesthesias. Radiology revealed a large olfactory region enhancing lesion. She was operated through a transbasal with olfactory preserving approach. This manuscript highlights the importance of olfactory preservation in such lesions.

  7. Benign giant mediastinal schwannoma presenting as cardiac tamponade in a woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiya Mitsuaki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal schwannomas are typically benign and asymptomatic, and generally present no immediate risks. We encountered a rare case of a giant benign posterior mediastinal schwannoma, complicated by life-threatening cardiac tamponade. Case presentation We report the case of a 72-year-old Japanese woman, who presented with cardiogenic shock. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a posterior mediastinal mass 150 cm in diameter, with pericardial effusion. The cardiac tamponade was treated with prompt pericardial fluid drainage. A biopsy was taken from the mass, and after histological examination, it was diagnosed as a benign schwannoma, a well-encapsulated non-infiltrating tumor, originating from the intrathoracic vagus nerve. It was successfully excised, restoring normal cardiac function. Conclusion Our case suggests that giant mediastinal schwannomas, although generally benign and asymptomatic, should be excised upon discovery to prevent the development of life-threatening cardiopulmonary complications.

  8. Facial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery.

  9. 听神经瘤显微手术面神经损伤的预防%Prevention of facial nerve injury in acoustic neuroma microsurgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷霆; 李龄

    2008-01-01

    目的 总结与分析听神经瘤显微手术中预防面神经损伤的方法.方法 经MRI和(或)CT检查确诊的大型听神经瘤(≥4.0 cm)180例(72%)及中型听神经瘤(2.4~4.0 cm)70例(28%).均采用经患侧枕下乙状窦后入路保留面神经的显微手术.注意三大解剖关系:骨性解剖、蛛网膜解剖、神经与血管的解剖.肿瘤囊内减压后,确认面神经的起始位置、面神经与肿瘤的关系、面神经变形与扭曲、面神经分离的方法、面神经的断裂端-端吻合.随访6个月~1年.结果 肿瘤全切除240例(96.0%);次全切除10例(4.0%),其中死亡1例(0.4%).面神经功能评定:Ⅰ级214例(85.6%);Ⅱ级25例(10.0%);Ⅲ级5例(2.1%);Ⅳ级5例(2.1%).结论 术中注意典型的解剖位置,正确的手术入路和显微手术技术可达到较高的肿瘤全切除率,提高面神经的功能保全率.%Objective To summarize and analyse the techniques of avoiding facial nerve iniury during acoustic neuroma microsurgery.Methods One hundred and eighty patients with large acoustic neuroma(≥4 cm)and 70 patients with medium acoustic neuroma(2.4-4.0 cm)Were diagnosed by MRI/CT scan before operation and confirmed by postoperational pathologic examination.All of patients were treated by sub-occipital retrosigmoid approach for tumor removal and facial nerve reservation during operation.The relationships among the bone,arachnoid,nerve and vascular anatomy were panicularly observed during the operation. After decompression of the tumor,the origination and location of the facial nerve as well as the relationship between the tumor and the facial nerve should be identified.The patients were followed-up from 6 months to 1 year postoperatively and assessed by House-Brackmann facial nerve function grading system.Results Total tumor resection was achieved in 240 of 250 cases (96%)and subtotal in 10 cases including 1 case died because of cerebellar encephalomalacia after operation. According to the House

  10. Intraosseous schwannoma of the ilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ohno, Takatoshi; Oshima, Koji; Nagano, Akihito; Hatano, Yuichiro; Nishibori, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    We presented a 27-year-old male diagnosed with intraosseous schwannoma of the ilium. Computed tomographic images revealed a well-demarcated, lobulated, expansile, osteolytic lesion in the right supraacetabular region of the ilium. In addition, an intratumoral punctate calcification and a sclerotic rim were observed. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrated a heterogeneously hyperintense lesion with a hypointense rim. Major parts of the lesion, excluding some central areas, were enhanced on gadolinium-enhanced MR images. Pathological examination revealed an intraosseous schwannoma. Our findings indicate that intraosseous schwannoma should be considered when images demonstrate a well-demarcated, lobulated, expansile, osteolytic lesion with a sclerotic rim.

  11. [Surgical facial reanimation after persisting facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Facial reanimation following persistent facial paralysis can be managed with surgical procedures of varying complexity. The choice of the technique is mainly determined by the cause of facial paralysis, the age and desires of the patient. The techniques most commonly used are the nerve grafts (VII-VII, XII-VII, cross facial graft), dynamic muscle transfers (temporal myoplasty, free muscle transfert) and static suspensions. An intensive rehabilitation through specific exercises after all procedures is essential to archieve good results.

  12. Padronização das técnicas de secção do nervo facial e de avaliação da mímica facial em ratos Standardization of techniques used in facial nerve section and facial movement evaluation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Damasceno de Faria

    2006-06-01

    paralisia facial a partir da observação clínica desses animais.AIM: standardization of the technique to section the extratemporal facial nerve in rats and creation of a scale to evaluate facial movements in these animals before and after surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental. METHOD: twenty Wistar rats were anesthetized with ketamine xylazine and submitted to sectioning of the facial nerve near its emergence through the mastoid foramen. Eye closure and blinking reflex, vibrissae movement and positioning were observed in all animals and a scale to evaluate these parameters was then created. RESULTS: The facial nerve trunk was found between the tendinous margin of the clavotrapezius muscle and the auricular cartilage. The trunk was proximally sectioned as it exits the mastoid foramen and the stumps were sutured with a 9-0-nylon thread. An evaluation and graduation scale of facial movements, independent for eye and vibrissae, was elaborated, together with a sum of the parameters, as a means to evaluate facial palsy. Absence of eye blinking and closure scored 1; the presence of orbicular muscle contraction, without blinking reflex, scored 2; 50% of eye closure through blinking reflex, scored 3, 75% of closure scored 4. The presence of complete eye closure and blinking reflex scored 5. The absence of movement and posterior position of the vibrissae scored 1; slight shivering and posterior position scored 2; greater shivering and posterior position, scored 3 and normal movement with posterior position, scored 4; symmetrical movement of he vibrissae, with anterior position, scored 5. CONCLUSION: The rat anatomy allows easy access to the extratemporal facial nerve, allowing its sectioning and standardized suture. It was also possible to establish an evaluation and graduation scale of the rat facial movements with facial palsy based on the clinical observation of these animals.

  13. Spontaneous regression of a cystic hypoglossal schwannoma causing unilateral tongue atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnford, Andrew J; Harrisson, Stuart E; Ditchfield, Adam; Shenouda, Emad

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old lady presented with intermittent headaches. Examination revealed striking marked unilateral tongue atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cystic lesion in the hypoglossal canal and a provisional diagnosis of cystic hypoglossal schwannoma made. Annual surveillance scans showed stable appearances but surprisingly at 3 years they showed a significant reduction in the size of the lesion. Most patients with hypoglossal schwannomas present with ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy; careful cranial nerve examination is vital in diagnosing such rare lesions. Little is known of their natural history, with most lesions undergoing surgery. This case highlights spontaneous regression following non-operative management.

  14. Malignant schwannoma of the infratemporal fossa: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Mohamed Mliha; Darouassi, Youssef; Chihani, Mehdi; Al Jalil, Abdelfettah; Tourabi, Khalid; Lakouichmi, Mohamed; Essadi, Ismail; Bouaity, Brahim; Ammar, Haddou

    2015-07-04

    Malignant schwannomas or neurofibrosarcomas are rare nerve tumors of unknown etiology. These neoplasms are highly aggressive with a marked propensity for local recurrence and metastatic spread. Their management continues to be a challenge for pathologists and surgeons. Maxillofacial locations are very exceptional. We report the case of a patient with unusual malignant schwannoma of the infratemporal fossa discovered at a late evolving stage. A 56-year-old woman, of Moroccan nationality, presented to our hospital in 2013 with a large right-sided hemifacial swelling that had evolved over the previous 4 months, with a limitation of mouth opening, nasal obstruction and episodes of epistaxis. A CT scan and MRI showed a large and invasive tumor occupying her right infratemporal fossa and maxillary sinus, with sphenoidal, ethmoidonasal, nasopharyngeal and intraorbital extension. A nasal endoscopic biopsy was performed. Immunohistochemical examination concluded a diagnosis of malignant schwannoma, and a palliative radiotherapy was decided; however, our patient died 10 days later. Malignant schwannoma of paranasal sinuses and the anterior skull base is a rare tumor that involves a high rate of local invasion. The prognosis is poorer compared to that occurring in the trunk and extremities.

  15. Intraoperative facial nerve reservation in patients with acoustic neuromas%听神经瘤显微手术与面神经保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 田道锋; 陈治标; 王军民; 蔡强; 徐海涛; 张申起; 陈谦学

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨大中型听神经瘤的显微手术治疗及面神经保护技巧.方法 自2007年9月至2011年9月在面神经电生理监测下采用枕下乙状窦后入路显微手术切除大中型听神经瘤142例.结果 肿瘤全切除136例(95.7%),次全切除6例(4.3%).术中面神经解剖保留132例(93.0%),面神经与肿瘤粘连紧密无法保留10例(7.0%).本组无长期昏迷及死亡病例.术后出现颅内感染3例、后组颅神经受损7例、眼睑闭合不能90例,无脑脊液漏病例.所有病人术后均随访3个月到2年,无术后复发病例;按House-Brackmann分级评估面神经功能,Ⅰ~Ⅱ级78例(54.9%),Ⅲ~Ⅳ级53例(37.3%),Ⅴ~Ⅵ级11例(7.8%).结论 充分了解桥脑小脑角区显微解剖知识,特别是了解听神经瘤与面神经的解剖关系,有助于提高手术效果.娴熟的操作技巧是手术成功的关键,术中监测及面神经的保留有助于面神经功能的保护.%Objective To summarize the experience in intraoperatively reservating facial nerves in patients with acoustic neuromas.Methods The clinical data of 142 patients with acoustic neuromas,who were treated in our hospital from September,2007 to September,2011,were analyzed retrospectively.All the patients were treated by microsurgery through suboccipital retrosigmoid approach under neurophysiological monitoring of the facial nerves.Results The total resection of the tumors was achieved in 136 (95.7%)patients and subtotal in 6(4.3%).The facial nerves were anatomically reservated in 132(93.0%).All the patients were followed up from 3 months to 2 years and the outcomes showed that the facial nerves function of 78(54.9%),53(37.3%)and 11(7.8%)patients belonged in House-Brackmann grades Ⅰ~Ⅱ,Ⅲ~Ⅳ and Ⅴ-Ⅵ respectively.Conclusions Fully understood the anatomy of cerebellopontin angle,especially the positional relationship between the acoustic neuroma and facial nerve,and skilled microsurgical

  16. The Role of Intraoperative Facial Nerve Monitoring in Acoustic Neuroma Resection%术中神经监测在听神经瘤切除术中对面神经的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈上杭; 王占祥; 陈玉英; 刘希尧; 谭国伟; 郭剑锋

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: To maintain the anatomic and functional intactness of facial nerve is one of the goal of acoustic neuroma resection. In this article, we investigated the role of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring in acoustic neuroma resection. METHODS: Clinical data of 57 patients with acoustic neuroma treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Among 57 patients, tumors were removed under microscope without intranperative facial nerve monitoring in 35 cases and with intraoperative monitoring in 22 cases. Post operative facial nerve function was followed up in all patients. RESULTS: House-Brackmann system was used for evaluating the function of facial nerve 3 months after operation. Among 22 cases with intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, facial nerve intactness was observed in 18 cases, Grade Ⅰ facial paralysis in 2 cases and Grade Ⅱ facial paralysis in 2 cases, repectively. The monitoring group had 2 cases Among 35 cases without intracperative facial nerve monitoring, intact faical function was observed in 14 cases, Grade Ⅰfacial paralysis in 12 cases, Grade Ⅱ facial paralysis in 6 cases, grade Ⅲ facial paralysis in 2 cases, and Grade Ⅴ facial paralysis in 1 case, respectively.Patients with intraoperative facial nervemonitoring had better performance in facial nerve function than those without monitoring (P< 0.05). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative nerve monitoring techniques facilitates the localization and preservation of the facial nerve in acoustic neuroma resection.%背景与目的:面神经瘫痪是听神经瘤切除术中最常见的并发症,近年来随着术中神经监测技术的应用,术后面神经功能已得到较好的保护.本研究旨在探讨术中神经监测在听神经瘤手术中对面神经功能的保护作用.方法:分析本院收治手术的57例听神经瘤患者,其中直接显微镜下切除肿瘤(非监测组)35例,显微镜下切除肿瘤过程中使用术中神经监测仪对

  17. Intraosseous schwannoma of the metacarpal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, R.A.; Athanasian, E.A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mintz, D.N. [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Intraosseous schwannoma (neurilemmoma) is an extremely rare, benign neoplasm, constituting less than 0.2% of primary bone tumors. It infrequently involves the bones of the hand. We present a case of intraosseous neurilemmoma of the metacarpal. (orig.)

  18. Multiple isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas A. S. Attia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plexiform schwannoma is a rare neurogenic tumor, arising from skin and subcutaneous tissue. The presence of multiple schwannomas suggests a possible association with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2. A 50-year old male patient presented with multiple papulo-nodular cutaneous lesions on both arms and forearms. Histopathological examination revealed a dermal multinodular pattern of well-circumscribed masses of closely packed cells, with peripheral myxoid tissue, well-encapsulated in a thin collagenous capsule. S-100 immunohistochemical staining was diffusely and strongly positive. Neuron-specific enolase was positive, confirming a neural tissue tumor. An audiogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of cerebro-pontine angle showed no detected abnormality, excluding acoustic neuroma. Thus, we present a case of multiple bilateral isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas, not associated with NF2. Multiple plexiform schwannomas is a very rare entity, distinct from neurofibromatosis (NF, and being confined to the dermis is even more rarely reported.

  19. Malignant renal schwannoma in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monier Sharif

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A nine-year-old male European shorthair cat with rapidly enlarging mass at the left kidney doubted to be malignant was presented. The purpose of this study is to present the clinical, radiological and pathological findings of a primary renal tumor in the cat. Grossly, the mass mostly encapsulated the kidney. Histologically, excisional biopsy showed worrying histological features. A sarcoma-like tumor composed mainly of neoplastic spindle-shaped cells. Neoplastic nodules of aggregations of fusiform cells arranged in multidirectional bundles. Immunohistochemically, several immunohistochemical satins (melan-A, S-100, vimentin, actin, desmin, cytokeratin, neurofilament, melan-A, NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein GFAP, Collagen IV and CD99 were used to differentially diagnose the mass. The stained neoplastic sections positively tested to S-100, but negative to the other aforementioned immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemistry with S-100 antibody staining showed an unusually strong positive reaction throughout the tumor cells. Based on our comparative diagnosis relative to other tumors, in addition to the progressive clinical signs, histopathological and immunohistochemical results, this case was presumptively diagnosis as a malignant schwannoma. According to our investigation of the relevant literature, this study of malignant renal Schwannoma (malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a highly rare case not previously characterized in a cat.

  20. 面神经损伤吻合术手术时机研究%Optimal Timing for Repair of Facial Nerve Trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡炯炯; 周梁; 马兆鑫

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨面神经损伤后最佳的修复时机.方法:以行面神经即时吻合术和延迟吻合术后豚鼠的辣根过氧化物酶(HRP)标记神经元数、有髓纤维数/HRP标记神经元等为观察指标,评价面神经即时吻合和延迟不同时期吻合术后面神经再生的情况.结果:各组指标比较,延迟7d缝合组和即时缝合组的治疗效果最佳,此2组间差异无统计学意义;延迟60 d缝合组和延迟90 d缝合组治疗效果最差.结论:在无法即时行面神经吻合术的情况下,可在神经断伤后7d吻合面神经.尽量争取在神经离断伤后60 d内修补损伤的面神经.%Objective:To evaluate the curative effect of immediate nerve suture and delayed nerve suture more comprehensively and more impersonally with longer time course. Methods: All the guinea pigs were randomly assigned to one of eight groups, normal group, group of immediate FFA, group of delayed FFA for 7 days, group of delayed FFA for 14 days, group of delayed FFA for 21 days, group of delayed FFA for 30 days, group of delayed FFA for 60 days, and group of delayed FFA for 90 days by turns. Two months after nerve suture, from observing of HRβ-labeled neurons and axons per motoneuron ratio, we evaluate the curative effect of immediate facial-facial anastomosis (FFA) and FFA delayed for 7-90 days objectively. Results-. Delayed FFA for 7 days showed equal or even better curative effect than the group of immediate FFA did,the group of delayed FFA for 60days and 90 days showed apparenT1y poorer curative effect than the immediately sutured and other delayed sutured ones did. Conclusions: Repairing facial nerve 7 days after trauma could get as good curative effect as immediate suturing of the nerve. Facial nerve regenerates poorly if it is repaired 60-90 days after trauma. The result is of some value to clinical works, that is, if immediate repair of facial nerve is impossible, repairing it 7 days after trauma is also ideal. Meanwhile, we

  1. An Individual with Gastric Schwannoma with Pathologically Malignant Potential Surviving Two Years after Laparoscopy-Assisted Partial Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Watanabe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are a kind of neurogenic tumor. They are generally benign and originate primarily from the central and peripheral nerve. They rarely develop in the gastrointestinal tract: gastric schwannomas make up 0.2% of gastric neoplasms. A malignant gastric schwannoma is a comparatively rare tumor, a few cases have been reported until now. We present the case of a 34-year-old male patient diagnosed during medical examination. The patient was treated with surgical resection, and 2 years passed without recurrence.

  2. Plexiform schwannoma of the forearm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsumi, Keiichi; Ogose, Akira; Hotta, Tetsuo; Hatano, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Endo, Naoto [Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Regenerative and Transplant Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Asahimachi 1-751, 951-8510, Niigata (Japan); Umezu, Hajime [Division of Pathology, Niigata University Hospital, Niigata (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    We report a case of plexiform schwannoma located in the flexor muscles of the forearm in the absence of other signs of neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis. Magnetic resonance examination revealed a multinodular irregular inhomogeneous mass. Some nodules displayed a peripheral, high intensity rim and a central low intensity (target sign) on T2-weighted images. Pre-operative diagnosis of the rare plexiform schwannoma may be possible with careful imaging examination for the target sign. (orig.)

  3. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa.

  4. Schwannoma of the sigmoid colon

    OpenAIRE

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Aslaner, Arif; Yaz, Müjgan; Gündüz, Umut Rıza

    2015-01-01

    Colonic schwannomas are very rare gastrointestinal tumours originating from Schwann cells, which form the neural sheath. Primary schwannomas of the lower gastrointestinal tract are very rare and usually benign in nature. However, if they are not surgically removed, malign degeneration can occur. We report a case of a 79-year-old woman who presented to our clinic with rectal bleeding and constipation. She underwent a lower gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. A mass subtotally obstructing the lum...

  5. Management of Large Tongue Schwannoma – A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Medhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of schwann cells. Oral cavity is a rare site for schwannomas, tongue being the most common location. Here we are presenting a case of a young adult who presented with a huge swelling in the tongue which was removed by mandibulotomy approach and pre-operative tracheostomy. A 22-year-old male patient presented to the outpatient department with a history of swelling in the tongue for the last 4 years with progressive difficulty in swallowing food and change of voice over the last few months. Upon examination a large swelling was observed on the posterior part of the tongue compromising the oropharyngeal inlet. The approximate size of the swelling was 5cmx4cm. After proper clinical evaluation the patient was advised to obtain a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study of the oral cavity, which showed it to be a nerve sheath tumor (Schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve branch. The patient was admitted for surgery. As difficult intubation was anticipated, pre-operative tracheostomy was performed. The tongue mass was approached by right paramedian mandibulotomy using a transcervical lip split incision. Post operative histopathological examination of the removed specimen showed hypercellular ‘Antony A’ area with plump spindle cells and hypocellular ‘Antony B’ area in a Hematoxylin & eosin stain (200x. This confirmed the diagnosis for a schwannoma. As each and every case is unique in its presentation, so is the management. The idea of presenting the above case is to emphasise the role of selection for the proper approach and foresee the preventable complications while working around the airway.

  6. 面神经电生理监测在大型听神经瘤术中的应用%Intraoperative electrophysiologic monitoring of the facial nerve in operation of large acoustic neuromas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵学明; 药天乐; 万大海; 王永红; 范益民; 郝解贺

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore intraoperative protection of facial nerve and evaluate its function after operation in large acoustic neuromas surgery by electrophysiologic monitoring. Method A total of 42 patients'clinical data with large acoustic neuromas between Jun, 2007 and Mar, 2010 were analyzed retrospectively,who were treated microsurgically with intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in our department. Results The facial nerve was preserved anatomically in 37 patients (88%). The function of facial nerve was kept well in 30 cases (71%). Stimulative intensity of 1 ~ 3 V at the end of operation is related to the good function of facial nerve. The proximal - to - distal amplitude ratio of facial nerve after surgery less than 0. 3 presented with a bad facial function. ConclusionsIntraoperative monitoring has significantly decreased facial nerve morbidity in large acoustic neuromas surgery. Stimulative intensity at the exit of facial nerve from brainstem is related to the facial nerve function negatively. The proximal - to - distal amplitude ratio can predict the facial nerve function positively following acoustic neuromas resection.%目的 探讨大型听神经瘤术中面神经监测对面神经保护及评估术后面神经功能的临床意义。方法回顾性分析我科2007年6月至2010年3月术中行面神经监测的42例大型听神经瘤的临床资料。结果 面神经解剖保留37例(88%),面神经功能保留30例(71%)。术末刺激强度1~3V即引起肌电反应者预后良好;而术末面神经近端与远端波幅之比<0.3者预后差。结论 大型听神经瘤术中面神经监测可显著降低术后面神经瘫痪的发生率,术末面神经脑干端的刺激强度与面神经功能呈负相关,而面神经近端与远端波幅之比与面神经功能呈正相关。

  7. The Middle Fossa Approach for the Removal of a Trochlear Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Boucher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Schwannomas originating from the trochlear nerve are extremely rare; only 30 cases have been reported in the literature. Many operative approaches have been utilized for lesion resection, but the advantages of the anterior transpetrosal approach are numerous and include excellent exposure, minimal extradural retraction of the temporal lobe, and minimal cerebrospinal fluid leaks. We report the second case of a trochlear schwannoma resected via the anterior transpetrosal approach. Setting. A 64-year-old male presented with 3-month history of diplopia and headaches. On physical examination, he was found to have a right fourth nerve palsy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass within the right ambient cistern compressing the adjacent midbrain. A right-sided anterior transpetrosal approach was used—which confirmed that the trochlear nerve entered the mass—to achieve gross total resection. Pathological examination confirmed diagnosis of schwannoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He experienced a persistent fourth nerve palsy postoperatively with an otherwise normal neurological examination. Follow-up imaging confirmed complete removal of the tumor. Conclusion. The anterior transpetrosal approach is an excellent approach for removal of trochlear schwannomas involving the cisternal course of the trochlear nerve. It affords complete visualization of this anatomical region while introducing minimal morbidity.

  8. Paralisia facial periférica bilateral na leucemia linfóide aguda: relato de caso Bilateral peripheric facial nerve palsy in acute linfoid leukemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos L. Antunes

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A mímica facial é fundamental para a expressão e comunicação humana, que são possíveis apenas através da integridade do nervo facial. Sendo assim, a paralisia facial periférica (PFP pode deixar seqüelas estéticas, funcionais e psicológicas. A causa mais comum é a paralisia de Bell (50 a 80%, onde a maioria dos pacientes apresenta manifestação unilateral. O acometimento bilateral simultâneo é raro, sendo a leucemia a neoplasia que com maior freqüência pode resultar nesse tipo de manifestação. A seguir, relatamos o caso de um paciente de dezoito anos de idade apresentando leucemia linfóide aguda (LLA e PFP simultânea, ambas refratárias ao tratamento quimioterápico, culminando com o óbito cinco meses após o início da PFP. Realizou-se considerações importantes sobre a fisiopatologia da PFP na LLA, além de uma revisão da literatura.The facial mimic is very important to the human expression and communication, which depend on the integrity of the facial nerve. So, the peripheric facial palsy (PFP can leave esthetics, functional and psychological sequelae. The more common etiology is Bell's palsy (50 to 80% and most of the patients show a unilateral manifestation. The simultaneous bilateral PFP is rare, and the leukemia is the neoplasia that can often that kind of manifestation. We present a clinical case of an 18-year-old patient with acute lymphoid leukemia and simultaneous bilateral facial palsy, who did not recover after the chemotherapy treatment, and died five months after the initial manifestation of the facial palsy. Important considerations were accomplished about the physiopathology of PFP in acute lymphoid leukemia, besides literature review.

  9. Role of Kabat rehabilitation in facial nerve palsy: a randomised study on severe cases of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, S; Iacolucci, C M; Di Traglia, M; Lazzarino, A I; Barbara, M

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of Bell's palsy (BP), based on steroids and/or antiviral drugs, may still leave a certain percentage of affected subjects with disfiguring sequelae due to incomplete recovery. The different procedures of physical rehabilitation have not been demonstrated to play a favourable role in this disorder. The aim of the present study was to compare functional outcomes in severe cases of Bell's palsy when treated by steroids alone or by steroids accompanied by Kabat physical rehabilitation. This prospective study included 94 subjects who showed sudden facial nerve (FN) palsy with House-Brackmann grade IV or V and who were divided into two groups on the basis of the therapeutic approach: one group (a) was treated by steroids, and the other (b) received steroids in combination with physical rehabilitation. Medical treatment consisted in administration of steroids at a dosage of 60 mg per day for 15 days; physical rehabilitative treatment consisted in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation according to Kabat, and was administered to one of the two groups of subjects. Recovery rate, degree of recovery and time for recovery were compared between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney and univariate logistic regression statistical tests (Ward test). Kabat patients (group b) had about 20 times the odds of improving by three HB grades or more (OR = 17.73, 95% CI = 5.72 to 54.98, p Kabat subjects). No difference was observed in the incidence of synkineses between the two groups. Steroid treatment appears to provide better and faster recovery in severe cases (HB IV and V) of BP when complemented with Kabat physical rehabilitation. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  10. Schwannoma vestibular: involução tumoral espontânea Vestibular Schwannoma: spontaneous tumor involution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A história natural dos schwannomas vestibulares ainda não está totalmente elucidada, mas sua maioria tende a apresentar crescimento lento, muitos permanecendo sem sintomas durante toda a vida do paciente. Cerca de 69% deste tipo de tumor diagnosticados não apresentam crescimento e, destes, 16% chegam a apresentar regressão tumoral. Considerando os tumores que apresentam crescimento, cerca de 70% crescem menos de 2 mm ao ano. O avanço nos métodos de diagnóstico por imagem, particularmente à ressonância magnética com contraste de gadolínio, permite o diagnóstico cada vez mais de lesões com sintomas mínimos e tamanhos menores. O tratamento de escolha para estes tumores ainda é a ressecção completa do tumor. As técnicas cirúrgicas apresentaram grande avanço nas últimas décadas, o que possibilitou diminuição da mortalidade. Assim, a cirurgia, que antes tinha como objetivo apenas a ressecção completa do tumor, agora visa também à preservação da audição e da função do nervo facial. Considerações finais: Considerando-se sua história natural, abre-se a possibilidade de uma conduta conservadora já que o ritmo de crescimento no primeiro ano após o diagnóstico prediz o comportamento do tumor nos próximos anos. A conduta conservadora não implica em repúdio à cirurgia, devendo ser utilizada em casos de aumento tumoral, piora dos sintomas ou desejo do paciente. Além disso, em relatos de literatura não há diferença estatisticamente significante entre os pacientes submetidos à cirurgia logo após o diagnóstico ou após conduta conservadora inicial, no que diz respeito às seqüelas pós-operatórias.The natural history of Vestibular Schwannomas (VS is yet not totally known, but most of them have the tendency to slow growth, sometimes without any kind of symptoms during the individual’s entire time. About 69% of diagnosed VS do not grow at all and 16% of these can even regress. Considering tumors that grow

  11. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Parekh, Aseem N.

    2012-01-01

    Sciatica is commonly caused by lumbar prolapsed intervertebral disc (PID) and other spinal lesions. Uncommon causes like nerve root schwannoma are rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica. Spinal schwannomas occur both sporadically and in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen's disease). This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and “failure of conservative treatment.” PMID:23259107

  12. Sciatica from a foraminal lumbar root schwannoma: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Parekh, Aseem N

    2012-01-01

    Sciatica is commonly caused by lumbar prolapsed intervertebral disc (PID) and other spinal lesions. Uncommon causes like nerve root schwannoma are rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica. Spinal schwannomas occur both sporadically and in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen's disease). This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and "failure of conservative treatment."

  13. [Different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) for central facial nerve paralysis after ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Xin; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Nong; Zhang, Chun-Hong; Shi, Xue-Min

    2014-07-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) on central facial nerve paralysis after ischemic stroke, and explore dose-effect relationship among different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) as well as its optimal treatment plan. According to different acupuncture stimulation intensities which were based on treatment time and needle insertion direction, fifty patients were randomly divided into a Hegu 1 group, a Hegu 2 group, a Hegu 3 group, a Hegu 4 group and a control group, ten cases in each one. Different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) combined with facial paralysis acupoints, including Yingxiang (LI 20), Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6) and Quanliao (SI 18), were applied in Hegu 1 to 4 groups; meanwhile acupuncture at stroke acupoints, including Neiguan (PC 6), Shuigou (GV 26) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6), and medication treatment were adopted. Except acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4), the treatment of the control group was identical as Hegu groups. The treatment duration lasted for 14 days. The House-Brackmann facial never grading systems (H-B), Toronto facial grading system (TFGS), degrees of facial never paralysis (DFNP), facial disability index (FDI) and clinical efficacy were compared among groups. (1) Compared before the treatment, H-B, TFGS, DFNP and physical function score in FDI were all improved significantly in the Hegu 1 to 4 groups (all P 0.05); all the scores in the control group were not evidently changed (all P > 0.05). (2) Compared with the control group, differences of H-B before and after treatment in the Hegu 1 to 4 groups, differences of TFGS in the Hegu 2 group and differences of DFNP in the Hegu 1 and Hegu 2 group were significantly improved (all P 0.05), in which the most evident change was found in Hegu 2 group. (3) The total effective rate was 90.0% (9/10), 100.0% (10/10), 90.0% (9/10) and 80.0% (8/10) in Hegu 1 to 4 groups, which were significantly higher than 60.0% (6/10) in the control group

  14. A Huge Ancient Schwannoma of the Epiglottis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jo Heon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2016-03-01

    Ancient schwannoma of the epiglottis is extremely rare. The authors report the first case of a patient with a huge ancient schwannoma of the epiglottis. Clinicians should consider the possibility that ancient schwannoma may originate in the epiglottis mimicking the other more frequently observed lesions.

  15. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Benjamin J; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Giddings, Neil A; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R; Demakas, John J; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2009-12-18

    Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities.We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  16. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbanks Robert K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities. We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  17. Dorsal dumb-bell melanotic schwannoma operated on by posterior and anterior approach: case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cerchio, Leonardo; Contratti, Filiberto; Fraioli, Mario F

    2006-10-01

    The schwannomas are benign tumors originating from Schwann cells which constitute the nerve sheath. The dorsal pigmented type of schwannomas is relatively rare (Goldstein in Am J Med Genet 86:62-65, 2004; Kurtkaya-Yapicier in Histol Histopathol 18(3):925-934, 2003). There are two distinct types of melanotic schwannoma: the sporadic melanotic schwannomas and the psammomatous melanotic schwannomas of Carney complex. We report a case of a patient harboring a right dorsal dumb-bell melanotic schwannoma and left adrenal mass. The patient underwent a surgical procedure for en bloc total removal of the mass by a posterior and anterior approach. Histopathological examination revealed the diagnosis of melanot