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Sample records for facial flat warts

  1. Pulsed dye laser treatment for facial flat warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, E; Boixeda, P; Ballester, A; Miguel-Morrondo, A; Truchuelo, T; Jaén, P

    2014-01-01

    The facial flat wart is not only a contagious viral disease, but also a cause of a distressing cosmetic problem. Although there are many therapeutic options, including salicylic acid, imiquimod, cryotherapy, retinoids, intralesional immunotherapy, and topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy among others, no monotherapy has been proved to achieve complete remission in every case. Treatment with pulsed dye laser (PDL) seems to be a promising therapeutic option. To assess the efficacy and safety of PDL in a series of patients with viral flat warts on the face, in this prospective study, 32 patients were treated with PDL at 595-nm wavelength, a laser energy density of 9 or 14 J/cm(2) with a spot size of 7 or 5 mm, respectively, with air cooling and a pulse duration of 0.5 millisecond. A complete response was noted in 14 patients (44%), and an excellent response was observed in 18 patients (56%) with 1-year follow-up, with only four recurrences. No significant side effects were reported except intense transitory purpuric response. We consider that PDL is a good option of treatment for flat warts on the face due to its good clinical results, fast response, and low incidence of side effects. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of oral isotretinoin in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguin-García, María Guadalupe; Jurado-Santa Cruz, Fermín; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Morales-Sánchez, Martha Alejandra

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Background: Recalcitrant facial flat warts are caused by human papillomavirus and may persist for years despite treatment. Isotretinoin has demonstrated benefits in the treatment of recalcitrant, genital and common warts, but placebo-controlled trials have not been performed. To determine whether isotretinoin is safe and effective for recalcitrant facial flat warts. Isotretinoin 30 mg/day or placebo was administered to 16 and 15 patients, respectively, in double-blind, randomized fashion for 12 weeks. Cutaneous lesions were assessed and adverse events including serologic and ophthalmologic changes were recorded. It is considered that warts were recalcitrant if the patient was treated for at least 3 years with at least three of the following options: retinoids, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen. Each patient in the istotretinoin group showed complete clearance of all flat warts, while none of the patients in the placebo group showed any improvement (p=0.0001). The most frequent adverse event was cheilitis. There were no statistically significant changes in the laboratory findings. The study design does not permit complete blinding of the dermatologist who can easily recognize the adverse effects of isotretinoin. The clinical findings, however, were so dramatic that this would not have impacted the findings. Another limitation of the study is a lack of follow-up to assess for recurrence after the drug was discontinued. Isotretinoin is an effective treatment for recalcitrant flat facial warts with a well-known, manageable safety profile.

  3. Irritated Method for Flat warts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiBingxu

    2004-01-01

    Summary Background The relation between spontaneous regression of Flat warts and T cells depended immunity was confirmed. Cells immunity against HPV was induced by presenting of HPV related antigens, and thrived by cytokine and some chemistry agent. So how to make HPV which incubated in keratinocyte to present PHV antigens and keratinocyte to secret cytokine or chemistry agents should be a pursuance for dermatologist who are looking for a efficient method to deal with flat warts. Present research had exhibited inflammable agents can induce dermatitis when apply to the skin surface, so it might bring flat warts to spontaneous regression. Objective To observe the effectiveness of irritant drugs on flat warts, and at same time to understand more on the mechanism of the regression. Methods Compared with Control we treat 88 case of flat warts with retinoid gel or 3% hydrogen peroxide solution plus 5 % salicylic acid cream (HPSC). Results Both retinoid gel and HPSC reveal significant effect on flat warts. Conclusion Retinoid gel or SPHC was effective on the treatment of flat warts. The possible explanation for this is the drugs when put on the skin will induce dermatitis and dissolve or denude keratin.

  4. Treatment of facial flat wart by XL-radiofrequency ablation under operating microscope%在手术显微镜下XL-射频皮肤治疗仪祛除面部扁平疣

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴林; 漆军; 蒋天裕; 张立宁; 高月明; 索伟; 肖红雨

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the therapeutic effect of XL-radiofrequency ablation under microscope on facial flat wart. Methods Forty-five patients with flat wart (13 males and 32 females) aged 16~68 years with a disease course of 3 months~10 years, who visited the Outpatient Department in our hospital from June 2006 to August 2011, were included in this study. The number of flat warts in each patient was 4 to 110 and≥10 in 31 patients. The largest flat wart was 60 mm×30 mm. The flat warts were treated once by XL-radiofrequency ablation under operating microscope. The patients were followed up for 6 months~2 years, during which relapse of the disease, pigmentation and scar formation were observed. Results The facial flat warts were cured in 43 out of the 45 patients. The number of facial flat warts was markedly reduced in 2 patients with mild pigmentation and no scar formation. Conclusion The curative rate of XL-radiofrequency ablation under operating microscope for facial flat warts is high with no scar formation.%  目的研究在手术显微镜下XL-射频皮肤治疗仪分层祛除面部扁平疣的技术及疗效.方法2006年6月-2011年8月我院门诊扁平疣患者45例,男13例,女32例,年龄16~68岁,病程3个月~10年.每例病变数4~110个,病变≥10个31例,病变最大的融成片状60 mm×30 mm.在手术显微镜下采用射频消融电极分层祛除病变,均治疗1次.随访观察6个月~2年,确定病变部位有无复发,色素沉着及疤痕形成.结果45例中43例治愈,2例数量减少,2例有轻微的色素沉着,未出现疤痕.结论在手术显微镜下XL-射频皮肤治疗仪微创分层祛除扁平疣治愈率高,无疤痕.

  5. Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription) medicines A blistering solution Freezing the wart (cryotherapy) to remove it Burning the wart ( electrocautery ) to ... and you want it removed. The wart causes pain. You have anal or genital warts. You have ...

  6. Clinical Observation on the Therapeutic Effects of Qu You Ding on Flat Wart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jun; Wang Jiayuan; Huang Ying; Zhou Jifu; Zhou Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ One hundred and twenty cases of flat wart were treated from 1990 to 2000 in our hospital. Among them, 80 cases were treated with local application of the other 40 cases were treated with phthiobuzone liniment. The results showed that the former had a better therapeutic effect. A report follows.

  7. Successful treatment of multiple filiform facial warts with imiquimod 5% cream in a patient infected by human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, J H; Bianchi, L; Marulli, G C; Soda, R; Chimenti, S

    2003-05-01

    Imiquimod, an imidazoquinoline amine, is approved for the topical treatment of external anogenital warts induced by human papilloma virus. Several clinical trials have shown imiquimod to be an effective and safe drug for treatment of anogenital warts. Consequently, it was considered that imiquimod might be effective on warts caused by the same aetiological agent located on other skin areas. We describe the favourable outcome of a case of multiple facial verrucae in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient treated with imiquimod 5% cream. This is a promising finding which supports those of two previous reports. We feel that imiquimod could be used in HIV-infected patients with multiple facial warts in whom conventional therapies are ineffective or produce significant side-effects.

  8. Long-Pulsed 532-Nm Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet Laser for Treatment of Facial Plane Warts in 160 Yemeni Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Mohammad Ali; Mohana, Mona Jameel; Alshami, Ahlam Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Warts in general and plane warts in particular pose a therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. Many treatment modalities exist, with variable success rates, side effect profiles, and precautions. The long-pulsed 532-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (LP Nd:YAG) laser has not been previously used for this indication. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of the LP Nd:YAG laser for treating facial plane warts. A total of 160 Yemeni patients (62 women, 98 men; age range, 5-55 years) were exposed to 1 laser treatment session with the following parameters: wavelength, 532 nm; pulse duration, 20 millisecond; spot size, 2 to 3 mm; and fluence, 25 J/cm. The end point was graying or whitening of the lesion. Color photographs were taken before and immediately after treatment and at follow-up visits 1, 4, and 16 weeks after the laser session. An overall clearance rate of 92% after only one session was achieved, with minimal and transient side effects. The LP Nd:YAG laser is safe and effective for treating facial plane warts, with a success rate of 92% after only one session.

  9. Wart (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warts are small, usually painless growths on the skin caused by a virus. The typical wart is a raised round or oval growth on the skin with a rough surface. Common warts tend to cause no discomfort unless they are ...

  10. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Common warts By Mayo Clinic Staff Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny ...

  11. Plantar Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consequently, you may contract the virus by walking barefoot around swimming pools or locker rooms. If the ... have had plantar warts before People who walk barefoot where exposure to a wart-causing virus is ...

  12. Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genital warts are a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The warts are soft, moist, pink, or flesh-colored bumps. ... or many of these bumps. In women, the warts usually occur in or around the vagina, on ...

  13. The value of reflectance confocal microscopy in diagnosis of flat pigmented facial lesions: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, E; Pellacani, G; Longo, C; Soyer, H P; Gonzalez, S; Hofmann-Wellenhof, R; Ahlgrimm-Siess, V; Guitera, P; Sinz, C; Kittler, H

    2017-08-01

    Flat pigmented facial lesions are difficult to diagnose even with dermatoscopy. It is controversial how additional information obtained by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) impacts the diagnosis and management. To examine what in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy of flat pigmented facial lesions adds to clinical examination using dermatoscopy including digital dermatoscopic monitoring. We prospectively collected 70 cases of flat pigmented facial lesions and recorded diagnoses and management decisions by experts based on direct clinical examination aided by dermatoscopy including digital dermatoscopic monitoring and by remote experts who reviewed the corresponding confocal images. The expert confocal readers were blinded to the clinical and dermatoscopic appearance of the lesion. The sensitivity of dermatoscopy plus digital dermatoscopic monitoring was 95.0% (95% CI 75.13% to 99.87%) and the specificity was 84.0% (95% CI 70.89% to 92.83%). The sensitivity of RCM was 95.0% (95% CI 75.13% to 99.87%) and the specificity was 82.0% (95% CI 68.56% to 91.42%). Although most flat pigmented facial lesions can be managed by clinical examination and dermatoscopy alone, confocal microscopy is a useful adjunct in selected lesions. If RCM is not correlated with clinical and dermatoscopic information, there is risk of overdiagnosis of actinic keratosis, however. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. Genital warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... warts URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000886.htm Genital warts To use the sharing ... They may be found on the penis , vulva , urethra, vagina , cervix , and around ... in the cervix , or to cervical cancer . These are called high-risk types of HPV. ...

  15. What's Up with Warts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Too Short All About Puberty What's Up With Warts? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Up With Warts? Print ... doctor can remove it. Why Do Kids Get Warts? Viruses cause warts. They're called human papilloma ( ...

  16. First Aid: Warts

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    ... to Be Smart About Social Media First Aid: Warts KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Warts Print A ... plantar warts. Signs and Symptoms Of a common wart include: located on back of hands, around nails, ...

  17. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel type of human papillomavirus 160 isolated from a flat wart of an immunocompetent patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Mitsuishi

    Full Text Available More than 150 types of Human papillomaviruses (HPVs have been isolated from numerous cutaneous and/or mucosal lesions. Flat wart samples on the face from 36 immunocompetent patients were collected and screened for HPV. From one sample, we cloned a putative novel genotype. The novel type consisted of 7779 bp in length with a GC content of 47.1%, containing open reading frames for putative early proteins (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7 and two late proteins (L1 and L2. Homology searches and phylogenetic analyses indicated that it belonged to Alphapapillomavirus (Alpha-PV species 2 and most closely resembled HPV 3. The virus fulfilled the definition of a novel type, and was named HPV 160 by the Reference Center for Papillomaviruses. The putative E7 protein of HPV 160 as well as HPV 29, 77, and 78 contained the Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu pRB-binding motif but other Alpha-PV species 2 (HPV 3, 10, 28, 94, 117, and 125 did not have this conserved motif.

  18. Genital Warts (For Parents)

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    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Warts (HPV) Print A A A What's in this ... Active Teens en español Verrugas genitales G enital warts are warts that are on or near a ...

  19. Warts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affects Your Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide to Getting Involved Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Warts KidsHealth > For Parents > Warts Print A A A ...

  20. Genital Warts (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Genital Warts (HPV) A A ... HPV infection. How Do People Know They Have HPV? Most HPV infections have no signs or symptoms. ...

  1. Clinical observation on carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for flat warts%点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪泽群; 郑楷平; 肖桂凤; 宋韬

    2014-01-01

    目的 评价点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣的临床疗效和安全性.方法 将83例扁平疣患者按治疗方法分为两组,观察组42例予点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗,对照组41例予液氮冷冻治疗,均10d为1个疗程,共治疗2个疗程.比较两组疗效、复发情况及不良反应.结果 观察组第1和2个疗程后痊愈率明显高于对照组[73.81%(31/42)比46.34%(19/41)和97.62%(41/42)比75.61%(31/41)],观察组复发率和不良反应发生率明显低于对照组[2.44%(1/41)比19.35%(6/31)和9.52%(4/42)比31.71%(13/41)],差异均有统计学意义(P< 0.05或< 0.01).结论 点阵二氧化碳激光联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣可明显提高痊愈率,降低复发率,而且安全.%Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety about carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for flat warts.Methods Eighty-three patients with flat warts were divided into 2 groups according to the treatment method,42 patients in treatment group were treated by carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy,41 patients in control group were treated by liquid nitrogen cryotherapy alone.As a period for 10 days,2 groups were given 2 periods of treatment.The therapeutic effect,recurrence rate and adverse reaction were compared between 2 groups.Results The cure rates of 1-period and 2-period in treatment group were significantly higher than those in control group [73.81%(31/42) vs.46.34%(19/41) and 97.62%(41/42) vs.75.61%(31/41)],the recurrence rate and incidence of adverse reaction in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group [2.44%(1/41) vs.19.35%(6/31) and 9.52%(4/42) vs.31.71%(13/41)],there were statistical differences (P < 0.05 or < 0.01).Conclusion Carbon dioxide fractional laser combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for fiat warts is a safe and effective treatment with low

  2. Warts, multiple - on hands (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warts are a very common skin condition. They frequently appear as single lesions or in small groups. ... of an unusually severe and extensive case of warts. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  3. Pulsed Dye Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Warts: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, David; Kravvas, Georgios; Al-Niaimi, Firas

    2017-04-01

    Warts or verrucae vulgaris are common cutaneous infections with currently no definitive curative treatments available. To determine the efficacy of pulsed dye laser (PDL) in the treatment of warts. A literature search was performed using the PubMed and MEDLINE databases. A search using {(Wart[s], verruca or condylomata)} AND [(Pulsed dye laser)] was used. Forty-four articles were identified as relevant to this review. Simple warts were very responsive to PDL, being treated successfully in over 95% of patients. Facial and anogenital warts also demonstrated excellent outcomes. Recalcitrant warts, displayed significant variability in their response, ranging between 50% and 100% across all articles. The response rates seen in peripheral warts (involving the hands and feet) were also very variable, ranging between 48% and 95%. Recurrence rates at 4 months of follow-up were documented as 0% to 15%. Complications have been described as very few and rare, the main ones being topical discomfort and erythema. Pulsed dye laser is a safe and effective modality in the treatment of warts that can be applied to most body parts. Cost and availability remain a limitation to the use of PDL; however, this modality can be used when other more traditional and accessible treatments have failed.

  4. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping of cutaneous warts in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Maria; Kakourou, Talia; Theodoridou, Maria; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Kabouris, Marios; Louizou, Eirini; Chrousos, George

    2013-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) infects the squamous epithelium of the skin and produces common warts, plantar warts, and flat warts, which occur commonly on the hands, face, and feet. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HPV in warts in children in order to associate the virus with the disease. Sixty-eight children with clinically diagnosed cutaneous warts were recruited. Skin biopsy samples were examined and DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. To distinguish between the HPV types, we used a specific pair of primers to amplify the HPV DNA. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the L1 region was followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and Luminex xMAP technology. HPV 57 was the predominant type in our study, although the detection of the high-risk HPV type 16 in 33% of our positive samples indicates the presence of mucosal high-risk HPV types in the skin of children. It seems that the newly introduced Luminex assay maximized the discrimination of genotypes even in the case of multiple HPV infections. Or findings also suggest the presence of high-risk HPV types in cutaneous warts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Warts, malnutrition, and sunshine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Topete, Rocío; Villa, Antonio; Leyva Santiago, Jaime; Scholtes, Christian; Archer-Dubon, Carla; Ysunza, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Viral warts are common in poor rural settings but their relationship to malnutrition has not been studied. We sought to determine the prevalence of warts in children of two communities in Oaxaca, Mexico, and compared it with their nutritional status. Children from Santa Catarina Yahuio and Santiago Laxopa of the state of Oaxaca were examined. Localization, number, and type of verruca were noted. Date of birth, height, and weight were obtained to determine nutritional status. A total of 213 children (116 girls and 97 boys), 107 in Yahuio and 106 in Laxopa, were studied. Mean age was 10.24 years. Thirty children (14.1%) had warts and 80% (24/30) of these lived in Yahuio (p = 0.0002). Almost half were teenagers. Most lesions were on sun-exposed areas. First degree malnutrition was found in 24.5%; second degree in 23.6% and third degree in 14.2%. A higher frequency of warts than previously reported was found. Malnutrition was prevalent in both groups but did not correlate positively with verruca. Verruca were more frequent in females, adolescents, sun-exposed areas, and higher altitude. We believe that the higher altitude of Yahuio facilitates greater exposure to ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression.

  6. Warts - A Clinicopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Sumit

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty patients attending an urban skin clinic and suffering from different types of warts were included in this study. Verruca vulgaris was the commonest type of wart comprising 44% of cases and epidermodysplasia verruciformis was the least frequent one. Persons of the age group 16 t o 25 years were mostly affected and majorities were in the middle income group (68.2%. In male, the genital area was the most commonly affected site while in female it was the upper extremity, namely, the fingers, and housewives were predominantly affected. Majority of patients had 2 to 5 lesions of 1 to 2 cm in diameter of 6 months to 1 year duration. Common histopathological features were hyperkeratosis, acanthosis with increased number of vacuolated cells in the stratum malpighii. None showed any sign malignancy.

  7. Warts (non-genital)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), of which there are over 100 types, which probably infects the skin via areas of minimal trauma. Risk factors include use of communal showers, occupational handling of meat, and immunosuppression. In immunocompetent people, warts are harmless and resolve as a result of natural immunity within months or years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for warts (non-genital)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic, review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: intralesional bleomycin; cimetidine; contact immunotherapy; cryotherapy; duct tape occlusion; formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde; homeopathy; photodynamic treatment; pulsed dye laser; surgical procedures; topical salicylic acid; and zinc sulphate. PMID:21726478

  8. Observation on the Efficacy of Thymopeptide Enteric -coated Capsules Combined with Liquid Nitrogen Cryotherapy in the Treatment of Flat Warts%胸腺肽肠溶胶囊联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣疗效探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂元梅; 董心亚; 燕群

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical efficacy of thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the treatment of flat warts. Methods 92 patients with flat warts were divided into two groups randomly. The control group was given thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules 10mg, orally, 3 times a day, and recombinant human interferon α-2b gel applied to the affected area twice a day, the 0.1% tretinoin cream applied to the affected area once every night before sleeping. The treatment group was given thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules 10mg, 3 times a day, orally, and at the same time, they were given liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. The two groups were given the course of treatment of two months. Results The effective rate was 93.5% in the treatment group, and that was 65.2% in the control group. The difference between the two groups in effective rate was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The curative effect of thymopeptide enteric-coated capsules combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy on flat warts is remarkable.%目的:探讨胸腺肽肠溶胶囊联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣的疗效。方法将92例扁平疣患者随机分为两组,对照组口服胸腺肽肠溶胶囊10 mg,tid,重组人干扰素α-2b凝胶外用bid,0.1%维A酸软膏外用睡前1次。治疗组口服胸腺肽肠溶胶囊10mg,tid,同时给于液氮冷冻治疗。两组疗程均为2个月。结果治疗组有效率为93.5%,对照组为65.2%。两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论胸腺肽肠溶胶囊联合液氮冷冻治疗扁平疣疗效确切。

  9. Observation on curative effect of external antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine combined with interferonα2b injection in the treatment of flat warts%中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星汇; 吕东; 秦萍萍; 刘润秋; 曹丽华; 周洋; 晓婷

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察外用中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣的疗效。方法:将90例入选的扁平疣患者随机分为三组。观察组:30例,应用中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣;对照1组和2组:各30例,单独应用中药抗菌剂治疗及单独应用干扰素α2b注射液治疗,比较三组疗效及复发率。结果:观察组疗效优于两对照组,复发率低于两对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),三组均未见明显的不良反应。结论:应用中药抗菌剂联合干扰素α2b注射液治疗扁平疣具有安全、有效的特点,疗效明显高于单独使用中药抗菌剂或干扰素α2b注射液,且复发率低,可以作为临床医生的一线选择。%Objective To observe the curative effect of external antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine combined with interferon α2b injection in the treatment of flat warts. Methods Ninety patients with flat warts were randomly divided into three groups.Thirty patients in the combination group received external antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine with interferon α2b injection;the others two in the control groups received only one of these treatments,then observe the effects and relapse rates of these three groups. Results The effective rate of treatment group was significantly higher than the control groups,and the relapse rate of treatment group was significantly lower than the control groups,the above showed significant difference(P<0.05).There was no siginificant side effects in these three groups. Conclusion External antibacterial washing with Chinese medcine combined with interferon α2b injection in the treatment of flat warts had better effect,low relapse rate and high safety,it is worthy of clinical application.

  10. HPV-associated oral warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  11. Clinicoepidemiological Study of Different Types of Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Sharma, Yugal K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Warts are cutaneous and, sometimes, mucosal lesions caused by one of the several human papilloma viruses. Aim. Assessment of the clinicoepidemiological aspects of warts. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive patients of warts presenting to the department of our institution were assigned two broad locational groups: genital and nongenital warts, the latter subdivided into common, plane, palmoplantar, mosaic, and digitate/filiform. Results. Ninety had nongenital and 10 had genital warts in our study; common (42%), palmoplantar (20%), and plane (18%) were the common types of the nongenital warts. All the genital warts were acuminate. In the second decade, the commonest age group, encompassed all patients of mosaic, 40% of palmoplantar, and 20% of genital warts. Overall male (66%) preponderance xisted. All cases of filiform warts were males. Mosaic warts affected females more commonly. Students (32%), laborers (28%), and housewives (16%) were the usual occupations. Cosmetic concern (92%), pain (16%), and itching (15%) were the common complaints. All patients of genital warts sought treatment within 6 months. Conclusions. Common, palmoplantar, and plane warts were the common types of nongenital warts. Overall prevalence peaked during the second decade but one-third of the cases of plane warts occurred during the first. Extremities were the most common sites (66.7%); face was the next commonly (23%) involved. PMID:27047542

  12. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Nongenital Warts

    OpenAIRE

    Sezai Sasmaz; Ozer Arican; Ergul Belge Kurutas

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male) and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphat...

  13. Topical cidofovir for plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla España, Laura; Del Boz, Javier; Fernández Morano, Teresa; Arenas Villafranca, Javier; de Troya Martín, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Plantar warts are a common reason for dermatological consultations and their treatment can occasionally be a challenge. Plantar warts are benign lesions produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV) that often fail to respond to habitual treatment. Cidofovir is a potent antiviral drug that acts competitively, inhibiting viral DNA polymerase. Our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of cidofovir cream for the treatment of viral plantar warts. We undertook a retrospective observational study of patients with plantar warts who received treatment with topical cidofovir between July 2008 and July 2011 at the Dermatology Service of the Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Spain. Data about the rate of treatment response, the adverse effects, and recurrences, as well as the characteristics of the patient cohort, were recorded. We identified 35 patients who had received some previous treatment. The usual concentration was 3% (in 33 of 35 cases), applied twice a day (in 31 of 35 cases). A greater or lesser response was noted in 28 cases. There were two recurrences. Topical cidofovir seems to be a useful alternative for the therapeutic management of recalcitrant plantar common warts that fail to respond to usual treatment.

  14. Review of Genital Wart Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Hongqing(田洪清); DU Donghong(杜东红)

    2002-01-01

    Although many traditional therapies areavailable for genital warts(GW), one of the major problemsin the treatment of GW is a high recurrenence rate. Inorder to resolve the problem of recurrence, new theraputicapproaches have been investigated. New approaches beingexplored include 5-fiuorouracil/epinephrine injectablecollagen gel, 5% imiguimod cream and humanpapillomavirus vaccine. Fluorouracil /epinephrine injectable collagen gel achieves high concentration of fiuorouracilat the site of injection. Imiguimod is a novelimmune-respones modifier, giving good clearance rates andtolerable side effects. Although the use of an HPV vaccine isfar away, preliminary studies show that it may be possibleto develop suitable prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines togenital warts.

  15. Heterogeneous keratohyalin formation in warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, R; Nicollier, M; Kienzler, J; Coumes Marquet, S; Agache, P G

    1978-06-29

    The heterogenecity of keratohyalin (KH) has been demonstrated in rats, then in human warts where similar morphological features have been found and among them, dense homogeneous ovoïd single granules (SG) and composite granules (CG) apparently made up of single granules "coated" with a matrix. This work compares the ultrastructure of the KH of the tongue of newborn rats with that of common warts with and without post-fixation by OsO4, after oxydation by H2O2 and after pepsin treatment. The osmiophily of the SG is confirmed as well as the absence of osmiophily of the matrix of the CG. In man, however, the SG are resistant to oxydation by H2O2 and the CG matrix is oxydation sensitive whereas the opposite is observed in the case of rats. These differences show that it is impossible to deduce the composition of the KH in human warts from that of the rat despite their close ultrastructural resemblance but that important modification of the keratogenesis and KH formation are induced in the cells parasited by the virus of common warts.

  16. Lessons on Peruvian wart or "disease Carrion"

    OpenAIRE

    Arce, Julián; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Malignant wart, is, as its name implies, the way hypertoxic, violent and often fatal, Peruvian wart or Carrion's disease. Individualized for the first time in 1870, when fatty epidemically in camps for railroad workers to La Oroya, located in the valleys between chosica and Matucana, was then given the name of Oroya fever to distinguish malaria eruptive wart, typhoid and other diseases, along with her reigned in these regions. Later, in 1885, the unexpected result of the memorable experience ...

  17. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Female Genital Warts: Global Trends and Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Gall, Stanley A.

    2001-01-01

    The increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-associated conditions such as genital warts in women is a global concern. Genital warts are a clinical manifestation of HPV types 6 and 11, and are estimated to affect 1% of sexually active adults aged between 15 and 49. HPV infection is also strongly associated with cervical cancer, and is prevalent in as many as 99% of cases. The psychological stress of having genital warts is often greater than the morbidi...

  19. Oxidative stress in patients with nongenital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmaz, Sezai; Arican, Ozer; Kurutas, Ergul Belge

    2005-08-31

    Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male) and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood by spectrophotometry. There was a statistically significant increase in levels of CAT, G6PD, SOD activities and MDA in the patients with warts compared to the control group (Pstress that might have a negative effect on the prognosis of the disease. Therefore, we propose an argument for the appropriateness to give priority to immunomodulatory treatment alternatives instead of destructive methods in patients with demonstrated oxidative stress.

  20. Topical treatments for cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Gibbs, Sam; Bennett, Cathy; Holland, Richard; Abbott, Rachel

    2012-09-12

    Viral warts are a common skin condition, which can range in severity from a minor nuisance that resolve spontaneously to a troublesome, chronic condition. Many different topical treatments are available. To evaluate the efficacy of local treatments for cutaneous non-genital warts in healthy, immunocompetent adults and children. We updated our searches of the following databases to May 2011: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), AMED (from 1985), LILACS (from 1982), and CINAHL (from 1981). We searched reference lists of articles and online trials registries for ongoing trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of topical treatments for cutaneous non-genital warts. Two authors independently selected trials and extracted data; a third author resolved any disagreements. We included 85 trials involving a total of 8815 randomised participants (26 new studies were included in this update). There was a wide range of different treatments and a variety of trial designs. Many of the studies were judged to be at high risk of bias in one or more areas of trial design.Trials of salicylic acid (SA) versus placebo showed that the former significantly increased the chance of clearance of warts at all sites (RR (risk ratio) 1.56, 95% CI (confidence interval) 1.20 to 2.03). Subgroup analysis for different sites, hands (RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.43 to 5.01) and feet (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.55), suggested it might be more effective for hands than feet.A meta-analysis of cryotherapy versus placebo for warts at all sites favoured neither intervention nor control (RR 1.45, 95% CI 0.65 to 3.23). Subgroup analysis for different sites, hands (RR 2.63, 95% CI 0.43 to 15.94) and feet (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.26 to 3.07), again suggested better outcomes for hands than feet. One trial showed cryotherapy to be better than both placebo and SA, but only for hand warts.There was no significant difference in cure rates between

  1. Treatment of Warts in Children: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlero, P; Hernández-Martín, Á

    2016-09-01

    Warts are among the most common skin infections in children. Although numerous treatment options are available, none are completely effective in a single session. Treatment is particularly complicated in children, not only because certain treatments are poorly tolerated, but also because parents frequently have unrealistic expectations. In this article, we offer an update on the treatments available for warts, focusing specifically on pediatric patients. We do not discuss treatments for oral and anogenital warts. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Female genital warts: global trends and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, S A

    2001-01-01

    The increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-associated conditions such as genital warts in women is a global concern. Genital warts are a clinical manifestation of HPV types 6 and 11, and are estimated to affect 1% of sexually active adults aged between 15 and 49. HPV infection is also strongly associated with cervical cancer, and is prevalent in as many as 99% of cases. The psychological stress of having genital warts is often greater than the morbidity of the disease, and therefore successful treatment is crucial. Current treatments are patient-applied and provider-administered therapies. Imiquimod 5% cream, a patient-applied therapy, is an efficacious treatment with tolerable side-effects and a low recurrence rate, and has the potential to be an effective strategy for the management of genital warts.

  3. Insects are Crawling in My Genital Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Jyoti; Singh, Saurabh; Gupta, Somesh

    2011-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with large exophytic genital wart arising from perineum, vulva, introitus of the vagina, and inner aspect of thighs. Patient developed severe itching and formication (insect-crawling sensation) in the lesions for past 1 week, though careful examination did not reveal any insects. Considering that the disease was causing psychological stress and physical symptoms, radiofrequency excision was planned. However, during the procedure, several maggots appeared from the crypts. The procedure was abandoned and maggots were removed manually. Subsequently external giant warts were removed using radiofrequency device. There was no recurrence of excised warts during 3 month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of maggots in genital warts.

  4. Insects are crawling in my genital warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Dhawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old woman presented with large exophytic genital wart arising from perineum, vulva, introitus of the vagina, and inner aspect of thighs. Patient developed severe itching and formication (insect-crawling sensation in the lesions for past 1 week, though careful examination did not reveal any insects. Considering that the disease was causing psychological stress and physical symptoms, radiofrequency excision was planned. However, during the procedure, several maggots appeared from the crypts. The procedure was abandoned and maggots were removed manually. Subsequently external giant warts were removed using radiofrequency device. There was no recurrence of excised warts during 3 month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of maggots in genital warts.

  5. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-01-01

    .... As a result, the patients are vulnerableto chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However,cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as humanpapilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported...

  6. Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards study tools Online Learning Center Meetings and events Make a difference Career planning Media Relations Toolkit AAD apps Academy meeting Chronic urticaria—for members Chronic urticaria—for public Dermatology World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC ...

  7. Is oral contraceptive associated with genital warts?

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the association between oral contraceptive use and the prevalence of genital warts in women. METHODS: Cross sectional case control study comparing oral contraceptive use in women with and without genital warts attending a city centre genitourinary medicine clinic controlling for recent sexual activity, the presence of other sexually transmitted infections, socio-economic class and history of pregnancy using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: After control...

  8. New approach to managing genital warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Catharine C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To summarize and determine the appropriate use for the new and old management tools for genital warts. Sources of information The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ACP Journal Club, and Trip. The bibliographies of retrieved papers were also reviewed. Clinical trials, qualitative review articles, consensus reports, and clinical practice guidelines were retrieved. Main message Symptomatic warts are prevalent in at least 1% of the population between the ages of 15 and 49, with estimates of up to 50% of the population being infected with human papillomavirus at some point in their lifetime. Imiquimod and podophyllotoxin are 2 new treatments for external genital warts that are less painful and can be applied by patients at home. In addition, the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine has been shown to be efficacious in preventing genital warts and cervical cancer. There is still a role for the older treatment methods in certain situations, such as intravaginal, urethral, anal, or recalcitrant warts; or for pregnant patients. Conclusion The new treatments of external genital warts can reduce the pain of treatment and the number of office visits. Other treatment methods are still useful in certain situations. PMID:23851535

  9. 2 Doses of HPV Shot Enough to Prevent Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doses of HPV Shot Enough to Prevent Genital Warts: Study Findings back up new CDC recommendations for ... human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to protect against genital warts in preteens and teens. Investigators at Boston University ...

  10. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Nongenital Warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezai Sasmaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and malondialdehyde (MDA in the venous blood by spectrophotometry. There was a statistically significant increase in levels of CAT, G6PD, SOD activities and MDA in the patients with warts compared to the control group (P<.05. However, we could not define a statistically significant correlation between these increased enzyme activities and MDA levels and the type, the duration, the number, and the location of lesions. We determined possible suppression of T cells during oxidative stress that might have a negative effect on the prognosis of the disease. Therefore, we propose an argument for the appropriateness to give priority to immunomodulatory treatment alternatives instead of destructive methods in patients with demonstrated oxidative stress.

  11. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  12. Warts transmitted in families and schools: a prospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Eekhof, J.A.H.; Egberts, P.F.; Blijswijk, S.C. van; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Gussekloo, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cutaneous warts are common in primary schoolchildren; however, knowledge on the routes of transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing warts is scarce. This study examines the association between the degree of HPV exposure and incidence of warts in primary

  13. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  14. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be...

  15. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-07-21

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient.

  16. Cosmetic Warts: Pseudo-Koebnerization of Warts after Cosmetic Procedures for Hair Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Sidharth, Sonthalia; Rahul, Arora; Rashmi, Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To sensitize patients, physicians, and aestheticians about the possibility of spread of cutaneous warts during cosmetic procedures, especially following temporary hair removal methods, such as shaving, waxing, threading, and using depilatory creams, so they practice the requisite safety measures. Cutaneous warts caused by human papilloma virus are highly contagious. They tend to spread locally with even the trivial trauma of scratching, resulting in autoinoculation or “pseudo-Koebn...

  17. Immunomodulators in warts: Unexplored or ineffective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous warts are known to be recurrent and often resistant to therapy. Resistant warts may reflect a localized or systemic cell mediated immune (CMI deficiency to HPV. Many modalities of treatment are in use; most of the provider-administered therapies are destructive and cause scarring, such as cryotherapy, chemical cauterisation, curettage, electrodessication and laser removal. Most patient-applied agents like podophyllotoxin have the risk of application-site reactions and recurrence. Thus immunotherapy is a promising modality which could lead to resolution of warts without any physical changes or scarring and in addition would augment the host response against the causative agent, thereby leading to complete resolution and decreased recurrences. Immunomodulators can be administered systemically, intralesionally or intradermally, and topically. A few agents have been tried and studied extensively such as cimetidine and interferons; others are new on the horizon, such as Echinacea, green tea catechins and quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and their efficacy is yet to be completely established. Though some like levamisole have shown no efficacy as monotherapy and are now used only in combination, other more recent agents require large and long term randomized placebo-controlled trials to clearly establish their efficacy or lack of it. In this review, we focus on the immunomodulators that have been used for the treatment of warts and the studies that have been conducted on them.

  18. Immunomodulators in warts: Unexplored or ineffective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Surabhi; Relhan, Vineet; Garg, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are known to be recurrent and often resistant to therapy. Resistant warts may reflect a localized or systemic cell mediated immune (CMI) deficiency to HPV. Many modalities of treatment are in use; most of the provider-administered therapies are destructive and cause scarring, such as cryotherapy, chemical cauterisation, curettage, electrodessication and laser removal. Most patient-applied agents like podophyllotoxin have the risk of application-site reactions and recurrence. Thus immunotherapy is a promising modality which could lead to resolution of warts without any physical changes or scarring and in addition would augment the host response against the causative agent, thereby leading to complete resolution and decreased recurrences. Immunomodulators can be administered systemically, intralesionally or intradermally, and topically. A few agents have been tried and studied extensively such as cimetidine and interferons; others are new on the horizon, such as Echinacea, green tea catechins and quadrivalent HPV vaccine, and their efficacy is yet to be completely established. Though some like levamisole have shown no efficacy as monotherapy and are now used only in combination, other more recent agents require large and long term randomized placebo-controlled trials to clearly establish their efficacy or lack of it. In this review, we focus on the immunomodulators that have been used for the treatment of warts and the studies that have been conducted on them. PMID:25814698

  19. Topical vitamin A treatment of recalcitrant common warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston Anca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common warts (verruca vulgaris are benign epithelial proliferations associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Salicylic acid and cryotherapy are the most frequent treatments for common warts, but can be painful and cause scarring, and have high failure and recrudescence rates. Topical vitamin A has been shown to be a successful treatment of common warts in prior informal studies. Case The subject is a healthy, physically-active 30 old female with a 9 year history of common warts on the back of the right hand. The warts resisted treatment with salicylic acid, apple cider vinegar and an over-the-counter blend of essential oils marketed for the treatment of warts. Daily topical application of natural vitamin A derived from fish liver oil (25,000 IU led to replacement of all the warts with normal skin. Most of the smaller warts had been replaced by 70 days. A large wart on the middle knuckle required 6 months of vitamin A treatment to resolve completely. Conclusion Retinoids should be further investigated in controlled studies to determine their effectiveness in treating common warts and the broad range of other benign and cancerous lesions induced by HPVs.

  20. Topical vitamin A treatment of recalcitrant common warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Anca; Garry, Robert F

    2012-01-17

    Common warts (verruca vulgaris) are benign epithelial proliferations associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Salicylic acid and cryotherapy are the most frequent treatments for common warts, but can be painful and cause scarring, and have high failure and recrudescence rates. Topical vitamin A has been shown to be a successful treatment of common warts in prior informal studies. The subject is a healthy, physically-active 30 old female with a 9 year history of common warts on the back of the right hand. The warts resisted treatment with salicylic acid, apple cider vinegar and an over-the-counter blend of essential oils marketed for the treatment of warts. Daily topical application of natural vitamin A derived from fish liver oil (25,000 IU) led to replacement of all the warts with normal skin. Most of the smaller warts had been replaced by 70 days. A large wart on the middle knuckle required 6 months of vitamin A treatment to resolve completely. Retinoids should be further investigated in controlled studies to determine their effectiveness in treating common warts and the broad range of other benign and cancerous lesions induced by HPVs.

  1. Warts transmitted in families and schools: a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Eekhof, Just A H; Egberts, Paulette F; van Blijswijk, Sophie C E; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous warts are common in primary schoolchildren; however, knowledge on the routes of transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing warts is scarce. This study examines the association between the degree of HPV exposure and incidence of warts in primary schoolchildren to support evidence-based recommendations on wart prevention. In this prospective cohort study, the hands and feet of all children in grades 1 to 7 (aged 4-12 years) of 3 Dutch primary schools were inspected for the presence of warts at baseline and after 11 to 18 months of follow-up. Data on the degree of HPV exposure included information obtained from parental questionnaires: preexistent warts, warts in family, prevalence of warts at baseline in the class, and use of public places (eg, swimming pools). Of the 1134 eligible children, 97% participated; the response rate from parental questionnaires was 77%, and loss to follow-up was 9%. The incidence for developing warts was 29 per 100 person-years at risk (95% confidence interval [CI] 26-32). Children with a white skin type had an increased risk of developing warts (hazard ratio [HR] 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.9). Having family members with warts (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.52-2.86) and wart prevalence in the class (HR 1.20 per 10% increase, 95% CI 1.03-1.41) were independent environmental risk factors. The degree of HPV exposure in the family and school class contributes to the development of warts in schoolchildren. Preventive recommendations should focus more on limiting HPV transmission in families and school classes, rather than in public places.

  2. A CASE REPORT OF GIANT GENITAL WARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Grimaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant genital warts (GGW represent a rare form of sexually transmitted disease caused by the human papillomavirus, arising more frequently in the vulvar and perianal regions as large exophytic cauliflower-like mass. Estimated rate of recurrence is 60 to 66%, while malignant transformation is possible and it has been reported in 30 to 56% of cases. A 45- years-old woman was admitted to our Structure of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Siena, Italy with an extensive cauliflower- like masses diffused on vulvar and perianal region. The patient was treated in general anaesthesia, with a wide en bloc excision up to free clinical edges and immediate reconstruction of the vulvar continuity. Buschke Lowenstein tumour or giant genital warts is a sporadic tumour with an elevate local recurrence rate. In some cases, surgery can be very difficult and it must be associated to other strategies. An accurate follow-up is always necessary

  3. Lichen Simplex Chronicus That Accompanies Anogenital Warts during the Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçilmiş Kerimoğlu, Ozlem; Doğan, Nasuh Utku; Tazegül, Aybike; Karameşe, Mehtap; Beyhekim, Hasan; Celik, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    Anogenital warts and lichen simplex chronicus (LSC) are rarely seen during the childhood. A 9-year-old girl has been presented to hospital by her parents with itching in the anogenital area. There were anogenital warts and a different erythematous lesion in the perianal region. On the pulpa of the right thumb, there was a wart extending under the nail. The lesions are surgically removed. The results of the histopathological examination were reported as condyloma acuminata and LSC. Children with anogenital warts should be examined carefully to discover the transmission route and other possible concomitant cutaneous diseases.

  4. Determining oxidant and antioxidant status in patients with genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokluk, Erdem; Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ramazan; Aslan, Mehmet; Balahoroglu, Ragip; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Huyut, Zubeyir

    2015-09-01

    Warts are abnormal skin growths caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections within the skin of patients. Genital warts usually appear in the perianal and perigenital regions. Asymptomatic warts may be activated after years and may damage natural immunity. The inflammation that occurs during this process may lead to an imbalance between the prooxidant and the antioxidant systems. The aim of this study was to investigate erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, serum paraoxonase enzyme levels, and oxidative stress levels in patients with genital warts. In total, 32 patients with genital warts and 35 healthy subjects were included in this study. Erythrocyte GSH-Px activity, serum catalase activity, and paraoxonase enzyme, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined. Erythrocyte GSH-Px activity, serum MDA levels, and catalase activity were significantly higher in patients with genital warts than in controls (P 0.05). Serum triglyceride levels were significantly lower in patients with genital warts than in controls (P 0.05). Our data suggest that oxidative stress is increased in genital warts. Increased oxidative stress levels may contribute to the pathogenesis of genital warts, and prolonged HPV infection due to chronic inflammation could also affect oxidative stress.

  5. Insects are Crawling in My Genital Warts

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Dhawan; Saurabh Singh; Somesh Gupta

    2011-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with large exophytic genital wart arising from perineum, vulva, introitus of the vagina, and inner aspect of thighs. Patient developed severe itching and formication (insect-crawling sensation) in the lesions for past 1 week, though careful examination did not reveal any insects. Considering that the disease was causing psychological stress and physical symptoms, radiofrequency excision was planned. However, during the procedure, several maggots appeared from the...

  6. CRYOSURGERY FOR TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS WARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Bagus Adhi Paramitha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Minor surgery is a general surgical procedure that applied with minimally invasive procedures and short duration, done in a superficial or just the affected tissue.  This technique is normally only requires a local anaesthetic and only has minimal  risk or complications. There are many cases that could be dealt with minor surgery one is veruka. Veruka or known as cutaneous warts is a disease that is often complained in children and adults. Veruka being estimated to occur until over 10% in children and young adults. Largest incident occurred in range of age 12 to 16 years. Veruka occurs more frequently in women than men. The peak incidence occur of age 13 years on women and 14.5 years in males. Salicylic acid and cryosurgery therapy are two of the most frequently performed in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Salicylic acid is therapy  for cutaneous warts who recently had already started replaced by cryosurgery because it is relatively easy to do and faster recovery.  

  7. Human papillomavirus typing of warts and response to cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, N; Sterling, J; Ahmed, I; Hague, J; Berth-Jones, J

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous warts are common and caused by a number of different types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the HPV types causing common warts and to determine any association between the HPV type and the duration of warts and response to cryotherapy. Eighty wart samples from 76 immunocompetent patients were taken from warts by paring prior to cryotherapy and analysed by in situ hybridization (ISH) with HPV probes specific to HPV 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 57 and PCR analysis using degenerate cutaneous HPV primers with subsequent DNA sequencing. Each patient's details, including site, duration and response of the wart to cryotherapy were recorded. Cryotherapy was performed at 2 week intervals for a maximum of 12 weeks. An HPV type was identified in 65 samples. The majority of warts (58 samples) were typed as HPV 2/27/57 by ISH and/or PCR. Three of the 18 samples that were HPV negative with ISH were HPV positive by PCR. Response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type, duration or location. In the 21 wart parings taken from patients aged 16 and under, response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type but warts of shorter duration were more likely to resolve with cryotherapy treatment than longer standing lesions. This study demonstrates that HPV type can be determined from wart parings. HPV-2 related viruses are the prevalent HPV types causing common warts on the hands and feet in this population. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Propolis as an alternative treatment for cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedan, Hatem; Hofny, Eman R M; Ismail, Sahar A

    2009-11-01

    Warts are common problems affecting adults and children. Multiple treatment options are available, but no single therapy stands out as uniformly effective. Propolis and Echinacea are relatively safe immunomodulators with antiviral properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of Propolis and Echinacea in treating different types of warts. In a single-blind, randomized, 3-months trial, 135 patients with different types of warts received oral Propolis, Echinacea, or placebo. In patients with plane and common warts treated with Propolis, cure was achieved in 75% and 73% of patients, respectively. These results were significantly better than those associated with Echinacea treatment or placebo. We conclude that Propolis is an effective and safe immunomodulating therapy for plane and common warts.

  9. Flat semimodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mohammed J. Al-Thani

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and investigate flat semimodules and k-flat semimodules .We hope these concepts will have the same importance in semimodule theory as in the theory of rings and modules.

  10. Resolution of Novel Human Papillomavirus–induced Warts after HPV Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Ulrike; Werner, Marko; Pfister, Herbert; Potthoff, Anja; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from warts on an immunosuppressed patient. After HPV vaccination, the warts resolved. HPVXS2 was also found in warts and normal skin of HIV-positive patients and rarely in HIV-negative controls. Further studies should elucidate the mechanisms that lead to wart clearance. PMID:24378072

  11. Resolution of novel human papillomavirus-induced warts after HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Werner, Marko; Pfister, Herbert; Potthoff, Anja; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from warts on an immunosuppressed patient. After HPV vaccination, the warts resolved. HPVXS2 was also found in warts and normal skin of HIV-positive patients and rarely in HIV-negative controls. Further studies should elucidate the mechanisms that lead to wart clearance.

  12. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003028.htm Facial paralysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Facial paralysis occurs when a person is no longer able ...

  13. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB In The Treatment Of Warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay S. P

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty patients (male-25, female-15 of age group 15 to 46 years (mean 23 years were attempted for contact sensitization with 0.5% -3% dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB solution. Thirty five cases could be hypersensitized. Out of these cases, 11(27.5%cases responded fully with subsequent local application of 0.5-1% DNCB solution on the warts and another 32.5% cases showed moderate response while 40% of cases did not show any response. It was also seen that 77.5% of patients suffered from moderate to severe complication in the form of eczematous reaction. Pain and induration both on the site of hypersensitization and on sites away from it. The eczematous reaction subsided slowly over 2 to 4 weeks period without leaving any permanent scar. DNCB (topical could be used for a cure under direct supervision in the selected cases of verrucae not responding to standard treatment by initial sensitization and thereafter direct application over the warts. There was a marginal increased tuberculin (PPD response after hypersensitization process with DNCB.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Islamic Intercessory Prayer on Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoşrik, Evren M; Cüceloğlu, Aydın E; Erpolat, Seval

    2014-02-18

    The present study aimed to examine the therapeutic effects of Islamic intercessory prayer on warts. Forty-five participants who are mostly Muslims and infected with warts were randomized into three groups: Group-1 (uncertain, with intercessory prayer), Group-2 (uncertain, no intercessory prayer), and control group (informed, no intervention). Stress symptoms were also measured before and after prayer sessions for these three groups. The results revealed that there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of healing. Although participants believed in the therapeutic effects of prayer, when participants did not trust the intercessor, prayer had no effect on warts.

  15. High prevalence of cutaneous warts in elementary school children and the ubiquitous presence of wart-associated human papillomavirus on clinically normal skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, M N C; Quint, K D; Bruggink, S C; Gussekloo, J; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Feltkamp, M C W; Quint, W G V; Eekhof, J A H

    2015-01-01

    One-third of Dutch primary school children have cutaneous warts; each year around 20% of them seek medical treatment. However, little is known about the epidemiology of the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) causing these warts. To investigate the distribution of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types in three primary school classes by analysing skin swabs taken from warts, and the forehead, hand dorsum and sole of the foot of included children. Using the hyperkeratotic skin lesion polymerase chain reaction/multiplex genotyping assay, each swab sample was used to genotype for 23 cutaneous wart-associated HPV types. Thirty-one (44%) of the 71 children had a total of 69 warts, with a maximum of six warts per child. In the wart swabs, HPV2, HPV27 and HPV57, members of Alphapapillomavirus species 4, were most frequently detected (27%, 32% and 14%, respectively), whereas HPV1 was only found in two plantar warts. The prevalence of HPV carriage, detected in swabs of clinically normal skin of the forehead, left hand and left sole was 80%, with the most prevalent types being HPV1 (59%), HPV2 (42%), HPV63 (25%) and HPV27 (21%). Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types were highly prevalent in primary school children, but did not correlate with the HPV types in warts. In contrast to the existing literature, HPV1 was frequently detected on clinically normal skin but was much less frequent in warts. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  17. Late effects of X-ray treatment of warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veien, N.K.; Norholm, A.; Hattel, T.; Justesen, O.

    1982-04-01

    Five to 22 years after warts on hands and feet were treated by X ray, 1122 patients with a total of 3675 warts were re-examined. X-Ray therapy had been given as one dose of 3000 r using 29 kV with a 0.3-mm Al filter; 19% of the warts had been given two treatments. Sequelae were seen in 4.8% of the sites where warts had been given one X-ray treatment and in 12.2% of the sites after two treatments. These side effects include hyperkeratosis in the pressure areas of palms and soles and atrophy primarily in areas with a thin cutis. There was no evidence of malignant transformation in any treatment site, and there were no deep-seated side effects such as ostitis or tendinitis.

  18. Mucocutaneous warts in Middle Anatolia, Turkey: clinical presentations and therapeutic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Iyidal, Ayşegül Yalçınkaya; Çakmak, Seray; Kılıç, Arzu; Gul, Ulker; Doner, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Viral warts are common skin condition caused by the human papilloma virus. Aim To determine the clinical features of warts and therapeutic approaches to warts and compare them with the literature. Material and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 362 consecutive patients presenting to a dermatology clinic in Ankara, Middle Anatolia, Turkey. Age, gender, anatomic localization, clinical types, number of warts, and medical therapy histories were recorded. Results In our study 139 (38.4%) children and 223 (61.6%) adults had warts. Warts were seen in 191 men, and 171 women. The mean age was 24.7 ±13.5. In all groups the incidence and the number of warts were higher in men. Clinical types of warts were vulgar, anogenital, plantar, verruca plana, filiform, and mosaic. Thirty-six (9.9%) of 362 cases had more than one type. The locations of warts were as follows extremities (n = 233, 64.4%), anogenital (n = 86, 23.7%) and head and neck (n = 73, 20.2%). The incidence of anogenital warts was statistically higher in men than women (p warts were higher in men, which is different than in previous reports. The anogenital wart (AW) was ranked second in all types of warts. According to this finding, we can say that the frequency of AW has been increased in Turkey. To our knowledge recently there have been no studies investigating the clinical features of viral warts in all ages in the literature. PMID:26161058

  19. Lesional HPV types of cutaneous warts can be reliably identified by surface swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, M N C; Khoe, L V; Eekhof, J A H; Kamp, M; Gussekloo, J; Ter Schegget, J; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Quint, W G V

    2011-10-01

    Large numbers of HPV types infect the human skin and members from the HPV genera alpha, gamma and mu are associated with cutaneous warts. The aim of this study was to test if the HPV genotypes in swabs of the overlying skin are identical to the types present within these warts. To this purpose, 25 persons being treated for persistent cutaneous warts were enrolled. Swabs of the overlying skin of the wart were collected from each participant. Additionally, scabs of the wart and deeper portions of the warts were surgically removed. HPV genotyping was performed on all samples using the novel HSL-PCR/MPG assay and the HPV genotyping results were compared. From the 25 wart biopsies one was HPV negative. 15 were positive for HPV27, 3 for HPV57, 2 for HPV2, 2 for HPV1, 1 for HPV3 and 1wart biopsy was positive for both HPV41 and HPV65. Scabs and swabs of the warts both showed identical typing results as the biopsies in 24 of the 25 cases (sensitivity: 96%). There was an excellent agreement between HPV types in the swabs of the skin that overlies the warts and the biopsies of these warts validating the use of wart swabs for future studies of wart-associated HPV types. HPV27 was highly prevalent (70%) in the in adults of the investigated population of patients with persistent cutaneous warts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Therapeutic options for external genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Ronald; Bourcier, Marc; Bhatia, Neal; Lynde, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of treatment for external genital warts (EGWs) is to eradicate visible lesions and address symptoms that may accompany them, but it does not address the underlying virus. Left untreated, warts may grow, remain the same, or spontaneously regress as a result of being cleared by the immune system. However, recurrence is common with or without treatment and may occur within 3 months of ending treatment in one-quarter to two-thirds of cases. Treatment options fall into two categories: provider or patient applied. Provider-based therapies include cryotherapy, trichloroacetic and bichloroacetic acid, electrocautery, surgical excision, and CO2 laser therapy. Patient-applied therapy choices include imiquimod and podophyllotoxin. Imiquimod 3.75% is a fairly new, patient-administered topical cream approved by Health Canada in 2011. Another recently approved patient-applied choice is sinecatechins, a green tea extract with immunomodulatory effects. Self-treatment options are attractive to patients because they offer privacy, convenience, and autonomy. In contrast, provider-administered therapies may boast increased precision (especially for areas that are hard to reach) and closer monitoring, which can be augmented by patient education and counseling. Available topical and surgical therapies vary widely in terms of cost, efficacy, adverse effects, dosage/frequency, and length of treatment. No one treatment is ideally suited to all patients or constitutes a gold standard. Treatment regimens must be tailored to each patient's needs and preferences. The health care provider's skills and experience will also factor into treatment decisions. In addition, the size, number, and location of lesions and whether the infection is new or recurrent will help guide the decision process toward the best treatment for a given patient.

  1. Viral Warts-A Clinico-Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmisha Chandrashekar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical criteria, laboratory diagnosis and treatment are well established, scanty attention has been paid to prevalence and pattern of viral warts in India. HIV is widely prevalent and its influence on the number and morphology of viral warts has not yet been studied in our setup. Hence, this study was undertaken. One hindered and forty four cases of viral warts were studied between September 2000 and June 2002 at the department of Dermatology and STD, JIPMER, Pondicherry. These included 81childeren and 63 adults. In Children, viral warts were most commonly seen in the age group of 10to14 years (41.9%, whereas in adults, the most commonly seen in the age 14to20 years (46.03%. The average age at presentation was 11.5 years. The male to female ratio was 2.2 to 1 in children and 1.8 to 1 in adults. Family history of warts was observed in 27.7% of the cases. In children, multiple site involvement (62.9% was more common than single site involvement. The most commonly involved site was hand in children as also in adults. In adults, single site involvement (66.6%was more common than multiple site involvement. The most common type of wart seen in both children and adults was the common wart. Twenty percent of the cases showed koebnerization. Four cases were found to be seropositive for HIV infection, who were adult with genital warts, but florid manifestations were not seen.

  2. Children with Warts: A Retrospective Study in an Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Anne M; Rainer, Barbara M; Basdag, Hatice; Cohen, Bernard A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate the demographics and course of common warts in children in an outpatient setting. A retrospective medical chart review and telephone survey study were completed on an outpatient cohort of children (0-17 yrs) with a clinical diagnosis of warts at a single-center, university-based pediatric dermatology practice. The main outcome measures included management, time to resolution, and associated factors of warts in children. Of the 254 patients we contacted, 214 agreed to participate in the survey. The most commonly involved sites were the hands and the head and neck area. Most children received some form of therapy, but it is unclear that any form of treatment altered the course. However, children with a medical history of childhood infections or more than one anatomic site had significantly greater risk of having a longer time to resolution. Warts resolved in 65% of children by 2 years and in 80% within 4 years, regardless of treatment. With the exception of a history of childhood infections and having more than one anatomic site, time to resolution was not altered by wart or patient characteristics. Thus counseling without aggressive destructive treatment is a reasonable approach to managing warts in most children. Our findings will provide guidance in the process of shared decision making with parents and children. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Intralesional Candida antigen for common warts in people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Aaron; Crawford, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Intralesional Candida antigen has been used as immunotherapy to treat refractory warts in the immunocompetent pediatric and adult populations but has not been reported in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To examine if Candida antigen resulted in clearance of medically refractory, long-standing common warts in a series of HIV patients. At a hospital-based, adult, outpatient dermatology clinic, seven patients with HIV with common warts of the hands and feet were treated with intralesional Candida antigen. The warts had been resistant to standard patient- and physician-applied modalities. Clearance was achieved in three of seven patients, whereas four of seven did not respond due to a lack of effectiveness or an inability to tolerate treatment. Adverse events included injection-site redness, pruritus, and pain. This is the first reported case series using Candida antigen for warts in individuals with HIV. The use of Candida antigen represents a simple and novel approach to the management of treatment-refractory warts in those with HIV. This case series provides a foundation for future larger, randomized trials.

  4. Facial swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help reduce facial swelling. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have: Sudden, painful, or severe facial ... or if you have breathing problems. The health care provider will ask about your medical and personal history. This helps determine treatment or ...

  5. Genital Warts -- Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966 - 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 46. Genital Warts — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital warts estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  6. Automated Facial Action Coding System for dynamic analysis of facial expressions in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jihun; Kohler, Christian G; Gur, Ruben C; Verma, Ragini

    2011-09-15

    Facial expression is widely used to evaluate emotional impairment in neuropsychiatric disorders. Ekman and Friesen's Facial Action Coding System (FACS) encodes movements of individual facial muscles from distinct momentary changes in facial appearance. Unlike facial expression ratings based on categorization of expressions into prototypical emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust, etc.), FACS can encode ambiguous and subtle expressions, and therefore is potentially more suitable for analyzing the small differences in facial affect. However, FACS rating requires extensive training, and is time consuming and subjective thus prone to bias. To overcome these limitations, we developed an automated FACS based on advanced computer science technology. The system automatically tracks faces in a video, extracts geometric and texture features, and produces temporal profiles of each facial muscle movement. These profiles are quantified to compute frequencies of single and combined Action Units (AUs) in videos, and they can facilitate a statistical study of large populations in disorders known to impact facial expression. We derived quantitative measures of flat and inappropriate facial affect automatically from temporal AU profiles. Applicability of the automated FACS was illustrated in a pilot study, by applying it to data of videos from eight schizophrenia patients and controls. We created temporal AU profiles that provided rich information on the dynamics of facial muscle movements for each subject. The quantitative measures of flatness and inappropriateness showed clear differences between patients and the controls, highlighting their potential in automatic and objective quantification of symptom severity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determining the cost of genital warts: a study from Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dee, A

    2009-09-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the average cost of a case of genital warts, for both males and females, with a view to informing the current debate as to which Human papillomavirus vaccine would have maximum cost-effectiveness in the Irish population. METHODS: Contact time between patients and healthcare professionals was prospectively measured at five genitourinary medicine clinics in the south-west of Ireland, over a period of 3 weeks. By identifying all those with genital warts, it was possible to calculate the proportion of total time taken by patients with this condition, and from this to calculate a cost per incident case, by gender. RESULTS: A total of 25.5% of attendances were for genital warts, and these patients used 26.2% of total clinic time (CI 25.4 to 27.0%). The average cost calculated for genital warts was 335 euros per incident case, and by gender 300 euros per male case and 366 euros per female case. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable costs associated with the treatment of genital warts, with female cases representing a higher cost than males. By vaccinating with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, there are significant savings to be made.

  8. Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types: prevalence and relation with patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Koning, M.N. de; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Schegget, J. ter; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data on cutaneous wart-associated HPV types are rare. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types and their relation with patient characteristics. STUDY DESIGN: Swabs were taken from all 744 warts of 246 consecutive immunocompetent

  9. The treatment and demographics of warts: an analysis of national trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Virginia J; Gustafson, Cheryl J; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Huang, William W

    2013-12-01

    Verrucae (warts) are a very common dermatologic disease. They can be of cosmetic concern, cause physical discomfort, and predispose patients to certain malignancies. Management of warts has traditionally been based on anatomic location, clinical appearance, and patient preference. To investigate trends in the treatment of warts, as well as patient demographics associated with the diagnosis of warts. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) was queried for data regarding patient visits associated with the diagnosis of warts from 1990 to 2009. There was a significant increase in the use of topical imiquimod during the study period, such that it became the most frequently used medication for warts. No statistically significant trends were detected regarding the frequency of treatment with medication only, procedure only, or combination treatment. In terms of patient demographics, there was an upward trend in regards to increasing patient age and the diagnosis of warts. However, there were no significant trends with respect to patient gender or race and the diagnosis of warts. Warts not otherwise specified (NOS) was the reported diagnosis for more than eighty percent of patient visits for warts. Trends in the treatment of plantar warts could not be evaluated as the ICD-9 code designating this diagnosis was recently instituted in 2009. Data from NAMCS are cross-sectional in nature. The advent of a new therapy and shifts in population patterns have modified the epidemiologic profile and treatment of warts.

  10. [Viral warts on hands and feet are often self-limiting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, Esben Lynge; Waldorf, Frans Boch

    2013-05-27

    Viral warts are common skin lesions caused by human papilloma virus. This article describes the pathogenesis, symptoms and treatment methods of cutaneous warts. The majority resolves spontaneously and the evidence on treatment of warts is rather poor, however, products with salicylic acid and cryotherapy have been surveyed most rigorously and shown to increase treatment rates.

  11. Cutaneous wart-associated HPV types: prevalence and relation with patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Koning, M.N. de; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Schegget, J. ter; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data on cutaneous wart-associated HPV types are rare. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cutaneous wart-associated HPV types and their relation with patient characteristics. STUDY DESIGN: Swabs were taken from all 744 warts of 246 consecutive immunocompetent partici

  12. Facial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery.

  13. Facial tics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tic - facial; Mimic spasm ... Tics may involve repeated, uncontrolled spasm-like muscle movements, such as: Eye blinking Grimacing Mouth twitching Nose wrinkling Squinting Repeated throat clearing or grunting may also be ...

  14. Facial Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihalache Sergiu; Stoica Mihaela-Zoica

    2014-01-01

    .... From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain...

  15. A Case of Recalcitrant Plantar Warts Associated with Statin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron G. Wernham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Plantar warts are a common presenting skin complaint caused by the human papillomavirus. 1st line therapies include cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid. Where there is resistance to these treatments, consideration is made for 2nd line therapies, including intralesional bleomycin, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic therapy. We present a case of bilateral persistent plantar warts, resistant to treatment with repeated cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid over a 6-year period. Following a patient initiated decision to discontinue their statin medication, we observed rapid clearance of plantar warts without change to standard therapy or their environment. This case correlates with emerging literature demonstrating a link between statin medication and proliferation of HPV through increased levels of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

  16. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Koning, M.N. de; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. OBJECTIVES: Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on wart-

  17. Anogenital warts in Danish men who have sex with men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Stinna; Kofoed, K

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anogenital warts (AGWs) and concurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men who have sex with men (MSM), and their knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV). Attitudes towards the HPV vaccine among MSM are explored. A web-based cross-sectional survey on AGWs...... number of sexual partners within the last year. MSM with a history of another STI reported a significantly higher prevalence of warts. More than 70% did not know what causes AGWs. If a free HPV vaccine were to be offered, 94.4% would like to receive it. These data suggest a high prevalence of AGWs...

  18. Characterization of two novel gammapapillomaviruses, HPV179 and HPV184, isolated from common warts of a renal-transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošnjak, Lea; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Pirš, Branko; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Gammapapillomavirus (Gamma-PV) is a diverse and rapidly expanding PV-genus, currently consisting of 76 fully characterized human papillomavirus (HPV) types. In this study, DNA genomes of two novel HPV types, HPV179 and HPV184, obtained from two distinct facial verrucae vulgares specimens of a 64 year-old renal-transplant recipient, were fully cloned, sequenced and characterized. HPV179 and HPV184 genomes comprise 7,228-bp and 7,324-bp, respectively, and contain four early (E1, E2, E6 and E7) and two late genes (L1 and L2); the non-coding region is typically positioned between L1 and E6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L1 nucleotide sequence placed both novel types within the Gamma-PV genus: HPV179 was classified as a novel member of species Gamma-15, additionally containing HPV135 and HPV146, while HPV184 was classified as a single member of a novel species Gamma-25. HPV179 and HPV184 type-specific quantitative real-time PCRs were further developed and used in combination with human beta-globin gene quantitative real-time PCR to determine the prevalence and viral load of the novel types in the patient's facial warts and several follow-up skin specimens, and in a representative collection, a total of 569 samples, of HPV-associated benign and malignant neoplasms, hair follicles and anal and oral mucosa specimens obtained from immunocompetent individuals. HPV179 and HPV184 viral loads in patients' facial warts were estimated to be 2,463 and 3,200 genome copies per single cell, respectively, suggesting their active role in the development of common warts in organ-transplant recipients. In addition, in this particular patient, both novel types had established a persistent infection of the skin for more than four years. Among immunocompetent individuals, HPV179 was further detected in low-copy numbers in a few skin specimens, indicating its cutaneous tissue tropism, while HPV184 was further detected in low-copy numbers in one mucosal and a few skin specimens

  19. Mucocutaneous warts in children: clinical presentations, risk factors, and response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutairi, Nawaf; AlKhalaf, Manar

    2012-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause cutaneous and mucosal infections in both adults and children. Warts are very common in children. All patients younger than 13 presenting with cutaneous warts in a 1-year period at Farwaniya Hospital in Kuwait were included in the study. In addition, their parents completed a questionnaire about possible environmental risk factors for warts. The treatment modalities used and their outcomes were recorded. This study included 2,916 children with warts. Common warts affected male patients more frequently. Warts were mostly located on the hands, in 1,172 patients (40.19%), followed by the feet in 1,096 patients (37.59%). Frequently associated environmental factors were walking barefoot, using a swimming pool, or having a family member with warts. The first-line treatment used was cryotherapy, followed by topical salicylic acid preparations. A total of 2,128 (72.98%) patients were cleared of their warts, and 232 (10.90%) patients had a recurrence. The cure rate in patients with hand warts was slightly higher than with warts on the feet (78.67% versus 70.52%). Treatment side effects were a complaint of 1,796 (61.59%) patients. The prevalence of warts is lowest among children less than 6 years old. No particular therapy has been confirmed to be effective at achieving complete remission in every patient.

  20. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media interested in ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  1. Children and Facial Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Children and Facial Trauma Children and Facial Trauma Patient Health Information News ... staff at newsroom@entnet.org . What is facial trauma? The term facial trauma means any injury to ...

  2. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  3. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When the skin is injured from a cut or tear the body heals by forming scar tissue. The appearance of the scar can range from ...

  4. Flat pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Kevin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    'Flat pyramid' is a multi-channel video installation. The project employs appropriated promotional and instructional video from a defunct pyramid scheme as the source material for fictionalized reenactment. The footage primarily consists of presentation documentation, testimonial interviews, and product photography—throughout all of which cutting rarely occurs between takes. Perpetrators and victims are seen moving in and out of their promotional personas, inadvertently making their disquieti...

  5. Health related quality of life in patients with anogenital warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadogeorgakis Helen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL instruments are an important tool for the evaluation of medical outcomes. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs influence the patients' life. We aimed to evaluate the HRQoL in patients with anogenital warts at the time of and 1 month after the diagnosis. Materials and methods We used the short-form (SF-36 questionnaire to compare the HRQoL of 91 patients with anogenital warts to 53 control subjects with the same socioeconomic characteristics. Results There was no statistical difference in the overall HRQoL measurement between the anogenital wart patients and controls. However, there was an improvement in the scales of vitality (65.22 ± 15.70 vs. 69.04 ± 14.11, respectively; p Conclusions HRQoL does not appear to be influenced in anogenital wart patients, as measured by the generic instrument SF-36. It is therefore important to develop specific instruments for the measurement of HRQoL in this group of patients.

  6. Intralesional Bleomycin for Warts: Patient Satisfaction and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruter, Laura; Saggar, Vishal; Akhavan, Alaleh; Patel, Parth; Umanoff, Nicole; Viola, Kate V; Stebbins, William; Smith, Elizabeth; Akhavan, Arash; Cohen, Justine V; Cohen, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of warts is challenging with regards to both tolerability and efficacy. Ascertain the efficacy, tolerability, and patient satisfaction of intralesional bleomycin in the treatment of warts. Retrospective chart review followed by telephone interviews with patients from university-based dermatology referral centers. Seventy-four percent (34/46) of patients had complete resolution (CR) of all warts. Of 34 patients who experienced CR, an average of 1.7 treatments were required. Pain experienced during the procedure and recovery, irrespective of outcome, was rated 5.8 out of 10 (range, 1-10; SD, 2.72; SEM, 0.40). Approximately 70% of patients had pain that lasted less than 2 days after treatment. Seventy-eight percent (36/46) of patients in the study were satisfied with treatment and would recommend it to others. Patients felt bleomycin to be an effective treatment modality for warts, offering high rates of CR in lesions resistant to more traditional therapies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Solutions for therapy-resistant warts. Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roon, E.N.; Schootstra, R.; Blanken, R.

    2002-01-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a strongly sensitizing compound, activating the immune system by inducing a type 4 hypersensitivity reaction. SADBE has been applied in the treatment of alopecia areate and resistant warts. From the results of clinical trials in children and adults the use of

  8. Successful treatment of periungual warts with topical cidofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla España, Laura; Del Boz, Javier; Fernández Morano, Teresa; Arenas-Villafranca, Javier; de Troya, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Periungual warts represent a treatment challenge because of its high recurrence rate and recalcitrance. These are benign lesions produced by the human papilloma virus (HPV) that often do not respond to habitual treatment. Cidofovir is a potent antiviral drug that acts inactivating viral DNA polymerase. Topical cidofovir for the treatment of HPV-related cutaneous and mucous lesions is becoming increasingly common. Our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of cidofovir cream for the treatment of viral periungual warts. We undertook a retrospective observational study of patients with periungual warts who received treatment with topical cidofovir between January 2010 and December 2013 at the Dermatology Service of the Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Spain. Data were recorded about the rate of treatment response, the adverse effects and recurrences, as well as the characteristics of the patient cohort. We identified 41 patients who had received some previous treatment. The concentration of cidofovir was 3% in all cases, usually applied twice a day (in 37 of the 41 cases). A greater or lesser response was noted in 35 cases. There were six recurrences in the follow-up period. Topical cidofovir seems to be a useful alternative for the therapeutic management of recalcitrant periungual common warts that fail to respond to usual treatment. Our experience with the use of this antiviral agent has been satisfactory, although in our opinion, it should be reserved for specific cases as its economical cost represents an important limitation.

  9. Ano-Genital Warts and HIV Status– A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shimpa; Gulbake, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Ano-Genital Warts (AGW) like other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) is associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This study of AGW was done in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Aim To study the risk factors and clinical presentations of ano-genital warts in HIV positive and negative patients. Materials and Methods A comparative, cross-sectional, descriptive study of 25 HIV positive and 25 HIV negative (n=50) AGW patients between 15-60 years of both sex was conducted in Dr. D. Y. Patil Hospital and Research Centre from July 2014 to July 2016. Results Significant association of HIV positivity (phomosexuality (p0.05). No patient presented with changes of malignancy. Four were adolescents below 19 years. Two patients had atypical presentations of giant condylomata i.e., Buschke-Lowenstein Tumour (BLT). Conclusion HIV positivity was significantly associated with the risk factors of age below 30 years, homo sexuality and multiple sexual partners. Anal warts were significantly common in HIV positive patients. Four adolescents with AGW underline the need for high risk behaviour counselling. No patient had malignant ano-genital warts. Follow up of these patients with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) sub-typing is necessary. PMID:28274028

  10. [Anogenital warts and suspicion of child sexual abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouesca, Juan Pablo; Indart de Arza, Miguel Javier; Stabilito, Luis

    2012-10-01

    This article deals with anogenital warts (AGW) injuries caused by human papiloma virus (HPV) in children. Diagnosis, epidemiology, modes of transmission, differential diagnosis, relationship between AGW and cancer are descript. Also, it remarks the presence of AGW as indicator of child sexual abuse. Finally, it includes suggestions for the management of patients and their families by the paediatrician.

  11. Warts in a cohort of Danish kidney transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Claus; Sand, Carsten; Hansen, Jesper Melchior;

    2012-01-01

    with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Of 740 patients with a functioning renal allograft and were free of dialysis who were surveyed, 568 returned the questionnaires. Patients were asked about general health issues, with a focus on transplantation history, cutaneous warts and whether they had ever had...

  12. Facial blindsight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eSolcà

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people’s categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex.

  13. Rejuvenecimiento facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Daniel Jacubovsky, Dr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento facial es un proceso único y particular a cada individuo y está regido en especial por su carga genética. El lifting facial es una compleja técnica desarrollada en nuestra especialidad desde principios de siglo, para revertir los principales signos de este proceso. Los factores secundarios que gravitan en el envejecimiento facial son múltiples y por ello las ritidectomías o lifting cérvico faciales descritas han buscado corregir los cambios fisonómicos del envejecimiento excursionando, como se describe, en todos los planos tisulares involucrados. Esta cirugía por lo tanto, exige conocimiento cabal de la anatomía quirúrgica, pericia y experiencia para reducir las complicaciones, estigmas quirúrgicos y revisiones secundarias. La ridectomía facial ha evolucionado hacia un procedimiento más simple, de incisiones más cortas y disecciones menos extensas. Las suspensiones musculares han variado en su ejecución y los vectores de montaje y resección cutánea son cruciales en los resultados estéticos de la cirugía cérvico facial. Hoy estos vectores son de tracción más vertical. La corrección de la flaccidez va acompañada de un interés en reponer el volumen de la superficie del rostro, en especial el tercio medio. Las técnicas quirúrgicas de rejuvenecimiento, en especial el lifting facial, exigen una planificación para cada paciente. Las técnicas adjuntas al lifting, como blefaroplastias, mentoplastía, lipoaspiración de cuello, implantes faciales y otras, también han tenido una positiva evolución hacia la reducción de riesgos y mejor éxito estético.

  14. Needling versus liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for the treatment of pedal warts a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Daniel J; Brimage, Jessica T; Naraghi, Reza N; Bower, Virginia M

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesized that needling of a pedal wart creates local inflammation and a subsequent cell-mediated immune response (CMIR) against human papillomavirus. The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether needling to induce a CMIR against human papillomavirus is an effective treatment for pedal warts compared with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. A secondary objective was to investigate whether the CMIR induced by needling is effective against satellite pedal warts. Eligible patients with pedal warts were randomly allocated to receive either needling or liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. Only the primary pedal wart was treated during the study. Follow-up was 12 weeks, with outcome assessments made independently under blinded circumstances. Of 37 patients enrolled in the study, 18 were allocated to receive needling and 19 to receive liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. Regression of the primary pedal wart occurred in 64.7% of the needling group (11 of 17) and in 6.2% of the liquid nitrogen cryotherapy group (1 of 16) (P =  .001). No significant relationship was found between needling of the primary pedal wart and regression of satellite pedal warts (P = .615) or complete pedal wart regression (P = .175). There was no significant difference in pain, satisfaction, or cosmesis between the two groups. The regression rate of the primary pedal wart was significantly higher in the needling group compared with the liquid nitrogen cryotherapy group.

  15. Natural course of cutaneous warts among primary schoolchildren: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Eekhof, Just A H; Egberts, Paulette F; van Blijswijk, Sophie C E; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2013-01-01

    Because cutaneous warts resolve spontaneously and available treatments often fail, family physicians and patients may consider a wait-and-see policy. We examined the natural course of cutaneous warts and treatment decisions in a prospective observational cohort of primary schoolchildren. We inspected the hands and feet of children aged 4 to 12 years from 3 Dutch primary schools for the presence of warts at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 15 months. Parental questionnaires at follow-up provided information on inconvenience caused by warts and any treatments used. Of the 1,134 eligible children, 1,099 (97%) participated, of whom 366 (33%) had cutaneous warts at baseline. Among these children with warts, loss to follow-up was 9% and the response rate to the parental questionnaires was 83%. The complete resolution rate was 52 per 100 person-years at risk (95% CI, 44-60). Younger age (hazard ratio = 1.1 per year decrease; 95% CI, 1.0-1.2) and non-Caucasian skin type (hazard ratio = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-2.9) increased the likelihood of resolution. During follow-up, 38% of children with warts at baseline treated their warts: 18% used over-the-counter treatment only, 15% used a family physician-provided treatment only, and 5% used both. Children were more likely to initiate treatment if the warts measured at least 1 cm in diameter (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9-5.3) and especially if parents reported that the warts caused inconvenience (odds ratio = 38; 95% CI, 16-90). One-half of primary schoolchildren with warts will be free of warts within 1 year. Young age and non-Caucasian skin type enhance resolution. Children with large or inconvenient warts are more likely to start treatment. These findings will be useful in the process of shared decision making with parents and children.

  16. Novel Treatment Approach for Deep Palmoplantar Warts Using Long-Pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG Laser and a Moisturizing Cream Without Prior Paring of the Wart Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Mohammad Ali; Mohana, Mona Jameel

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of palmoplantar wart removal using long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser after application of a moisturizing cream. Previously described laser treatments for wart removal are associated with negative side effects and need to pare the warts before laser treatment. Two hundred forty patients (142 males, 98 females) were treated for 1-40 palmoplantar warts by long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser (spot size 4-6 mm, pulse duration 20 msec, fluence 200 J/cm(2)) after covering the wart surface with a thin film of a moisturizing cream. The endpoint was lesion graying or whitening with or without development of a hemorrhagic bulla beneath the treated wart. Color photographs were taken before and immediately after each laser session and at 1, 4, and 16 weeks after the last session. The overall clearance rate was 97%, with 90% of treated patients cured after one session, 4% after two, and 3% after three. Clearance rate after three laser sessions decreased linearly with the number of warts from 100% to 95%. Less accessible wart location in interdigital spaces also decreased the cure rate after three sessions from 100% to 95%. Additionally, warts became more difficult to eradicate as they aged. Remission lasted up to 6 years, and complications were mild and infrequent (17.5%). This novel method is effective in removing palmoplantar warts. It is easier, time-saving, and safer than other methods described in previous studies conducted with ablative or nonablative lasers.

  17. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar S Gundeti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs, Agni (thermal cautery and Shastrakarma (surgery for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK, i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases.

  18. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeti, Manohar S.; Reddy, R. Govind; Muralidhar, Jangle Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara) for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK), i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera) Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases. PMID:25624698

  19. Association Between Smoking and Size of Anal Warts in HIV-infected Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, HN; Amirian, ES; Beasley, RP; Piller, L; Chan, W; Scheurer, ME

    2015-01-01

    While the association between smoking and HPV infection, cervical cancer, and anal cancer has been well studied, evidence on the association between cigarette smoking and anal warts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cigarette smoking status influences the size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women in a sample of 976 HIV-infected women from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). A linear mixed model was used to determine the effect of smoking on anal wart size. Even though women who were currently smokers had larger anal warts at baseline and slower growth rate of anal wart size after each visit than women who were not current smokers, there was no association between size of anal wart and current smoking status over time. Further studies on the role of smoking and interaction between smoking and other risk factors, however, should be explored. PMID:23155099

  20. The Overlapped Triple Circle Pulse Technique with Nd:YAG Laser for Refractory Hand Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Ugur Anil; Cömert, Asuman; Cinar, Can

    2015-06-01

    Inadvertent superficial treatment of hand warts causes recurrence, whereas aggressive treatment can lead to tissue defects resulting in hand dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a novel laser treatment modality for recalcitrant hand warts. The study included 51 patients who were treated for 146 recalcitrant hand warts using 1064 nm long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser between 2011 and 2014. The laser treatment method is novel because each treated wart was aligned at the intersection point of the circles of 3 laser pulses per session. Among the 146 hand warts, 88.35% were successfully treated with one session and 100% of those that required a second treatment session were treated successfully, based on the 12 month follow-up examination. Long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment was observed to be a safe, rapid, and effective method for treating recalcitrant hand warts.

  1. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeti, Manohar S; Reddy, R Govind; Muralidhar, Jangle Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara) for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK), i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera) Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases.

  2. Intralesional immunotherapy for difficult to treat warts with Mycobacterium w vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Immunotherapy is an evolving therapeutic modality for the treatment of warts. We conducted a study to assess the efficacy and safety of intralesional Mycobacterium w vaccine for the treatment of warts at sites that were difficult to treat. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with at least one wart present on either the plantar surface of their feet, palms, volar aspect of their fingers, or periungual or subungual region, were treated with 0.1 ml of killed Mycobacterium w vaccine given intralesionally in a single wart, without any prior sensitisation dose. Thereafter, a single injection of 0.1 ml of vaccine was given at intervals of four weeks in a single wart till there was complete resolution of the warts or a maximum of 10 injections. Treatment was stopped if there was no response after three injections. The patients were followed up for at least six months. Results: Out of the 30 patients, 28 (93.33%) patients had complete resolution of their warts, both at the injected and distant sites. The mean (SD) time for complete clearance of warts was 43.71(32.82) days and the mean (SD) dose of vaccine that was required for complete clearance of warts was 0.186 ml (0.101). Four patients (14.28%) had a recurrence of warts. The treatment was well-tolerated and the side effects were reversible in the majority of the patients. Conclusion: In comparison to the earlier studies using Mycobacterium w vaccine for the treatment of warts, our study was different in the following aspects: No sensitisation dose was given, only a single wart was injected at a time and the duration between the period of injections was increased to four weeks. With all these changes we eliminated the complications due to the sensitisation dose and achieved good results. This study provides new insight into the dose and schedule of treatment of this evolving therapeutic modality. PMID:25722598

  3. A novel modification of the autoimplantation therapy for the treatment of multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Nischal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ideal treatment for warts should be effective, safe, have less morbidity and provide long-lasting immunity against human papilloma virus. This can optimally achieved by the stimulation of the immune system against the virus. The autoimplantation of warts, autowart injection and quadrivalent vaccines have been used for this purpose. Autoimplanatation is a simple technique where the subcutis deep wart tissue is harvested as a donor and implanted into the uninvolved skin. However, this led to two wounds, at donor and recipient sites. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel modification of autoimplantation therapy in the treatment of multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three patients with multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts were enrolled. Instead of taking a bit of the wart tissue, the donor tissue was harvested by paring the wart. The pared tissue was implanted deep into the subcutis by stab incision done using the same surgical blade no. 11. The resolution of all warts within 3 months after the procedure was considered successful. Patients with complete clearance were followed up for 1 month for any recurrence. Results: Out of 35 patients, 27 patients were available for follow-up. A total of 20 (74.1% patients showed a complete clearance of warts within 3 months. Partial clearance was seen in 1 patient. Erythematous nodules developed at the site of implantation in 3 (11.1% patients. There was relapse in one patient. Conclusion: A modified technique of autoimplantation of warts employing the pared stratum corneum tissue from the wart is a simple, effective, less traumatic and rapid procedure in the treatment of multiple, recurrent and palmoplantar warts.

  4. [Anogenital warts: a clinical, pathological and virological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix Díaz, J; Betlloch Mas, I; Pastor Tomás, N; Bañuls Roca, J; Martínez, M T

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between the presence of anogenital warts (AGW) in children and the sexual abuse as mode of transmission. Our series includes 8 patients with AGW who were treated in our hospital during the year 2007. A complete physical examination was carried out, including colposcopy or anoscopy, and samples were taken for histopathological examination and human papiloma virus (HPV) subtyping. We considered perinatal transmission as a possible route in two cases. Although sexual abuse was definitively confirmed in only one case, we observed some findings in four cases that led us to consider the possibility of sexual abuse. We did not consider the possibility of heteroinoculation or autoinoculation from common warts in any case. Our results have demonstrated the difficulty in assessing with certainty the source of HPV contamination in children with AGW.

  5. Warts in a cohort of Danish kidney transplanted patients: impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, Claus; Sand, Carsten; Hansen, Jesper Melchior; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Koch, Karen; Villumsen, John; Axelsen, Mads

    2012-11-01

    There are no published clinical studies evaluating the impact of warts on quality of life after transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of self-reported skin warts and skin cancer and their impact on quality of life in kidney transplanted patients, as measured with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Of 740 patients with a functioning renal allograft and were free of dialysis who were surveyed, 568 returned the questionnaires. Patients were asked about general health issues, with a focus on transplantation history, cutaneous warts and whether they had ever had cutaneous cancer. A total of 285 (52%) patients replied that they had warts, and these increased with time since last transplantation, with a p-value warts, 1 for patients with warts, and 2 for patients having warts and skin cancer. In conclusion, renal transplant recipients experience increasing numbers of warts and skin cancer over time, and having skin cancer impairs patients' quality of life to a greater degree than warts.

  6. Intralesional cidofovir in the treatment of cutaneous warts in a renal transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Marie-Michèle; Cloutier, Richard; Noël, Réal

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are often recalcitrant to conventional therapy in immunocompromised patients. Cidofovir is a potent antiviral agent shown to have a broad spectrum of action against DNA virus, including human papillomavirus. To determine the efficacy of intralesional cidofovir in the treatment of florid warts in an immunocompromised renal transplant patient. The patient received seven injections of intralesional cidofovir at 4 week intervals in his numerous palmar warts. Based on our results, intralesional cidofovir is a promising therapeutic modality in the treatment of cutaneous warts in the renal transplant population.

  7. Impact of genital warts on emotional and sexual well-being differs by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Henrike J; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T; van der Sande, Marianne A B

    2014-11-01

    To assess gender-specific impact of genital warts on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to explore to what extent sexual characteristics and clinical symptoms influenced the impact on emotional and sexual well-being of both sexes. We conducted a survey of sexual and clinical characteristics from persons diagnosed with genital warts at STI clinics. HRQoL was measured using two measurement tools: 1) the generic EQ-5D; and 2) the genital warts-specific CECA-10 including an emotional well-being and a sexual activity dimension. The EQ-5D scores were compared with scores of the general population. Descriptive analyses were used to explore characteristics associated with HRQoL scores stratified for gender. The HRQoL-measurement tools showed that genital warts have especially an emotional impact. The impact of genital warts on HRQoL was greater for women than for men. In addition, the CECA-10 showed that in women the impact of genital warts on sexual activity was influenced by age, relationship status and number of warts. No related factors were seen in men. Genital warts have a greater impact on women than on men. In women, sexual and clinical factors influenced the impact of genital warts on well-being, whereas in men no such factors were found.

  8. Vestibular papillomatosis: a benign condition mimicking genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonder, Margaret A; Hunter-Yates, Jennifer; Lawrence, W Dwayne; Telang, Gladys H

    2012-12-01

    Vestibular papillomatosis (VP) is a benign condition of the female genitalia that may be mistaken for condyloma acuminatum (genital warts). In contrast to condylomata, lesions of VP each grow from a distinct mucosal insertion; match the color of the surrounding mucosa; and are symmetrically distributed, limited to the inner labia minora and vaginal introitus. Recognition of this entity will help to prevent unnecessary stress, testing, and discomfort.

  9. An expert system for selecting wart treatment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozeimeh, Fahime; Alizadehsani, Roohallah; Roshanzamir, Mohamad; Khosravi, Abbas; Layegh, Pouran; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2017-02-01

    As benign tumors, warts are made through the mediation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and may grow on all parts of body, especially hands and feet. There are several treatment methods for this illness. However, none of them can heal all patients. Consequently, physicians are looking for more effective and customized treatments for each patient. They are endeavoring to discover which treatments have better impacts on a particular patient. The aim of this study is to identify the appropriate treatment for two common types of warts (plantar and common) and to predict the responses of two of the best methods (immunotherapy and cryotherapy) to the treatment. As an original work, the study was conducted on 180 patients, with plantar and common warts, who had referred to the dermatology clinic of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. In this study, 90 patients were treated by cryotherapy method with liquid nitrogen and 90 patients with immunotherapy method. The selection of the treatment method was made randomly. A fuzzy logic rule-based system was proposed and implemented to predict the responses to the treatment method. It was observed that the prediction accuracy of immunotherapy and cryotherapy methods was 83.33% and 80.7%, respectively. According to the results obtained, the benefits of this expert system are multifold: assisting physicians in selecting the best treatment method, saving time for patients, reducing the treatment cost, and improving the quality of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric facial nerve rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-11-01

    Facial paralysis is a rare but severe condition in the pediatric population. Impaired facial movement has multiple causes and varied presentations, therefore individualized treatment plans are essential for optimal results. Advances in facial reanimation over the past 4 decades have given rise to new treatments designed to restore balance and function in pediatric patients with facial paralysis. This article provides a comprehensive review of pediatric facial rehabilitation and describes a zone-based approach to assessment and treatment of impaired facial movement.

  11. INTRALESIONAL MEASLES, MUMPS AND RUBELLA (MMR VACCINE-AN EFFECTIVE THERAPEUTIC TOOL IN THE TREATMENT OF WART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Warts are common cutaneous viral infection. Various therapeutic modalities have been using in treatment of wart, but none of them are standardised. Immunotherapy is new current approach in the treatment of wart. AIMS: To know the efficacy and safety profile of Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR Vaccine in the treatment of wart. METHODS: MMR vaccine was injected into a largest single wart intralesionally and subsequent injections given every 2 weeks apart for about 3 to 5 times. Every month followup of patients was done to know the clearance of wart. RESULTS: Complete remission of warts seen in 70.4% of patients, partial remission seen in 22.2% and no response was seen in 7.4% of patients. No serious adverse side effects were seen in the current study. CONCLUSION: MMR vaccine can be considered as a safe, effective, inexpensive intralesional immunotherapeutic modality in the treatment of wart.

  12. Cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts (verrucae): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockayne, Sarah; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Jayakody, Shalmini; Kang'ombe, Arthur Ricky; Stamuli, Eugena; Turner, Gwen; Thomas, Kim; Curran, Mike; Denby, Gary; Hashmi, Farina; McIntosh, Caroline; McLarnon, Nichola; Torgerson, David; Watt, Ian

    2011-06-07

    To compare the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts. A multicentre, open, two arm randomised controlled trial. University podiatry school clinics, NHS podiatry clinics, and primary care in England, Scotland, and Ireland. 240 patients aged 12 years and over, with a plantar wart that in the opinion of the healthcare professional was suitable for treatment with both cryotherapy and salicylic acid. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by a healthcare professional, up to four treatments two to three weeks apart. Patient self treatment with 50% salicylic acid (Verrugon) daily up to a maximum of eight weeks. Complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes were (a) complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks controlling for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of wart, (b) patient self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months, (c) time to clearance of plantar wart, (d) number of plantar warts at 12 weeks, and (e) patient satisfaction with the treatment. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in the proportions of participants with complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks (17/119 (14%) v 15/110 (14%), difference 0.65% (95% CI -8.33 to 9.63), P=0.89). The results did not change when the analysis was repeated but with adjustment for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of plantar wart or for patients' preferences at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months (29/95 (31%) v 33/98 (34%), difference -3.15% (-16.31 to 10.02), P=0.64) or in time to clearance (hazard ratio 0.80 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.25), P=0.33). There was also no evidence of a difference in the number of plantar warts at 12 weeks (incident rate ratio 1.08 (0.81 to 1.43), P=0.62). Salicylic acid and

  13. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more to fully heal and achieve maximum improved appearance. Facial plastic surgery makes it possible to correct facial flaws that can undermine self-confidence. Changing how your scar looks can help change ...

  14. Facial attractiveness: General patterns of facial preferences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kościński, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    This review covers universal patterns in facial preferences. Facial attractiveness has fascinated thinkers since antiquity, but has been the subject of intense scientific study for only the last quarter of a century...

  15. [Surgical facial reanimation after persisting facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Facial reanimation following persistent facial paralysis can be managed with surgical procedures of varying complexity. The choice of the technique is mainly determined by the cause of facial paralysis, the age and desires of the patient. The techniques most commonly used are the nerve grafts (VII-VII, XII-VII, cross facial graft), dynamic muscle transfers (temporal myoplasty, free muscle transfert) and static suspensions. An intensive rehabilitation through specific exercises after all procedures is essential to archieve good results.

  16. Facial porokeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Dafnis C; Haley, Jennifer C; Chiu, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    A 34-year-old man from El Salvador was referred to our clinic with a 10-year history of a pruritic erythematous facial eruption. He reported increased pruritus and scaling of lesions when exposed to the sun. He worked as a construction worker and admitted to frequent sun exposure. Physical examination revealed well-circumscribed erythematous to violaceous papules with raised borders and atrophic centers localized to the nose (Figure 1). He did not have lesions on the arms or legs. He did not report a family history of similar lesions. A biopsy specimen was obtained from the edge of a lesion on the right ala. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimen showed acanthosis of the epidermis with focal invagination of the corneal layer and a homogeneous column of parakeratosis in the center of that layer consistent with a cornoid lamella (Figure 2). Furthermore, the granular layer was absent at the cornoid lamella base. The superficial dermis contained a sparse, perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. No evidence of dysplasia or malignancy was seen. These findings supported a diagnosis of porokeratosis. The patient underwent a trial of cryotherapy with moderate improvement of the facial lesions.

  17. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Koning, M.N. de; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. OBJECTIVES: Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on

  18. Intralesional bleomycin in the treatment of cutaneous warts: A randomized clinical trial comparing it with cryotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Though not in regular practice, intralesional (IL bleomycin has been used for the treatment of warts since the 1970s and on the other hand, till now cryotherapy is quite regularly used to treat warts. Aim: Our aim was to assess the evidence for the efficacy of IL bleomycin, in comparison with a control group of similar sample receiving cryotherapy, in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Methods: Patients were randomized using computer-generated codes to receive either cryotherapy (double freeze-thaw cycle or IL bleomycin (0.1% solution with concurrent anesthesia for a maximum of four treatments 3 weeks apart and a maximum of five warts treated in each visit for both groups. Patients had their warts measured at base-line and with each return visit including a post treatment follow-up that was 8 weeks apart from last treatment taken. Results: Of the 73 patients completing the study, 39 (53% were treated with IL bleomycin and 34 (47% were treated with cryotherapy. Out of 155 treated warts, 87 (56% were treated with IL beomycin and 68 (44% were treated with cryotherapy. The clearance rates in context of number of patients and number of warts were 94.9% and 97% for bleomycin and 76.5% and 82% for cryotherapy respectively ( P < 0.05 by x 2 analysis and RR = 7.67. Conclusion: IL bleomycin injection was significantly more effective than cryotherapy for treatment of cutaneous wart.

  19. Treatment of recalcitrant warts with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin: a promising new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Yosef, Ayman; Salah, Eman

    2013-01-01

    Recalcitrant warts represent a therapeutic challenge for both patients and physicians. Recently, intralesional immunotherapy by different antigens has been proved effective in the treatment of different types of warts. We describe a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with troublesome huge common wart on the left little toe of 5 years duration and not responding to many lines of therapy. Nearby and distant common and plantar warts have also been observed. Intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine was injected into the huge wart of the little toe at 2-week intervals for five sessions. Follow-up was made every month for 6 months. A gradual decrease in the size of the injected wart was observed until reaching complete clearance by the end of the fifth session. Untreated nearby common and distant warts disappeared completely by the end of the third session. BCG injection was associated with erythema and edema with or without pustules, at the site of injection. A flu-like illness that rapidly subsided within 3 days was also observed with each injection. No recurrence was observed after the 6-month follow-up period. Intralesional immunotherapy with BCG vaccine seems to be a promising effective and safe treatment modality for recalcitrant warts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Incidence of genital warts among the Hong Kong general adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to estimate the incidence of genital warts in Hong Kong and explore a way to establish a surveillance system for genital warts among the Hong Kong general population. Methods A total of 170 private doctors and all doctors working in the 5 local Social Hygiene Clinics (SHC) participated in this study. During the 14-day data collection period (January 5 through18, 2009), the participating doctors filled out a log-form on a daily basis to record the number of patients with genital warts. The total number of new cases of genital warts presented to private and public doctors in Hong Kong was projected using the stratification sampling method. Results A total of 721 (0.94%) adults presented with genital warts to the participating doctors during the two-week study period, amongst them 73 (10.1%) were new cases. The projected number of new cases of genital warts among Hong Kong adults was 442 (297 male and 144 female) during the study period. The incidence of genital warts in Hong Kong was estimated to be 203.7 per 100,000 person-years (respectively 292.2 and 124.9 per 100,000 person-years for males and females). Conclusions The incidence of genital warts is high among adults in Hong Kong. The study demonstrates the importance of collecting surveillance data from both private and public sectors. PMID:20849578

  1. Photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid or placebo for recalcitrant foot and hand warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, I M; Na, R; Fogh, H

    2000-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) followed by irradiation with incoherent light (ALA-PDT) for recalcitrant warts have had beneficial results. Therefore, we undertook a randomised, parallel, double-blind clinical trial of ALA-PDT versus placeboPDT for recalcitrant...... foot and hand warts....

  2. Intralesional Vitamin D Injection May Be an Effective Treatment Option for Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Habibullah; Ergin, Can; Demir, Betül; Ekiz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Plantar warts are typically resistant to treatment. In recent years, treatments have included administration of intralesional tuberculin; measles, mumps, rubella vaccine; and Candida albicans antigen immunotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of intralesional vitamin D administration for the treatment of warts. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intralesional vitamin D treatment for plantar warts. Twenty patients with single or multiple plantar warts were included in this study. Vitamin D(3) (0.2 mL, 7.5 mg/mL) was injected into the base of the warts after prilocaine (0.1 mL, 20 mg/mL) injection. A maximum of 5 warts were treated in 1 session, with at maximum 2 injections performed at 4-week intervals. In total, 16 of 20 patients (80%) showed complete resolution of warts, and 1 patient showed partial resolution. Three patients failed to show any response. No recurrence or serious adverse effects were observed. Intralesional vitamin D(3) may be an effective treatment option for warts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of Genital Warts in Kenyan Female Sex Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Barbara E.; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Jaoko, Walter; Estambale, Benson; Kiarie, James N.; Masese, Linnet N.; Deya, Ruth; Manhart, Lisa E.; Graham, Susan M.; McClelland, R. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background Our goal in the present study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of genital warts in a population of female sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya. Because of the high prevalence of HIV-1 in this population, we were particularly interested in the association between HIV-1 infection and genital warts. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of the prevalence and correlates of genital warts among high-risk women in Mombasa, Kenya. Between 2001 and 2007, 1182 women were enrolled, of whom 613 (51.4%) were HIV-1-seropositive. Chi square tests and logistic regression were used to examine the associations between genital warts and potential correlates. Results Genital warts were identified on clinical examination in 27 (2.3%) women. Women who were HIV-1-seropositive were nearly 8 times as likely to have genital warts compared to HIV-1-seronegative women (OR 7.69, 95% CI 2.30–25.6). Conclusion Understanding the prevalence and correlates of genital warts will help to determine whether coverage for the wart-inducing subtypes 6 and 11 in an HPV vaccine is an important consideration in resource-limited countries. PMID:23060082

  4. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  5. Facial Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalache Sergiu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During their lifetime, people learn to recognize thousands of faces that they interact with. Face perception refers to an individual's understanding and interpretation of the face, particularly the human face, especially in relation to the associated information processing in the brain. The proportions and expressions of the human face are important to identify origin, emotional tendencies, health qualities, and some social information. From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain. Our main goal is to put emphasis on presenting human faces specialized studies, and also to highlight the importance of attractiviness in their retention. We will see that there are many factors that influence face recognition.

  6. Immunotherapy with Intralesional Candida Albicans Antigen in Resistant or Recurrent Warts: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Warts are sometimes resistant or they tend to recur after every possible destructive therapy. Immunotherapy with skin-test antigens has been used as a viable therapeutic option in such recalcitrant cases. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the response of resistant or recurrent warts to intralesional Candida albicans antigen immunotherapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with resistant or recurrent warts who showed a positive test reaction to C. albicans antigen were given intralesional injections of purified C. albicans antigen solution in a single wart at 3-weekly intervals for a total of three doses. The patients were monitored for resolution of the injected wart as well as other untreated warts. The patients who responded positively were then followed up for any relapses over the next 6 months. Adverse events, if any, were also documented. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in the study, 34 completed the total treatment protocol of three injections and 6 months of follow-up. In these 34 patients, 19 (56%) showed a complete resolution of warts at all places on the body. In addition, two patients (6%) showed a partial or complete resolution of the treated wart, but there was no effect on the untreated warts. Thirteenpatients (38%) failed to show any response to the treatment regimen. In all patients showing resolution of all the warts, there were no relapses at any site over the next 6 months of follow-up. The most common adverse effect seen was pain during the intralesional injection. Conclusions: Intralesional Candida immunotherapy seems to be an effective treatment option in more than half of the patients who fail to show a positive response to destructive modes of treatment or in whom there are multiple recurrences. Limitations: The small sample size and lack of control group are the main limitations of the study. PMID:24082180

  7. Immunotherapy with intralesional Candida albicans antigen in resistant or recurrent warts: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warts are sometimes resistant or they tend to recur after every possible destructive therapy. Immunotherapy with skin-test antigens has been used as a viable therapeutic option in such recalcitrant cases. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the response of resistant or recurrent warts to intralesional Candida albicans antigen immunotherapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with resistant or recurrent warts who showed a positive test reaction to C. albicans antigen were given intralesional injections of purified C. albicans antigen solution in a single wart at 3-weekly intervals for a total of three doses. The patients were monitored for resolution of the injected wart as well as other untreated warts. The patients who responded positively were then followed up for any relapses over the next 6 months. Adverse events, if any, were also documented. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in the study, 34 completed the total treatment protocol of three injections and 6 months of follow-up. In these 34 patients, 19 (56% showed a complete resolution of warts at all places on the body. In addition, two patients (6% showed a partial or complete resolution of the treated wart, but there was no effect on the untreated warts. Thirteenpatients (38% failed to show any response to the treatment regimen. In all patients showing resolution of all the warts, there were no relapses at any site over the next 6 months of follow-up. The most common adverse effect seen was pain during the intralesional injection. Conclusions: Intralesional Candida immunotherapy seems to be an effective treatment option in more than half of the patients who fail to show a positive response to destructive modes of treatment or in whom there are multiple recurrences. Limitations: The small sample size and lack of control group are the main limitations of the study.

  8. [Peripheral facial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Ballivet de Régloix, S; Champagne, C; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Kossowski, M

    2013-06-01

    Facial palsy can be defined as a decrease in function of the facial nerve, the primary motor nerve of the facial muscles. When the facial palsy is peripheral, it affects both the superior and inferior areas of the face as opposed to central palsies, which affect only the inferior portion. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The prognosis is good in most cases. In cases with significant cosmetic sequelae, a variety of surgical procedures are available (such as hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, temporalis myoplasty and Tenzel external canthopexy) to rehabilitate facial aesthetics and function.

  9. Ratio of anogenital warts between different anatomical sites in homosexual and heterosexual individuals in Australia, 2002-2013: implications for susceptibility of different anatomical sites to genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, E P F; Lin, A C; Read, T R H; Bradshaw, C S; Chen, M Y; Fairley, C K

    2015-05-01

    There is little known regarding the transmissibility of human papillomavirus (HPV) between different sites in men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual individuals. We conducted a retrospective analysis investigating all new patients attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in Australia between 2002 and 2013. We describe the prevalence and ratio of the first episode of anogenital warts in MSM and heterosexual males and females. The proportion of new MSM clients with anal and penile warts was 4·0% (362/8978) and 1·6% (141/8978), respectively; which gave an anal-to-penile wart ratio of 1:2·6. About 13·7% (1656/12112) of heterosexual males had penile warts and 10·0% (1121/11166) of females had vulval warts, which yielded a penile-to-vulval wart ratio of 1:0·7. Penile-anal transmission has a higher ratio than penile-vulval transmission, suggesting that the anal epithelium may be more susceptible to HPV infection than the vulval epithelium in females; these ratios are important in modelling the control of HPV in MSM.

  10. Two-year experience of using the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine as intralesional immunotherapy for warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, C H; Choi, H; Song, S H; Kim, M S; Shin, B S

    2014-07-01

    The currently available treatments for warts, including cryosurgery, laser surgery, electrosurgery, and topical keratolytic applications, are often very painful and can induce disfiguring scars. Recently, intralesional immunotherapy with skin test antigens and vaccines has been shown to be effective in the management of warts. To evaluate the efficacy of a new intralesional immunotherapy for warts, using the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. A retrospective study was performed, and we enrolled 136 patients with various types of warts into the study, which was for a duration of 2 years. Patients were treated for a total of six times at 2-week intervals. The treatment response was classified as one of three levels, based on reduction in the size and number of warts, and patients with complete response (CR) were checked for recurrence. Clinical evaluations were carried out using photographs and medical records. Over half (51.5%) of patients experienced > 50% reduction in the size and number of warts, and 46.7% who had distant warts (in different locations) showed good response. Common warts showed significantly higher treatment response than other types of warts (P warts after 6 months. We suggest that intralesional immunotherapy with MMR vaccine is a tolerable and effective method for patients who are sensitive to pain, concerned about side effects, or have common warts. Treatment response is improved by increasing the number of injections. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Anogenital warts in children: sexual abuse or unintentional contamination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Lisieux Eyer de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital warts (AGW were recently recognized in children, and their significance as an index of childhood sexual abuse is controversial. We report our transdisciplinary approach (including a pediatric surgeon, psychologist, social worker, ethics expert, and occasionally law enforcement agents and its results in a group of 17 children with AGW treated at the public pediatric referral hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during a 3-year period (1996-1999. All children were treated by electrocauterization of the warts, tested for other STDs, and submitted to perineal examination under anesthesia. Families received psycho-social counseling as necessary and cases were referred to child protection and law enforcement agents when indicated according to Brazilian legislation. We identified a high incidence of sexual abuse (8 children, 5/7 > 5 years old, with 3 patients inconclusive as to sexual abuse and 7 cases of perinatal transmission (5/8 5 years of age. However, strong support and a transdisciplinary approach to the children and their families is necessary to identify it.

  12. Evolving role of immunotherapy in the treatment of refractory warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thappa, Devinder M; Chiramel, Minu J

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous and genital warts are common dermatological conditions caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Although it is a benign condition, it causes disfigurement, has a tendency to koebnerize, and can be transmitted to others. This makes adequate and timely treatment important. There are several conventional treatments available with variable response. Topical and systemic immunotherapy has now found a significant place in the treatment of warts because of its nondestructive action, ease of use, and promising results. Through this review, we would like to present a brief overview of the various immunotherapeutic agents used. These include more established agents such as imiquimod, Mycobacterium w vaccine, bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine, Candida antigen, trichophyton antigen, tuberculin, zinc, cimetidine, levamisole, HPV vaccine, and autoimplantation therapy. Other agents such as contact immunotherapy which is sparsely used now than before and newer agents such as Corynebacterium parvum, sinecatechins, echinacea, propolis, glycyrrizinic acid, and Vitamin D have also been discussed. The mechanism of action of these agents, along with their dosage, mode of administration, duration of use, expected outcomes and comparative efficacy, evidence for their use, and expected side effects, if any, are reviewed. PMID:27730031

  13. Oral zinc sulfate treatment for viral warts: an open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Je-Ho; Kim, Su-Han; Jung, Do-Sang; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kwon, Kyung-Sool; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2011-06-01

    Viral warts, which are caused by the human papilloma virus, are a common problem in dermatology. Various modalities have been used to treat warts, but none are uniformly effective or directly antiviral. Recent studies show that oral zinc sulfate could be effective in the treatment of viral warts. Thirty-one patients with multiple, non-genital viral warts were recruited in this open-label clinical study. The patients were treated with oral zinc sulfate (10 mg/kg to a maximum dose of 600 mg/day) for 2 months and followed up with assessments for the resolution of their warts and for any evidence of recurrence after treatment. Among the 31 patients, 18 patients showed low serum zinc levels (58%). Of 26 patients who completed the study (84%), 13 (50%) showed complete resolution of their warts after 2 months of treatment. Complete responders remained free of lesions at 6-month follow-up. No serious side-effects were reported apart from nausea (16%), mild gastric pain (3%) and itching sensation (3%). Oral zinc sulfate was found to be a good option in the treatment of viral warts, as it was safe and effective without important side-effects. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. Photodynamic therapy can improve warts' discomfort in renal transplant patients prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparsa, Agnès; Blaise, Sophie; Tack, Brigitte; Dalmay, François; Leroy, Dominique; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Béani, Jean-Claude; Bédane, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted showing that aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be an alternative treatment for recalcitrant warts. Recently, we performed a study evaluating methyl-aminolevulinic acid (MAL)-PDT for the treatment of hand warts in a population of renal transplant patients. Two symmetrical targets were selected on each hand and randomly assigned to chemical keratolytic treatment followed by three cycles of ALA-PDT (75 J cm(-2) red light). Patients were evaluated after 3 months and a second run of PDT was performed if the total area and number of warts decreased less than 50%, with evaluation every 3 months for 1 year. Twenty patients were included and 16 were evaluable (9 M, 7 F). After 6 months the reduction of warts' area was 48.4% on the treated side versus 18.4% in the control area (P = 0.021). The decrease in the total number of warts was 41%versus 19.4% (P = NS). The global tolerance of the treatment was good with acceptable pain during irradiation. These results suggest that ALA-PDT is a safe and efficient treatment for transplanted patient warts. The improvement between treated and control zone is 20% due to the decrease in untreated warts' area and number. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Treatment of common warts with the immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Nilton

    2012-01-01

    Warts are epithelial proliferations in the skin and mucous membrane caused by various types of HPV. They can decrease spontaneously or increase in size and number according to the patient's immune status. The Propionium bacterium parvum is a strong immune stimulant and immune modulator and has important effects in the immune system and it is able to produce antibodies in the skin. To show the efficacy of the Propionium bacterium parvum in saline solution in the treatment of skin warts. A randomized double-blind study. Twenty patients with multiple warts were divided into two groups: one received 0,1 ml intradermal injection of placebo solution in just one of the warts and the other received 0,1 ml of saline solution of Propionium bacterium parvum, one dose a month, for 3 to 5 months. Among the 20 patients who participated in the study, ten received the placebo and ten received the saline solution with Propionium bacterium parvum. In 9 patients treated with the Propionium bacterium parvum solution the warts disappeared without scars and in 1 patient it decreased in size. In 9 patients who received the placebo no change to the warts was observed and in 1 it decreased in size. The immune modulator and immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum produced antibodies in the skin which destroyed the warts without scars, with statistically significant results (Pwarts.

  16. Intralesional immunotherapy with killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii vaccine for the treatment of extensive cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Chouhan, Kavish; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Multiple cutaneous warts in adults are often symptomatic, cosmetically disabling, and difficult to treat. Killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii (previously known as Mycobacterium w, popularly known as Mw) vaccine has earlier been investigated in genital warts with encouraging results. To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of intralesional injected killed Mw vaccine for the treatment of extensive extragenital cutaneous warts. In this study, a retrospective analysis of medical records was performed in patients with cutaneous warts treated with intralesional Mw vaccine. Only patients with more than 5 extra-genital warts, involving at least two body sites and which had not shown any signs of spontaneous regression over 6 months were treated with the vaccine. Forty four patients were treated with intralesional Mw vaccine. The mean number of warts was 41.5±25.7 with a disease duration of 3.1±2.5 years. Complete clearance was achieved in 24 (54.5%) patients with a mean of 3.4±1.1 intralesional injections. Cosmetically acceptable response to therapy (>75% clearance) was achieved in 37 (84.1%) patients. Wart response at distant sites was seen in 38 (86.3%) patients. Thirty-six patients (81.8%) experienced mild therapy-related side effects. Eighteen patients with complete response were followed up for 5.27±1.7 months and none had recurrence of lesions. Killed Mw vaccine is safe and effective in the treatment of extensive cutaneous warts. Larger, preferably randomized controlled trials are needed to assess its efficacy vis a vis standard therapies for warts.

  17. Treatment of recalcitrant warts with intralesional measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine: a promising approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Nofal, Eman; Yosef, Ayman; Nofal, Hager

    2015-06-01

    Recalcitrant warts represent a frustrating challenge for both patients and physicians. Although many destructive and immunotherapeutic modalities are available for the treatment of warts, an ideal, universally effective approach has not been explored to date. Recently, intralesional antigen immunotherapy has shown promising efficacy in the treatment of warts. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intralesional measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine in the treatment of recalcitrant warts. The study included 70 adult patients with multiple recalcitrant extragenital warts of different sizes and durations, with or without distant warts. They were directly injected, without a pre-sensitization skin test, with 0.3 intralesional MMR vaccine into the largest wart at 2-week intervals until complete clearance or for a maximum of five treatments. Follow-up was made every month for six months to detect any recurrence. Sixty-five patients, 35 men and 30 women, completed the study, and five patients discontinued for various reasons. Complete clearance of the lesions was observed in 41 patients (63%), partial response in 15 patients (23%), and no response in nine patients (14%). Complete response was demonstrated in 74.5% of those presenting with distant warts. Side effects were mild and insignificant in the form of pain during injection, itching, erythema, and edema at the site of injection and flu-like symptoms. Recurrence was detected in two patients only. Intralesional immunotherapy by MMR vaccine is a promising, effective, and safe treatment modality for recalcitrant warts. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. The quality of life of patients with genital warts: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Helle K

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital warts, which are caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV, are one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in Europe. Although genital warts are commonly perceived as a non-serious condition, treatment is often long, of varying effectiveness and the recurrence rate is high. Very few studies have been performed on the personal consequences of genital warts. The aim of this qualitative study, set in Denmark, was to examine the ways in which genital warts may affect patients' quality of life. Methods To obtain an in-depth understanding of patients' perceptions of genital warts, we used qualitative focus-group interviews with five men and five women aged between 18 and 30 years who had genital warts. The interview guide was based on a literature review that identified important issues and questions. The data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. Results Patients' experiences were related to cultural conceptions of venereal diseases and the respective identities and sexuality of the sexes. The disease had negative psychological and social effects both for men and for women and it affected their sex and love lives, in particular. The psychological burden of the disease was increased by the uncertain timeline and the varying effectiveness of treatment. We identified a need for more patient information about the disease and its psycho-sexual aspects. Conclusions The men and women participating in this study considered their quality of life to be significantly lowered because of genital warts. The experiences described by the participants give insights that may be valuable in treatment and counselling. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine that has now been added to the childhood vaccination programme for girls in Denmark for the prevention of cervical cancer can also prevent 90% of cases of genital warts. Our results suggest that HPV vaccination could considerably reduce the largely unacknowledged

  19. Surgical-Allogeneic Facial Reconstruction: Facial Transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato; Daniela Micheline Dos Santos; Lisiane Cristina Bannwart; Marcela Filié Haddad; Leonardo Viana Pereira; Aljomar José Vechiato Filho

    2014-01-01

    Several factors including cancer, malformations and traumas may cause large facial mutilation. These functional and aesthetic deformities negatively affect the psychological perspectives and quality of life of the mutilated patient. Conventional treatments are prone to fail aesthetically and functionally. The recent introduction of the composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA), which uses transplanted facial tissues of healthy donors to recover the damaged or non-existent facial tissue of mu...

  20. Cantharidin-podophylotoxin-salicylic acid versus cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar warts: a randomized prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçar, N; Taşlı, L; Korkmaz, S; Ergin, S; Erdoğan, B Ş

    2012-07-01

    Plantar warts are refractory to any form of treatment. High cure rates have been reported with a topical proprietary formulation consisting of 1% cantharidin, 5% podophyllotoxin and 30% salicylic acid (CPS). However, no data exists comparing the efficacy of this formulation with another treatment. Cryotherapy is a method that is also widely used in the treatment of plantar warts. Likewise, there is no evidence that it is more effective than any topical treatment. We aim to compare the efficacy of topical CPS and cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar warts. Patients with plantar warts were consecutively treated with either cryotherapy or topical CPS. Both treatments were performed every 2 weeks for up to five sessions. In patients without complete clearance, the therapy was switched to the other treatment option. Twenty-six patients with a total of 134 warts were included. Fourteen patients were completely cleared of their warts with topical CPS, whereas only in five of 12 patients (41.7%) warts were completely cleared with cryotherapy (P=0.001). In seven patients without complete clearance, the therapy was switched to CPS. Four of these patients missed the follow-up. While the two of the remaining three patients were cleared of their warts, one patient's warts still failed to clear. Topical CPS is more effective than cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar warts. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  1. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Koning, Maurits N C; Feltkamp, Mariet C W; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Quint, Wim G V; Assendelft, Willem J J; Eekhof, Just A H

    2013-07-01

    Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on wart-associated HPV type. Consecutive patients with new common or plantar warts were recruited in 30 Dutch family practices. Patients (n=250) were randomly allocated to liquid-nitrogen cryotherapy, 40% salicylic acid self-application, or wait-and-see policy. Before treatment, swabs were taken from all separate warts and analysed by a broad spectrum HPV genotyping assay. At 13 weeks, cure rates with 95% confidence intervals of common and plantar warts on intention to treat basis were compared between treatment arms for the different wart-associated HPV types. In total, 7% of swabs tested negative for HPV DNA and 16% contained multiple types, leaving 278 of 371 common swabs (75%) and 299 of 373 plantar swabs (80%) with a single type for analysis. After wait-and-see policy, cure rates were 2/70 (3%, 95% confidence interval 1-10) for HPV 2/27/57-associated common warts, 4/58 (7%, 3-16) for HPV 2/27/57-associated plantar warts, and 21/36 (58%, 42-73) for HPV 1-associated plantar warts. After cryotherapy, cure rates were 30/44 (68%, 53-80), 6/56 (11%, 5-21), and 15/23 (65%, 45-81); after salicylic acid 16/87 (18%, 12-28), 15/60 (25%, 16-37), and 24/26 (92%, 76-98), respectively. HPV type influenced the natural course and response to treatment for plantar warts. HPV testing potentially optimises wart treatment in primary care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  3. Flat for Free Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2010-01-01

    @@ Just as Thomas Fried man's famous book,The World Is Flat,if not completely flat,it is anyway tending to be shaped flat.January 1,2010 saw the formation of the China-ASEAN Free Trade Agreement(CAFTA),which was another historical event flattening majority of Asia continent for international trade.

  4. Facial Expression Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial compon

  5. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  6. Facial paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sashank; Redett, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Facial paralysis can have devastating physical and psychosocial consequences. These are particularly severe in children in whom loss of emotional expressiveness can impair social development and integration. The etiologies of facial paralysis, prospects for spontaneous recovery, and functions requiring restoration differ in children as compared with adults. Here we review contemporary management of facial paralysis with a focus on special considerations for pediatric patients.

  7. Surgical-allogeneic facial reconstruction: facial transplants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several factors including cancer, malformations and traumas may cause large facial mutilation. These functional and aesthetic deformities negatively affect the psychological perspectives and quality of life of the mutilated patient. Conventional treatments are prone to fail aesthetically and functionally. The recent introduction of the composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA, which uses transplanted facial tissues of healthy donors to recover the damaged or non-existent facial tissue of mutilated patients, resulted in greater clinical results. Therefore, the present study aims to conduct a literature review on the relevance and effectiveness of facial transplants in mutilated subjects. It was observed that the facial transplants recovered both the aesthetics and function of these patients and consequently improved their quality of life.

  8. Bleomycin-Coated Microneedles for Treatment of Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Sol; Ryu, Ha Ryeong; Roh, Joo Young; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Bleomycin-coated microneedles were devised for delivery of bleomycin into the sub-epidermal skin layer for the treatment of warts in order to provide patient convenience and reduce patient pain and fear. Poly-lactic-acid (L-PLA) microneedles were fabricated by a molding process and then the tips were partially coated using a dip-coating method based on a microstructure well. The mechanical strength of the pre-coated polymer microneedles was observed by inserting them in porcine foot and back skin. The holes were stained with trypan blue and the mechanical failure of the microneedles was investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The initial distribution of a model drug using microneedles was compared with distribution by intralesional injection. The amount of drug leaked below the skin using microneedles was measured and compared with that leaked by intralesional injection. The pharmacokinetic properties of bleomycin-coated microneedles were studied. The bleomycin remaining on the coated microneedles after the in vivo pharmacokinetic study was measured. Bleomycin was successfully coated on the tips of L-PLA microneedles. More than 80% of the bleomycin dissolved into the skin in vitro within 15 min. L-PLA microneedles possessed sufficient mechanical strength to penetrate skin with a thick stratum corneum. Compared to intralesional injection, tip-coated microneedles were more effective in distributing a drug into the sub-epidermal skin layer. A pharmacokinetic study of bleomycin-coated microneedles showed 50 min of Tmax. Bleomycin-coated microneedles appeared to be a convenient and painless alternative to conventional intralesional injection of bleomycin. The microneedles delivered bleomycin into the targeted dermal layer regardless of body site. Bleomycin-coated microneedles therefore provide a suitable method for the treatment of warts.

  9. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  10. Prevalence and Determinants of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infection in Male Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Jin; Seo, Juhyung; Ha, Seong-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence and type distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in genital warts of Korean men, and for the first time, to describe the risk factors associated with high-risk HPV infection in male genital warts. Materials and Methods In a single private clinic, 150 consecutive male patients with histopathologic-confirmed genital warts who underwent HPV genotyping by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were included in this study. We detected HPV DNA in male genital warts and evaluated HPV type distribution, especially high-risk HPV types, by use of PCR. The associations between HPV prevalence and various characteristics, such as age, circumcision status, type of genital warts diagnosis (new vs. recurrent), number of lesions, site of lesions, and gross morphology, were assessed by use of unconditional multiple logistic regression. Results High-risk HPV types were detected in 31 cases (23.5%), and of these, 27 cases (20.5%) contained both high-risk and low-risk HPV types. The most frequently detected high-risk HPV types were HPV16 (6.8%), HPV33 (4.5%), HPV18 (2.3%), and HPV68 (2.3%). In particular, the prevalence of infection with HPV16 and/or HPV18 was 8.3% (11 of 132). In the multivariate analysis, lesions located at sites including the base of the penis or the pubic area, papular or mixed genital warts, and lack of circumcision significantly increased the association with high-risk HPV infection in male genital warts. Conclusions The prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was substantial in male genital warts. The site and morphology of lesions and circumcision status were significantly associated with the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection. PMID:24648877

  11. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (threa...

  12. Loss of quality of life associated with genital warts: baseline analyses from a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénécal, Martin; Brisson, Marc; Maunsell, Elizabeth; Ferenczy, Alex; Franco, Eduardo L; Ratnam, Sam; Coutlée, François; Palefsky, Joel M; Mansi, James A

    2011-04-01

    The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against HPV types responsible for 90% of anogenital warts. This study estimated the quality of life lost to genital warts using the EQ-5D, a generic instrument widely used for applications in economic analyses. The findings are described in terms that are more specific to individuals with genital warts using psychosocial questions adapted from the HPV impact profile, a measure developed for HPV-related conditions. Between September 2006 and February 2008, 42 physicians across Canada recruited 330 consenting patients 18 years and older with genital warts, either at the first or follow-up visit for an initial or recurrent episode. The quality of life lost associated with genital warts was estimated by the difference between participants' EQ-5D scores and age and gender-specific population norms. The study questionnaire was self-completed by 270 participants who were aged 31.5 years (SD 10.4) on average. The majority of participants were women (53.3%), heterosexual (93.5%) and in a stable relationship (66.0%). Genital warts were associated with detriments in the EQ-5D domains of anxiety/depression, pain/discomfort and usual activities. The absolute difference in the EQ-5D utility score and the EQ-VAS health status between genital warts patients and population norms was 9.9 (95% CI 7.3 to 12.5) and 6.0 (95% CI 4.1 to 7.9) percentage points, respectively. These results did not vary significantly according to patient age, gender, time since first episode or number of episodes. The results suggest that genital warts negatively affect the wellbeing of men and women as reflected by poorer quality of life scores compared with population norms.

  13. Successful Treatment of Refractory Wart with a Topical Activated Vitamin D in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Moscarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Warts are benign proliferations of the skin and mucosa caused by infection with human papillomavirus. They are commonly treated with destructive modalities such as cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen, local injection of bleomycin, electrocoagulation, topical application of glutaraldehyde, and local and systemic interferon-β therapy. These treatment modalities often cause pain and sometimes scarring or pigmentation after treatment. We herein report a case with a right index finger wart, which was successfully treated with a topical activated vitamin D.

  14. 21 CFR 358.150 - Labeling of wart remover drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... containing salicylic acid identified in § 358.110(b). “Wash affected area.” (Optional: “May soak wart in warm... (until wart is removed) for up to 12 weeks.” (3) For products containing salicylic acid identified in....” (ii) “Do not use this product on irritated skin, on any area that is infected or reddened, if you...

  15. Safety and effectiveness of autoinoculation therapy in cutaneous warts: A double - blind, randomized, placebo - controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika Ranjan Lal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of the availability of multiple treatment options, viral warts are known for their persistence and recurrence, causing frustration to patients and treating physicians. Aims: To study the effectiveness and safety of autoinoculation as a treatment modality in cutaneous warts. Methods: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out. In the treatment group, full-thickness warty tissue was excised, minced and implanted in a small dermal pocket. In the control group, warty tissue was only excised and not implanted, though a dermal pocket was made. Patients were evaluated every four weeks with lesion counts. The procedure was repeated at 4 and 8 weeks. Response was assessed at each visit and at 12 weeks. Results: Forty-eight patients with cutaneous warts (male: female = 32:16 were randomized into autoinoculation and control groups. The number of warts at baseline was comparable in both groups (P = 0.293. Reduction in the number of warts was significantly more in the autoinoculation group (8.50 ± 13.88 than in the control group (10.04 ± 5.80 from 8 weeks onwards (P = 0.010. Complete resolution occurred only in the autoinoculation group, in 62.5% of cases. Adverse effects were seen in 11 patients, including infection of the donor site (5 cases, keloid formation (3 and hypopigmentation (3. Conclusion: Autoinoculation may be an effective therapeutic modality for cutaneous warts and two sessions may be required for optimum results.

  16. Status of oxidative stress on lesional skin surface of plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arican, O; Ozturk, P; Kurutas, E B; Unsal, V

    2013-03-01

    Warts are abnormal skin growths caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections within the skin of the patients. Sometimes the disease is difficult to treatment, and also, the relationship between HPV and some forms of skin cancers is important. The cutaneous oxidative stress status of warts is absent in the literature. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in affected skin areas in a group of patients with plantar warts. Thirty-six consecutive patients with a diagnosis of plantar warts were enrolled. The samples were obtained by scraping the skin surface. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured spectrophotometrically at samples. The SOD activity was significantly lower, and the MDA level was significantly higher on the lesional area than on the non-lesional area (P warts may play a role in pathogenesis of the disease. The addition of topical drugs with antioxidative effects may be valuable in the treatment of warts. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Investigations of the efficacy of diphenylcyclopropenone immunotherapy for the treatment of warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong-Woo; Lew, Bark-Lynn; Sim, Woo-Young

    2014-12-01

    Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) immunotherapy has been used to treat warts, particularly in patients, such as children, who cannot endure treatment-related pain and in patients with large numbers of warts. However, the efficacy of DPCP immunotherapy remains subject to much controversy. Specifically, cure rates and treatment durations have varied across reports, primarily because of the lack of large-scale studies. We performed an uncontrolled, open-label study to investigate the efficacy of DPCP immunotherapy for the treatment of cutaneous warts. A total of 170 patients with warts were enrolled in this uncontrolled, open-label study from 2006 to 2012. Each patient was sensitized with 0.1% DPCP. Two weeks after sensitization, DPCP was applied to warts once per week. We achieved high clearance rates in 141 of 170 patients (82.9%) and 434 of 511 lesions (84.9%). Immunotherapy with DPCP was much more effective when the lesions were located on the hands and when the patient was aged 0.005%. Side effects occurred in 36 patients, but no serious adverse effects occurred, and blistering at the sensitized site was the most common adverse effect. Immunotherapy with DPCP is an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of recalcitrant warts. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Immunotherapy using purified protein derivative in the treatment of warts: An open uncontrolled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Saoji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warts are known to clear spontaneously with the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI to the virus. Purified protein derivative (PPD of tuberculin bacilli has been used as a non-specific stimulant of CMI to achieve this outcome. Aim: To study the effect of PPD in the treatment of warts. Methods: Patients with difficult-to-treat warts were selected for immunotherapy. Each patient received 2.5 TU of PPD intralesionally in a few warts. A total of four sessions were given at 2 weekly intervals and patients were followed up for 6 months after the last dose. Results: Sixty-one patients were recruited of which 55 completed 6 months follow up and were available for analysis. Of these, 25 had verruca vulgaris, 18 had verruca plana and 12 had plantar warts. Forty two (76% patients showed complete clearance after four sessions while the remaining 13 (24% patients were non-responders. One patient developed a recurrence after total clearance during the follow-up period. Adverse effects were erythema, edema and pain at the site of injections. Limitations: As this was an uncontrolled trial, there is no comparison with a non-intervention group. Also, a Mantoux test was not done due to practical difficulties. Conclusion: Immunotherapy with PPD is helpful in the treatment of cutaneous warts.

  19. Treatment of common and plane warts in children with topical viable Bacillus Calmette-Guerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Nofal, Ahmad; Hosny, Doaa

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of verrucae in children is difficult and may be painful using traditional methods, especially if they are multiple or on the face. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical application of viable Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in a paste formula as a new immunotherapeutic modality in the treatment of common and plane warts in children. The present study included 80 children with common and plane warts at different sites on the body. They were divided into two groups. Group A (40 patients) received topical viable BCG and group B (40 patients) received topical saline as control. All patients and controls had received a previous vaccination of BCG. BCG was applied once weekly for six consecutive weeks. Patients who had partial or no response received another course of treatment for another 6 weeks. Follow-up was at 6 months to detect any recurrences. A highly significant difference was found between the therapeutic response of common and plane warts to BCG and saline (placebo) (p warts and 45% of patients with plane warts. No response was detected in the control group. No recurrences or side effects were observed in the BCG group. Topical immunotherapeutic BCG is a new, effective, safe treatment option for children with common and plane warts. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Anal and Oral Sites Among Patients with Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a leading cause of anogenital malignancies and a role of HPV in the aetiology of oro-pharyngeal cancers has been demonstrated. The frequency of oral HPV infection in patients with genital warts and the association between concomitant...... genital, anal and oral infection is unclear. A total of 201 men and women with genital wart-like lesions were recruited. Swab samples were obtained from the genital warts and the anal canal and an oral rinse was collected. Anal HPV was found in 46.2% and oral HPV in 10.4% of the participants. Concordance...... between anal and genital wart HPV types was 78.1%, while concordance between oral and genital wart types was 60.9%. A lower concordance of 21.7% was observed between anal and oral HPV types. Significantly more women than men had multiple HPV types and anal HPV. In conclusion, extra genital HPV is common...

  1. Examining the efficacy and safety of squaric acid therapy for treatment of recalcitrant warts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shaily; Wilmer, Erin N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the safety and efficacy of squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) therapy on the treatment of recalcitrant warts in children. This retrospective chart review examined 72 patients treated using SADBE from July 2002 to December 2012. Patients were followed for 6 months to 11 years. Patients were treated at a pediatric dermatology outpatient clinic at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Seventy-two children with verrucae who failed initial treatment for warts were selected for the study. Full long-term follow-up was obtained in 48 patients. Four patients discontinued the use of SADBE because of adverse effects. The primary study outcome was efficacy of SADBE treatment. Adverse effects, dosages administered, type of wart, other cutaneous disease present, and level of immunosuppression were measured. Forty of 48 (83%) patients in whom treatment outcomes could be obtained reported complete resolution of their warts. Seventy percent of patients used a maximum concentration of 0.4% SADBE and 60% of patients reported no adverse effects. The majority of patients treated with SADBE reported complete resolution of warts. Most patients reported no adverse effects even while receiving doses as high as 2% daily. This study shows that SADBE is a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant warts in children. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Treatment of recalcitrant warts with the carbon dioxide laser using an excision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Georgette; Mahaffey, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    Recalcitrant warts remain a challenging problem to treat, with considerable morbidity for patients. Our technique uses the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser as a bloodless scalpel to excise and treat recalcitrant warts. This paper reviews the results of patients with recalcitrant warts treated by the senior author using this technique. A retrospective case note review and questionnaire-based survey of patients treated by this technique. Seventy-one recalcitrant warts treated in 22 patients, all as day case procedures. A total of 54.5% of patients had complete remission after one treatment and the average length of follow-up was 71.5 months. Recurrence occurred on average 5.29 months following treatment. Of those patients, 90% were successfully retreated, giving an overall rate of 95.5%. In total, 46.7% of patients were left with scarring, but all felt this was acceptable given the benefits of the treatment, and 80.0% of patients would have the procedure again. Four patients had spontaneous regression of warts at other body sites not treated with the CO2 laser. This study illustrates the efficacy of our technique with a favourable outcome comparable to published studies. Recurrence occurred within 12 months; therefore, we would recommend this as a minimum follow-up period. In addition, the disappearance of warts at distant sites suggests that the effects of the CO2 laser therapy modulate the immune system, thereby extending it beyond simple excision or ablation.

  3. Intralesional cidofovir for the treatment of multiple and recalcitrant cutaneous viral warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broganelli, Paolo; Chiaretta, Antonella; Fragnelli, Barbara; Bernengo, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Cidofovir is a nucleoside analog of deoxycytidine with a strong activity against a broad spectrum of DNA viruses, including human papillomavirus. The first objective was to evaluate efficacy of cidofovir for the treatment of cutaneous viral warts, recalcitrant after conventional therapies or where the surgery approach is difficult for their location or extension. Second, the present authors propose to point out possible local and systemic side effects consequent to treatment. Two-hundred eighty patients affected by recalcitrant cutaneous viral warts, were treated with intralesional cidofovir 15 mg/mL once a month. The present authors stated that candidates were those who had made before at least two other treatments reported in the guideline for management of cutaneous viral warts. In 276 cases, warts completely cleared: 158 of those have a follow-up period longer than 12 months and 118 have a follow-up of 6 months. On the average, 3,2 injections were enough to solve the problem. Local side effects consisted of pain and burning sensation during the injections; itching, erythema, and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation were observed. No cases of systemic side effects were noted. The treatment was well tolerated, and the warts were completely cleared without relapses. Intralesional cidofovir is emerging as an effective therapeutic alternative for warts that are unresponsive to conventional treatments.

  4. [Warts, swimming pools and atopy: a case control study conducted in a private dermatology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penso-Assathiany, D; Flahault, A; Roujeau, J C

    1999-10-01

    Our purpose was to study two risk factors of warts, i.e., swimming pool frequentation and atopy. A case-control study was performed in four dermatologists' private offices. The cases were patients consulting for the first time for warts; the controls were patients consulting for the first time for acne. Univariate analysis performed in 153 questionnaires (including 86 cases and 67 controls) showed an association between warts with swimming pool frequentation one year before consulting and between warts and history of atopy. Multivariate analysis showed an association between warts and history of atopy (OR: 4.20; confidence interval at 95 p. 100 = (1.52-11.6). The link between warts and frequentation of swimming pool one year before is not significant (OR: 1.81; confidence interval at 95 p. 100 = (0.78-4.21)) but shows a tendency. This last point should be confirmed in further studies. Additionally, this study showed that this kind of clinical research can be carried out in dermatologist private practice.

  5. Childhood atopic dermatitis and warts are associated with increased risk of infection: a US population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies suggested that atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with aberrant immune responses, which might predispose toward both cutaneous and extracutaneous infections. The goal of this study was to determine whether childhood AD is associated with increased risk of warts, extracutaneous infections, and other atopic diseases and how these disorders cosegregate. The 2007 National Health Interview Survey from a nationally representative sample of 9417 children age 0 to 17 years was used. Children with AD and other atopic disease had higher odds of warts. In contrast, children with AD with or without other atopic disease had higher odds of extracutaneous infections, including strep throat, other sore throat, head or chest cold, influenza/pneumonia, sinus infections, recurrent ear infections, chickenpox, and urinary tract infections (P Warts were also associated with increased odds of all extracutaneous infections (P warts and AD had a higher number of infections than those with either disorder alone (P warts had higher odds of ever receiving a diagnosis of asthma, current asthma, asthma exacerbation in the past year, hay fever, and food allergy. Children with AD with warts had even higher odds of asthma, hay fever, and food allergies than those with AD and no warts. The associations between childhood AD, atopic disease, warts, and extracutaneous infections suggest that barrier disruption, immune disruption, or both contribute to susceptibility to warts and extracutaneous infections in children. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genital and extra-genital warts increase the risk of asymptomatic genital human papillomavirus infection in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Goodman, Marc T; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J; Zhu, Xuemei; Tom, James; Ning, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationship of warts in different parts of the body and the risk of asymptomatic genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men. Methods We examined the relationship of self-reported genital and extra-genital warts with the subsequent acquisition of asymptomatic genital HPV infection in a cohort of 331 adult men. Participants were followed at 2-month intervals for up to 4 years. Past and current presence of warts was queried at study entry. At each visit, the external genitals were sampled for HPV DNA testing. Results Men who reported a history of genital warts, including current warts, were at increased risk of acquisition of asymptomatic HPV infection of the penis glans/corona, penis shaft and scrotum. The magnitude of these associations was greatest for HPV 6/11 infection. History of warts on the fingers, arms and trunk of the body was also associated with increased risk of genital HPV infection. Current presence of warts on the fingers and trunk specifically increased the risk of acquisition of HPV types not typically found on the genitals. Conclusions Men with a history of warts on the genitals, fingers, arms and trunk may be at increased risk for acquisition of new genital HPV infections. Warts may provide an efficient reservoir for the transmission of virions to the genitals through auto-inoculation. The potential for the spread of HPV throughout the body through auto-inoculation has important implications for prevention and control of HPV infection. PMID:21602516

  7. Very late onset small intestinal B cell lymphoma associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia and diffuse cutaneous warts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bouhnik, Y; Etienney, I; Nemeth, J; Thevenot, T; Lavergne-Slove, A; Matuchansky, C

    2000-01-01

    .... They presented with a longstanding history of fluctuating protein losing enteropathy, multiple cutaneous plane warts, and markedly dilated mucosal and submucosal lymphatic channels in duodenal biopsies...

  8. Topical adapalene in the treatment of plantar warts; Randomized comparative open trial in comparison with cryo-therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various therapeutic modalities, which are available for treating plantar wart, have not been successful every time. Aims: To evaluate topical adapalene under occlusion in the treatment of plantar warts and compare it with cryo-therapy. Materials and Methods: 50 patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, open study. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each. Group A patients having 299 plantar warts were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion while Group B patients having 125 warts were treated using cryo-therapy. All the patients were evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts and the results compared. Result: All the warts of 25 patients of Group A that were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% cleared in 36.71 ± 19.24 (55.95-17.47 days except those in one patient. In Group B, warts in all except one treated by cryo-therapy cleared in 52.17 ± 30.06 (82.23-22.11 days. There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients. Conclusion: Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy.

  9. Surgical treatment of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ritvik P

    2009-03-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (facial paralysis (3 weeks to 2 yr) and chronic facial paralysis (>2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgical therapies are facial nerve decompression and facial nerve repair. For facial paralysis of intermediate duration, nerve transfer procedures are appropriate. For chronic facial paralysis, treatment typically requires regional or free muscle transfer. Static techniques of facial reanimation can be used for acute, intermediate, or chronic facial paralysis as these techniques are often important adjuncts to the overall management strategy.

  10. Relatively Flat Envelopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁南庆

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate relatively flat envelopes. A necessary and sufficient condition is given for a relatively-finitely presented module to have a (mono-morphic or epic) relatively flat envelope. Then those rings are characterized whose every relatively-finitely presented module has a relatively flat envelope which coincides with its in-jective envelope. Some known results are obtained as corollaries.

  11. Creating flat design websites

    CERN Document Server

    Pratas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This book contains practical, step-by-step tutorials along with plenty of explanation about designing your flat website. Each section is introduced sequentially, building up your web design skills and completing your website.Creating Flat Design Websites is ideal for you if you are starting on your web development journey, but this book will also benefit seasoned developers wanting to start developing in flat.

  12. Strongly Gorenstein Flat Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Xia ZHANG; Li Min WANG

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of modules and rings.We show this dimension has nice properties when the ring is coherent,and extend the well-known Hilbert's syzygy theorem to the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of rings.Also,we investigate the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of direct products of rings and (almost)excellent extensions of rings.

  13. Evaluation of the efficacy of 50% citric acid solution in plane wart treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali Anahita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Treatment of plane warts is problematic, methods such as cryotherapy and cauterization is associated with high recurrence rate, risk of scar, pain and high cost. Topical tretinoin causes irritant contact dermatitis that limited its use. Citric acid was used in treatment of warts in traditional medicine of Iran. We evaluated the efficacy of 50% citric acid solution in water in treatment of plane warts and compared it with 0.05% tretinoin lotion. Materials and Methods : This study was a double blind; prospective, case-control study.Seventy-five patients with bilateral plane warts who signed informed consent were included. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy, breast-feeding, suffering from any systemic disease and the use of any other drug due to treatment of warts in past six weeks. The patients randomly used citric acid or Tretinoin lotion to lesions at each side of the body. Randomization was performed by coin-flipping. Patients were examined at three weeks interval for six weeks and number of warts were recorded in the proforma, which included the name, sex, address and code of the drug that was used in each side of the body and side effects. The results were analyzed by Chi-square test statistically. Results: After six weeks 64.4% of the lesions in citric acid treated group disappeared versus 53.7% of the lesions in tretinoin treated group. This difference was significant ( P value Conclusion: On the basis of this study, the treatment of plane warts by 50% citric acid is strongly suggested. This modality is superior to tretinoin lotion due to higher efficacy and low incidence of side-effects and lower cost.

  14. Contemporary facial reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhama, Prabhat K; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-01

    The facial nerve is the most commonly paralyzed nerve in the human body. Facial paralysis affects aesthetic appearance, and it has a profound effect on function and quality of life. Management of patients with facial paralysis requires a multidisciplinary approach, including otolaryngologists, plastic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and physical therapists. Regardless of etiology, patients with facial paralysis should be evaluated systematically, with initial efforts focused upon establishing proper diagnosis. Management should proceed with attention to facial zones, including the brow and periocular region, the midface and oral commissure, the lower lip and chin, and the neck. To effectively compare contemporary facial reanimation strategies, it is essential to employ objective intake assessment methods, and standard reassessment schemas during the entire management period.

  15. Facial Reconstruction and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Genther, Dane J; Byrne, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Extracranial infiltration of the facial nerve by salivary gland tumors is the most frequent cause of facial palsy secondary to malignancy. Nevertheless, facial palsy related to salivary gland cancer is uncommon. Therefore, reconstructive facial reanimation surgery is not a routine undertaking for most head and neck surgeons. The primary aims of facial reanimation are to restore tone, symmetry, and movement to the paralyzed face. Such restoration should improve the patient's objective motor function and subjective quality of life. The surgical procedures for facial reanimation rely heavily on long-established techniques, but many advances and improvements have been made in recent years. In the past, published experiences on strategies for optimizing functional outcomes in facial paralysis patients were primarily based on small case series and described a wide variety of surgical techniques. However, in the recent years, larger series have been published from high-volume centers with significant and specialized experience in surgical and nonsurgical reanimation of the paralyzed face that have informed modern treatment. This chapter reviews the most important diagnostic methods used for the evaluation of facial paralysis to optimize the planning of each individual's treatment and discusses surgical and nonsurgical techniques for facial rehabilitation based on the contemporary literature.

  16. [Facial tics and spasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; van Dijk, J Marc C; Elting, Jan Willem J; de Koning-Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-01-01

    Facial tics and spasms are socially incapacitating, but effective treatment is often available. The clinical picture is sufficient for distinguishing between the different diseases that cause this affliction.We describe three cases of patients with facial tics or spasms: one case of tics, which are familiar to many physicians; one case of blepharospasms; and one case of hemifacial spasms. We discuss the differential diagnosis and the treatment possibilities for facial tics and spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, because of the associated social incapacitation. Botulin toxin should be considered as a treatment option for facial tics and a curative neurosurgical intervention should be considered for hemifacial spasms.

  17. Imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Christine S; Huang, William W

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous warts are highly prevalent lesions caused by the infection of keratinocytes by different types of human papillomaviruses. Although cutaneous warts are capable of resolving spontaneously, these infections can persist for long periods of time by evading the host immune system, and, as a result, many patients choose to seek treatment. Imiquimod is an immune response modifier that is approved as a topical cream for the treatment of anogenital warts by the US Food and Drug Administration. However, the efficacy of imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts has not been well established. The purpose of this article is to systematically review the published literature regarding the efficacy of imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts, and to evaluate the quality and outcomes of these studies. A literature search was performed through clinical queries PubMed (National Library of Medicine) database and the Cochrane database. All completed studies written in English and published through May 2014 were considered. Studies evaluating the use of imiquimod for anogenital warts were excluded. There were no other restrictions based on patient age, sex, ethnicity, or skin type. The studies were evaluated and assessed based on study design, patient population, treatment regimen, clinical outcome, and adverse events. A total of 393 records were identified in the initial search; 23 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and included in the review. Of these studies, six publications reported on immunocompromised individuals only. The highest quality study identified was a grade B, level 3 case-control cohort study in which patients with multiple warts had certain warts treated with imiquimod and others left untreated to serve as a control. The remaining studies identified were level 4 non-controlled case series (grade C) and level 5 case reports (grade D). In immunocompetent patients enrolled in non-controlled studies, the combined rate of patients achieving

  18. Managing external genital warts: practical aspects of treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Marc; Bhatia, Neal; Lynde, Charles; Vender, Ronald

    2013-12-01

    Rising rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in recent decades, including external genital warts (EGWs), underscore the need for effective management of this common sexually transmitted disease. Although treatment is a vital aspect that aims primarily to resolve physical symptoms, health care providers must also address the psychosocial burden that typically accompanies diagnosis, treatment, remission, and recurrence. Education and counseling are integral components of care to address the cascade of negative emotional reactions that follow diagnosis, which often include anger, shame, stigma, frustration, and fear. Health care providers should offer patient information that is clear and simple, both verbally and in written form. Research to date has shown that information is most helpful when it is conveyed in a supportive tone and avoids stigmatization. Treatment decisions should consider the patient's preferences and the clinician's ability to offer certain therapies. A locally relevant algorithm and an individualized treatment approach are recommended by various treatment guidelines to improve the chances of compliance and treatment success. Given that success rates are variable, monitoring treatment is also necessary to gauge the patient's response to treatment, local reactions, and the potential need to switch treatments. Patients diagnosed with EGWs should also be screened for other sexually transmitted diseases because coinfection is common. Vaccination is becoming an increasingly important aspect of prevention strategies for HPV infections and should be considered for eligible patients.

  19. Fat and expanded act in parallel to regulate growth through warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongqiang; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2007-12-18

    The conserved Drosophila tumor suppressors Fat and Expanded have both recently been implicated in regulating the activity of the Warts tumor suppressor. However, there has been disagreement as to the nature of the links among Fat, Expanded, and Warts and the significance of these links to growth control. We report here that mutations in either expanded or fat can be rescued to viability simply by overexpressing Warts, indicating that their essential function is their influence on Warts rather than reported effects on endocytosis or other pathways. These rescue experiments also separate the transcriptional from the planar cell polarity branches of Fat signaling and reveal that Expanded does not directly affect polarity. We also investigate the relationship between expanded and fat and show, contrary to prior reports, that they have additive effects on imaginal disk growth and development. Although mutation of fat can cause partial loss of Expanded protein from the membrane, mutation of fat promotes growth even when Expanded is overexpressed and accumulates at its normal subapical location. These observations argue against recent proposals that Fat acts simply as a receptor for the Hippo signaling pathway and instead support the proposal that Fat and Expanded can act in parallel to regulate Warts through distinct mechanisms.

  20. Intralesional antigen immunotherapy for the treatment of warts: current concepts and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Salah, Eman; Nofal, Eman; Yosef, Ayman

    2013-08-01

    Many destructive and immunotherapeutic modalities have been used for the management of warts; however, an optimal treatment with high efficacy and absent or low recurrence has not been explored to date. Recently, the use of intralesional immunotherapy with different antigens has shown promising efficacy in the treatment of warts. We review the different aspects of this new modality, including candidates, types of warts treated, dosage, number and interval between treatment sessions, mode of action, efficacy, adverse effects, recurrence rate, advantages, disadvantages, current place and future prospects. A literature review revealed that healthy immune subjects are the best candidates, and a pre-sensitization test is usually done before the start of therapy. The dosage, the number and interval between sessions, and the success rates varied among the different studies. The mode of action is still uncertain, but is essentially mediated through stimulation of T helper-1 cell cytokine response. Adverse effects are mild and generally insignificant, and the recurrence rate is absent or low. Intralesional antigen immunotherapy seems to be a promising, effective and safe treatment modality for viral warts. Future well-designed and controlled studies would help to more clearly define its place in the challenging field of wart therapy.

  1. Co-infection of Bovine Papillomavirus and feline-associated Papillomavirus in bovine cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, M A R; Carvalho, C C R; Coutinho, L C A; Reis, M C; de Aragão Batista, M V; de Castro, R S; Dos Anjos, F B R; de Freitas, A C

    2012-12-01

    The diversity of papillomavirus (PV) found in bovine cutaneous warts from Brazilian cattle was evaluated using the PCR technique with the utilization of consensus primers MY09/11 and by PCR using Bovine Papillomavirus (BPV) type-specific primers followed by sequencing. Eleven cutaneous warts from 6 cattle herds were selected. Six warts were positive for the presence of PV. The presence of BPV types 1, 2, 3, 6 and feline sarcoid-associated PV (FeSarPV) in cutaneous wart lesions, as well as the presence of co-infections, was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that FeSarPV is described co-infecting a cutaneous wart in Brazil. The present study confirms the previous finding of FeSarPV infecting cattle. These results show the necessity of more studies to investigate the diversity of PV in cattle, its diversity and the possibility of co-infection in cattle and other animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Impact of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine on genital warts in an opportunistic vaccination structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Samuel; Mizrachi, Yossi; Chodick, Gabi; Katz, Rachel; Schejter, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    Genital warts are the most common sexually transmitted disease and have a detrimental impact on quality of life. Genital warts could be prevented by prophylactic HPV vaccination. The objective was to study real-life benefit of opportunistic HPV vaccination on age and gender specific incidence of genital warts. We performed a register-based population cohort study from publicly funded health-care provider in Israel. The incidence of genital warts was assessed during three time frame intervals: 2006-2008 (pre-vaccination effect period) 2009-2012 (early post-vaccination effect period) and 2013-2015 (late post-vaccination effect period), with an average annual number of members of 1,765,481, 1,906,774 and 2,042,678 in the years 2006-2008, 2009-2012 and 2013-2015, respectively. Among females, annual incidence of genital warts per 100,000 women decreased from 210.43 to 161.71 (OR 0.76, 95%CI 0.71-0.82, pwarts per 100,000 men decreased from 262.85 to 232.40 (OR 0.88, 95%CI 0.83-0.93, pwarts even in opportunistic HPV vaccination structure. This information may be relevant for health-care providers in countries where national immunization programs do not include HPV vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intensive local thermotherapy cleared extensive viral warts in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Huo, Wei; Qi, Rui-Qun; Hu, Lanting; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2015-02-01

    A variety of medications and procedures are available for the treatment of warts, but it appeared the treatment response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is poor. It is necessary to investigate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of local thermotherapy for extensive viral warts. A SLE patient on systemic steroid developed extensive viral warts on both her hands and feet for months. She had a high score of SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), up to 30, and was extensively treated with high and prolonged dosage of corticosteroid and intermittent use of cyclophosphamide. We applied local hyperthermia at 44 °C on a target lesion for 30 min on days 1, 2, 3, 17, 18, a protocol which has been successfully used in treating viral warts. There was no sign of clinical response in a 3-month follow-up. Then we treated the patient on a once-a-week protocol. All the lesions cleared in ten weeks and there was no sign of recurrence. This observation suggests that more intensive local hyperthermia is required for clearing viral warts in SLE.

  4. History of facial pain diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M; Jensen, Troels S

    2017-01-01

    Premise Facial pain refers to a heterogeneous group of clinically and etiologically different conditions with the common clinical feature of pain in the facial area. Among these conditions, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), persistent idiopathic facial pain, temporomandibular joint pain, and trigeminal...

  5. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Bavinck, J.N.; Waal, M.W. de; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in

  6. Paring and intense pulsed light versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot warts: a randomized clinical trial with blinded outcome evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Gluud, Christian; Winkel, Per

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of recalcitrant viral warts remains a therapeutic challenge. Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been suggested effective to clear wart tissue. The objective was in a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of paring followed by IPL versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot...... warts....

  7. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Bavinck, J.N.; Waal, M.W. de; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in

  8. The Clinical Effectiveness of Intralesional Injection of 2% Zinc Sulfate Solution in the Treatment of Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Essam-elden Mohamed; Tawfik, Khaled Mohamed; Mahmoud, Asmaa Moneir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate solution in the treatment of common warts. Patients and Methods. One hundred and twenty patients (78 females and 42 males) aged 5–55 years with 225 common warts participated in this prospective monocentric randomized study. All lesions were treated with intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate. Results. From 225 warts injected, 135 warts (60%) cured from the first session, 51 warts (22.67%) cured from the second session, and 12 warts (5.33%) cured from the third session. There is no significant relation between improvement and patient's ages, duration, or number of warts (P > 0.05). All patients complained from pain during injection, and all treated lesions showed redness, tenderness, and swelling in the first 3 days after injection. Late complications were postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in 90 patients (75%), scaring in 9 patients (7.5%), and ulceration in 3 patients (2.5%). Recurrence occurred in 3 lesions (1.33%). Conclusion. The clinical data indicate that intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate is an effective maneuver in the treatment of common warts; however, its associated complications limit its use. PMID:27123361

  9. The Clinical Effectiveness of Intralesional Injection of 2% Zinc Sulfate Solution in the Treatment of Common Warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam-elden Mohamed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate solution in the treatment of common warts. Patients and Methods. One hundred and twenty patients (78 females and 42 males aged 5–55 years with 225 common warts participated in this prospective monocentric randomized study. All lesions were treated with intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate. Results. From 225 warts injected, 135 warts (60% cured from the first session, 51 warts (22.67% cured from the second session, and 12 warts (5.33% cured from the third session. There is no significant relation between improvement and patient’s ages, duration, or number of warts (P<0.05. All patients complained from pain during injection, and all treated lesions showed redness, tenderness, and swelling in the first 3 days after injection. Late complications were postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in 90 patients (75%, scaring in 9 patients (7.5%, and ulceration in 3 patients (2.5%. Recurrence occurred in 3 lesions (1.33%. Conclusion. The clinical data indicate that intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate is an effective maneuver in the treatment of common warts; however, its associated complications limit its use.

  10. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care : randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; de Waal, Margot W. M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods: Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were recruit

  11. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care : randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; de Waal, Margot W. M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods: Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were

  12. Retinoids strongly and selectively correlate with keratin 13 and not keratin 19 expression in cutaneous warts of renal transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokx, W.A.M.; Smit, J.V.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Link, M.M.G.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Ruiter, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the expression of keratin (K) 13 and K19 in cutaneous warts of renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and immunocompetent individuals (ICIs). DESIGN: Retrospective, nonrandomized immunohistochemical study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Specimens from cutaneous warts of RTRs and ICIs were

  13. Tolerance and safety of superficial chemical peeling with salicylic acid in various facial dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Zafar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemical peeling is a skin-wounding procedure that may have some potentially undesirable side-effects. AIMS: The present study is directed towards safety concerns associated with superficial chemical peeling with salicylic acid in various facial dermatoses. METHODS: The study was a non-comparative and a prospective one. Two hundred and sixty-eight patients of either sex, aged between 10 to 60 years, undergoing superficial chemical peeling for various facial dermatoses (melasma, acne vulgaris, freckles, post-inflammatory scars/pigmentation, actinic keratoses, plane facial warts, etc. were included in the study. Eight weekly peeling sessions were carried out in each patient. Tolerance to the procedure and any undesirable effects noted during these sessions were recorded. RESULTS: Almost all the patients tolerated the procedure well. Mild discomfort, burning, irritation and erythema were quite common but the incidence of major side-effects was very low and these too, were easily manageable. There was no significant difference in the incidence of side-effects between facial dermatoses (melasma, acne and other pigmentary disorders. CONCLUSION: Chemical peeling with salicylic acid is a well tolerated and safe treatment modality in many superficial facial dermatoses.

  14. New proposal for the treatment of viral warts with intralesional injection of 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Sun Ji; Hwang, Jong Ik; Lee, Kyung Jin; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Baik Kee

    2012-06-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intralesional injection (ILI) can theoretically enhance the efficacy of the PDT, the effect of ILI-PDT on warts has not been reported in the literature so far. Eight patients with multiple viral warts were enrolled in the study. PDT was performed after the incubation for 1 h, followed by the ILI of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) into the warts. The treatment was repeated at 2-3 week intervals. Fifty percent of patients showed good to cure response. Complete remission was observed in two patients. There was no apparent correlation between the initial severity of warts and the likelihood of response. No one reported severe adverse reaction. The present study suggests that intralesional administration of ALA might be a safe and effective treatment option of thick treatment-resistant warts and can be performed with a shorter incubation period.

  15. Facial expression and sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2001-08-01

    This study examined facial expression in the presentation of sarcasm. 60 responses (sarcastic responses = 30, nonsarcastic responses = 30) from 40 different speakers were coded by two trained coders. Expressions in three facial areas--eyebrow, eyes, and mouth--were evaluated. Only movement in the mouth area significantly differentiated ratings of sarcasm from nonsarcasm.

  16. Holistic facial expression classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  17. Facial talon cusps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T

    1997-12-01

    This is a report of two patients with isolated facial talon cusps. One occurred on a permanent mandibular central incisor; the other on a permanent maxillary canine. The locations of these talon cusps suggests that the definition of a talon cusp include teeth in addition to the incisor group and be extended to include the facial aspect of teeth.

  18. Comparative efficacy of topical 5% 5-fluorouracil with electrosurgery in treatment of warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra Alka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Warts are common dermatologicals disorder which are dificult to treat. In the present study the efficacy of topical 5% 5-fluorouracil was evaluated in various types of warts and compared with the conventional electrosurgical method which included both electrodessication and electrofulguration. 50 patients clinically diagnosed as warts were enrolled. 25 patients were treated with topical 5% 5-fluorouracil applied for 4 hrs twice daily for 3 weeks, while another 25 were treated with electrosurgery. It was observed that electrosurgery yielded better initial results than 5-fluorouracil (72 and 52% respectively, but at the end of 6 months, the results were favourable for 5-fluorouracil as compared to electrosurgery (44 and 36% respectively. This was due to the signficantly low recurrence rate with 5-fluorouracil in contrast to electrosurgery (8 and 48% respectively. Though electrosurgery yielded quicker initial results but 5-fluorouracil was better as long term measurer because of its significantly lower recurrence rates.

  19. Genital warts and infection with human immunodeficiency virus in high-risk women in Burkina Faso: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van de Perre Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses are the most common sexually transmitted infections, and genital warts, caused by HPV-6 and 11, entail considerable morbidity and cost. The natural history of genital warts in relation to HIV-1 infection has not been described in African women. We examined risk factors for genital warts in a cohort of high-risk women in Burkina Faso, in order to further describe their epidemiology. Methods A prospective study of 765 high-risk women who were followed at 4-monthly intervals for 27 months in Burkina Faso. Logistic and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with prevalent, incident and persistent genital warts, including HIV-1 serostatus, CD4+ count, and concurrent sexually transmitted infections. In a subset of 306 women, cervical HPV DNA was tested at enrolment. Results Genital wart prevalence at baseline was 1.6% (8/492 among HIV-uninfected and 7.0% (19/273 among HIV-1 seropositive women. Forty women (5.2% experienced at least one incident GW episode. Incidence was 1.1 per 100 person-years among HIV-uninfected women, 7.4 per 100 person-years among HIV-1 seropositive women with a nadir CD4+ count >200 cells/μL and 14.6 per 100 person-years among HIV-1 seropositive women with a nadir CD4+ count ≤200 cells/μL. Incident genital warts were also associated with concurrent bacterial vaginosis, and genital ulceration. Antiretroviral therapy was not protective against incident or persistent genital warts. Detection of HPV-6 DNA and abnormal cervical cytology were strongly associated with incident genital warts. Conclusions Genital warts occur much more frequently among HIV-1 infected women in Africa, particularly among those with low CD4+ counts. Antiretroviral therapy did not reduce the incidence or persistence of genital warts in this population.

  20. Pulsed dye laser and intralesional bleomycin for the treatment of recalcitrant cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Joelle S; Harland, Christopher C

    2014-02-01

    Viral warts are a common ailment. Clinicians often combine multiple treatments to boost efficacy. One such novel combination is pulsed dye laser with bleomycin intralesionally (PDL + BI), described for the successful treatment of single hand warts. To evaluate PDL + BI for the treatment of poor prognosis hand and foot warts. This 4-year retrospective case series examined the efficacy of PDL + BI used consecutively on patients whose warts were treated with this modality alone. PDL 595 nm was used in stacking mode to achieve hemorrhagic blistering prior to intralesional bleomycin (1 mg/ml normal saline). Twenty cases (65% male, age 13-62, mean age 42) were identified. Two (10%) were immunocompromised. Twenty five percent of warts affected hands, 55% feet, 20% both. Thirty five percent were solitary >1 cm(2) , 40% were multiple or mosaic verucae. The mean duration was 5.1 years (0.5-15). Seventy five percent received local anesthetic. Mean number of treatments was two. Post-operative pain varied from none to severe, sometimes causing difficulty in walking. Blistering and crusting disappeared after 17 days (range 7-42). Outcome had a mean follow-up of 24 months (3-53) with 60% complete response, 15% partial, 25% no response. Mean satisfaction level was 7 (range 0-10, 10 highest). Outcome was better with local anesthetic (complete response 75%) as it permitted more aggressive treatment. Patients that had both anesthetic and repeat treatment sessions experienced 92% complete response. PDL + BI offers a novel method for treatment of recalcitrant warts, but local anesthetic and repeat treatments are recommended. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. One stone, two birds: managing multiple common warts on hands and face by local hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lanting; Qi, Ruiqun; Hong, Yuxiao; Huo, Wei; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A man developed with multiple warts on his hands and the inner canthus of his left eye. We applied local hyperthermia on a single target lesion on his hand at a surface temperature of 44 °C for 30 minutes on Days 1, 2, 3, 17, and 18. All the lesions treated with or without heat cleared 8 weeks after the last treatment. Treatment of a target lesion resolved all other untreated lesions, a fact suggestive that local hyperthermia could induce activation of specific immunity against human papillomavirus on the lesional skin, which lead to resolution of all the warts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Warts signaling controls organ and body growth through regulation of ecdysone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Erik; Nagy, Stanislav; Gerlach, Stephan Uwe

    2017-01-01

    under different environmental conditions is poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hippo/Warts signaling functions intrinsically to regulate tissue growth and organ size [3, 4], whereas systemic growth is controlled via antagonistic interactions of the steroid hormone ecdysone and nutrient-dependent insulin....../insulin-like growth factor (IGF) (insulin) signaling [2, 5]. The interplay between insulin and ecdysone signaling regulates systemic growth and controls organismal size. Here, we show that Warts (Wts; LATS1/2) signaling regulates systemic growth in Drosophila by activating basal ecdysone production, which negatively...

  3. Successful topical treatment of hand warts in a paediatric patient with tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, B Cherie; Moore, John E

    2008-11-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) (Melaleuca alternifolia) has been used recently as an effective topical application for the treatment of skin infections due to a variety of aetiological microbial agents, including mainly bacterial infections. We detail the first report in the peer-reviewed literature of the successful treatment with TTO of a paediatric patient with warts on her right middle finger. TTO was applied topically once daily to the lesions for 12 days, with a successful outcome, including complete re-epithelization of the infected areas. The case highlights the potential use of TTO in the treatment of common warts due to human papilloma virus.

  4. Mechanism of action of imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of anogenital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyring; Arany; Stanley; Stoler; Tomai; Miller; Owens; Smith

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the mechanism of action of imiquimod cream in the treatment of anogenital warts, and to apply the findings to the results of previously conducted safety and efficacy trials.Methods: Imiquimod (16 patients) or placebo (3 patients) cream was applied 3 times a week for up to 16 weeks; cream remained on the skin overnight for 8 +/- 2 hours. Wart biopsies were taken at prestudy, week 6, and the end of treatment (just prior to clearance or at week 16) and analyzed using PCR for HPV/DNA and RT-PCR for mRNA to identify cytokines, cellular markers, markers of proliferation and differentiation, and viral gene products. Efficacy was assessed based on wart area regression as documented by wart area measurements and photographs.Results: All patients enrolled in the trial had HPV type 6/11. All imiquimod-treated patients experienced a >/=75% clearance in baseline/target wart area. Imiquimod treatment stimulated significant increases in mRNA for IFN-alpha, 2'5' AS and IFN-gamma. Increases in mRNA for CD4, CD8, and TNF-alpha were also observed, suggesting activation of a T-helper type-1 cell mediated response. During the trial one of the vehicle treated patients also experienced spontaneous wart clearance; comparisons of the cytokine levels for this patient were similar to those observed for the imiquimod treated patients.Conclusions: The results of this mechanism of action trial indicate that the stimulation of local cytokines and cellular infiltrates by imiquimod leads to a reduction of HPV types 6 and 11 viral load with subsequent wart regression and normalization of keratinocyte proliferation without evidence of scarring. In two previous randomized vehicle-controlled trials evaluating patients with anogenital warts, the majority of patients had HPV-DNA types 6 or 11 as assessed by in situ hybridization. These results provide additional insight into the mechanism of total

  5. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  6. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2009-01-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  7. Flat-port connectors

    KAUST Repository

    Alrashed, Mohammed

    2017-05-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for connectors used with electronic devices, such as input and/or output ports to connect peripheral equipment or accessories. More specifically, various flat-port are provided that can be used in place of standard connectors including, but not limited to, audio jacks and Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. The flat-port connectors are an alternate connection design to replace the traditional receptacle port (female-port), making the device more sealed creation more dust and water resistant. It is unique in the way of using the outer surfaces of the device for the electrical connection between the ports. Flat-port design can allow the manufacture of extremely thin devices by eliminating the side ports slots that take a lot of space and contribute to the increase thickness of the device. The flat-port receptacle improves the overall appearance of the device and makes it more resistant to dust and water.

  8. Live facial feature extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO JieYu

    2008-01-01

    Precise facial feature extraction is essential to the high-level face recognition and expression analysis. This paper presents a novel method for the real-time geomet-ric facial feature extraction from live video. In this paper, the input image is viewed as a weighted graph. The segmentation of the pixels corresponding to the edges of facial components of the mouth, eyes, brows, and nose is implemented by means of random walks on the weighted graph. The graph has an 8-connected lattice structure and the weight value associated with each edge reflects the likelihood that a random walker will cross that edge. The random walks simulate an anisot-ropic diffusion process that filters out the noise while preserving the facial expres-sion pixels. The seeds for the segmentation are obtained from a color and motion detector. The segmented facial pixels are represented with linked lists in the origi-nal geometric form and grouped into different parts corresponding to facial com-ponents. For the convenience of implementing high-level vision, the geometric description of facial component pixels is further decomposed into shape and reg-istration information. Shape is defined as the geometric information that is invari-ant under the registration transformation, such as translation, rotation, and iso-tropic scale. Statistical shape analysis is carried out to capture global facial fea-tures where the Procrustes shape distance measure is adopted. A Bayesian ap-proach is used to incorporate high-level prior knowledge of face structure. Ex-perimental results show that the proposed method is capable of real-time extraction of precise geometric facial features from live video. The feature extraction is robust against the illumination changes, scale variation, head rotations, and hand inter-ference.

  9. PCA facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hori, Inas H.; El-Momen, Zahraa K.; Ganoun, Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. The comparative study of Facial Expression Recognition (FER) techniques namely Principal Component's analysis (PCA) and PCA with Gabor filters (GF) is done. The objective of this research is to show that PCA with Gabor filters is superior to the first technique in terms of recognition rate. To test and evaluates their performance, experiments are performed using real database by both techniques. The universally accepted five principal emotions to be recognized are: Happy, Sad, Disgust and Angry along with Neutral. The recognition rates are obtained on all the facial expressions.

  10. Genital Warts and Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia: Natural History and Effects of Treatment and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, L. Stewart; Xie, Xianhong; Darragh, Teresa; Minkoff, Howard; Levine, Alexandra M.; Watts, D. Heather; Wright, Rodney L.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the natural history of genital warts and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) in women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods A cohort of 2,791 HIV infected and 953 uninfected women followed for up to 13 years had genital examinations at 6-month intervals, with biopsy for lesions suspicious for VIN. Results The prevalence of warts was 4.4% (5.3% for HIV seropositive women and 1.9% for seronegative women, P warts was 33% (95% C.I. 30, 36%) in HIV seropositive and 9% (95% C.I. 6, 12%) in seronegative women (P warts. Among 501 HIV seropositive and 43 seronegative women, warts regressed in 410 (82%) seropositive and 41 (95%) seronegative women (P = 0.02), most in the first year after diagnosis. In multivariable analysis, regression was negatively associated with HIV status and lower CD4 count as well as older age. Incident VIN of any grade occurred more frequently among HIV seropositive than seronegative women: 0.42 (0.33 – 0.53) vs 0.07 (0.02 – 0.18)/100 person-years (P warts and VIN are more common among HIV seropositive than seronegative women, wart regression is common even in women with HIV, and cancers are infrequent. PMID:21934446

  11. Surgical Treatment of Facial Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Ritvik P.

    2009-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgi...

  12. Successful treatment of plantar warts with very diluted bleomycin using a translesional multipuncture technique: pilot prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Khalid M; Khurram, Huma

    2012-01-01

    Plantar warts are common and often painful. Treatment of plantar warts is difficult and requires multiple treatments. Several clinical trials have proven the efficacy of bleomycin, but relatively high concentrations have been required and considerable side effects have been experienced. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-concentration (0.1 U/mL) bleomycin using a translesional injection technique for the treatment of plantar warts. The study included 23 patients with single or multiple plantar warts. Very low-concentration bleomycin was injected into a single wart or the largest plantar wart in the case of multiple lesions. Injections were performed at 4-week intervals until resolution of the warts or development of side effects. The translesional multipuncture technique was used. Thirteen patients were male (56.5%), and the mean age was 27.7 years. The results revealed complete clearance of warts in 17 of 23 (74%) patients, partial response in 1 (4.3%) patient, and no response in 3 (13%) patients. Recurrence was observed in 2 patients at 3 months of follow-up. Among those two, one patient showed complete clearance after the second injection at 6 months of follow-up. All patients were followed for 6 months after the initial treatment. No significant long-term adverse effects were noted. Only three patients (13%) had localized moderate pain for 2 to 3 days after the injection. Translesional injection by very low-concentration (0.1 U/mL) bleomycin appears to be a simple, effective, and safe treatment modality for plantar warts.

  13. Comparative evaluation of topical 10% potassium hydroxide and 30% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of plane warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhaya Jayaprasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warts are benign proliferations of skin and mucosa caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV. Plane warts are caused by HPV types 3, 10, 28, and 41, occurring mostly in children and young adults. Among the treatment modalities, topical application of trichloroacetic acid (TCA is age old. Potassium hydroxide (KOH has a keratolytic effect on virus-infected cells. It is less irritating, less painful, less scar forming, and can be safely used in children too. Hence, it could be a better topical agent in the treatment of plane warts. Aims and Objectives: To compare the safety and efficacy of topical 10% KOH with 30% TCA in the treatment of plane warts. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with plane warts were randomly assigned into two arms of thirty patients each; arm A received topical 10% KOH and arm B received topical 30% TCA as a once weekly application until the complete clearance of warts or a maximum period of 12 weeks. Results: Statistically no significant difference (P = 0.07 was found between the objective therapeutic response to 10% KOH and 30% TCA at the end of study (12 weeks. However, subjective response to 10% KOH was better and statistically significant (P = 0.03. There was no recurrence of warts seen on follow-up for 3 months of complete responders in both the arms. Conclusion: 10% KOH is found to be equally effective in the treatment of plane warts compared to 30% TCA with the advantage of faster onset of action and tendency of completely clearing warts with fewer side effects.

  14. Measles, mumps and rubella vaccine as an intralesional immunotherapy in treatment of warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti N. Shah

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Intralesional immunotherapy with MMR vaccine was found to be a simple, effective, and safe treatment for warts. This study proved to be cost effective as patients can be treated with just 03 doses of MMR vaccine given at the interval of two weeks. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 472-476

  15. Vagarious successful treatment of recalcitrant warts in combination with CO2 laser and imiquimod 5% cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ying; Zheng, Yi-Qing; Wang, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Imiquimod 5% cream is widely regarded as a safe and effective option when treating recalcitrant warts, owing to the ointment's negligible side effects. However, our observations highlighted case of a patient incurring severe adverse reactions due to application of the cream, although the treatment proved successful in curing recalcitrant warts which had developed on the external auditory canal and external ear. All lesions were entirely removed with short-pulsed CO2 laser. As soon as the wound-healing process was completed, imiquimod 5% cream was self-applied on the healing wounds once daily for 5 days per week in a total of 2 weeks. The patient appeared normal after the CO2 laser treatment and experienced severe redness, itching, exudation, and incrustation after a 2-week imiquimod 5% cream therapy. All lesions showed no recurrence during the 12-month followed-up process. We concluded that a feasible treatment modality to cure recalcitrant cutaneous warts is in combination of CO2 laser and imiquimod. Immunoenhancement plays an important role in the treatment of recalcitrant warts.

  16. [Application of cantharidin, podophyllotoxin, and salicylic acid in recalcitrant plantar warts. A preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Daniel; Agrasar-Cruz, Carlos; Bautista-Casasnovas, Adolfo; Álvarez-Castro, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Plantar warts often are refractory to any treatment and can last for decades in adults. Recalcitrant warts are defined as those that have persisted for more than two years, or after at least two treatment modalities. A total of 15 consecutive patients with recalcitrant plantar warts were included in this preliminary study. The treatment consisted of applying one to two sessions that comprised compounding 1% cantharidin, 5% of podophyllotoxin, and 30% salicylic acid (CPS), with an interval between applications of four weeks. With treatment and subsequent follow-up for six months, there was complete eradication of lesions in 15 patients, eight (53.3%) required a single application of the solution, and seven (46.7%) two applications, with no side effects. Patient satisfaction related to treatment was measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) of 10 cm in length, with an average score 9.73 ± 0.46, and all said they would proceed with the treatment again if necessary. Topical treatment by compounding is safe, effective, and a promising therapeutic modality when applied in recalcitrant plantar warts.

  17. Intralesional Candida Antigen Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Recalcitrant and Multiple Warts in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Garza, Fania Z; Roé Crespo, Esther; Torres Pradilla, Mauricio; Aguilera Peirò, Paula; Baltà Cruz, Susana; Hernández Ruiz, María Eugenia; Baselga Torres, Eulàlia

    2015-01-01

    Intralesional injection of Candida antigen appears to be an effective alternative for the treatment of warts. To determine the efficacy and safety of this treatment. We retrospectively reviewed records of all children who received intralesional injection of Candida antigen at our center from January 2008 to July 2013. From a total of 220 patients, 156 (70.9%) had a complete response, 37 (16.8%) had a partial response, and 27 (12.2%) had no improvement. An average of 2.73 treatments was needed. Forty-seven of the patients with more than one wart (21.3%) also noted at least partial resolution of untreated warts at distant sites. Twenty-seven of the 47 patients (57.4%) had complete resolution. All treated patients experienced some discomfort at the time of the injection, but no serious side effects were reported. We report our results using this approach in a large group of children. Intralesional injection of Candida antigen is an effective and safe therapy for children with multiple and recalcitrant cutaneous warts. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dose-Related Differences in Effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Against Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Maria; Dehlendorff, Christian; Sand, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing the number of doses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen from 3 to 2 could increase coverage rates. In this cohort study, we assessed the risk of genital warts (GWs) according to timing and number of doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine. METHODS: From population...

  19. Verrugas en los pezones de vacas lecheras - Warts on the teats of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babaahmady, Ebrahim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLas verrugas del ganado bovino o papilomatosis es una enfermedadviral, infectocontagiosa, que se puede transmitir entre los bovinos yotros animales, afectando diversas regiones del cuerpo.SummaryBovine wart papillomatosis is a viral disease, infectious, which can be transmitted between cattle and other animals, affecting various body’s regions.

  20. Estimation of the impact of genital warts on health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhall, S; Ramsey, T; Cai, C; Crouch, S; Jit, M; Birks, Y; Edmunds, W J; Newton, R; Lacey, C J N

    2008-06-01

    One of the two new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines protects against HPV types 6 and 11, which cause over 95% of genital warts, in addition to protecting against HPV types 16 and 18. In anticipation of HPV vaccine implementation, the impact of genital warts on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured to assess the potential benefits of the quadrivalent over the bivalent vaccine. Genitourinary medicine clinic patients aged 18 years and older with a current diagnosis of genital warts were eligible; 81 consented and were interviewed by a member of the research team. A generic HRQoL questionnaire, the EQ-5D (comprising EQ-5D index and EQ visual analogue scale (VAS) scores) and a disease-specific HRQoL instrument, the CECA10, were administered. Previously established UK population norms were used as a control group for EQ-5D comparisons. Cases (with genital warts) had lower EQ VAS and EQ-5D index scores than controls. After adjusting for age a mean difference between cases and controls 30 years of age and under (n = 70) of 13.9 points (95% CI 9.9 to 17.6, pHPV vaccination should be considered in decisions about which HPV vaccine to implement in the United Kingdom.

  1. Intravenous cidofovir for resistant cutaneous warts in a patient with psoriasis treated with monoclonal antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McAleer, M A

    2012-02-01

    Human papilloma virus is a common and often distressing cutaneous disease. It can be therapeutically challenging, especially in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of recalcitrant cutaneous warts that resolved with intravenous cidofovir treatment. The patient was immunocompromised secondary to monoclonal antibody therapy for psoriasis.

  2. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete

    2016-01-01

    , clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology......Persistent facial pains, especially temporomandibular disorders (TMD), are common conditions. As dentists are responsible for the treatment of most of these disorders, up-to date knowledge on the latest advances in the field is essential for successful diagnosis and management. The review covers...... TMD, and different neuropathic or putative neuropathic facial pains such as persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia, trigeminal neuralgia and painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy. The article presents an overview of TMD pain as a biopsychosocial condition, its prevalence...

  3. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete

    2016-01-01

    TMD, and different neuropathic or putative neuropathic facial pains such as persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia, trigeminal neuralgia and painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy. The article presents an overview of TMD pain as a biopsychosocial condition, its prevalence......Persistent facial pains, especially temporomandibular disorders (TMD), are common conditions. As dentists are responsible for the treatment of most of these disorders, up-to date knowledge on the latest advances in the field is essential for successful diagnosis and management. The review covers......, clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  4. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete;

    2016-01-01

    , clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  5. Systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of genital warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Anogenital warts (AGWs) are a common, highly infectious disease caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), whose high recurrence rates contribute to direct medical costs, productivity loss and increased psychosocial impact. Because of the lack of a systematic review of the epidemiology of AGWs in the literature, this study reviewed the published medical literature on the incidence and prevalence of AGWs. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed on the worldwide incidence and prevalence of AGWs between 2001 and 2012 using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. An additional screening of abstracts from relevant sexual health and infectious disease conferences from 2009 to 2011 was also conducted. Only original studies with general adult populations (i.e., at least including ages 20 through 40 years) were included. Results The overall (females and males combined) reported annual incidence of any AGWs (including new and recurrent) ranged from 160 to 289 per 100,000, with a median of 194.5 per 100,000. New AGW incidence rates among males ranged from 103 to 168 per 100,000, with a median of 137 per 100,000 and among females from 76 to 191 per 100,000, with a median of 120.5 per 100,000 per annum. The reported incidence of recurrent AGWs was as high as 110 per 100,000 among females and 163 per 100,000 among males. Incidence peaked before 24 years of age in females and between 25 and 29 years of age among males. The overall prevalence of AGWs based on retrospective administrative databases or medical chart reviews or prospectively collected physician reports ranged from 0.13% to 0.56%, whereas it ranged from 0.2% to 5.1% based on genital examinations. Conclusions The literature suggests that AGWs are widespread and the prevalence depends on study methodology as suggested by higher rates reported from routine genital examinations versus those from treatment records. However, there remains a need for more population-based studies from certain regions

  6. Management of facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter B; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2008-01-01

    people. Side effects are frequent, but most patients are satisfied with the operation. In the short term, the key to success in sympathetic surgery for facial blushing lies in a meticulous and critical patient selection and in ensuring that the patient is thoroughly informed about the high risk of side...... effects. In the long term, the key to success in sympathetic surgery for facial blushing lies in more quality research comparing surgical, pharmacologic, and psychotherapeutic treatments....

  7. Simultaneous facial feature tracking and facial expression recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Shangfei; Zhao, Yongping; Ji, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    The tracking and recognition of facial activities from images or videos have attracted great attention in computer vision field. Facial activities are characterized by three levels. First, in the bottom level, facial feature points around each facial component, i.e., eyebrow, mouth, etc., capture the detailed face shape information. Second, in the middle level, facial action units, defined in the facial action coding system, represent the contraction of a specific set of facial muscles, i.e., lid tightener, eyebrow raiser, etc. Finally, in the top level, six prototypical facial expressions represent the global facial muscle movement and are commonly used to describe the human emotion states. In contrast to the mainstream approaches, which usually only focus on one or two levels of facial activities, and track (or recognize) them separately, this paper introduces a unified probabilistic framework based on the dynamic Bayesian network to simultaneously and coherently represent the facial evolvement in different levels, their interactions and their observations. Advanced machine learning methods are introduced to learn the model based on both training data and subjective prior knowledge. Given the model and the measurements of facial motions, all three levels of facial activities are simultaneously recognized through a probabilistic inference. Extensive experiments are performed to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model on all three level facial activities.

  8. Classifying Facial Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  9. The combination treatment using CO₂ laser and photodynamic therapy for HIV seropositive men with intraanal warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Xiang, Li; Chen, Jiayuan; He, Qin; Li, Qing; Li, Jing; Wang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    We evaluate the effectiveness of combination treatment using photodynamic therapy after carbon dioxide laser in preventing the recurrence of condylomata acuminata for intraanal warts in HIV positive homosexual men. A retrospective survey of 41 patients referred to the STD clinic of the Fourth People's Hospital of Shenzhen for the treatment of intraanal warts among HIV positive homosexual men between Janurary 2009 and September 2011. The patients who accepted CO₂ laser monotherapy for the same diagnosis were used as the comparison group. After the confirmation of the diagnosis of HIV infection and intraanal warts, the patients were treated with the combination treatment using PDT with 5-ALA thermal gel immediately after CO₂ laser ablation of the warts. PDT was performed with irradiation of 100 J/cm² at an irradiance of 100-150 mW/cm² with a semiconductor laser, wavelength 635 nm. PDT therapy was repeated twice with 2 weekly intervals. Follow up examinations including an anoscopy every 4 weeks after the latest PDT. After 3 cycles of PDT treatments, 39 cases of anoscopy examination showed no new or recurrent lesions. At the end of the sixth months, recurrence occurred in 12(29%) cases. HPV 11 was present in 6 (50%) of these recurrences. HPV 6/11 or 16/18 remains positive in 19 cases (46.3%) and HPV negative in 22 cases. The combination treatment with CO₂ laser and PDT is much more effective in reducing the treatment cycles and the time intervals of the whole treatment for intraanal warts in HIV infected people. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Egberts, Paulette F; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; de Waal, Margot W M; Assendelft, Willem J J; Eekhof, Just A H

    2015-05-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in 53 Dutch general practices. We randomly allocated eligible patients to 13-week treatment protocols of office-applied MCA versus liquid nitrogen cryotherapy every 2 weeks for patients with common warts (n=188), and MCA versus cryotherapy combined with daily SA self-application for patients with plantar warts (n=227). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients whose warts were all cured at 13 weeks. In the common wart group, cure rates were 40/92 (43%, 95% confidence interval 34-54) for MCA and 50/93 (54%, 44-64) for cryotherapy (risk difference (RD) -10%, -25-4.0, P=0.16). In the plantar wart group, cure rates were 49/106 (46%, 37-56) for MCA and 45/115 (39%, 31-48) for cryotherapy combined with SA (RD 7.1, 5.9-20, P=0.29). For common warts, MCA is an effective alternative to cryotherapy to avoid pain during the treatment, although pain after the treatment is similar. For plantar warts, office-applied MCA may be preferred over cryotherapy combined with SA, on the basis of comparable effectiveness, less treatment pain, and less treatment burden.

  11. Individual energy savings for individual flats in blocks of flats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anker; Rose, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that similar flats in a block do not have the same energy demand. Part of the explanation for this is the location of the flat in the building, e.g. on the top floor, at the house end or in the middle of the building. It is possible to take this into account when the heating bill...... is distributed on the individual flats. Today, most blocks of flats have individual heat meters to save energy and to ensure a fair distribution of the cost. If all flats have the same indoor temperature, the distribution is correct. In practice, the inhabitants of the different flats maintain different indoor...

  12. Idiopathic CD4 T-Cell Lymphocytopenia: A Case Report of a Young Boy With Recalcitrant Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Loretta; Weinstein, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic CD4 T-cell lymphocytopenia (ICL) is an immunodeficiency disorder that presents with a decrease in CD4(+) T cells without evidence of a human immunodeficiency virus infection. It is most commonly diagnosed after a patient presents with an opportunistic infection and can also be associated with malignancies and autoimmune diseases. This case presentation and literature review highlights the common skin findings in patients with ICL, mainly recalcitrant warts, and discusses the treatment options available. The patient described is the youngest reported with ICL presenting with isolated cutaneous findings of recalcitrant warts and psoriasis. Many treatment options were tried for the warts, with the most significant response to acitretin. This case highlights the importance of considering underlying immunodeficiency in patients with recalcitrant warts as well as developing treatment plans. Such patients require close follow-up by both dermatology and immunology to monitor for the development of other diseases related to ICL. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Adolescents with HIV and facial lipoatrophy: response to facial stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus Claudio Gabana-Silveira; Laura Davison Mangilli; Sassi, Fernanda C.; Arnaldo Feitosa Braga; Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of facial stimulation over the superficial muscles of the face in individuals with facial lipoatrophy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and with no indication for treatment with polymethyl methacrylate. METHOD: The study sample comprised four adolescents of both genders ranging from 13 to 17 years in age. To participate in the study, the participants had to score six or less points on the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. The facial stim...

  14. Assessing Pain by Facial Expression: Facial Expression as Nexus

    OpenAIRE

    Prkachin, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    The experience of pain is often represented by changes in facial expression. Evidence of pain that is available from facial expression has been the subject of considerable scientific investigation. The present paper reviews the history of pain assessment via facial expression in the context of a model of pain expression as a nexus connecting internal experience with social influence. Evidence about the structure of facial expressions of pain across the lifespan is reviewed. Applications of fa...

  15. Ongoing decline in genital warts among young heterosexuals 7 years after the Australian human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric P F; Read, Tim R H; Wigan, Rebecca; Donovan, Basil; Chen, Marcus Y; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K

    2015-05-01

    Australia has provided free quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines to school girls since mid-2007 and a catch-up programme in the community to women aged up to 26 years in 2007-2009. We describe the temporal trend of genital warts in different populations in Melbourne. We analysed the proportion diagnosed with genital warts for all new patients attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre from July 2004 to June 2014, stratified by different risk groups and age. Adjusted ORs were calculated to compare the annual trend in the proportion of patients with genital warts in different risk groups in the prevaccination period (before June 2007) and the vaccination period (after July 2007). The proportion with genital warts decreased in women aged 32 years, from 4.0% to 8.5% (p=0.037). The odds per year for diagnosis of genital warts adjusted for number of sexual partners in the vaccination period were 0.55 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.65) and 0.63 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.74) in women and heterosexual men aged warts in both women and men aged >32 years. A small annual decline in genital warts was observed in men who have sex with men (aOR=0.92; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.97). Genital warts have now become rare in young Australian women and heterosexual men 7 years after the launch of the national HPV vaccination programme but in stark contrast, remain common in men who have sex with men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Long-pulsed 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser treatment for refractory warts on hands and feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Utako; Takeuchi, Kaori; Kinoshita, Ayako; Takamori, Kenji; Suga, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    Common warts (verruca vulgaris) are the most commonly seen benign cutaneous tumors. However, warts in the hands and feet regions often respond poorly to treatment, some are resistant to more than 6 months of treatment with currently available modalities, including cryotherapy, being defined as refractory warts. We investigated the usefulness of long-pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (LP-Nd:YAG) treatment for refractory warts. The clinical trial was conducted on 20 subjects (11 male, nine female) with a total of 34 lesions (periungual/subungual areas, plantar areas, fingers and/or toes). All the subjects suffered from refractory warts despite conventional treatments for more than 6 months. The patients were administrated up to six sessions of treatment, at intervals of 4 weeks between sessions, with an LP-Nd:YAG at a spot size of 5 mm, pulse duration of 15 msec and fluence of 150-185 J/cm(2) . Evaluation of the treatment results at 24 weeks after the initial treatment showed complete clearance of the refractory warts in 56% of the patients. Histological evaluation showed separation of the dermis and epidermis at the basement membrane with coagulated necrosis of the wart tissue in the lower epidermis, as well as coagulation and destruction of the blood vessels in the papillary dermis following the laser irradiation. No scarring, post-hyperpigmentary changes or serious adverse events were documented. Our preliminary results show that LP-Nd:YAG treatments are safe and effective for refractory warts of hands and feet, causing minimal discomfort, and is a viable treatment alternative. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  17. Glycolic Acid 15% Plus Salicylic Acid 2%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Blanco, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial flat warts are a contagious viral disease that can cause disturbing cosmetic problems. Topical glycolic acid has been reported to be effective in dermatological treatment depending on the exfoliant capacity, but has not often been reported to be effective in the treatment of facial flat warts. Objective: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glycolic acid 15% topical gel plus salicylic acid 2% in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts. Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients 7 to 16 years of age with recalcitrant facial flat warts were enrolled in this study. Patients having warts by the eye and lip regions were excluded from the study. A fine layer of face gel was applied to the treatment area once daily. Most of the participants had tried different treatments with no success. Assessments for the response and the occurrence of side effects were performed every two weeks at Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. Results: All the patients were clinically cured within eight weeks. Seven patients cleared in four weeks, and 13 patients cleared in eight weeks. No noticeable adverse events were related to the skin. Conclusion: Topical gel of glycolic acid 15% plus salicylic acid 2% is safe and effective when applied to facial flat warts once daily until clearance and may be considered as first-line treatment. PMID:21938272

  18. Intralesional tuberculin (PPD) versus measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in treatment of multiple warts: a comparative clinical and immunological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Maha Adel; Salem, Samar Abdallah M; Fouad, Dina Adel; El-Fatah, Abeer Aly Abd

    2015-01-01

    Intralesional purified protein derivative (PPD) or mumps, measles, rubella (MMR) were not previously compared regarding their efficacy or mechanism of action in treatment of warts. We aimed to compare their efficacy in treatment of multiple warts and investigate their effect on serum interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-12. Thirty patients with multiple warts were included (10 treated with PPD, 10 with MMR, and 10 with normal saline (control)). Injection was done every 3 weeks until clearance or maximum of three treatments. Clinical response of target and distant warts was evaluated. Serum ILs-4 and -12 were assessed before and after treatment. A significantly higher rate of complete response was found in target and distant warts with PPD (60% each) and MMR (80%, 40%, respectively) compared with controls (0%), with no significant difference between both treatments. After treatment, the control group showed the lowest serum IL-12 and IL-4 levels compared with the MMR- and PPD-treated groups with statistically significant difference in between. MMR resulted in a significantly higher serum IL-12 than PPD. With PPD, IL-4 was increased with statistically significant change compared with pretreat-ment level. Intralesional PPD and MMR show comparable efficacy and safety in treatment of multiple warts. Serum ILs-4 and-12 increase following antigen injection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Long-Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Warts: Report on a Series of 369 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae Young; Lee, Ji Ho; Lee, Chang Kyun; Ahn, Ji Young; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2009-01-01

    Various treatment methods have been adopted in the management of warts; however, there is still no consensus on first-line treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of warts. Over the course of 1 yr, 369 patients with recalcitrant or untreated warts were exposed to a long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The following parameters were used: spot size, 5 mm; pulse duration, 20 msec; and fluence, 200 J/cm2. No concomitant topical treatment was used. In all, 21 patients were lost during follow up; hence, the data for 348 patients were evaluated. The clearance rate was 96% (336 of the 348 treated warts were eradicated). The clearance rate of verruca vulgaris after the first treatment was very high (72.6%), whereas the clearance rate of deep palmopantar warts after the first treatment was low (44.1%). During a median follow-up period of 2.24 months (range, 2-10 months), 11 relapses were seen (recurrence rate, 3.27%). In conclusion, long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser is safe and effective for the removal or reduction of warts and is less dependent on patient compliance than are other treatment options. PMID:19794989

  20. Safety and effectiveness of autoinoculation therapy in cutaneous warts: a double--blind, randomized, placebo--controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Niharika Ranjan; Sil, Amrita; Gayen, Tirthankar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the availability of multiple treatment options, viral warts are known for their persistence and recurrence, causing frustration to patients and treating physicians. To study the effectiveness and safety of autoinoculation as a treatment modality in cutaneous warts. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out. In the treatment group, full-thickness warty tissue was excised, minced and implanted in a small dermal pocket. In the control group, warty tissue was only excised and not implanted, though a dermal pocket was made. Patients were evaluated every four weeks with lesion counts. The procedure was repeated at 4 and 8 weeks. Response was assessed at each visit and at 12 weeks. Forty-eight patients with cutaneous warts (male: female=32:16) were randomized into autoinoculation and control groups. The number of warts at baseline was comparable in both groups (P=0.293). Reduction in the number of warts was significantly more in the autoinoculation group (8.50±13.88) than in the control group (10.04±5.80) from 8 weeks onwards (P=0.010). Complete resolution occurred only in the autoinoculation group, in 62.5% of cases. Adverse effects were seen in 11 patients, including infection of the donor site (5 cases), keloid formation (3) and hypopigmentation (3). Autoinoculation may be an effective therapeutic modality for cutaneous warts and two sessions may be required for optimum results.

  1. Use of intralesional interferon-alpha for the treatment of recalcitrant oral warts in patients with AIDS: a report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Nur, F; Glick, M; Schubert, M; Silverberg, I

    2001-12-01

    Four human immunodeficiency virus-positive homosexual men with 2- to 4.5-year histories of recurrent oral warts that had failed to respond to conventional surgical and other treatment modalities were offered treatment with interferon-alpha. All had multiple or large oral warts, 3 had skin warts, 2 had a history of anal warts, and 1 had penile lesions. All 4 patients were treated with a combination of intralesional and subcutaneous interferon-alpha. Adverse side effects were dose-related, mild, and transient; they included flulike symptoms (3 patients), hair loss and tachycardia (1 patient), and transient changes in the white blood cell count. All patients responded to therapy and remained free of disease up to 42 months. Intralesional injection with interferon-alpha appears to provide excellent clinical control for recurrent, multiple, and extensive oral warts in the human immunodeficiency virus-positive population, and is a useful adjunct to initial surgical removal of oral warts.

  2. Neuromuscular retraining for facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diels, H J; Combs, D

    1997-10-01

    Neuromuscular retraining is an effective method for rehabilitating facial musculature in patients with facial paralysis. This nonsurgical therapy has demonstrated improved functional outcomes and is an important adjunct to surgical treatment for restoring facial movement. Treatment begins with an intensive clinical evaluation and incorporates appropriate sensory feedback techniques into a patient-specific, comprehensive, home therapy program. This article discusses appropriate patients, timelines for referral, and basic treatment practices of facial neuromuscular retraining for restoring function and expression to the highest level possible.

  3. Computer facial animation

    CERN Document Server

    Parke, Frederic I

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive work provides the fundamentals of computer facial animation and brings into sharper focus techniques that are becoming mainstream in the industry. Over the past decade, since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant developments by academic research groups and in the film and games industries leading to the development of morphable face models, performance driven animation, as well as increasingly detailed lip-synchronization and hair modeling techniques. These topics are described in the context of existing facial animation principles. The second ed

  4. Facial Data Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuliang; YUAN Hanning; CAO Baohua; WANG Dakui

    2015-01-01

    Expressional face recognition is a challenge in computer vision for complex expressions. Facial data field is proposed to recognize expression. Fundamentals are presented in the methodology of face recognition upon data field and subsequently, technical algorithms including normalizing faces, generating facial data field, extracting feature points in partitions, assigning weights and recog-nizing faces. A case is studied with JAFFE database for its verification. Result indicates that the proposed method is suitable and eff ective in expressional face recognition con-sidering the whole average recognition rate is up to 94.3%. In conclusion, data field is considered as a valuable alter-native to pattern recognition.

  5. Flat covers of modules

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinzhong

    1996-01-01

    Since the injective envelope and projective cover were defined by Eckmann and Bas in the 1960s, they have had great influence on the development of homological algebra, ring theory and module theory. In the 1980s, Enochs introduced the flat cover and conjectured that every module has such a cover over any ring. This book provides the uniform methods and systematic treatment to study general envelopes and covers with the emphasis on the existence of flat cover. It shows that Enochs' conjecture is true for a large variety of interesting rings, and then presents the applications of the results. Readers with reasonable knowledge in rings and modules will not have difficulty in reading this book. It is suitable as a reference book and textbook for researchers and graduate students who have an interest in this field.

  6. Facial palsy after blunt trauma and without facial bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltro, Pedro Soler; Goldenberg, Dov Charles; Aldunate, Johnny Leandro Conduta Borda; Alessi, Mariana Sisto; Chang, Alexandre Jin Bok Audi; Alonso, Nivaldo; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2010-07-01

    A 14-year-old patient had a low-energy facial blunt trauma that evolved to right facial paralysis caused by parotid hematoma with parotid salivary gland lesion. Computed tomography and angiography demonstrated intraparotid collection without pseudoaneurysm and without radiologic signs of fracture in the face. The patient was treated with serial punctures for hematoma deflation, resolving with regression and complete remission of facial paralysis, with no late sequela. The authors discuss the relationship between facial nerve traumatic injuries associated or not with the presence of facial fractures, emphasizing the importance of early recognition and appropriate treatment of such cases.

  7. Flat Earth图片

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    欢迎来到这期的光盘介绍。本月的附刊光盘中,除了每月的精彩教程外,您可在光盘中找到15张由Flat Earth友情提供的库存图片。当然还有Twixtor和最新的Acrobat Reader 7。

  8. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  9. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; Pmean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  10. Diplegia facial traumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.

  11. Management of facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter B; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2008-01-01

    an indication for treatment, facial blushing may be treated effectively by thoracoscopic sympathectomy. The type of blushing likely to benefit from sympathectomy is mediated by the sympathetic nerves and is the uncontrollable, rapidly developing blush typically elicited when one receives attention from other...

  12. Facial Paralysis Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razfar, Ali; Lee, Matthew K; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Facial nerve paralysis is a devastating condition arising from several causes with severe functional and psychological consequences. Given the complexity of the disease process, management involves a multispecialty, team-oriented approach. This article provides a systematic approach in addressing each specific sequela of this complex problem.

  13. Paralisia facial bilateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.

  14. GENITAL WARTS INCIDENCE IN SAINT-PETERBURG, LENINGRADSKAYA REGION, KARELIYA REPUBLIC IN 2004–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Stebelko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In 2012, information on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection was included in the form of state statistics number 5 «Information on vaccinations» in according to the Order of Rosstat number 645. In the world practice, as one of the early performance criteria of effectiveness of immunization against human papilloma virus is  morbidity rate by anogenital warts. The aim of this study was to investigate the regional characteristics of distribution of anogenital (venereal warts before and in the initial periods of vaccination against human papillomavirus infection in three regions of the North-West Federal Regions — Saint Petersburg, Leningrad Oblast, Republic of Karelia. The period of retrospective epidemiological analysis was 10 years. There were significant differences in the levels and trends, morbidity by anogenital warts in general population and by gender. Moreover, different patterns of the frequency of disease among household contacts were revealed. In all three areas persons of 18–29 years old were identified as the risk group. The importance of determining the characteristics of epidemic processes for specified nosology in each territory has been demonstrated.

  15. Molecular Epidemiological Study on Prevalence of Human Papillomaviruses in Patients with Common Warts in Beijing Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN-JUN LEI; RUN AN; CHEN-FANG DONG; YU-KANG YUAN; XIAO-PING DONG; CHEN GAO; CHEN WANG; JUN HAN; JIAN-MING CHEN; GUANG-CAI XIANG; QI SHI; HuI-YING JIANG; WEI ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the circulation, distribution, and genomic diversity of HPVs in common warts in Beijing area of China. Methods Forty eight patients with pathologically diagnosed common warts were screened for the presence of HPV with HPV type-specific PCR and direct .sequencing analysis. The genomic diversity of HPVs prevalent in Chinese patients was analyzed based on LCR. Results Forty one (85.5%) samples were positive for HPV DNA, 13(31.7%)-HPV-57, 12(29.3%)-HPV-1 a, 7(17%)-HPV-27 and 5(12.2%)-HPV-2a. Four cases were infected with two different HPV types, two (4.9%) with HPV-1a and HPV-27, one (2.4%) with HPV-1 and HPV-57 and one (2.4%) with HPV-27 and HPV-57. In contrast to the prevalence of single strain of novel HPV-57 variant and HPV-1 prototype, two HPV-2 and three HPV-27 novel variants were found to circulate in Beijing. Conclusion HPV-1, -2, -27 and -57 are predominantly prevalent in patients with common warts in Beijing.

  16. Effectiveness and safety profile of 40% trichloroacetic acid and cryotherapy for plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Su, Ozlem; Onsun, Nahide

    2016-09-01

    Plantar warts are one of the most common infectious skin disease caused by the human papillomavirus. In this study, cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by the physician, up to four treatments 2 weeks apart. Forty percent trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was applied to warts weekly up to four treatments. At the end of 4 weeks, the clinical improvement of the TCA group (n = 30) was six patients (20%) with no change, one patient (3.3%) with a mild response, 13 patients (43.3%) with a moderate response and 10 patients (33.3%) with a good response. In the cryotherapy group, clinical responses were 12 patients (40%) with no change, four patients (13.3%) with a mild response, 12 patients (40%) with a moderate response and two patients (6.7%) with a good response. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement between the two treatment groups (P = 0.027). According to our results, TCA 40% is more effective for clearance of plantar warts with significantly improved long-term safety profile.

  17. DEVELOPING CONTROL STRATEGIES OF POTATO WART DISEASE (SYNCHYTRIUM ENDOBIOTICUM IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Gunacti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate purpose of this study was to control Potato Wart Disease. Thus, during 2010 – 2011, in order to control the Potato Wart Disease caused by Synchytrium endobioticum the efficacy of seed fungicides and soil fumigants, the influence of 15 different plants used as alternative cropping to potato and the extracts derived from carrot, onion, garlic and radish were examined on the sporangium viability. The results revealed that the roots of turnip tuber were the most effective treatment among four different plant extracts used. Sunflower and Rye were found to be promising alternative crops to potato for the region with 74% and 73% of sporangium mortality, respectively. The most effective fumigant application on the viability of Synchytrium endobioticum sporangia in the soil was Formaldehyde with a 93.8 – 97.5 % efficacy rate. The fungicide efficacy on the diseases occurrence changed from 25.2 % to 62.5 % comparing to control plots. Although significant differences were obtained numerically between efficacy ratios, no statistically significant differences were found in all applications. The most effective application on Potato Wart Disease occurrence was the dosages of 60 and 80 g /m2 of Metham Sodium among the four different concentrations of Formaldehyde, Metham Sodium, Dazomet and Urea as plant fertilizer.

  18. Detection of human papillomavirus in oral warts using in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Orsini Machado de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human papillomavirus is a group of DNA epitheliotrophic viruses associated with the etiology of benign and malignant oral warts. More than 100 types have been identified and among them, 24 have been found into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze human papillomavirus prevalence and its subtypes in 50 oral warts, of which 20 were squamous papillomas, 17 condylomaacuminatum and 13 verruca vulgaris. Method: In situ hybridization was used with biotinylated DNA probes for wide-spectrum HPV and with specific probes for human papillomavirus 6/11, human papillomavirus 16/18 and human papillomavirus 31/33. Results: Human papillomavirus was present in ten (20% of the 50 oral wart cases, 03 (3/20 squamous papillomas, 05 (5/17 condyloma acuminatum and 02 (2/13 verruca vulgaris. Of these, 8 (16% were positive to the HPV probe 6/11 being 5 condyloma acuminatum, 1 squamous papilloma and 2 verruca vulgaris. Three cases (6% demonstrated positivity to the human papillomavirus probe 16/18, with 2 being cases of condyloma and the other a case of squamous papilloma. Of the six positive cases to the human papillomavirus probe 31/33, (12% 4 were condyloma acuminatum and 2 squamous papillomas. Conclusion: The human papillomavirus expression (20% found in this study was low, but within the average found in the literature. Nonetheless, in addition to in situ hybridization, other methods may be necessary for confirming the presence of human papillomavirus.

  19. Novel Facial Features Segmentation Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for facial features extractions is proposed. The facial features we segment are the two eyes, nose and mouth. The algorithm is based on an improved Gabor wavelets edge detector, morphological approach to detect the face region and facial features regions, and an improved T-shape face mask to locate the extract location of facial features. The experimental results show that the proposed method is robust against facial expression, illumination, and can be also effective if the person wearing glasses, and so on.

  20. Flat conductor cable commercialization project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, P.; Wadsworth, E.

    1977-01-01

    An undercarpet flat conductor cable and a baseboard flat conductor cable system were studied for commercialization. The undercarpet system is designed for use in office and commercial buildings. It employs a flat power cable, protected by a grounded metal shield, that terminates in receptacles mounted on the floor. It is designed to interface with a flat conductor cable telephone system. The baseboard system consists of a flat power cable mounted in a plastic raceway; both the raceway and the receptacles are mounted on the surface of the baseboard. It is designed primarily for use in residential buildings, particularly for renovation and concrete and masonry construction.

  1. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care: randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J.J.; de Waal, Margot W.M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were recruited in 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands between May 1, 2006, and Jan. 26, 2007. We randomly allocated eligible patients to one of three groups: cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen every two weeks, self-application of salicylic acid daily or a wait-and-see approach. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants whose warts were all cured at 13 weeks. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Secondary outcomes included treatment adherence, side effects and treatment satisfaction. Research nurses assessed outcomes during home visits at 4, 13 and 26 weeks. Results Of the 250 participants (age 4 to 79 years), 240 were included in the analysis at 13 weeks (loss to follow-up 4%). Cure rates were 39% (95% confidence interval [CI] 29%–51%) in the cryotherapy group, 24% (95% CI 16%–35%) in the salicylic acid group and 16% (95% CI 9.5%–25%) in the wait-and-see group. Differences in effectiveness were most pronounced among participants with common warts (n = 116): cure rates were 49% (95% CI 34%–64%) in the cryotherapy group, 15% (95% CI 7%–30%) in the salicylic acid group and 8% (95% CI 3%–21%) in the wait-and-see group. Cure rates among the participants with plantar warts (n = 124) did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Interpretation For common warts, cryotherapy was the most effective therapy in primary care. For plantar warts, we found no clinically relevant difference in effectiveness between cryotherapy, topical application of salicylic acid or a wait-and-see approach after 13 weeks. (ClinicalTrial.gov registration no. ISRCTN42730629) PMID:20837684

  2. Interaction between facial expression and color

    OpenAIRE

    Kae Nakajima; Tetsuto Minami; Shigeki Nakauchi

    2017-01-01

    Facial color varies depending on emotional state, and emotions are often described in relation to facial color. In this study, we investigated whether the recognition of facial expressions was affected by facial color and vice versa. In the facial expression task, expression morph continua were employed: fear-anger and sadness-happiness. The morphed faces were presented in three different facial colors (bluish, neutral, and reddish color). Participants identified a facial expression between t...

  3. Evaluation of topical potassium hydroxide solution for treatment of plane warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil I Al-Hamdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plane wart is a common dermatological disease that is caused by human papilloma virus; although the rate of spontaneous recovery is high, it usually takes a long time to occur. Many modalities of treatments have been used but none of them proved to be uniformly effective. Potassium hydroxide (KOH solution is a well-known keratolytic agent with many dermatological uses. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of topical KOH solution in the treatment of plane warts. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 patients with plane warts, consulting the department of Dermatology and Venereology of Basra Teaching Hospital between March 2008 and October 2009, were enrolled in this opened therapeutic trial study. Patients were divided into two age and sex cross-matched equal groups; patients in group (A were treated with topical 5% KOH solution once at night, while patients in group (B were treated with topical 10% KOH solution once nightly. Only 107 patients from group (A and 95 patients from group (B completed the study, while the remainders were defaulted for unknown reasons. The patients were evaluated at second and fourth week to assess the cure rates and side effects, those patients who showed complete cure were followed up for 3 months to detect any recurrence. Results: At the end of second week, 9.3% of group (A patients showed complete disappearance of their warts, vs 66.3% of group (B patients. At the end of fourth week, 80.3% of group (A patients showed complete response in comparison with 82.1% of group (B patients. The side effects for the treating solution in both concentrations include itching, burning sensation, erythema, and temporary dyspigmentations, that were reported in 77.6% of group (A patients in comparison with 90.5% of group (B patients. Recurrence rate was reported in 5.8% of group (A patients vs 5.1% of group (B patients during the three months period of follow-up. Conclusions: Topical KOH solution is

  4. Cost analysis of Human Papillomavirus-related cervical diseases and genital warts in Swaziland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Benn; Dlamini, Xolisile; Östensson, Ellinor

    2017-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has proven to be the cause of several severe clinical conditions on the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, oropharynx and penis. Several studies have assessed the costs of cervical lesions, cervical cancer (CC), and genital warts. However, few have been done in Africa and none in Swaziland. Cost analysis is critical in providing useful information for economic evaluations to guide policymakers concerned with the allocation of resources in order to reduce the disease burden. Materials and methods A prevalence-based cost of illness (COI) methodology was used to investigate the economic burden of HPV-related diseases. We used a top-down approach for the cost associated with hospital care and a bottom-up approach to estimate the cost associated with outpatient and primary care. The current study was conducted from a provider perspective since the state bears the majority of the costs of screening and treatment in Swaziland. All identifiable direct medical costs were considered for cervical lesions, cervical cancer and genital warts, which were primary diagnoses during 2015. A mix of bottom up micro-costing ingredients approach and top-down approaches was used to collect data on costs. All costs were computed at the price level of 2015 and converted to dollars ($). Results The total annual estimated direct medical cost associated with screening, managing and treating cervical lesions, CC and genital warts in Swaziland was $16 million. The largest cost in the analysis was estimated for treatment of high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer representing 80% of the total cost ($12.6 million). Costs for screening only represented 5% of the total cost ($0.9 million). Treatment of genital warts represented 6% of the total cost ($1million). Conclusion According to the cost estimations in this study, the economic burden of HPV-related cervical diseases and genital warts represents a major public health issue in Swaziland. Prevention of HPV

  5. Piecewise flat gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Meent, Maarten, E-mail: M.vandeMeent@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, PO Box 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-04-07

    We examine the continuum limit of the piecewise flat locally finite gravity model introduced by 't Hooft. In the linear weak field limit, we find the energy-momentum tensor and metric perturbation of an arbitrary configuration of defects. The energy-momentum turns out to be restricted to satisfy certain conditions. The metric perturbation is mostly fixed by the energy-momentum except for its lightlike modes which reproduce linear gravitational waves, despite no such waves being present at the microscopic level.

  6. Flat feet in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe flatfoot, as one of very frequent deformities in everyday medical practice. A special condition of the deformity associated with a calcaneal valgus position and complicated by a knee valgus position (as a consequence of non-treatment is described. Also, the precise anatomy of the longitudinal foot arches (medial and lateral, definition and classification of the deformity, clinical findings and therapeutic protocols are proposed. The authors especially emphasise that the need for having extensive knowledge on the differences between a flexible and rigid flatfoot, having in mind that the treatment of flexible flat foot is usually not necessary, while the treatment of rigid flatfoot is usually unavoidable.

  7. Retinotopy of facial expression adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Kazumichi

    2014-01-01

    The face aftereffect (FAE; the illusion of faces after adaptation to a face) has been reported to occur without retinal overlap between adaptor and test, but recent studies revealed that the FAE is not constant across all test locations, which suggests that the FAE is also retinotopic. However, it remains unclear whether the characteristic of the retinotopy of the FAE for one facial aspect is the same as that of the FAE for another facial aspect. In the research reported here, an examination of the retinotopy of the FAE for facial expression indicated that the facial expression aftereffect occurs without retinal overlap between adaptor and test, and depends on the retinal distance between them. Furthermore, the results indicate that, although dependence of the FAE on adaptation-test distance is similar between facial expression and facial identity, the FAE for facial identity is larger than that for facial expression when a test face is presented in the opposite hemifield. On the basis of these results, I discuss adaptation mechanisms underlying facial expression processing and facial identity processing for the retinotopy of the FAE.

  8. Comparative study of topical 80% trichloroacetic acid with 35% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of the common wart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshkpoor, Fakhrozaman; Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Sharghi, Mohammad; Hoseinzadeh, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Common warts caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) are considered to be the most common infectious skin disease. No individual treatment for common warts is effective as monotherapy in eradicating the lesions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a 35% and an 80% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solution in the treatment of the common wart. In this single-blinded clinical trial, 62 eligible patients with common warts referred to the dermatology clinic of Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Patients were randomly divided into two groups, each treated with a TCA solution (group A, TCA 80%; group B, TCA 35%) once per week until complete clearance of the lesions or for a maximum duration of six weeks. Seven patients were excluded from the final analysis (one patient in group A and six patients in group B) for various reasons, including irregular follow-up, using physical tools such as razor blades to remove the lesion, and failure to complete treatment; and 55 patients were included in the final analysis. Improvement to treatment responses was classified as: no change (no changes in the number of warts), mild (clearing of less than 25% of warts), moderate (clearing of 25% to 75% of warts), and good (clearing of more than 75% of warts). At the end of follow-up, the clinical improvement of group A (n=30) was: 10 patients (33.3%) with a mild response, 6 patients (20%) with a moderate response, and 14 patients (46.7%) with a good response. In group B (n=25), 16 patients (64%) showed a mild response, 6 patients (24%) a moderate response, and 3 patients (12%) a good response. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement between the two treatment groups (P=.017). Improvement was greater with a higher concentration of TCA solution. This study showed that a different concentration of TCA solution was an effective form of treatment for common warts. Trichloroacetic acid 80% is more effective, but this solution must be used only with careful

  9. Decline in in-patient treatments of genital warts among young Australians following the national HPV vaccination program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a rapid decline in the number of young heterosexuals diagnosed with genital warts at outpatient sexual health services since the national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program started in Australia in 2007. We assessed the impact of the vaccination program on the number of in-patient treatments for genital warts. Methods Data on in-patient treatments of genital warts in all private hospitals were extracted from the Medicare website. Medicare is the universal health insurance scheme of Australia. In the vaccine period (2007–2011) and pre-vaccine period (2000–2007) we calculated the percentage change in treatment numbers and trends in annual treatment rates in private hospitals. Australian population data were used to calculate rates. Summary rate ratios of average annual trends were determined. Results Between 2000 and 2011, 6,014 women and 936 men aged 15–44 years underwent in-patient treatment for genital warts in private hospitals. In 15–24 year old women, there was a significant decreasing trend in annual treatment rates of vulval/vaginal warts in the vaccine period (overall decrease of 85.3% in treatment numbers from 2007 to 2011) compared to no significant trend in the pre-vaccine period (summary rate ratio (SRR) = 0.33, p warts in the vaccine period (decrease of 70.6%) compared to an increasing trend in the pre-vaccine period (SRR = 0.76, p = 0.02). In 25–34 year old men there was a significant decreasing trend in the vaccine period compared to no change in the pre-vaccine period (SRR = 0.81, p = 0.04) and in 35–44 year old men there was no significant change in rates of penile warts both periods, but the rate of change was greater in the vaccine period (SRR = 0.70, p = 0.02). Conclusions The marked decline in in-patient treatment of vulval/vaginal warts in the youngest women is probably attributable to the HPV vaccine program. The moderate decline in in-patient treatments for

  10. Realistic facial animation generation based on facial expression mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Garrod, Oliver; Jack, Rachael; Schyns, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions reflect internal emotional states of a character or in response to social communications. Though much effort has been taken to generate realistic facial expressions, it still remains a challenging topic due to human being's sensitivity to subtle facial movements. In this paper, we present a method for facial animation generation, which reflects true facial muscle movements with high fidelity. An intermediate model space is introduced to transfer captured static AU peak frames based on FACS to the conformed target face. And then dynamic parameters derived using a psychophysics method is integrated to generate facial animation, which is assumed to represent natural correlation of multiple AUs. Finally, the animation sequence in the intermediate model space is mapped to the target face to produce final animation.

  11. Facial Expression of Affect in Children with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, L.; Moss, J.; Jutley, J.; Cornish, K.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) have been reported to show comparatively high levels of flat and negative affect but there have been no empirical evaluations. In this study, we use an objective measure of facial expression to compare affect in CdLS with that seen in Cri du Chat syndrome (CDC) and a group of…

  12. Does Facial Expressivity Count? How Typically Developing Children Respond Initially to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Steven D.; Slavny, Rachel; Hand, Charlotte; Cardoso, Alice; Smith, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Research investigating expressivity in children with autism spectrum disorder has reported flat affect or bizarre facial expressivity within this population; however, the impact expressivity may have on first impression formation has received little research input. We examined how videos of children with autism spectrum disorder were rated for…

  13. Other facial neuralgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Francis; Nurmikko, Turo; Sommer, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Premise In this article we review some lesser known cranial neuralgias that are distinct from trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, or trigeminal neuropathies. Included are occipital neuralgia, superior laryngeal neuralgia, auriculotemporal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal and nervus intermedius neuralgia, and pain from acute herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia of the trigeminal and intermedius nerves. Problem Facial neuralgias are rare and many physicians do not see such cases in their lifetime, so patients with a suspected diagnosis within this group should be referred to a specialized center where multidisciplinary team diagnosis may be available. Potential solution Each facial neuralgia can be identified on the basis of clinical presentation, allowing for precision diagnosis and planning of treatment. Treatment remains conservative with oral or topical medication recommended for neuropathic pain to be tried before more invasive procedures are undertaken. However, evidence for efficacy of current treatments remains weak.

  14. Facial resemblance enhances trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruine, Lisa M

    2002-07-07

    Organisms are expected to be sensitive to cues of genetic relatedness when making decisions about social behaviour. Relatedness can be assessed in several ways, one of which is phenotype matching: the assessment of similarity between others' traits and either one's own traits or those of known relatives. One candidate cue of relatedness in humans is facial resemblance. Here, I report the effects of an experimental manipulation of facial resemblance in a two-person sequential trust game. Subjects were shown faces of ostensible playing partners manipulated to resemble either themselves or an unknown person. Resemblance to the subject's own face raised the incidence of trusting a partner, but had no effect on the incidence of selfish betrayals of the partner's trust. Control subjects playing with identical pictures failed to show such an effect. In a second experiment, resemblance of the playing partner to a familiar (famous) person had no effect on either trusting or betrayals of trust.

  15. Fractional Laser-Assisted Topical Imiquimod 5% Cream Treatment for Recalcitrant Common Warts in Children: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Min; Kim, Gun-Wook; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Ko, Hyun-Chang

    2016-12-01

    Conventional treatments for warts like cryotherapy are limited by the pain during procedures, especially in pediatric patients. Imiquimod is a topical immune response modifier, but the thick stratum corneum of common warts prevents drug permeation through skin. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fractional laser/topical 5% imiquimod cream for the treatment of warts in children. Eleven pediatric patients with multiple recalcitrant common warts were included. Lesions were treated using an ablative fractional 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser at 1- or 2-week interval. After each laser treatment session, imiquimod 5% cream was self-applied once daily 5 days a week. Response and adverse effects were assessed 2 weekly until complete clearance or up to maximum of 48 weeks. Pain during fractional laser was assessed using a visual analogue scale (0-10). Eight of the 11 (72.7%) children experienced complete clearance. Mean duration was 29.7 (16-48) weeks, and the mean number of fractional laser was 17.5 (8-37). No significant adverse effect was observed. Pain visual analogue scale during fractional laser was 2.4 (1-4) compared to 6.2 (5-8) during cryotherapy. This pilot study indicates that fractional laser-assisted topical imiquimod may provide benefit for recalcitrant warts in children.

  16. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites.

  17. Congenital Facial Teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Manjunath; Hegde, Padmaraj; Devaraju, Umesh M.

    2011-01-01

    Teratomas are neoplasm composed of three germinal layers of the embryo that form tissues not normally found in the organ in which they arise. These are most common in the sacrococcygeal region and are rare in the head and neck, which account for less than 6%. An unusual case of facial teratoma in a new born, managed successfully is described here with postoperative follow up of 2 years without any recurrence.

  18. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian, with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25. Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI, Malaysian Chinese (MC and Malaysian Malay (MM were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05 but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1% were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5% short and 81 (28.3% long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts.1 Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%; 2 Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3 Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4 All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5 No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  19. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata).......To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  20. Decline in genital warts diagnoses among young women and young men since the introduction of the bivalent HPV (16/18) vaccination programme in England: an ecological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canvin, M; Sinka, K; Hughes, G; Mesher, D

    2017-03-01

    For several decades, diagnoses of genital warts at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England had been increasing. In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme was introduced using the bivalent vaccine (types 16 and 18 only). A decrease in genital warts was not anticipated. However, rates of genital warts in GUM clinics have declined significantly since the introduction of the vaccine. Using data from GUM clinics across England, we analysed rates of genital warts by age, gender, sexual orientation and estimated vaccine coverage. The reduction in rates of genital warts diagnoses at GUM clinics between 2009 and 2014 was 30.6% among young women aged 15-19 years and 25.4% among same age heterosexual young men. Overall there was an association showing higher warts reduction with increasing vaccination coverage with the largest declines in warts diagnoses observed in young women aged 15 years (50.9%) with the highest vaccination coverage. No such declines were observed in men who have sex with men (MSM) of the same age. The results of these ecological analyses are strongly in keeping with the bivalent HPV vaccine providing modest protection against genital warts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Paring and intense pulsed light versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot warts: a randomized clinical trial with blinded outcome evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Gluud, Christian; Winkel, Per

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of recalcitrant viral warts remains a therapeutic challenge. Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been suggested effective to clear wart tissue. The objective was in a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of paring followed by IPL versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot...

  2. IS THE WORLD FLAT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Încalţărău

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization became more and more prominent during the last decades. There is no way to argue that globalization led to more interconnected economies, facilitating the communication and the collaboration around the world. But where is this going? Doesglobalization mean uniformity or diversity? As the world begins to resemble more, the people are trying to distinguish between them more, which can exacerbate nationalistic feeling. Friedman argues that globalization made the world smaller and flatter, allowing all countries to take chance of the available opportunities equally. But is this really true? Although politic and cultural factors can stand in front of a really flat world, what is the key for Chinese and Indian success and which are theirs perspectives?

  3. Flat Helical Nanosieves

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Shengtao; Hussain, Sajid; Huang, Kun; Ling, Xiaohui; Siew, Shawn Yohanes; Liu, Hong; Teng, Jinghua; Danner, Aaron; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Compact and miniaturized devices with flexible functionalities are always highly demanded in optical integrated systems. Plasmonic nanosieve has been successfully harnessed as an ultrathin flat platform for complex manipulation of light, including holography, vortex generation and non-linear processes. Compared with most of reported single-functional devices, multi-functional nanosieves might find more complex and novel applications across nano-photonics, optics and nanotechnology. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a promising roadmap for nanosieve-based helical devices, which achieves full manipulations of optical vortices, including its generation, hybridization, spatial multiplexing, focusing and non-diffraction propagation etc., by controlling the geometric phase of spin light via over 121 thousands of spatially-rotated nano-sieves. Thanks to such spin-conversion nanosieve helical elements, it is no longer necessary to employ the conventional two-beam interferometric measurement to characterize optical ...

  4. Facial pain and temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of facial pain and the association of facial pain with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) as well as with other factors, in a geographically defined population-based sample consisting of subjects born in 1966 in northern Finland, and in a case-control study including subjects with facial pain and their healthy controls. In addition, the influence of conservative stomatognathic and necessary prosthetic treatme...

  5. More Ricci-flat branes

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, J M

    1999-01-01

    Certain supergravity solutions (including domain walls and the magnetic fivebrane) have recently been generalised by Brecher and Perry by relaxing the condition that the brane worldvolume be flat. In this way they obtain examples in which the brane worldvolume is a static spacetime admitting parallel spinors. In this note we simply point out that the restriction to static spacetimes is unnecessary, and in this way exhibit solutions where the brane worldvolume is an indecomposable Ricci-flat lorentzian manifold admitting parallel spinors. We discuss more Ricci-flat fivebranes and domain walls, as well as new Ricci-flat D3-branes.

  6. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  7. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  8. History of facial pain diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Troels S

    2017-01-01

    Premise Facial pain refers to a heterogeneous group of clinically and etiologically different conditions with the common clinical feature of pain in the facial area. Among these conditions, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), persistent idiopathic facial pain, temporomandibular joint pain, and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TAC) are the most well described conditions. Conclusion TN has been known for centuries, and is recognised by its characteristic and almost pathognomonic clinical features. The other facial pain conditions are less well defined, and over the years there has been confusion about their classification. PMID:28181442

  9. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  10. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be seen ...

  11. Prevalence, Incidence, and Clearance of Anogenital Warts in Kenyan Men Reporting High-Risk Sexual Behavior, Including Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, Santiago; Wahome, Elizabeth; Mwashigadi, Grace; Thiong'o, Alexander N.; Stekler, Joanne D.; Wald, Anna; Sanders, Eduard J.; Graham, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes a spectrum of disease, ranging from warts to cancer. Prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with anogenital warts in East African men are unknown. Methods. Kenyan men reporting high-risk sexual behavior were inspected for anogenital warts at enrollment and follow-up visits. Logistic regression was performed to identify associations with anogenital warts at baseline. Cox regression was performed to analyze predictors of incident anogenital warts, and Kaplan–Meier curves were used to estimate clearance. Results. Baseline anogenital wart prevalence in 1137 men was 2.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0%–4.0%) overall, 2.0% in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected men, and 9.4% in HIV-1-infected men (adjusted odds ratio, 5.43; 95% CI, 2.03–11.29). Over a median of 1.4 years, anogenital wart incidence among 1104 men was 5.3 (95% CI, 4.3–6.5) per 100 person-years. Having HIV-1 infection at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.66; 95% CI, 1.01–2.72) or a genital syndrome during follow-up (aHR, 4.78; 95% CI, 3.03–7.56) was associated with increased wart incidence. Wart clearance was lower in HIV-1-infected men (log-rank Pwart prevalence and incidence were increased in HIV-1-infected men, and anogenital warts co-occurred with other genital syndromes. Quadrivalent HPV vaccination should be recommended for young men in settings with high HIV-1 prevalence. PMID:26110169

  12. iFace: Facial Expression Training System

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Kyoko; Kurose, Hiroyuki; Takami, Ai; Nishida, Shogo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a target facial expression selection interface for a facial expression training system and a facial expression training system were both proposed and developed. Twelve female dentists used the facial expression training system, and evaluations and opinions about the facial expression training system were obtained from these participants. In the future, we will attempt to improve both the target facial expression selection interface and the comparison of a current and a target f...

  13. Treatment of Athlete's Plantar Warts Using a Botanical Blend: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik O; Kozin, Adam F; Ruiz, Guillermo; Lasku, Arben; Langland, Jeffrey O

    2017-05-01

    Context • Viral plantar warts, or verruca plantaris, are a benign epithelial tumor caused by various strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Current treatments have had mixed degrees of success, are moderately invasive, and are often incompatible with participation in sports. Objective • The study intended to examine the benefits of treating plantar warts with a topical, botanical blend that has had clinical success treating herpes simplex virus cold sores. Methods • A synergistic botanical blend was applied topically. Setting • The case report was completed at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (Tempe, Arizona, USA). Participant • The participant was a 24-y-old male soccer player, 177.8 cm tall, and weighing 69 kg with previously diagnosed, viral mosaic warts. Intervention • The patient used a pumice stone during bathing for the first week to remove dead tissue and ensure sufficient contact and entry of the botanical gel into infected tissue. After drying the area, the patient applied the botanical gel blend 1 to 2 times daily postshower, spreading it evenly across the surface of the entire lesion. The patient discontinued the exfoliation technique after the first week. Results • Within the first week of treatment, the patient noted changes to the infected area of the hallux epidermal tissue. The combination of exfoliation and application of the gel caused marked, visible differences in presentation by the fifth day of treatment. At 1-mo postintervention, or day 90, the epidermal tissue was asymptomatic and devoid of petechiae, malformations, or visible infection. Conclusions • The results of the current case study directly contrast with the drawbacks of commonly accepted, first-line interventions in the treatment of viral plantar warts and, in many respects, demonstrate better efficacy and fewer side effects than the standard of care. The positive results also highlight the necessity for additional study in the fields of sports

  14. Macular pigmentation complicating irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoyrul, B; Paulus, J

    2016-04-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare acquired disorder characterized by macu-lar pigmentation of the lips and oral mucosa, with frequent longitudinal melanonychia. Involvement of other areas, such as the genitalia and fingers, has rarely been described. LHS is a benign condition with no known systemic manifestations. We report the case of a woman who developed melanotic macules on her fingers and elbow 16 years after the onset of pigmentation of her lips. This unusual feature of LHS in our patient was associated with irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts. Only two cases of an association with an inflammatory dermatosis have been reported previously in the literature.

  15. Presence and structure of the wart layer in tracheids of some junipers as visualised in the scanning electron micscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence and structure of the wart layer was investigated in the tracheids of the following juniper species: J. communis L., J. communis var. saxatilis Pall., J. sabina L., J. virginiana L., J. chinensis L. and J. squamata Lamb. The wart layer was found to be present in the tracheids of the stem, roots and branches of spring and summer growths, thus, it is an integral element of their structure. It would seem that this layer is a trait of these juniper species and may be one of the taxonomic features of their wood.

  16. Cephalometric soft tissue facial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, R T

    1999-10-01

    My objective is to present a cephalometric-based facial analysis to correlate with an article that was published previously in the American Journal of Orthodontic and Dentofacial Orthopedics. Eighteen facial or soft tissue traits are discussed in this article. All of them are significant in successful orthodontic outcome, and none of them depend on skeletal landmarks for measurement. Orthodontic analysis most commonly relies on skeletal and dental measurement, placing far less emphasis on facial feature measurement, particularly their relationship to each other. Yet, a thorough examination of the face is critical for understanding the changes in facial appearance that result from orthodontic treatment. A cephalometric approach to facial examination can also benefit the diagnosis and treatment plan. Individual facial traits and their balance with one another should be identified before treatment. Relying solely on skeletal analysis, assuming that the face will balance if the skeletal/dental cephalometric values are normalized, may not yield the desired outcome. Good occlusion does not necessarily mean good facial balance. Orthodontic norms for facial traits can permit their measurement. Further, with a knowledge of standard facial traits and the patient's soft tissue features, an individualized norm can be established for each patient to optimize facial attractiveness. Four questions should be asked regarding each facial trait before treatment: (1) What is the quality and quantity of the trait? (2) How will future growth affect the trait? (3) How will orthodontic tooth movement affect the existing trait (positively or negatively)? (4) How will surgical bone movement to correct the bite affect the trait (positively or negatively)?

  17. Plastic Changes of Synapses and Excitatory Neurotransmitter Receptors in Facial Nucleus Following Facial-facial Anastomosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei CHEN; Jun SONG; Linghui LUO; Shusheng GONG

    2008-01-01

    The remodeling process of synapses and eurotransmitter receptors of facial nucleus were observed. Models were set up by facial-facial anastomosis in rat. At post-surgery day (PSD) 0, 7, 21 and 60, synaptophysin (p38), NMDA receptor subunit 2A and AMPA receptor subunit 2 (GIuR2) were observed by immunohistochemical method and emi-quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Meanwhile, the synaptic structure of the facial motorneurons was observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The intensity of p38 immunoreactivity was decreased, reaching the lowest value at PSD day 7, and then increased slightly at PSD 21. Ultrastructurally, the number of synapses in nucleus of the operational side decreased, which was consistent with the change in P38 immhnoreactivity. NMDAR2A mRNA was down-regulated significantly in facial nucleus after the operation (P000.05). The synapses innervation and the expression of NMDAR2A and AMPAR2 mRNA in facial nucleus might be modified to suit for the new motor tasks following facial-facial anastomosis, and influenced facial nerve regeneration and recovery.

  18. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness.

  19. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  20. Processing faces and facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posamentier, Mette T; Abdi, Hervé

    2003-09-01

    This paper reviews processing of facial identity and expressions. The issue of independence of these two systems for these tasks has been addressed from different approaches over the past 25 years. More recently, neuroimaging techniques have provided researchers with new tools to investigate how facial information is processed in the brain. First, findings from "traditional" approaches to identity and expression processing are summarized. The review then covers findings from neuroimaging studies on face perception, recognition, and encoding. Processing of the basic facial expressions is detailed in light of behavioral and neuroimaging data. Whereas data from experimental and neuropsychological studies support the existence of two systems, the neuroimaging literature yields a less clear picture because it shows considerable overlap in activation patterns in response to the different face-processing tasks. Further, activation patterns in response to facial expressions support the notion of involved neural substrates for processing different facial expressions.

  1. Tracking facial features with occlusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARKIN Evgeny; PRAKASH Edmond C.

    2006-01-01

    Facial expression recognition consists of determining what kind of emotional content is presented in a human face.The problem presents a complex area for exploration, since it encompasses face acquisition, facial feature tracking, facial expression classification. Facial feature tracking is of the most interest. Active Appearance Model (AAM) enables accurate tracking of facial features in real-time, but lacks occlusions and self-occlusions. In this paper we propose a solution to improve the accuracy of fitting technique. The idea is to include occluded images into AAM training data. We demonstrate the results by running ex periments using gradient descent algorithm for fitting the AAM. Our experiments show that using fitting algorithm with occluded training data improves the fitting quality of the algorithm.

  2. Facial Asymmetry and Emotional Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Pickin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This report is about facial asymmetry, its connection to emotional expression, and methods of measuring facial asymmetry in videos of faces. The research was motivated by two factors: firstly, there was a real opportunity to develop a novel measure of asymmetry that required minimal human involvement and that improved on earlier measures in the literature; and secondly, the study of the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression is both interesting in its own right, and important because it can inform neuropsychological theory and answer open questions concerning emotional processing in the brain. The two aims of the research were: first, to develop an automatic frame-by-frame measure of facial asymmetry in videos of faces that improved on previous measures; and second, to use the measure to analyse the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression, and connect our findings with previous research of the relationship.

  3. Vascularization of the facial bones by facial artery: implications for full face allotransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rampazzo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background-The maxillary artery is recognized as the main vascular supply of the facial bones; nonetheless clinical evidence supports a co-dominant role for the facial artery. This study explores the extent of the facial skeleton within a facial allograft that can be harvested based on the facial artery. Methods-Twenty-three cadaver heads were used in this study. In 12 heads, the right facial, superficial temporal and maxillary arteries were injected. In 1 head, facial artery angiography w...

  4. Odontogenic Facial Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordany Boza Mejias

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: odontogenic facial cellulitis is an acute inflammatory process manifested in very different ways, with a variable scale in clinical presentation ranging from harmless well defined processes, to diffuse and progressive that may develop complications leading the patient to a critical condition, even risking their lives. Objective: To characterize the behavior of odontogenic facial cellulitis. Methods: A descriptive case series study was conducted at the dental clinic of Aguada de Pasajeros, Cienfuegos, from September 2010 to March 2011. It included 56 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Variables analyzed included: sex, age, teeth and regions affected, causes of cellulite and prescribed treatment. Results: no sex predilection was observed, lower molars and submandibular anatomical region were the most affected (50% and 30 4% respectively being tooth decay the main cause for this condition (51, 7%. The opening access was not performed to all the patients in the emergency service. The causal tooth extraction was not commonly done early, according to the prescribed antibiotic group. Thermotherapy with warm fomentation and saline mouthwash was the most prescribed and the most widely used group of antibiotics was the penicillin. Conclusions: dental caries were the major cause of odontogenic cellulite. There are still difficulties with the implementation of opening access.

  5. Salvador-warts-hippo signaling promotes Drosophila posterior follicle cell maturation downstream of notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polesello, Cédric; Tapon, Nicolas

    2007-11-06

    The Salvador Warts Hippo (SWH) network limits tissue size in Drosophila and vertebrates [1]. Decreased SWH pathway activity gives rise to excess proliferation and reduced apoptosis. The core of the SWH network is composed of two serine/threonine kinases Hippo (Hpo) and Warts (Wts), the scaffold proteins Salvador (Sav) and Mats, and the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki) [1]. Two band 4.1 related proteins, Merlin (Mer) and Expanded (Ex), have been proposed to act upstream of Hpo, which in turn activates Wts ([1] for review). Wts phosphorylates and inhibits Yki, repressing the expression of Yki target genes [2-4]. Recently, several planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have been implicated in the SWH network in growth control [5-8]. Here, we show that, during oogenesis, the core components of the SWH network are required in posterior follicle cells (PFCs) competent to receive the Gurken (Grk)/TGFalpha signal emitted by the oocyte to control body axis formation. Our results suggest that the SWH network controls the expression of Hindsight, the downstream effector of Notch, required for follicle cell mitotic cycle-endocycle switch. The PCP members of the SWH network are not involved in this process, indicating that signaling upstream of Hpo varies according to developmental context.

  6. Adverse Psychosexual Impact Related to the Treatment of Genital Warts and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bittencourt Campaner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the psychosexual impact related to the treatment of genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN in women. Methods. 75 patients presenting with HPV-induced genital lesions, belonging to one of two patient groups, were included in the study: 29 individuals with genital warts (GWs and 46 individuals with CIN grades 2 or 3 (CIN 2/3. Initially, medical charts of each woman were examined for extraction of data on the type of HPV-induced infection and treatment administered. Subjects were interviewed to collect sociodemographic data as well as personal, gynecologic, obstetric, and sexual history. After this initial anamnesis, the Sexual Quotient-Female Version (SQ-F questionnaire was applied to assess sexual function. After application of the questionnaire, patients answered specific questions produced by the researchers, aimed at assessing the impact of the disease and its treatment on their sexual lives. Results. It is noteworthy that patients with CIN 2/3 had statistically similar classification of sexual quotient to patients with GWs (P=0.115. However, patients with GWs more frequently gave positive answers to the specific questions compared to patients with CIN 2/3. Conclusion. Based on these findings, it is clear that GWs have a greater impact on sexual behavior compared to CIN 2/3.

  7. Prevalence of cutaneous warts in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luisa Moreira; Santos, Willer Goncalves Dourado; Santiago, Mittermayer Barretto

    2016-09-30

    The aim of this study was to review and evaluate systematically the scientific evidence on the relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous warts (CW) caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. With strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, we extensively searched the PUBMED, BVS (Virtual Health Library), and SCOPUS databases for the studies that evaluated the prevalence of CW in patients with SLE. Secondary references were additionally obtained from the selected articles. Only four articles met the research criteria and showed a higher frequency of CW in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. One of them highlighted about rheumatoid factor (RF) in the sera of patients with SLE and found an inverse correlation between the occurrence of warts and RF autoantibody. Moreover, most of the selected articles showed that the presence of CW did not correlate with the use of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, these findings suggest that the prevalence of CW in patients with SLE is probably high due to the defects in immune mechanisms, independently of immunosuppressive drugs.

  8. Vaccines against human papillomavirus infections: protection against cancer, genital warts or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joura, E A; Pils, S

    2016-12-01

    Since 2006, three vaccines against infections and disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) became available in Europe-in 2006 a quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine, in 2007 a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine and in 2015 a nonavalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine. HPV 16 and 18 are the most oncogenic HPV strains, causing about 70% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers, HPV 6 and 11 cause 85% of all genital warts. The additional types of the polyvalent vaccine account for about 20% of invasive cervical cancer and >35% of pre-cancer. The potential differences between these vaccines caused some debate. All three vaccines give a robust and long-lasting protection against the strains in the various vaccines. The promise of cross-protection against other types (i.e. HPV 31/33/45) and hence a broader cancer protection was not fulfilled because these observations were confounded by the vaccine efficacy against the vaccine types. Furthermore, cross-protection was not consistent over various studies, not durable and not consistently seen in the real world experience. The protection against disease caused by oncogenic HPV strains was not compromised by the protection against low-risk types causing genital warts. The most effective cancer protection to date can be expected by the nonavalent vaccine, data indicate a 97% efficacy against cervical and vulvovaginal pre-cancer caused by these nine HPV types.

  9. Combination of Circumcision and Microwave in Treatment of Genital Warts in Uncircumcised Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊翌明; 马泽粦; 吴志华; 李顺凡; 陈秋霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of combina-tion of circumcision and microwave on genital warts in uncircumcised men.Methods: A randomized, prospective study of 109 uncircumcised adult men with genital warts was con-ducted in a STD clinic in Zhanjiang, Guangdong. One group (n=54) received microwave therapy only, while the other group (n=55) was taken the combination of circumcision and microwave therapy. The recurrences were observed at the end of months 3, 6 and 12, and operative complications were also recorded.Results: There were no significant differences in the mean age and duration of the disease between two groups (P>0.05). No serious operative complications were documented. The recurrence rate in circumci-sion plus microwave group was markedly lower than that in microwave group (12.7% vs 29.6%, PO.05).Conclusion: Circumcision can be safely performed under local anesthesia in an outpatient setting. Com-bination of circumcision and microwave can produce excellent effect as well as less tissue damage,therefore, it may be ideal for uncircumcised patients with extensive condvlomas.

  10. Colesteatoma causando paralisia facial Cholesteatoma causing facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gurgel Testa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial causada pelo colesteatoma é pouco freqüente. As porções do nervo mais acometidas são a timpânica e a região do 2º joelho. Nos casos de disseminação da lesão colesteatomatosa para o epitímpano anterior, o gânglio geniculado é o segmento do nervo facial mais sujeito à injúria. A etiopatogenia pode estar ligada à compressão do nervo pelo colesteatoma seguida de diminuição do seu suprimento vascular como também pela possível ação de substâncias neurotóxicas produzidas pela matriz do tumor ou pelas bactérias nele contidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, as características clínicas e o tratamento da paralisia facial decorrente da lesão colesteatomatosa. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo envolvendo dez casos de paralisia facial por colesteatoma selecionados através de levantamento de 206 descompressões do nervo facial com diferentes etiologias, realizadas na UNIFESP-EPM nos últimos dez anos. RESULTADOS: A incidência de paralisia facial por colesteatoma neste estudo foi de 4,85%,com predominância do sexo feminino (60%. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 39 anos. A duração e o grau da paralisia (inicial juntamente com a extensão da lesão foram importantes em relação à recuperação funcional do nervo facial. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico precoce é fundamental para que ocorra um resultado funcional mais adequado. Nos casos de ruptura ou intensa fibrose do tecido nervoso, o enxerto de nervo (auricular magno/sural e/ou a anastomose hipoglosso-facial podem ser sugeridas.Facial paralysis caused by cholesteatoma is uncommon. The portions most frequently involved are horizontal (tympanic and second genu segments. When cholesteatomas extend over the anterior epitympanic space, the facial nerve is placed in jeopardy in the region of the geniculate ganglion. The aetiology can be related to compression of the nerve followed by impairment of its

  11. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  12. CD4+ cell count and HIV load as predictors of size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Hung N; Amirian, E Susan; Chan, Wenyaw; Beasley, R Palmer; Piller, Linda B; Scheurer, Michael E

    2012-02-15

    Little is known about the associations between CD4(+) cell counts, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load, and human papillomavirus "low-risk" types in noncancerous clinical outcomes. This study examined whether CD4(+) count and HIV load predict the size of the largest anal warts in 976 HIV-infected women in an ongoing cohort. A linear mixed model was used to determine the association between size of anal wart and CD4(+) count and HIV load. The incidence of anal warts was 4.15 cases per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.83-4.77) and 1.30 cases per 100 person-years (95% CI, 1.00-1.58) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women, respectively. There appeared to be an inverse association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4(+) count at baseline; however, this was not statistically significant. There was no association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4(+) count or HIV load over time. There was no evidence for an association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4(+) count or HIV load over time. Further exploration on the role of immune response on the development of anal warts is warranted in a larger study.

  13. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way.

  14. Diplegia facial traumatica Traumatic facial diplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.A case of traumatic facial diplegia with left partial loss of hearing following head injury is reported. X-rays showed fractures on the occipital and left temporal bones. A review of traumatic facial paralysis is made.

  15. Paralisia facial bilateral Bilateral facial paralysis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.A case of bilateral facial paralysis following meningococcal meningitis and herpes simplex infection is reported. The author discusses the differential diagnosis of bilateral facial nerve paralysis which includes several diseases and syndromes and concludes by herpetic aetiology.

  16. Flats: Preliminary WFC Data and Plans for Flight Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Hartig, G.; Tsvetanov, Z.

    2000-10-01

    The ACS WFC pixel-to-pixel P-flats with the build-3 detector repeat over a three month time span to a precision of better than 0.1% rms. The shape of the low frequency Lflat field varies with wavelength, where the ratio of the F435W/F814W L-flats differs from unity by - 10% in two patches near opposite corners of the field of view. At ~0.5%, the high frequency pixel-to-pixel structure in the WFC P-flats is about half that of the HRC build-2 and does not increase as much toward shorter wavelengths as the HRC build-2 with the Lesser coating. The amplitude of the fringes for continuum illumination is less than 1%, even in the narrow band ramp filters, while the fringing in monochromatic light is - 10% at 9300 Å. The goals of the laboratory WFC and HRC flat field program are to obtain the set of external flats that fully populates the pipeline database and to archive a baseline of high S/N internal flats for tracking post-launch changes.

  17. Is classical flat Kasner spacetime flat in quantum gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Parampreet

    2016-01-01

    Quantum nature of classical flat Kasner spacetime is studied using effective spacetime description in loop quantum cosmology. We find that even though the spacetime curvature vanishes at the classical level, non-trivial quantum gravitational effects can arise. For the standard loop quantization of Bianchi-I spacetime, which uniquely yields universal bounds on expansion and shear scalars and results in a generic resolution of strong singularities, we find that a flat Kasner metric is not a physical solution of the effective spacetime description, except in a limit. The lack of a flat Kasner metric at the quantum level results from a novel feature of the loop quantum Bianchi-I spacetime: quantum geometry induces non-vanishing spacetime curvature components, making it not Ricci flat even when no matter is present. The non-curvature singularity of the classical flat Kasner spacetime is avoided, and the effective spacetime transits from a flat Kasner spacetime in asymptotic future, to a Minkowski spacetime in asym...

  18. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  19. Does facial resemblance enhance cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Giang

    Full Text Available Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces. A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system.

  20. Analysis methods for facial motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Mishima

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective techniques to evaluate a facial movement are indispensable for the contemporary treatment of patients with motor disorders such as facial paralysis, cleft lip, postoperative head and neck cancer, and so on. Recently, computer-assisted, video-based techniques have been devised and reported as measuring systems in which facial movements can be evaluated quantitatively. Commercially available motion analysis systems, in which a stereo-measuring technique with multiple cameras and markers to facilitate search of matching among images through all cameras, also are utilized, and are used in many measuring systems such as video-based systems. The key is how the problems of facial movement can be extracted precisely, and how useful information for the diagnosis and decision-making process can be derived from analyses of facial movement. Therefore, it is important to discuss which facial animations should be examined, and whether fixation of the head and markers attached to the face can hamper natural facial movement.

  1. Acupuncture Treatment of Facial Spasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Case History Ms. Zheng from Singapore, aged 51 years, paid her first visit on Aug.30, 2006, with the chief complaint of left facial paralysis accompanied with facial spasm for 5 years. The patient got left facial paralysis in 2001, which was not completely cured, and developed into facial spasm one year later. Although she had received various treatments including surgical operation, the disease was not cured. At the moment she had discomfort and dull sensation in the left facial area, mainly accompanied with twitching of the peripheral nerve of the eye. She was also accompanied with posterior auricular muscle tension and discomfort. She had fairly good sleep and appetite, but slightly quick temper. Physical examination at the moment showed that the patient had a slightly thin body figure, flushing face, and good mental state. The blood pressure was 110/75mmHg and the heart rate was 85 beats/min. No abnormal signs were found in the heart and lungs. The facial examination showed mild swelling of the left side of the face, incomplete closing of the eye lids, disappearance of wrinkles on the forehead, shallow nasolabial groove, and obvious muscle tension and tenderness in the left opisthotic region. Careful observation could find slight facial muscular twitching. The tongue proper was red with little coating, and the pulse thready-wiry.

  2. Photodynamic therapy (PDT and waterfiltered infrared A (wIRA in patients with recalcitrant common hand and foot warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, Gerd

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common warts (verrucae vulgares are human papilloma virus (HPV infections with a high incidence and prevalence, most often affecting hands and feet, being able to impair quality of life. About 30 different therapeutic regimens described in literature reveal a lack of a single striking strategy. Recent publications showed positive results of photodynamic therapy (PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA in the treatment of HPV-induced skin diseases, especially warts, using visible light (VIS to stimulate an absorption band of endogenously formed protoporphyrin IX. Additional experiences adding waterfiltered infrared A (wIRA during 5-ALA-PDT revealed positive effects. Aim of the study: First prospective randomised controlled blind study including PDT and wIRA in the treatment of recalcitrant common hand and foot warts. Comparison of "5-ALA cream (ALA vs. placebo cream (PLC" and "irradiation with visible light and wIRA (VIS+wIRA vs. irradiation with visible light alone (VIS". Methods: Pre-treatment with keratolysis (salicylic acid and curettage. PDT treatment: topical application of 5-ALA (Medac in "unguentum emulsificans aquosum" vs. placebo; irradiation: combination of VIS and a large amount of wIRA (Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 4 mm water cuvette, waterfiltered spectrum 590-1400 nm, contact-free, typically painless vs. VIS alone. Post-treatment with retinoic acid ointment. One to three therapy cycles every 3 weeks. Main variable of interest: "Percent change of total wart area of each patient over the time" (18 weeks. Global judgement by patient and by physician and subjective rating of feeling/pain (visual analogue scales. 80 patients with therapy-resistant common hand and foot warts were assigned randomly into one of the four therapy groups with comparable numbers of warts at comparable sites in all groups. Results: The individual total wart area decreased during 18 weeks in group 1 (ALA+VIS+wIRA and in group 2 (PLC

  3. Facial Action Units Recognition: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Shan, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many approaches to facial expression recognition focus on assessing the six basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, and surprise). Real-life situations proved to produce many more subtle facial expressions. A reliable way of analyzing the facial behavior is the Facial Action Coding

  4. Microbial biofilms on silicone facial prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Facial disfigurements can result from oncologic surgery, trauma and congenital deformities. These disfigurements can be rehabilitated with facial prostheses. Facial prostheses are usually made of silicones. A problem of facial prostheses is that microorganisms can colonize their surface. It is hard

  5. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2009-07-01

    Aesthetic facial reconstruction is a challenging art. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction requires a thorough understanding of the basic principles of the functional and aesthetic requirements for facial reconstruction. From there, further refinement and attention to detail can be provided. This paper discusses basic principles of aesthetic facial reconstruction.

  6. Facial Action Units Recognition: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Shan, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many approaches to facial expression recognition focus on assessing the six basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, and surprise). Real-life situations proved to produce many more subtle facial expressions. A reliable way of analyzing the facial behavior is the Facial Action Coding

  7. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Khanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial melanoses (FM are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl′s melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP, erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure to chemicals in EDP, exposure to allergens in Riehl′s melanosis are implicated. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features. The treatment of FM includes removal of aggravating factors, vigorous photoprotection, and some form of active pigment reduction either with topical agents or physical modes of treatment. Topical agents include hydroquinone (HQ, which is the most commonly used agent, often in combination with retinoic acid, corticosteroids, azelaic acid, kojic acid, and glycolic acid. Chemical peels are important modalities of physical therapy, other forms include lasers and dermabrasion.

  8. Simple technique for facial dimple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hassan El-Sabbagh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subjects seeking aesthetic surgery for facial dimples are increasing in number. Literature on dimple creation surgery are sparse. Various techniques have been used with their own merits and disadvantages. Materials and Methods: Facial dimples were created in 23 cases. All the subjects were females. Five cases were bilateral and the rest were unilateral. Results: Minor complications such as swelling and hematoma were observed in four cases. Infection occurred in two cases. Most of the subjects were satisfied with the results. Conclusions: Suturing technique is safe, reliable and an easily reproducible way to create facial dimple. Level of Evidence: IV: Case series.

  9. Sleep Wrinkles: Facial Aging and Facial Distortion During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Goesel; Kane, Michael A C; Lambros, Val

    2016-09-01

    Wrinkles are just one indicator of facial aging, but an indicator that is of prime importance in our world of facial aesthetics. Wrinkles occur where fault lines develop in aging skin. Those fault lines may be due to skin distortion resulting from facial expression or may be due to skin distortion from mechanical compression during sleep. Expression wrinkles and sleep wrinkles differ in etiology, location, and anatomical pattern. Compression, shear, and stress forces act on the face in lateral or prone sleep positions. We review the literature relating to the development of wrinkles and the biomechanical changes that occur in response to intrinsic and extrinsic influences. We explore the possibility that compression during sleep not only results in wrinkles but may also contribute to facial skin expansion.

  10. Ronchi test for flat mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Engelfried, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: jurgen@ifisica.uaslp.mx; Morelos, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2005-11-11

    One of the RICHes in the velocity spectrometers of the proposed CKM experiment requires a flat mirror, situated in the high intensity kaon beam. To reduce the interaction background for the experiment, this mirror has to be as thin as possible. First glass prototypes were produced in Mexico. To test the surface quality of these prototypes, we extended the Ronchi method so flat mirrors can also be tested. We present the methods and report on results of our measurements.

  11. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  12. Pediatric facial burns: Is facial transplantation the new reconstructive psychosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D; Zuker, Ronald M; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Current pediatric burn care has resulted in survival being the expectation for most children. Composite tissue allotransplantation in the form of face or hand transplantation may present opportunities for reconstructive surgery of patients with burns. The present paper addresses the question “Could facial transplantation be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of pediatric burns associated with facial disfigurement?” METHODS: Therapeutic benefit of facial transplantation was defined in terms of psychiatric adjustment and quality of life (QOL). To ascertain therapeutic benefit, studies of pediatric burn injury and associated psychiatric adjustment and QOL in children, adolescents and adults with pediatric burns, were reviewed. RESULTS: Pediatric burn injury is associated with anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive disorders. Many patients with pediatric burns do not routinely access psychiatric care for these disorders, including those for psychiatric assessment of suicidal risk. A range of QOL outcomes were reported; four were predominantly satisfactory and one was predominantly unsatisfactory. DISCUSSION: Facial transplantation may reduce the risk of depressive and anxiety disorders other than post-traumatic stress disorder. Facial transplantation promises to be the new reconstructive psychosurgery, because it may be a surgical intervention with the potential to reduce the psychiatric suffering associated with pediatric burns. Furthermore, patients with pediatric burns may experience the stigma of disfigurement and psychiatric conditions. The potential for improved appearance with facial transplantation may reduce this ‘dual stigmata’. Studies combining surgical and psychiatric research are warranted. PMID:19949498

  13. Nablus mask-like facial syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allanson, Judith; Smith, Amanda; Hare, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS) has many distinctive phenotypic features, particularly tight glistening skin with reduced facial expression, blepharophimosis, telecanthus, bulky nasal tip, abnormal external ear architecture, upswept frontal hairline, and sparse eyebrows. Over the last few...... heterozygous deletions significantly overlapping the region associated with NMLFS. Notably, while one mother and child were said to have mild tightening of facial skin, none of these individuals exhibited reduced facial expression or the classical facial phenotype of NMLFS. These findings indicate...

  14. Facial Expression Recognition Using SVM Classifier

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Facial feature tracking and facial actions recognition from image sequence attracted great attention in computer vision field. Computational facial expression analysis is a challenging research topic in computer vision. It is required by many applications such as human-computer interaction, computer graphic animation and automatic facial expression recognition. In recent years, plenty of computer vision techniques have been developed to track or recognize the facial activities in three levels...

  15. Sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter Bjørn; Pilegaard, Hans K; Ladegaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background. Facial blushing is one of the most peculiar of human expressions. The pathophysiology is unclear, and the prevalence is unknown. Thoracoscopic sympathectomy may cure the symptom and is increasingly used in patients with isolated facial blushing. The evidence base for the optimal level...... of targeting the sympathetic chain is limited to retrospective case studies. We present a randomized clinical trial. Methods. 100 patients were randomized (web-based, single-blinded) to rib-oriented (R2 or R2-R3) sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing at two university hospitals during a 6-year period...... in all social and mental domains in both groups. Overall, 85% of the patients had an excellent or satisfactory result, with no significant difference between the R2 procedure and the R2-R3 procedure. Mild recurrence of facial blushing occurred in 30% of patients within the first year. One patient...

  16. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  17. Spontaneous Emotional Facial Expression Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Zeng

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Change in a speaker’s emotion is a fundamental component in human communication. Automatic recognition of spontaneous emotion would significantly impact human-computer interaction and emotion-related studies in education, psychology and psychiatry. In this paper, we explore methods for detecting emotional facial expressions occurring in a realistic human conversation setting—the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI. Because non-emotional facial expressions have no distinct description and are expensive to model, we treat emotional facial expression detection as a one- class classification problem, which is to describe target objects (i.e., emotional facial expressions and distinguish them from outliers (i.e., non-emotional ones. Our preliminary experiments on AAI data suggest that one-class classification methods can reach a good balance between cost (labeling and computing and recognition performance by avoiding non-emotional expression labeling and modeling.

  18. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  19. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  20. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  1. A REVIEW ON FACIAL NEURALGIAS

    OpenAIRE

    Solanki, Gaurav

    2010-01-01

    Facial neuralgias are produced by a change in neurological structure or function. This type of neuropathic pain affects the mental health as well as quality of life of patients. There are different types of neuralgias affecting the oral and maxillofacial region. These unusual pains are linked to some possible mechanisms. Various diagnostic tests are done to diagnose the proper cause of facial neuralgia and according to it the medical and surgical treatment is done to provide relief to patient.

  2. Animating facial images with drawings

    OpenAIRE

    Tunali, Gamze Dilek

    1996-01-01

    Ankara : Bilkent Univ., 1996. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1996. Includes bibliographical references leaves 54-56. The work presented here describes the power of 2D animation with texture mai^ping controlled by line drawings. Animation is specifically intended for facial animation and not restricted by the human face. We initially have a sequence of facial images which are taken from a video sequence of the same face and an image of another face to be animated...

  3. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U. S.; Hariram; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. Purpose: To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Materials and Methods: Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected randomly for this study. On the basis of examination and investigations a suitable management approach involving rest and observation, open or closed reduction and immobilization, trans-osseous (TO) wiring, mini bone plate fixation, splinting and replantation, elevation and fixation of zygoma, etc. were carried out. Results and Conclusion: In our study fall was the predominant cause for most of the facial injuries in children. There was a 1.09% incidence of facial injuries in children up to 16 years of age amongst the total patients. The age-wise distribution of the fracture amongst groups (I, II and III) was found to be 26.67%, 51.67% and 21.67% respectively. Male to female patient ratio was 3:1. The majority of the cases of facial injuries were seen in Group II patients (6-11 years) i.e. 51.67%. The mandibular fracture was found to be the most common fracture (0.60%) followed by dentoalveolar (0.27%), mandibular + midface (0.07) and midface (0.02%) fractures. Most of the mandibular fractures were found in the parasymphysis region. Simple fracture seems to be commonest in the mandible. Most of the mandibular and midface fractures in children were amenable to conservative therapies except a few which required surgical intervention. PMID:22639504

  4. Developmental facial paralysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Anesti, Katerina

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the confusing nomenclature and pathogenesis of Developmental Facial Paralysis, and how it can be differentiated from other causes of facial paralysis present at birth. Differentiating developmental from traumatic facial paralysis noted at birth is important for determining prognosis, but also for medicolegal reasons. Given the dramatic presentation of this condition, accurate and reliable guidelines are necessary in order to facilitate early diagnosis and initiate appropriate therapy, while providing support and counselling to the family. The 30 years experience of our center in the management of developmental facial paralysis is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve embryology, anatomy, nerve physiology, and an appreciation of well-recognized mishaps during fetal development. It is hoped that a better understanding of this condition will in the future lead to early targeted screening, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment in this population of facially disfigured patients, which will facilitate their emotional and social rehabilitation, and their reintegration among their peers.

  5. Topical pyruvic acid (70% versus topical salicylic acid (16.7% compound in treatment of plantar warts: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Shahmoradi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Topical pyruvic acid and compound salicylic acid had the same efficacy and complications in treating plantar warts. Decision for choosing the treatment can be made based on the costs and individual factors as well as patients preferences.

  6. Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards study tools Online Learning Center Meetings and events Make a difference Career planning Media Relations Toolkit AAD apps Academy meeting Chronic urticaria—for members Chronic urticaria—for public Dermatology World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC ...

  7. Anal Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Past Presidents Healthcare Economics Committee 2017 Tripartite Meeting Search form Search Login Join Now Find a Surgeon You are here Patients / Resources / ...

  8. Mothers' depressive symptoms and children's facial emotions: examining the depression-inhibition hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Theodore; Meunier, Leah N; Lusk, Kathryn; Perfect, Michelle M

    2012-02-01

    Vibrant expression of emotion is the principal means infants and young children use to elicit appropriate and timely caregiving, stimulation, and support. This study examined the depression-inhibition hypothesis: that declines in mothers' support as their depressive symptoms increase inhibit children's emotional communication. Ninety-four mothers and their 14- to 27-month-olds interacted in a university playroom. Based on microanalytic coding of discrete facial displays, results supported three components of the hypothesis. (a) As mothers' depressive symptoms increased, children displayed less facial emotion (more flat affect, less joy, less sadness, less negative). (b) Mothers' low emotional and behavioral support predicted children's low facial communication and mediated relations between mothers' depressive symptoms and children's infrequent emotion. (c) Children who were passive with mothers behaviorally expressed emotion infrequently. Children's passivity mediated relations between mothers' depressive symptoms and children's infrequent emotion displays. Contrary to modeling and contagion theories, mothers' facial displays did not mediate relations between their depressive symptoms and children's facial displays. Nor were the outcomes children experienced regulating their facial displays. Rather, findings suggest that, even when depressive symptoms are modest, young children inhibit emotion as mothers' depressive symptoms increase to withdraw from unresponsive mothers, which may adversely affect children's subsequent relationships and competencies.

  9. The facial expression of schizophrenic patients applied with infrared thermal facial image sequence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bo-Lin Jian; Chieh-Li Chen; Wen-Lin Chu; Min-Wei Huang

    2017-01-01

    .... Thus, this study used non-contact infrared thermal facial images (ITFIs) to analyze facial temperature changes evoked by different emotions in moderately and markedly ill schizophrenia patients...

  10. Decline in hospitalization for genital warts in the Veneto region after an HPV vaccination program: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchio, Silvia; Baldovin, Tatjana; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Furlan, Patrizia; Saia, Mario; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2017-04-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted pathogens. This observational study was conducted to estimate the trend of hospitalization for genital warts (GWs) in the Veneto region (Italy) from 2004 to 2015. All patients with GWs were identified in the hospital discharge records of all public and accredited private hospitals that related to Veneto residents and contained the ICD9-CM code 078.11 associated with a genital surgical procedure (vulval/vaginal warts, penile warts and anal warts). Annual total and sex- and age-specific hospitalization rates and trends were calculated and correlated with the different HPV vaccine coverage over the study period. An annual rate of 11.8 per 100,000 population (8.6 per 100,000 males, and 14.8 per 100,000 females) was found, corresponding to 6076 hospitalizations for condyloma (53.3% vulval/vaginal, 35.8% anal, 8.3% penile, and 2.6% both penile or vulval/vaginal and anal). Among females, the rate of overall GWs remained stable to 2007 (19.1 per 100,000), then dropped significantly, reaching a rate of 11.3 per 100,000 in 2015 (average annual percent changes [AAPC]: -6.1%; 95% CI: -8.4; -3.7). For males, the overall rate increased over the study period (from 6.4 per 100,000 in 2004 to 10.8 per 100,000 in 2015; AAPC: 3.8%; 95% CI: 1.2; 6.4). Among the potentially vaccinated females (12- to 20-year-olds) there was a 62.1% decrease in the number of vulval/vaginal warts from the years 2010-2012 to the years 2013-2015 due to an increase in the HPV coverage rate. A similar reduction among males was observed in the same period and the same age group for penile warts (-68.2%). GWs have an important impact on the health services and data suggest that GW-related hospitalization rates rapidly decline in a population with a high HPV vaccination coverage (about 75%). Further efforts should be made to better clarify the epidemiological picture regarding HPV-related diseases, with particular regard to sexual

  11. The comparison study of 5 Fluorouracil vs. cryotherpy in the treatment of the backhand resistant common wart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Asghariazar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wart is a common disease which is caused by a group of viruses called Human Papilloma Virus. The most prevalent type of wart is common wart and the most prevalent site of involvement is hands. Complete recovery, no recurrency and effectiveness in all patients are not obtained by any of therapeutic methods, so in this study we decided to compare therapeutic effects of 5 Fluorouracil (FU with cryotherapy in treatment of common warts of backhand. Material and Methods: In this study, in a one year period from March 2012 to March 2013, 60 patients that referred to dermatology clinic of Sina hospital included the study with the diagnosis of backhand wart .Patients were divided into two groups of treatment, one treated with cryotherapy (30 patients and one threated with 5 FU (30 patients. Age and gender of patients, number of lesions and duration of involvement were documented. Treatment by topical 5 FU was implemented for 4 weeks, twice a day for 4 hours each course. Second group was treated by cryotherapy (liquid nitrogen spray, two sessions with a two-week interval between sessions. Their response to treatment was evaluated as good, moderate and weak. Results: There was no difference in age, gender and mean of duration of involvement and number of lesions between two groups. Response to treatment was considerably better in 5 FU group (p=0.02. Also rate of relapse and complications were lower in 5 FU group of treatment, with a statistically significant difference compared to the cryotherapy group (P<0.001. In separate evaluation of complications only scar formation was equal in two groups and pain and bullae formation were lower in 5 FU group with a statistically significant difference (P<0.001 both. Conclusions: According to limited studies in this field, results of this study could be the base of more comprehensive studies in evaluating the efficacy of 5 FU in treatment of common warts. Appropriate therapeutic response in addition to

  12. Effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics: changes in facial content and frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-11-01

    Aesthetic units of the face can be divided into facial content (FC; eyes, nose, lips, and mouth), anterior facial frame (AFF; a contour line from the trichion, the temporal line of the frontal bone, the lateral orbital rim, the most lateral line of the anterior part of the zygomatic body, the anterior border of the masseter muscle, to the inferior border of the chin), and posterior facial frame (PFF; a contour line from the hairline, the zygomatic arch, to the ramus and gonial angle area of the mandible). The size and shape of each FC and the balance and proportion between FCs create a unique appearance for each person. The facial form can be determined through the combination of AFF and PFF. In the Asian population, clinicians frequently encounter problems of FC (eg, acute nasolabial angle, protrusive and everted lips, nonconsonant lip line, or lip canting), AFF (eg, midface hypoplasia, protrusive and asymmetric chin, vertical deficiency/excess of the anterior maxilla and symphysis, or prominent zygoma), and PFF (eg, square mandibular angle). These problems can be efficiently and effectively corrected through the combination of hard tissue surgery such as anterior segmental osteotomy, genioplasty, mandibular angle reduction, malarplasty, and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the purposes of this article were to introduce the concepts of FC, AFF, and PFF, and to explain the effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics.

  13. Imiquimod 3.75% Cream Applied Daily to Treat Anogenital Warts: Combined Results from Women in Two Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Baker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate if new imiquimod formulations using a shorter treatment duration are safe and efficacious to treat anogenital warts. Methods. In two studies 534 women ≥12 years of age (mean 33.4 with 2–30 warts (mean 7.9 and total wart area ≥10 mm2 (mean 166.3 were randomized (1 : 2 : 2 to placebo (106, imiquimod 2.5% (212 or 3.75% (216 creams applied once daily until complete clearance or a maximum of 8 weeks. Results. For placebo, imiquimod 2.5% and 3.75%, respectively, complete clearance of all warts was achieved in 14.2%, 28.3%, and 36.6% of women (intent-to-treat, P=0.008 imiquimod 2.5%, and P<0.001 3.75% versus placebo. Mean changes in wart counts were −10.7%, −50.9%, and −63.5% (per-protocol, P<0.001 each active versus placebo and safety-related discontinuation rates 0.9%, 1.4%, and 2.3%. Conclusions. Imiquimod 3.75% applied daily for up to 8 weeks was well tolerated and superior to placebo in treating women with external anogenital warts.

  14. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Serour, Francis [Department of Pediatric Surgery, The E. Wolfson Medical Center, Holon (Israel); Chaouat, Malka [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Karem, Jerusalem (Israel); Gonen, Pinhas [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Tommasino, Massimo [International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon (France); Sherman, Levana [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Primary keratinocytes were used to evaluate transforming and carcinogenic abilities of cutaneous HPVs. • E6E7 of cancer associated β HPV types transform primary human keratinocytes. • E6 proteins of cancer and wart associated HPVs inhibit UVB induced cell death. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced proliferation arrest. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced apoptosis signaling.

  15. The Fallacies of Flatness: Thomas Friedman's "The World Is Flat"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight; Roberts, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Thomas Friedman's best-selling "The World is Flat" has exerted much influence in the west by providing both an accessible analysis of globalization and its economic and social effects, and a powerful cultural metaphor for globalization. In this review, we more closely examine Friedman's notion of the social contract, the moral center of his…

  16. A Contemporary Approach to Facial Reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Nate; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2015-01-01

    The management of acute facial nerve insult may entail medical therapy, surgical exploration, decompression, or repair depending on the etiology. When recovery is not complete, facial mimetic function lies on a spectrum ranging from flaccid paralysis to hyperkinesis resulting in facial immobility. Through systematic assessment of the face at rest and with movement, one may tailor the management to the particular pattern of dysfunction. Interventions for long-standing facial palsy include physical therapy, injectables, and surgical reanimation procedures. The goal of the management is to restore facial balance and movement. This article summarizes a contemporary approach to the management of facial nerve insults.

  17. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  18. Nonlocal gravity: Conformally flat spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2016-01-01

    The field equations of the recent nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation are presented in a form that is reminiscent of general relativity. The implications of the nonlocal field equations are studied in the case of conformally flat spacetimes. Even in this simple case, the field equations are intractable. Therefore, to gain insight into the nature of these equations, we investigate the structure of nonlocal gravity in two-dimensional spacetimes. While any smooth 2D spacetime is conformally flat and satisfies Einstein's field equations, only a subset containing either a Killing vector or a homothetic Killing vector can satisfy the field equations of nonlocal gravity.

  19. Dermoscopic Features of Facial Pigmented Skin Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Yana; Attia, Enas A. S.; Souid, Khawla; Vasilenko, Inna V.

    2013-01-01

    Four types of facial pigmented skin lesions (FPSLs) constitute diagnostic challenge to dermatologists; early seborrheic keratosis (SK), pigmented actinic keratosis (AK), lentigo maligna (LM), and solar lentigo (SL). A retrospective analysis of dermoscopic images of histopathologically diagnosed clinically-challenging 64 flat FPSLs was conducted to establish the dermoscopic findings corresponding to each of SK, pigmented AK, LM, and SL. Four main dermoscopic features were evaluated: sharp demarcation, pigment pattern, follicular/epidermal pattern, and vascular pattern. In SK, the most specific dermoscopic features are follicular/epidermal pattern (cerebriform pattern; 100% of lesions, milia-like cysts; 50%, and comedo-like openings; 37.50%), and sharp demarcation (54.17%). AK and LM showed a composite characteristic pattern named “strawberry pattern” in 41.18% and 25% of lesions respectively, characterized by a background erythema and red pseudo-network, associated with prominent follicular openings surrounded by a white halo. However, in LM “strawberry pattern” is widely covered by psewdonetwork (87.5%), homogenous structureless pigmentation (75%) and other vascular patterns. In SL, structureless homogenous pigmentation was recognized in all lesions (100%). From the above mentioned data, we developed an algorithm to guide in dermoscopic features of FPSLs. PMID:23431466

  20. Female Facial Appearance and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Gray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study addressed whether rated femininity, attractiveness, and health in female faces are associated with numerous indices of self-reported health history (number of colds/stomach bugs/frequency of antibiotic use in a sample of 105 females. It was predicted that all three rating variables would correlate negatively with bouts of illness (with the exception of rates of stomach infections, on the assumption that aspects of facial appearance signal mate quality. The results showed partial support for this prediction, in that there was a general trend for both facial femininity and attractiveness to correlate negatively with the reported number of colds in the preceding twelve months and with the frequency of antibiotic use in the last three years and the last twelve months. Rated facial femininity (as documented in September was also associated with days of flu experienced in the period spanning the November-December months. However, rated health did not correlate with any of the health indices (albeit one marginal result with antibiotic use in the last twelve months. The results lend support to previous findings linking facial femininity to health and suggest that facial femininity may be linked to some aspects of disease resistance but not others.

  1. Cortical control of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system.

  2. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  3. Compound facial expressions of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories--happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another.

  4. [The history of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques.

  5. Effects of high mobility group protein box 1 and toll like receptor 4 pathway on warts caused by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Deng, Yunhua; Xie, Yuyan; Shen, Guanxin

    2014-10-01

    Accumulative evidence has demonstrated that inflammation has an important role in human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenicity. However, the effects of high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1)-toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway associated inflammation on epidermal warts caused by HPV remain unclear. The present study investigated the HMGB1, TLR4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 expression in condyloma acuminatum (CA) and verruca vulgaris (VV). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that p65 expression in epithelial nuclei in VV and CA was significantly higher than in normal skin (NS) (Pwarts caused by HPV. HMGB1-TLR4 pathway-associated inflammation may therefore have a pivotal role in CA. HMGB1, rather than TLR4, may be a vital mediator of inflammation in VV. Therapies targeting HMGB1 may be a potential strategy for the treatment of HPV-associated warts.

  6. Slowing down facial movements and vocal sounds enhances facial expression recognition and facial-vocal imitation in children with autism

    OpenAIRE

    Tardif, Carole; Lainé, France; Rodriguez, Mélissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on CD-Rom, under audio or silent conditions, and under dynamic visual conditions (slowly, very slowly, at normal speed) plus a st...

  7. Flat space physics from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, R

    2004-01-01

    We point out that aspects of quantum mechanics can be derived from the holographic principle, using only a perturbative limit of classical general relativity. In flat space, the covariant entropy bound reduces to the Bekenstein bound. The latter does not contain Newton's constant and cannot operate via gravitational backreaction. Instead, it is protected by - and in this sense, predicts - the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

  8. The complexity of flat origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, M. [Xerox, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hayes, B. [ParcPlace-Digitalk, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We study a basic problem in mathematical origami: determine if a given crease pattern can be folded to a flat origami. We show that assigning mountain and valley folds is NP-hard. We also show that determining a suitable overlap order for flaps is NP-hard, even assuming a valid mountain and valley assignment.

  9. Line bundles and flat connections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INDRANIL BISWAS; GEORG SCHUMACHER

    2017-06-01

    We prove that there are cocompact lattices $\\Gamma$ in $\\rm SL(2,\\mathbb C)$ with the property that there are holomorphic line bundles $L$ on $\\rm SL(2,\\mathbb C)/ \\Gamma$ with $c_{1}(L) = 0$ such that $L$ does not admit any unitary flat connection.

  10. Comment: The comparison study of 5 Fluorouracil vs. cryotherpy in the treatment of the backhand resistant common wart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chuh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We refer to the study conducted by Asghariazar R et al comparing the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil against cryotherapy in the management of backhand resistant common warts [1]. We congratulate their success in reporting such a high-quality study. We would humbly like to offer a few pieces of advice, which might further augment the clinical relevance and the scientific content for future studies along similar veins.

  11. Genetic diversity of bovine papillomavirus types, including two putative new types, in teat warts from dairy cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Michele; de Camargo Tozato, Claudia; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; de Alcântara, Brígida Kussumoto; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Otonel, Rodrigo Alejandro Arellano; Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2016-06-01

    Teat papillomatosis affects dairy cows worldwide. Milking can become difficult due to teat warts, and maintaining affected cows in the herds may diminish economic profit in the dairy industry. Currently, 13 bovine papillomavirus (BPV) types have been fully characterized, and numerous putative BPV types have been identified through partial L1 gene PCR. In order to identify the viral types present in warts on the udders of dairy cows, 40 teat lesions from 24 cows from 13 cattle farms in three States of Brazil were evaluated by PV L1 gene PCR. The warts that were evaluated contained sequences from BPVs 6-10, the putative BPV types BAPV9 and BAPV4, and two unreported putative papillomavirus (PV) types, named BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7. In addition, mixed infections and coinfections were identified, since more than one lesion was observed on the udders of 13 cows. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BPV/BR-UEL6 is closely related to BPVs belonging to the genus Xipapillomavirus, while BPV/BR-UEL7 clustered with the previously reported strains Cervus timorensis and Pudu puda PVs, which represent a putative new PV type, and it was only distantly related to xi-, epsilon-, delta- and dyoxi-PVs. These results provide information that will assist in the understanding of the association of BPVs 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, as well as putative BPV types BAPV4 and BAPV9, with mammary papillomatosis. This is the first characterization of putative novel PV types BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7 in teat warts of dairy cows, highlighting the high genetic diversity of BPVs associated with teat papillomatosis.

  12. Cellular signaling in sinecatechins-treated external genital and perianal warts: unraveling the mechanism of action of a botanical therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harrison; P; Nguyen; Hung; Q; Doan; Peter; Rady; Stephen; K; Tyring

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Derived from green tea leaves,sinecatechins(Veregen)ointment,15%is a topical therapy that is FDA-approved to treat human papillomavirus(HPV)-induced external genital and perianal warts(EGW)in immunocompetent patients aged 18 years and older.In two phase 3 trials enrolling over 1,000 participants with EGW,a 16-week treatment regimen with sinecatechins ointment resulted in higher rates of complete clearance of all warts—both

  13. Pulsed dye laser versus Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of plantar warts: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mohamady, Abd El-Shakor; Mearag, Ibrahim; El-Khalawany, Mohamed; Elshahed, Ahmed; Shokeir, Hisham; Mahmoud, Anas

    2014-05-01

    Plantar warts are common viral infection that are usually challenging in treatment. Conventional treatment methods are usually invasive, have low efficacy, and need long recovery periods. In this study, we compared pulsed dye laser (PDL) and neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers in the treatment of recalcitrant plantar warts. The study included 46 patients with multiple plantar warts. In each patient, lesions were divided into two groups: one treated with Nd:YAG (spot size, 7 mm; energy, 100 J/cm(2); and pulse duration, 20 ms) and the other with PDL (spot size, 7 mm; energy, 8 J/cm(2); and pulse duration, 0.5 ms). Laser sessions were applied every 2 weeks with maximum of six sessions. The study included 63% males and 37% females with a mean age of 29.6 ± 7.34 years. The cure rate was 73.9% with PDL with no significant difference (p = 0.87) from Nd:YAG (78.3%). The number of sessions required was more in PDL (mean, 5.05 ± 0.2) compared with Nd:YAG (mean, 4.65 ± 0.5) but without significant difference. Complications were significantly higher with Nd:YAG (43.5%) compared with PDL (8.7%). Hematoma was the most common complication recorded by Nd:YAG (28.3 %), and it was significantly higher (p = 0.002) than PDL (2.2%). Relapse was recorded in 8.7% with Nd:YAG compared with 13% in PDL with no significant difference (p = 0.74). Our results suggested that PDL and Nd:YAG lasers are effective in the treatment of resistant plantar warts. PDL is safer and less painful but needs more sessions, while Nd:YAG is more painful and shows more complications.

  14. Correlation between pretreatment levels of interferon response genes and clinical responses to an immune response modifier (Imiquimod) in genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, I; Tyring, S K; Brysk, M M; Stanley, M A; Tomai, M A; Miller, R L; Smith, M H; McDermott, D J; Slade, H B

    2000-07-01

    Imiquimod (IQ) has been successfully used in treatment of genital warts. In clinical settings, patients responded well but wart reduction rates varied. Our aim was to find a correlation between clinical responses and pretreatment (constitutive) levels of genes that might be involved in the molecular action of IQ. Since IQ is a cytokine inducer, we analyzed levels of expression of genes of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and their inhibitors as well as interferon response factors (IRFs) in pretreatment biopsy specimens from complete responders (99 to 100% wart reduction rate) versus incomplete responders (75 to 92% wart reduction rate) by reverse transcription-PCR. We found that mRNA levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and IRF1 were higher in complete responders than in incomplete responders. Incomplete responders expressed larger amounts of STAT3, IRF2, and protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) mRNAs compared to complete responders before IQ treatment. We hypothesize that high-level expression of STAT1 and IRF1 is advantageous for a better IQ response. The observed differences in constitutive mRNA levels of these genes may be the consequence of alterations in cellular differentiation and/or variable expression of endogenous interferons. Previous in vitro studies showed that keratinocyte differentiation coordinates the balance between positive and negative signals along the JAK/STAT pathway by regulating the IRF1:IRF2 and STAT1:PIAS1 ratios and thus affecting induction of IQ-inducible genes. Specifically, differentiation supports constitutive expression of STAT1 and IRF1 mRNAs but not expression of IRF2 and PIAS1. Our data are in good agreement with studies that showed the importance of STAT1 in cytokine induction and activation of interferon-responsive genes by IQ.

  15. Automatic Flatness Control of Cold Rolling Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbe, Yoshiharu; Sekiguchi, Kunio

    One of the subjects of cold rolling is a flatness of the rolled strip. Conventionally, measured strip flatness was approximated by polynomial (2th, 4th, 6th) equation across the entire strip width. This made it difficult to deal with desired loose edge or any desired flatness across the entire strip width. Also conventional flatness control was done for the entire strip width, so if there is a different flatness error among drive side and work side, conventional flatness control can not control properly. We propose independent strip flatness control among drive side and work side, and also automatic flatness control (AFC) system with arbitrary desired strip flatness. Also some applied results to cold mill are shown.

  16. Overview of facial paralysis: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Thuy-Anh N; Limb, Charles J

    2008-05-01

    Facial paralysis represents the end result of a wide array of disorders and heterogeneous etiologies, including congenital, traumatic, infectious, neoplastic, and metabolic causes. Thus, facial palsy has a diverse range of presentations, from transient unilateral paresis to devastating permanent bilateral paralysis. Although not life-threatening, facial paralysis remains relatively common and can have truly severe effects on one's quality of life, with important ramifications in terms of psychological impact and physiologic burden. Prognosis and outcomes for patients with facial paralysis are highly dependent on the etiologic nature of the weakness as well as the treatment offered to the patient. Facial plastic surgeons are often asked to manage the sequelae of long-standing facial paralysis. It is important, however, for any practitioner who assists this population to have a sophisticated understanding of the common etiologies and initial management of facial paralysis. This article reviews the more common causes of facial paralysis and discusses relevant early treatment strategies.

  17. Automatic Facial Expression Analysis A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Sumathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Automatic Facial Expression Recognition has been one of the latest research topic since1990’s.There have been recent advances in detecting face, facial expression recognition andclassification. There are multiple methods devised for facial feature extraction which helps in identifyingface and facial expressions. This paper surveys some of the published work since 2003 till date. Variousmethods are analysed to identify the Facial expression. The Paper also discusses about the facialparameterization using Facial Action Coding System(FACS action units and the methods whichrecognizes the action units parameters using facial expression data that are extracted. Various kinds offacial expressions are present in human face which can be identified based on their geometric features,appearance features and hybrid features . The two basic concepts of extracting features are based onfacial deformation and facial motion. This article also identifies the techniques based on thecharacteristics of expressions and classifies the suitable methods that can be implemented.

  18. [Therapy for atypical facial pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroko

    2009-09-01

    Atypical facial pain is a pain in the head, neck and the face, without organic causes. It is treated at departments of physical medicine, such as dental, oral and maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, cerebral surgery, or head and neck surgery. In primary care, it is considered to be a medically unexplained symptom (MUS), or a somatoform disorder, such as somatization caused by a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) by psychiatrists. Usually, patients consult departments of physical medicine complaining of physical pain. Therefore physicians in these departments should examine the patients from the holistic perspective, and identify organic diseases. As atypical facial pain becomes chronic, other complications, including psychiatric complaints other than physical pain, such as depression may develop. Moreover, physical, psychological, and social factors affect the symptoms by interacting with one another. Therefore, in examining atypical facial pain, doctors specializing in dental, oral and maxillofacial medicine are required to provide psychosomatic treatment that is based on integrated knowledge.

  19. The prevalence and genotype of human papillomavirus on cervical samples from an Irish female population with external genital warts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cremin, Suzanne M

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cervical genotype profile of females who presented to an STI Clinic with external genital warts (EGW); and to determine the potential vaccine coverage prior to the uptake of the HPV vaccines. Sixty-one cervical scrapings were taken from females aged 18-35 y who had external genital warts or a history of external genital warts. The resulting 50 samples that were positive for HPV-DNA were subjected to genotype identification. Forty-six of these samples had detectable genotypes by LIPA analysis and most (78%, 36\\/46) had multiple low risk (LR) and high risk (HR) genotypes on the cervix. Twenty-five of these samples (54%) had more than 1 HR genotype. Of the 36 patients who had any HR genotypes, 18 (50%) were identified to have the most oncogenic HPV genotypes, namely 16 and 18. Three of these samples had both 16 and 18 on the cervix. The presence of multiple HR genotypes on the majority of cervical samples from a self-referred population of females with EGW is presented. This study is of importance since persistent HR-HPV is the necessary risk factor in the development of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. Gardisil, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine would have been useful in the prevention of 28% (13\\/46) of these infections.

  20. Perception of facial expression and facial identity in subjects with social developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefter, Rebecca L; Manoach, Dara S; Barton, Jason J S

    2005-11-22

    It has been hypothesized that the social dysfunction in social developmental disorders (SDDs), such as autism, Asperger disorder, and the socioemotional processing disorder, impairs the acquisition of normal face-processing skills. The authors investigated whether this purported perceptual deficit was generalized to both facial expression and facial identity or whether these different types of facial perception were dissociated in SDDs. They studied 26 adults with a variety of SDD diagnoses, assessing their ability to discriminate famous from anonymous faces, their perception of emotional expression from facial and nonfacial cues, and the relationship between these abilities. They also compared the performance of two defined subgroups of subjects with SDDs on expression analysis: one with normal and one with impaired recognition of facial identity. While perception of facial expression was related to the perception of nonfacial expression, the perception of facial identity was not related to either facial or nonfacial expression. Likewise, subjects with SDDs with impaired facial identity processing perceived facial expression as well as those with normal facial identity processing. The processing of facial identity and that of facial expression are dissociable in social developmental disorders. Deficits in perceiving facial expression may be related to emotional processing more than face processing. Dissociations between the perception of facial identity and facial emotion are consistent with current cognitive models of face processing. The results argue against hypotheses that the social dysfunction in social developmental disorder causes a generalized failure to acquire face-processing skills.

  1. STUDY OF ACQUIRED FACIAL HYPERPIGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjumani Sobhanakumari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Facial hypermelanosis is a clinical feature of a diverse group of disorders most commonly in middle-aged females who are exposed to sunlight. There is a considerable overlap in clinical features among the clinical entities of facial hypermelanosis. Aetiology in most of facial melanosis is unknown, but some factors like UV radiation in melasma and exposure to allergens in Riehl’s melanosis could be implicated. Histopathology is an accurate diagnostic tool. The benefit of histopathology is not only to confirm diagnosis, but also to exclude related disorders. Among the hyperpigmented conditions, melasma, Riehl’s melanosis, Acanthosis Nigricans (AN and Lichen Planus Pigmentosus (LPP are the common causes of facial hypermelanosis - most common being melasma. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of hundred consenting patients who attended the outpatient wing of Dermatology Department of Government Medical College, Kottayam. They were included only after getting the written informed consent. RESULTS Maximum number of patients were in the 5 th decade. 65% were females. Homemakers/housewives constituted the main study group (34%.55% of patients had duration of pigmentation between 1 to 5 years. Among these, melasma and acanthosis nigricans had the longest duration of disease. 69% of patients were symptomatic. Most common clinical diagnosis was melasma (45 followed by acanthosis nigricans (17, Riehl’s melanosis (15 and lichen planus pigmentosus (14. One case each of exogenous ochronosis and Addison’s disease and remaining were post inflammatory. Histopathologically, 63% of patients had histological features suggestive of melasma, which evolved as the most common cause of facial melanosis, next common being acanthosis nigricans and Riehl’s melanosis. CONCLUSION Clinical and histopathological examination is must to confirm the definite diagnosis of facial hyper-pigmentation. Skin is said to be the window to

  2. Facial Expression Synthesis Based on Imitation

    OpenAIRE

    Yihjia Tsai; Hwei Jen Lin; Fu Wen Yang

    2012-01-01

    It is an interesting and challenging problem to synthesise vivid facial expression images. In this paper, we propose a facial expression synthesis system which imitates a reference facial expression image according to the difference between shape feature vectors of the neutral image and expression image. To improve the result, two stages of postprocessing are involved. We focus on the facial expressions of happiness, sadness, and surprise. Experimental results show vivid and flexible results.

  3. Facial skin care products and cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-01-01

    Facial skin care products and cosmetics can both aid or incite facial dermatoses. Properly selected skin care can create an environment for barrier repair aiding in the re-establishment of a healing biofilm and diminution of facial redness; however, skin care products that aggressively remove intercellular lipids or cause irritation must be eliminated before the red face will resolve. Cosmetics are an additive variable either aiding or challenging facial skin health.

  4. Facial aging: A clinical classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiffman Melvin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classification of facial aging is to have a simple clinical method to determine the severity of the aging process in the face. This allows a quick estimate as to the types of procedures that the patient would need to have the best results. Procedures that are presently used for facial rejuvenation include laser, chemical peels, suture lifts, fillers, modified facelift and full facelift. The physician is already using his best judgment to determine which procedure would be best for any particular patient. This classification may help to refine these decisions.

  5. The Epidemiology of Facial Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Koopman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Assuming that the average age of the readership of this thesis is 35 years, and that 49% is male, given the number of theses printed (n=500) and the average life expectancy (78 years for men, 82.3 years for women), nine [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 8 - 10] readers (1.8%) will get a form of facial pain as studied in this thesis. Despite its low frequency the severity and debilitating nature of certain facial pain conditions is an important motivator for scien...

  6. Darwin, deception, and facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul

    2003-12-01

    Darwin did not focus on deception. Only a few sentences in his book mentioned the issue. One of them raised the very interesting question of whether it is difficult to voluntarily inhibit the emotional expressions that are most difficult to voluntarily fabricate. Another suggestion was that it would be possible to unmask a fabricated expression by the absence of the difficult-to-voluntarily-generate facial actions. Still another was that during emotion body movements could be more easily suppressed than facial expression. Research relevant to each of Darwin's suggestions is reviewed, as is other research on deception that Darwin did not foresee.

  7. Connections between the facial and trigeminal nerves: Anatomical basis for facial muscle proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Cobo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception is a quality of sensibility that originates in specialized sensory organs (proprioceptors that inform the central nervous system about static and dynamic conditions of muscles and joints. The facial muscles are innervated by efferent motor nerve fibers and typically lack proprioceptors. However, facial proprioception plays a key role in the regulation and coordination of the facial musculature and diverse reflexes. Thus, facial muscles must be necessarily supplied also for afferent sensory nerve fibers provided by other cranial nerves, especially the trigeminal nerve. Importantly, neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated that facial proprioceptive impulses are conveyed through branches of the trigeminal nerve to the central nervous system. The multiple communications between the facial and the trigeminal nerves are at the basis of these functional characteristics. Here we review the literature regarding the facial (superficial communications between the facial and the trigeminal nerves, update the current knowledge about proprioception in the facial muscles, and hypothesize future research in facial proprioception.

  8. Facial Specialty. Teacher Edition. Cosmetology Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is one of a series of curriculum guides designed to direct and support instruction in vocational cosmetology programs in the State of Oklahoma. It contains seven units for the facial specialty: identifying enemies of the skin, using aromatherapy on the skin, giving facials without the aid of machines, giving facials with the aid…

  9. Exploiting facial expressions for affective video summarisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joho, H.; Jose, J.M.; Valenti, R.; Sebe, N.; Marchand-Maillet, S.; Kompatsiaris, I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to affective video summarisation based on the facial expressions (FX) of viewers. A facial expression recognition system was deployed to capture a viewer's face and his/her expressions. The user's facial expressions were analysed to infer personalised affective scenes

  10. Personalised modelling of facial action unit intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Shuang; Rudovic, Ognjen; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions depend greatly on facial morphology and expressiveness of the observed person. Recent studies have shown great improvement of the personalized over non-personalized models in variety of facial expression related tasks, such as face and emotion recognition. However, in the context

  11. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kamide

    2012-01-01

    tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear.

  12. Facial Nerve Palsy In Secondary Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuria B.L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary syphilis with right facial nerve palsy is reported. A 28 year old unmarried male presented with diffuse maculopapular rash and facial nerve palsy. He had elevated while cells and protein in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were positive for VDRL and TPHA tests. Facial nerve palsy and maculopapular rash improved with penicillin therapy.

  13. Prevalence and incidence of external genital warts in a sample of Italian general female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suligoi, Barbara; Vittori, Giorgio; Salfa, Maria Cristina; Timelli, Laura; Corsini, Dario; Fattorini, Giovanni; Mariani, Luciano

    2017-02-06

    The Human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted virus worldwide. The objective of this study was to estimate: 1) the prevalence and the incidence of external genital warts (eGW) in a sample of women attending community outpatient clinics and 2) the total number of eGW cases in the Italian female population aged 15-64 years. A prospective study was performed for a 12-month period between 2009 and 2010, among a sample of women attending community gynecological outpatient clinics located throughout Italy. Demographic data, for every woman aged 15-64 years, were collected. For women diagnosed with eGW, behavioral and clinical data were recorded. Prevalence of eGW was calculated as the proportion between the number of women with eGW and that of women visiting any of the participating gynecologists; incidence of eGW was calculated as the proportion between the number of women with a new diagnosis of eGW and that of women visiting any of the participating gynecologists. Standardized prevalence by age was used to estimate the number of eGW cases occurring in the Italian female population aged 15-64 years. In 2009-2010, 44 community gynecologists were included in the network. In one-year period, 16,410 women visited any of the participating gynecologists; 63 women were diagnosed with eGW, corresponding to a prevalence of 3.8 cases per 1,000 women per year (95%CI: 2.9-4.9). The incidence of eGW was 3.0 cases per 1,000 women per year (95%CI: 2.2-3.9). Women aged 15-24 years showed both the highest prevalence and incidence. Prevalence and incidence significantly decreased by increasing age group (p stress the effectiveness of community clinical networks in investigating STI epidemiology among women from the general population, confirm the relevance of HPV vaccination programs among adolescents, and underscore the need of promoting safe sex, implementing early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of genital warts.

  14. Flat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    菲亚特选在柏林举行的“面包与黄油(Bread&Butter)”青年时尚秀中发布了500柴油版车型。这款车型首先推出的是黑色和绿色车身颜色,共限量1万辆,目前已有6000辆被售出。现在,它又追加了1款车身颜色“午夜蓝”,菲亚特选择这款颜色,是因为它很接近牛仔裤的颜色,更容易吸引年轻的消费者。

  15. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  16. Parallel spinors on flat manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michał

    2006-05-01

    Let p(M) be the dimension of the vector space of parallel spinors on a closed spin manifold M. We prove that every finite group G is the holonomy group of a closed flat spin manifold M(G) such that p(M(G))>0. If the holonomy group Hol(M) of M is cyclic, then we give an explicit formula for p(M) another than that given in [R.J. Miatello, R.A. Podesta, The spectrum of twisted Dirac operators on compact flat manifolds, Trans. Am. Math. Soc., in press]. We answer the question when p(M)>0 if Hol(M) is a cyclic group of prime order or dim⁡M≤4.

  17. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  18. Flat heat pipe design, construction, and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voegler, G.; Boughey, B.; Cerza, M.; Lindler, K.W.

    1999-08-02

    This paper details the design, construction and partial analysis of a low temperature flat heat pipe in order to determine the feasibility of implementing flat heat pipes into thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems.

  19. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial…

  20. Facial three-dimensional morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Serrao, G

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional facial morphometry was investigated in a sample of 40 men and 40 women, with a new noninvasive computerized method. Subjects ranged in age between 19 and 32 years, had sound dentitions, and no craniocervical disorders. For each subject, 16 cutaneous facial landmarks were automatically collected by a system consisting of two infrared camera coupled device (CCD) cameras, real time hardware for the recognition of markers, and software for the three-dimensional reconstruction of landmarks' x, y, z coordinates. From these landmarks, 15 linear and 10 angular measurements, and four linear distance ratios were computed and averaged for sex. For all angular values, both samples showed a narrow variability and no significant gender differences were demonstrated. Conversely, all the linear measurements were significantly higher in men than in women. The highest intersample variability was observed for the measurements of facial height (prevalent vertical dimension), and the lowest for the measurements of facial depth (prevalent horizontal dimension). The proportions of upper and lower face height relative to the anterior face height showed a significant sex difference. Mean values were in good agreement with literature data collected with traditional methods. The described method allowed the direct and noninvasive calculation of three-dimensional linear and angular measurements that would be usefully applied in clinics as a supplement to the classic x-ray cephalometric analyses.

  1. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  2. Topical management of facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Villapalos, Jorge; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N

    2008-11-01

    The face is the central point of the physical features of the human being. It transmits expressions and emotions, communicates feelings and allows for individual identity. It contains complex musculature and a pliable and unique skin envelope that reacts to the environment through a vast network of nerve endings. The face hosts vital areas that make phonation, feeding, and vision possible. Facial burns disrupt these anatomical and functional structures creating pain, deformity, swelling, and contractures that may lead to lasting physical and psychological sequelae. The management of facial burns may include operative and non-operative treatment or both, depending on the depth and extent of the burn. This paper intends to provide a review of the available options for topical management of facial burns. Topical agents will be defined as any agent applied to the surface of the skin that alters the outcome of the facial burn. Therefore, the classic concept of topical therapy will be expanded and developed within two major stages: acute and rehabilitation. Comparison of the effectiveness of the different treatments and relevant literature will be discussed.

  3. Constraint-based facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.M. Ruttkay

    1999-01-01

    textabstractConstraints have been traditionally used for computer animation applications to define side conditions for generating synthesized motion according to a standard, usually physically realistic, set of motion equations. The case of facial animation is very different, as no set of motion equ

  4. Guide to Understanding Facial Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a significant loss of tone in the tissues and considerable facial sagging. One of the most important functions of ... involve proce- dures in which a patient’s own tissue is used to ele- vate the sagging portions of the face. These slings may be applied to the portion ...

  5. Constraint-based facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.M. Ruttkay

    1999-01-01

    textabstractConstraints have been traditionally used for computer animation applications to define side conditions for generating synthesized motion according to a standard, usually physically realistic, set of motion equations. The case of facial animation is very different, as no set of motion

  6. Half-flat Quantum Hair

    CERN Document Server

    García-Compeán, Hugo; Martínez-Merino, Aldo; Santos-Silva, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    By wrapping D3-branes over 3-cycles on a Half-flat manifold we construct an effective supersymmetric Black Hole in the N=2 low-energy theory in four-dimensions. Specifically we find that the torsion cycles present in a half-flat compactification, corresponding to the mirror symmetric image of electric NS flux on a Calabi-Yau manifold, manifest in the black hole physics as quantum hair. We compute the electric and magnetic charges related to the quantum hair, and also the mass contribution to the effective black hole. We find that by wrapping a number of D3-branes equal to the order of the discrete group associated to the torsional part of the half-flat homology, the effective charge and mass terms vanishes. We compute the variation of entropy and the corresponding temperature associated with the lost of the quantum hair. We also comment on the equivalence between canceling Freed-Witten anomalies and the assumption of self-duality for the five-form field strength. Finally from a K-theoretical perspective, we c...

  7. Flat colon polyps: what should radiologists know?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignjatovic, A. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Burling, D., E-mail: burlingdavid@yahoo.co.u [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Ilangovan, R.; Clark, S.K.; Taylor, S.A.; East, J.E.; Saunders, B.P. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    With the recent publication of international computed tomography (CT) colonography standards, which aim to improve quality of examinations, this review informs radiologists about the significance of flat polyps (adenomas and hyperplastic polyps) in colorectal cancer pathways. We describe flat polyp classification systems and propose how flat polyps should be reported to ensure patient management strategies are based on polyp morphology as well as size. Indeed, consistency when describing flat polyps is of increasing importance given the strengthening links between CT colonography and endoscopy.

  8. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  9. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  10. Quality of life of homosexual males with genital warts: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Helle K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent qualitative study in Denmark showed that genital warts (GWs can considerably lower the quality of life of heterosexual patients. In this follow-up study, we interviewed men having sex with men (MSM suffering from GWs to obtain an in-depth understanding of their perception of GWs and determine the extent to which minority (homosexual cultural issues affect these patients' experiences. Qualitative interviews with six MSM were performed using a semi-structured interview guide. Questions were formulated on the basis of the earlier qualitative study in heterosexual patients with GWs along with a literature review. Data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. Findings Many MSM worried about being stigmatised and excluded from the small homosexual 'scene', their key social group, thereby lowering their chances of finding sex and love. Most participants had suffered from GWs for several years which added to the negative psycho-sexual and social effects of the disease. Participants' fears of developing anal cancer were similar to those expressed about cervical cancer by females with GWs. Conclusions Ano-genital human papillomavirus (HPV infection is common and has a serious psychological and sexual impact among MSM. However, they do not benefit to the same extent as heterosexual men from the herd immunity effect of HPV vaccination of girls. The pathological profile and concerns specific to MSM should be addressed when communicating with these patients, and should be taken into account when considering HPV vaccination of boys.

  11. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of bovine papillomavirus in cutaneous warts in cattle in Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Cantú-Covarrubias, Antonio; Álvarez, José Francisco Morales; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Papillomas occur more frequently in cattle than other domestic animals. The causal agent of bovine papillomatosis is a virus that belongs to the family Papillomaviridae. In Tamaulipas, Mexico, the virus is considered a serious problem and has impeded the export of cattle to the United States, resulting in serious economic losses. Owing to the lack of information regarding the subtypes of papillomaviruses that infect cattle in Mexico, the aim of this study was to determine the subtypes in Tamaulipas. Fifty-two warts were analyzed with the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) involving primers that amplify the E7 gene of bovine papillomavirus (BPV). The PCR products were sequenced to differentiate the BPV-1 and BPV-2 subtypes. The sequencing quality was determined with the use of MEGA 6.0 software. Comparison of the Tamaulipas sequences with those of known BPV types by means of the MUSCLE algorithm showed that 53% of the former were BPV-1 and 47% were BPV-2. The distribution of the 2 subtypes in the cattle was homogeneous. This study demonstrated the presence of BPV-1 and BPV-2 in cattle from Tamaulipas and constitutes the first molecular characterization of papillomas in Mexico.

  12. CXCL12 Mediates Aberrant Costimulation of B Lymphocytes in Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections, Myelokathexis Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Roselli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections, Myelokathexis (WHIM syndrome is an immunodeficiency caused by mutations in chemokine receptor CXCR4. WHIM patient adaptive immunity defects remain largely unexplained. We have previously shown that WHIM-mutant T cells form unstable immunological synapses, affecting T cell activation. Here, we show that, in WHIM patients and WHIM CXCR4 knock-in mice, B cells are more apoptosis prone. Intriguingly, WHIM-mutant B cells were also characterized by spontaneous activation. Searching for a mechanistic explanation for these observations, we uncovered a novel costimulatory effect of CXCL12, the CXCR4 ligand, on WHIM-mutant but not wild-type B cells. The WHIM CXCR4-mediated costimulation led to increased B-cell activation, possibly involving mTOR, albeit without concurrently promoting survival. A reduction in antigenic load during immunization in the mouse was able to circumvent the adaptive immunity defects. These results suggest that WHIM-mutant CXCR4 may lead to spontaneous aberrant B-cell activation, via CXCL12-mediated costimulation, impairing B-cell survival and thus possibly contributing to the WHIM syndrome defects in adaptive immunity.

  13. Preventing cervical cancer and genital warts - How much protection is enough for HPV vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    HPV associated disease is a global health problem: 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated with HPV 16 and 18 accounting for 70% of cases of cervical cancer. Genital warts caused by HPV 6 and 11 have a lifetime risk of acquisition of 10%. HPV vaccines are subunit vaccines consisting of virus like particles comprised of the L1 major capsid protein. Two vaccines have been licenced since 2006/2007 and are in the National Immunisation programmes in 62 countries. Both vaccines include HPV 16 and 18 VLPs and one also includes HPV 6 and 11. The vaccines are highly immunogenic and well tolerated. Genital HPV is a sexually transmitted infection with peak incidence occurring just after the onset of sexual activity and the routine cohort for immunisation in almost all countries are adolescent girls 9-15 years of age with or without catch up for older adolescents and young women. Population effectiveness is now being demonstrated for these vaccines in countries with high vaccine coverage. HPV vaccines are highly immunogenic and effective and the original 3 dose schedules have already been reduced, for those 14 years and under, to 2 for both licenced vaccines. There is preliminary evidence that 1 dose of vaccine is as effective as 2 or 3 in preventing persistent HPV infection in the cervix in young women and further reductions in dosage may be possible if supported by appropriate virological, immunological and modelling studies.

  14. Verrucous carcinoma of the foot, not your typical plantar wart: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Diandra K; Ponder, Erinn N; Berrey, B Hudson; Kubik, Melanie J; Sindone, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Verrucous carcinoma of the foot is often misdiagnosed initially as plantar warts. Delayed diagnostic treatments with the use of optimal biopsy techniques may result in significant hindrances for patient care and may often result in detrimental outcomes to the patient. With the use of various epidermal biopsy methods, early diagnostic treatment can be implemented to a slow-growing lesion unresponsive to topical agents preventing unfavorable pedal amputations. A case study of verrucous carcinoma of the foot with surgical resection was conducted along with a literature review. Verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the foot is known to be a rare, locally invasive, well-differentiated low-grade squamous cell carcinoma that may evolve from the human papilloma virus. This localized tumor of the foot often has low metastatic potential, however can be quite invasive. It is therefore pertinent to obtain adequate radiological studies when planning for surgical resection of this tumor. When localized to the foot, it often involves deep structures such as tendons, muscle & bone. Complete wide local excision of the tumor is essential to avoid recurrence. We present a case of verrucous carcinoma of the foot in a 46-year-old African American male with a past medical history of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Human papilloma virus (HPV). The patient refused a Transmetatarsal amputation. The loss of the third digit was a result of tissue loss following resection and an attempt to relocate a severely laterally dislocated 3rd digit, not PVD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Misrecognition of facial expressions in delinquents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuura Naomi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have suggested impairment in facial expression recognition in delinquents, but controversy remains with respect to how such recognition is impaired. To address this issue, we investigated facial expression recognition in delinquents in detail. Methods We tested 24 male adolescent/young adult delinquents incarcerated in correctional facilities. We compared their performances with those of 24 age- and gender-matched control participants. Using standard photographs of facial expressions illustrating six basic emotions, participants matched each emotional facial expression with an appropriate verbal label. Results Delinquents were less accurate in the recognition of facial expressions that conveyed disgust than were control participants. The delinquents misrecognized the facial expressions of disgust as anger more frequently than did controls. Conclusion These results suggest that one of the underpinnings of delinquency might be impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions, with a specific bias toward interpreting disgusted expressions as hostile angry expressions.

  16. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  17. Man-machine collaboration using facial expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Katahera, S.; Cai, D.

    2002-09-01

    For realizing the flexible man-machine collaboration, understanding of facial expressions and gestures is not negligible. In our method, we proposed a hierarchical recognition approach, for the understanding of human emotions. According to this method, the facial AFs (action features) were firstly extracted and recognized by using histograms of optical flow. Then, based on the facial AFs, facial expressions were classified into two calsses, one of which presents the positive emotions, and the other of which does the negative ones. Accordingly, the facial expressions belonged to the positive class, or the ones belonged to the negative class, were classified into more complex emotions, which were revealed by the corresponding facial expressions. Finally, the system architecture how to coordinate in recognizing facil action features and facial expressions for man-machine collaboration was proposed.

  18. An inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor function does not affect the ability of human papillomavirus 11 to form warts in the xenografted immunodeficient mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Tanya; Howett, Mary K; Welsh, Patricia A; Patrick, Susan D; Neely, Elizabeth B; Flanagan, Neil; Pollack, Vincent A; Pustilnik, Leslie R; Moyer, Jim; Perros, Manos

    2007-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) has been shown to be induced and activated in cells infected with HPV, suggesting that it may play a physiological role in viral replication or in the formation or maintenance of warts. To investigate this possibility, human foreskin tissue was infected with HPV11 and transplanted onto the renal capsule and the dermis of immunodeficient mice. The animals were treated orally or topically with the potent EGFr inhibitor CP-545130, with treatment starting either immediately following graft attachment, or following a 70 day period to allow development of warts. The rate of appearance of warts, wart size and number were monitored. In addition, we measured intra-lesional HPV replication levels and examined the morphology of the graft tissues. Analysis of the results showed no significant difference between placebo and compound-treated groups, despite high levels of compound present in the graft tissue. We conclude that EGFr kinase activity is not required for the development and maintenance of HPV-11-induced warts in this model.

  19. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework.

  20. Rejuvenecimiento facial en "doble sigma" "Double ogee" facial rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Ramírez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Las técnicas subperiósticas descritas por Tessier revolucionaron el tratamiento del envejecimiento facial, recomendando esta vía para tratar los signos tempranos del envejecimiento en pacientes jóvenes y de mediana edad. Psillakis refinó la técnica y Ramírez describió un método más seguro y eficaz de lifting subperióstico, demostrando que la técnica subperióstica de rejuveneciento facial se puede aplicar en el amplio espectro del envejecimiento facial. La introducción del endoscopio en el tratamiento del envejecimiento facial ha abierto una nueva era en la Cirugía Estética. Hoy la disección subperióstica asistida endocópicamente del tercio superior, medio e inferior de la cara, proporciona un medio eficaz para la reposición de los tejidos blandos, con posibilidad de aumento del esqueleto óseo craneofacial, menor edema facial postoperatorio, mínima lesión de las ramas del nervio facial y mejor tratamiento de las mejillas. Este abordaje, desarrollado y refinado durante la última década, se conoce como "Ritidectomía en Doble Sigma". El Arco Veneciano en doble sigma, bien conocido en Arquitectura desde la antigüedad, se caracteriza por ser un trazo armónico de curva convexa y a continuación curva cóncava. Cuando se observa una cara joven, desde un ángulo oblicuo, presenta una distribución característica de los tejidos, previamente descrita para el tercio medio como un arco ojival arquitectónico o una curva en forma de "S". Sin embargo, en un examen más detallado de la cara joven, en la vista de tres cuartos, el perfil completo revela una "arco ojival doble" o una sigma "S" doble. Para ver este recíproco y multicurvilíneo trazo de la belleza, debemos ver la cara en posición oblicua y así poder ver ambos cantos mediales. En esta posición, la cara joven presenta una convexidad característica de la cola de la ceja que confluye en la concavidad de la pared orbitaria lateral formando así el primer arco (superior

  1. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  2. An extension to flat band ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulacsi, M.; Kovacs, G.; Gulacsi, Z.

    2014-11-01

    From flat band ferromagnetism, we learned that the lowest energy half-filled flat band gives always ferromagnetism if the localized Wannier states on the flat band satisfy the connectivity condition. If the connectivity conditions are not satisfied, ferromagnetism does not appear. We show that this is not always the case namely, we show that ferromagnetism due to flat bands can appear even if the connectivity condition does not hold due to a peculiar behavior of the band situated just above the flat band.

  3. Length spectra and degeneration of flat metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Duchin, Moon; Rafi, Kasra

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider flat metrics (semi-translation structures) on surfaces of finite type. There are two main results. The first is a complete description of when a set of simple closed curves is spectrally rigid, that is, when the length vector determines a metric among the class of flat metrics. Secondly, we give an embedding into the space of geodesic currents and use this to get a boundary for the space of flat metrics. The geometric interpretation is that flat metrics degenerate to "mixed structures" on the surface: part flat metric and part measured foliation.

  4. Facial Expression at Retrieval Affects Recognition of Facial Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng eChen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that memory can be modulated by emotional stimuli at the time of encoding and consolidation. For example, happy faces create better identity recognition than faces with certain other expressions. However, the influence of facial expression at the time of retrieval remains unknown in the literature. To separate the potential influence of expression at retrieval from its effects at earlier stages, we had participants learn neutral faces but manipulated facial expression at the time of memory retrieval in a standard old/new recognition task. The results showed a clear effect of facial expression, where happy test faces were identified more successfully than angry test faces. This effect is unlikely due to greater image similarity between the neutral learning face and the happy test face, because image analysis showed that the happy test faces are in fact less similar to the neutral learning faces relative to the angry test faces. In the second experiment, we investigated whether this emotional effect is influenced by the expression at the time of learning. We employed angry or happy faces as learning stimuli, and angry, happy, and neutral faces as test stimuli. The results showed that the emotional effect at retrieval is robust across different encoding conditions with happy or angry expressions. These findings indicate that emotional expressions affect the retrieval process in identity recognition, and identity recognition does not rely on emotional association between learning and test faces.

  5. Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovic-Stesevic, Vesna; Verna, Carlalberta; Krastl, Gabriel; Kuhl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate.

  6. Non-Perturbative Flat Direction Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Basboll, A; Riva, F; West, S M; Basboll, Anders; Maybury, David; Riva, Francesco; West, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    We argue that supersymmetric flat direction vevs can decay non-perturbatively via preheating. Considering the case of a single flat direction, we explicitly calculate the scalar potential in the unitary gauge for a U(1) theory and show that the mass matrix for excitations around the flat direction has non-diagonal entries which vary with the phase of the flat direction vev. Furthermore, this mass matrix has 2 zero eigenvalues (associated with the excitations along the flat direction) whose eigenstates change with time. We show that these 2 light degrees of freedom are produced copiously in the non-perturbative decay of the flat direction vev. We also comment on the application of these results to the MSSM flat direction H_uL.

  7. Significant Reduction in the Incidence of Genital Warts in Young Men 5 Years into the Danish Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program for Girls and Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerup, Signe; Baldur-Felskov, Birgitte; Blomberg, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Denmark introduced the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine into the vaccination program for 12- to 15-year-old girls in 2008 to 2009. In 2012, the program was supplemented with a catch-up program for women aged up to 27 years. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Danish...... vaccination program on the nationwide incidence of genital warts (GWs), after the second catch-up by including information on both hospital treatments and on self-administered treatment with podophyllotoxin. Genital wart incidence was investigated in both sexes; however, the main focus was on potential herd...... percentage change (EAPC) was calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Genital wart incidence was either stable or increased in both sexes in 2006 to 2008. After introduction of the vaccination program, GW incidence decreased significantly in women aged 12 to 35 years and men aged 12 to 29 years, with rapid...

  8. Flat lens for seismic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Brule, Stephane; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    A prerequisite for achieving seismic invisibility is to demonstrate the ability of civil engineers to control seismic waves with artificially structured soils. We carry out large-scale field tests with a structured soil made of a grid consisting of cylindrical and vertical holes in the ground and a low frequency artificial source (< 10 Hz). This allows the identification of a distribution of energy inside the grid, which can be interpreted as the consequence of an effective negative refraction index. Such a flat lens reminiscent of what Veselago and Pendry envisioned for light opens avenues in seismic metamaterials to counteract the most devastating components of seismic signals.

  9. Recognizing Action Units for Facial Expression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying-Li; Kanade, Takeo; Cohn, Jeffrey F

    2001-02-01

    Most automatic expression analysis systems attempt to recognize a small set of prototypic expressions, such as happiness, anger, surprise, and fear. Such prototypic expressions, however, occur rather infrequently. Human emotions and intentions are more often communicated by changes in one or a few discrete facial features. In this paper, we develop an Automatic Face Analysis (AFA) system to analyze facial expressions based on both permanent facial features (brows, eyes, mouth) and transient facial features (deepening of facial furrows) in a nearly frontal-view face image sequence. The AFA system recognizes fine-grained changes in facial expression into action units (AUs) of the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), instead of a few prototypic expressions. Multistate face and facial component models are proposed for tracking and modeling the various facial features, including lips, eyes, brows, cheeks, and furrows. During tracking, detailed parametric descriptions of the facial features are extracted. With these parameters as the inputs, a group of action units (neutral expression, six upper face AUs and 10 lower face AUs) are recognized whether they occur alone or in combinations. The system has achieved average recognition rates of 96.4 percent (95.4 percent if neutral expressions are excluded) for upper face AUs and 96.7 percent (95.6 percent with neutral expressions excluded) for lower face AUs. The generalizability of the system has been tested by using independent image databases collected and FACS-coded for ground-truth by different research teams.

  10. Treatments for unwanted facial hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J; Lui, H

    Twenty-two percent of women in North America have unwanted facial hair, which can cause embarrassment and result in a significant emotional burden. Treatment options include plucking, waxing (including the sugar forms), depilatories, bleaching, shaving, electrolysis, laser, intense pulsed light (IPL), and eflornithine 13.9% cream (Vaniqa, Barrier Therapeutics in Canada and Shire Pharmaceuticals elsewhere). Eflornithine 13.9% cream is a topical treatment that does not remove the hairs, but acts to reduce the rate of growth and appears to be effective for unwanted facial hair on the mustache and chin area. Eflornithine 13.9% cream can be used in combination with other treatments such as lasers and IPL to give the patient the best chance for successful hair removal.

  11. Facial cystic lymphangioma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasotto, Matteo; Clozza, Emanuele; Tirelli, Giancarlo

    2012-07-01

    Lymphangiomas are uncommon congenital malformations of the lymphatic system, generally diagnosed during childhood. These malformations are rarely seen in adults, and the literature provides poor guidelines for treatment options that must be carefully applied to the facial region. Diagnosis in adult subjects is difficult to achieve, and also management of these conditions is still challenging because they tend to infiltrate adjacent tissues, causing frequent relapses. Radical surgery is the main form of treatment, avoiding the sacrifice of function or aesthetics of the patient. Two cases of cystic lymphangioma of the facial region found in adults are described from a clinical and pathologic point of view. The aim of this article was to point out that an early recognition of cystic lymphangioma is a crucial goal to initiate a prompt treatment avoiding serious complication.

  12. Asymmetry of Facial Mimicry and Emotion Perception in Patients With Unilateral Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Sebastian; Wood, Adrienne; Banks, Caroline A; Agoulnik, Dasha; Hadlock, Tessa A; Niedenthal, Paula M

    2016-05-01

    The ability of patients with unilateral facial paralysis to recognize and appropriately judge facial expressions remains underexplored. To test the effects of unilateral facial paralysis on the recognition of and judgments about facial expressions of emotion and to evaluate the asymmetry of facial mimicry. Patients with left or right unilateral facial paralysis at a university facial plastic surgery unit completed 2 computer tasks involving video facial expression recognition. Side of facial paralysis was used as a between-participant factor. Facial function and symmetry were verified electronically with the eFACE facial function scale. Across 2 tasks, short videos were shown on which facial expressions of happiness and anger unfolded earlier on one side of the face or morphed into each other. Patients indicated the moment or side of change between facial expressions and judged their authenticity. Type, time, and accuracy of responses on a keyboard were analyzed. A total of 57 participants (36 women and 21 men) aged 20 to 76 years (mean age, 50.2 years) and with mild left or right unilateral facial paralysis were included in the study. Patients with right facial paralysis were faster (by about 150 milliseconds) and more accurate (mean number of errors, 1.9 vs 2.5) to detect expression onsets on the left side of the stimulus face, suggesting anatomical asymmetry of facial mimicry. Patients with left paralysis, however, showed more anomalous responses, which partly differed by emotion. The findings favor the hypothesis of an anatomical asymmetry of facial mimicry and suggest that patients with a left hemiparalysis could be more at risk of developing a cluster of disabilities and psychological conditions including emotion-recognition impairments. 3.

  13. The impact of genital warts: loss of quality of life and cost of treatment in eight sexual health clinics in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, M; Soldan, K; Kinghorn, G; Gilson, R; Nathan, M; Ross, J D; Lacey, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the loss of quality of life and cost of treatment associated with genital warts seen in sexual health clinics. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study and case note review of individuals with genital warts, carried out in eight sexual health clinics in England and Northern Ireland. Individuals with genital warts attending the participating clinics were invited to take part in the questionnaire study. 895 participants were recruited. A separate sample of 370 participants who had attended a participating clinic with a first visit for a first or recurrent episode of genital warts between April and June 2007 was included in the case note review. Quality of life was measured using the EQ-5D questionnaire and the cost of an episode of care was derived from the case note review. Results The weighted mean EQ-5D index score was 0.87 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.89). The weighted mean disutility was 0.056 (95% CI 0.038 to 0.074). The estimated mean loss of quality-adjusted life-years associated with an episode of genital warts was 0.018 (95% CI 0.0079 to 0.031), equivalent to 6.6 days of healthy life lost per episode. The weighted mean cost per episode of care was £94 (95% CI £84 to £104), not including the cost of a sexually transmitted infection screen. Conclusions Genital warts have a substantial impact on the health service and the individual. This information can be utilised for economic evaluation of human papillomavirus vaccination. PMID:21636616

  14. Familial congenital peripheral facial paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo Vallenas, Roberto; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Aldave, Raquel; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Reyes, Juan; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Castañeda, César; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; VERA, JOSÉ; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, Servicio de Neurología. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study 29 individuals belonging to four familiar generations in whom 9 cases of facial paralysis was found in 2 generations. Setting: Neurophysiology Service, Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen National Hospital. Material and Methods: Neurological exam and electrophysiologic (EMG and VCN), otorrhinolaryngologic, radiologic, electroencephalographic, dermatoglyphic and laboratory studies were performed in 7 of the 9 patients (5 men and 2 women). Results: One case of right peripheral facia...

  15. Giant sialocele following facial trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros Júnior,Rui; Rocha Neto,Alípio Miguel da; Queiroz, Isaac Vieira; Cauby,Antônio de Figueiredo; Gueiros,Luiz Alcino Monteiro; Leão,Jair Carneiro

    2012-01-01

    Injuries in the parotid and masseter region can cause serious impairment secondary to damage of important anatomical structures. Sialocele is observed as facial swelling associated with parotid duct rupture due to trauma. The aim of this paper is to report a case of a giant traumatic sialocele in the parotid gland, secondary to a knife lesion in a 40-year-old woman. Conservative measures could not promote clinical resolution and a surgical intervention for the placement of a vacuum drain was ...

  16. Removal of unwanted facial hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenenberger, Donald W; Utecht, Lynn M

    2002-11-15

    Unwanted facial hair is a common problem that is seldom discussed in the primary care setting. Although men occasionally request removal of unwanted facial hair, women most often seek help with this condition. Physicians generally neglect to address the problem if the patient does not first request help. The condition may be caused by androgen overproduction, increased sensitivity to circulating androgens, or other metabolic and endocrine disorders, and should be properly evaluated. Options for hair removal vary in efficacy, degree of discomfort, and cost. Clinical studies on the efficacy of many therapies are lacking. Short of surgical removal of the hair follicle, the only permanent treatment is electrolysis. However, the practice of electrolysis lacks standardization, and regulation of the procedure varies from state to state. Shaving, epilation, and depilation are the most commonly attempted initial options for facial hair removal. Although these methods are less expensive, they are only temporary. Laser hair removal, although better studied than most methods and more strictly regulated, has yet to be proved permanent in all patients. Eflornithine, a topical treatment, is simple to apply and has minimal side effects. By the time most patients consult a physician, they have tried several methods of hair removal. Family physicians can properly educate patients and recommend treatment for this common condition if they are armed with basic knowledge about the treatment options.

  17. Identification based on facial parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanov Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two opposing views dominate face identification literature, one suggesting that the face is processed as a whole and another suggesting analysis based on parts. Our research tried to establish which of these two is the dominant strategy and our results fell in the direction of analysis based on parts. The faces were covered with a mask and the participants were uncovering different parts, one at the time, in an attempt to identify a person. Already at the level of a single facial feature, such as mouth or eye and top of the nose, some observers were capable to establish the identity of a familiar face. Identification is exceptionally successful when a small assembly of facial parts is visible, such as eye, eyebrow and the top of the nose. Some facial parts are not very informative on their own but do enhance recognition when given as a part of such an assembly. Novel finding here is importance of the top of the nose for the face identification. Additionally observers have a preference toward the left side of the face. Typically subjects view the elements in the following order: left eye, left eyebrow, right eye, lips, region between the eyes, right eyebrow, region between the eyebrows, left check, right cheek. When observers are not in a position to see eyes, eyebrows or top of the nose, they go for lips first and then region between the eyebrows, region between the eyes, left check, right cheek and finally chin.

  18. Flat coalgebraic fixed point logics

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Fixed point logics have a wide range of applications in computer science, in particular in artificial intelligence and concurrency. The most expressive logics of this type are the mu-calculus and its relatives. However, popular fixed point logics tend to trade expressivity for simplicity and readability, and in fact often live within the single variable fragment of the mu-calculus. The family of such flat fixed point logics includes, e.g., CTL, the *-nesting-free fragment of PDL, and the logic of common knowledge. Here, we extend this notion to the generic semantic framework of coalgebraic logic, thus covering a wide range of logics beyond the standard mu-calculus including, e.g., flat fragments of the graded mu-calculus and the alternating-time mu-calculus (such as ATL), as well as probabilistic and monotone fixed point logics. Our main results are completeness of the Kozen-Park axiomatization and a timed-out tableaux method that matches EXPTIME upper bounds inherited from the coalgebraic mu-calculus but avo...

  19. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  20. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial “line-laser” scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a “stereophotography” (3dMD) and a “structured light” facial scanner (FaceScan) ...

  1. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Xiong, Yu-Xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial "line-laser" scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a "stereophotography" (3dMD) and a "structured light" facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and "3D error" as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use.

  2. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial “line-laser” scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a “stereophotography” (3dMD) and a “structured light” facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and “3D error” as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use. PMID:28056044

  3. Incidence of anogenital warts in Germany: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolajczyk Rafael T

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papilloma virus (HPV types 6 and 11 account for 90 percent of anogenital warts (AGW. Assessment of a potential reduction of the incidence of AGW following introduction of HPV vaccines requires population-based incidence rates. The aim of this study was to estimate incidence rates of AGW in Germany, stratified by age, sex, and region. Additionally, the medical practitioner (gynaecologist, dermatologist, urologist etc. who made the initial diagnosis of AGW was assessed. Methods Retrospective cohort study in a population aged 10 to 79 years in a population-based healthcare insurance database. The database included more than 14 million insurance members from all over Germany during the years 2004-2006. A case of AGW was considered incident if a disease-free period of twelve months preceded the diagnosis. To assess regional variation, analyses were performed by federal state. Results The estimated incidence rate was 169.5/100,000 person-years for the German population aged 10 to 79 years. Most cases occurred in the 15 to 40 years age group. The incidence rate was higher and showed a peak at younger ages in females than in males. The highest incidence rates for both sexes were observed in the city-states Berlin, Hamburg and Bremen. In females, initial diagnosis of AGW was most frequently made by a gynaecologist (71.7%, whereas in males, AGW were most frequently diagnosed by a dermatologist (44.8% or urologist (25.1%. Conclusions Incidence of AGW in Germany is comparable with findings for other countries. As expected, most cases occurred in the younger age groups. The frequency of diagnoses of AGW differs between sexes and women and men receive treatment by doctors of different specialties.

  4. Serine protease Omi/HtrA2 targets WARTS kinase to control cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuninaka, S; Iida, S-I; Hara, T; Nomura, M; Naoe, H; Morisaki, T; Nitta, M; Arima, Y; Mimori, T; Yonehara, S; Saya, H

    2007-04-12

    The serine protease Omi/HtrA2 was initially regarded as a proapoptotic molecule that proteolyses several proteins to induce cell death. Recent studies, however, indicate that loss of Omi protease activity increases susceptibility to stress-induced cell death. These complicated findings suggest that the protease activity of Omi is involved not only in apoptosis but also in cellular homeostasis. However, the targets which Omi uses to mediate this novel process are unknown. Previously, we showed that WARTS (WTS)/large tumor-suppressor 1 mitotic kinase interacts with the protein/discs-large protein/zonula (PDZ) domain of Omi and promotes its protease activity. We now report that WTS is a substrate for Omi protease activity, thus it is not only a regulator but also a downstream target of this protease. Interaction with Omi PDZ domain is required for WTS to be proteolysed. When caspase-9-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were treated with staurosporine, WTS was proteolysed by activated endogenous Omi without induction of cell death. Therefore, protease activity of Omi and proteolysis of WTS are not necessarily required for cell death. We found that depletion of Omi from HeLa cells results in accelerated cell proliferation despite no significant change in the duration of mitosis. The depletion of WTS showed the same effect on S phase progression. Therefore, WTS proteolytic fragment(s) generated by Omi may act as an inhibitor of G1/S progression. Our data reveal a role for Omi-mediated processing of WTS in negative regulation of cell cycle progression at interphase, suggesting a novel function of Omi other than apoptosis.

  5. Control of tissue growth and cell transformation by the Salvador/Warts/Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Grusche, Felix A; Harvey, Kieran F

    2012-01-01

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (SWH) pathway is an important regulator of tissue growth that is frequently subverted in human cancer. The key oncoprotein of the SWH pathway is the transcriptional co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP). YAP promotes tissue growth and transformation of cultured cells by interacting with transcriptional regulatory proteins via its WW domains, or, in the case of the TEAD1-4 transcription factors, an N-terminal binding domain. YAP possesses a putative transactivation domain in its C-terminus that is necessary to stimulate transcription factors in vitro, but its requirement for YAP function has not been investigated in detail. Interestingly, whilst the WW domains and TEAD-binding domain are highly conserved in the Drosophila melanogaster YAP orthologue, Yorkie, the majority of the C-terminal region of YAP is not present in Yorkie. To investigate this apparent conundrum, we assessed the functional roles of the YAP and Yorkie C-termini. We found that these regions were not required for Yorkie's ability to drive tissue growth in vivo, or YAP's ability to promote anchorage-independent growth or resistance to contact inhibition. However, the YAP transactivation domain was required for YAP's ability to induce cell migration and invasion. Moreover, a role for the YAP transactivation domain in cell transformation was uncovered when the YAP WW domains were mutated together with the transactivation domain. This shows that YAP can promote cell transformation in a flexible manner, presumably by contacting transcriptional regulatory proteins either via its WW domains or its transactivation domain.

  6. Control of tissue growth and cell transformation by the Salvador/Warts/Hippo pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (SWH pathway is an important regulator of tissue growth that is frequently subverted in human cancer. The key oncoprotein of the SWH pathway is the transcriptional co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP. YAP promotes tissue growth and transformation of cultured cells by interacting with transcriptional regulatory proteins via its WW domains, or, in the case of the TEAD1-4 transcription factors, an N-terminal binding domain. YAP possesses a putative transactivation domain in its C-terminus that is necessary to stimulate transcription factors in vitro, but its requirement for YAP function has not been investigated in detail. Interestingly, whilst the WW domains and TEAD-binding domain are highly conserved in the Drosophila melanogaster YAP orthologue, Yorkie, the majority of the C-terminal region of YAP is not present in Yorkie. To investigate this apparent conundrum, we assessed the functional roles of the YAP and Yorkie C-termini. We found that these regions were not required for Yorkie's ability to drive tissue growth in vivo, or YAP's ability to promote anchorage-independent growth or resistance to contact inhibition. However, the YAP transactivation domain was required for YAP's ability to induce cell migration and invasion. Moreover, a role for the YAP transactivation domain in cell transformation was uncovered when the YAP WW domains were mutated together with the transactivation domain. This shows that YAP can promote cell transformation in a flexible manner, presumably by contacting transcriptional regulatory proteins either via its WW domains or its transactivation domain.

  7. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral...

  8. Mind-Refreshing Acupuncture Therapy for Facial Spasm,Trigeminal Neuralgia and Stubborn Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正; 方桂梅

    2004-01-01

    @@ Facial spasm, trigeminal neuralgia and stubborn facial paralysis are commonly seen in clinic. The authors have obtained quite good therapeutic results for the above diseases by using the mind-refreshing acupuncture therapy. These are introduced in the following.

  9. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  11. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ji Min; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Sang Wha

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects.

  12. Síndrome de dolor facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. F. Eugenio Tenhamm

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El dolor o algia facial constituye un síndrome doloroso de las estructuras cráneo faciales bajo el cual se agrupan un gran número de enfermedades. La mejor manera de abordar el diagnóstico diferencial de las entidades que causan el dolor facial es usando un algoritmo que identifica cuatro síndromes dolorosos principales que son: las neuralgias faciales, los dolores faciales con síntomas y signos neurológicos, las cefaleas autonómicas trigeminales y los dolores faciales sin síntomas ni signos neurológicos. Una evaluación clínica detallada de los pacientes, permite una aproximación etiológica lo que orienta el estudio diagnóstico y permite ofrecer una terapia específica a la mayoría de los casos

  13. A Review of Facial Nerve Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    An intimate knowledge of facial nerve anatomy is critical to avoid its inadvertent injury during rhytidectomy, parotidectomy, maxillofacial fracture reduction, and almost any surgery of the head and neck. Injury to the frontal and marginal mandibular branches of the facial nerve in particular can lead to obvious clinical deficits, and areas where these nerves are particularly susceptible to injury have been designated danger zones by previous authors. Assessment of facial nerve function is no...

  14. Influence of gravity upon some facial signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Bazin, R; Piot, B

    2015-06-01

    Facial clinical signs and their integration are the basis of perception than others could have from ourselves, noticeably the age they imagine we are. Facial modifications in motion and their objective measurements before and after application of skin regimen are essential to go further in evaluation capacities to describe efficacy in facial dynamics. Quantification of facial modifications vis à vis gravity will allow us to answer about 'control' of facial shape in daily activities. Standardized photographs of the faces of 30 Caucasian female subjects of various ages (24-73 year) were successively taken at upright and supine positions within a short time interval. All these pictures were therefore reframed - any bias due to facial features was avoided when evaluating one single sign - for clinical quotation by trained experts of several facial signs regarding published standardized photographic scales. For all subjects, the supine position increased facial width but not height, giving a more fuller appearance to the face. More importantly, the supine position changed the severity of facial ageing features (e.g. wrinkles) compared to an upright position and whether these features were attenuated or exacerbated depended on their facial location. Supine station mostly modifies signs of the lower half of the face whereas those of the upper half appear unchanged or slightly accentuated. These changes appear much more marked in the older groups, where some deep labial folds almost vanish. These alterations decreased the perceived ages of the subjects by an average of 3.8 years. Although preliminary, this study suggests that a 90° rotation of the facial skin vis à vis gravity induces rapid rearrangements among which changes in tensional forces within and across the face, motility of interstitial free water among underlying skin tissue and/or alterations of facial Langer lines, likely play a significant role. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Fran

  15. Facial nerve schwannoma in revision stapedotomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre

    2004-05-01

    We describe a male patient who presented a progressive conductive unilateral hearing loss 20 years after otosclerosis surgery. Computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggested a facial schwannoma in its tympanic segment. At the time of revision surgery, a facial schwannoma was found to originate at the tympanic segment, pushing the prosthesis out of the oval window fenestration. The Teflon-piston was repositioned with difficulties in the central platinotomy, and the facial schwannoma was left intact.

  16. [Peripheral paralysis of facial nerve in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steczkowska-Klucznik, Małgorzata; Kaciński, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral facial paresis is one of the most common diagnosed neuropathies in adults and also in children. Many factors can trigger facial paresis and most frequent are infectious, carcinoma and demyelinisation diseases. Very important and interesting problem is an idiopathic facial paresis (Bell's palsy). Actually the main target of scientific research is to assess the etiology (infectious, genetic, immunologic) and to find the most appropriate treatment.

  17. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippl, Martin; Karim, Ahmed A; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al., 2002). The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs) and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1). Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser), AU4 (brow lowerer), AU12 (lip corner puller) and AU24 (lip presser), each in alternation with a resting phase. Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g., M1, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, putamen), as well as in the thalamus, insula, and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the "like attracts like" principle (Donoghue et al., 1992). AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex.

  18. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eKrippl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS,Ekman et al., 2002. The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1. Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser, AU4 (brow lowerer, AU12 (lip corner puller and AU24 (lip presser, each in alternation with a resting phase.Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g. M1, premotor cortex, SMA, putamen, as well as in the thalamus, insula and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU 4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the like attracts like principle (Donoghue et al., 1992 . AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex.

  19. Neuroticism delays detection of facial expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Sawada, Reiko; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kubota, Yasutaka; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid detection of emotional signals from facial expressions is fundamental for human social interaction. The personality factor of neuroticism modulates the processing of various types of emotional facial expressions; however, its effect on the detection of emotional facial expressions remains unclear. In this study, participants with high- and low-neuroticism scores performed a visual search task to detect normal expressions of anger and happiness, and their anti-expressions within a cr...

  20. The Science and Theory behind Facial Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan P. Farkas, MD; Joel E. Pessa, MD; Bradley Hubbard, MD; Rod J. Rohrich, MD, FACS

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The etiology of age-related facial changes has many layers. Multiple theories have been presented over the past 50–100 years with an evolution of understanding regarding facial changes related to skin, soft tissue, muscle, and bone. This special topic will provide an overview of the current literature and evidence and theories of facial changes of the skeleton, soft tissues, and skin over time.

  1. Anatomical considerations to prevent facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaeian, Jason; Rohrich, Rod J; Stuzin, James M

    2015-05-01

    Injury to the facial nerve during a face lift is a relatively rare but serious complication. A large body of literature has been dedicated toward bettering the understanding of the anatomical course of the facial nerve and the relative danger zones. Most of these prior reports, however, have focused on identifying the location of facial nerve branches based on their trajectory mostly in two dimensions and rarely in three dimensions. Unfortunately, the exact location of the facial nerve relative to palpable or visible facial landmarks is quite variable. Although the precise location of facial nerve branches is variable, its relationship to soft-tissue planes is relatively constant. The focus of this report is to improve understanding of facial soft-tissue anatomy so that safe planes of dissection during surgical undermining may be identified for each branch of the facial nerve. Certain anatomical locations more prone to injury and high-risk patient parameters are further emphasized to help minimize the risk of facial nerve injury during rhytidectomy.

  2. Facial expression recognition using thermal image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guotai; Song, Xuemin; Zheng, Fuhui; Wang, Peipei; Omer, Ashgan

    2005-01-01

    Facial expression recognition will be studied in this paper using mathematics morphology, through drawing and analyzing the whole geometry characteristics and some geometry characteristics of the interesting area of Infrared Thermal Imaging (IRTI). The results show that geometry characteristic in the interesting region of different expression are obviously different; Facial temperature changes almost with the expression at the same time. Studies have shown feasibility of facial expression recognition on the basis of IRTI. This method can be used to monitor the facial expression in real time, which can be used in auxiliary diagnosis and medical on disease.

  3. Social Use of Facial Expressions in Hylobatids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Scheider

    Full Text Available Non-human primates use various communicative means in interactions with others. While primate gestures are commonly considered to be intentionally and flexibly used signals, facial expressions are often referred to as inflexible, automatic expressions of affective internal states. To explore whether and how non-human primates use facial expressions in specific communicative interactions, we studied five species of small apes (gibbons by employing a newly established Facial Action Coding System for hylobatid species (GibbonFACS. We found that, despite individuals often being in close proximity to each other, in social (as opposed to non-social contexts the duration of facial expressions was significantly longer when gibbons were facing another individual compared to non-facing situations. Social contexts included grooming, agonistic interactions and play, whereas non-social contexts included resting and self-grooming. Additionally, gibbons used facial expressions while facing another individual more often in social contexts than non-social contexts where facial expressions were produced regardless of the attentional state of the partner. Also, facial expressions were more likely 'responded to' by the partner's facial expressions when facing another individual than non-facing. Taken together, our results indicate that gibbons use their facial expressions differentially depending on the social context and are able to use them in a directed way in communicative interactions with other conspecifics.

  4. Neuroticism Delays Detection of Facial Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Reiko; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kubota, Yasutaka; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid detection of emotional signals from facial expressions is fundamental for human social interaction. The personality factor of neuroticism modulates the processing of various types of emotional facial expressions; however, its effect on the detection of emotional facial expressions remains unclear. In this study, participants with high- and low-neuroticism scores performed a visual search task to detect normal expressions of anger and happiness, and their anti-expressions within a crowd of neutral expressions. Anti-expressions contained an amount of visual changes equivalent to those found in normal expressions compared to neutral expressions, but they were usually recognized as neutral expressions. Subjective emotional ratings in response to each facial expression stimulus were also obtained. Participants with high-neuroticism showed an overall delay in the detection of target facial expressions compared to participants with low-neuroticism. Additionally, the high-neuroticism group showed higher levels of arousal to facial expressions compared to the low-neuroticism group. These data suggest that neuroticism modulates the detection of emotional facial expressions in healthy participants; high levels of neuroticism delay overall detection of facial expressions and enhance emotional arousal in response to facial expressions.

  5. Periocular Reconstruction in Patients with Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Shannon S; Joseph, Andrew W; Douglas, Raymond S; Massry, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    Facial paralysis can result in serious ocular consequences. All patients with orbicularis oculi weakness in the setting of facial nerve injury should undergo a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation. The main goal of management in these patients is to protect the ocular surface and preserve visual function. Patients with expected recovery of facial nerve function may only require temporary and conservative measures to protect the ocular surface. Patients with prolonged or unlikely recovery of facial nerve function benefit from surgical rehabilitation of the periorbital complex. Current reconstructive procedures are most commonly intended to improve coverage of the eye but cannot restore blink.

  6. Reflectance confocal microscopy features of facial angiofibromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Cayetano, José-Francisco; Yélamos, Oriol; Rossi, Anthony M.; Marchetti, Michael A.; Jain, Manu

    2017-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are benign tumors presenting as firm, dome-shaped, flesh-colored to pink papules, typically on the nose and adjoining central face. Clinically and dermoscopically they can mimic melanocytic nevi or basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging tool that is useful in diagnosing melanocytic and non-melanocytic facial lesions. To date no studies have described the RCM features of facial angiofibromas. Herein, we present two cases of facial angiofibromas that were imaged with RCM and revealed tumor island-like structures that mimicked BCC, leading to skin biopsy.

  7. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Relationships between Processing Facial Identity, Emotional Expression, Facial Speech, and Gaze Direction during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Sibylle M.; Schwarzer, Gudrun; Korell, Monika; Maier-Karius, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with 5- to 11-year-olds and adults to investigate whether facial identity, facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction are processed independently of or in interaction with one another. In a computer-based, speeded sorting task, participants sorted faces according to facial identity while disregarding…

  9. Allometry of facial mobility in anthropoid primates: implications for the evolution of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Seth D

    2009-01-01

    Body size may be an important factor influencing the evolution of facial expression in anthropoid primates due to allometric constraints on the perception of facial movements. Given this hypothesis, I tested the prediction that observed facial mobility is positively correlated with body size in a comparative sample of nonhuman anthropoids. Facial mobility, or the variety of facial movements a species can produce, was estimated using a novel application of the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). I used FACS to estimate facial mobility in 12 nonhuman anthropoid species, based on video recordings of facial activity in zoo animals. Body mass data were taken from the literature. I used phylogenetic generalized least squares (PGLS) to perform a multiple regression analysis with facial mobility as the dependent variable and two independent variables: log body mass and dummy-coded infraorder. Together, body mass and infraorder explain 92% of the variance in facial mobility. However, the partial effect of body mass is much stronger than for infraorder. The results of my study suggest that allometry is an important constraint on the evolution of facial mobility, which may limit the complexity of facial expression in smaller species. More work is needed to clarify the perceptual bases of this allometric pattern.

  10. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  11. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the world's largest specialty association for facial plastic surgery. It represents more than 2,700 facial plastic ... the American Board of Otolaryngology , which includes facial plastic surgery. Others are certified in plastic surgery, ophthalmology, and ...

  12. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT FOR FACIAL PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TOH Foh Fook

    2002-01-01

    @@ Peripheral facial paralysis is a common disease with manifestation of facial paralysis. The author's clinical observation on 50 cases of facial paralysis treated mainly with acupuncture showed an effeclive rate of 98%, and the remarkable effectiveness was reported as follow.

  13. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  14. Representability of Hom Implies Flatness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitin Nitsure

    2004-02-01

    Let be a projective scheme over a noetherian base scheme , and let $\\mathcal{F}$ be a coherent sheaf on . For any coherent sheaf $\\mathcal{E}$ on , consider the set-valued contravariant functor $\\hom_{(\\mathcal{E},\\mathcal{F})}$ on -schemes, defined by $\\hom_{(\\mathcal{E},\\mathcal{F})}(T)=\\mathrm{Hom}(\\mathcal{E}_T,\\mathcal{F}_T)$ where $\\mathcal{E}_T$ and $\\mathcal{F}_T$ are the pull-backs of $\\mathcal{E}$ and $\\mathcal{F}$ to $X_T=X×_s T$. A basic result of Grothendieck ([EGA], III 7.7.9) says that if $\\mathcal{F}$ is flat over then $\\hom_{(\\mathcal{E},\\mathcal{F})}$ is representable for all $\\mathcal{E}$. We prove the converse of the above, in fact, we show that if is a relatively ample line bundle on over such that the functor $\\hom_{(L^{-n},\\mathcal{F})}$ is representable for infinitely many positive integers , then $\\mathcal{F}$ is flat over . As a corollary, taking $X=S$, it follows that if $\\mathcal{F}$ is a coherent sheaf on then the functor $T\\mapsto H^0(T,\\mathcal{F}_T)$ on the category of -schemes is representable if and only if $\\mathcal{F}$ is locally free on . This answers a question posed by Angelo Vistoli. The techniques we use involve the proof of flattening stratification, together with the methods used in proving the author's earlier result (see [N1]) that the automorphism group functor of a coherent sheaf on is representable if and only if the sheaf is locally free.

  15. Evaluation of TNF-α serum level in patients with recalcitrant multiple common warts, treated by lipid garlic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenawy, Soha; Mohammed, Ghada Farouk; Younes, Soha; Elakhras, Atef Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    No universal consensus about optimal modality for treating the recalcitrant multiple common warts (RMCW). The objective of the study was to evaluate the immunological mechanisms and clinical therapeutic effect of using lipid garlic extract (LGE) in the treatment of RMCW. The study included 50 patients with RMCW. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the first group (25 patients) received LGE, and the second group (25 patients) received saline as a control group. In both groups, treatments were made to single lesions, or largest wart in case of multiple lesions, until complete clearance of lesions or for a maximum of 4 weeks. Blood serum was taken at pre-study and at the fourth week to measure tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level. A significant difference was found between the therapeutic responses of RMCW to LGE antigen and saline control group (p < 0.001). In the LGE group, complete response was achieved in 96% of patients presenting with RMCW. There was a statistically nonsignificant increase in TNF-α of LGE group versus saline group. No recurrence was observed in the LGE group. LGE as an immunotherapy is an inexpensive, effective, and safe modality with good cure rates for treatment of RMCWs, when other topical or physical therapies have failed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Insulin- and Warts-Dependent Regulation of Tracheal Plasticity Modulates Systemic Larval Growth during Hypoxia in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel M.; Shen, Zhouyang; Owyang, Kristin E.; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to dynamic environmental cues during organismal development requires coordination of tissue growth with available resources. More specifically, the effects of oxygen availability on body size have been well-documented, but the mechanisms through which hypoxia restricts systemic growth have not been fully elucidated. Here, we characterize the larval growth and metabolic defects in Drosophila that result from hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions reduced fat body opacity and increased lipid droplet accumulation in this tissue, without eliciting lipid aggregation in hepatocyte-like cells called oenocytes. Additionally, hypoxia increased the retention of Dilp2 in the insulin-producing cells of the larval brain, associated with a reduction of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Overexpression of the wildtype form of the insulin receptor ubiquitously and in the larval trachea rendered larvae resistant to hypoxia-induced growth restriction. Furthermore, Warts downregulation in the trachea was similar to increased insulin receptor signaling during oxygen deprivation, which both rescued hypoxia-induced growth restriction, inhibition of tracheal molting, and developmental delay. Insulin signaling and loss of Warts function increased tracheal growth and augmented tracheal plasticity under hypoxic conditions, enhancing oxygen delivery during periods of oxygen deprivation. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism that coordinates oxygen availability with systemic growth in which hypoxia-induced reduction of insulin receptor signaling decreases plasticity of the larval trachea that is required for the maintenance of systemic growth during times of limiting oxygen availability. PMID:25541690

  17. Insulin- and warts-dependent regulation of tracheal plasticity modulates systemic larval growth during hypoxia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Wong

    Full Text Available Adaptation to dynamic environmental cues during organismal development requires coordination of tissue growth with available resources. More specifically, the effects of oxygen availability on body size have been well-documented, but the mechanisms through which hypoxia restricts systemic growth have not been fully elucidated. Here, we characterize the larval growth and metabolic defects in Drosophila that result from hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions reduced fat body opacity and increased lipid droplet accumulation in this tissue, without eliciting lipid aggregation in hepatocyte-like cells called oenocytes. Additionally, hypoxia increased the retention of Dilp2 in the insulin-producing cells of the larval brain, associated with a reduction of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Overexpression of the wildtype form of the insulin receptor ubiquitously and in the larval trachea rendered larvae resistant to hypoxia-induced growth restriction. Furthermore, Warts downregulation in the trachea was similar to increased insulin receptor signaling during oxygen deprivation, which both rescued hypoxia-induced growth restriction, inhibition of tracheal molting, and developmental delay. Insulin signaling and loss of Warts function increased tracheal growth and augmented tracheal plasticity under hypoxic conditions, enhancing oxygen delivery during periods of oxygen deprivation. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism that coordinates oxygen availability with systemic growth in which hypoxia-induced reduction of insulin receptor signaling decreases plasticity of the larval trachea that is required for the maintenance of systemic growth during times of limiting oxygen availability.

  18. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  19. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  20. Lateral facial cleft associated with accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and peripheral facial weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, D; Toplu, G; Türkseven, A; Senses, D A; Yiğit, B

    2014-07-01

    Transverse facial cleft is a very rare malformation. The Tessier no. 7 cleft is a lateral facial cleft which emanates from oral cavity and extends towards the tragus, involving both soft tissue and skeletal components. Here, we present a case having transverse facial cleft, accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and ipsilateral peripheral facial nerve weakness. After surgical repair of the cleft in 2-month of age, improvement of the facial nerve function was detected in 3-year of age. Resection of the accessory mandible was planned in 5-6 years of age.