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Sample records for facial electromyography emg

  1. Using State-Space Model with Regime Switching to Represent the Dynamics of Facial Electromyography (EMG) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Manshu; Chow, Sy-Miin

    2010-01-01

    Facial electromyography (EMG) is a useful physiological measure for detecting subtle affective changes in real time. A time series of EMG data contains bursts of electrical activity that increase in magnitude when the pertinent facial muscles are activated. Whereas previous methods for detecting EMG activation are often based on deterministic or…

  2. Using State-Space Model with Regime Switching to Represent the Dynamics of Facial Electromyography (EMG) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Manshu; Chow, Sy-Miin

    2010-01-01

    Facial electromyography (EMG) is a useful physiological measure for detecting subtle affective changes in real time. A time series of EMG data contains bursts of electrical activity that increase in magnitude when the pertinent facial muscles are activated. Whereas previous methods for detecting EMG activation are often based on deterministic or…

  3. Statistical processing of facial electromyography (EMG) signals in emotional film scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, Joyce; van den Broek, Egon; van Herk, Jan; Tuinenbreijer, Kees; Schut, Marleen

    To improve human-computer interaction, computers need to recognize and respond properly to their users’ emotional state. As a first step to such systems, we investigated how emotional experiences are expressed in various statistical parameters of facial EMG signals. 22 Subjects were presented with 8

  4. iEMG: Imaging electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Holger; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Advanced data analysis and visualization methodologies have played an important role in making surface electromyography both a valuable diagnostic methodology of neuromuscular disorders and a robust brain-machine interface, usable as a simple interface for prosthesis control, arm movement analysis, stiffness control, gait analysis, etc. But for diagnostic purposes, as well as for interfaces where the activation of single muscles is of interest, surface EMG suffers from severe crosstalk between deep and superficial muscle activation, making the reliable detection of the source of the signal, as well as reliable quantification of deeper muscle activation, prohibitively difficult. To address these issues we present a novel approach for processing surface electromyographic data. Our approach enables the reconstruction of 3D muscular activity location, making the depth of muscular activity directly visible. This is even possible when deep muscles are overlaid with superficial muscles, such as seen in the human forearm. The method, which we call imaging EMG (iEMG), is based on using the crosstalk between a sufficiently large number of surface electromyographic electrodes to reconstruct the 3D generating electrical potential distribution within a given area. Our results are validated by in vivo measurements of iEMG and ultrasound on the human forearm.

  5. Knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing EMG examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Mauro; Aretini, Alessandro; Greco, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing the procedure. In one year, 1,586 consecutive patients (mean age 56 years; 58.8% women) were admitted to two EMG labs to undergo EMG for the first time. The patients found to be "informed" about the how an EMG examination is performed and about the purpose of EMG numbered 448 (28.2%), while those found to be "informed" only about the manner of its execution or only about its purpose numbered 161 (10.2%) and 151 (9.5%), respectively. The remaining 826 (52.1%) patients had either no information, or the information they had was very poor or incorrect (this was particularly true if they had been consulting websites). Being "informed" was associated with level of education (high), type of referring physician (specialist) and with an appropriate referral diagnosis specified in the EMG request. The quality of patient information on EMG was found to be very poor and could be improved. Physicians referring patients for EMG examinations, especially general practitioners, should assume primary responsibility for patient education and counseling in this field.

  6. Identification of contaminant type in surface electromyography (EMG) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Paul; Fraser, Graham D; Chan, Adrian D C; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J

    2014-07-01

    The ability to recognize various forms of contaminants in surface electromyography (EMG) signals and to ascertain the overall quality of such signals is important in many EMG-enabled rehabilitation systems. In this paper, new methods for the automatic identification of commonly occurring contaminant types in surface EMG signals are presented. Such methods are advantageous because the contaminant type is typically not known in advance. The presented approach uses support vector machines as the main classification system. Both simulated and real EMG signals are used to assess the performance of the methods. The contaminants considered include: 1) electrocardiogram interference; 2) motion artifact; 3) power line interference; 4) amplifier saturation; and 5) additive white Gaussian noise. Results show that the contaminants can readily be distinguished at lower signal to noise ratios, with a growing degree of confusion at higher signal to noise ratios, where their effects on signal quality are less significant.

  7. Electromyography (EMG) accuracy compared to muscle biopsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, Malcolm; Jossiphov, Joseph; Nevo, Yoram

    2007-07-01

    Reports show wide variability of electromyography (EMG) in detecting pediatric neuromuscular disorders. The study's aim was to determine EMG/nerve conduction study accuracy compared to muscle biopsy and final clinical diagnosis, and sensitivity for myopathic motor unit potential detection in childhood. Of 550 EMG/nerve conduction studies performed by the same examiner from a pediatric neuromuscular service, 27 children (ages 6 days to 16 years [10 boys; M:F, 1:1.7]) with muscle biopsies and final clinical diagnoses were compared retrospectively. Final clinical diagnoses were congenital myopathies (5 of 27,18%), nonspecific myopathies (biopsy myopathic, final diagnosis uncertain; 6 of 27, 22%), congenital myasthenic syndrome (3 of 27, 11%), juvenile myasthenia gravis (1 of 27, 4%), arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (2 of 27, 7%), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (1 of 27, 4%), bilateral peroneal neuropathies (1 of 27, 4%), and normal (8 of 27, 30%). There were no muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy patients. EMG/nerve conduction studies had a 74% agreement with final clinical diagnoses and 100% agreement in neurogenic, neuromuscular junction, and normal categories. Muscle biopsies concurred with final diagnoses in 87%, and 100% in myopathic and normal categories. In congenital myasthenic syndrome, muscle biopsies showed mild variation in fiber size in 2 of 3 children and were normal in 1 of 3. EMG sensitivity for detecting myopathic motor unit potentials in myopathies was 4 of 11 (36%), greater over 2 years of age (3 of 4, 75%), compared to infants less than 2 years (1 of 7, 14%), not statistically significant (P = .0879). EMGs false-negative for myopathy in infants EMG detected myopathic motor unit potentials in 40%, with false-negative results neurogenic (20%) or normal (40%). Because our study has no additional tests for active myopathies, for example Duchenne muscular dystrophy genetic testing, our sensitivity for myopathies is lower than if we

  8. Undifferentiated Facial Electromyography Responses to Dynamic, Audio-Visual Emotion Displays in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozga, Agata; King, Tricia Z.; Vuduc, Richard W.; Robins, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined facial electromyography (fEMG) activity to dynamic, audio-visual emotional displays in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and typically developing (TD) individuals. Participants viewed clips of happy, angry, and fearful displays that contained both facial expression and affective prosody while surface electrodes measured…

  9. What do facial expressions of emotion express in young children? The relationship between facial display and EMG measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Balconi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explored the relationship between emotional facial response and electromyographic modulation in children when they observe facial expression of emotions. Facial responsiveness (evaluated by arousal and valence ratings and psychophysiological correlates (facial electromyography, EMG were analyzed when children looked at six facial expressions of emotions (happiness, anger, fear, sadness, surprise and disgust. About EMG measure, corrugator and zygomatic muscle activity was monitored in response to different emotional types. ANOVAs showed differences for both EMG and facial response across the subjects, as a function of different emotions. Specifically, some emotions were well expressed by all the subjects (such as happiness, anger and fear in terms of high arousal, whereas some others were less level arousal (such as sadness. Zygomatic activity was increased mainly for happiness, from one hand, corrugator activity was increased mainly for anger, fear and surprise, from the other hand. More generally, EMG and facial behavior were highly correlated each other, showing a “mirror” effect with respect of the observed faces.

  10. Robot Control Using Electromyography (EMG Signals of the Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DaSalla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to design a human–interface system, using EMG signals elicited by various wrist movements, to control a robot. EMG signals are normalized and based on joint torque. A three-layer neural network is used to estimate posture of the wrist and forearm from EMG signals. After training the neural network and obtaining appropriate weights, the subject was able to control the robot in real time using wrist and forearm movements.

  11. Emotional mimicry signals pain empathy as evidenced by facial electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Bin; Wang, Yu-Zheng; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2015-12-09

    Facial mimicry has been suggested to be a behavioral index for emotional empathy. The present study is the first to investigate the link between facial muscle activity and empathy for pain by facial electromyographic (EMG) recording while observers watched videos depicting real-life painful events. Three types of visual stimulus were used: an intact painful scene and arm-only (needle injection) and face only (painful expression) scenes. Enhanced EMG activity of the corrugator supercilii (CS) and zygomaticus major (ZM) muscles was found when observers viewed others in pain, supporting a unique pain expression that is distinct from the expression of basic emotions. In the intact video stimulus condition, CS activity was correlated positively with the empathic concern score and ZM activity, suggesting facial mimicry mediated empathy for pain. Cluster analysis of facial EMG responses revealed markedly different patterns among stimulus types, including response category, ratio, and temporal dynamics, indicating greater ecological validity of the intact scene in eliciting pain empathy as compared with partial scenes. This study is the first to quantitatively describe pain empathy in terms of facial EMG data. It may provide important evidence for facial mimicry as a behavioral indicator of pain empathy.

  12. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral...

  13. Lower arm electromyography (EMG) activity detection using local binary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Paul; Chatlani, Navin; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J; Menon, Radhika; Lakany, Heba

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new electromyography activity detection technique in which 1-D local binary pattern histograms are used to distinguish between periods of activity and inactivity in myoelectric signals. The algorithm is tested on forearm surface myoelectric signals occurring due to hand gestures. The novel features of the presented method are that: 1) activity detection is performed across multiple channels using few parameters and without the need for majority vote mechanisms, 2) there are no per-channel thresholds to be tuned, which makes the process of activity detection easier and simpler to implement and less prone to errors, 3) it is not necessary to measure the properties of the signal during a quiescent period before using the algorithm. The algorithm is compared to other offline single- and double-threshold activity detection methods and, for the data sets tested, it is shown to have a better overall performance with greater tolerance to the noise in the real data set used.

  14. Coherence explored between emotion components: evidence from event-related potentials and facial electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, Kornelia; Grandjean, Didier; Scherer, Klaus R

    2014-04-01

    Componential theories assume that emotion episodes consist of emergent and dynamic response changes to relevant events in different components, such as appraisal, physiology, motivation, expression, and subjective feeling. In particular, Scherer's Component Process Model hypothesizes that subjective feeling emerges when the synchronization (or coherence) of appraisal-driven changes between emotion components has reached a critical threshold. We examined the prerequisite of this synchronization hypothesis for appraisal-driven response changes in facial expression. The appraisal process was manipulated by using feedback stimuli, presented in a gambling task. Participants' responses to the feedback were investigated in concurrently recorded brain activity related to appraisal (event-related potentials, ERP) and facial muscle activity (electromyography, EMG). Using principal component analysis, the prediction of appraisal-driven response changes in facial EMG was examined. Results support this prediction: early cognitive processes (related to the feedback-related negativity) seem to primarily affect the upper face, whereas processes that modulate P300 amplitudes tend to predominantly drive cheek region responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  16. Usefulness of electromyography of the cavernous corpora (CC EMG) in the diagnosis of arterial erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virseda-Chamorro, M; Lopez-Garcia-Moreno, A M; Salinas-Casado, J; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2012-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) of the corpora cavernosa (CC-EMG) is able to record the activity of the erectile tissue during erection, and thus has been used as a diagnostic technique in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). The present study examines the usefulness of the technique in the diagnosis of arterial ED. A cross-sectional study was made of 35 males with a mean age of 48.5 years (s.d. 11.34), referred to our center with ED for >1 year. The patients were subjected to CC-EMG and a penile Doppler ultrasound study following the injection of 20 μg of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). The patients were divided into three groups according to their response to the intracavernous injection of PGE1: Group 1 (adequate erection and reduction/suppression of EMG activity); Group 2 (insufficient erection and persistence of EMG activity); and Group 3 (insufficient erection and reduction/suppression of EMG activity). Patient classification according to response to the intracavernous injection of PGE1 was as follows: Group 1: six patients (17%), Group 2: 18 patients (51%), and Group 3: 11 patients (31%). Patients diagnosed with arterial insufficiency according to Doppler ultrasound (systolic arterial peak velocity EMG activity showed a sensitivity of 66.7% (confidence interval between 50 and 84%) and a specificity of 92.9% (confidence interval between 84 and 100%) in the diagnosis of arterial ED. Owing to the high specificity of CC-EMG response to the injection of PGE1, this test is considered useful as a screening technique in the diagnosis of arterial ED.

  17. Coordinated upper limb training assisted with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-01-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training on muscular coordination was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5 times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Improvements were found in the muscle co-ordination between the antagonist muscle pair (flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) as measured by muscle co-contractions in EMG signals; and also in the reduction of excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii. Reduced spasticity in the fingers was also observed as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score.

  18. Evaluation of sonomyography (SMG) for control compared with electromyography (EMG) in a discrete target tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Kenney, Laurence P; Xie, Hong-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Most of the commercial upper-limb externally powered prosthetic devices are controlled by electromyography (EMG) signals. We previously proposed using the real-time change of muscle thickness detected using ultrasound, namely sonomyography (SMG), for the control of prostheses. In this study, we compared the performance of subjects using 1-D SMG signal and surface EMG signal, using a discrete target tracking protocol involving a series of letter cancellation tasks. Each task involved using grip force, EMG or SMG from a wrist extensor muscle to move a cursor to one of 5 locations on a computer screen, at the first four of which were located a letter and last of which was a word of "NEXT". The target was defined by the location showing the letter "E" and, once the subject reached this target, they were instructed to "cancel" the E from the screen, using a button operated by the contralateral hand. A paired t-test revealed that the percentage of letters correctly cancelled with force/angle and SMG signal in isometric force control, and with SMG in wrist extension were significantly higher than with EMG (PEMG for prosthetic control.

  19. The role of emotion in learning trustworthiness from eye-gaze: Evidence from facial electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manssuer, Luis R; Pawling, Ralph; Hayes, Amy E; Tipper, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Gaze direction can be used to rapidly and reflexively lead or mislead others' attention as to the location of important stimuli. When perception of gaze direction is congruent with the location of a target, responses are faster compared to when incongruent. Faces that consistently gaze congruently are also judged more trustworthy than faces that consistently gaze incongruently. However, it's unclear how gaze-cues elicit changes in trust. We measured facial electromyography (EMG) during an identity-contingent gaze-cueing task to examine whether embodied emotional reactions to gaze-cues mediate trust learning. Gaze-cueing effects were found to be equivalent regardless of whether participants showed learning of trust in the expected direction or did not. In contrast, we found distinctly different patterns of EMG activity in these two populations. In a further experiment we showed the learning effects were specific to viewing faces, as no changes in liking were detected when viewing arrows that evoked similar attentional orienting responses. These findings implicate embodied emotion in learning trust from identity-contingent gaze-cueing, possibly due to the social value of shared attention or deception rather than domain-general attentional orienting.

  20. Temporal Taylor's scaling of facial electromyography and electrodermal activity in the course of emotional stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chołoniewski, Jan; Chmiel, Anna; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Hołyst, Janusz A.; Küster, Dennis; Kappas, Arvid

    2016-09-01

    High frequency psychophysiological data create a challenge for quantitative modeling based on Big Data tools since they reflect the complexity of processes taking place in human body and its responses to external events. Here we present studies of fluctuations in facial electromyography (fEMG) and electrodermal activity (EDA) massive time series and changes of such signals in the course of emotional stimulation. Zygomaticus major (ZYG, "smiling" muscle) activity, corrugator supercilii (COR, "frowning"bmuscle) activity, and phasic skin conductance (PHSC, sweating) levels of 65 participants were recorded during experiments that involved exposure to emotional stimuli (i.e., IAPS images, reading and writing messages on an artificial online discussion board). Temporal Taylor's fluctuations scaling were found when signals for various participants and during various types of emotional events were compared. Values of scaling exponents were close to 1, suggesting an external origin of system dynamics and/or strong interactions between system's basic elements (e.g., muscle fibres). Our statistical analysis shows that the scaling exponents enable identification of high valence and arousal levels in ZYG and COR signals.

  1. EMG study for perioral facial muscles function during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanawa, S; Tsuboi, A; Watanabe, M; Sasaki, K

    2008-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify the temporal and quantitative modulation in the orbicularis oris (OO) and buccinator (BUC) muscle activities during mastication. Ten healthy males (26.9 +/- 1.0 years) participated. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the facial muscles were recorded with fine wire electrodes when chewing the chewing gum (one to four sticks) and peanuts (one to five pieces). Surface EMGs of the masseter (MAS) and digastric muscles were recorded simultaneously. EMGs of the OO and BUC showed rhythmic single-peaked bursts corresponding to the jaw-opening phase of chewing cycles. The total cycle lengths were constant regardless of the food amount. Integrated EMGs of the OO changed significantly when the amount of both foods changed (anova: P < 0.05). Those of the BUC changed significantly with the amount of gum changed (P < 0.05), but did not change with the amount of peanuts changed. The burst duration of OO changed significantly when the amount of gum changed during ipsilateral chewing (P < 0.05). When the amount of peanuts changed during ipsilateral chewing, the onset of OO and the peak of BUC based on the onset of MAS activity changed significantly (P < 0.05). However, the onset, peak and offset of the OO and BUC based on the offset of MAS did not change regardless of the amounts chewed. The changes of the OO and BUC activities may derive from chewing-generated sensory inputs in accordance with the physical property of food in part, which would relate to the function of these muscles during mastication.

  2. Electromyography (EMG) signal recognition using combined discrete wavelet transform based adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arozi, Moh; Putri, Farika T.; Ariyanto, Mochammad; Khusnul Ari, M.; Munadi, Setiawan, Joga D.

    2017-01-01

    People with disabilities are increasing from year to year either due to congenital factors, sickness, accident factors and war. One form of disability is the case of interruptions of hand function. The condition requires and encourages the search for solutions in the form of creating an artificial hand with the ability as a human hand. The development of science in the field of neuroscience currently allows the use of electromyography (EMG) to control the motion of artificial prosthetic hand into the necessary use of EMG as an input signal to control artificial prosthetic hand. This study is the beginning of a significant research planned in the development of artificial prosthetic hand with EMG signal input. This initial research focused on the study of EMG signal recognition. Preliminary results show that the EMG signal recognition using combined discrete wavelet transform and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) produces accuracy 98.3 % for training and 98.51% for testing. Thus the results can be used as an input signal for Simulink block diagram of a prosthetic hand that will be developed on next study. The research will proceed with the construction of artificial prosthetic hand along with Simulink program controlling and integrating everything into one system.

  3. Emotional facial expressions evoke faster orienting responses, but weaker emotional responses at neural and behavioural levels compared to scenes: A simultaneous EEG and facial EMG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavratzakis, Aimee; Herbert, Cornelia; Walla, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded simultaneously with facial electromyography (fEMG) to determine whether emotional faces and emotional scenes are processed differently at the neural level. In addition, it was investigated whether these differences can be observed at the behavioural level via spontaneous facial muscle activity. Emotional content of the stimuli did not affect early P1 activity. Emotional faces elicited enhanced amplitudes of the face-sensitive N170 component, while its counterpart, the scene-related N100, was not sensitive to emotional content of scenes. At 220-280ms, the early posterior negativity (EPN) was enhanced only slightly for fearful as compared to neutral or happy faces. However, its amplitudes were significantly enhanced during processing of scenes with positive content, particularly over the right hemisphere. Scenes of positive content also elicited enhanced spontaneous zygomatic activity from 500-750ms onwards, while happy faces elicited no such changes. Contrastingly, both fearful faces and negative scenes elicited enhanced spontaneous corrugator activity at 500-750ms after stimulus onset. However, relative to baseline EMG changes occurred earlier for faces (250ms) than for scenes (500ms) whereas for scenes activity changes were more pronounced over the whole viewing period. Taking into account all effects, the data suggests that emotional facial expressions evoke faster attentional orienting, but weaker affective neural activity and emotional behavioural responses compared to emotional scenes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of mental fatigue on facial EMG activity during a simulated workday

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, I.J.T.; Gaillard, A.W.K.; Vries, J. de

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated whether facial EMG measures are sensitive to the effects of fatigue. EMG activity of the corrugator and frontalis muscles was recorded during and after a simulated workday. Fatigue was evaluated in four ways: (a) the building up of fatigue effects during the workday,

  5. The influence of mental fatigue on facial EMG activity during a simulated workday

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, I.J.T.; Gaillard, A.W.K.; Vries, J. de

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated whether facial EMG measures are sensitive to the effects of fatigue. EMG activity of the corrugator and frontalis muscles was recorded during and after a simulated workday. Fatigue was evaluated in four ways: (a) the building up of fatigue effects during the workday, (

  6. The effects of post-stroke upper-limb training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-10-01

    Loss of hand function and finger dexterity are main disabilities in the upper limb after stroke. An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Significant motor improvements were observed in the Fugl-Meyer hand/wrist and shoulder/elbow scores (pEMG level (p<0.05) and a significant decrease of ED and FD co-contraction during the training (p<0.05); the excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii were also reduced significantly after the training (p<0.05).

  7. Is disgust sensitive to classical conditioning as indexed by facial electromyography and behavioural responses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Charmaine; Bosman, Renske C; Engelhard, Iris; Olatunji, Bunmi O; de Jong, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies provided preliminary support for the role of classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning, yet this evidence has been limited to self-report. This study included facial electromyographical (EMG) measurements (corrugator and levator muscles) and a behavioural approach task

  8. Facial mimicry and the mirror neuron system:Simultaneous acquisition of facial electromyography and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja U Likowski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown that humans automatically react with congruent facial reactions, i.e. facial mimicry, when seeing a vis-á-vis’ facial expressions. The current experiment is the first investigating the neuronal structures responsible for differences in the occurrence of such facial mimicry reactions by simultaneously measuring BOLD and facial EMG in an MRI scanner. Therefore, 20 female students viewed emotional facial expressions (happy, sad, and angry of male and female avatar characters. During Differentiation presentation, the BOLD signal as well as M. zygomaticus major and M. corrugator supercilii activity were recorded simultaneously. Results show prototypical patterns of facial mimicry after correction for MR-related artifacts: enhanced M. zygomaticus major activity in response to happy and enhanced M. corrugator supercilii activity in response to sad and angry expressions. Regression analyses show that these congruent facial reactions correlate significantly with activations in the IFG, SMA and cerebellum. Stronger zygomaticus reactions to happy faces were further associated to increased activities in the caudate, MTG and PCC. Corrugator reactions to angry expressions were further correlated with the hippocampus, insula and STS. Results are discussed in relation to core and extended models of the mirror neuron system.

  9. Facial EMG responses to odors in solitude and with an audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, L; Kaufmann, N

    1994-04-01

    Two experiments were undertaken to examine whether facial responses to odors correlate with the hedonic odor evaluation. Experiment 1 examined whether subjects (n = 20) spontaneously generated facial movements associated with odor evaluation when they are tested in private. To measure facial responses, EMG was recorded over six muscle regions (M. corrugator supercilii, M. procerus, M. nasalis, M. levator, M. orbicularis oculi and M. zygomaticus major) using surface electrodes. In experiment 2 the experimental group (n = 10) smelled the odors while they were visually inspected by the experimenter sitting in front of the test subjects. The control group (n = 10) performed the same experimental condition as those subjects participating in experiment 1. Facial EMG over four mimetic muscle regions (M. nasalis, M. levator, M. zygomaticus major, M. orbicularis oculi) was measured while subjects smelled different odors. The main findings of this study may be summarized as follows: (i) there was no correlation between valence rating and facial EMG responses; (ii) pleasant odors did not evoke smiles when subjects smelled the odors in private; (iii) in solitude, highly concentrated malodors evoked facial EMG reactions of those mimetic muscles which are mainly involved in generating a facial display of disgust; (iv) those subjects confronted with an audience showed stronger facial reactions over the periocular and cheek region (indicative of a smile) during the smelling of pleasant odors than those who smelled these odors in private; (v) those subjects confronted with an audience showed stronger facial reactions over the M. nasalis region (indicative of a display of disgust) during the smelling of malodors than those who smelled the malodors in private. These results were taken as evidence for a more social communicative function of facial displays and strongly mitigates the reflexive-hedonic interpretation of facial displays to odors as supposed by Steiner.

  10. Simultaneous scalp electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and whole-body segmental inertial recording for multi-modal neural decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulea, Thomas C; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Ozdemir, Recep; Paloski, William H; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2013-07-26

    Recent studies support the involvement of supraspinal networks in control of bipedal human walking. Part of this evidence encompasses studies, including our previous work, demonstrating that gait kinematics and limb coordination during treadmill walking can be inferred from the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) with reasonably high decoding accuracies. These results provide impetus for development of non-invasive brain-machine-interface (BMI) systems for use in restoration and/or augmentation of gait- a primary goal of rehabilitation research. To date, studies examining EEG decoding of activity during gait have been limited to treadmill walking in a controlled environment. However, to be practically viable a BMI system must be applicable for use in everyday locomotor tasks such as over ground walking and turning. Here, we present a novel protocol for non-invasive collection of brain activity (EEG), muscle activity (electromyography (EMG)), and whole-body kinematic data (head, torso, and limb trajectories) during both treadmill and over ground walking tasks. By collecting these data in the uncontrolled environment insight can be gained regarding the feasibility of decoding unconstrained gait and surface EMG from scalp EEG.

  11. The Effects of Acupuncture on Peripheral Facial Palsy Sequelae after 20 Years via Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrin, Saulo; Soares, Nayara; Regalo, Simone Cecilio Hallak; Verri, Edson Donizetti

    2015-10-01

    This research used electromyography to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on facial palsy peripheral sequelae. The 44-year-old woman who participated in this study presented sequelae resulting from 20 years of peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) on the right side and synkinesis in the left eye. In electromyography, the electrodes were positioned on the motor points over the orbicularis oris and the orbicularis oculi muscles to establish myofunctional feedback prior to and after rehabilitation, which consisted of 20-minute sessions of acupuncture once per week for 20 weeks: using manual stimulation at acupoints Yintang, LR3, GB21, CV17, ST2, ST3, ST6, ST7, GB2, and SI19; and Tou-Kuang-Min and ST4 using electrical stimulation with a 4-Hz pulsed current. The subjective pain intensities were recorded. The root-mean-square (RMS) electromyographic comparative analysis showed greater activation and recruitment of muscle fibers on the right side and a reduced overload on the left side, which promoted a functional evolution of movements and a positive response in the stomatognathic system. Acupuncture associated with electrical stimulation reversed the peripheral facial paralysis in a short time. Severe sequelae were minimized due to the balance of muscle activation in response to the electrical stimulation provided by the acupuncture needles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Is disgust sensitive to classical conditioning as indexed by facial electromyography and behavioural responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Charmaine; Bosman, Renske C; Engelhard, Iris; Olatunji, Bunmi O; de Jong, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies provided preliminary support for the role of classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning, yet this evidence has been limited to self-report. This study included facial electromyographical (EMG) measurements (corrugator and levator muscles) and a behavioural approach task to assess participants' motivation-to-eat the actual food items (conditioned stimuli, CS). Food items served as CS and film excerpts of a woman vomiting served as unconditioned stimuli (US). Following acquisition the CS+ (neutral CS paired with US disgust) was rated as more disgusting and less positive. Notably, the conditioned response was transferred to the actual food items as evidenced by participants' reported lowered willingness-to-eat. Participants also showed heightened EMG activity in response to the CS+ which seemed driven by the corrugator indexing a global negative affect. These findings suggest that classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning can be reliably observed in subjective but not in disgust-specific physiological responding.

  13. A Novel Unsupervised Adaptive Learning Method for Long-Term Electromyography (EMG) Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Yang, Dapeng; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Huajie; Liu, Hong; Kotani, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Performance degradation will be caused by a variety of interfering factors for pattern recognition-based myoelectric control methods in the long term. This paper proposes an adaptive learning method with low computational cost to mitigate the effect in unsupervised adaptive learning scenarios. We presents a particle adaptive classifier (PAC), by constructing a particle adaptive learning strategy and universal incremental least square support vector classifier (LS-SVC). We compared PAC performance with incremental support vector classifier (ISVC) and non-adapting SVC (NSVC) in a long-term pattern recognition task in both unsupervised and supervised adaptive learning scenarios. Retraining time cost and recognition accuracy were compared by validating the classification performance on both simulated and realistic long-term EMG data. The classification results of realistic long-term EMG data showed that the PAC significantly decreased the performance degradation in unsupervised adaptive learning scenarios compared with NSVC (9.03% ± 2.23%, p < 0.05) and ISVC (13.38% ± 2.62%, p = 0.001), and reduced the retraining time cost compared with ISVC (2 ms per updating cycle vs. 50 ms per updating cycle). PMID:28608824

  14. A Novel Unsupervised Adaptive Learning Method for Long-Term Electromyography (EMG Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance degradation will be caused by a variety of interfering factors for pattern recognition-based myoelectric control methods in the long term. This paper proposes an adaptive learning method with low computational cost to mitigate the effect in unsupervised adaptive learning scenarios. We presents a particle adaptive classifier (PAC, by constructing a particle adaptive learning strategy and universal incremental least square support vector classifier (LS-SVC. We compared PAC performance with incremental support vector classifier (ISVC and non-adapting SVC (NSVC in a long-term pattern recognition task in both unsupervised and supervised adaptive learning scenarios. Retraining time cost and recognition accuracy were compared by validating the classification performance on both simulated and realistic long-term EMG data. The classification results of realistic long-term EMG data showed that the PAC significantly decreased the performance degradation in unsupervised adaptive learning scenarios compared with NSVC (9.03% ± 2.23%, p < 0.05 and ISVC (13.38% ± 2.62%, p = 0.001, and reduced the retraining time cost compared with ISVC (2 ms per updating cycle vs. 50 ms per updating cycle.

  15. Analysis of Muscle Contraction on Pottery Manufacturing Process Using Electromyography (EMG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soewardi, Hartomo; Azka Rahmayani, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common problems in pottery manufacturing process is musculoskeletal disorders on workers. This disorder was caused by uncomfortable posture where the workers sit on the floor with one leg was folded and another was twisted for long duration. Back, waist, buttock, and right knee frequently experience the disorders. The objective of this research is to investigate the muscle contraction at such body part of workers in manufacturing process of pottery. Electromyography is used to investigate the muscle contraction based on the median frequency signal. Focus measurements is conducted on four muscles types. They are lower interscapular muscle on the right and left side, dorsal lumbar muscle, and lateral hamstring muscle. Statistical analysis is conducted to test differences of muscle contraction between female and male. The result of this research showed that the muscle which reached the highest contraction is dorsal lumbar muscle with the average of median frequency is 51,84 Hz. Then followed by lower interscapular muscle on the left side with the average of median frequency is 31,30 hz, lower interscapular muscle on the right side average of median frequency is 31,24 Hz, and lateral hamstring muscle average of median frequency is 21,77 Hz. Based on the statistic analysis result, there were no differences between male and female on left and right lower interscapular muscle and dorsal lumbar muscle but there were differences on lateral hamstring muscle with the significance level is 5%. Besides that, there were differences for all combination muscle types with the level of significance is 5%.

  16. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy in adolescence : Interrelations between facial electromyography and self-reported trait and state measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Graaff, Jolien; Meeus, W; de Wied, Minet; van Boxtel, Anton; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M.; Branje, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined interrelations of trait and state empathy in an adolescent sample. Self-reported affective trait empathy and cognitive trait empathy were assessed during a home visit. During a test session at the university, motor empathy (facial electromyography), and self-reported affective an

  17. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy in adolescence : Interrelations between facial electromyography and self-reported trait and state measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaff, J.; Meeus, W.H.J.; de Wied, M.; van Boxtel, A.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Koot, H.M.; Branje, S.T.J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined interrelations of trait and state empathy in an adolescent sample. Self-reported affective trait empathy and cognitive trait empathy were assessed during a home visit. During a test session at the university, motor empathy (facial electromyography), and self-reported affective

  18. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy in adolescence : Interrelations between facial electromyography and self-reported trait and state measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Graaff, Jolien; Meeus, W; de Wied, Minet; van Boxtel, Anton; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M.; Branje, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined interrelations of trait and state empathy in an adolescent sample. Self-reported affective trait empathy and cognitive trait empathy were assessed during a home visit. During a test session at the university, motor empathy (facial electromyography), and self-reported affective an

  19. Facial EMG responses to emotional expressions are related to emotion perception ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künecke, Janina; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Recio, Guillermo; Sommer, Werner; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a "reactivation" of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG)--in response to emotional facial expressions. N° = °269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N° = °110) in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective.

  20. Facial EMG responses to emotional expressions are related to emotion perception ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Künecke

    Full Text Available Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a "reactivation" of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG--in response to emotional facial expressions. N° = °269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N° = °110 in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective.

  1. Contributions of facial morphology, age, and gender to EMG activity under biting and resting conditions: a canonical correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, L L; Glaros, A G

    1995-08-01

    Theoretical studies suggest that facial morphology may confer a mechanical advantage to particular individuals during force production, but not during rest. However, prior studies on the relationship between facial morphology and EMG suffer from various methodological limitations. We examined the hypothesis that facial morphology variables contribute significantly and meaningfully to the variance in masticatory muscle EMG when subjects produce specific levels of interocclusal force, but not when subjects are at rest. Measures of facial morphology included gonial angle, ramus height, and maxillary height, as determined from lateral cephalograms. EMG data were obtained from surface electrodes placed on masseter and temporalis sites. Subjects (N = 96) sat in a darkened, sound-attenuated room while they watched a seven-minute segment of a movie. EMG activity obtained during the last two minutes was used as a baseline period. Using the central incisors, subjects then provided five different force levels ranging from 6.5 to 48 lb in random order on a bite-force device while EMG data were collected. A canonical correlation analysis, performed on the set of predictor variables (age, gender, and facial morphology measurements) and the set of criterion variables (EMG data), showed a significant canonical correlation between the two variable sets while biting, but not at rest. Age, but not the facial morphology variables, was highly related to the canonical variate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Surface Facial Electromyography Reactions to Light-Relevant and Season-Relevant Stimuli in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    psychophysiological responding in the nonseasonal depression literature (e.g., Cacioppo, Bush, & Tassinary, 1992; Greden, Genero , Price, Feinberg...with Schwartz et al. (1978) and Carney et al. (1981), Greden, Price, Genero , Feinberg, and Levine (1984) found that higher baseline levels of facial...York: Academic Press. Greden, J. F., Price, H. L., Genero , N., Feinberg, M., & Levine, S. (1984). Facial EMG activity levels predict treatment

  3. Rapid Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Paula M.; Moody, Eric J.; McIntosh, Daniel N.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Reed, Catherine L.

    2008-01-01

    Typical adults mimic facial expressions within 1000ms, but adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not. These rapid facial reactions (RFRs) are associated with the development of social-emotional abilities. Such interpersonal matching may be caused by motor mirroring or emotional responses. Using facial electromyography (EMG), this study…

  4. EMG (Electromyography) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes the muscle to contract, or tighten. The muscle contraction itself produces electrical signals. For the purpose of ... three kinds of diseases that interfere with normal muscle contraction: diseases of the muscle itself (most commonly, muscular ...

  5. Near-wins and near-losses in gambling: A behavioral and facial EMG study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yin; van Dijk, Eric; Clark, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated responses to near-wins (i.e., nonwin outcomes that were close to a major win, and their counterpart, near-losses (nonwin outcomes that are proximal to a major loss) in a decision-making task, measuring (a) luck ratings, (b) adjustment of bet amount, and (c) facial muscle reactivity at zygomaticus and corrugator sites. Compared to full-misses, near-wins decreased self-perceived luck and near-losses increased self-perceived luck, consistent with the effects of upward versus downward counterfactual thinking, respectively. Wins and losses both increased zygomaticus reactivity, and losses selectively enhanced corrugator reactivity. Near-wins heightened zygomaticus activity, but did not affect corrugator activity, thus showing a similar response pattern to actual wins. There were no significant facial EMG effects of near-losses. We infer that near-wins engender some appetitive processing, despite their objective nonwin status. PMID:25234840

  6. Evaluation of Applied Kinesiology meridian techniques by means of surface electromyography (sEMG): demonstration of the regulatory influence of antique acupuncture points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga

    2009-05-29

    The use of Applied Kinesiology techniques based on manual muscle tests relies on the relationship between muscles and acupuncture meridians. Applied Kinesiology detects body dysfunctions based on changes in muscle tone. Muscle tonification or inhibition within the test setting can be achieved with selected acupoints. These acupoints belong to either the same meridian or related meridians. The aim of this study is to analyze muscle sedation and tonification by means of surface electromyography. Manual muscle tests were carried out using standard Applied Kinesiology (AK) techniques. The investigation included basic AK procedures such as sedation and tonification with specific acupoints. The sedation and tonification acupoints were selected from related meridians according to the Five Elements. The tonification effect of these acupoints was also tested while interfering effects were induced by manual stimulation of scars. The effects of selective neural therapy, i.e. individually tested and selected anesthetic agent, for the treatment of scars were also studied. The characteristics of muscle action were documented by surface electromyographys (sEMG). The sEMG data showed a diminution of signal intensity when sedation was used. Graded sedation resulted in a graded diminution of signal amplitude. Graded increase in signal amplitude was observed when antique acupuncture points were used for tonification. The tactile stretch stimulus of scars localized in meridian-independent places produced diminution of signal intensity on a reference muscle, similar to sedation. These changes, however, were not corrected by tonification acupoints. Correction of these interferences was achieved by lesion specific neural therapy with local anesthetics. We demonstrated the central working principles, i.e. sedation and tonification, of Applied Kinesiology through the use of specific acupoints that have an influence on manual muscle tests. Sedation decreases RMS signal in sEMG, whereas

  7. Schedule-induced masseter EMG in facial pain subjects vs. no-pain controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramling, S E; Grayson, R L; Sullivan, T N; Schwartz, S

    1997-02-01

    Empirical reports suggest that oral habits (e.g., teeth clenching) may be behavioral mediators linking stress to muscle hyperreactivity and the development of facial pain. Another report suggests that excessive behavioral adjuncts develop in conjunction with fixed-time stimulus presentation. The present study assessed the extent to which the oral habits exhibited by facial pain patients are schedule-induced. Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) symptomatology (n = 15) and pain-free controls (n = 15) participated in a 4-phase experiment (adaptation, baseline, task, recovery) designed to elicit schedule-induced behaviors. Self-report of oral habits and negative affect were recorded after each phase. Objective measures of oral habits were obtained via behavioral observation and masseter EMG recordings. Results revealed that negative arousal significantly increased during the fixed-time (FT) task and was also associated with increased oral habits among the TMD subjects. Moreover, 40% of the TMD subjects and none of the controls exhibited a pattern of EMG elevations in the early part of the inter-stimulus interval that met a strict criteria for scheduled-induced behavior per se. Taken together, these results suggest that the TMD subjects were engaging in schedule-induced oral habits. The adjunctive behavior literature seems to provide a plausible explanation as to how oral habits develop and are maintained in TMD patients, despite their painful consequences.

  8. Eletromiografia de superfície em pacientes portadores de paralisia facial periférica Surface electromyography in peripheral facial paralysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fontes Ferreira Bernardes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estudar a atividade eletromiográfica dos músculos frontal, orbicular dos olhos, zigomáticos, orbicular da boca em indivíduos normais e pacientes portadores de paralisia facial e o índice de simetria entre os dois lados da face. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados por meio da eletromiografia de superfície, seis indivíduos sem histórico de alteração na musculatura facial e seis pacientes com paralisia facial periférica. Para a avaliação eletromiográfica foram solicitados os seguintes movimentos (ao esforço máximo: elevação da testa, fechamento de olhos, protrusão labial e retração labial. RESULTADOS: encontrou-se que em indivíduos normais a média dos potenciais eletromiográficos para ambos os lados da face é semelhante, demonstrando que a integridade do nervo facial é fundamental para o equilíbrio da mímica facial. Nos pacientes com paralisia facial a média dos potenciais eletromiográficos para ambos os lados da face é significativamente diferente (evidenciando a falta de inervação neural. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados eletromiográficos mostraram diferença estatisticamente significante entres os dois lados da face nos indivíduos normais e nos pacientes com paralisia facial.PURPOSE: to study the surface electromyographic activity of frontal, orbicular occuli, orbicular oris and zigomatycs muscles in normal subjects and in peripheral facial paralysis patients. METHODS: six volunteers with no facial paralysis history as well as six peripheral facial paralysis patients were evaluated with electromyography using superficial electrodes. Maximum effort muscle activity and symmetry index were measured for the voluntary movements such as: raising eyebrows, eyes closing, smiling, puckering lips. RESULTS: it was found out that in normal subjects the muscle activity values were similar between the two sides of the face, showing that the facial nerve integrity is fundamental to the balance of facial mimics. In facial paralysis

  9. Electromyographic responses to emotional facial expressions in 6-7 year olds: A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschamps, P.K.H.; Schutte, I.; Kenemans, J.L.; Matthys, W.C.H.J.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary studies have demonstrated that school-aged children (average age 9-10 years) show mimicry responses to happy and angry facial expressions. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using facial electromyography (EMG) as a method to study facial mimicry responses in

  10. Surface electromyography recording of spontaneous eyeblinks: applications in neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Alice; Brenna, Stefano; Cavallari, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    We are designing an implantable neuroprosthesis for the treatment of unilateral facial paralysis. The envisioned biomimetic device paces artificial blinks in the paretic eyelid when activity in the healthy orbicularis oculi (orbicularis) muscle is detected. The present article focuses on electromyography (EMG)-based eyeblink detection. A pilot clinical study was performed in healthy volunteers who were intended to represent individuals with facial paralysis. Spontaneous eyeblinks were detected by a surface EMG recording. Blink detection accuracy was tested at rest and during voluntary smiling and chewing. Fifteen participants were asked to wear surface recording electrodes on the left side of their face, detecting the orbicularis oculi, the masseter, and the zygomatic muscle EMG activity. Participants were asked to look ahead, voluntarily smile, and chew according to an experimental protocol. Custom software was designed with the purpose of selectively filtering the multichannel EMG recordings and triggering a digital output. The software filter allowed elimination of spurious artificial eyeblinks and thus increased the accuracy of the EMG recording apparatus for the spontaneous blinking. Orbicularis oculi EMG recording worked as a real-time eyeblink-detecting system. Moreover, the multichannel EMG recording coupled to a proper digital signal processing was very effective in specifically detecting the spontaneous blinking during other facial muscle activities. With regard to closed-loop biomimetic devices for the pacing of the eyeblink, the EMG signal represents a valid option for the recording side.

  11. Non-invasive 3D facial analysis and surface electromyography during functional pre-orthodontic therapy: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca M. Tartaglia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Functional orthodontic devices can modify oral function thus permitting more adequate growth processes. The assessment of their effects should include both facial morphology and muscle function. This preliminary study investigated whether a preformed functional orthodontic device could induce variations in facial morphology and function along with correction of oral dysfunction in a group of orthodontic patients in the mixed and early permanent dentitions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks (forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, jaw and ears were collected in 10 orthodontic male patients aged 8-13 years, and in 89 healthy reference boys of the same age. Soft tissue facial angles, distances, and ratios were computed. Surface electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscles was performed, and standardized symmetry, muscular torque and activity were calculated. Soft-tissue facial modifications were analyzed non-invasively before and after a 6-month treatment with a functional device. Comparisons were made with z-scores and paired Student's t-tests. RESULTS: The 6-month treatment stimulated mandibular growth in the anterior and inferior directions, with significant variations in three-dimensional facial divergence and facial convexity. The modifications were larger in the patients than in reference children. In several occasions, the discrepancies relative to the norm became not significant after treatment. No significant variations in standardized muscular activity were found. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results showed that the continuous and correct use of the functional device induced measurable intraoral (dental arches and extraoral (face morphological modifications. The device did not modify the functional equilibrium of the masticatory muscles.

  12. 肌电图检测患者的心理调适%Psychological adjustment of the patients by using electromyography (EMG) detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓丽; 张延红; 马冬云; 张凤霞; 白雪

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore and find some effective psychological adjustment measures by the way of analyzing the patients' mental states who undergo the electromyography detection. METHODS 120 cases of electromyography detection patients were randomly divided into the observational group and the control group. The patients in the control group were tested by EMG detection in a routine way, while the patients in the observational group. in addition to the routine way, were taken psychological adjustment tests according to different mental states. Compared the results of the patients' EMG detection in the two groups. RESULTS The majority of the patients in the observational group showed stable mental state, and they can cooperate with the EMG detection process except one, significantly better than the control group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION A series of adjustment measures can be adopted in view of patients' psychological states, and the patients can actively cooperate with the detection , the time of inspection can be shortened, the success rate of the detection can be improved.%目的 通过分析肌电图检测患者的心理状态,探讨进行有效心理调适措施.方法 将120例需进行肌电图检测患者随机分为观察组和对照组,对照组患者接受常规方法检测,观察组患者除常规检测外,还针对患者不同心理状态进行相应的心理调适.比较两组患者完成检测情况.结果 观察组绝大多数患者心理状态稳定,能配合检测,只有1例不合作.明显优于对照组(P<0.01).结论 针对肌电图检测患者的心理状态,采取一系列调适措施,使患者能够积极配合检测,缩短了检测时间,提高了检测的成功率.

  13. Application of Electromyography (EMG) in Sports Biomechanical Researches%肌电图(EMG)在运动生物力学研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琨; 李小生; 宋姌; 富仁杰; 郭晓慧

    2014-01-01

    主要通过文献研究,从应用的角度出发,对肌电图(EMG)在运动生物力学研究中的相关研究进行综述.包括EMG的测量、结果的处理与分析、应用研究成果、存在问题和应用展望.重点对目前的研究提出问题并进行探讨,为EMG在运动生物力学中的进一步研究与应用提出思考和帮助.

  14. Power spectral analysis of surface electromyography (EMG) at matched contraction levels of the first dorsal interosseous muscle in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Shin, Henry; Zhou, Ping; Niu, Xun; Liu, Jie; Rymer, William Zev

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to help assess complex neural and muscular changes induced by stroke using power spectral analysis of surface electromyogram (EMG) signals. Fourteen stroke subjects participated in the study. They were instructed to perform isometric voluntary contractions by abducting the index finger. Surface EMG signals were collected from the paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles with forces ranging from 30% to 70% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the paretic muscle. Power spectral analysis was performed to characterize features of the surface EMG in paretic and contralateral muscles at matched forces. A Linear Mixed Model was applied to identify the spectral changes in the hemiparetic muscle and to examine the relation between spectral parameters and contraction levels. Regression analysis was performed to examine the correlations between spectral characteristics and clinical features. Differences in power spectrum distribution patterns were observed in paretic muscles when compared with their contralateral pairs. Nine subjects showed increased mean power frequency (MPF) in the contralateral side (>15 Hz). No evident spectrum difference was observed in 3 subjects. Only 2 subjects had higher MPF in the paretic muscle than the contralateral muscle. Pooling all subjects' data, there was a significant reduction of MPF in the paretic muscle compared with the contralateral muscle (paretic: 168.7 ± 7.6 Hz, contralateral: 186.1 ± 8.7 Hz, mean ± standard error, F=36.56, ppower spectrum did not confirm a significant correlation between the MPF and contraction force in either hand (F=0.7, p>0.5). There was no correlation between spectrum difference and Fugl-Meyer or Chedoke scores, or ratio of paretic and contralateral MVC (p>0.2). There appears to be complex muscular and neural processes at work post stroke that may impact the surface EMG power spectrum. The majority of the tested stroke subjects had lower MPF in the

  15. Beauty in the eye of the beholder: Using facial electromyography to examine the association between eating disorder symptoms and perceptions of emaciation among undergraduate women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Dorian R; Velkoff, Elizabeth A; Forrest, Lauren N; Fussner, Lauren M; Smith, April

    2017-03-07

    Thin-ideal internalization, drive for thinness, and over-evaluation of the importance of thinness are associated with eating disorders (EDs). However, little research has examined to what extent perceptions of emaciation are also associated with ED symptoms. In the present study, 80 undergraduate women self-reported on ED symptomatology and perceptions of emaciated, thin, and overweight female bodies. While participants viewed images of these different body types, facial electromyography was used to measure activation of facial muscles associated with disgust reactions. Emaciated and overweight bodies were rated negatively and elicited facial responses consistent with disgust. Further, ED symptomatology was associated with pronounced aversion to overweight bodies (assessed via self-report pleasantness ratings), and attenuated negative affect to emaciated bodies (assessed via facial electromyography). The latter association was significant even when controlling for self-reported perceptions of emaciation, suggesting that psychophysiological methods in ED research may provide valuable information unavailable via self-report.

  16. Emotional responses to irony and emoticons in written language: Evidence from EDA and facial EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dominic; Mackenzie, Ian G; Leuthold, Hartmut; Filik, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    While the basic nature of irony is saying one thing and communicating the opposite, it may also serve additional social and emotional functions, such as projecting humor or anger. Emoticons often accompany irony in computer-mediated communication, and have been suggested to increase enjoyment of communication. In the current study, we aimed to examine online emotional responses to ironic versus literal comments, and the influence of emoticons on this process. Participants read stories with a final comment that was either ironic or literal, praising or critical, and with or without an emoticon. We used psychophysiological measures to capture immediate emotional responses: electrodermal activity to directly measure arousal and facial electromyography to detect muscle movements indicative of emotional expressions. Results showed higher arousal, reduced frowning, and enhanced smiling for messages with rather than without an emoticon, suggesting that emoticons increase positive emotions. A tendency toward less negative responses (i.e., reduced frowning and enhanced smiling) for ironic than literal criticism, and less positive responses (i.e., enhanced frowning and reduced smiling) for ironic than literal praise suggests that irony weakens the emotional impact of a message. The present findings indicate the utility of a psychophysiological approach in studying online emotional responses to written language.

  17. Influence of a scheduled-waiting task on EMG reactivity and oral habits among facial pain patients and no-pain controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, R A; Townsend, D R; Gramling, S E

    2000-12-01

    Recent research has strongly implicated the role of psychological stress in the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It is widely reported that oral habits (e.g., teeth grinding) probably provide a behavioral link between stress and the development of TMD symptomatology. Extrapolation of research in the field of adjunctive behavior to the TMD disorders suggests that oral behaviors may develop conjointly with fixed-time (FT) stimulus presentation. The current experiment extended previous research examining this possibility by assessing the influence of experimental stress on masseter EMG and oral habits among persons who met broadband criteria for TMD and no-pain controls. Oral habit activity was assessed via self-report questionnaire whereas masseter muscle activity was measured continuously via electromyography across four phases (Adaptation, Free-Play, Scheduled-Play, Recovery). The Scheduled-Play phase was designed as a stress-reactivity task that included an FT schedule. Results indicated that, consistent with the stress-reactivity model, the Scheduled-Play phase resulted in a significant increase in masseter EMG levels relative to Free-Play and Adaptation, and that this effect was significantly larger for the TMD group relative to controls. The results suggest an adjunctive behavior effect although the effect was not specific to those with facial pain. Oral habit data showed a significant phase effect with oral habits that was significantly higher during the Scheduled-Play phase relative to Adaptation. The findings are the impetus for further study regarding the mechanisms whereby oral habits are developed and maintained despite their painful consequences.

  18. Continuous monitoring of electromyography (EMG), mechanomyography (MMG), sonomyography (SMG) and torque output during ramp and step isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Xie, Hong-Bo; Chen, Xin

    2010-11-01

    In this study we simultaneously collected ultrasound images, EMG, MMG from the rectus femoris (RF) muscle and torque signal from the leg extensor muscle group of nine male subjects (mean±SD, age=30.7±.4.9 years; body weight=67.0±8.4kg; height=170.4±6.9cm) during step, ramp increasing, and decreasing at three different rates (50%, 25% and 17% MVC/s). The muscle architectural parameters extracted from ultrasound imaging, which reflect muscle contractions, were defined as sonomyography (SMG) in this study. The cross-sectional area (CSA) and aspect ratio between muscle width and thickness (width/thickness) were extracted from ultrasound images. The results showed that the CSA of RF muscles decreased by 7.25±4.07% when muscle torque output changed from 0% to 90% MVC, and the aspect ratio decreased by 41.66±7.96%. The muscle contraction level and SMG data were strongly correlated (R(2)=0.961, P=0.003, for CSA and R(2)=0.999, PEMG RMS in ramp increasing was 8.25±4.00% higher than step (P=0.002). The normalized MMG RMS of step contraction was significantly lower than ramp increasing and decreasing, with averaged differences of 12.22±3.37% (P=0.001) and 12.06±3.37% (P=0.001), respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that the CSA and aspect ratio, i.e., SMG signals, can provide useful information about muscle contractions. They may therefore complement EMG and MMG for studying muscle activation strategies under different conditions.

  19. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy in adolescence: Interrelations between facial electromyography and self-reported trait and state measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Graaff, Jolien; Meeus, Wim; de Wied, Minet; van Boxtel, Anton; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M; Branje, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined interrelations of trait and state empathy in an adolescent sample. Self-reported affective trait empathy and cognitive trait empathy were assessed during a home visit. During a test session at the university, motor empathy (facial electromyography), and self-reported affective and cognitive state empathy were assessed in response to empathy-inducing film clips portraying happiness and sadness. Adolescents who responded with stronger motor empathy consistently reported higher affective state empathy. Adolescents' motor empathy was also positively related to cognitive state empathy, either directly or indirectly via affective state empathy. Whereas trait empathy was consistently, but modestly, related to state empathy with sadness, for state empathy with happiness few trait-state associations were found. Together, the findings provide support for the notion that empathy is a multi-faceted phenomenon. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy seem to be related processes, each playing a different role in the ability to understand and share others' feelings.

  20. Study of EMG on the treatment and prognosis of idiopathic facial paralysis%神经肌电图对特发性面瘫治疗及预后评估的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋春霞; 谢增辉; 何芳梅; 张世俊; 林涛; 张蓓; 李亚军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of the neuro-EMG (electroneurography, ENG and electromyography, EMG) on the treatment and prognosis in idiopathic facial paralysis. Methods The keypoint Ⅳ EMG made in Denmark was used to detect the ENG and EMG of ipsilateral and contralateral facial nerve of the 96 cases of patients with clinical diagnosis of idiopathic facial paralysis. The motor conduction latency period and amplitude of facial nerve temporal branch, zygo-matic branch and buccal branch and the EMG in frontal muscle,orbicularis muscle and orbicularis oris muscle were recorded, and then compared with the patients own contralateral ones. Results It was statistically significant (P <0. 05) that facial nerve motor conduction latency were longer and M-wave amplitude lowered than its own contralateral side in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis. The facial muscle of mild patients with generally normal EMG and amplitude dropt less than 70% and nerve conduction velocity dropt less than 20% was fully recovered within three months and the cure rate was 100%. Most of the patients with amplitude dropt to 70% - 90% and nerve conduction velocity dropt to 20% ~ 50% , or moderate part neurogenic damage EMG,was fully recovered within three months and the cure rate was 87. 8%. The facial muscle of the moderate and severe patients with amplitude dropt to more than 90% and nerve conduction velocity dropt to more than 50% and partial or complete neurogenic damage was fully recovered and the cure rate was 50%. The patients with facial muscle of 25% patients with evoked potentials disappeared,NCN absented and completely damaged EMG showed fully recovered in three months. Conclusion It is important to test the ENG and EMG on the prognostic assessment of nerve injury and recovery of facial muscle in idiopathic facial paralysis, which provides an objective basis for clinical treatment.%目的 探讨神经肌电图(神经电图electroneurography,ENG和肌电图electromyography

  1. Surface Electromyography-Based Facial Expression Recognition in Bi-Polar Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyar Hamedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Facial expression recognition has been improved recently and it has become a significant issue in diagnostic and medical fields, particularly in the areas of assistive technology and rehabilitation. Apart from their usefulness, there are some problems in their applications like peripheral conditions, lightening, contrast and quality of video and images. Approach: Facial Action Coding System (FACS and some other methods based on images or videos were applied. This study proposed two methods for recognizing 8 different facial expressions such as natural (rest, happiness in three conditions, anger, rage, gesturing ‘a’ like in apple word and gesturing no by pulling up the eyebrows based on Three-channels in Bi-polar configuration by SEMG. Raw signals were processed in three main steps (filtration, feature extraction and active features selection sequentially. Processed data was fed into Support Vector Machine and Fuzzy C-Means classifiers for being classified into 8 facial expression groups. Results: 91.8 and 80.4% recognition ratio had been achieved for FCM and SVM respectively. Conclusion: The confirmed enough accuracy and power in this field of study and FCM showed its better ability and performance in comparison with SVM. It’s expected that in near future, new approaches in the frequency bandwidth of each facial gesture will provide better results.

  2. Suboptimal Exposure to Facial Expressions When Viewing Video Messages From a Small Screen: Effects on Emotion, Attention, and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaja, Niklas; Kallinen, Kari; Saari, Timo; Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Liisa

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of suboptimally presented facial expressions on emotional and attentional responses and memory among 39 young adults viewing video (business news) messages from a small screen. Facial electromyography (EMG) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were used as physiological measures of emotion and attention, respectively.…

  3. Surface electromyography of facial muscles during natural and artificial feeding of infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cristiane F; Trezza, Ercília M C; Murade, Emílio C M; Padovani, Carlos R

    2006-01-01

    To measure and compare the activity of the masseter, temporalis and buccinator muscles in different infant feeding methods. Cross-sectional study of 60 full-term infants with no intercurrent diseases, aged between two and three months, classified into the following groups: 1) exclusive breastfeeding; 2) breastfeeding plus bottle-feeding; and 3) exclusive breastfeeding plus cup feeding. Surface electromyography was performed during infant feeding. The Krushal-Wallis test was used, complemented by multiple paired comparisons of the groups. A 5% significance level was chosen for the tests. Statistically higher results were verified in the breastfeeding group in relation to the bottle-feeding one, both in the range of movement and the mean contraction of the masseter. With regard to the temporalis muscle, statistically higher results were found in the breastfeeding group comparatively to the bottle-feeding one. As to the buccinator muscle, statistically higher results were observed in the breastfeeding group in relation to the bottle-feeding one, although in this case, the difference concerned only the range of contraction. The similarities between the muscle activity in the breastfeeding and in the cup-feeding groups suggests that cup-feeding can be used as an alternative infant feeding method, being better than bottle-feeding, due to the hyperactivity of the buccinator muscle, which could result in changes to the structural growth and development of the stomatognathic system functions.

  4. Wireless electronic-tattoo for long-term high fidelity facial muscle recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzelberg, Lilah; David Pur, Moshe; Steinberg, Stanislav; Rand, David; Farah, Maroun; Hanein, Yael

    2017-05-01

    Facial surface electromyography (sEMG) is a powerful tool for objective evaluation of human facial expressions and was accordingly suggested in recent years for a wide range of psychological and neurological assessment applications. Owing to technical challenges, in particular the cumbersome gelled electrodes, the use of facial sEMG was so far limited. Using innovative facial temporary tattoos optimized specifically for facial applications, we demonstrate the use of sEMG as a platform for robust identification of facial muscle activation. In particular, differentiation between diverse facial muscles is demonstrated. We also demonstrate a wireless version of the system. The potential use of the presented technology for user-experience monitoring and objective psychological and neurological evaluations is discussed.

  5. EMG reactivity and oral habits among facial pain patients in a scheduled-waiting competitive task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, R A; Lakatos, C A; Gramling, S E

    1999-12-01

    For individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) it has been theorized that stressful events trigger oral habits (e.g., teeth grinding), thereby increasing masticatory muscle tension and subsequent pain. Recent research involving adjunctive behaviors found an increase in masseter surface EMG (sEMG) and oral habits when students with TMD symptomatology were placed on a fixed-time reinforcement schedule. The current study used a treatment-seeking community sample with TMD symptomatology in a competitive task designed to be a more naturalistic Fixed Time task. The experiment consisted of Adaptation, Free-Play, Scheduled-Play, and Recovery phases. During the Scheduled-Play phase participants played, and waited to play, an electronic poker game. Results indicated that masseter muscle tension in the Scheduled-Play phase was significantly higher (p oral habits and overall affect were significantly higher (p's oral habits may lead to TMD symptomatology.

  6. Social hierarchies and emotions: cortical prefrontal activity, facial feedback (EMG), and cognitive performance in a dynamic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pagani, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    In the present research, we manipulated the perceived superior/inferior status during a competitive cognitive task. In two experiments, we created an explicit and strongly reinforced social hierarchy based on incidental rating on an attentional task. Based on our hypotheses, social rank may influence nonverbal cues (such as facial mimic related to emotional response), cortical lateralized activity in frontal areas (brain oscillations), and cognitive outcomes in response to rank modulation. Thus, the facial mimic (corrugators vs. zygomatic muscle activity), frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta), and real cognitive performance [(error rate (ER); response times (RTs)] were considered. Specifically, a peer-group comparison was enrolled and an improved (experiment 1, N = 29) or decreased (experiment 2, N = 31) performance was artificially manipulated by the experimenter. Results showed a significant improved cognitive performance (decreased ER and RTs), an increased zygomatic activity (positive emotions), and a more prefrontal left-lateralized cortical response in the case of a perceived increased social ranking. On the contrary, a significant decreased cognitive performance (increased ER and RTs), an increased corrugators activity (negative emotions), and a less left-lateralized cortical response were observed as a consequence of a perceived decreased social ranking. Moreover, the correlational values revealed a consistent trend between behavioral (RTs) and EMG and EEG measures for both experiments. The present results suggest that social status not only guides social behavior, but it also influences cognitive processes and subjects' performance.

  7. The potential and limitations of quantitative electromyography in equine medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Inge D; Franssen, Hessel

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the scope of using (quantitative) electromyography (EMG) in diagnosing myopathies and neuropathies in equine patients. In human medicine, many EMG methods are available for the diagnosis, pathophysiological description and evaluation, monitoring, or rehabilitation of patients,

  8. Is quantitative electromyography reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, F; Ruf, S; Pancherz, H

    1996-01-01

    The reliability of quantitative electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles was investigated in 14 subjects without any signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Integrated EMG activity from the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles was recorded bilaterally by means of bipolar surface electrodes during chewing and biting activities. In the first experiment, the influence of electrode relocation was investigated. No influence of electrode relocation on the recorded EMG signal could be detected. In a second experiment, three sessions of EMG recordings during five different chewing and biting activities were performed in the morning (I); 1 hour later without intermediate removal of the electrodes (II); and in the afternoon, using new electrodes (III). The method errors for different time intervals (I-II and I-III errors) for each muscle and each function were calculated. Depending on the time interval between the EMG recordings, the muscles considered, and the function performed, the individual errors ranged from 5% to 63%. The method error increased significantly (P masseter (mean 27.2%) was higher than for the temporalis (mean 20.0%). The largest function error was found during maximal biting in intercuspal position (mean 23.1%). Based on the findings, quantitative electromyography of the masticatory muscles seems to have a limited value in diagnostics and in the evaluation of individual treatment results.

  9. When age matters: differences in facial mimicry and autonomic responses to peers' emotions in teenagers and adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ardizzi

    Full Text Available Age-group membership effects on explicit emotional facial expressions recognition have been widely demonstrated. In this study we investigated whether Age-group membership could also affect implicit physiological responses, as facial mimicry and autonomic regulation, to observation of emotional facial expressions. To this aim, facial Electromyography (EMG and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA were recorded from teenager and adult participants during the observation of facial expressions performed by teenager and adult models. Results highlighted that teenagers exhibited greater facial EMG responses to peers' facial expressions, whereas adults showed higher RSA-responses to adult facial expressions. The different physiological modalities through which young and adults respond to peers' emotional expressions are likely to reflect two different ways to engage in social interactions with coetaneous. Findings confirmed that age is an important and powerful social feature that modulates interpersonal interactions by influencing low-level physiological responses.

  10. When age matters: differences in facial mimicry and autonomic responses to peers' emotions in teenagers and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardizzi, Martina; Sestito, Mariateresa; Martini, Francesca; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Ravera, Roberto; Gallese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Age-group membership effects on explicit emotional facial expressions recognition have been widely demonstrated. In this study we investigated whether Age-group membership could also affect implicit physiological responses, as facial mimicry and autonomic regulation, to observation of emotional facial expressions. To this aim, facial Electromyography (EMG) and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) were recorded from teenager and adult participants during the observation of facial expressions performed by teenager and adult models. Results highlighted that teenagers exhibited greater facial EMG responses to peers' facial expressions, whereas adults showed higher RSA-responses to adult facial expressions. The different physiological modalities through which young and adults respond to peers' emotional expressions are likely to reflect two different ways to engage in social interactions with coetaneous. Findings confirmed that age is an important and powerful social feature that modulates interpersonal interactions by influencing low-level physiological responses.

  11. Association between facial growth pattern and facial muscle activity: A prospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdullah, Mohannad; Saltaji, Humam; Abou-Hamed, Hussein; Youssef, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the relationship between facial growth pattern and electromyography (EMG) of facial muscles: anterior temporalis, masseter, buccinators, orbicularis oris, mentalis and anterior digastric. The sample consisted of 77 subjects aged between 18-28 years (mean age 21.10±2.03), with dental Class I relationship, normal overjet and overbite, balanced facial profile, no signs of temporomandibular disorders, and no previous orthodontic treatment. Facial growth pattern was determined on the lateral cephalograms according to the Björk sum (sum of the N-S-Ar, S-Ar-Go, and Ar-Go-Me angles) dividing the sample into three groups: horizontal facial pattern group (24 subjects), normal facial pattern group (41 subjects), and vertical facial pattern group (12 subjects). The EMG of anterior temporalis, masseter, buccinator, orbicularis oris, mentalis and anterior digastric muscles were examined for each patient in the rest position and in functional positions (central maximum intercuspation, chewing on right side, chewing on left side and swallowing). Mean values and standard deviation of EMG were obtained and compared between the three groups. At rest, the EMG of the masseter, orbicularis oris and anterior digastric were higher in the vertical facial pattern group compared with the other two groups, with a moderate positive correlation between the EMG of these muscles and the Björk sum (Pmuscles (Pmuscle activity and facial growth pattern. The findings suggest that the activity of masticatory and perioral muscles could play a role in the direction of the facial growth. Copyright © 2015 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Electromyography physiology engineering and noninvasive applications

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Philip; John Wiley & Sons

    2004-01-01

    "Featuring contributions from key innovators working in the field today, Electromyography reveals the broad applications of EMG data in areas as diverse as neurology, ergonomics, exercise physiology, rehabilitation, movement analysis, biofeedback, and myoelectric control of prostheses." "Electromyography offers physiologists, medical professionals, and students in biomedical engineering a new window into the possibilities of this technology."--Jacket.

  13. Optimal signal bandwidth for the recording of surface EMG activity of facial, jaw, oral, and neck muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, A.

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous pericranial electromyographic (EMG) activity is generally small and is contaminated by strong low-frequency artifacts. High-pass filtering should suppress artifacts but affect EMG signal power only minimally. In 24 subjects who performed a warned simple reaction time task, the optimal hi

  14. Surface Electromyography Signal Processing and Classification Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae G. Chang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Electromyography (EMG signals are becoming increasingly important in many applications, including clinical/biomedical, prosthesis or rehabilitation devices, human machine interactions, and more. However, noisy EMG signals are the major hurdles to be overcome in order to achieve improved performance in the above applications. Detection, processing and classification analysis in electromyography (EMG is very desirable because it allows a more standardized and precise evaluation of the neurophysiological, rehabitational and assistive technological findings. This paper reviews two prominent areas; first: the pre-processing method for eliminating possible artifacts via appropriate preparation at the time of recording EMG signals, and second: a brief explanation of the different methods for processing and classifying EMG signals. This study then compares the numerous methods of analyzing EMG signals, in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above.

  15. Surface Electromyography Signal Processing and Classification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rubana H.; Reaz, Mamun B. I.; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Bin Mohd; Bakar, Ashrif A. A.; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Chang, Tae. G.

    2013-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals are becoming increasingly important in many applications, including clinical/biomedical, prosthesis or rehabilitation devices, human machine interactions, and more. However, noisy EMG signals are the major hurdles to be overcome in order to achieve improved performance in the above applications. Detection, processing and classification analysis in electromyography (EMG) is very desirable because it allows a more standardized and precise evaluation of the neurophysiological, rehabitational and assistive technological findings. This paper reviews two prominent areas; first: the pre-processing method for eliminating possible artifacts via appropriate preparation at the time of recording EMG signals, and second: a brief explanation of the different methods for processing and classifying EMG signals. This study then compares the numerous methods of analyzing EMG signals, in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above. PMID:24048337

  16. Surface electromyography signal processing and classification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rubana H; Reaz, Mamun B I; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Bin Mohd; Bakar, Ashrif A A; Chellappan, K; Chang, T G

    2013-09-17

    Electromyography (EMG) signals are becoming increasingly important in many applications, including clinical/biomedical, prosthesis or rehabilitation devices, human machine interactions, and more. However, noisy EMG signals are the major hurdles to be overcome in order to achieve improved performance in the above applications. Detection, processing and classification analysis in electromyography (EMG) is very desirable because it allows a more standardized and precise evaluation of the neurophysiological, rehabitational and assistive technological findings. This paper reviews two prominent areas; first: the pre-processing method for eliminating possible artifacts via appropriate preparation at the time of recording EMG signals, and second: a brief explanation of the different methods for processing and classifying EMG signals. This study then compares the numerous methods of analyzing EMG signals, in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above.

  17. Electromyographic monitoring of facial nerve under different levels of neuromuscular blockade during middle ear microsurgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yi-rong; XU Jing; CHEN Lian-hua; CHI Fang-lu

    2009-01-01

    Background The evoked electromyography (EMG) is frequently used to identify facial nerve in order to prevent its damage during surgeries. Partial neuromuscular blockade (NMB) has been suggested to favor EMG activity and insure patients' safety. The aim of this study was to determine an adequate level of NMB correspondent to sensible facial nerve identification by evaluating the relationship between facial EMG responses and peripheral NMB levels during the middle ear surgeries.Methods Facial nerve evoked EMG and NMB monitoring were performed simultaneously in 40 patients who underwent tympanoplasty. Facial electromyographic responses were recorded by insertion of needle electrodes into the orbicularis oris and orbicularis oculi muscles after electrical stimulation on facial nerve. The NMB was observed objectively with the hypothenar muscle's twitching after electrical stimulation of ulnar nerve, and the intensity of blockade was adjusted at levels of 0, 25%, 50%, 75%, 90%, and 100% respectively with increased intravenous infusion of Rocuronium (muscle relaxant).Results All of the patients had detectable EMG responses at the levels of NMB ≤50%. Four out of forty patients had no EMG response at the levels of NMB ≥75%. A significant linear positive correlation was present between stimulation thresholds and NMB levels while a linear negative correlation was present between EMG amplitudes and NMB levels.Conclusions The facial nerve monitoring via facial electromyographic responses can be obtained when an intraoperative partial neuromuscular blockade is induced to provide an adequate immobilization of the patient. The 50% NMB should be considered as the choice of anesthetic management for facial nerve monitoring in otologic microsurgery based on the relationship of correlation.

  18. Validity of surface electromyography for vastus intermedius muscle assessed by needle electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Akima, Hiroshi

    2011-06-15

    Recently, a new recording technique for surface electromyography (EMG) of the deeper muscle component of the quadriceps femoris muscle group, i.e., vastus intermedius (VI) muscle, from the distal portion of the VI muscle has been developed; however, the effect of electrode location on EMG signal of the VI muscle remains unclear. The aim of this study is to compare neuromuscular activation detected at the middle and distal portions of the VI muscle, in order to clarify whether the surface EMG of the VI muscle can be used to assess the neuromuscular activation of the entire muscle. Six healthy men participated in this study. During incremental ramp contraction of isometric knee extension (~30% of maximal voluntary contraction), needle EMG was recorded from the middle and distal regions of the VI muscle and surface EMG was performed at the distal region of the VI muscle. Excellent correlation was observed between needle EMG at the middle and distal regions (r=0.897-0.984, pEMG detected at the distal versus needle EMG detected at the middle and that of surface EMG detected at distal versus needle EMG detected at distal (pEMG at the distal portion of the VI muscle, which is the only region available for surface EMG, can be used to evaluate global neuromuscular activation of the VI muscle during isometric contraction at a low force level.

  19. Reproducibility of corpus cavernosum electromyography in healthy young man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X.; Frantzen, J.; Holsheimer, J.; Meuleman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Research on reproducibility of corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) is relevant because reproducible signals indicate a biological phenomenon and not an artefact. Reproducible signals are also required to use CC-EMG as a diagnostic tool for erectile dysfunction. The aim of this study was to a

  20. Investigation of Physiological Properties of Nerves and Muscles Using Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Seán M.; Johnson, Christopher D.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement and representation of the electrical activity of muscles [electromyography (EMG)] have a long history from the Victorian Era until today. Currently, EMG has uses both as a research tool, in noninvasively recording muscle activation, and clinically in the diagnosis and assessment of nerve and muscle disease and injury as well as in…

  1. Electromyographic responses to emotional facial expressions in 6-7year olds: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, P K H; Schutte, I; Kenemans, J L; Matthys, W; Schutter, D J L G

    2012-08-01

    Preliminary studies have demonstrated that school-aged children (average age 9-10years) show mimicry responses to happy and angry facial expressions. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using facial electromyography (EMG) as a method to study facial mimicry responses in younger children aged 6-7years to emotional facial expressions of other children. Facial EMG activity to the presentation of dynamic emotional faces was recorded from the corrugator, zygomaticus, frontalis and depressor muscle in sixty-one healthy participants aged 6-7years. Results showed that the presentation of angry faces was associated with corrugator activation and zygomaticus relaxation, happy faces with an increase in zygomaticus and a decrease in corrugator activation, fearful faces with frontalis activation, and sad faces with a combination of corrugator and frontalis activation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring facial EMG response to emotional facial expressions in 6-7year old children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface electromyography physiology, engineering and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    The book presents a quantitative approach to the study and use of noninvasively detected electromyographic (EMG) signals, as well as their numerous applications in various aspects of the life sciences. Surface Electromyography: Physiology, Engineering, and Applications is an update of Electromyography: Physiology, Engineering, and Noninvasive Applications (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2004) and focuses on the developments that have taken place over the last decade. The first nine chapters deal with the generation, detection, understanding, interpretation, and modeling of EMG signals. Detection technology, with particular focus on EMG imaging techniques that are based on two-dimensional electrode arrays are also included in the first half of the book. The latter 11 chapters deal with applications, which range fro monitoring muscle fatigue, electrically elicited contractions, posture analysis, prevention of work-related and child-delivery-related neuromuscular disorders, ergonomics, movement analysis, physical therapy, ex...

  3. Embodied simulation as part of affective evaluation processes: task dependence of valence concordant EMG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, André; Funcke, Jakob Maria

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on recent findings, this study examines whether valence concordant electromyography (EMG) responses can be explained as an unconditional effect of mere stimulus processing or as somatosensory simulation driven by task-dependent processing strategies. While facial EMG over the Corrugator supercilii and the Zygomaticus major was measured, each participant performed two tasks with pictures of album covers. One task was an affective evaluation task and the other was to attribute the album covers to one of five decades. The Embodied Emotion Account predicts that valence concordant EMG is more likely to occur if the task necessitates a somatosensory simulation of the evaluative meaning of stimuli. Results support this prediction with regard to Corrugator supercilii in that valence concordant EMG activity was only present in the affective evaluation task but not in the non-evaluative task. Results for the Zygomaticus major were ambiguous. Our findings are in line with the view that EMG activity is an embodied part of the evaluation process and not a mere physical outcome.

  4. Surface Electromyography for Speech and Swallowing Systems: Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Cara E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Applying surface electromyography (sEMG) to the study of voice, speech, and swallowing is becoming increasingly popular. An improved understanding of sEMG and building a consensus as to appropriate methodology will improve future research and clinical applications. Method: An updated review of the theory behind recording sEMG for the…

  5. Surface Electromyography for Speech and Swallowing Systems: Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Cara E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Applying surface electromyography (sEMG) to the study of voice, speech, and swallowing is becoming increasingly popular. An improved understanding of sEMG and building a consensus as to appropriate methodology will improve future research and clinical applications. Method: An updated review of the theory behind recording sEMG for the…

  6. Anal sphincter EMG in the diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, K; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Løkkegaard, Annemette;

    2010-01-01

    The role of electromyography (EMG) recorded from the external anal sphincter (EAS) in the diagnosis of atypical parkinsonian syndromes is a matter for continuous debate. Most studies addressing this issue are retrospective.......The role of electromyography (EMG) recorded from the external anal sphincter (EAS) in the diagnosis of atypical parkinsonian syndromes is a matter for continuous debate. Most studies addressing this issue are retrospective....

  7. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, M; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Tan, T S; Ismail, K; Ali, J; Dee-Uam, C; Pavaganun, C; Yupapin, P P

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human-machine interface (HMI) technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG)-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2-11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy >90% of chosen combinations proved their ability to be used as command controllers.

  8. Seizure Onset Detection based on one sEMG channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Hoppe, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method to detect seizure onsets of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography (sEMG) data. The proposed method is generic and based on a single channel making it ideal for a small detection or monitoring device. The sEMG signal is high-pass filtered...

  9. The Response of Hyperkinesis to EMG Biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Maryellen J.; And Others

    A study was conducted involving eight hyperkinetic males (11-15 years old) to determine if Ss receiving electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training would show a reduction in frontalis muscle tension, hyperactivity, and lability, and increases in self-esteem and visual and auditory attention span. Individual 45- and 30-minute relaxation exercises…

  10. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamedi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available M Hamedi1, Sh-Hussain Salleh2, TS Tan2, K Ismail2, J Ali3, C Dee-Uam4, C Pavaganun4, PP Yupapin51Faculty of Biomedical and Health Science Engineering, Department of Biomedical Instrumentation and Signal Processing, University of Technology Malaysia, Skudai, 2Centre for Biomedical Engineering Transportation Research Alliance, 3Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, University of Technology Malaysia (UTM, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 4College of Innovative Management, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University, Pathum Thani, 5Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Advanced Research Center for Photonics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human–machine interface (HMI technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2–11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy

  11. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies').

  12. Classification of surface EMG signal with fractal dimension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao; WANG Zhi-zhong; REN Xiao-mei

    2005-01-01

    Surface EMG (electromyography) signal is a complex nonlinear signal with low signal to noise ratio (SNR). This paper is aimed at identifying different patterns of surface EMG signals according to fractal dimension. Two patterns of surface EMG signals are respectively acquired from the right forearm flexor of 30 healthy volunteers during right forearm supination (FS)or forearm pronation (FP). After the high frequency noise is filtered from surface EMG signal by a low-pass filter, fractal dimension is calculated from the filtered surface EMG signal. The results showed that the fractal dimensions of filtered FS surface EMG signals and those of filtered FP surface EMG signals distribute in two different regions, so the fractal dimensions can represent different patterns of surface EMG signals.

  13. Effect of the Enveloppe Linguale Nocturne on atypical swallowing: surface electromyography and computerised postural test evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ciavarella, D; Mastrovincenzo, M; Sabatucci, A; Parziale, V; Chimenti, C

    2010-01-01

    .... Seven patients affected by AS were evaluated. Surface Electromyography (sEMG) testing was performed on each patient with different tongue positions, and swallowing was evaluated with and without the ELN...

  14. Independent component analysis of high-density electromyography in muscle force estimation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudenmann, D.; Daffertshofer, A.; Kingma, I.; Stegeman, D.F.; Dieen, J.H. van

    2007-01-01

    Accurate force prediction from surface electromyography (EMG) forms an important methodological challenge in biomechanics and kinesiology. In a previous study (Staudenmann et al., 2006), we illustrated force estimates based on analyses lent from multivariate statistics. In particular, we showed the

  15. Safety of needle electromyography of the diaphragm: Anterior lung margins in quietly breathing healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podnar, S.; Doorduin, J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Controversy persists as to whether the lung interposes on the needle electrode insertion path during diaphragm electromyography (EMG). METHODS: Using high-resolution ultrasonography, we measured the distances between the medial recess of the intercostal spaces (ICSs) around the

  16. DOES ELECTROMYOGRAPHY BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING REDUCE WORK-RELATED NECK PAIN?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training in dental professionals to reduce upper trapezius muscle tension and thereby to reduce the work related neck pain. By reducing muscle activity in the neck and shoulder postural stabilizing muscles, EMG biofeedback training would be an effective mode of treatment in dental professionals for the management of work related neck pain. Subjects and Methods: This RCT included a total of 50...

  17. Hand gesture recognition based on surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Ali-Akbar; Kulic, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Human hands are the most dexterous of human limbs and hand gestures play an important role in non-verbal communication. Underlying electromyograms associated with hand gestures provide a wealth of information based on which varying hand gestures can be recognized. This paper develops an inter-individual hand gesture recognition model based on Hidden Markov models that receives surface electromyography (sEMG) signals as inputs and predicts a corresponding hand gesture. The developed recognition model is tested with a dataset of 10 various hand gestures performed by 25 subjects in a leave-one-subject-out cross validation and an inter-individual recognition rate of 79% was achieved. The promising recognition rate demonstrates the efficacy of the proposed approach for discriminating between gesture-specific sEMG signals and could inform the design of sEMG-controlled prostheses and assistive devices.

  18. Reduced facial reactivity as a contributor to preserved emotion regulation in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedder, David J; Terrett, Gill; Bailey, Phoebe E; Henry, Julie D; Ruffman, Ted; Rendell, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated whether differences in the type of strategy used, or age-related differences in intensity of facial reactivity, might contribute to preserved emotion regulation ability in older adults. Young (n = 35) and older (n = 33) adults were instructed to regulate their emotion to positive and negative pictures under 3 conditions (watch, expressive suppression, cognitive 'detached' reappraisal). Participants were objectively monitored using facial electromyography (EMG) and assessed on memory performance. Both age groups were effectively, and equivalently, able to reduce their facial expressions. In relation to facial reactivity, the percentage increase of older adults' facial muscle EMG activity in the watch condition was significantly reduced relative to young adults. Recall of pictures following regulation was similar to the watch condition, and there was no difference in memory performance between the 2 regulation strategies for both groups. These findings do not support the proposal that the type of strategy used explains preserved emotion regulation ability in older adults. Coupled with the lack of memory costs following regulation, these data instead are more consistent with the suggestion that older adults may retain emotion regulation capacity partly because they exhibit less facial reactivity to begin with.

  19. Electromyography monitoring of patients with salivary gland diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Nahlieli, Oded; Segal, Samuel; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2005-12-01

    To provide a description of surface electromyography (sEMG) of spontaneous saliva swallowing (SSS) and monitoring of swallow rate in patients with salivary gland diseases. Numbers of SSS obtained during 2 hours of sEMG monitoring were compared with sialometry data for healthy volunteers (n = 100), patients with Sjögren syndrome (n = 10), and patients after parotid gland (n = 15) and submandibular gland (n = 16) surgery. Normative: 1 SSS every 2 minutes and 15 seconds; Sjögren: 1 SSS every 13 minutes (P sEMG monitoring give a clinician more reliable data to evaluate salivary gland disorders than sialometry alone.

  20. Increasing Elbow Torque Output of Stroke Patients by EMG-Controlled External Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Myoelectric signal processing: optimal estimation applied to electromyography � part 1: derivation of the optimal myprocessor,� IEEE Trans. Biomed...stroke patients. The control signal to the manipulator is the difference between the weighted biceps and triceps EMG, so that the system moves with the...EMG of biceps and triceps. Contrary to the many attempts in the past that used EMG signal for switch control, in the current study, we used EMG

  1. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remijn, L.; Groen, B.E.; Speyer, R.; Limbeek, J. van; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masti

  2. Quality improvement of diagnosis of the electromyography data based on statistical characteristics of the measured signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, Karina G.; Avrunin, Oleg G.; Zlepko, Sergii M.; Romanyuk, Sergii O.; Zabolotna, Natalia I.; Kotyra, Andrzej; Komada, Paweł; Smailova, Saule

    2016-09-01

    Research and systematization of motor disorders, taking into account the clinical and neurophysiologic phenomena, are important and actual problem of neurology. The article describes a technique for decomposing surface electromyography (EMG), using Principal Component Analysis. The decomposition is achieved by a set of algorithms that uses a specially developed for analyze EMG. The accuracy was verified by calculation of Mahalanobis distance and Probability error.

  3. Acoustic myography, electromyography and bite force in the masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortopidis, D; Lyons, M F; Baxendale, R H

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic myography (AMG) offers some advantages over electromyography (EMG) in certain circumstances, but the use of AMG on the jaw-closing muscles has not been fully tested. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between AMG, EMG and force in the masseter muscles of nine healthy male subjects. The AMG was recorded using a piezoelectric crystal microphone and the EMG was recorded simultaneously with surface electrodes. Force was recorded between the anterior teeth with a strain-gauge transducer. Analysis showed that Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.913 for force/AMG and 0.973 for force/EMG in all subjects, indicating a linear relationship between force, AMG and EMG at the four different force levels tested (25-75% of maximum). It is apparent that AMG may be used as an accurate monitor of masseter muscle force production, although some care is required in the technique.

  4. Requests for electromyography in Rome: a critical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Castagnoli, Claudio; Madrigale, Andrea; Barella, Massimo; Serrao, Mariano; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    To date, there exist no data reporting the level of suitability of requests for electromyography examinations (EMGs) in Rome. The records of 1,220 consecutive patients (age: 57.6±15.0 years; 400 M, 820 F) in two neurophysiology laboratories were collected and analyzed. In total, 1,317 EMGs were requested, mainly by general practitioners (GPs) (57%) and orthopedic specialists (18%). The most common diagnoses were L4-L5 radiculopathy (22%) and carpal tunnel syndrome (21%); 332 examinations (25%) were normal. 68% of requests were not accompanied by any specific query. The concordance between initial hypothesis/final post-EMG diagnosis was low (0.05). In 17% of cases, the EMG was deemed diagnostically useless by the neurophysiologist, which seems to indicate potentially suboptimal prescription of EMGs.

  5. Use of surface electromyography to estimate neck muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerich, C M; Joines, S M; Hermans, V; Moon, S D

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the use of surface electromyography (sEMG) for the study of the neck musculature in response to work and workplace design during light work and semi-static tasks. The paper also draws upon basic research and biomechanical modeling in order to provide methodological recommendations for the use of surface electromyography in this region of the body and to identify areas which require further investigation. The paper includes review and discussion of electrode site location, methods of normalization, data reliability, and factors that can affect sEMG signals from this region, including noise, physiologic artifact, stress, visual deficiencies, and pain. General guidance for maximum exertions with the neck musculature, for sEMG normalization or other purposes, is also included.

  6. Enjoying vs. smiling: Facial muscular activation in response to emotional language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fino, Edita; Menegatti, Michela; Avenanti, Alessio; Rubini, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined whether emotionally congruent facial muscular activation - a somatic index of emotional language embodiment can be elicited by reading subject-verb sentences composed of action verbs, that refer directly to facial expressions (e.g., Mario smiles), but also by reading more abstract state verbs, which provide more direct access to the emotions felt by the agent (e.g., Mario enjoys). To address this issue, we measured facial electromyography (EMG) while participants evaluated state and action verb sentences. We found emotional sentences including both verb categories to have valence-congruent effects on emotional ratings and corresponding facial muscle activations. As expected, state verb-sentences were judged with higher valence ratings than action verb-sentences. Moreover, despite emotional congruent facial activations were similar for the two linguistic categories, in a late temporal window we found a tendency for greater EMG modulation when reading action relative to state verb sentences. These results support embodied theories of language comprehension and suggest that understanding emotional action and state verb sentences relies on partially dissociable motor and emotional processes.

  7. Gesture recognition by instantaneous surface EMG images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Weidong; Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Li, Jiajun

    2016-11-15

    Gesture recognition in non-intrusive muscle-computer interfaces is usually based on windowed descriptive and discriminatory surface electromyography (sEMG) features because the recorded amplitude of a myoelectric signal may rapidly fluctuate between voltages above and below zero. Here, we present that the patterns inside the instantaneous values of high-density sEMG enables gesture recognition to be performed merely with sEMG signals at a specific instant. We introduce the concept of an sEMG image spatially composed from high-density sEMG and verify our findings from a computational perspective with experiments on gesture recognition based on sEMG images with a classification scheme of a deep convolutional network. Without any windowed features, the resultant recognition accuracy of an 8-gesture within-subject test reached 89.3% on a single frame of sEMG image and reached 99.0% using simple majority voting over 40 frames with a 1,000 Hz sampling rate. Experiments on the recognition of 52 gestures of NinaPro database and 27 gestures of CSL-HDEMG database also validated that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods. Our findings are a starting point for the development of more fluid and natural muscle-computer interfaces with very little observational latency. For example, active prostheses and exoskeletons based on high-density electrodes could be controlled with instantaneous responses.

  8. Gesture recognition by instantaneous surface EMG images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Weidong; Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Li, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Gesture recognition in non-intrusive muscle-computer interfaces is usually based on windowed descriptive and discriminatory surface electromyography (sEMG) features because the recorded amplitude of a myoelectric signal may rapidly fluctuate between voltages above and below zero. Here, we present that the patterns inside the instantaneous values of high-density sEMG enables gesture recognition to be performed merely with sEMG signals at a specific instant. We introduce the concept of an sEMG image spatially composed from high-density sEMG and verify our findings from a computational perspective with experiments on gesture recognition based on sEMG images with a classification scheme of a deep convolutional network. Without any windowed features, the resultant recognition accuracy of an 8-gesture within-subject test reached 89.3% on a single frame of sEMG image and reached 99.0% using simple majority voting over 40 frames with a 1,000 Hz sampling rate. Experiments on the recognition of 52 gestures of NinaPro database and 27 gestures of CSL-HDEMG database also validated that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods. Our findings are a starting point for the development of more fluid and natural muscle-computer interfaces with very little observational latency. For example, active prostheses and exoskeletons based on high-density electrodes could be controlled with instantaneous responses. PMID:27845347

  9. Perineal surface electromyography does not typically demonstrate expected relaxation during normal voiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Anna C; Nager, Charles W; Litman, Heather J; Fitzgerald, Mary P; Kraus, Stephen; Norton, Peggy; Sirls, Larry; Rickey, Leslie; Wilson, Tracey; Dandreo, Kimberly J; Shepherd, Jonathan; Zimmern, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    To describe perineal surface patch electromyography (EMG) activity during urodynamics (UDS) and compare activity between filling and voiding phases and to assess for a relationship between preoperative EMG activity and postoperative voiding symptoms. 655 women underwent standardized preoperative UDS that included perineal surface EMG prior to undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. Pressure-flow studies were evaluated for abdominal straining and interrupted flow. Quantitative EMG values were extracted from 10 predetermined time-points and compared between fill and void. Qualitative EMG activity was assessed for the percent of time EMG was active during fill and void and for the average amplitude of EMG during fill compared to void. Postoperative voiding dysfunction was defined as surgical revision or catheterization more than 6 weeks after surgery. Fisher's exact test with a 5% two-sided significance level was used to assess differences in EMG activity and postoperative voiding dysfunction. 321 UDS had interpretable EMG studies, of which 131 (41%) had EMG values at all 10 predetermined and annotated time-points. Quantitative and qualitative EMG signals during flow were usually greater than during fill. The prevalence of postoperative voiding dysfunction in subjects with higher preoperative EMG activity during void was not significantly different. Results were similar in the 42 subjects who had neither abdominal straining during void nor interrupted flow. Perineal surface patch EMG did not measure expected pelvic floor and urethral sphincter relaxation during voiding. Preoperative EMG did not predict patients at risk for postoperative voiding dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Techniques of EMG signal analysis: detection, processing, classification and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M.S.; Mohd-Yasin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals can be used for clinical/biomedical applications, Evolvable Hardware Chip (EHW) development, and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquired from muscles require advanced methods for detection, decomposition, processing, and classification. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and algorithms for EMG signal analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the signal and its nature. We further point up some of the hardware implementations using EMG focusing on applications related to prosthetic hand control, grasp recognition, and human computer interaction. A comparison study is also given to show performance of various EMG signal analysis methods. This paper provides researchers a good understanding of EMG signal and its analysis procedures. This knowledge will help them develop more powerful, flexible, and efficient applications. PMID:16799694

  11. Slow Echo: Facial EMG Evidence for the Delay of Spontaneous, but Not Voluntary, Emotional Mimicry in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Winkielman, Piotr; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous mimicry, including that of emotional facial expressions, is important for socio-emotional skills such as empathy and communication. Those skills are often impacted in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Successful mimicry requires not only the activation of the response, but also its appropriate speed. Yet, previous studies examined ASD…

  12. Clinical investigation on 22 cases of acoustic neuromas with intraoperative facial nerve function monitoring%听神经瘤术中面神经功能监测22例临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺宇波; 吉宏明; 赵建伟; 陈胜利; 张刚利; 李荔荣

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨术中面神经监测对术后面神经功能保留的影响.方法 使用英国牛津公司Medelec神经生理术中监测仪,对22例听神经瘤术中进行面神经自发面肌电图及电刺激诱发面肌电图监测.结果 通过术中监测自发肌电图结合电刺激诱发肌电图可以精确判断面神经的位置;本组22例大中型听神经瘤,术后6月面神经H-B分级Ⅰ-Ⅱ级13例,Ⅲ级2例,Ⅳ级1例,Ⅴ级1例,Ⅵ级5例.结论 术中肌电图监测可以提示面神经的位置和走行,为手术时避免损伤神经提供依据;肿瘤切除后可帮助确认面神经结构是否完整;全切肿瘤后引出肌电图的最小电刺激强度与面神经预后密切相关.%Objective To explore the influence of intraoperative monitoring on postoperative facial nerve function in acoustic neuroma patients. Methods The facial nerve spontaneous and stimulated electromyography( EMG ) of 22 cases of acoustic neuromas were monitored by Oxford company Medelec intraoperative neurophysiologic monitor. Results The position of facial nerve was correctly located via intraoperative monitoring spontaneous EMG combined with stimulated EMG. According to House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system,the facial nerve was grade I - II in 13 of 22 cases after operation for 6 months,grade Ⅲ in 2 cases,grade Ⅳ in one case,grade Vin one case,and grade VI in 5 cases. Conclusion Intraoprative electromyography( EMG ) could reveal the position of facial nerve and avoid the nerve injury. EMG could help confirm the integrity of the postoperative facial nerve. The minimal stimulated intensity which can derive EMG is related with the prognosis of facial nerve function after total resection of the tumor.

  13. Faces and bodies: perception and mimicry of emotionally congruent and incongruent facial and bodily expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska eKret

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional emotion theories stress the importance of the face in the expression of emotions but bodily expressions are becoming increasingly important. Here we tested the hypothesis that similar physiological responses can be evoked by observing emotional face and body signals and that the reaction to angry signals is amplified in anxious individuals. We designed three experiments in which participants categorized emotional expressions from isolated facial and bodily expressions and from emotionally congruent and incongruent face-body compounds. Participants’ fixations were measured and their pupil size recorded with eye-tracking equipment, and their facial reactions measured with electromyography (EMG. The behavioral results support our prediction that the recognition of a facial expression is improved in the context of a matching posture and importantly, also vice versa. From their facial expression, it appeared that observers acted with signs of negative emotionality (increased corrugator activity to angry and fearful facial expressions and with positive emotionality (increased zygomaticus to happy facial expressions. What we predicted and found, was that angry and fearful cues from the face or the body, attracted more attention than happy cues. We further observed that responses evoked by angry cues were amplified in individuals with high anxiety scores. In sum, we show that people process bodily expressions of emotion in a similar fashion as facial expressions and that the congruency between the emotional signals from the face and body ameliorates the recognition of the emotion.

  14. Facial reactions in response to dynamic emotional stimuli in different modalities in patients suffering from schizophrenia: a behavioral and EMG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa eSestito

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Emotional facial expression is an important low-level mechanism contributing to the experience of empathy, thereby lying at the core of social interaction. Schizophrenia is associated with pervasive social cognitive impairments, including emotional processing of facial expressions. In this study we test a novel paradigm in order to investigate the evaluation of the emotional content of perceived emotions presented through dynamic expressive stimuli, facial mimicry evoked by the same stimuli, and their functional relation. Fifteen healthy controls and 15 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were presented with stimuli portraying positive (laugh, negative (cry and neutral (control emotional stimuli in visual, auditory modalities in isolation, and congruently or incongruently associated. Participants where requested to recognize and quantitatively rate the emotional value of the perceived stimuli, while electromyographic activity of Corrugator and Zygomaticus muscles was recorded. All participants correctly judged the perceived emotional stimuli and prioritized the visual over the auditory modality in identifying the emotion when they were incongruently associated (Audio-Video Incongruent condition. The neutral emotional stimuli did not evoke any muscle responses and were judged by all participants as emotionally neutral. Control group responded with rapid and congruent mimicry to emotional stimuli, and in Incongruent condition muscle responses were driven by what participants saw rather than by what they heard. Patient group showed a similar pattern only with respect to negative stimuli, whereas showed a lack of or a non-specific Zygomaticus response when positive stimuli were presented. Finally, we found that only patients with reduced facial mimicry (Internalizers judged both positive and negative emotions as significantly more neutral than controls. The relevance of these findings for studying emotional deficits in schizophrenia is discussed.

  15. Respiratory muscle activity measured with a noninvasive EMG technique : technical aspects and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, EJW; Van Eykern, LA; Sprikkelman, AB; Hoekstra, MO; Van Aalderen, WMC

    A new method is being developed to investigate airway obstruction in young children by means of noninvasive electromyography (EMG) of diaphragmatic and intercostal muscles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the EMG measurements. Eleven adults, 39 school children (20

  16. Respiratory muscle activity measured with a noninvasive EMG technique : technical aspects and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, EJW; Van Eykern, LA; Sprikkelman, AB; Hoekstra, MO; Van Aalderen, WMC

    2000-01-01

    A new method is being developed to investigate airway obstruction in young children by means of noninvasive electromyography (EMG) of diaphragmatic and intercostal muscles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the EMG measurements. Eleven adults, 39 school children (20 he

  17. Agonist and Antagonist Muscle EMG Activity Pattern Changes with Skill Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhorn, Richard

    1983-01-01

    Using electromyography (EMG), researchers studied changes in the control of biceps and triceps brachii muscles that occurred as women college students learned two elbow flexion tasks. Data on EMG activity, angular kinematics, training, and angular displacement were analyzed. (Author/PP)

  18. An EMG Keyboard for Forearm Amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwei Yu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-efficiency, easy-to-use input device is not only important for data entry but also for human-computer interaction. To date, there has been little research on input devices with many degrees of freedom (DOF that can be used by the handicapped. This paper presents the development of an electromyography (EMG-based input device for forearm amputees. To overcome the difficulties in analysing EMG and realising high DOF from biosignals, the following were integrated: (1 an online learning method to cope with nonlinearity and the individual difference of EMG signals; (2 a smoothing algorithm to deal with noisy recognition results and transition states; and (3 a modified Huffman coding algorithm to generate the optimal code, taking expected error and input efficiency into consideration. Experiments showed the validity of the system and the possibility for development of a quiet, free-posture (no postural restriction input device with many DOF for users, including forearm amputees.

  19. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...

  20. Uterine electromyography for identification of first-stage labor arrest in term nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, Blanka; Graatsma, Elisabeth M.; Hekman-Drost, Elske; Eijkemans, Marinus J.; van Leeuwen, Jules H. Schagen; Visser, Gerard H.; Jacod, Benoit C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to study whether uterine electromyography (EMG) can identify inefficient contractions leading to first-stage labor arrest followed by cesarean delivery in term nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor. STUDY DESIGN: EMG was recorded during spontaneous labor in 119 nulli

  1. Uterine electromyography for identification of first-stage labor arrest in term nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, Blanka; Graatsma, Elisabeth M.; Hekman-Drost, Elske; Eijkemans, Marinus J.; van Leeuwen, Jules H. Schagen; Visser, Gerard H.; Jacod, Benoit C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to study whether uterine electromyography (EMG) can identify inefficient contractions leading to first-stage labor arrest followed by cesarean delivery in term nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor. STUDY DESIGN: EMG was recorded during spontaneous labor in 119 nulli

  2. Corticospinal excitability measurements using transcranial magnetic stimulation are valid with intramuscular electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Muscular targets that are deep or inaccessible to surface electromyography (sEMG) require intrinsic recording using fine-wire electromyography (fEMG). It is unknown if fEMG validly record cortically evoked muscle responses compared to sEMG. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the validity and agreement of fEMG compared to sEMG to quantify typical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures pre and post repetitive TMS (rTMS). The hypotheses were that fEMG would demonstrate excellent validity and agreement compared with sEMG. Materials and methods In ten healthy volunteers, paired pulse and cortical silent period (CSP) TMS measures were collected before and after 1200 pulses of 1Hz rTMS to the motor cortex. Data were simultaneously recorded with sEMG and fEMG in the first dorsal interosseous. Concurrent validity (r and rho) and agreement (Tukey mean-difference) were calculated. Results fEMG quantified corticospinal excitability with good to excellent validity compared to sEMG data at both pretest (r = 0.77–0.97) and posttest (r = 0.83–0.92). Pairwise comparisons indicated no difference between sEMG and fEMG for all outcomes; however, Tukey mean-difference plots display increased variance and questionable agreement for paired pulse outcomes. CSP displayed the highest estimates of validity and agreement. Paired pulse MEP responses recorded with fEMG displayed reduced validity, agreement and less sensitivity to changes in MEP amplitude compared to sEMG. Change scores following rTMS were not significantly different between sEMG and fEMG. Conclusion fEMG electrodes are a valid means to measure CSP and paired pulse MEP responses. CSP displays the highest validity estimates, while caution is warranted when assessing paired pulse responses with fEMG. Corticospinal excitability and neuromodulatory aftereffects from rTMS may be assessed using fEMG. PMID:28231250

  3. Computing emotion awareness through facial electromyography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schut, Marleen H.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; van Herk, Jan; Tuinenbreijer, Kees; Huang, Thomas S.; Sebe, Nicu; Lew, Michael S.; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Kölsch, Mathias; Galata, Aphrodite; Kisacanin, Branislav

    2006-01-01

    To improve human-computer interaction (HCI), computers need to recognize and respond properly to their user’s emotional state. This is a fundamental application of affective computing, which relates to, arises from, or deliberately influences emotion. As a first step to a system that recognizes

  4. Surface electromyography in orthodontics - a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Piątkowska, Dagmara; Lipski, Mariusz; Mehr, Katarzyna

    2013-05-31

    Electromyography is the most objective and reliable technique for evaluating muscle function and efficiency by detecting their electrical potentials. It makes it possible to assess the extent and duration of muscle activity. The main aim of surface electromyography is to detect signals from many muscle fibers in the area of the detecting surface electrodes. These signals consist of a weighted summation of the spatial and temporal activity of many motor units. Hence, the analysis of the recordings is restricted to an assessment of general muscle activity, the cooperation of different muscles, and the variability of their activity over time.                         This study presents the main assumptions in the assessment of electrical muscle activity through the use of surface electromyography, along with its limitations and possibilities for further use in many areas of orthodontics. The main clinical uses of sEMG include the diagnostics and therapy of temporomandibular joint disorders, an assessment of the extent of stomatognathic system dysfunctions in subjects with malocclusion, and the monitoring of orthodontic therapies.

  5. Analysis of EMG Signals in Aggressive and Normal Activities by Using Higher-Order Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necmettin Sezgin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and classification of electromyography (EMG signals are very important in order to detect some symptoms of diseases, prosthetic arm/leg control, and so on. In this study, an EMG signal was analyzed using bispectrum, which belongs to a family of higher-order spectra. An EMG signal is the electrical potential difference of muscle cells. The EMG signals used in the present study are aggressive or normal actions. The EMG dataset was obtained from the machine learning repository. First, the aggressive and normal EMG activities were analyzed using bispectrum and the quadratic phase coupling of each EMG episode was determined. Next, the features of the analyzed EMG signals were fed into learning machines to separate the aggressive and normal actions. The best classification result was 99.75%, which is sufficient to significantly classify the aggressive and normal actions.

  6. Reproducibility and responsiveness of a noninvasive EMG technique of the respiratory muscles in COPD patients and in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, ML; van Eykern, LA; Vennik, PW; Koeter, GH; Maarsingh, EJW; Wijkstra, PJ

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the reproducibility and responsiveness of transcutaneous electromyography (EMG) of the respiratory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD) and healthy subjects during breathing against an inspiratory load. In seven healthy subjects and

  7. A study on the effect of age, gender and paralysis on sEMG signals

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a technology to measure the bio-potentials across the muscles. The true prospective of this technology is yet to be explored. In this paper, a simple and economic construction of a sEMG sensor is proposed. These sensors are used to determine the differences in the Electromyography (EMG) signal patterns of different individuals. Signals of several volunteers from different age groups, gender and individual having paralysis have been obtained. The sEMG data acquisition is done using the soundcard of a computer, hence reducing the need of additional hardware. Finally, the data is used to analyse the relationship between electromyography and factors like age, gender and health condition i.e. paralysis.

  8. Diagnosis of Ulnar Nerve Entrapment at the Arcade of Struthers with Electromyography and Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Ulnar neuropathy is caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in the upper extremity, frequently occurring at the level of the elbow or wrist. Rarely, ulnar nerve entrapment may be seen proximal to the elbow. This report details a case of ulnar neuropathy diagnosed and localized to the arcade of Struthers with electromyography (EMG) and ultrasound (US) imaging and confirmed at time of operative release. US imaging and EMG findings were used to preoperatively localize the level of comp...

  9. Standardization of surface electromyography utilized to evaluate patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael

    2007-06-06

    Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. We introduce surface electromyography (sEMG) to carry out rapid assessment of such patients and propose suggestions for standardizing sEMGs in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Specifics steps for establishing standards for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles), the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water) are presented in detail. A previously described normative database for single swallowing and drinking and standard approach to analysis was compared to data on the duration and electric activity of muscles involved in deglutition and with sEMG recordings in order to estimate stages of a swallow. SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, timesaving and inexpensive to perform. With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG can serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management.

  10. Standardization of surface electromyography utilized to evaluate patients with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaiman Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgorund Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. We introduce surface electromyography (sEMG to carry out rapid assessment of such patients and propose suggestions for standardizing sEMGs in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Methods Specifics steps for establishing standards for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles, the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water are presented in detail. A previously described normative database for single swallowing and drinking and standard approach to analysis was compared to data on the duration and electric activity of muscles involved in deglutition and with sEMG recordings in order to estimate stages of a swallow. Conclusion SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, timesaving and inexpensive to perform. With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG can serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography as indexes of muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Duvoisin, Marc R.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is tested that exercise-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast shifts would relate to electromyography (EMG) amplitude if both measures reflect muscle use during exercise. Both magnetic resonance images (MRI) and EMG data were obtained for separate eccentric (ECC) and cocentric (CON) exercise of increasing intensity for seven subjects 30-32 yr old. CON and ECC actions caused increased integrated EMG (IEMG) and T2 values which were strongly related with relative resistance. The rate of increase and absolute value of both T2 and IEMG were found to be greater for CON than for ECC actions. For both actions IEMG and T2 were correlated. Data obtained suggest that surface IEMG accurately reflects the contractile behavior of muscle and exercise-induced increases in MRI T2 values reflect certain processes that scale with muscle use.

  12. Is empathy necessary to comprehend the emotional faces? The empathic effect on attentional mechanisms (eye movements), cortical correlates (N200 event-related potentials) and facial behaviour (electromyography) in face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Canavesio, Ylenia

    2016-01-01

    The present research explored the effect of social empathy on processing emotional facial expressions. Previous evidence suggested a close relationship between emotional empathy and both the ability to detect facial emotions and the attentional mechanisms involved. A multi-measure approach was adopted: we investigated the association between trait empathy (Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale) and individuals' performance (response times; RTs), attentional mechanisms (eye movements; number and duration of fixations), correlates of cortical activation (event-related potential (ERP) N200 component), and facial responsiveness (facial zygomatic and corrugator activity). Trait empathy was found to affect face detection performance (reduced RTs), attentional processes (more scanning eye movements in specific areas of interest), ERP salience effect (increased N200 amplitude), and electromyographic activity (more facial responses). A second important result was the demonstration of strong, direct correlations among these measures. We suggest that empathy may function as a social facilitator of the processes underlying the detection of facial emotion, and a general "facial response effect" is proposed to explain these results. We assumed that empathy influences cognitive and the facial responsiveness, such that empathic individuals are more skilful in processing facial emotion.

  13. CHANGES OF SINGLE FIBER ELECTROMYOGRAPHY IN PATIENTS WITH INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Jian; Li-ying Cui; Ben-hong Li; Hua Du

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the significance of single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) in diagnosis of inflammatory myopathies and the correlation with other assistant examination findings.Methods SFEMG were recorded from the extensor digitorum communis of 34 patients with polymyositis or dermatomyositis and compared with the fmdings of routine electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK) determination,and muscle biopsy.Results SFEMG recordings in 34 patients were all abnormal. The prominent feature was markedly increased fiber density (FD) with normally or mildly increased jitter. FD ranged from 1.0 to 6.0 (2.34±0.43). Jitter ranged from 5 to 78μs (41.6±10.3 μs). The potential pairs with jitter values greater than 55 μs ranged from 0% to 55% (7.7% ± 11.8%). Block was detected at one recording site in only one patient. Routine EMG demonstrated myogenic lesions in only 24 patients (70.6%). FD was a little higher in the normal-EMG subgroup or the neurogenic-EMG subgroup than myogenic-EMG subgroup but without statistical significance. Elevated CK levels were found in 75% patients (24/32). FD in the normal CK subgroup was significantly higher than that in the elevated CK subgroup (2.62±0.40 vs. 2.28±0.40, P < 0.05). Muscle pathologies were consistent with the diagnosis of myositis in 75% (15/20).Conclusion SFEMG is of great value in the diagnosis and disease process understanding of inflammatory myopathies for the clinically suspected patients with normal routine EMG, CK levels, and muscle biopsies.

  14. Engagement and EMG in serious gaming : Experimenting with sound and dynamics in the levee patroller training game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurink, E.L.; Houtkamp, J.; Toet, A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured the effects of sound and visual dynamic elements on user experience of a serious game, with special interest in engagement and arousal. Engagement was measured through questionnaires and arousal through the SAM and electromyography (EMG). We adopted the EMG of the corrugator (frown muscl

  15. Homomorphic Deconvolution for MUAP Estimation From Surface EMG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagetti, Giorgio; Crippa, Paolo; Orcioni, Simone; Turchetti, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a technique for parametric model estimation of the motor unit action potential (MUAP) from the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal by using homomorphic deconvolution. The cepstrum-based deconvolution removes the effect of the stochastic impulse train, which originates the sEMG signal, from the power spectrum of sEMG signal itself. In this way, only information on MUAP shape and amplitude were maintained, and then, used to estimate the parameters of a time-domain model of the MUAP itself. In order to validate the effectiveness of this technique, sEMG signals recorded during several biceps curl exercises have been used for MUAP amplitude and time scale estimation. The parameters so extracted as functions of time were used to evaluate muscle fatigue showing a good agreement with previously published results.

  16. The perception and mimicry of facial movements predict judgments of smile authenticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Korb

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which people perceive different types of smiles and judge their authenticity remain unclear. Here, 19 different types of smiles were created based on the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, using highly controlled, dynamic avatar faces. Participants observed short videos of smiles while their facial mimicry was measured with electromyography (EMG over four facial muscles. Smile authenticity was judged after each trial. Avatar attractiveness was judged once in response to each avatar's neutral face. Results suggest that, in contrast to most earlier work using static pictures as stimuli, participants relied less on the Duchenne marker (the presence of crow's feet wrinkles around the eyes in their judgments of authenticity. Furthermore, mimicry of smiles occurred in the Zygomaticus Major, Orbicularis Oculi, and Corrugator muscles. Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, activity in these muscles predicted authenticity judgments, suggesting that facial mimicry influences the perception of smiles. However, no significant mediation effect of facial mimicry was found. Avatar attractiveness did not predict authenticity judgments or mimicry patterns.

  17. The perception and mimicry of facial movements predict judgments of smile authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Sebastian; With, Stéphane; Niedenthal, Paula; Kaiser, Susanne; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms through which people perceive different types of smiles and judge their authenticity remain unclear. Here, 19 different types of smiles were created based on the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), using highly controlled, dynamic avatar faces. Participants observed short videos of smiles while their facial mimicry was measured with electromyography (EMG) over four facial muscles. Smile authenticity was judged after each trial. Avatar attractiveness was judged once in response to each avatar's neutral face. Results suggest that, in contrast to most earlier work using static pictures as stimuli, participants relied less on the Duchenne marker (the presence of crow's feet wrinkles around the eyes) in their judgments of authenticity. Furthermore, mimicry of smiles occurred in the Zygomaticus Major, Orbicularis Oculi, and Corrugator muscles. Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, activity in these muscles predicted authenticity judgments, suggesting that facial mimicry influences the perception of smiles. However, no significant mediation effect of facial mimicry was found. Avatar attractiveness did not predict authenticity judgments or mimicry patterns.

  18. Biomechanical Correlates of Surface Electromyography Signals Obtained during Swallowing by Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A.; Carnaby (Mann), Giselle D.; Groher, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe biomechanical correlates of the surface electromyographic signal obtained during swallowing by healthy adult volunteers. Method: Seventeen healthy adults were evaluated with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and surface electromyography (sEMG) while swallowing 5 mL of liquid barium sulfate. Three…

  19. Lower motor neuron involvement examined by quantitative electromyography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) includes demonstration of lower motor neuron (LMN) and upper motor neuron (UMN) involvement of bulbar and spinal muscles. Electromyography (EMG) is essential to confirm LMN affection in weak muscles, and to demonstrate changes...

  20. Biomechanical Correlates of Surface Electromyography Signals Obtained during Swallowing by Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A.; Carnaby (Mann), Giselle D.; Groher, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe biomechanical correlates of the surface electromyographic signal obtained during swallowing by healthy adult volunteers. Method: Seventeen healthy adults were evaluated with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and surface electromyography (sEMG) while swallowing 5 mL of liquid barium sulfate. Three…

  1. The value of electromyography in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红芬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of needle electromyography(EMG)in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region.Methods Patients hospitalized in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from March 2008 to June 2013 with abnormalities on MRI of cervical vertabra and preliminary diagnosed as intramedullary tumor or inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region were enrolled in the

  2. The Relationship between Submental Surface Electromyography and Hyo-Laryngeal Kinematic Measures of Mendelsohn Maneuver Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azola, Alba M.; Greene, Lindsey R.; Taylor-Kamara, Isha; Macrae, Phoebe; Anderson, Cheryl; Humbert, Ianessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Mendelsohn Maneuver (MM) is a commonly prescribed technique that is taught to individuals with dysphagia to improve swallowing ability. Due to cost and safety concerns associated with videofluoroscopy (VFS) use, submental surface electromyography (ssEMG) is commonly used in place of VFS to train the MM in clinical and research…

  3. Epidermal electronics for electromyography: An application to swallowing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Li, Xinda; Scott, Dylan K; Jang, Kyung-In; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Rogers, John A; Rieger, Jana

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck cancer treatment alters the anatomy and physiology of patients. Resulting swallowing difficulties can lead to serious health concerns. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to swallowing therapy exercises. sEMG signal collected from the area under the chin provides visual biofeedback from muscle contractions and is used to help patients perform exercises correctly. However, conventional sEMG adhesive pads are relatively thick and difficult to effectively adhere to a patient's altered chin anatomy, potentially leading to poor signal acquisition in this population. Here, the emerging technology of epidermal electronics is introduced, where ultra-thin geometry allows for close contouring of the chin. The two objectives of this study were to (1) assess the potential of epidermal electronics technology for use with swallowing therapy and (2) assess the significance of the reference electrode placement. This study showed comparative signals between the new epidermal sEMG patch and the conventional adhesive patches used by clinicians. Furthermore, an integrated reference yielded optimal signal for clinical use; this configuration was more robust to head movements than when an external reference was used. Improvements for future iterations of epidermal sEMG patches specific to day-to-day clinical use are suggested. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of surface electromyography measurements from the suprahyoid muscle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, M; Stubbs, P W; Pedersen, A R; Jensen, J; Nielsen, J F

    2017-09-01

    Assessment of swallowing musculature using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) can be used to evaluate neural pathways. However, recording of the swallowing musculature is often invasive, uncomfortable and unrealistic in normal clinical practice. To investigate the possibility of using the suprahyoid muscle complex (SMC) using surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess changes to neural pathways by determining the reliability of measurements in healthy participants over days. Seventeen healthy participants were recruited. Measurements were performed twice with one week between sessions. Single-pulse (at 120% and 140% of the resting motor threshold (rMT)) and paired-pulse (2 ms and 15 ms paired pulse) transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were used to elicit MEPs in the SMC which were recorded using sEMG. ≈50% of participants (range: 42-58%; depending on stimulus type/intensity) had significantly different MEP values between day 1 and day 2 for single-pulse and paired-pulse TMS. A large stimulus artefact resulted in MEP responses that could not be assessed in four participants. The assessment of the SMC using sEMG following TMS was poorly reliable for ≈50% of participants. Although using sEMG to assess swallowing musculature function is easier to perform clinically and more comfortable to patients than invasive measures, as the measurement of muscle activity using TMS is unreliable, the use of sEMG for this muscle group is not recommended and requires further research and development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Swallowing before and after tonsillectomy as evaluated by surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Krakovski, Daniel; Gavriel, Haim

    2007-07-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) was performed on adult patients (n = 40) following tonsillectomy to evaluate recovery by objective means. Evaluated parameters included timing of swallowing and continuous drinking, electric amplitude and graphic patterns of masseter (MS), and measurement of infrahyoid (INF) and submental (SUB) muscles after tonsillectomy and comparison with normative database. The duration of drinking periods showed significant increase among patients; single-swallow durations remained normal. The electric activity of MS and INF muscles was significantly higher among the patients compared with normative database. It took one month until all the EMG data returned to normal. Tonsillectomy affects muscle activity during swallowing by involving additional muscles in deglutition. EMG is a simple reliable method for postoperative evaluation and might contribute to comparative analysis of different tonsillectomy techniques. EMG can be used during pre- and postoperative stages to monitor recovery and functional improvement of throat muscles and deglutition. The reported sEMG method and obtained data might be further used: 1) As an additional tool for comparison of different methods of tonsillectomy (eg, cold vs hot dissection, laser surgery, etc); 2) For further development of objective postsurgical pain assessment; 3) As an additional tool for assessment and development of less traumatic surgical technique; and 4) For monitoring of recovery in difficult cases.

  6. DOES ELECTROMYOGRAPHY BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING REDUCE WORK-RELATED NECK PAIN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Faisal.C.K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Electromyography (EMG biofeedback training in dental professionals to reduce upper trapezius muscle tension and thereby to reduce the work related neck pain. By reducing muscle activity in the neck and shoulder postural stabilizing muscles, EMG biofeedback training would be an effective mode of treatment in dental professionals for the management of work related neck pain. Subjects and Methods: This RCT included a total of 50 dental professionals (29 males and 21 females aged between 27-44 years (mean age of 36.4.They were randomly allocated equally into either experimental group who received EMG Biofeedback or the control group who received the conventional physiotherapy management. Patients in the control group were given Hot Packs, IFT and neck care advice. In addition to conventional Physiotherapy treatments, patients in the experimental group received an EMG Biofeedback training program for the bilateral trapezius. The treatments were given for 30-45 minutes/ day / 5 days in a week for 2 weeks. The outcome tools used were; Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Neck Disability Scale (NDI and both were measured before starting the treatment and at end of 2 weeks. Results & Conclusion: Adding EMG biofeedback training for the trapezius muscles along with conventional physiotherapy management is found to be an effective method of treatment in the management of chronic non specific neck pain patients.

  7. A strategy for identifying locomotion modes using surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Kuiken, Todd A; Lipschutz, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the use of surface electromyography (EMG) combined with pattern recognition (PR) to identify user locomotion modes. Due to the nonstationary characteristics of leg EMG signals during locomotion, a new phase-dependent EMG PR strategy was proposed for classifying the user's locomotion modes. The variables of the system were studied for accurate classification and timely system response. The developed PR system was tested on EMG data collected from eight able-bodied subjects and two subjects with long transfemoral (TF) amputations while they were walking on different terrains or paths. The results showed reliable classification for the seven tested modes. For eight able-bodied subjects, the average classification errors in the four defined phases using ten electrodes located over the muscles above the knee (simulating EMG from the residual limb of a TF amputee) were 12.4% +/- 5.0%, 6.0% +/- 4.7%, 7.5% +/- 5.1%, and 5.2% +/- 3.7%, respectively. Comparable results were also observed in our pilot study on the subjects with TF amputations. The outcome of this investigation could promote the future design of neural-controlled artificial legs.

  8. Brachialis muscle activity can be assessed with surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudenmann, Didier; Taube, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The brachialis muscle (BR) represents an important elbow flexor and its activity has so far mainly been measured with intramuscular electromyography (EMG). The aim of this study was to examine whether the activity of the BR can be assessed with surface EMG without interference from the biceps brachii (BB). With eight subjects we measured surface EMG of the arm flexor synergists, BR, BB, and brachioradialis (BRR) during two isometric voluntary contraction types: (1) pure elbow flexion and (2) elbow flexion with a superimposed forearm supination. Since the BR and BB have a distinct biomechanical function, an individual activity of the BR can be expected for the second contraction type, if the BR can be assessed independently from the BB. The correlation coefficients between EMG amplitudes and flexion force (supination torque) were determined. During pure flexion the activities of all synergists were similarly correlated with the flexion force (r = 0.96 ± 0.02). During flexion+supination the activity of the BR was distinct from the activity of the BB, with a 14% higher correlation for the BR with the flexion force and a 40-64% lower correlation with the supination torque. The BB predicted supination torque substantially better than the BR and BRR (r = 0.93 ± 0.02). The current results demonstrate that the activity of the BR can be assessed with surface EMG as it was distinct from the BB during flexion+supination but predicted flexion force equally well as BB during the pure flexion contraction.

  9. Characterization of surface EMG signals using improved approximate entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei-ting; WANG Zhi-zhong; REN Xiao-mei

    2006-01-01

    An improved approximate entropy (ApEn) is presented and applied to characterize surface electromyography (sEMG)signals. In most previous experiments using nonlinear dynamic analysis, this certain processing was often confronted with the problem of insufficient data points and noisy circumstances, which led to unsatisfactory results. Compared with fractal dimension as well as the standard ApEn, the improved ApEn can extract information underlying sEMG signals more efficiently and accurately. The method introduced here can also be applied to other medium-sized and noisy physiological signals.

  10. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  11. Spatial variability in cortex-muscle coherence investigated with magnetoencephalography and high-density surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, Harri; Botter, Alberto; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2015-11-01

    Cortex-muscle coherence (CMC) reflects coupling between magnetoencephalography (MEG) and surface electromyography (sEMG), being strongest during isometric contraction but absent, for unknown reasons, in some individuals. We used a novel nonmagnetic high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) electrode grid (36 mm × 12 mm; 60 electrodes separated by 3 mm) to study effects of sEMG recording site, electrode derivation, and rectification on the strength of CMC. Monopolar sEMG from right thenar and 306-channel whole-scalp MEG were recorded from 14 subjects during 4-min isometric thumb abduction. CMC was computed for 60 monopolar, 55 bipolar, and 32 Laplacian HD-sEMG derivations, and two derivations were computed to mimic "macroscopic" monopolar and bipolar sEMG (electrode diameter 9 mm; interelectrode distance 21 mm). With unrectified sEMG, 12 subjects showed statistically significant CMC in 91-95% of the HD-sEMG channels, with maximum coherence at ∼25 Hz. CMC was about a fifth stronger for monopolar than bipolar and Laplacian derivations. Monopolar derivations resulted in most uniform CMC distributions across the thenar and in tightest cortical source clusters in the left rolandic hand area. CMC was 19-27% stronger for HD-sEMG than for "macroscopic" monopolar or bipolar derivations. EMG rectification reduced the CMC peak by a quarter, resulted in a more uniformly distributed CMC across the thenar, and provided more tightly clustered cortical sources than unrectifed sEMGs. Moreover, it revealed CMC at ∼12 Hz. We conclude that HD-sEMG, especially with monopolar derivation, can facilitate detection of CMC and that individual muscle anatomy cannot explain the high interindividual CMC variability.

  12. Can masticatory electromyography be normalised to submaximal bite force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, S R; Burden, A M; Yates, J M; Zioupos, P; Winwood, K

    2015-05-01

    The combination of bite force and jaw muscle electromyography (EMG) provides an insight into the performance of the stomatognathic system, especially in relation to dynamic movement tasks. Literature has extensively investigated possible methods for normalising EMG data encapsulating many different approaches. However, bite force literature trends towards normalising EMG to a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), which could be difficult for ageing populations or those with poor dental health or limiting conditions such as temporomandibular disorder. The objectives of this study were to (i) determine whether jaw-closing muscle activity is linearly correlated with incremental submaximal and maximal bite force levels and (ii) assess whether normalising maximal and submaximal muscle activity to that produced when performing a low submaximal bite force (20 N) improves repeatability of EMG values. Thirty healthy adults (15 men, 15 women; mean age 21 ± 1·2 years) had bite force measurements obtained using a custom-made button strain gauge load cell. Masseter and anterior temporalis muscle activities were collected bilaterally using surface EMG sensors whilst participants performed maximal biting and three levels of submaximal biting. Furthermore, a small group (n = 4 females) were retested for reliability purposes. Coefficients of variation and intra-class correlation coefficients showed markedly improved reliability when EMG data were normalised compared to non-normalised. This study shows that jaw muscle EMG may be successfully normalised to a very low bite force. This may open possibilities for comparisons between at-risk sample groups that may otherwise find it difficult to produce maximal bite force values.

  13. Heart rate variability and surface electromyography of trained cyclists at different cadences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Saraiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The heart rate variability (HRV and surface electromyography (sEMG are important tools in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic system and neuromuscular parameters, respectively. The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of HRV and sEMG of the vastus lateralis in two exercise protocols on a cycle ergometer at 60 and 80 rpm. Eight healthy men cyclists who have trained for at least two years were evaluated. Reduction was observed followed by stabilization of RMSSD and SDNN indices of HRV (p<0.05 along with increases in the amplitude of the sEMG signal (p<0.05 in both protocols. Significant correlations were observed between the responses of HRV and sEMG in the cadence of 60 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.42, p=0.03; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.45, p=0.01 and 80 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.47, p=0.02; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.49, p=0.01, yet no difference was observed for these variables between the two protocols. We concluded that the parasympathetic cardiac responses and sEMG are independent of cadences applied at the same power output.

  14. Continuous Estimation of Wrist Torque from Surface EMG Signals Using Path-dependent Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Li-zhi; ZHANG Ding-guo; SHENG Xin-jun; ZHU Xiang-yang

    2014-01-01

    Continuous estimation of wrist torque from surface electromyography (EMG) signals has been studied by some research institutes. Hysteresis effect is a phenomenon in EMG force relationship. In this work, a path-dependent model based on hysteresis effect was used for continuously estimating wrist torque from surface EMG signals. The surface EMG signals of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) were collected along with wrist torque of flexion/extension degree-of-freedom. EMG signal of FCU was used to estimate the torque of wrist flexion and EMG signal of ECR to estimate the torque of wrist extension. The existence of hysteresis effect has been proven either during wrist flexion or extension on all subjects. And the estimation performance of path-dependent model is much better than the overall model. Thus, the path-dependent model is suitable to improve the wrist torque's estimation accuracy.

  15. Classification of Simultaneous Movements using Surface EMG Pattern Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Aaron J.; Smith, Lauren H.; Rouse, Elliott J.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced upper-limb prostheses capable of actuating multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) are now commercially available. Pattern recognition algorithms that use surface electromyography (EMG) signals show great promise as multi-DOF controllers. Unfortunately, current pattern recognition systems are limited to activate only one degree of freedom at a time. This study introduces a novel classifier based on Bayesian theory to provide classification of simultaneous movements. This approach and two o...

  16. EMG Biofeedback for online predictive control of grasping force in a myoelectric prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Active hand prostheses controlled using electromyography (EMG) signals have been used for decades to restore the grasping function, lost after an amputation. Although myocontrol is a simple and intuitive interface, it is also imprecise due to the stochastic nature of the EMG recorded using surface electrodes. Furthermore, the sensory feedback from the prosthesis to the user is still missing. In this study, we present a novel concept to close the loop in myoelectric prostheses. In a...

  17. Classification of finger movements for the dexterous hand prosthesis control with surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Timemy, Ali H; Bugmann, Guido; Escudero, Javier; Outram, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    A method for the classification of finger movements for dexterous control of prosthetic hands is proposed. Previous research was mainly devoted to identify hand movements as these actions generate strong electromyography (EMG) signals recorded from the forearm. In contrast, in this paper, we assess the use of multichannel surface electromyography (sEMG) to classify individual and combined finger movements for dexterous prosthetic control. sEMG channels were recorded from ten intact-limbed and six below-elbow amputee persons. Offline processing was used to evaluate the classification performance. The results show that high classification accuracies can be achieved with a processing chain consisting of time domain-autoregression feature extraction, orthogonal fuzzy neighborhood discriminant analysis for feature reduction, and linear discriminant analysis for classification. We show that finger and thumb movements can be decoded accurately with high accuracy with latencies as short as 200 ms. Thumb abduction was decoded successfully with high accuracy for six amputee persons for the first time. We also found that subsets of six EMG channels provide accuracy values similar to those computed with the full set of EMG channels (98% accuracy over ten intact-limbed subjects for the classification of 15 classes of different finger movements and 90% accuracy over six amputee persons for the classification of 12 classes of individual finger movements). These accuracy values are higher than previous studies, whereas we typically employed half the number of EMG channels per identified movement.

  18. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gazzoni

    Full Text Available The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1 the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2 the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1 it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2 hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  19. New method of neck surface electromyography for the evaluation of tongue-lifting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Y; Maeda, N; Pan, Q; Sugimoto, K; Hashimoto, Y; Tanaka, Y; Kodama, N; Minagi, S

    2016-06-01

    Elevation of the posterior part of the tongue is important for normal deglutition and speech. The purpose of this study was to develop a new surface electromyography (EMG) method to non-invasively and objectively evaluate activity in the muscles that control lifting movement in the posterior tongue. Neck surface EMG (N-EMG) was recorded using differential surface electrodes placed on the neck, 1 cm posterior to the posterior border of the mylohyoid muscle on a line orthogonal to the lower border of the mandible. Experiment 1: Three healthy volunteers (three men, mean age 37·7 years) participated in an evaluation of detection method of the posterior tongue lifting up movement. EMG recordings from the masseter, temporalis and submental muscles and N-EMG revealed that i) N-EMG was not affected by masseter muscle EMG and ii) N-EMG activity was not observed during simple jaw opening and tongue protrusion, revealing the functional difference between submental surface EMG and N-EMG. Experiment 2: Seven healthy volunteers (six men and one woman, mean age 27·9 years) participated in a quantitative evaluation of muscle activity. Tongue-lifting tasks were perfor-med, exerting a prescribed force of 20, 50, 100 and 150 gf with visual feedback. For all subjects, a significant linear relationship was observed bet-ween the tongue-lifting force and N-EMG activity (P EMG can be used to quantify the force of posterior tongue lifting and could be useful to evaluate the effect of tongue rehabilitation in future studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  1. Contactless measurement of muscles fatigue by tracking facial feature points in a video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    their exercises when the level of the fatigue might be dangerous for the patients. The current technology for measuring tiredness, like Electromyography (EMG), requires installing some sensors on the body. In some applications, like remote patient monitoring, this however might not be possible. To deal......Physical exercise may result in muscle tiredness which is known as muscle fatigue. This occurs when the muscles cannot exert normal force, or when more than normal effort is required. Fatigue is a vital sign, for example, for therapists to assess their patient’s progress or to change...... with such cases, in this paper we present a contactless method based on computer vision techniques to measure tiredness by detecting, tracking, and analyzing some facial feature points during the exercise. Experimental results on several test subjects and comparing them against ground truth data show...

  2. Wavelet transform analysis of electromyography kung fu strikes data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Osmar Pinto; Marzullo, Ana Carolina de Miranda

    2009-11-01

    In martial arts and contact sports strikes are performed at near maximum speeds. For that reason, electromyography (EMG) analysis of such movements is non-trivial. This paper has three main goals: firstly, to investigate the differences in the EMG activity of muscles during strikes performed with and without impacts; secondly, to assess the advantages of using Sum of Significant Power (SSP) values instead of root mean square (rms) values when analyzing EMG data; and lastly to introduce a new method of calculating median frequency values using wavelet transforms (WMDF). EMG data of the deltoid anterior (DA), triceps brachii (TB) and brachioradialis (BR) muscles were collected from eight Kung Fu practitioners during strikes performed with and without impacts. SSP results indicated significant higher muscle activity (p = 0.023) for the strikes with impact. WMDF results, on the other hand, indicated significant lower values (p = 0. 007) for the strikes with impact. SSP results presented higher sensitivity than rms to quantify important signal differences and, at the same time, presented lower inter-subject coefficient of variations. The result of increase in SSP values and decrease in WMDF may suggest better synchronization of motor units for the strikes with impact performed by the experienced Kung Fu practitioners. Key PointsThe results show higher muscle activity and lower electromyography median frequencies for strikes with impact compared to strikes without.SSP results presented higher sensitivity and lower inter-subject coefficient of variations than rms results.Kung Fu palm strikes with impact may present better motor units' synchronization than strikes without.

  3. Multi-modal myocontrol: Testing combined force- and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Markus; Eiband, Thomas; Castellini, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    Myocontrol, that is control of prostheses using bodily signals, has proved in the decades to be a surprisingly hard problem for the scientific community of assistive and rehabilitation robotics. In particular, traditional surface electromyography (sEMG) seems to be no longer enough to guarantee dexterity (i.e., control over several degrees of freedom) and, most importantly, reliability. Multi-modal myocontrol is concerned with the idea of using novel signal gathering techniques as a replacement of, or alongside, sEMG, to provide high-density and diverse signals to improve dexterity and make the control more reliable. In this paper we present an offline and online assessment of multi-modal sEMG and force myography (FMG) targeted at hand and wrist myocontrol. A total number of twenty sEMG and FMG sensors were used simultaneously, in several combined configurations, to predict opening/closing of the hand and activation of two degrees of freedom of the wrist of ten intact subjects. The analysis was targeted at determining the optimal sensor combination and control parameters; the experimental results indicate that sEMG sensors alone perform worst, yielding a nRMSE of 9.1%, while mixing FMG and sEMG or using FMG only reduces the nRMSE to 5.2-6.6%. To validate these results, we engaged the subject with median performance in an online goal-reaching task. Analysis of this further experiment reveals that the online behaviour is similar to the offline one.

  4. Uses of electromyography in dentistry: An overview with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Shamima Easmin; Basri, Rehana; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the uses of electromyography (EMG) in dentistry in the last few years in related research. EMG is an advanced technique to record and evaluate muscle activity. In the previous days, EMG was only used for medical sciences, but now EMG playing a tremendous role in medical as well as dental sector. Materials and Methods: Several electronic databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, Science Direct, and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies published until July 2015. Results: EMG can be used in both diagnosis and treatment purpose to record neuromuscular activity. In dentistry, we can utilize EMG to evaluate muscular activity in function such as chewing and biting or parafunctional activities such as clenching and bruxism. In case of TMJ and myofascial pain disorders, EMG widely is used in the last few years. Conclusions: EMG is one of biometric tests that occur in the modern evidence-based dentistry practice. PMID:27403065

  5. Electromyography responses of pediatric and young adult volunteers in low-speed frontal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Emily A; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Seacrist, Thomas; Maltese, Matthew R; Sterner, Robert; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2013-10-01

    No electromyography (EMG) responses data exist of children exposed to dynamic impacts similar to automotive crashes, thereby, limiting active musculature representation in computational occupant biomechanics models. This study measured the surface EMG responses of three neck, one torso and one lower extremity muscles during low-speed frontal impact sled tests (average maximum acceleration: 3.8g; rise time: 58.2ms) performed on seated, restrained pediatric (n=11, 8-14years) and young adult (n=9, 18-30years) male subjects. The timing and magnitude of the EMG responses were compared between the two age groups. Two normalization techniques were separately implemented and evaluated: maximum voluntary EMG (MVE) and neck cross-sectional area (CSA). The MVE-normalized EMG data indicated a positive correlation with age in the rectus femoris for EMG latency; there was no correlation with age for peak EMG amplitudes for the evaluated muscles. The cervical paraspinous exhibited shorter latencies compared with the other muscles (2-143ms). Overall, the erector spinae and rectus femoris peak amplitudes were relatively small. Neck CSA-normalized peak EMG amplitudes negatively correlated with age for the cervical paraspinous and sternocleidomastoid. These data can be useful to incorporate active musculature in computational models, though it may not need to be age-specific in low-speed loading environments.

  6. Functional evaluation of paratubal muscles using electromyography in patients with chronic unilateral tubal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ki-Hong; Jun, Beom-Cho; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Park, Yong-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Eustachian tube dysfunction is closely related to the development of otitis media and result from several factors including inflammation within the nasal cavity and nasopharynx, adenoid hypertrophy, cleft palate and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To some extent, eustachian tube dysfunction may be related to weakness of the paratubal muscles, such as the tensor veli palatini and levator veli palatini muscles. The aim of the study is to find out myogenic factors in eustachian tube dysfunction using electromyography (EMG), and to evaluate the clinical feasibility of EMG. Ten patients with unilateral eustachian tube dysfunction were included in this study. The healthy side of each patient was used as a control. EMG tests on paratubal muscles were conducted under the view of a 30° endoscope or fiberoptic laryngoscope. EMG on the tensor veli palatini showed decreased amplitudes on the affected side in one patient during phonation. EMG on the levator veli palatini showed decreased amplitudes on the affected side in two patients during both deglutition and phonation, one patient during phonation only, and two patients during deglutition only. The only patient who had decreased amplitude on EMG of the tensor veli palatini also had decreased amplitude on EMG of the levator veli palatini. In conclusion, although it is generally accepted that the tensor veli palatini plays a major role in opening the eustachian tube, reduced activity of the levator veli palatini may be related to eustachian tube dysfunction. When assessing eustachian tube function, EMG is useful for evaluating myogenic factors.

  7. Establishment of a recording method for surface electromyography in the iliopsoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiroumaru, Takumi; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Isaka, Tadao

    2014-08-01

    We examined the availability and reliability of surface electromyography (EMG) signals from the iliopsoas muscle (IL). Using serial magnetic resonance images from fifty healthy young males, we evaluated whether the superficial region of IL was adequate for attaching surface EMG electrodes. Subsequently, we assessed EMG cross-talk from the sartorius muscle (SA)-the nearest to IL-using a selective cooling method in fourteen subjects. The skin above SA was cooled, and the median frequencies of EMG signals from IL and SA were determined. The maximum voluntary contraction during isometric hip flexion was measured before and after selective cooling, and surface EMG signals from SA and IL were measured. The superficial area of IL was adequately large (13.2±2.7cm(2)) for recording surface EMG in all fifty subjects. The maximum perimeter for the medial-lateral skin facing IL was noted at a level 3-5cm distal to the anterior superior iliac spine. Following cooling, the median frequency for SA decreased significantly (from 70.1 to 51.9Hz, pEMG cross-talk from SA was negligible for surface EMG signals from IL during hip flexion.

  8. WAVELET TRANSFORM ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHY KUNG FU STRIKES DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Miranda Marzullo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In martial arts and contact sports strikes are performed at near maximum speeds. For that reason, electromyography (EMG analysis of such movements is non-trivial. This paper has three main goals: firstly, to investigate the differences in the EMG activity of muscles during strikes performed with and without impacts; secondly, to assess the advantages of using Sum of Significant Power (SSP values instead of root mean square (rms values when analyzing EMG data; and lastly to introduce a new method of calculating median frequency values using wavelet transforms (WMDF. EMG data of the deltoid anterior (DA, triceps brachii (TB and brachioradialis (BR muscles were collected from eight Kung Fu practitioners during strikes performed with and without impacts. SSP results indicated significant higher muscle activity (p = 0.023 for the strikes with impact. WMDF results, on the other hand, indicated significant lower values (p = 0. 007 for the strikes with impact. SSP results presented higher sensitivity than rms to quantify important signal differences and, at the same time, presented lower inter-subject coefficient of variations. The result of increase in SSP values and decrease in WMDF may suggest better synchronization of motor units for the strikes with impact performed by the experienced Kung Fu practitioners

  9. Visuomotor control of neck surface electromyography in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Jessica R; Valentin, Juliana C; Hands, Gabrielle L; Stevens, Christina A; Langmore, Susan E; Noordzij, J Pieter; Stepp, Cara E

    2014-01-01

    To compare performance of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and age-matched controls on a visuomotor tracking task controlled via surface electromyography (sEMG). Twenty-seven adults with PD and twenty-four older controls produced dry swallows and completed a visuomotor tracking task utilizing both static and dynamic targets. sEMG was recorded at the anterior neck and submental surface during both tasks. There was no significant difference in visuomotor tracking ability between cohorts. Post hoc analyses indicated that there was no significant difference between participant groups in the strength or duration of swallows as measured by sEMG but that participants with PD showed a trend for decreased swallow durations at the anterior neck (padj = 0.067) whereas controls showed a trend for increased durations at the anterior neck (padj = 0.112), compared to the submental surface. However, there were no significant correlations between swallowing behavior and visuomotor tracking ability. There were no significant differences in visuomotor tracking performance between individuals with PD and controls. Furthermore, there was no relationship between tracking ability and swallowing behavior. We conclude that sEMG-mediated biofeedback may have limited promise as a tool for treating PD-related dysphagia.

  10. Surface electromyography of continuous drinking in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Gabriel, Chaim; Eviatar, Ephraim; Segal, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    To give a description of normal surface electromyography (sEMG) aspects of uninterrupted (continuous) drinking and to establish normal sEMG values for swallowing 100 mL of water. Prospective observational study of healthy volunteers. Four hundred twenty apparently healthy male and female volunteers divided into three age groups (18-40, 41-65, 66+ years). The evaluated parameters included the total duration, number of swallows, amount of water per swallow, and voltage of the EMG activity of the orbicularis oris, masseter, and submental-submandibular muscles and the infrahyoid muscle groups covered by the m. platysma. The overall normal mean values for duration, number of swallows, and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking were compiled. The age-related increase in duration of swallows and of total drinking time was significant only in the older group (95% confidence interval, P or = .05). The mean electric activity (in muV) varied insignificantly among the age groups. The activity of the m. orbicularis oris was the least informative. An unexpectedly significant number of healthy subjects (14.25%, P swallow after drinking. The establishment of normal sEMG levels now makes this modality applicable for evaluating the swallowing mechanism among adults for potentially identifying and ruling out abnormalities. Its simplicity, noninvasiveness, and low level of discomfort also make it highly suitable for screening purposes.

  11. Comparison of electromyography and force as interfaces for prosthetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Elaine A; Perreault, Eric J; Kuiken, Todd A

    2011-01-01

    The ease with which persons with upper-limb amputations can control their powered prostheses is largely determined by the efficacy of the user command interface. One needs to understand the abilities of the human operator regarding the different available options. Electromyography (EMG) is widely used to control powered upper-limb prostheses. It is an indirect estimator of muscle force and may be expected to limit the control capabilities of the prosthesis user. This study compared EMG control with force control, an interface that is used in everyday interactions with the environment. We used both methods to perform a position-tracking task. Direct-position control of the wrist provided an upper bound for human-operator capabilities. The results demonstrated that an EMG control interface is as effective as force control for the position-tracking task. We also examined the effects of gain and tracking frequency on EMG control to explore the limits of this control interface. We found that information transmission rates for myoelectric control were best at higher tracking frequencies than at the frequencies previously reported for position control. The results may be useful for the design of prostheses and prosthetic controllers.

  12. Kinematical and EMG-classifications of a fencing attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frère, J; Göpfert, B; Nüesch, C; Huber, C; Fischer, M; Wirz, D; Friederich, N F

    2011-01-01

    8 expert fencers were studied with a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Each subject performed 10 flèche attacks toward a standardized target. Surface electromyography signals (EMG) were recorded of the deltoid pars clavicularis, infraspinatus and triceps brachii caput laterale muscles of the weapon arm. The recorded EMGs were averaged using EMG wavelet-transformation software. 4 phases were defined based on the arm kinematics and used to classify fencers into 2 groups. A first group of 4 fencers showed an early maximal elbow extension (Early MEE) whereas the second group presented a late maximal elbow extension (Late MEE). 2 EMG-classifications were based on this kinematical classification, one in the time-domain and the other in the frequency-domain by using the spherical classification. The time-domain EMG-classification showed a significantly ( P=0.03) higher normalized deltoid intensity for the Early MEE group (91 ± 18%) than the Late MEE group (36 ± 13%) in the attack phase. The spherical classification revealed that the activity of all the muscles was significantly classified (recognition rate 75%, P=0.04) between the 2 groups. This study of EMG and kinematics of the weapon upper limb in fencing proposes several classifications, which implies a relationship between kinematic strategies, muscular activations and fencing success.

  13. A Novel Feature Extraction for Robust EMG Pattern Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai

    2009-01-01

    Varieties of noises are major problem in recognition of Electromyography (EMG) signal. Hence, methods to remove noise become most significant in EMG signal analysis. White Gaussian noise (WGN) is used to represent interference in this paper. Generally, WGN is difficult to be removed using typical filtering and solutions to remove WGN are limited. In addition, noise removal is an important step before performing feature extraction, which is used in EMG-based recognition. This research is aimed to present a novel feature that tolerate with WGN. As a result, noise removal algorithm is not needed. Two novel mean and median frequencies (MMNF and MMDF) are presented for robust feature extraction. Sixteen existing features and two novelties are evaluated in a noisy environment. WGN with various signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), i.e. 20-0 dB, was added to the original EMG signal. The results showed that MMNF performed very well especially in weak EMG signal compared with others. The error of MMNF in weak EMG signal with...

  14. Reliability of surface EMG measurements from the suprahyoid muscle complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Stubbs, Peter William; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    2017-01-01

    reliable for ≈50% of participants. Although using sEMG to assess swallowing musculature function is easier to perform clinically and more comfortable to patients than invasive measures, as the measurement of muscle activity using TMS is unreliable, the use of sEMG for this muscle group is not recommended......Background: Assessment of swallowing musculature using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) can be used to evaluate neural pathways. However, recording of the swallowing musculature is often invasive, uncomfortable and unrealistic in normal clinical practise. Objective: To investigate the possibility...... of using the suprahyoid muscle complex (SMC) using surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess changes to neural pathways by determining the reliability of measurements in healthy participants over days. Methods: Seventeen healthy participants were recruited. Measurements were performed twice with one week...

  15. Active Finger Recognition from Surface EMG Signal Using Bayesian Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Nozomu; Hoashi, Yuki; Konishi, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposed an active finger recognition method using Bayesian filter in order to control a myoelectric hand. We have previously proposed a finger joint angle estimation method based on measured surface electromyography (EMG) signals and a linear model. However, when we estimate 2 or more finger angles by this estimation method, the estimation angle of the inactive finger is not accurate. This is caused by interference of surface EMG signal. To solve this interference problem, we proposed active finger recognition method from the amplitude spectrum of surface EMG signal using Bayesian filter. To confirm the effectiveness of this recognition method, we developed a myoelectric hand simulator that implements proposed recognition algorithm and carried out real-time recognition experiment.

  16. Archery performance level and repeatability of event-related EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, A R; Ertan, H; Korkusuz, F

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to compare the repeatability of electromyographic linear envelopes (LE) of archery groups. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals of musculus flexor digitorum superficialis (MFDS) and extensor digitorum (MED) of 23 participants (seven skilled, six beginner archers and ten non-archers) were recorded during archery shooting. Two-second periods (clicker falls at first second) of 12 shots' EMG data were recorded, full-wave rectified and filtered (60 ms moving-average filter) for each participant's drawing arm. Repeatability was investigated by using a statistical criterion, variance ratio (VR). Archers' performances were evaluated in terms of FITA scores. The results showed that FITA scores were significantly correlated to the VRs of MFDS and MED. EMG LEs were more repeatable among archers than non-archers. Therefore, we inferred that VRs of MFDS and MED might be important variables for (a) assessing shooting techniques, (b) evaluation of archers' progress, and (c) selection of talented archers.

  17. Effects of innovative virtual reality game and EMG biofeedback on neuromotor control in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Sim, Yon Ju; You, Joshua H; Kim, Cheol J

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor control dysfunction or dyskinesia is a hallmark of neuromuscular impairment in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and is often implicated in reaching and grasping deficiencies due to a neuromuscular imbalance between the triceps and biceps. To mitigate such muscle imbalances, an innovative electromyography (EMG)-virtual reality (VR) biofeedback system were designed to provide accurate information about muscle activation and motivation. However, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not yet been determined in children with CP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined EMG biofeedback and VR (EMG-VR biofeedback) intervention system to improve muscle imbalance between triceps and biceps during reaching movements in children with spastic CP. Raw EMG signals were recorded at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, band-pass filtered between 20-450 Hz, and notch-filtered at 60 Hz during elbow flexion and extension movements. EMG data were then processed using MyoResearch Master Edition 1.08 XP software. All participants underwent both interventions consisting of the EMG-VR biofeedback combination and EMG biofeedback alone. EMG analysis resulted in improved muscle activation in the underactive triceps while decreasing overactive or hypertonic biceps in the EMG-VR biofeedback compared with EMG biofeedback. The muscle imbalance ratio between the triceps and biceps was consistently improved. The present study is the first clinical trial to provide evidence for the additive benefits of VR intervention for enhancing the upper limb function of children with spastic CP.

  18. 肌电图监测在听神经瘤手术中面神经保护及其功能预后%Facial nerve protection and its evaluation in acoustic neuroma surgery by electromyography monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻廉; 刘会林; 殷晓梅; 牛朝诗; 傅先明

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨肌电图在听神经瘤切除手术中对面神经的保护作用及术后对面神经功能预后的评价.方法 56例听神经瘤患者,其中男性24例,女性32例,年龄10~68岁,平均年龄48.3岁.使用美国Nicoli公司Endeavor-CR 16通道术中监护仪,对患者的面神经监测资料进行归纳、分析和整理.面神经监测主要采取两种方式:自发连续肌电图(onlian EMG)和间断电刺激诱发肌电图(triggered EMG).结果 onlian EMG结合triggered EMG可以准确定位面神经.肿瘤切除后在面神经出脑干端进行电刺激,刺激量为0.1~4.0mA,相应的术后面神经功能保留优良率高.超过10mA术后面神经功能很难恢复.面神经解剖保留率为87.5%(49/56).结论 听神经瘤切除术中肌电图监测可以精确判断面神经的走向,提高面神经的解剖和功能保留率.

  19. Effect of vibrotactile feedback on an EMG-based proportional cursor control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunchong; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been introduced into the bio-mechatronics systems, however, most of them are lack of the sensory feedback. In this paper, the effect of vibrotactile feedback for a myoelectric cursor control system is investigated quantitatively. Simultaneous and proportional control signals are extracted from EMG using a muscle synergy model. Different types of feedback including vibrotactile feedback and visual feedback are added, assessed and compared with each other. The results show that vibrotactile feedback is capable of improving the performance of EMG-based human machine interface.

  20. Analysing MUAP of EMG Signal with Power Density Spectrum in Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Kumar Bhoi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a proper description of the EMG signal is probably the greatest single factor which has hampered the development of electromyography into a precise discipline. Our proposed methodology described the relationship between the EMG signal and the properties of a contracting muscle by analysing its power density spectrum. We have also discussed the basic concepts on Motor Unit Action potential and analyzed the spectral density of a healthy person EMG signal. The Power spectral Density is calculated with Welch's PSD estimate method by taking Hamming {&} Kaiser Window. This model can be useful for the study of gate analysis and control scheme of the peripheral nervous system

  1. Robust Features Of Surface Electromyography Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, M. I.; Miskon, M. F.; Yaacob, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, application of robotics in human life has been explored widely. Robotics exoskeleton system are one of drastically areas in recent robotic research that shows mimic impact in human life. These system have been developed significantly to be used for human power augmentation, robotics rehabilitation, human power assist, and haptic interaction in virtual reality. This paper focus on solving challenges in problem using neural signals and extracting human intent. Commonly, surface electromyography signal (sEMG) are used in order to control human intent for application exoskeleton robot. But the problem lies on difficulty of pattern recognition of the sEMG features due to high noises which are electrode and cable motion artifact, electrode noise, dermic noise, alternating current power line interface, and other noise came from electronic instrument. The main objective in this paper is to study the best features of electromyography in term of time domain (statistical analysis) and frequency domain (Fast Fourier Transform).The secondary objectives is to map the relationship between torque and best features of muscle unit activation potential (MaxPS and RMS) of biceps brachii. This project scope use primary data of 2 male sample subject which using same dominant hand (right handed), age between 20-27 years old, muscle diameter 32cm to 35cm and using single channel muscle (biceps brachii muscle). The experiment conduct 2 times repeated task of contraction and relaxation of biceps brachii when lifting different load from no load to 3kg with ascending 1kg The result shows that Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) has less error than mean value of reading compare to root mean square (RMS) value. Thus, Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) show the linear relationship against torque experience by elbow joint to lift different load. As the conclusion, the best features is MaxPS because it has the lowest error than other features and show

  2. Electromyography in evaluation of pain after different types of tonsillectomy: prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Gavrieli, Haim; Krakovski, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Combined surface electromyography (sEMG) and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain assessment was performed on randomly assigned adults following tonsillectomy to research the effect of fibrin sealant (Group 1, n = 25), CO(2) laser (Group 2, n = 18) and electrocoagulation (Group 3, n = 40) on postsurgical pain. Timing and amplitude of sEMG activity of masseter, infrahyoid and submandibular muscles were measured during swallowing simultaneously with VAS assessment and compared to normative database. Postsurgical electric activity of masseter and infrahyoid was significantly higher in comparison with normative database. sEMG and VAS data showed that tonsillectomy ended with fibrin sealant caused less pain than laser or electrocoagulation techniques with no correlation between the VAS score and duration of swallows. Tonsillectomy affects muscle activity significantly by involving additional muscles (infrahyoid) in swallowing. Combined sEMG and VAS data indicated electrocautery as the most painful, laser as less painful, and fibrin sealant as the least painful technique.

  3. Utilization and yield of nerve conduction studies and electromyography in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mello, S

    2016-02-01

    Older adults are at increased risk of both central and peripheral neurological disorders. Impaired nerve and muscle deficits contribute to morbidity and reduced quality of life. Our aim was to define the utilization and yield of nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG) in older adults. We reviewed NCS and EMG records for all patients older than age 65 in the year 2012. Of 1,530 NCS and EMGs performed, 352 (23%) were in patients older than 65 (mean age 73.7, 52% male). Two hundred and eighty-eight (83.7%) of NCS were abnormal as were 102 (71.8%) of EMGs. The likelihood of having an abnormal test result increased with increasing age. The most common diagnosis was peripheral neuropathy 231 (65.4%). The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is particularly high in this age group, and detection is vital to prevent morbidity and improve quality of life.

  4. Abnormal surface EMG during clinically normal wrist movement in cervical dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. M.; Leenders, K. L.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; de Jong, B. M.; Kuiper, A. J.; Maurits, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether patients with cervical dystonia (CD) have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts. Eight healthy controls and eight CD patients performed a flexion-extension movement of the right wrist. Movement execution was recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) from fore

  5. Airflow limitation in asthmatic children assessed with a non-invasive EMG technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, EJW; van Eykern, LA; de Haan, RJ; Griffioen, RW; Hoekstra, MO; van Aalderen, WMC

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between electromyography (EMG) of the diaphragm and intercostal muscles and the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at different levels of histamine-induced airflow limitation, and the response to salbutamol. Moreover, we assessed the reprod

  6. Electrical stimulation of the upper extremity in stroke: cyclic versus EMG-triggered stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, de Joke R.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of cyclic and electromyography (EMG)-triggered electrical stimulation on motor impairment and function of the affected upper extremity in chronic stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Outpatient clinic of a rehabilitation centre. Subjects and inte

  7. Airflow limitation in asthmatic children assessed with a non-invasive EMG technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, EJW; van Eykern, LA; de Haan, RJ; Griffioen, RW; Hoekstra, MO; van Aalderen, WMC

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between electromyography (EMG) of the diaphragm and intercostal muscles and the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at different levels of histamine-induced airflow limitation, and the response to salbutamol. Moreover, we assessed the

  8. Short latency hand movement classification based on surface EMG spectrogram with PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong Zhai; Jelfs, Beth; Chan, Rosa H M; Chung Tin

    2016-08-01

    Hand gesture recognition from forearm surface electromyography (sEMG) is an active research field in the development of motor prosthesis. Studies have shown that classification accuracy and efficiency is highly dependent on the features extracted from the EMG. In this paper, we show that EMG spectrograms are a particularly effective feature for discriminating multiple classes of hand gesture when subjected to principal component analysis for dimensionality reduction. We tested our method on the Ninapro database which includes sEMG data (12 channels) of 40 subjects performing 50 different hand movements. Our results demonstrate improved classification accuracy (by ~10%) over purely time domain features for 50 different hand movements, including small finger movements and different levels of force exertion. Our method has also reduced the error rate (by ~12%) at the transition phase of gestures which could improve robustness of gesture recognition when continuous classification from sEMG is required.

  9. Effect of a Short Time Concentric Versus Eccentric Training Program on Electromyography Activity and Peak Torque of Quadriceps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Caserotti, Paolo; Carvalho, C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an 8-week concentric (CON) versus eccentric (ECC) isokinetic training program on the electromyography (EMG) signal amplitude of vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF). Also, the isometric (ISO) and dynamic maximum...

  10. A more precise, repeatable and diagnostic alternative to surface electromyography - an appraisal of the clinical utility of acoustic myography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian P

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic myography (AMG) enables a detailed and accurate measurement of those muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between the nerve and muscle, measuring solely muscle contractions, unlike surface electromyography (sEMG). With modern amplifiers and d...

  11. A comparative study of various electrodes in electromyography of the striated urethral and anal sphincter in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Kristensen, E S; Qvist, N

    1985-01-01

    The series comprised 41 children aged 6 to 14 years consecutively referred with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. Carbon dioxide cystometry was carried out in the supine and the erect position and combined with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). The external urethral sphincter...

  12. Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Sculley, Dean V; Lockie, Robert G; Dascombe, Ben J

    2014-10-01

    This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve well-trained young men performed high-intensity back squat exercise (12 sets at 70-90% 1-repetition maximum) on two occasions, during which EMG and NIRS continuously monitored muscle activation and oxygenation of the thigh muscles. Intra-test reliability for EMG and NIRS variables was generally higher than inter-test reliability. EMG median frequency variables were generally more reliable than amplitude-based variables. The reliability of EMG measures was not related to the intensity or number of repetitions performed during the set. No notable differences were evident in the reliability of EMG between different agonist muscles. NIRS-derived measures of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and tissue saturation index were generally more reliable during single-repetition sets than multiple-repetition sets at the same intensity. Tissue saturation index was the most reliable NIRS variable. Although the reliability of the EMG and NIRS measures varied across the exercise protocol, the precise causes of this variability are not yet understood. However, it is likely that biological variation during multi-joint isotonic resistance exercise may account for some of the variation in the observed results.

  13. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  14. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Freitas

    Full Text Available Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI, collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  15. Surface electromyography in orthodontics – a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    WoŸniak, Krzysztof; Piątkowska, Dagmara; Lipski, Mariusz; Mehr, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Electromyography is the most objective and reliable technique for evaluating muscle function and efficiency by detecting their electrical potentials. It makes it possible to assess the extent and duration of muscle activity. The main aim of surface electromyography is to detect signals from many muscle fibers in the area of the detecting surface electrodes. These signals consist of a weighted summation of the spatial and temporal activity of many motor units. Hence, the analysis of the recordings is restricted to an assessment of general muscle activity, the cooperation of different muscles, and the variability of their activity over time. This study presents the main assumptions in the assessment of electrical muscle activity through the use of surface electromyography, along with its limitations and possibilities for further use in many areas of orthodontics. The main clinical uses of sEMG include the diagnostics and therapy of temporomandibular joint disorders, an assessment of the extent of stomatognathic system dysfunctions in subjects with malocclusion, and the monitoring of orthodontic therapies. PMID:23722255

  16. Effect of Selective Muscle Training Using Visual Emg Biofeedback on Infraspinatus and Posterior Deltoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim One-bin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of visual electromyography (EMG biofeedback during side-lying shoulder external rotation exercise on the EMG amplitude for the posterior deltoid, infraspinatus, and infraspinatus/posterior deltoid EMG activity ratio. Thirty-one asymptomatic subjects were included. Subjects performed side-lying shoulder external rotation exercise with and without visual EMG biofeedback. Surface EMG was used to collect data from the posterior deltoid and infraspinatus muscles. The visual EMG biofeedback applied the pre-established threshold to prevent excessive posterior deltoid muscle contraction. A paired t-test was used to determine the significance of the measurements between without vs. with visual EMG biofeedback. Posterior deltoid activity significantly decreased while infraspinatus activity and the infraspinatus/posterior activity ratio significantly increased during side-lying shoulder external rotation exercise with visual EMG biofeedback. This suggests that using visual EMG biofeedback during shoulder external rotation exercise is a clinically effective training method for reducing posterior deltoid activity and increasing infraspinatus activity.

  17. Zebrafish needle EMG: a new tool for high-throughput drug screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Joon; Nam, Tai-Seung; Byun, Donghak; Choi, Seok-Yong; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Sohee

    2015-09-01

    Zebrafish models have recently been highlighted as a valuable tool in studying the molecular basis of neuromuscular diseases and developing new pharmacological treatments. Needle electromyography (EMG) is needed not only for validating transgenic zebrafish models with muscular dystrophies (MD), but also for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics. However, performing needle EMG on larval zebrafish has not been feasible due to the lack of proper EMG sensors and systems for such small animals. We introduce a new type of EMG needle electrode to measure intramuscular activities of larval zebrafish, together with a method to hold the animal in position during EMG, without anesthetization. The silicon-based needle electrode was found to be sufficiently strong and sharp to penetrate the skin and muscles of zebrafish larvae, and its shape and performance did not change after multiple insertions. With the use of the proposed needle electrode and measurement system, EMG was successfully performed on zebrafish at 30 days postfertilization (dpf) and at 5 dpf. Burst patterns and spike morphology of the recorded EMG signals were analyzed. The measured single spikes were triphasic with an initial positive deflection, which is typical for motor unit action potentials, with durations of ∼10 ms, whereas the muscle activity was silent during the anesthetized condition. These findings confirmed the capability of this system of detecting EMG signals from very small animals such as 5 dpf zebrafish. The developed EMG sensor and system are expected to become a helpful tool in validating zebrafish MD models and further developing therapeutics.

  18. Supplementing biomechanical modeling with EMG analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Jagodnik, Kathleen; Crentsil, Lawton; Humphreys, Bradley; Funk, Justin; Gallo, Christopher; Thompson, William; DeWitt, John; Perusek, Gail

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that astronauts experience musculoskeletal deconditioning when exposed to microgravity environments for long periods of time. Spaceflight exercise is used to counteract these effects, and the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been effective in minimizing musculoskeletal losses. However, the exercise devices of the new exploration vehicles will have requirements of limited mass, power and volume. Because of these limitations, there is a concern that the exercise devices will not be as effective as ARED in maintaining astronaut performance. Therefore, biomechanical modeling is being performed to provide insight on whether the small Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) device, which utilizes a single-strap design, will provide sufficient physiological loading to maintain musculoskeletal performance. Electromyography (EMG) data are used to supplement the biomechanical model results and to explore differences in muscle activation patterns during exercises using different loading configurations.

  19. Decoding of individual finger movements from surface EMG signals using vector autoregressive hierarchical hidden Markov models (VARHHMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesevic, Nebojsa; Markovic, Dimitrije; Kanitz, Gunter; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian; Antfolk, Christian

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for predicting individual fingers movements from surface electromyography (EMG). The method is intended for real-time dexterous control of a multifunctional prosthetic hand device. The EMG data was recorded using 16 single-ended channels positioned on the forearm of healthy participants. Synchronously with the EMG recording, the subjects performed consecutive finger movements based on the visual cues. Our algorithm could be described in following steps: extracting mean average value (MAV) of the EMG to be used as the feature for classification, piece-wise linear modeling of EMG feature dynamics, implementation of hierarchical hidden Markov models (HHMM) to capture transitions between linear models, and implementation of Bayesian inference as the classifier. The performance of our classifier was evaluated against commonly used real-time classifiers. The results show that the current algorithm setup classifies EMG data similarly to the best among tested classifiers but with equal or less computational complexity.

  20. Pattern recognition of surface electromyography signals for real-time control of wrist exoskeletons

    OpenAIRE

    Khokhar, Zeeshan Omer

    2010-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals have been used in numerous studies for the classification of hand gestures and successfully implemented in the position control of different prosthetic hands. An estimation of the intended torque of the user could also provide sufficient information for an effective force control of hand prosthesis or an assistive device. This thesis presents the use of pattern recognition to estimate the torque applied by a human wrist and its real-time implementation ...

  1. Spatial variation and inconsistency between estimates of onset of muscle activation from EMG and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Angela V; Botter, Alberto; Vieira, Taian Martins; Peolsson, Anneli; Petzke, Frank; Davey, Paul; Falla, Deborah

    2017-02-08

    Delayed onset of muscle activation can be a descriptor of impaired motor control. Activation onset can be estimated from electromyography (EMG)-registered muscle excitation and from ultrasound-registered muscle motion, which enables non-invasive measurements in deep muscles. However, in voluntary activation, EMG- and ultrasound-detected activation onsets may not correspond. To evaluate this, ten healthy men performed isometric elbow flexion at 20% to 70% of their maximal force. Utilising a multi-channel electrode transparent to ultrasound, EMG and M(otion)-mode ultrasound were recorded simultaneously over the biceps brachii muscle. The time intervals between automated and visually estimated activation onsets were correlated with the regional variation of EMG and muscle motion onset, contraction level and speed. Automated and visual onsets indicated variable time intervals between EMG- and motion onset, median (interquartile range) 96 (121) ms and 48 (72) ms, respectively. In 17% (computed analysis) or 23% (visual analysis) of trials, motion onset was detected before local EMG onset. Multi-channel EMG and M-mode ultrasound revealed regional differences in activation onset, which decreased with higher contraction speed (Spearman ρ ≥ 0.45, P explain the high variation of the time intervals between local EMG- and ultrasound-detected activation onset.

  2. Surface electromyography in preoperative evaluation and postoperative monitoring of Zenker's diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Patients with Zenker's diverticulum (ZD) underwent surface electromyography (sEMG) evaluation to determine sEMG patterns specific for ZD. Group 1 comprised patients with proven long-standing ZD that refused surgical treatment (n = 11, age mean = 55.7 years). Group 2 comprised surgically operated on patients with ZD (n = 6, age mean = 61 years). The timing, amplitude, and graphic patterns of activity of the masseter, submental, and laryngeal strap muscles were examined during voluntary single water swallows ("normal"), single swallows of excessive amounts of water (20 ml, "stress test"), and continuous drinking of 100 cc of water. The muscle activity in pharyngeal and initial esophageal stages of swallowing was measured, and graphic records were evaluated in relation to timing and voltage. The data were compared with the previously established normative database. The main sEMG patterns of ZD are (1) duration of swallowing and drinking is longer than normal (p swallowing activity is higher than normal (p swallow followed by secondary swallow of the regurgitated portion of a bolus as seen at the sEMG records are specific graphic patterns for the ZD. Zenker's diverticulum has its own specific sEMG patterns. Surface EMG, being an important screening method for patients with dysphagia, is a valuable additional diagnostic tool for ZD. Because it is noninvasive and nonradiographic, it can be used for monitoring of long-standing cases of the disease as well as monitoring of postsurgical recovery.

  3. Comparison of electromyography and kinemyography during recovery from non-depolarising neuromuscular blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, P A; Freelander, N; Liang, S; Heller, G; Phillips, S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two commercially available quantitative neuromuscular function monitoring techniques, electromyography (EMG) and kinemyography (KMG), were compared with respect to repeatability and accuracy during late recovery from neuromuscular blockade. Train-of-four (TOF) ratios were recorded in 30 patients using KMG and EMG at the adductor pollicis muscle. Measurements were taken on the same hand using the Datex-Ohmeda NeuroMuscular Transmission monitor (GE Healthcare, Helsinki, Finland). Instrumental precision was evaluated using the coefficient of repeatability, while accuracy was assessed using the bias and limits of agreement. The coefficients of repeatability were similar for both techniques (0.035 for KMG and 0.043 for EMG), indicating a similar level of precision. KMG overestimated the TOF ratios measured with EMG with a bias of 0.11 (95% limits of agreement: -0.13 to 0.35). At a TOF ratio of 0.90 the bias was 0.08 (95% limits of agreement: -0.08 to 0.25). This means that at a TOF ratio of 0.90 measured with KMG will be approximately equivalent to a TOF ratio of 0.80 measured with EMG at the adductor pollicis muscle, but it may indeed be as low as 0.65 or as high as 1.00. Therefore, TOF ratios measured by KMG and EMG cannot be used interchangeably.

  4. Intramuscular pressure and electromyography as indexes of force during isokinetic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratow, M.; Ballard, R. E.; Grenshaw, A. G.; Styf, J.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    A direct method for measuring force production of specific muscles during dynamic exercise is presently unavailable. Previous studies indicate that both intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) correlate linearly with muscle contraction force during isometric exercise. The objective of this study was to compare IMP and EMG as linear assessors of muscle contraction force during dynamic exercise. IMP and surface EMG activity were recorded during concentric and eccentric isokinetic plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles of nine male volunteers. Ankle torque was measured using a dynamometer, and IMP was measured via catheterization. IMP exhibited better linear correlation than EMG with ankle joint torque during concentric contractions of the SOL and the TA, as well as during eccentric contractions. IMP provides a better index of muscle contraction force than EMG during concentric and eccentric exercise through the entire range of torque. IMP reflects intrinsic mechanical properties of individual muscles, such as length-tension relationships, which EMG is unable to assess.

  5. Recognition of handwriting from electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Linderman

    Full Text Available Handwriting--one of the most important developments in human culture--is also a methodological tool in several scientific disciplines, most importantly handwriting recognition methods, graphology and medical diagnostics. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of handwritten traces or kinematic analysis of handwriting; whereas electromyographic (EMG signals associated with handwriting have received little attention. Here we show for the first time, a method in which EMG signals generated by hand and forearm muscles during handwriting activity are reliably translated into both algorithm-generated handwriting traces and font characters using decoding algorithms. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of recreating handwriting solely from EMG signals - the finding that can be utilized in computer peripherals and myoelectric prosthetic devices. Moreover, this approach may provide a rapid and sensitive method for diagnosing a variety of neurogenerative diseases before other symptoms become clear.

  6. Electromyography normalization methods for high-velocity muscle actions: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nick; Scurr, Joanna

    2013-10-01

    Electromyograms used to assess neuromuscular demand during high-velocity tasks require normalization to aid interpretation. This paper posits that, to date, methodological approaches to normalization have been ineffective and have limited the application of electromyography (EMG). There is minimal investigation seeking alternative normalization methods, which must be corrected to improve EMG application in sports. It is recognized that differing normalization methods will prevent cross-study comparisons. Users of EMG should aim to identify normalization methods that provide good reliability and a representative measure of muscle activation. The shortcomings of current normalization methods in high-velocity muscle actions assessment are evident. Advances in assessing alternate normalization methods have been done in cycling and sprinting. It is advised that when normalizing high-intensity muscle actions, isometric methods are used with caution and a dynamic alternative, where the muscle action is similar to that of the task is preferred. It is recognized that optimal normalization methods may be muscle and task dependent.

  7. Electromyography Activation Levels of the 3 Gluteus Medius Subdivisions During Manual Strength Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otten, Roald; Tol, Johannes L; Holmich, Per

    2015-01-01

    of the individual GM subdivisions. The second aim was to evaluate differences in sEMG activation levels between the tested and contralateral (stabilizing) leg. METHOD: Twenty healthy physically active male subjects participated in this study. Muscle activity using sEMG was recorded for the GM subdivisions in 8......STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional. CONTEXT: Gluteus medius (GM) muscle dysfunction is associated with overuse injury. The GM is functionally composed of 3 separate subdivisions: anterior, middle, and posterior. Clinical assessment of the GM subdivisions is relevant to detect strength and activation...... deficits and guide specific rehabilitation programs. However, the optimal positions for assessing the strength and activation of these subdivisions are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The first aim was to establish which strength-testing positions produce the highest surface electromyography (sEMG) activation levels...

  8. Age-Related Increase in Electromyography Burst Activity in Males and Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Theou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advancement of electromyography (EMG technology facilitates measurement of muscle activity outside the laboratory during daily life. The purpose of this study was to determine whether bursts in EMG recorded over a typical 8-hour day differed between young and old males and females. Muscle activity was recorded from biceps brachii, triceps brachii, vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris of 16 young and 15 old adults using portable surface EMG. Old muscles were active 16–27% of the time compared to 5–9% in young muscles. The number of bursts was greater in old than young adults and in females compared to males. Burst percentage and mean amplitude were greater in the flexor muscles compared with the extensor muscles. The greater burst activity in old adults coupled with the unique activity patterns across muscles in males and females provides further understanding of how changes in neuromuscular activity effects age-related functional decline between the sexes.

  9. Development of a Multi-DOF Electromyography Prosthetic System Using the Adaptive Joint Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernandez Arieta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an electrically powered prosthetic system controlled by electromyography (EMG signal detected from the skin surface of the human body. The research of electrically powered prosthetic systems is divided into two main subjects. One is the design of the joint mechanism. We propose the use of an adaptive joint mechanism based on the tendon-driven architecture. This mechanism includes mechanical torque–velocity converters and a mechanism to assist the proximal joint torque by distal actuators. The other subject is the recognition of the EMG signal. For the discrimination of many patterns and nonlinear properties of the EMG signal, we propose a controller based on a simple pattern recognition information process. The system also drives 12 servomotors to move the adaptive joint mechanism. In this paper, we show the proposed system and describe the mechanical design of the prosthetic hand. The experimental results show that the electrically powered devices can be controlled using the proposed method.

  10. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed objectively by surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Objective swallowing assessment is indicated in the management of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Surface electromyography (sEMG) provides a non-invasive, objective method of quantifying muscle activity. It was hypothesised that the measurement of sEMG activity during swallowing would distinguish between preserved and disordered swallow function in DMD. This comparative study investigated the peak, duration, and relative timing of muscle activity during swallowing of four muscle groups: orbicularis oris, masseter, submental, and infrahyoid. The study included three groups of participants: Nine DMD patients with dysphagia (mean age = 21.7 ± 4.2 years), six DMD patients with preserved swallow function (21.0 ± 3.0 years), and 12 healthy controls (24.8 ± 3.1 years). Dysphagic DMD participants produced significantly higher normalised peak amplitude measurements than the healthy control group for masseter (61.77 vs. 5.07; p ≤ 0.01) and orbicularis oris muscles (71.87 vs. 26.22; p ≤ 0.05). Intrasubject variability for masseter peak amplitude was significantly greater for dysphagic DMD participants than the other groups (16.01 vs. 5.86 vs. 2.18; p ≤ 0.05). There were no differences in timing measurements between groups. Different characteristic sEMG waveforms were observed for the three groups. sEMG provides useful physiological information for the evaluation of swallowing in DMD patients, justifying further study.

  11. Baseline correction of intraoperative electromyography using discrete wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampp, Stefan; Prell, Julian; Thielemann, Henning; Posch, Stefan; Strauss, Christian; Romstöck, Johann

    2007-08-01

    In intraoperative analysis of electromygraphic signals (EMG) for monitoring purposes, baseline artefacts frequently pose considerable problems. Since artefact sources in the operating room can only be reduced to a limited degree, signal-processing methods are needed to correct the registered data online without major changes to the relevant data itself. We describe a method for baseline correction based on "discrete wavelet transform" (DWT) and evaluate its performance compared to commonly used digital filters. EMG data from 10 patients who underwent removal of acoustic neuromas were processed. Effectiveness, preservation of relevant EMG patterns and processing speed of a DWT based correction method was assessed and compared to a range of commonly used Butterworth, Resistor-Capacitor and Gaussian filters. Butterworth and DWT filters showed better performance regarding artefact correction and pattern preservation compared to Resistor-Capacitor and Gaussian filters. Assuming equal weighting of both characteristics, DWT outperformed the other methods: While Butterworth, Resistor-Capacitor and Gaussian provided good pattern preservation, the effectiveness was low and vice versa, while DWT baseline correction at level 6 performed well in both characteristics. The DWT method allows reliable and efficient intraoperative baseline correction in real-time. It is superior to commonly used methods and may be crucial for intraoperative analysis of EMG data, for example for intraoperative assessment of facial nerve function.

  12. Gender differences in experiential and facial reactivity to approval and disapproval during emotional social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggert, Nicole; Wilhelm, Frank H; Derntl, Birgit; Blechert, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Negative social evaluations represent social threats and elicit negative emotions such as anger or fear. Positive social evaluations, by contrast, may increase self-esteem and generate positive emotions such as happiness and pride. Gender differences are likely to shape both the perception and expression of positive and negative social evaluations. Yet, current knowledge is limited by a reliance on studies that used static images of individual expressers with limited external validity. Furthermore, only few studies considered gender differences on both the expresser and perceiver side. The present study approached these limitations by utilizing a naturalistic stimulus set displaying nine males and nine females (expressers) delivering social evaluative sentences to 32 female and 26 male participants (perceivers). Perceivers watched 30 positive, 30 negative, and 30 neutral messages while facial electromyography (EMG) was continuously recorded and subjective ratings were obtained. Results indicated that men expressing positive evaluations elicited stronger EMG responses in both perceiver genders. Arousal was rated higher when positive evaluations were expressed by the opposite gender. Thus, gender differences need to be more explicitly considered in research of social cognition and affective science using naturalistic social stimuli.

  13. Gender differences in experiential and facial reactivity to approval and disapproval during emotional social interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eWiggert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Negative social evaluations represent social threats and elicit negative emotions such as anger or fear. Positive social evaluations, by contrast, may increase self-esteem and generate positive emotions such as happiness and pride. Gender differences are likely to shape both the perception and expression of positive and negative social evaluations. Yet, current knowledge is limited by a reliance on studies that used static images of individual expressers with limited external validity. Furthermore, only few studies considered gender differences on both the expresser and perceiver side. The present study approached these limitations by utilizing a naturalistic stimulus set displaying 9 males and 9 females (expressers delivering social evaluative sentences to 32 female and 26 male participants (perceivers. Perceivers watched 30 positive, 30 negative, and 30 neutral messages while facial electromyography (EMG was continuously recorded and subjective ratings were obtained. Results indicated that men expressing positive evaluations elicited stronger EMG responses in both perceiver genders. Arousal was rated higher when positive evaluations were expressed by the opposite gender. Thus, gender differences need to be more explicitly considered in research of social cognition and affective science using naturalistic social stimuli.

  14. Improvements on EMG-based handwriting recognition with DTW algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengzhang; Ma, Zheren; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Dingguo

    2013-01-01

    Previous works have shown that Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) algorithm is a proper method of feature extraction for electromyography (EMG)-based handwriting recognition. In this paper, several modifications are proposed to improve the classification process and enhance recognition accuracy. A two-phase template making approach has been introduced to generate templates with more salient features, and modified Mahalanobis Distance (mMD) approach is used to replace Euclidean Distance (ED) in order to minimize the interclass variance. To validate the effectiveness of such modifications, experiments were conducted, in which four subjects wrote lowercase letters at a normal speed and four-channel EMG signals from forearms were recorded. Results of offline analysis show that the improvements increased the average recognition accuracy by 9.20%.

  15. Muscular fatigue detection using sEMG in dynamic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Diana R; Lizano, J M; Montano, L

    2015-08-01

    In this work we have studied different indicators of muscle fatigue from the electrical signal produced by the muscles when contract (sEMG or EMG: surface electromyography): Mean Frequency of the power spectrum (MNF), Median Frequency (Fmed), Dimitrov Spectral Index (FInsm5), Root Mean Square (RMS), and Zerocrossing (ZC). The most reliable features are selected to develop a detection algorithm that estimates muscle fatigue. The approach used in the algorithm is probabilistic and is based on the technique of Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). The system is divided into two stages: training and validation. During training, the algorithm learns the distribution of data regarding fatigue evolution; after that, the algorithm is validated with data that have not been used to train. Therefore, two experimental sessions have been performed with 6 healthy subjects for biceps.

  16. An implementation of movement classification for prosthesis control using custom-made EMG system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejić Luka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromyography (EMG is a well known technique used for recording electrical activity produced by human muscles. In the last few decades, EMG signals are used as a control input for prosthetic hands. There are several multifunctional myoelectric prosthetic hands for amputees on the market, but so forth, none of these devices permits the natural control of more than two degrees of freedom. In this paper we present our implementation of the pattern classification using custom made components (electrodes and an embedded EMG amplifier. The components were evaluated in offline and online tests, in able bodied as well as amputee subjects. This type of control is based on computing the time domain features of the EMG signals recorded from the forearm and using these features as input for a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA classifier estimating the intention of the prosthetic user. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III - 41007

  17. The Application of sEMG in Aging: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Rosso, Valeri; Pizzigalli, Luisa; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this mini-review is to describe the potential application of surface electromyography (sEMG) techniques in aging studies. Aging is characterized by multiple changes of the musculoskeletal system physiology and function. This paper will examine some of the innovative methods used to monitor age-related alterations of the neuromuscular system from sEMG signals. A description of critical assumptions which underlie some of these approaches is emphasized. The first part focuses on the evolution of the recording techniques and describes some methodological issues. The second part focuses on how to use the following techniques to characterize aging: amplitude and spectral sEMG signal analysis, muscle fiber conduction velocity estimation, and myoelectric fatigue assessment. The last part describes a number of advanced sEMG approaches which seem promising in the geriatric population to estimate motor unit number, size, recruitment thresholds, and firing rates.

  18. An adaptation strategy of using LDA classifier for EMG pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoshi; Zhao, Yaonan; Yao, Fuan; Xu, Lisheng; Shang, Peng; Li, Guanglin

    2013-01-01

    The time-varying character of myoelectric signal usually causes a low classification accuracy in traditional supervised pattern recognition method. In this work, an unsupervised adaptation strategy of linear discriminant analysis (ALDA) based on probability weighting and cycle substitution was suggested in order to improve the performance of electromyography (EMG)-based motion classification in multifunctional myoelectric prostheses control in changing environment. The adaptation procedure was firstly introduced, and then the proposed ALDA classifier was trained and tested with surface EMG recordings related to multiple motion patterns. The accuracies of the ALDA classifier and traditional LDA classifier were compared when the EMG recordings were added with different degrees of noise. The experimental results showed that compared to the LDA method, the suggested ALDA method had a better performance in improving the classification accuracy of sEMG pattern recognition, in both stable situation and noise added situation.

  19. Knee joint angle affects EMG-force relationship in the vastus intermedius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    It is not understood how the knee joint angle affects the relationship between electromyography (EMG) and force of four individual quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the knee joint angle on the EMG-force relationship of the four individual QF muscles, particularly the vastus intermedius (VI), during isometric knee extensions. Eleven healthy men performed 20-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at knee joint angles of 90°, 120° and 150°. Surface EMG of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized by the root mean square during MVC. The normalized EMG of the four QF synergists at a knee joint angle of 150° was significantly lower than that at 90° and 120° (P knee joint angle of 150°. Furthermore, the neuromuscular activation of the VI was the most sensitive to change in muscle length among the four QF synergistic muscles.

  20. Motor unit properties of biceps brachii in chronic stroke patients assessed with high-density surface EMG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, L.A.C.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate motor unit (MU) characteristics of the biceps brachii in post-stroke patients, using high-density surface electromyography (sEMG). Eighteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients took part. The Fugl-Meyer score for the upper extremity was assessed. Subjects

  1. Distinction between computer workers with and without work-related neck-shoulder complaints based on multiple surface EMG parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Laura A.C.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to distinguish between computer workers with (cases) and without (controls) work-related neck–shoulder complaints by combining multiple surface electromyography (EMG) parameters in a logistic regression model. Fourteen controls and 13 c

  2. EMG Processing Based Measures of Fatigue Assessment during Manual Lifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual lifting is one of the common practices used in the industries to transport or move objects to a desired place. Nowadays, even though mechanized equipment is widely available, manual lifting is still considered as an essential way to perform material handling task. Improper lifting strategies may contribute to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs, where overexertion contributes as the highest factor. To overcome this problem, electromyography (EMG signal is used to monitor the workers’ muscle condition and to find maximum lifting load, lifting height and number of repetitions that the workers are able to handle before experiencing fatigue to avoid overexertion. Past researchers have introduced several EMG processing techniques and different EMG features that represent fatigue indices in time, frequency, and time-frequency domain. The impact of EMG processing based measures in fatigue assessment during manual lifting are reviewed in this paper. It is believed that this paper will greatly benefit researchers who need a bird’s eye view of the biosignal processing which are currently available, thus determining the best possible techniques for lifting applications.

  3. EMG Processing Based Measures of Fatigue Assessment during Manual Lifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhaban, M. H.; Abdullah, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Manual lifting is one of the common practices used in the industries to transport or move objects to a desired place. Nowadays, even though mechanized equipment is widely available, manual lifting is still considered as an essential way to perform material handling task. Improper lifting strategies may contribute to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), where overexertion contributes as the highest factor. To overcome this problem, electromyography (EMG) signal is used to monitor the workers' muscle condition and to find maximum lifting load, lifting height and number of repetitions that the workers are able to handle before experiencing fatigue to avoid overexertion. Past researchers have introduced several EMG processing techniques and different EMG features that represent fatigue indices in time, frequency, and time-frequency domain. The impact of EMG processing based measures in fatigue assessment during manual lifting are reviewed in this paper. It is believed that this paper will greatly benefit researchers who need a bird's eye view of the biosignal processing which are currently available, thus determining the best possible techniques for lifting applications. PMID:28303251

  4. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew David; Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises.

  5. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew David Vigotsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises.

  6. Filter banks and the "Intensity Analysis" of EMG

    CERN Document Server

    Borg, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Vinzenz von Tscharner (2000) has presented an interesting mathematical method for analyzing EMG-data called "intensity analysis" (EMG = electromyography). Basically the method is a sort of bandpassing of the signal. The central idea of the method is to describe the "power" (or "intensity") of a non-stationary EMG signal as a function both of time and of frequency. The connection with wavelet theory is that the filter is constructed by rescaling a given mother wavelet using a special array of scales (center frequencies) with non-constant relative bandwidth. Some aspects of the method may seem a bit ad hoc and we have therefore undertaken a closer mathematical investigation, showing the connection with the conventional wavelet analysis and giving a somewhat simplified formulation of the method using Morlet wavelets. It is pointed out that the "intensity analysis" method is related to the concept of an equalizer. In order to illustrate the method we apply it to nonstationary EMG-signals of a dynamic leg-extensio...

  7. Development of new muscle contraction sensor to replace sEMG for using in muscles analysis fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Matsuoka, Y; Kong, W; Imtiaz, U; Bartolomeo, L; Cosentino, S; Zecca, M; Sessa, S; Ishii, H; Takanishi, A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the technologies for detecting, processing and interpreting bioelectrical signals have improved tremendously. In particular, surface electromyography (sEMG) has gained momentum in a wide range of applications in various fields. However, sEMG sensing has several shortcomings, the most important being: measurements are heavily sensible to individual differences, sensors are difficult to position and very expensive. In this paper, the authors will present an innovative muscle contraction sensing device (MC sensor), aiming to replace sEMG sensing in the field of muscle movement analysis. Compared with sEMG, this sensor is easier to position, setup and use, less dependent from individual differences, and less expensive. Preliminary experiments, described in this paper, confirm that MC sensing is suitable for muscle contraction analysis, and compare the results of sEMG and MC sensor for the measurement of forearm muscle contraction.

  8. [Comparison of swallowing surface electromyography in globus patients and healthy adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Jinrang

    2015-02-01

    To study the surface electromyography (sEMG) changes of globus patients during swallowing and to discuss the cause of the globus. The sEMG during swallowing was recorded in 126 healthy volunteers (control group) and 34 globus patients (globus group).Swallow included dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow. The durations and amplitudes of muscle activities during every swallow were recorded. The durations and amplitudes of the sEMG in two groups were compared using t test. The durations of sEMG at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow were (1.128 ± 0.191)s and (1.091 ± 0.208)s, while the amplitudes were (0.313 ± 0.110) mV and (0.286 ± 0.106) mV in control group. The durations of sEMG at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow were (1.178 ± 0.252)s and (1.127 ± 0.178)s, while the amplitudes were (0.341 ± 0.116) mV and (0.316 ± 0.094) mV in globus group. There were no significant differences between globus patients and healthy volunteers in the durations and amplitudes of sEMG at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow (P > 0.05).Furthermore, there were also no significant differences in the durations and amplitudes of the sEMG between the two groups in the same gender (P > 0.05). The results of swallowing sEMG suggested that the swallowing function in globus patients has not been damaged and psychological intervention should be considered in the treatment.

  9. Analysis of statistical and standard algorithms for detecting muscle onset with surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Matthew S; Tweedell, Andrew J; Haynes, Courtney A

    2017-01-01

    The timing of muscle activity is a commonly applied analytic method to understand how the nervous system controls movement. This study systematically evaluates six classes of standard and statistical algorithms to determine muscle onset in both experimental surface electromyography (EMG) and simulated EMG with a known onset time. Eighteen participants had EMG collected from the biceps brachii and vastus lateralis while performing a biceps curl or knee extension, respectively. Three established methods and three statistical methods for EMG onset were evaluated. Linear envelope, Teager-Kaiser energy operator + linear envelope and sample entropy were the established methods evaluated while general time series mean/variance, sequential and batch processing of parametric and nonparametric tools, and Bayesian changepoint analysis were the statistical techniques used. Visual EMG onset (experimental data) and objective EMG onset (simulated data) were compared with algorithmic EMG onset via root mean square error and linear regression models for stepwise elimination of inferior algorithms. The top algorithms for both data types were analyzed for their mean agreement with the gold standard onset and evaluation of 95% confidence intervals. The top algorithms were all Bayesian changepoint analysis iterations where the parameter of the prior (p0) was zero. The best performing Bayesian algorithms were p0 = 0 and a posterior probability for onset determination at 60-90%. While existing algorithms performed reasonably, the Bayesian changepoint analysis methodology provides greater reliability and accuracy when determining the singular onset of EMG activity in a time series. Further research is needed to determine if this class of algorithms perform equally well when the time series has multiple bursts of muscle activity.

  10. Chaotic analysis of electromyography signal at low back and lower limb muscles during forward bending posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swie, Y W; Sakamoto, K; Shimizu, Y

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to perform further investigation on muscular activity during forward bending posture by applying a nonlinear dynamic (chaotic) analysis method. The objective is to determine the characteristics of the low back and lower limb muscle electromyography (EMG) signal under chaotic analysis while maintaining a certain posture. Twelve subjects were asked to maintain postures of six stages in bending angles from 0 to 180 degrees, and the EMG signals of erector spinae (ES) at L1 and L5 levels, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius were recorded. Two important concepts to characterize deterministic chaos, Correlation Dimension (D2) and Lyapunov Exponents (lambda, LE), were applied to observe the chaotic characteristic of the EMG signals, and the results were also compared to the FFT based total power value. The EMG signals in all observed muscles during bending posture showed results of positive LE and high D2 at 5.5 to 7.5, which led us to classify EMG as a high dimension chaotic signal. The result obtained showed that the correlation dimension could be used as a reliable method to compare the EMG signal in various postures (or muscle contraction conditions). However, Lyapunov exponents did not show a significant difference of comparison result thus leading to the conclusion that LE could not be a reliable measure for high dimension chaotic system, such as an EMG signal. It was also shown that in both light and deep bending, the EMG signal of the low back muscles was of the same complexity level due to the D2 result. It was evident that somehow the low back muscle remained loaded in all bending stages which was contrary to the hypothesis that the low back muscle was less active during the deep bending, as was the case in most of the previous studies. The reason of such phenomenon was elucidated with use of the theory of muscular functional differentiation, including corticalization and spinalization.

  11. Limitations of surface EMG signals of extrinsic muscles in predicting postures of human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinjamuri, Ramana; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert; Sun, Mingui

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the limitations of sEMG (surface Electromyography) signals collected from the extrinsic muscles in the forearm in predicting the postures of human hand. Four subjects were asked to try ten extreme postures of hand which need high effort. Two of these four subjects were asked to try ten more normal postures which did not need effort During the experiments, muscle activity and static postures of the hand were measured. The data obtained were analyzed by principal component analysis. The results obtained revealed the limitations of sEMG signals of extrinsic muscles in reproducing the postures of the hand.

  12. Classifying sEMG-based Hand Movements by Means of Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Isaković

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve surface electromyography (sEMG based control of hand prosthesis, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA for feature extraction. The sEMG data from a group of healthy subjects (downloaded from free Ninapro database comprised the following sets: three grasping, eight wrist, and eleven finger movements. We tested the accuracy of a simple quadratic classifier for two sets of features derived from PCA. Preliminary results suggest that the first two principal components do not guarantee successful hand movement classification. The hand movement classification accuracy significantly increased with using three instead of two features, in all three sets of movements and throughout all subjects.

  13. Classification of finger extension and flexion of EMG and Cyberglove data with modified ICA weight matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ganesh R; Acharyya, Amit; Nguyen, Hung T

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the classification of finger flexion and extension of surface Electromyography (EMG) and Cyberglove data using the modified Independent Component Analysis (ICA) weight matrix. The finger flexion and extension data are processed through Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and next separated using modified ICA for each individual with customized weight matrix. The extension and flexion features of sEMG and Cyberglove (extracted from modified ICA) were classified using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) with near 90% classification accuracy. The applications of this study include Human Computer Interface (HCI), virtual reality and neural prosthetics.

  14. The Efficacy of Two Treatment Techniques for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy as Measured by Electromyography and Thermal Information. [Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, David Michael

    Two techniques to normalize muscle tone were evaluated with nine infants and young children with cerebral palsy who were enrolled in the Rural Infant Stimulation Environment (RISE) Program, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Electromyography (EMG) and skin temperature data were used to assess the effects of trunk rotation and slow rolling on a ball. EMG…

  15. A simple test of muscle coactivation estimation using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.F. Ervilha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In numerous motor tasks, muscles around a joint act coactively to generate opposite torques. A variety of indexes based on electromyography signals have been presented in the literature to quantify muscle coactivation. However, it is not known how to estimate it reliably using such indexes. The goal of this study was to test the reliability of the estimation of muscle coactivation using electromyography. Isometric coactivation was obtained at various muscle activation levels. For this task, any coactivation measurement/index should present the maximal score (100% of coactivation. Two coactivation indexes were applied. In the first, the antagonistic muscle activity (the lower electromyographic signal between two muscles that generate opposite joint torques is divided by the mean between the agonistic and antagonistic muscle activations. In the second, the ratio between antagonistic and agonistic muscle activation is calculated. Moreover, we computed these indexes considering different electromyographic amplitude normalization procedures. It was found that the first algorithm, with all signals normalized by their respective maximal voluntary coactivation, generates the index closest to the true value (100%, reaching 92 ± 6%. In contrast, the coactivation index value was 82 ± 12% when the second algorithm was applied and the electromyographic signal was not normalized (P < 0.04. The new finding of the present study is that muscle coactivation is more reliably estimated if the EMG signals are normalized by their respective maximal voluntary contraction obtained during maximal coactivation prior to dividing the antagonistic muscle activity by the mean between the agonistic and antagonistic muscle activations.

  16. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  17. EMG-force relation in the first dorsal interosseous muscle of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanmiri-Nezhad, Faezeh; Hu, Xiaogang; Suresh, Nina L; Rymer, William Z; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between surface electromyography (EMG) and muscle force is essential to assess muscle function and its deficits. However, few studies have explored the EMG-force relation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The purpose of this study was to examine the EMG-force relation in ALS subjects and its alteration in comparison with healthy control subjects. Surface EMG and force signals were recorded while 10 ALS and 10 age-matched healthy control subjects produced isometric voluntary contractions in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle over the full range of activation. A linear fit of the EMG-force relation was evaluated through the normalized root mean square error (RMSE) between the experimental and predicted EMG amplitudes. The EMG-force relation was compared between the ALS and the healthy control subjects. With a linear fit, the normalized RMSE between the experimental and predicted EMG amplitudes was 9.6 ± 3.6% for the healthy control subjects and 12.3 ± 8.0% for the ALS subjects. The slope of the linear fit was 2.9 ± 2.2 μVN-1 for the ALS subjects and was significantly shallower (p force, the slope for the remaining ALS subjects was 3.5 ± 2.2 μVN-1 and was not significantly different from the control subjects (p > 0.05). A linear fit can be used to well describe the EMG-force relation for the FDI muscle of both ALS and healthy control subjects. A variety of processes may work together in ALS that can adversely affect the EMG-force relation.

  18. Electromyography in the four competitive swimming strokes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonas; Figueiredo, Pedro; Daly, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview on 50 years of research in electromyography in the four competitive swimming strokes (crawl, breaststroke, butterfly, and backstroke). A systematic search of the existing literature was conducted using the combined keywords "swimming" and "EMG" on studies published before August 2013, in the electronic databases PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SPORT discus, Academic Search Elite, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane Library. The quality of each publication was assessed by two independent reviewers using a custom made checklist. Frequency of topics, muscles studied, swimming activities, populations, types of equipment and data treatment were determined from all selected papers and, when possible, results were compared and contrasted. In the first 20 years of EMG studies in swimming, most papers were published as congress proceedings. The methodological quality was low. Crawl stroke was most often studied. There was no standardized manner of defining swimming phases, normalizing the data or of presenting the results. Furthermore, the variability around the mean muscle activation patterns is large which makes it difficult to define a single pattern applicable to all swimmers in any activity examined.

  19. Surface electromyography as a screening method for evaluation of dysphagia and odynophagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2009-02-20

    Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. The article analyzes various instrumental methods of dysphagia assessment, introduces surface electromyography (sEMG) to carry out rapid assessment of such patients, and debates proposed suggestions for sEMG screening protocol in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Subject related books and articles from 1813 to 2007 were obtained through library search, MEDLINE (1949-2007) and EMBASE (1975-2007). Specifics steps for establishing the protocol for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles), the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water) are presented in detail. SEMG is compared with other techniques in terms of cost, timing, involvement of radiation, etc. According to the published data, SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, time-saving and inexpensive to perform. The major weakness of the method seems to be inability for precise diagnostic of neurologically induced dysphagia. With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG might serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management but cannot serve for proper investigation of neurogenic dysphagia.

  20. Correlation of Electromyography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Diagnosis of Suspected Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız Arslan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with pain or numbness without motor deficits are the most common group referred to electrophysiology laboratories as suspected radiculopathy. We wanted to investigate whether electromyography (EMG was useful for this group in the diagnosis or therapy of radiculopathy. Our aim was to investigate the correlation and classification of EMG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in the diagnosis of suspected radiculopathy. METHODS: We included 74 patients with a ≥2-month history of numbness and pain in the neck and back that radiated into the arm or leg. Patients with diabetes mellitus, previous disc or spine operation, polyneuropathy, spinal cord diseases (tumor, infection or syrinxs, motor deficits, and abnormal nerve conduction studies were excluded. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 51.58±11.53 years. In total, 41 (55.4% patients were women and 33 (44.6% were men; 48.8% (n=36 showed cervical radiculopathy and 51.2% (n=38 exhibited lumbosacral radiculopathy. The most common MRI finding was protrusion (37.8%, and the most common EMG finding was re-innervation (59.5%. The correlation of MRI and EMG findings was significant in lumbar radiculopathy (p=0.007, but not in the cervical radiculopathy results (p=0.976. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: EMG and MRI findings were compatible for lumbar radiculopathy, but not for cervical radiculopathy in mild to moderate grades.

  1. Multi-channel electromyography pattern classification using deep belief networks for enhanced user experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIM Hyeon-min; LEE Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced algorithm is proposed to recognize multi-channel electromyography (EMG) patterns using deep belief networks (DBNs). It is difficult to classify the EMG features because an EMG signal has nonlinear and time-varying characteristics. Therefore, in several previous studies, various machine-learning methods have been applied. A DBN is a fast, greedy learning algorithm that can find a fairly good set of weights rapidly, even in deep networks with a large number of parameters and many hidden layers. To evaluate this model, we acquired EMG signals, extracted their features, and then compared the model with the DBN and other conventional classifiers. The accuracy of the DBN is higher than that of the other algorithms. The classification performance of the DBN model designed is approximately 88.60%. It is 7.55% (p=9.82×10-12) higher than linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and 2.89% (p=1.94×10-5) higher than support vector machine (SVM). Further, the DBN is better than shallow learning algorithms or back propagation (BP), and this model is effective for an EMG-based user-interfaced system.

  2. Accuracy of the surface electromyography RMS processing for the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Kelly Cristina dos Santos; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Pires, Paulo Fernandes; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-08-01

    Due to the multifactor etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), the precise diagnosis remains a matter of debate and validated diagnostic tools are needed. The aim was to determine the accuracy of surface electromyography (sEMG) activity, assessed in the amplitude domain by the root mean square (RMS), in the diagnosis of TMD. One hundred twenty-three volunteers were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and distributed into two groups: women with myogenous TMD (n=80) and women without TMD (n=43). The volunteers were then submitted to sEMG evaluation of the anterior temporalis, masseter and suprahyoid muscles at rest and during maximum voluntary teeth clenching (MVC) on parafilm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the muscle activity were analyzed. Differences between groups were found in all muscles analyzed at rest as well as in the masseter and suprahyoid muscles during MVC on parafilm. Moderate accuracy (AUC: 0.74-0.84) of the RMS sEMG was found in all muscles regarding the diagnosis of TMD at rest and in the suprahyoid muscles during MVC on parafilm. Moreover, sensitivity ranging from 71.3% to 80% and specificity from 60.5% to 76.6%. In contrast, RMS sEMG did not exhibit acceptable degrees of accuracy in the other masticatory muscles during MVC on parafilm. It was concluded that the RMS sEMG is a complementary tool for clinical diagnosis of the myogenous TMD.

  3. Pseudomyopathic Changes in Needle Electromyography in Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Komatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS is a rare presynaptic disorder of the neuromuscular junction in association with cancer and subsequently in cases in which no neoplasm has been detected (O’Neill et al., 1988. The diagnosis of LEMS is based on the combination of fluctuating muscle weakness, diminished or absent reflexes, and a more than 60% increment of compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude after brief exercise or 50 Hz stimulation for 1 s in a repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS test (Oh et al., 2005. On the other hand, needle electromyography (EMG findings related to LEMS have not been well described. Here, we report a case of LEMS, which showed apparent myopathic changes in needle EMG findings. Furthermore, we retrospectively examined the needle EMG findings in 8 patients with LEMS. In six of the 8 patients, the EMG findings showed myopathy-like findings. Although the findings of needle EMG indicated myopathic changes at a glance, the motor unit potential (MUP returned to normal after a sustained strong muscle contraction. We propose the name “pseudomyopathic changes” for this phenomenon.

  4. Three-way analysis of spectrospatial electromyography data: classification and interpretation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka-Pekka Kauppi

    Full Text Available Classifying multivariate electromyography (EMG data is an important problem in prosthesis control as well as in neurophysiological studies and diagnosis. With modern high-density EMG sensor technology, it is possible to capture the rich spectrospatial structure of the myoelectric activity. We hypothesize that multi-way machine learning methods can efficiently utilize this structure in classification as well as reveal interesting patterns in it. To this end, we investigate the suitability of existing three-way classification methods to EMG-based hand movement classification in spectrospatial domain, as well as extend these methods by sparsification and regularization. We propose to use Fourier-domain independent component analysis as preprocessing to improve classification and interpretability of the results. In high-density EMG experiments on hand movements across 10 subjects, three-way classification yielded higher average performance compared with state-of-the art classification based on temporal features, suggesting that the three-way analysis approach can efficiently utilize detailed spectrospatial information of high-density EMG. Phase and amplitude patterns of features selected by the classifier in finger-movement data were found to be consistent with known physiology. Thus, our approach can accurately resolve hand and finger movements on the basis of detailed spectrospatial information, and at the same time allows for physiological interpretation of the results.

  5. Sub-vocal speech pattern recognition of Hindi alphabet with surface electromyography signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munna Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently electromyography (EMG based speech signals have been used as pattern recognition of phoneme, vocal frequency estimation, browser interface, and classification of speech related problem identification. Attempts have been made to use EMG signal for sub-vocal speech pattern recognition of Hindi phonemes fx1,fx2,fx3,fx4 and Hindi words. That provides the command sub-vocally to control the devices. Sub-vocal EMG data were collected from more than 10 healthy subjects aged between 25 and 30 years. EMG-based sub-vocal database are acquired from four channel BIOPAC MP-30 acquisition system. Four pairs of Ag-AgCl electrodes placed in the participant neck area of skin. AR coefficients and Cepstral coefficients were computed as features of EMG-based sub-vocal signal. Furthermore, these features are classified by HMM classifier. H2M MATLAB toolbox was used to develop HMM classifier for classification of phonemes. Results were averaged on 10 subjects. An average classification accuracy of Ka is found to be 85% whereas the classification accuracy of Kha and Gha is in between 88% and 90%. The classification accuracy rate of Ga was found to be 78% which was lesser as compared to Kha and Gha.

  6. Three-way analysis of spectrospatial electromyography data: classification and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Hahne, Janne; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Hyvärinen, Aapo

    2015-01-01

    Classifying multivariate electromyography (EMG) data is an important problem in prosthesis control as well as in neurophysiological studies and diagnosis. With modern high-density EMG sensor technology, it is possible to capture the rich spectrospatial structure of the myoelectric activity. We hypothesize that multi-way machine learning methods can efficiently utilize this structure in classification as well as reveal interesting patterns in it. To this end, we investigate the suitability of existing three-way classification methods to EMG-based hand movement classification in spectrospatial domain, as well as extend these methods by sparsification and regularization. We propose to use Fourier-domain independent component analysis as preprocessing to improve classification and interpretability of the results. In high-density EMG experiments on hand movements across 10 subjects, three-way classification yielded higher average performance compared with state-of-the art classification based on temporal features, suggesting that the three-way analysis approach can efficiently utilize detailed spectrospatial information of high-density EMG. Phase and amplitude patterns of features selected by the classifier in finger-movement data were found to be consistent with known physiology. Thus, our approach can accurately resolve hand and finger movements on the basis of detailed spectrospatial information, and at the same time allows for physiological interpretation of the results.

  7. Electromyographic and ultrasonographic evaluation of the masseter muscle individuals with unilateral peripheral facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Individuals with peripheral Facial Paralysis (FP show conditions that lead to unilateral mastication, performed by the non-affected side, mainly due to the difficulty of action of the buccinator muscle. Objectives: characterize the motor control and morphology of the masseter muscle in individuals with unilateral peripheral FP through electromyographic and ultrasonographic evaluation. Method: 16 participants, of both sexes, with ages superior to 18 years old. The study group (SG consisted of 8 individuals who'd had idiopathic unilateral peripheral FP for more than 6 months; the control group (CG consisted of 8 normal individuals. All the subjects were submitted to the masseter muscle evaluation through surface electromyography (sEMG and ultrasonography (USG during the following tasks: rest, clenching with cotton roller between the teeth (CT and clenching with maximum intercuspation (MIC. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in comparisons within and between the groups concerning the hemifacial asymmetry, both for the sEMG and for the USG. Also there were no significant differences in the activation of the masticatory muscles (masseter and temporal in the sEMG. Conclusions: Both the motor control and the morphology of the masseter muscles in individuals with unilateral peripheral FP were similar to those of normal individuals. Although literature suggests that the demand of functional adaptations made by FP individuals could exceed the structural and functional tolerance of the temporomandibular joints, the results indicate that the length of analyzed patient's FP was not enough to generate anatomical and physiological differences in the masticatory muscles.

  8. A Multi-Modal Approach for Hand Motion Classification Using Surface EMG and Accelerometers

    OpenAIRE

    Fougner, Anders Lyngvi; Scheme, Erik; Chan, Adrian D. C.; Englehart, Kevin; Stavdahl, Øyvind

    2011-01-01

    For decades, electromyography (EMG) has been used for diagnostics, upper-limb prosthesis control, and recently even for more general human-machine interfaces. Current commercial upper limb prostheses usually have only two electrode sites due to cost and space limitations, while researchers often experiment with multiple sites. Micro-machined inertial sensors are gaining popularity in many commercial and research applications where knowledge of the postures and movements of the body is desired...

  9. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy Narender P; Shrirao Nikhil A; Kosuri Durga R

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In virtual reality (VR) systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG togeth...

  10. Estudi de la señal de EMG pel tratactament de la incontinència urinària

    OpenAIRE

    Benasques Borau, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This project is focused on the analysis of the Electromyographic signal (EMG) of the pelvic floor muscles during the realization of physical exercises oriented to increase the strength of the muscles. These exercises are oriented to reduce urinary incontinence in adult women. Studying records of electromyography (EMG) under conditions similar to a randomized clinical trial. With the records obtained, it is expected to study where is the best location of the electrodes in the abdomen to det...

  11. Investigating Facial Electromyography as an Indicator of Cognitive Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Conference Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2015 – November 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House...UNIT NUMBER H0DC (53273027) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education...Belcamp, MD 2 Middendorf Scientific Services – Medway, Ohio 45341 3 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education – Belcamp, MD 4 Ball Aerospace

  12. Computing emotion awareness through galvanic skin response and facial electromyography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; van den Broek, Egon; Schut, Marleen H.; van Herk, Jan; Tuinenbreijer, Kees; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Ouwerkerk, Martin; Overbeek, Thérése; Pasveer, W. Frank; de Ruyter, Boris

    2008-01-01

    To improve human-computer interaction (HCI), computers need to recognize and respond properly to their user’s emotional state. This is a fundamental application of affective computing, which relates to, arises from, or deliberately influences emotion. As a first step to a system that recognizes

  13. Electromyography and Mechanomyography Signals During Swallowing in Healthy Adults and Head and Neck Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Hodgetts, William; Scott, Dylan; Kuffel, Kristina; King, Ben; Brodt, Chris; Rieger, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to dysphagia therapy to demonstrate the activity of submental muscles during swallowing exercises. Mechanomyography (MMG) has been suggested as a potential superior alternative to sEMG; however, this advantage is not confirmed for signal acquired from submental muscles. This study compared the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained from sEMG and MMG sensors during swallowing tasks, in healthy participants and those with a history of head and neck cancer (HNC), a population with altered anatomy and a high incidence of dysphagia. Twenty-two healthy adults and 10 adults with a history of HNC participated in this study. sEMG and MMG signals were acquired during dry, thin liquid, effortful, and Mendelsohn maneuver swallows. SNR was compared between the two sensors using repeated measures ANOVAs and subsequent planned pairwise comparisons. Test-retest measures were collected on 20 % of participants. In healthy participants, MMG SNR was higher than that of sEMG for dry [t(21) = -3.02, p = 0.007] and thin liquid swallows [t(21) = -4.24, p sEMG also showed much better test-retest reliability than MMG. Biofeedback provided as an adjuvant to dysphagia therapy in patients with HNC should employ sEMG technology, as this sensor type yielded better SNR and overall test-retest reliability. Poor MMG test-retest reliability was noted in both healthy and HNC participants and may have been related to differences in sensor application.

  14. Skeletal Class II correction and neuromuscular adaptation with twin-block: A cephalometric and electromyography study in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Kumar; Tulika Tripathi; Maninder Singh Sidhu; Puneet Yadav; Ashish Dabas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is believed that significant changes in electromyography (EMG) activity are observed at the end of the treatment, which are concomitant with a clinical improvement seen in sagittal jaw relationship during skeletal Class II correction by functional appliances. It is thought that similar interaction occurs between bone shape and muscle activity in the maxillofacial complex this study aims at evaluating the effects of twin-block on correction of skeletal Class II by lateral ceph...

  15. Neck Muscle EMG-Force Relationship and Its Reliability During Isometric Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Martire, Riccardo; Gladh, Kristofer; Westman, Anton; Äng, Björn O

    2017-12-01

    Susceptible to injury, the neck is subject to scientific investigations, frequently aiming to elucidate possible injury mechanisms via surface electromyography (EMG) by indirectly estimating cervical loads. Accurate estimation requires that the EMG-force relationship is known and that its measurement error is quantified. Hence, this study examined the relationship between EMG and isometric force amplitude of the anterior neck (AN), the upper posterior neck (UPN), and the lower posterior neck (LPN) and then assessed the relationships' test-retest reliability across force-percentiles within and between days. EMG and force data were sampled from 18 participants conducting randomly ordered muscle contractions at 5-90% of maximal voluntary force during three trials over 2 days. EMG-force relationships were modeled with general linear mixed-effects regression. Overall fitted lines' between-trial discrepancies were evaluated. Finally, the reliability of participants' fitted regression lines was quantified by an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the standard error of measurement (SEM). A rectilinear model had the best fit for AN while positively oriented quadratic models had the best fit for UPN and LPN, with mean adjusted conditional coefficients of determination and root mean square errors of 0.97-0.98 and 4-5%, respectively. Overall EMG-force relationships displayed a maximum 6% between-trial discrepancy and over 20% of maximal force, and mean ICC was above 0.79 within day and 0.27-0.61 between days across areas. Corresponding SEM was below 12% both within and between days across areas, excluding UPN between days, for which SEM was higher. EMG-force relationships were elucidated for three neck areas, and provided models allow inferences to be drawn from EMG to force on a group level. Reliability of EMG-force relationship models was higher within than between days, but typically acceptable for all but the lowest contraction intensities, and enables adjustment

  16. Masticatory Muscle Sleep Background EMG Activity is Elevated in Myofascial TMD Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Karen G.; Janal, Malvin N.; Sirois, David A.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Wigren, Pia E.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite theoretical speculation and strong clinical belief, recent research using laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording has provided new evidence that frequency of sleep bruxism (SB) masseter muscle events, including grinding or clenching of the teeth during sleep, is not increased for women with chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The current case-control study compares a large sample of women suffering from chronic myofascial TMD (n=124) with a demographically matched control group without TMD (n=46) on sleep background electromyography (EMG) during a laboratory PSG study. Background EMG activity was measured as EMG root mean square (RMS) from the right masseter muscle after lights out. Sleep background EMG activity was defined as EMG RMS remaining after activity attributable to SB, other orofacial activity, other oromotor activity and movement artifacts were removed. Results indicated that median background EMG during these non SB-event periods was significantly higher (p<.01) for women with myofascial TMD (median=3.31 μV and mean=4.98 μV) than for control women (median=2.83 μV and mean=3.88 μV) with median activity in 72% of cases exceeding control activity. Moreover, for TMD cases, background EMG was positively associated and SB event-related EMG was negatively associated with pain intensity ratings (0–10 numerical scale) on post sleep waking. These data provide the foundation for a new focus on small, but persistent, elevations in sleep EMG activity over the course of the night as a mechanism of pain induction or maintenance. PMID:24237356

  17. An EMG-Controlled Robotic Hand Exoskeleton for Bilateral Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, Daniele; Barsotti, Michele; Loconsole, Claudio; Solazzi, Massimiliano; Troncossi, Marco; Mazzotti, Claudio; Castelli, Vincenzo Parenti; Procopio, Caterina; Lamola, Giuseppe; Chisari, Carmelo; Bergamasco, Massimo; Frisoli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel electromyography (EMG)-driven hand exoskeleton for bilateral rehabilitation of grasping in stroke. The developed hand exoskeleton was designed with two distinctive features: (a) kinematics with intrinsic adaptability to patient's hand size, and (b) free-palm and free-fingertip design, preserving the residual sensory perceptual capability of touch during assistance in grasping of real objects. In the envisaged bilateral training strategy, the patient's non paretic hand acted as guidance for the paretic hand in grasping tasks. Grasping force exerted by the non paretic hand was estimated in real-time from EMG signals, and then replicated as robotic assistance for the paretic hand by means of the hand-exoskeleton. Estimation of the grasping force through EMG allowed to perform rehabilitation exercises with any, non sensorized, graspable objects. This paper presents the system design, development, and experimental evaluation. Experiments were performed within a group of six healthy subjects and two chronic stroke patients, executing robotic-assisted grasping tasks. Results related to performance in estimation and modulation of the robotic assistance, and to the outcomes of the pilot rehabilitation sessions with stroke patients, positively support validity of the proposed approach for application in stroke rehabilitation.

  18. Individual finger classification from surface EMG: Influence of electrode set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celadon, Nicolo; Dosen, Strahinja; Paleari, Marco; Farina, Dario; Ariano, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to minimize the number of channels, determining acceptable electrode locations and optimizing electrode-recording configurations to decode isometric flexion and extension of individual fingers. Nine healthy subjects performed cyclical isometric contractions activating individual fingers. During the experiment they tracked a moving visual marker indicating the contraction type (flexion/extension), desired activation level and the finger that should be employed. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals were detected from the forearm muscles using a matrix of 192 channels (24 longitudinal columns and 8 transversal rows, 10 mm inter-electrode distance). The classification was evaluated in the context of a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) with different sets of EMG electrodes: A) one linear array of 8 electrodes, B) two arrays of 8 electrodes each, C) a set with one electrode on the barycenter of each sEMG activity area, D) all the recorded channels. The results showed that the classification accuracy depended on the electrode set (F=14.67, p 82% of average success rate). Considering the computation time and electrode positioning, it is concluded that two arrays of 8 electrodes provide an optimal configuration to classify the isometric flexion and extension of individual fingers.

  19. EMG Pattern Classification by Split and Merge Deep Belief Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-min Shim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper; we introduce an enhanced electromyography (EMG pattern recognition algorithm based on a split-and-merge deep belief network (SM-DBN. Generally, it is difficult to classify the EMG features because the EMG signal has nonlinear and time-varying characteristics. Therefore, various machine-learning methods have been applied in several previously published studies. A DBN is a fast greedy learning algorithm that can identify a fairly good set of weights rapidly—even in deep networks with a large number of parameters and many hidden layers. To reduce overfitting and to enhance performance, the adopted optimization method was based on genetic algorithms (GA. As a result, the performance of the SM-DBN was 12.06% higher than conventional DBN. Additionally, SM-DBN results in a short convergence time, thereby reducing the training epoch. It is thus efficient in reducing the risk of overfitting. It is verified that the optimization was improved using GA.

  20. The role of EMG awareness in EMG biofeedback learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreto, J

    1995-06-01

    Underlying most research on biofeedback learning is a theoretical model of the processes involved. The current study tested a prediction from the Awareness Model: High initial EMG awareness should facilitate response control during EMG biofeedback training. Seventy-two undergraduates were assessed for forehead EMG awareness by asking them to produce target responses from 1.0 to 5.0 microV every 15 s for 16 trials. Based on this assessment, two groups (high and low awareness) were trained for 64 trials to produce these target levels with either EMG biofeedback, practice (no feedback), or noncontingent EMG feedback. A transfer task was identical to the initial assessment. During training, the biofeedback group deviated less from target than the practice and noncontingent groups. The biofeedback group was the only group to improve from initial EMG awareness activity. During transfer, only the low awareness biofeedback group remained below initial EMG awareness level. These findings can be interpreted in terms of the Two-Process Model.

  1. Surface EMG-Based Inter-Session Gesture Recognition Enhanced by Deep Domain Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Geng, Weidong

    2017-02-24

    High-density surface electromyography (HD-sEMG) is to record muscles' electrical activity from a restricted area of the skin by using two dimensional arrays of closely spaced electrodes. This technique allows the analysis and modelling of sEMG signals in both the temporal and spatial domains, leading to new possibilities for studying next-generation muscle-computer interfaces (MCIs). sEMG-based gesture recognition has usually been investigated in an intra-session scenario, and the absence of a standard benchmark database limits the use of HD-sEMG in real-world MCI. To address these problems, we present a benchmark database of HD-sEMG recordings of hand gestures performed by 23 participants, based on an 8 × 16 electrode array, and propose a deep-learning-based domain adaptation framework to enhance sEMG-based inter-session gesture recognition. Experiments on NinaPro, CSL-HDEMG and our CapgMyo dataset validate that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods on intra-session and effectively improved inter-session gesture recognition.

  2. Nonnegative matrix factorization for the identification of EMG finger movements: evaluation using matrix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ganesh R; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-03-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is widely used in evaluating the functional status of the hand to assist in hand gesture recognition, prosthetics and rehabilitation applications. The sEMG is a noninvasive, easy to record signal of superficial muscles from the skin surface. Considering the nonstationary characteristics of sEMG, recent feature selection of hand gesture recognition using sEMG signals necessitate designers to use nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based methods. This method exploits both the additive and sparse nature of signals by extracting accurate and reliable measurements of sEMG features using a minimum number of sensors. The testing has been conducted for simple and complex finger flexions using several experiments with artificial neural network classification scheme. It is shown, both by simulation and experimental studies, that the proposed algorithm is able to classify ten finger flexions (five simple and five complex finger flexions) recorded from two sEMG sensors up to 92% (95% for simple and 87% for complex flexions) accuracy. The recognition performances of simple and complex finger flexions are also validated with NMF permutation matrix analysis.

  3. Surface EMG-Based Inter-Session Gesture Recognition Enhanced by Deep Domain Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Geng, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    High-density surface electromyography (HD-sEMG) is to record muscles’ electrical activity from a restricted area of the skin by using two dimensional arrays of closely spaced electrodes. This technique allows the analysis and modelling of sEMG signals in both the temporal and spatial domains, leading to new possibilities for studying next-generation muscle-computer interfaces (MCIs). sEMG-based gesture recognition has usually been investigated in an intra-session scenario, and the absence of a standard benchmark database limits the use of HD-sEMG in real-world MCI. To address these problems, we present a benchmark database of HD-sEMG recordings of hand gestures performed by 23 participants, based on an 8 × 16 electrode array, and propose a deep-learning-based domain adaptation framework to enhance sEMG-based inter-session gesture recognition. Experiments on NinaPro, CSL-HDEMG and our CapgMyo dataset validate that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods on intra-session and effectively improved inter-session gesture recognition. PMID:28245586

  4. Bilinear modeling of EMG signals to extract user-independent features for multiuser myoelectric interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we propose a multiuser myoelectric interface that can easily adapt to novel users. When a user performs different motions (e.g., grasping and pinching), different electromyography (EMG) signals are measured. When different users perform the same motion (e.g., grasping), different EMG signals are also measured. Therefore, designing a myoelectric interface that can be used by multiple users to perform multiple motions is difficult. To cope with this problem, we propose for EMG signals a bilinear model that is composed of two linear factors: 1) user dependent and 2) motion dependent. By decomposing the EMG signals into these two factors, the extracted motion-dependent factors can be used as user-independent features. We can construct a motion classifier on the extracted feature space to develop the multiuser interface. For novel users, the proposed adaptation method estimates the user-dependent factor through only a few interactions. The bilinear EMG model with the estimated user-dependent factor can extract the user-independent features from the novel user data. We applied our proposed method to a recognition task of five hand gestures for robotic hand control using four-channel EMG signals measured from subject forearms. Our method resulted in 73% accuracy, which was statistically significantly different from the accuracy of standard nonmultiuser interfaces, as the result of a two-sample t -test at a significance level of 1%.

  5. An analysis of EMG electrode configuration for targeted muscle reinnervation based neural machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Zhou, Ping; Li, Guanglin; Kuiken, Todd A

    2008-02-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a novel neural machine interface for improved myoelectric prosthesis control. Previous high-density (HD) surface electromyography (EMG) studies have indicated that tremendous neural control information can be extracted from the reinnervated muscles by EMG pattern recognition (PR). However, using a large number of EMG electrodes hinders clinical application of the TMR technique. This study investigated a reduced number of electrodes and the placement required to extract sufficient neural control information for accurate identification of user movement intents. An electrode selection algorithm was applied to the HD EMG recordings from each of four TMR amputee subjects. The results show that when using only 12 selected bipolar electrodes the average accuracy over subjects for classifying 16 movement intents was 93.0 (+/-3.3)%, just 1.2% lower than when using the entire HD electrode complement. The locations of selected electrodes were consistent with the anatomical reinnervation sites. Additionally, a practical protocol for clinical electrode placement was developed, which does not rely on complex HD EMG experiment and analysis while maintaining a classification accuracy of 88.7+/-4.5%. These outcomes provide important guidelines for practical electrode placement that can promote future clinical application of TMR and EMG PR in the control of multifunctional prostheses.

  6. Muscle force estimation with surface EMG during dynamic muscle contractions: a wavelet and ANN based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fengjun; Chew, Chee-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Human muscle force estimation is important in biomechanics studies, sports and assistive devices fields. Therefore, it is essential to develop an efficient algorithm to estimate force exerted by muscles. The purpose of this study is to predict force/torque exerted by muscles under dynamic muscle contractions based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) approaches. Mean frequency (MF) of the surface electromyography (EMG) signals power spectrum was calculated from CWT. ANN models were trained to derive the MF-force relationships from the subset of EMG signals and the measured forces. Then we use the networks to predict the individual muscle forces for different muscle groups. Fourteen healthy subjects (10 males and 4 females) were voluntarily recruited in this study. EMG signals were collected from the biceps brachii, triceps, hamstring and quadriceps femoris muscles to evaluate the proposed method. Root mean square errors (RMSE) and correlation coefficients between the predicted forces and measured actual forces were calculated.

  7. Evaluation of novel algorithm embedded in a wearable sEMG device for seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Wolf, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    We implemented a modified version of a previously published algorithm for detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures into a prototype wireless surface electromyography (sEMG) recording device. The method was modified to require minimum computational load, and two parameters were trained...... on prior sEMG data recorded with the device. Along with the normal sEMG recording, the device is able to set an alarm whenever the implemented algorithm detects a seizure. These alarms are annotated in the data file along with the signal. The device was tested at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU......) at the Danish Epilepsy Center. Five patients were included in the study and two of them had generalized tonic-clonic seizures. All patients were monitored for 2–5 days. A double-blind study was made on the five patients. The overall result showed that the device detected four of seven seizures and had a false...

  8. An EMG-to-force processing approach for determining ankle muscle forces during normal human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogey, R A; Perry, J; Gitter, A J

    2005-09-01

    Muscle forces move our limbs. These forces must be estimated with indirect techniques, as direct measurements are neither generally possible nor practical. An electromyography (EMG)-to-force processing technique was developed. Ankle joint moments and, by extension, ankle muscle forces were calculated. The ankle moment obtained by inverse dynamics was calculated for ten normal adults during free speed gait. There was close correlation between inverse dynamics ankle moments and moments determined by the EMG-to-force processing approach. Muscle forces were determined. The gait peak Achilles tendon force occurred in late single limb support. Peak force observed (2.9 kN) closely matched values obtained where force transducers were used to obtain in vivo muscle forces (2.6 kN). The EMG-to-force processing model presented here appears to be a practical means to determine in vivo muscle forces.

  9. EMG assisted optimization: a hybrid approach for estimating muscle forces in an indeterminate biomechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewicki, J; McGill, S M

    1994-10-01

    There are two basic approaches to estimate individual muscle forces acting on a joint, given the indeterminacy of moment balance equations: optimization and electromyography (EMG) assisted. Each approach is characterized by unique advantages and liabilities. With this in mind, a new hybrid method which combines the advantages of both of these traditional approaches, termed 'EMG assisted optimization' (EMGAO), was described. In this method, minimal adjustments are applied to the individual muscle forces estimated from EMG, so that all moment equilibrium equations are satisfied in three dimensions. The result is the best possible match between physiologically observed muscle activation patterns and the predicted forces, while satisfying the moment constraints about all three joint axes. Several forms of the objective function are discussed and their effect on individual muscle adjustments is illustrated in a simple two-dimensional example.

  10. Arm Orthosis/Prosthesis Movement Control Based on Surface EMG Signal Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suberbiola, Aaron; Zulueta, Ekaitz; Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Etxeberria-Agiriano, Ismael; Graña, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    This paper shows experimental results on electromyography (EMG)-based system control applied to motorized orthoses. Biceps and triceps EMG signals are captured through two biometrical sensors, which are then filtered and processed by an acquisition system. Finally an output/control signal is produced and sent to the actuators, which will then perform the actual movement, using algorithms based on autoregressive (AR) models and neural networks, among others. The research goal is to predict the desired movement of the lower arm through the analysis of EMG signals, so that the movement can be reproduced by an arm orthosis, powered by two linear actuators. In this experiment, best accuracy has achieved values up to 91%, using a fourth-order AR-model and 100ms block length.

  11. Combining psychophysical measures of discomfort and electromyography for the evaluation of a new automotive seating concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolich, Mike; Taboun, Salem M

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the advantages and disadvantages of a new automotive seating concept, known as the micro-adjuster control system, could be reliably evaluated using both a physiological assessment technique (i.e., electromyography [EMG]) and a subjective questionnaire. The results indicate that psychophysical measures of discomfort and the root mean squared (RMS) activity of the EMG are statistically related, r (8) = -.788, p =.020. More specifically, subjective perceptions of comfort were found to improve with decreasing levels of muscle activity. This implies that seat comfort can be evaluated on the basis of physiological as well as subjective responses to prolonged driving. This finding should drastically improve automobile seat design efforts.

  12. Experiences in the creation of an electromyography database to help hand amputated persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Heynen, Simone; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Castellimi, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Müller, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Currently, trans-radial amputees can only perform a few simple movements with prosthetic hands. This is mainly due to low control capabilities and the long training time that is required to learn controlling them with surface electromyography (sEMG). This is in contrast with recent advances in mechatronics, thanks to which mechanical hands have multiple degrees of freedom and in some cases force control. To help improve the situation, we are building the NinaPro (Non-Invasive Adaptive Prosthetics) database, a database of about 50 hand and wrist movements recorded from several healthy and currently very few amputated persons that will help the community to test and improve sEMG-based natural control systems for prosthetic hands. In this paper we describe the experimental experiences and practical aspects related to the data acquisition.

  13. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between...... convulsive epileptic seizures and convulsive PNES. METHODS: In this case-control study, surface EMG was recorded from the deltoid muscles during long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring in 25 patients and in 21 healthy controls. A total of 46 clinical episodes were recorded: 28 generalized...... tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) from 14 patients with epilepsy, and 18 convulsive PNES from 12 patients (one patient had both GTCS and PNES). The healthy controls were simulating GTCS. To quantitatively characterize the signals we calculated the following parameters: root mean square (RMS) of the amplitude...

  14. Familial congenital peripheral facial paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo Vallenas, Roberto; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Aldave, Raquel; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Reyes, Juan; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Castañeda, César; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; VERA, JOSÉ; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, Servicio de Neurología. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study 29 individuals belonging to four familiar generations in whom 9 cases of facial paralysis was found in 2 generations. Setting: Neurophysiology Service, Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen National Hospital. Material and Methods: Neurological exam and electrophysiologic (EMG and VCN), otorrhinolaryngologic, radiologic, electroencephalographic, dermatoglyphic and laboratory studies were performed in 7 of the 9 patients (5 men and 2 women). Results: One case of right peripheral facia...

  15. Spontaneous activity in electromyography may differentiate certain benign lower motor neuron disease forms from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Manu E; Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Sandell, Satu; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Saukkonen, Annamaija; Soikkeli, Raija; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-08-15

    There is limited data on electromyography (EMG) findings in other motor neuron disorders than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We assessed whether the distribution of active denervation detected by EMG, i.e. fibrillations and fasciculations, differs between ALS and slowly progressive motor neuron disorders. We compared the initial EMG findings of 43 clinically confirmed, consecutive ALS patients with those of 41 genetically confirmed Late-onset Spinal Motor Neuronopathy and 14 Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy patients. Spontaneous activity was more frequently detected in the first dorsal interosseus and deltoid muscles of ALS patients than in patients with the slowly progressive motor neuron diseases. The most important observation was that absent fibrillations in the first dorsal interosseus muscle identified the benign forms with sensitivities of 66%-77% and a specificity of 93%. The distribution of active denervation may help to separate ALS from mimicking disorders at an early stage.

  16. Visuomotor control of neck surface electromyography in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Jessica R.; Valentin, Juliana C.; Hands, Gabrielle L.; Stevens, Christina A.; Langmore, Susan E.; Noordzij, J. Pieter; Stepp, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare performance of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and age-matched controls on a visuomotor tracking task controlled via surface electromyography (sEMG). METHODS Twenty-seven adults with PD and twenty-four older controls produced dry swallows and completed a visuomotor tracking task utilizing both static and dynamic targets. sEMG was recorded at the anterior neck and submental surface during both tasks. RESULTS There was no significant difference in visuomotor tracking ability between cohorts. Post hoc analyses indicated that there was no significant difference between participant groups in the strength or duration of swallows as measured by sEMG but that participants with PD showed a trend for decreased swallow durations at the anterior neck (padj=0.067) whereas controls showed a trend for increased durations at the anterior neck (padj=0.112), compared to the submental surface. However, there were no significant correlations between swallowing behavior and visuomotor tracking ability. CONCLUSION There were no significant differences in visuomotor tracking performance between individuals with PD and controls. Furthermore, there was no relationship between tracking ability and swallowing behavior. We conclude that sEMG-mediated biofeedback may have limited promise as a tool for treating PD-related dysphagia. PMID:25318778

  17. Improved Prediction of Preterm Delivery Using Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of Uterine Electromyography Signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Ren

    Full Text Available Preterm delivery increases the risk of infant mortality and morbidity, and therefore developing reliable methods for predicting its likelihood are of great importance. Previous work using uterine electromyography (EMG recordings has shown that they may provide a promising and objective way for predicting risk of preterm delivery. However, to date attempts at utilizing computational approaches to achieve sufficient predictive confidence, in terms of area under the curve (AUC values, have not achieved the high discrimination accuracy that a clinical application requires. In our study, we propose a new analytical approach for assessing the risk of preterm delivery using EMG recordings which firstly employs Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD to obtain their Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF. Next, the entropy values of both instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency of the first ten IMF components are computed in order to derive ratios of these two distinct components as features. Discrimination accuracy of this approach compared to those proposed previously was then calculated using six differently representative classifiers. Finally, three different electrode positions were analyzed for their prediction accuracy of preterm delivery in order to establish which uterine EMG recording location was optimal signal data. Overall, our results show a clear improvement in prediction accuracy of preterm delivery risk compared with previous approaches, achieving an impressive maximum AUC value of 0.986 when using signals from an electrode positioned below the navel. In sum, this provides a promising new method for analyzing uterine EMG signals to permit accurate clinical assessment of preterm delivery risk.

  18. Exploration of Force Myography and surface Electromyography in hand gesture classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianta; Merhi, Lukas-Karim; Xiao, Zhen Gang; Menon, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Whereas pressure sensors increasingly have received attention as a non-invasive interface for hand gesture recognition, their performance has not been comprehensively evaluated. This work examined the performance of hand gesture classification using Force Myography (FMG) and surface Electromyography (sEMG) technologies by performing 3 sets of 48 hand gestures using a prototyped FMG band and an array of commercial sEMG sensors worn both on the wrist and forearm simultaneously. The results show that the FMG band achieved classification accuracies as good as the high quality, commercially available, sEMG system on both wrist and forearm positions; specifically, by only using 8 Force Sensitive Resisters (FSRs), the FMG band achieved accuracies of 91.2% and 83.5% in classifying the 48 hand gestures in cross-validation and cross-trial evaluations, which were higher than those of sEMG (84.6% and 79.1%). By using all 16 FSRs on the band, our device achieved high accuracies of 96.7% and 89.4% in cross-validation and cross-trial evaluations.

  19. Dental Implants - Perceiving Patients' Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects. Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2% were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50 of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01 basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings.

  20. Analysis of using EMG and mechanical sensors to enhance intent recognition in powered lower limb prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A. J.; Kuiken, T. A.; Hargrove, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of electromyography (EMG) data, in combination with a diverse array of mechanical sensors, to locomotion mode intent recognition in transfemoral amputees using powered prostheses. Additionally, we determined the effect of adding time history information using a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) for both the mechanical and EMG sensors. Approach. EMG signals from the residual limbs of amputees have been proposed to enhance pattern recognition-based intent recognition systems for powered lower limb prostheses, but mechanical sensors on the prosthesis—such as inertial measurement units, position and velocity sensors, and load cells—may be just as useful. EMG and mechanical sensor data were collected from 8 transfemoral amputees using a powered knee/ankle prosthesis over basic locomotion modes such as walking, slopes and stairs. An offline study was conducted to determine the benefit of different sensor sets for predicting intent. Main results. EMG information was not as accurate alone as mechanical sensor information (p < 0.05) for any classification strategy. However, EMG in combination with the mechanical sensor data did significantly reduce intent recognition errors (p < 0.05) both for transitions between locomotion modes and steady-state locomotion. The sensor time history (DBN) classifier significantly reduced error rates compared to a linear discriminant classifier for steady-state steps, without increasing the transitional error, for both EMG and mechanical sensors. Combining EMG and mechanical sensor data with sensor time history reduced the average transitional error from 18.4% to 12.2% and the average steady-state error from 3.8% to 1.0% when classifying level-ground walking, ramps, and stairs in eight transfemoral amputee subjects. Significance. These results suggest that a neural interface in combination with time history methods for locomotion mode classification can enhance intent

  1. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probab...

  2. Augmented effects of EMG biofeedback interfaced with virtual reality on neuromuscular control and movement coordination during reaching in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Cha, Young Joo; You, Sung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare therapeutic effects of an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback augmented by virtual reality (VR) and EMG biofeedback alone on the triceps and biceps (T:B) muscle activity imbalance and elbow joint movement coordination during a reaching motor taskOBJECTIVE: To compare therapeutic effects of an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback augmented by virtual reality (VR) and EMG biofeedback alone on the triceps and biceps muscle activity imbalance and elbow joint movement coordination during a reaching motor task in normal children and children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). 18 children with spastic CP (2 females; mean±standard deviation = 9.5 ± 1.96 years) and 8 normal children (3 females; mean ± standard deviation = 9.75 ± 2.55 years) were recruited from a local community center. All children with CP first underwent one intensive session of EMG feedback (30 minutes), followed by one session of the EMG-VR feedback (30 minutes) after a 1-week washout period. Clinical tests included elbow extension range of motion (ROM), biceps muscle strength, and box and block test. EMG triceps and biceps (T:B) muscle activity imbalance and reaching movement acceleration coordination were concurrently determined by EMG and 3-axis accelerometer measurements respectively. Independent t-test and one-way repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) were performed at p biofeedback when augmented by virtual reality exercise games in children with spastic CP. The augmented EMG and VR feedback produced better neuromuscular balance control in the elbow joint than the EMG biofeedback alone.

  3. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  4. Artificial facial nerve reflex restores eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujuan Wang; Keyong Li; Jingquan Liu; Dongyue Xu; Yuefeng Rui; Chunsheng Yang

    2010-01-01

    To date, treatment of peripheral facial paralysis has focused on preservation of facial nerve integrity. However, with seriously damaged facial nerve cases, it is difficult to recover anatomical and functional integrity using present therapies. Therefore, the present study utilized artificial facial nerve reflex to obtain orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) electromyography signals on the uninjured side through the use of implanted recording electrodes. The implanted electrical chips analyzed facial muscle motion on the uninjured side and triggered an electrical stimulator to emit current pulses, which resulted in stimulation of injured OOM contraction and maintained bilateral symmetry and consistency. Following signal recognition, extraction, and computer analysis, electromyography signals in the uninjured OOM resulted in complete eyelid closure, which was consistent with the voltage threshold for eye closure. These findings suggested that artificial facial nerve reflex through the use of implanted microelectronics in unilateral peripheral facial paralysis could restore eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation.

  5. Surface EMG based muscle activity analysis for aerobic cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Venkatesh; Jayaraman, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined the muscle activity of aerobic cyclist on biceps brachii medial, trapezius medial, latissimus dorsi medial, and erector spinae muscles bilaterally during 30 min of cycling. Thirteen male volunteers were chosen and placed in two groups (with and without low back pain (LBP)). Surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded bilaterally from selected muscle groups for 30 min of cycling for each subject. Statistical tests were performed to determine the difference in fatigue, using mean power frequency difference. LBP group showed a significantly higher fatigue (p<0.05) in left biceps brachii medial when compared to the control group. High fatigue in the back muscles in the LBP group was not found; however, when linear regression was performed for these individuals, the data showed a possibility of worsening in their condition due to 30 min of cycling.

  6. Analysis of scapular muscle EMG activity in patients with idiopathic neck pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Bostyn, Emma; Delemarre, Jolien; Lemahieu, Trees; Cagnie, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    It is proposed that altered scapular muscle function can contribute to abnormal loading of the cervical spine. However, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of the scapular muscles. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature regarding the differences or similarities in scapular muscle activity, measured by electromyography ( = EMG), between patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to pain-free controls. Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies investigating scapular muscle EMG activity (amplitude, timing and fatigue parameters) were searched in Pubmed and Web of Science. 25 articles were included in the systematic review. During rest and activities below shoulder height, no clear differences in mean Upper Trapezius ( = UT) EMG activity exist between patients with idiopathic neck pain and a healthy control group. During overhead activities, no conclusion for scapular EMG amplitude can be drawn as a large variation of results were reported. Adaptation strategies during overhead tasks are not the same between studies. Only one study investigated timing of the scapular muscles and found a delayed onset and shorter duration of the SA during elevation in patients with idiopathic neck pain. For scapular muscle fatigue, no definite conclusions can be made as a wide variation and conflicting results are reported. Further high quality EMG research on scapular muscles (broader than the UT) is necessary to understand/draw conclusions on how scapular muscles react in the presence of idiopathic neck pain.

  7. An Anthropomorphic Robot Hand Developed Based on Underactuated Mechanism and Controlled by EMG Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-peng Yang; Jing-dong Zhao; Yi-kun Gu; Xin-qing Wang; Nan Li; Li Jiang; Hong Liu; Hai Huang; Da-wei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    When developing a humanoid myo-control hand, not only the mechanical structure should be considered to afford a high dexterity, but also the myoelectric (electromyography, EMG) control capability should be taken into account to fully accomplish the actuation tasks. This paper presents a novel humanoid robotic myocontrol hand (AR hand Ⅲ) which adopted an underac-tuated mechanism and a forearm myocontrol EMG method. The AR hand Ⅲ has five fingers and 15 joints, and actuated by three embedded motors. Underactuation can be found within each finger and between the rest three fingers (the middle finger, the ring finger and the little finger) when the hand is grasping objects. For the EMG control, two specific methods are proposed: the three-fingered hand gesture configuration of the AR hand Ⅲ and a pattern classification method of EMG signals based on a statistical learning algorithm-Support Vector Machine (SVM). Eighteen active hand gestures of a testee are recognized ef-fectively, which can be directly mapped into the motions of AR hand Ⅲ. An on-line EMG control scheme is established based on two different decision functions: one is for the discrimination between the idle and active modes, the other is for the recog-nition of the active modes. As a result, the AR hand Ⅲ can swiftly follow the gesture instructions of the testee with a time delay less than 100 ms.

  8. Continuous motion decoding from EMG using independent component analysis and adaptive model training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (EMG) is popularly used to decode human motion intention for robot movement control. Traditional motion decoding method uses pattern recognition to provide binary control command which can only move the robot as predefined limited patterns. In this work, we proposed a motion decoding method which can accurately estimate 3-dimensional (3-D) continuous upper limb motion only from multi-channel EMG signals. In order to prevent the muscle activities from motion artifacts and muscle crosstalk which especially obviously exist in upper limb motion, the independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the independent source EMG signals. The motion data was also transferred from 4-manifold to 2-manifold by the principle component analysis (PCA). A hidden Markov model (HMM) was proposed to decode the motion from the EMG signals after the model trained by an adaptive model identification process. Experimental data were used to train the decoding model and validate the motion decoding performance. By comparing the decoded motion with the measured motion, it is found that the proposed motion decoding strategy was feasible to decode 3-D continuous motion from EMG signals.

  9. Effectiveness of the Wavelet Transform on the Surface EMG to Understand the Muscle Fatigue During Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M. S.; Mamun, Md.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is the decline in ability of a muscle to create force. Electromyography (EMG) is a medical technique for measuring muscle response to nervous stimulation. During a sustained muscle contraction, the power spectrum of the EMG shifts towards lower frequencies. These effects are due to muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue is often a result of unhealthy work practice. In this research, the effectiveness of the wavelet transform applied to the surface EMG (SEMG) signal as a means of understanding muscle fatigue during walk is presented. Power spectrum and bispectrum analysis on the EMG signal getting from right rectus femoris muscle is executed utilizing various wavelet functions (WFs). It is possible to recognize muscle fatigue appreciably with the proper choice of the WF. The outcome proves that the most momentous changes in the EMG power spectrum are symbolized by WF Daubechies45. Moreover, this research has compared bispectrum properties to the other WFs. To determine muscle fatigue during gait, Daubechies45 is used in this research to analyze the SEMG signal.

  10. An Analysis of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Hand Muscle EMG for Improved Pattern Recognition Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewuyi, Adenike A; Hargrove, Levi J; Kuiken, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Pattern recognition control combined with surface electromyography (EMG) from the extrinsic hand muscles has shown great promise for control of multiple prosthetic functions for transradial amputees. There is, however, a need to adapt this control method when implemented for partial-hand amputees, who possess both a functional wrist and information-rich residual intrinsic hand muscles. We demonstrate that combining EMG data from both intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles to classify hand grasps and finger motions allows up to 19 classes of hand grasps and individual finger motions to be decoded, with an accuracy of 96% for non-amputees and 85% for partial-hand amputees. We evaluated real-time pattern recognition control of three hand motions in seven different wrist positions. We found that a system trained with both intrinsic and extrinsic muscle EMG data, collected while statically and dynamically varying wrist position increased completion rates from 73% to 96% for partial-hand amputees and from 88% to 100% for non-amputees when compared to a system trained with only extrinsic muscle EMG data collected in a neutral wrist position. Our study shows that incorporating intrinsic muscle EMG data and wrist motion can significantly improve the robustness of pattern recognition control for application to partial-hand prosthetic control.

  11. [EMG monitoring in functional electrostimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Rafolt, D; Mayr, W; Lanmüller, H

    2000-04-01

    When using functional electrical stimulation (FES), correct adjustment of stimulation parameters, and monitoring of the stimulated muscle is mandatory if tissue damage is to be avoided. Although several FES systems are already in regular use, a method for direct muscle monitoring is still lacking. This paper investigates the suitability of the electromyogram (EMG) for such a purpose. In six sheep, the right latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) and the associated thoracodorsal nerve were exposed. Stimulation was effected via electrodes placed on the nerve. Three electrodes were placed in the LDM for EMG recording, and the tendon was connected to a force transducer for isometric force measurement. Stimulation was applied for one second (burst), followed by a three-second pause. The stimulation current was increased in 0.2 mA steps, starting at 0 mA and ending at 4 mA. Throughout the investigation, the EMG signal was monitored with an oscilloscope. In addition, the EMG signal and the force transducer signal were recorded for subsequent analysis. An analysis of the data of all six sheep revealed an almost linear relationship between muscle force and m-wave amplitude (magnitude of r = 0.95, p EMG recording with three intramuscular electrodes is a reliable method of monitoring FES-induced muscle activity, but the absolute force cannot be measured.

  12. Surface EMG signals in very late-stage of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Prat, Joan; Janssen, Mariska M H P; Koopman, Bart F J M; Stienen, Arno H A; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2017-08-29

    Robotic arm supports aim at improving the quality of life for adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by augmenting their residual functional abilities. A critical component of robotic arm supports is the control interface, as is it responsible for the human-machine interaction. Our previous studies showed the feasibility of using surface electromyography (sEMG) as a control interface to operate robotic arm supports in adults with DMD (22-24 years-old). However, in the biomedical engineering community there is an often raised skepticism on whether adults with DMD at the last stage of their disease have sEMG signals that can be measured and used for control. In this study sEMG signals from Biceps and Triceps Brachii muscles were measured for the first time in a 37 year-old man with DMD (Brooke 6) that lost his arm function 15 years ago. The sEMG signals were measured during maximal and sub-maximal voluntary isometric contractions and evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and co-activation ratio. Beyond the profound deterioration of the muscles, we found that sEMG signals from both Biceps and Triceps muscles were measurable in this individual, although with a maximum signal amplitude 100 times lower compared to sEMG from healthy subjects. The participant was able to voluntarily modulate the required level of muscle activation during the sub-maximal voluntary isometric contractions. Despite the low sEMG amplitude and a considerable level of muscle co-activation, simulations of an elbow orthosis using the measured sEMG as driving signal indicated that the sEMG signals of the participant had the potential to provide control of elbow movements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that sEMG signals from a man with DMD at the last-stage of the disease were measured, analyzed and reported. These findings offer promising perspectives to the use of sEMG as an intuitive and natural control interface for robotic arm supports in adults with DMD until

  13. Changes in facial electromyographic activity in spider-phobic girls after psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Leutgeb, Verena; Schienle, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of spider phobia have indicated that disgust is a crucial disorder-relevant emotion and that the facial electromyogram (EMG) of the levator labii region is a reliable disgust indicator. The present investigation focused on EMG effects of psychotherapy in thirty girls (aged between 8 and 14 years) suffering from spider phobia. They were presented with phobia-relevant, generally fear-inducing, disgust-inducing and affectively neutral pictures in a first EMG session. Subsequently,...

  14. Electromyography-based analysis of human upper limbs during 45-day head-down bed-rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Anshuang; Wang, Chunhui; Qi, Hongzhi; Li, Fan; Wang, Zheng; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Chen, Shanguang; Ming, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Muscle deconditioning occurs in response to simulated or actual microgravity. In spaceflight, astronauts become monkey-like for mainly using their upper limbs to control the operating system and to complete corresponding tasks. The changes of upper limbs' athletic ability will directly affect astronauts' working performance. This study investigated the variation trend of surface electromyography (sEMG) during prolonged simulated microgravity. Eight healthy males participating in this study performed strict 45-day head-down bed-rest (HDBR). On the 5th day of pre-HDBR, and the 15th, the 30th and the 45th days of HDBR, the subjects performed maximum pushing task and maximum pulling task, and sEMG was collected from upper limbs synchronously. Each subject's maximum volunteer contractions of both the tasks during these days were compared, showing no significant change. However, changes were detected by sEMG-based analysis. It was found that integrated EMG, root mean square, mean frequency, fuzzy entropy of deltoid, and fuzzy entropy of triceps brachii changed significantly when comparing pre-HDBR with HDBR. The variation trend showed a recovery tendency after significant decline, which is inconsistent with the monotonic variation of lower limbs that was proved by previous research. These findings suggest that EMG changes in upper limbs during prolonged simulated microgravity, but has different variation trend from lower limbs.

  15. Electromyography of Swallowing with Fine Wire Intramuscular Electrodes in Healthy Human: Amplitude Difference of Selected Hyoid Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Haruhi; González-Fernández, Marlís; Matsuo, Koichiro; Brodsky, Martin B; Yoda, Mitsumasa; Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Hideto; Hiraoka, Takashi; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined the intensity of muscle activity during swallowing in healthy humans. We examined selected hyoid muscles using fine wire intramuscular electromyography (EMG) during swallowing of four food consistencies. Thirteen healthy adults were studied using videofluorography and EMG of the anterior belly of digastric (ABD), geniohyoid (GH), sternohyoid (SH), and masseter (MA; surface electrodes) while ingesting thin liquid (three trials) and solid food of three consistencies (banana, tofu, and cookie, three trials each). After rectification, integration, and normalization, peak EMG amplitudes for each muscle in each trial were measured. Hyoid displacements were measured in two dimensions. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni correction. GH had the highest adjusted amplitude for both solids and liquid. For MA and ABD, amplitude was highest with triturated cookie. For ABD, amplitude was lowest with liquid. There were no significant food consistency effects for GH or SH. Hyoid displacements were greatest for cookie and the lowest for liquid. EMG amplitude varied with initial food consistency. The high peak EMG amplitude of GH is consistent with its essential role in opening the upper esophageal sphincter. High MA amplitude with hard solid foods is likely due to the higher tongue-palate pressure with triturated solids. The higher ABD amplitude with solid food is associated with greater hyoid displacement. These findings support the existence of a central pattern generator that modifies the level of muscle activity during pharyngeal swallowing in response to input from mechanoreceptors in the oral cavity.

  16. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group. Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD, who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable.

  17. Surface electromyography as a screening method for evaluation of dysphagia and odynophagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eviatar Ephraim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. The article analyzes various instrumental methods of dysphagia assessment, introduces surface electromyography (sEMG to carry out rapid assessment of such patients, and debates proposed suggestions for sEMG screening protocol in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Data sources Subject related books and articles from 1813 to 2007 were obtained through library search, MEDLINE (1949–2007 and EMBASE (1975–2007. Methods Specifics steps for establishing the protocol for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles, the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water are presented in detail. SEMG is compared with other techniques in terms of cost, timing, involvement of radiation, etc. Results According to the published data, SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, time-saving and inexpensive to perform. The major weakness of the method seems to be inability for precise diagnostic of neurologically induced dysphagia. Conclusion With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG might serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management but cannot serve for proper investigation of neurogenic dysphagia.

  18. Experience of using electromyography of the genioglossus in the investigation of paediatric dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Kayal; Rockett, Juliet; Ryan, Martina; Harris, Rebecca; Pitt, Matthew; Devile, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, retrospectively, the utility of genioglossus electromyography (gEMG) in evaluating children with suspected neurogenic feeding and swallowing difficulties. Children who were evaluated using gEMG at a tertiary paediatric neurology dysphagia service were reviewed. Data were analysed by the presence/absence of neurogenic changes on gEMG and the method of feeding at their most recent follow-up. The study group comprised 59 individuals (36 males, 23 females; median age 20 mo; range 1 mo-15 y). The study cohort included individuals with heterogeneous neurological phenotypes (n=40), craniofacial syndrome (n=10), and congenital bulbar palsy (n=9). gEMG identified 35 out of 59 (60%) with neurogenic changes. At follow-up, 24 individuals were on oral feeds and 35 were on alternative methods of feeding (nasogastric /gastrostomy). Eight out of 24 children on oral feeds showed neurogenic changes compared with 27 out of 35 on alternative feeds. χ(2) analysis of feeding method at follow-up and the presence or absence of neurogenic change on EMG was highly significant (p≤0.002). When confounding factors for alternative feeds were accounted for on univariate analysis, the neurogenic changes, severe gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and respiratory comorbidities were statistically significant in predicting the alternative feeding, whereas growth failure and behavioural difficulties were not significant confounders. Moreover, multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the neurogenic changes were independently predictive of an alternative method of feeding after adjusting for other confounders with an odds ratio of 29.6 (95% confidence interval 3.97-220; pneurogenic dysphagia as the degree of severity is independently correlated with long-term feeding outcomes. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Surface electromyography as a screening method for evaluation of dysphagia and odynophagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2009-01-01

    Objective Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. The article analyzes various instrumental methods of dysphagia assessment, introduces surface electromyography (sEMG) to carry out rapid assessment of such patients, and debates proposed suggestions for sEMG screening protocol in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Data sources Subject related books and articles from 1813 to 2007 were obtained through library search, MEDLINE (1949–2007) and EMBASE (1975–2007). Methods Specifics steps for establishing the protocol for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles), the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water) are presented in detail. SEMG is compared with other techniques in terms of cost, timing, involvement of radiation, etc. Results According to the published data, SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, time-saving and inexpensive to perform. The major weakness of the method seems to be inability for precise diagnostic of neurologically induced dysphagia. Conclusion With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG might serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management but cannot serve for proper investigation of neurogenic dysphagia. PMID:19232090

  20. A systematic review of surface electromyography analyses of the bench press movement task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołaś, Artur; Blazek, Dusan; Maszczyk, Adam; Wilk, Michał; Pietraszewski, Przemysław; Petr, Miroslav; Uhlir, Petr; Zając, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Background The bench press exercise (BP) plays an important role in recreational and professional training, in which muscle activity is an important multifactorial phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to systematically review electromyography (EMG) studies performed on the barbell BP exercise to answer the following research questions: Which muscles show the greatest activity during the flat BP? Which changes in muscle activity are related to specific conditions under which the BP movement is performed? Strategy PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library were searched through June 10, 2016. A combination of the following search terms was used: bench press, chest press, board press, test, measure, assessment, dynamometer, kinematics and biomechanics. Only original, full-text articles were considered. Results The search process resulted in 14 relevant studies that were included in the discussion. The triceps brachii (TB) and pectoralis major (PM) muscles were found to have similar activity during the BP, which was significantly higher than the activity of the anterior deltoid. During the BP movement, muscle activity changes with exercise intensity, velocity of movement, fatigue, mental focus, movement phase and stability conditions, such as bar vibration or unstable surfaces. Under these circumstances, TB is the most common object of activity change. Conclusions PM and TB EMG activity is more dominant and shows greater EMG amplitude than anterior deltoid during the BP. There are six factors that can influence muscle activity during the BP; however, the most important factor is exercise intensity, which interacts with all other factors. The research on muscle activity in the BP has several unresolved areas, such as clearly and strongly defined guidelines to perform EMG measurements (e.g., how to elaborate with surface EMG limits) or guidelines for the use of exact muscle models. PMID

  1. Quality of reporting masticatory muscle electromyography in 2004: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo-Olivo, S; Gadotti, I; Kornerup, M; Lagravère, M O; Flores-Mir, C

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluated the quality of reporting electromyography in studies evaluating the masticatory muscles published during 2004. Several electronic databases were searched. Abstracts and later articles were selected by a consensus from the five reviewers. An adaptation of the methodological checklist published by the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK) was used. The following information regarding electrodes was reported on the 35 finally selected articles: location (94.3%), interelectrode distance (48.6%), and material (42.9%); detection and amplification: amplification type (54.3%), gain (25.7%), low high pass filters (60%) and cut-off frequencies (60%); electromyography (EMG) processing: sampling rate (74.2%), rectification (46.6%), root-mean square (RMS) (39.2%); number of bits and model of A/D card (17.1%); and normalization procedure (40%). Reasons for the poor reporting are discussed. Because of the general poor quality of reporting of the analysed studies, findings of studies using surface electromyography of masticatory muscles should be interpreted with caution.

  2. Identification of swallowing events from sEMG Signals Obtained from Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby Mann, Giselle D; Groher, Michael E

    2007-04-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is being used with increasing frequency to identify the occurrence of swallowing, to describe swallow physiology, and to treat impaired swallowing function in dysphagic patients. Despite this increased utilization, limited information is available regarding the validity and reliability of investigators and clinicians to interpret sEMG data in reference to swallowing. This study examines the validity and interjudge reliability of swallow identification using sEMG records obtained from healthy adults. Validity and reliability estimates were compared between experienced and naïve judges in the identification of swallows from graphic sEMG records. Multiple validity estimates were high, indicating a strong degree of accuracy in identification of swallows versus nonswallow movements from sEMG traces. Experienced judges were more accurate than naïve judges (classification accuracy: experienced = 90% vs. naïve = 81%; p = 0.006, kappa: experienced = 0.89 vs. naïve 0.62; p = 0.008). Judges in both groups were more likely to classify swallows as nonswallow movements (false negatives) than to classify nonswallow movements as swallows (false positives). Interjudge reliability estimates indicated a high degree of agreement among judges in the identification of swallows versus nonswallow movements from the sEMG signal, with higher agreement among experienced judges (average kappa coefficient: experienced = 0.75 vs. naïve = 0.51). These results suggest that the sEMG graphic record is a valid and reliable tool for identifying normal swallows and that experience with this technique results in better identification and interjudge agreement.

  3. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003028.htm Facial paralysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Facial paralysis occurs when a person is no longer able ...

  4. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  5. The Application of Surface Electromyography in the Assessment of Ergonomic Risk Factors Associated with Manual Lifting Tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 杨磊; 丁嘉顺; 王正伦

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ergonomic risk factors associated with manual lifting tasks using surface electromyography (EMG). 13 volunteers lifted loads of 6 and 13kg at two speeds and at two horizontal distances in 3 different postures and three boxes of different sizes, from floor to knuckle height, performing 72 lifting tasks. For each lift, the surface electromyography signals from the erector spinae muscles, bilaterally at T10 and L3, was recorded. The ergonomic risk factors associated with manual lifting tasks were evaluated by comparing the average amplitude of EMG signals from the erector spinae muscles. The EMG average amplitude for lifting the load of 13 kg was 14.3 % greater than that for lifting the load of 6kg (t= -10.93, P<0.01).The EMG average amplitude at the site of L3 was 10.3 % greater than that at the site of T10 (t= -7.98, P<0.01). The EMG average amplitude when performing "fast" lift was 5.9 %greater than the "slow" lift (t= -4.63, P<0.01 ). The posture of lifting affected the EMG average amplitude.It was lowest with semi-squat posture and greatest with squat posture (F= 27.76, P<0.01). The result of multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the loads of lifting, the size of box, horizontal distance, posture of lifting, the site of the spine subjected to force, lifting speed were the factors affecting the EMG average amplitude. The most significant factor was the loads of lifting,followed by the site of the spine subjected to force and the lifting speed in terms of risk. The ergonomic risk factors associated with manual lifting tasks includes the loads, posture, lifting speed,horizontal distance, the site of the spine subjected to force etc. The results of signal amplitude of EMG from the erector spinae muscles showed that semi-squat posture is the best posture for lifting tasks.

  6. Laryngeal electromyography in movement disorders: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimaid Paulo A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes preliminary laryngeal electromyography (LEMG data and botulinum toxin treatment in patients with dysphonia due to movement disorders. Twenty-five patients who had been clinically selected for botulinum toxin administration were examined, 19 with suspected laryngeal dystonia or spasmodic dysphonia (SD, 5 with vocal tremor, and 1 with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. LEMG evaluations were performed before botulinum toxin administration using monopolar electrodes. Electromyography was consistent with dystonia in 14 patients and normal in 5, and differences in frequency suggesting essential tremor in 3 and Parkinson tremors in 2. The different LEMG patterns and significant improvement in our patients from botulinum toxin therapy has led us to perform laryngeal electromyography as a routine in UNICAMP movement disorders ambulatory.

  7. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory muscle electromyography and dyspnea during exercise in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Andrew H; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Camp, Pat G; Reid, W Darlene; Romer, Lee M; Guenette, Jordan A

    2017-03-02

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has consistently been shown to reduce exertional dyspnea in health and disease; however, the physiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. A growing body of literature suggests that dyspnea intensity can largely be explained by an awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, as indirectly measured using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). Accordingly, we sought to determine if improvements in dyspnea following IMT can be explained by decreases in inspiratory muscle EMG activity. Twenty-five healthy recreationally-active men completed a detailed familiarization visit followed by two maximal incremental cycle exercise tests separated by 5 weeks of randomly assigned pressure threshold IMT or sham control training (SC). The IMT group (n=12) performed 30 inspiratory efforts twice daily against a 30 repetition maximum intensity. The SC group (n=13) performed a daily bout of 60 inspiratory efforts against 10% maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), with no weekly adjustments. Dyspnea intensity was measured throughout exercise using the modified 0-10 Borg scale. Sternocleidomastoid and scalene EMG were measured using surface electrodes whereas EMGdi was measured using a multi-pair esophageal electrode catheter. IMT significantly improved MIP (pre:-138±45 vs. post:-160±43cmH2O, pmuscle EMG during exercise in either group. Improvements in dyspnea intensity ratings following IMT in healthy humans cannot be explained by changes in the electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles.

  8. Immediate effect of the resilient splint evaluated using surface electromyography in patients with TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, André Luís; Silva, Bruno Caetano; Gentil, Flávio Henrique Umeda; Sforza, Chiarella; da Silva, Marco Antonio Moreira Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the immediate effect of resilient splints through surface electromyography testing and to compare the findings with the electromyographic profiles of asymptomatic subjects. The participants were 30 subjects, 15 patients with TMD (TMD Group) and 15 healthy subjects (Control Group), classified according to Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD) Axis I. A resilient occlusal splint was made for each patient in the TMD Group from two mm thick silicon to cover all teeth. The EMG examination was performed before and immediately after installing the splint. Three tests were performed as follows: 1. Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) using cotton rolls (standards test); 2. MVC in maximal intercuspation position; and 3. MVC with the splint in position. The EMG signal was recorded for five seconds. EMG indices were calculated to assess muscle symmetry, jaw torque, and impact. There was a statistically significant difference when comparing the results among the study groups. The symmetry index values in the Control Group were higher than the TMD Initial Group and similar to the TMD Group after the installation of the splint. The index values of torque were higher in TMD Initial Group when compared with the Controls. Impact values were lower than normal values in the TMD Initial Group and restored upon installation of the splint. The resilient occlusal splints may be used as complementary or adjunctive treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

  9. Diagnosis of Ulnar Nerve Entrapment at the Arcade of Struthers with Electromyography and Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, Wesley N; Hagerty, Sarah E; Huyhn, Lisa; Jordan, Adrienne C; Munin, Michael C; Spiess, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    Ulnar neuropathy is caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in the upper extremity, frequently occurring at the level of the elbow or wrist. Rarely, ulnar nerve entrapment may be seen proximal to the elbow. This report details a case of ulnar neuropathy diagnosed and localized to the arcade of Struthers with electromyography (EMG) and ultrasound (US) imaging and confirmed at time of operative release. US imaging and EMG findings were used to preoperatively localize the level of compression in a patient presenting with left ulnar neuropathy. In this case, ulnar entrapment 8 cm proximal to the medial epicondyle was diagnosed. Surgical release was performed and verified the level of entrapment at the arcade of Struthers in the upper arm. Alleviation of symptoms was noted at 8-week follow-up; no complications occurred. US imaging can be used in complement with EMG studies to properly diagnose and localize the level of ulnar nerve entrapment. This facilitates full release of the nerve and may prevent the need for revision surgery.

  10. A Wavelet-Based Method to Predict Muscle Forces From Surface Electromyography Signals in Weightlifting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaofeng Wei; Feng Tian; Gang Tang; Chengtao Wang

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a wavelet-based method to predict muscle forces from surface electromyography (EMG) signals in vivo.The weightlifting motor task was implemented as the case study.EMG signals of biceps brachii,triceps brachii and deltoid muscles were recorded when the subject carried out a standard weightlifting motor task.The wavelet-based algorithm was used to process raw EMG signals and extract features which could be input to the Hill-type muscle force models to predict muscle forces.At the same time,the musculoskeletal model of subject's weightlifting motor task was built and simulated using the Computed Muscle Control (CMC) method via a motion capture experiment.The results of CMC were compared with the muscle force predictions by the proposed method.The correlation coefficient between two results was 0.99(p<0.01).However,the proposed method was easier and more efficiency than the CMC method.It has potential to be used clinically to predict muscle forces in vivo.

  11. Effect of window length on performance of the elbow-joint angle prediction based on electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triwiyanto; Wahyunggoro, Oyas; Adi Nugroho, Hanung; Herianto

    2017-05-01

    The high performance of the elbow joint angle prediction is essential on the development of the devices based on electromyography (EMG) control. The performance of the prediction depends on the feature of extraction parameters such as window length. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of the window length on the performance of the elbow-joint angle prediction. The prediction algorithm consists of zero-crossing feature extraction and second order of Butterworth low pass filter. The feature was used to extract the EMG signal by varying window length. The EMG signal was collected from the biceps muscle while the elbow was moved in the flexion and extension motion. The subject performed the elbow motion by holding a 1-kg load and moved the elbow in different periods (12 seconds, 8 seconds and 6 seconds). The results indicated that the window length affected the performance of the prediction. The 250 window lengths yielded the best performance of the prediction algorithm of (mean±SD) root mean square error = 5.68%±1.53% and Person’s correlation = 0.99±0.0059.

  12. Effects of electrocardiography contamination and comparison of ECG removal methods on upper trapezius electromyography recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Ryan J; Maluf, Katrina S

    2014-12-01

    Electromyography (EMG) recordings from the trapezius are often contaminated by the electrocardiography (ECG) signal, making it difficult to distinguish low-level muscle activity from muscular rest. This study investigates the influence of ECG contamination on EMG amplitude and frequency estimations in the upper trapezius during muscular rest and low-level contractions. A new method of ECG contamination removal, filtered template subtraction (FTS), is described and compared to 30 Hz high-pass filter (HPF) and averaged template subtraction (ATS) methods. FTS creates a unique template of each ECG artifact using a low-pass filtered copy of the contaminated signal, which is subtracted from contaminated periods in the original signal. ECG contamination results in an over-estimation of EMG amplitude during rest in the upper trapezius, with negligible effects on amplitude and frequency estimations during low-intensity isometric contractions. FTS and HPF successfully removed ECG contamination from periods of muscular rest, yet introduced errors during muscle contraction. Conversely, ATS failed to fully remove ECG contamination during muscular rest, yet did not introduce errors during muscle contraction. The relative advantages and disadvantages of different ECG contamination removal methods should be considered in the context of the specific motor tasks that require analysis.

  13. Wrist Rehabilitation Assisted by an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robot After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ling; Tong, Raymond Kai-yu; Ho, Newmen S K; Xue, Jing-jing; Rong, Wei; Li, Leonard S W

    2015-09-01

    Augmented physical training with assistance from robot and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may introduce intensive motor improvement in chronic stroke. To compare the rehabilitation effectiveness achieved by NMES robot-assisted wrist training and that by robot-assisted training. This study was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Twenty-six hemiplegic subjects with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to receive 20-session wrist training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven NMES robot (NMES robot group, n = 11) and with an EMG-driven robot (robot group, n = 15), completed within 7 consecutive weeks. Clinical scores, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to evaluate the training effects before and after the training, as well as 3 months later. An EMG parameter, muscle co-contraction index, was also applied to investigate the session-by-session variation in muscular coordination patterns during the training. The improvement in FMA (shoulder/elbow, wrist/hand) obtained in the NMES robot group was more significant than the robot group (P application in the treatment could bring more improvements in the distal motor functions and faster rehabilitation progress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Training-related changes in the EMG-moment relationship during isometric contractions: Further evidence of improved control of muscle activation in strength-trained men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarantini, David; Bru, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of using electromyography (EMG) to track muscle activity has raised the question of its relationship with the effort exerted by the muscles around the joints. However, the EMG-moment relationship is yet to be fully defined, and increasing knowledge of this topic could contribute to research in motor control and to the development of EMG-based algorithms and devices. With regards the training-related adaptations at the peripheral and central level, the present study investigated the effect of strength training on EMG-moment relationship. Our aim was to clarify its nature and gain further understanding of how morphological and neural factors may affect its form. The EMG-moment relationship was determined during knee flexion and extension isometric contractions performed by strength-trained male athletes and untrained male participants. The results showed that strength training induced linearity of the EMG-moment relationship concomitantly with enhanced maximum force production capacity and decreased co-activation of knee agonist-antagonist muscle pair. These results clarified discordant results regarding the linear or curved nature of the EMG-moment in isometric conditions and suggested that the remarkable linearity of the EMG-moment found in trained participants could indicate improved control of muscle activation.

  15. Comparison between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG Mapping for Identifying Dystonic Superficial Muscles in Primary Cervical Dystonia: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Su Jin [Seoul National University School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Kwang Hong; Lee, Ji Young; Cho, Sook Kyung; Yu, Jang; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Sungkyunkawn University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study was conducted to compare {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and electromyography (EMG) mapping in patients with primary cervical dystonia (PCD) to find dystonic superficial cervical muscles. Ten consecutive patients with PCD (M:F=5:5, age 44{+-}13 years) whose dystonic posture was not relieved with conventional muscle relaxant therapy were included. Target cervical muscles for the comparison between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG mapping were four representative superficial bilateral cervical muscles: splenius capitis muscle, sternocleidomstoid muscle, upper trapeziums muscle, and levitator scapulae muscle. The diagnostic efficacy was compared between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG mapping using physical exam and measurement of rotation angle as the gold standard. Among 80 muscles evaluated, there were 21 (26%) dystonic superficial cervical muscles assessed with physical exam and motion analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for localizing dystonic muscles were 76, 92, and 88% for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and 95, 66, and 74% for EMG mapping, respectively. The sensitivity of EMG mapping was significantly higher than that of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. In contrast, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is more specific and accurate than EMG mapping for finding superficial dystonic cervical muscles. The high sensitivity of EMG mapping suggests that {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG mapping are complementary for finding dystonic superficial cervical muscles.

  16. Surface EMG pattern recognition for real-time control of a wrist exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokhar Zeeshan O

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface electromyography (sEMG signals have been used in numerous studies for the classification of hand gestures and movements and successfully implemented in the position control of different prosthetic hands for amputees. sEMG could also potentially be used for controlling wearable devices which could assist persons with reduced muscle mass, such as those suffering from sarcopenia. While using sEMG for position control, estimation of the intended torque of the user could also provide sufficient information for an effective force control of the hand prosthesis or assistive device. This paper presents the use of pattern recognition to estimate the torque applied by a human wrist and its real-time implementation to control a novel two degree of freedom wrist exoskeleton prototype (WEP, which was specifically developed for this work. Methods Both sEMG data from four muscles of the forearm and wrist torque were collected from eight volunteers by using a custom-made testing rig. The features that were extracted from the sEMG signals included root mean square (rms EMG amplitude, autoregressive (AR model coefficients and waveform length. Support Vector Machines (SVM was employed to extract classes of different force intensity from the sEMG signals. After assessing the off-line performance of the used classification technique, the WEP was used to validate in real-time the proposed classification scheme. Results The data gathered from the volunteers were divided into two sets, one with nineteen classes and the second with thirteen classes. Each set of data was further divided into training and testing data. It was observed that the average testing accuracy in the case of nineteen classes was about 88% whereas the average accuracy in the case of thirteen classes reached about 96%. Classification and control algorithm implemented in the WEP was executed in less than 125 ms. Conclusions The results of this study showed that

  17. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, S Hamid; Wotiz, Robert P; De Luca, Carlo J

    2008-08-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probability classifier adapted from the original precision decomposition system (PD I) of LeFever and De Luca (25, 26), an artificial intelligence approach has been used to develop a multiclassifier system (PD II) for addressing some of the experimentally identified problem situations. On a database of indwelling EMG signals reflecting such conditions, the fully automatic PD II system is found to achieve a decomposition accuracy of 86.0% despite the fact that its results include low-amplitude action potential trains that are not decomposable at all via systems such as PD I. Accuracy was established by comparing the decompositions of indwelling EMG signals obtained from two sensors. At the end of the automatic PD II decomposition procedure, the accuracy may be enhanced to nearly 100% via an interactive editor, a particularly significant fact for the previously indecomposable trains.

  18. Intra-session and inter-day reliability of forearm surface EMG during varying hand grip forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Oskouei, Alireza; Paulin, Michael G; Carman, Allan B

    2013-02-01

    Surface electromyography (EMG) is widely used to evaluate forearm muscle function and predict hand grip forces; however, there is a lack of literature on its intra-session and inter-day reliability. The aim of this study was to determine reliability of surface EMG of finger and wrist flexor muscles across varying grip forces. Surface EMG was measured from six forearm flexor muscles of 23 healthy adults. Eleven of these subjects undertook inter-day test-retest. Six repetitions of five randomized isometric grip forces between 0% and 80% of maximum force (MVC) were recorded and normalized to MVC. Intra- and inter-day reliability were calculated through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Normalized EMG produced excellent intra-session ICC of 0.90 when repeated measurements were averaged. Intra-session SEM was low at low grip forces, however, corresponding normalized SEM was high (23-45%) due to the small magnitude of EMG signals. This may limit the ability to evaluate finer forearm muscle function and hand grip forces in daily tasks. Combining EMG of functionally related muscles improved intra-session SEM, improving within-subject reliability without taking multiple measurements. Removing and replacing electrodes inter-day produced poor ICC (ICC < 0.50) but did not substantially affect SEM.

  19. EMG-Based Continuous and Simultaneous Estimation of Arm Kinematics in Able-Bodied Individuals and Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the potential biological signals for human-machine interactions (brain, nerve, and muscle signals, electromyography (EMG widely used in clinical setting can be obtained non-invasively as motor commands to control movements. The aim of this study was to develop a model for continuous and simultaneous decoding of multi-joint dynamic arm movements based on multi-channel surface EMG signals crossing the joints, leading to application of myoelectrically controlled exoskeleton robots for upper-limb rehabilitation. Twenty subjects were recruited for this study including 10 stroke subjects and 10 able-bodied subjects. The subjects performed free arm reaching movements in the horizontal plane with an exoskeleton robot. The shoulder, elbow and wrist movements and surface EMG signals from six muscles crossing the three joints were recorded. A non-linear autoregressive exogenous (NARX model was developed to continuously decode the shoulder, elbow and wrist movements based solely on the EMG signals. The shoulder, elbow and wrist movements were decoded accurately based only on the EMG inputs in all the subjects, with the variance accounted for (VAF > 98% for all three joints. The proposed approach is capable of simultaneously and continuously decoding multi-joint movements of the human arm by taking into account the non-linear mappings between the muscle EMGs and joint movements, which may provide less effortful control of robotic exoskeletons for rehabilitation training of individuals with neurological disorders and arm impairment.

  20. Application of EMG monitoring to microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm%肌电图监测在面肌痉挛微血管减压术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄进; 吴祥奎; 张岩松; 邵君飞

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨面肌肌电图监测在面肌痉挛微血管减压术(MVD)中的应用价值。方法回顾性分析MVD治疗的72例面肌痉挛患者的临床资料,术中仔细辨别并处理责任血管,通过实时记录面肌的肌电反应了解减压效果。结果60例有明确责任血管压迫,6例单纯性蛛网膜粘连或增厚,6例存在隐匿性责任血管。术后异常肌电图波形完全消失54例,基本消失16例,无明显变化2例。术后临床症状完全消失57例,部分消失14例,无改善1例;总有效率为98.6%(71/72)。结论面肌肌电图监测可实时了解术中减压效果,对面肌痉挛的MVD,尤其是隐匿性责任血管所致面肌痉挛具有重要的指导作用。%Objective To explore the applied value of intraoperative electromyography (EMG) monitoring to microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm. Methods The clinical data of 72 patients with hemifacial spasm, who underwent microvascular decompression under intraoperative EMG monitoring, were analyzed retrospectively. The real-time recording of EMG response of facial muscles was performed by the needle electrode put into the ipsilateral orbicularis oculi muscle, orbicularis oris muscle and masseter. Intraoperative careful identification and treatment of vessels responsible for hemifacial spasm in order to understand the effect of decompression and objectively evaluate the prognoses of the patients. Results The blood vessels responsible for the hemifacial spasm were definitely determined in 60 patients. The arachnoid adhesion or thickening was found in 6 patients. The occult blood vessels probably were the vessels responsible for the hemifacial spasm in 6 patients. The abnormal EMG waveforms completely disappeared in 54 patients, almost disappeared in 16 and were unchanged in 2 after the decompression. The clinical symptoms disappeared completely in 57 patients, partly in 14 and were unchanged in 1 after the decompression. The

  1. Time-varying surface electromyography topography as a prognostic tool for chronic low back pain rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Kwok, Jerry Weilun; Tse, Jessica Yuk-Hang; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei

    2014-06-01

    Nonsurgical rehabilitation therapy is a commonly used strategy to treat chronic low back pain (LBP). The selection of the most appropriate therapeutic options is still a big challenge in clinical practices. Surface electromyography (sEMG) topography has been proposed to be an objective assessment of LBP rehabilitation. The quantitative analysis of dynamic sEMG would provide an objective tool of prognosis for LBP rehabilitation. To evaluate the prognostic value of quantitative sEMG topographic analysis and to verify the accuracy of the performance of proposed time-varying topographic parameters for identifying the patients who have better response toward the rehabilitation program. A retrospective study of consecutive patients. Thirty-eight patients with chronic nonspecific LBP and 43 healthy subjects. The accuracy of the time-varying quantitative sEMG topographic analysis for monitoring LBP rehabilitation progress was determined by calculating the corresponding receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Physiologic measure was the sEMG during lumbar flexion and extension. Patients who suffered from chronic nonspecific LBP without the history of back surgery and any medical conditions causing acute exacerbation of LBP during the clinical test were enlisted to perform the clinical test during the 12-week physiotherapy (PT) treatment. Low back pain patients were classified into two groups: "responding" and "nonresponding" based on the clinical assessment. The responding group referred to the LBP patients who began to recover after the PT treatment, whereas the nonresponding group referred to some LBP patients who did not recover or got worse after the treatment. The results of the time-varying analysis in the responding group were compared with those in the nonresponding group. In addition, the accuracy of the analysis was analyzed through ROC curves. The time-varying analysis showed discrepancies in the root-mean-square difference (RMSD) parameters between the

  2. Surface EMG of the masticatory muscles (Part 3): Impact of changes to the dynamic occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugger, S; Schindler, H J; Kordass, B; Hugger, A

    2013-01-01

    The third part of this literature review on the clinical relevance of surface electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles summarizes the results of clinical studies in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), preferably randomized controlled trials, examining the impact of changes to the dynamic occlusion. Clenching in left and right laterotrusive positions results in decrease in EMG activity of masseter and temporalis muscles on both working and non-working side. Masseter muscle exhibits largely uniform bilateral activity in laterotrusive positions, independent of canine guidance or group function with and without non-working side contacts. There is a dominance of temporalis muscle activity on the working side and, in case of posterior contacts and balancing contacts, temporalis muscle activity increases and changes from an unilateral to a symmetrical pattern.

  3. Acquisition and Analysis of EMG Signals to Recognize Multiple Hand Movements for Prosthetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Gini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in developing active prosthesis is how to control them in a natural way. In order to increase the effectiveness of hand prostheses there is a need in better exploiting electromyography (EMG signals. After an analysis of the movements necessary for grasping, we individuated five movements for the wrist-hand mobility. Then we designed the basic electronics and software for the acquisition and the analysis of the EMG signals. We built a small size electronic device capable of registering them that can be integrated into a hand prosthesis. Among all the numerous muscles that move the fingers, we have chosen the ones in the forearm and positioned only two electrodes. To recognize the operation, we developed a classification system, using a novel integration of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and wavelet features.

  4. EMG signals characterization in three states of contraction by fuzzy network and feature extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhlesabadifarahani, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Neuro-muscular and musculoskeletal disorders and injuries highly affect the life style and the motion abilities of an individual. This brief highlights a systematic method for detection of the level of muscle power declining in musculoskeletal and Neuro-muscular disorders. The neuro-fuzzy system is trained with 70 percent of the recorded Electromyography (EMG) cut off window and then used for classification and modeling purposes. The neuro-fuzzy classifier is validated in comparison to some other well-known classifiers in classification of the recorded EMG signals with the three states of contractions corresponding to the extracted features. Different structures of the neuro-fuzzy classifier are also comparatively analyzed to find the optimum structure of the classifier used.

  5. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  6. Design of sEMG assembly to detect external anal sphincter activity: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraz, Arsam; Leaker, Brian; Mosse, Charles Alexander; Solomon, Eskinder; Craggs, Michael; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2017-09-13

    Conditional trans-rectal stimulation of the pudendal nerve could provide a viable solution to treat hyperreflexive bladder in spinal cord injury. A set threshold of the amplitude estimate of the external anal sphincter surface electromyography (sEMG) may be used as the trigger signal. The efficacy of such a device should be tested in a large scale clinical trial. As such a probe should remain in situ for several hours while patients attend to their daily routine, the recording electrodes should be designed to be large enough to maintain good contact while observing design constraints. The objective of this study was to arrive at a design for intra-anal sEMG recording electrodes for the subsequent clinical trials while deriving the possible recording and processing parameters. Approach: Having in mind existing solutions and based on theoretical and anatomical considerations, a set of four multi-electrode probes were designed and developed. These were tested in a healthy subject and the measured sEMG traces were recorded and appropriately processed. Main results: It was shown that while comparatively large electrodes record sEMG traces that are not sufficiently correlated with the external anal sphincter contractions, smaller electrodes may not maintain a stable electrode tissue contact. It was shown that 3 mm wide and 1 cm long electrodes with 5 mm inter-electrode spacing, in agreement with Nyquist sampling, placed 1 cm from the orifice may intra-anally record a sEMG trace sufficiently correlated with external anal sphincter activity. Significance: The outcome of this study can be used in any biofeedback, treatment or diagnostic application where the activity of the external anal sphincter sEMG should be detected for an extended period of time. . © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  7. Lower extremity EMG-driven modeling of walking with automated adjustment of musculoskeletal geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andrew J; Patten, Carolynn; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2017-01-01

    Neuromusculoskeletal disorders affecting walking ability are often difficult to manage, in part due to limited understanding of how a patient's lower extremity muscle excitations contribute to the patient's lower extremity joint moments. To assist in the study of these disorders, researchers have developed electromyography (EMG) driven neuromusculoskeletal models utilizing scaled generic musculoskeletal geometry. While these models can predict individual muscle contributions to lower extremity joint moments during walking, the accuracy of the predictions can be hindered by errors in the scaled geometry. This study presents a novel EMG-driven modeling method that automatically adjusts surrogate representations of the patient's musculoskeletal geometry to improve prediction of lower extremity joint moments during walking. In addition to commonly adjusted neuromusculoskeletal model parameters, the proposed method adjusts model parameters defining muscle-tendon lengths, velocities, and moment arms. We evaluated our EMG-driven modeling method using data collected from a high-functioning hemiparetic subject walking on an instrumented treadmill at speeds ranging from 0.4 to 0.8 m/s. EMG-driven model parameter values were calibrated to match inverse dynamic moments for five degrees of freedom in each leg while keeping musculoskeletal geometry close to that of an initial scaled musculoskeletal model. We found that our EMG-driven modeling method incorporating automated adjustment of musculoskeletal geometry predicted net joint moments during walking more accurately than did the same method without geometric adjustments. Geometric adjustments improved moment prediction errors by 25% on average and up to 52%, with the largest improvements occurring at the hip. Predicted adjustments to musculoskeletal geometry were comparable to errors reported in the literature between scaled generic geometric models and measurements made from imaging data. Our results demonstrate that with

  8. Intramuscular pressure: A better tool than EMG to optimize exercise for long-duration space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, A. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Styf, J.; Kahan, N.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    A serious problem experienced by astronauts during long-duration space flight is muscle atrophy. In order to develop countermeasures for this problem, a simple method for monitoring in vivo function of specific muscles is needed. Previous studies document that both intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) provide quantitative indices of muscle contraction force during isometric exercise. However, at present there are no data available concerning the usefulness of IMP versus EMG during dynamic exercise. Methods: IMP (Myopress catheter) and surface EMG activity were measured continuously and simultaneously in the tibalis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles of 9 normal male volunteers (28-54 years). These parameters were recorded during both concentric and eccentric exercises which consisted of plantarflexon and dorsiflexon of the ankle joint. A Lido Active Isokinetic Dynamometer concurrently recorded ankle joint torque and position. Results: Intramuscular pressure correlated linearly with contraction force for both SOL (r exp 2 = 0.037) and TA (R exp 2 = 0.716 and r exp 2 = 0.802, respectively). During eccentric exercises, SOL and TA IMP also correlated linearly with contraction force (r(exp 2) = 0.883 and r(exp 2) = 0.904 respectively), but SOL and TA EMG correlated poorly with force (r(exp 2) = 0.489 and r(exp 2) = 0.702 respectively). Conclusion: IMP measurement provides a better index of muscle contraction force than EMG during concentric and eccentric exercise. IMP reflects intrinsic mechanical properties of individual muscles, such as length tension relationships. Although invasive, IMP provides a more powerful tool and EMG for developing exercise hardware and protocols for astronauts exposed to long-duration space flight.

  9. EMG Activity of Masseter Muscles in the Elderly According to Rheological Properties of Solid Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Au Jin; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Park, Hyoung Su; Park, Ki-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    To assess the impact of aging on masticatory muscle function according to changes in hardness of solid food. Each of fifteen healthy elderly and young people were selected. Subjects were asked to consume cooked rice, which was processed using the guidelines of the Universal Design Foods concept for elderly people (Japan Care Food Conference 2012). The properties of each cooked rice were categorized as grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 (5×10(3), 2×10(4), 5×10(4), and 5×10(5) N/m(2)) respectively. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to measure masseter activity from food ingestion to swallowing of test foods. The raw data was normalized by the ratio of sEMG activity to maximal voluntary contraction and compared among subjects. The data was divided according to each sequence of mastication and then calculated within the parameters of EMG activities. Intraoral tongue pressure was significantly higher in the young than in the elderly (psEMG data of the masseter can provide valuable information to aid in the selection of foods according to hardness for the elderly. The results also support the necessity of specialized food preparation or products for the elderly.

  10. A Scheme of sEMG Feature Extraction for Improving Myoelectric Pattern Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai Ding; Liang Wang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a feature extraction scheme based on sparse representation considering the non⁃stationary property of surface electromyography ( sEMG ) . Sparse Bayesian Learning ( SBL ) algorithm was introduced to extract the feature with optimal class separability to improve recognition accuracies of multi⁃movement patterns. The SBL algorithm exploited the compressibility ( or weak sparsity) of sEMG signal in some transformed domains. The proposed feature extracted by using the SBL algorithm was named SRC. The feature SRC represented time⁃varying characteristics of sEMG signal very effectively. We investigated the effect of the feature SRC by comparing with other fourteen individual features and eighteen multi⁃feature sets in offline recognition. The results demonstrated the feature SRC revealed the important dynamic information in the sEMG signals. And the multi⁃feature sets formed by the feature SRC and other single features yielded more superior performance on recognition accuracy. The best average recognition accuracy of 91. 67% was gained by using SVM classifier with the multi⁃feature set combining the feature SRC and the feature wavelength ( WL ) . The proposed feature extraction scheme is promising for multi⁃movement recognition with high accuracy.

  11. A Review of Classification Techniques of EMG Signals during Isotonic and Isometric Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazmi, Nurhazimah; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Azizi; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiroh; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Zamzuri, Hairi; Mazlan, Saiful Amri

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, there has been major interest in the exposure to physical therapy during rehabilitation. Several publications have demonstrated its usefulness in clinical/medical and human machine interface (HMI) applications. An automated system will guide the user to perform the training during rehabilitation independently. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography (EMG) beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as movement analysis. This paper gives an overview of the numerous methods available to recognize motion patterns of EMG signals for both isotonic and isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who would like to select the most appropriate methodology in classifying motion patterns, especially during different types of contractions. For feature extraction, the probability density function (PDF) of EMG signals will be the main interest of this study. Following that, a brief explanation of the different methods for pre-processing, feature extraction and classifying EMG signals will be compared in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above.

  12. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  13. Reproducibility of surface EMG in the human masseter and anterior temporalis muscle areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroflorio, Tommaso; Icardi, Katia; Torsello, Ferruccio; Deregibus, Andrea; Debernardi, Cesare; Bracco, Pietro

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings, made at mandibular rest position from the masseter and temporalis anterior areas, are intra- and inter-session reproducible. A template was designed and built to permit the correct electrode placement from one session to the next session. A sample of 18 subjects was examined. Two groups, homogeneous for age, sex, and craniofacial morphology were selected. The first group included asymptomatic subjects with no signs or symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) and the second group included patients suffering from muscle-related TMD. Data were obtained from different sEMG recordings made at mandibular rest position in the same session and in different sessions, repositioning the electrodes using a template designed for that purpose. The electromyograph used in this, study is part of the EMG K6-I Win Diagnostic System. Results showed that reproducibility of sEMG signals from the masseter and anterior temporalis areas at mandibular rest position is possible.

  14. A Review of Classification Techniques of EMG Signals during Isotonic and Isometric Contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhazimah Nazmi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been major interest in the exposure to physical therapy during rehabilitation. Several publications have demonstrated its usefulness in clinical/medical and human machine interface (HMI applications. An automated system will guide the user to perform the training during rehabilitation independently. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography (EMG beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as movement analysis. This paper gives an overview of the numerous methods available to recognize motion patterns of EMG signals for both isotonic and isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who would like to select the most appropriate methodology in classifying motion patterns, especially during different types of contractions. For feature extraction, the probability density function (PDF of EMG signals will be the main interest of this study. Following that, a brief explanation of the different methods for pre-processing, feature extraction and classifying EMG signals will be compared in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above.

  15. Control of depth of anesthesia using MUSMAR--exploring electromyography and the analgesic dose as accessible disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Catarina S; Mendonça, Teresa; Lemos, João M; Amorim, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    The problem of controlling the level of depth of anesthesia measured by the Bispectral Index (BIS) of the electroencephalogram of patients under general anesthesia, is considered. It is assumed that the manipulated variable is the infusion rate of the hypnotic drug propofol, while the drug remifentanil is also administered for analgesia. Since these two drugs interact, the administration rate of remifentanil is considered as an accessible disturbance in combination with the level of electromyography (EMG) that also interferes with the BIS signal. In order to tackle the high uncertainty present on the system, the predictive adaptive controller MUSMAR is used. The performance of the controller is illustrated by means of simulation with 45 patient individual adjusted models, which incorporate the effect of the drugs interaction on BIS. This controller structure proved to be robust to the EMG and remifentanil disturbances, patient variability, changing reference values and noise.

  16. The influence of digital filter type, amplitude normalisation method, and co-contraction algorithm on clinically relevant surface electromyography data during clinical movement assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaprakash, Daniel; Weir, Gillian J; Dunne, James J; Alderson, Jacqueline A; Donnelly, Cyril J

    2016-12-01

    There is a large and growing body of surface electromyography (sEMG) research using laboratory-specific signal processing procedures (i.e., digital filter type and amplitude normalisation protocols) and data analyses methods (i.e., co-contraction algorithms) to acquire practically meaningful information from these data. As a result, the ability to compare sEMG results between studies is, and continues to be challenging. The aim of this study was to determine if digital filter type, amplitude normalisation method, and co-contraction algorithm could influence the practical or clinical interpretation of processed sEMG data. Sixteen elite female athletes were recruited. During data collection, sEMG data was recorded from nine lower limb muscles while completing a series of calibration and clinical movement assessment trials (running and sidestepping). Three analyses were conducted: (1) signal processing with two different digital filter types (Butterworth or critically damped), (2) three amplitude normalisation methods, and (3) three co-contraction ratio algorithms. Results showed the choice of digital filter did not influence the clinical interpretation of sEMG; however, choice of amplitude normalisation method and co-contraction algorithm did influence the clinical interpretation of the running and sidestepping task. Care is recommended when choosing amplitude normalisation method and co-contraction algorithms if researchers/clinicians are interested in comparing sEMG data between studies.

  17. EMG reactivity and oral habits among young adult headache sufferers and painfree controls in a scheduled-waiting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason C; Nicholson, Robert A; Gramling, Sandra E

    2003-12-01

    Previous research has shown that patients with facial pain exhibit a pattern of physiological and behavioral reactivity to scheduled-waiting tasks that may help account for the development of facial pain. The present study extended this line of research by examining the psychophysiological reactivity of headache sufferers in a similar task. A total of 34 frequent headache sufferers screened by International Headache Society (IHS) criteria and 13 painfree controls completed a psychophysiological assessment consisting of 4 phases (adaptation, free-play, scheduled-play, and recovery) that included a scheduled-waiting condition (scheduled-play) designed to produce adjunctive behavior. Masseter and frontalis EMG were measured continuously during each phase and self-reported oral habits and pain ratings were collected following each phase. A significant interaction and group effect was found on frontalis EMG, with the headache group exhibiting elevated EMG levels across the phases, whereas the control group exhibited increasing EMG levels that peaked during the scheduled-play phase. Only a significant phase effect was found on masseter EMG, with the highest EMG levels recorded during the scheduled-play phase for both groups. In addition, a significant phase effect was found on self-reported oral habits data. Overall, these results provide general support for the adjunctive behavior effect, but the predicted difference in magnitude between the groups was not found.

  18. Classification of Anticipatory Signals for Grasp and Release from Surface Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Ho Chit; Shah, Julie A; Stirling, Leia A

    2016-10-25

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is a technique for recording natural muscle activation signals, which can serve as control inputs for exoskeletons and prosthetic devices. Previous experiments have incorporated these signals using both classical and pattern-recognition control methods in order to actuate such devices. We used the results of an experiment incorporating grasp and release actions with object contact to develop an intent-recognition system based on Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and continuous-emission hidden Markov models (HMM) of sEMG data. We tested this system with data collected from 16 individuals using a forearm band with distributed sEMG sensors. The data contain trials with shifted band alignments to assess robustness to sensor placement. This study evaluated and found that pattern-recognition-based methods could classify transient anticipatory sEMG signals in the presence of shifted sensor placement and object contact. With the best-performing classifier, the effect of label lengths in the training data was also examined. A mean classification accuracy of 75.96% was achieved through a unigram HMM method with five mixture components. Classification accuracy on different sub-movements was found to be limited by the length of the shortest sub-movement, which means that shorter sub-movements within dynamic sequences require larger training sets to be classified correctly. This classification of user intent is a potential control mechanism for a dynamic grasping task involving user contact with external objects and noise. Further work is required to test its performance as part of an exoskeleton controller, which involves contact with actuated external surfaces.

  19. Real-time intelligent pattern recognition algorithm for surface EMG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahed Mehran

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromyography (EMG is the study of muscle function through the inquiry of electrical signals that the muscles emanate. EMG signals collected from the surface of the skin (Surface Electromyogram: sEMG can be used in different applications such as recognizing musculoskeletal neural based patterns intercepted for hand prosthesis movements. Current systems designed for controlling the prosthetic hands either have limited functions or can only be used to perform simple movements or use excessive amount of electrodes in order to achieve acceptable results. In an attempt to overcome these problems we have proposed an intelligent system to recognize hand movements and have provided a user assessment routine to evaluate the correctness of executed movements. Methods We propose to use an intelligent approach based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS integrated with a real-time learning scheme to identify hand motion commands. For this purpose and to consider the effect of user evaluation on recognizing hand movements, vision feedback is applied to increase the capability of our system. By using this scheme the user may assess the correctness of the performed hand movement. In this work a hybrid method for training fuzzy system, consisting of back-propagation (BP and least mean square (LMS is utilized. Also in order to optimize the number of fuzzy rules, a subtractive clustering algorithm has been developed. To design an effective system, we consider a conventional scheme of EMG pattern recognition system. To design this system we propose to use two different sets of EMG features, namely time domain (TD and time-frequency representation (TFR. Also in order to decrease the undesirable effects of the dimension of these feature sets, principle component analysis (PCA is utilized. Results In this study, the myoelectric signals considered for classification consists of six unique hand movements. Features chosen for EMG signal

  20. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  1. Relationship among the myelography, MRI and EMG in young patients with low back pain or radiating pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Youn [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Jae [Gwang-Ju City Geriatiric Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We wanted to evaluate the relationship among the myelography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electromyography (EMG) findings in young patients with low back pain, and we wanted to assess the significance of the spinal geometric measurements as well as type of disc herniation seen on MRI. Forty-four young men with lower back pain were included, and they were all clinically suspected of suffering with lumbar disc herniation. All of them underwent myelography, MRI and EMG. We measured spinal geometry including the anteroposterior diameters of the central canal and thecal sac, the interlaminar distance, the width of the lateral recess and the thickness of the ligamentum flavum, and we evaluated for root deviation as well as disc herniation on the MRIs. We compared the types of disc herniation on MRI with the myelography and EMG findings. Also, we investigated the correlation of the spinal geometric measurements on MRI with the EMG and myelography findings. The types of disc herniation on MRI were not significantly related to the myelography ({rho} = 0.298) and EMG findings ({rho} = 0.372). The EMG findings were not related to either the myelography findings ({rho} = 0.435) or the spinal geometric measurements ({rho} > 0.05) on MRI. Nerve root compression that was noted on myelography was related to the thecal sac AP diameter ({rho} = 0.016) and the width of the lateral recess ({rho} = 0.011). There were no correlations between myelography and the findings of root deviation on MRI ({rho} = 0.052). MRI can play an excellent diagnostic role for young patients with radiculopathy or lower back pain. It could increase the diagnostic accuracy if it is used in conjunction with myelography and EMG. The narrowing of thecal sac AP diameter and the width of lateral recess rather than the type of disc herniation on MRI were well correlated with the myelography and EMG findings.

  2. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of taste solutions, carbonation, and cold stimulus on the power frequency content of swallowing submental surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yutaka; Morita, Yuji; Koizumi, Hideki; Shingai, Tomio

    2009-05-01

    This study explored the effects of 5 taste solutions (citric acid, sucrose, sodium chloride, caffeine, and sodium glutamate) versus water on the power frequency content of swallowing submental surface electromyography (sEMG). Healthy subjects were presented with 5 ml of each of 5 tastants and water. Data were collected in 3 trials of the 5 tastants and water by using submental sEMG, which was then subjected to spectral analysis. Sour and salt taste solutions increased the spectrum-integrated values of the total power components. The spectrum-integrated values of low-frequency power (below 10 Hz) in the salt taste trial significantly increased, whereas those of high-frequency power (above 10 Hz) in the sour taste trial tended to increase. Neither pleasantness nor intensity of taste was related to these changes. This study also explored the effects of carbonation and cold stimulus on the power frequency content of continuous swallowing sEMG for 60-ml solutions. Carbonation significantly increased the spectrum-integrated value of the total power components by significantly increasing the high-frequency content. Cold stimulus significantly decreased the low-frequency content. In summary, this study reveals that taste, carbonation, and cold stimulus have qualitatively different influences on the power frequency content of swallowing sEMG.

  4. Comparison between muscle activation measured by electromyography and muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography for effective muscle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk; Kim, Suhn-Yeop; Oh, Duck-Won; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, Ji-Whan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the intrarater reliability and validity of muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography (US) and muscle activity via electromyography (EMG) during manual muscle testing (MMT) of the external oblique (EO) and lumbar multifidus (MF) muscles. The study subjects were 30 healthy individuals who underwent MMT at different grades. EMG was used to measure the muscle activity in terms of ratio to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and root mean square (RMS) metrics. US was used to measure the raw muscle thickness, the ratio of muscle thickness at MVC, and the ratio of muscle thickness at rest. One examiner performed measurements on each subject in 3 trials. The intrarater reliabilities of the % MVC RMS and raw RMS metrics for EMG and the % MVC thickness metrics for US were excellent (ICC=0.81-0.98). There was a significant difference between all the grades measured using the % MVC thickness metric (pEMG measurement methods than with the others (r=0.51-0.61). Our findings suggest that the % MVC thickness determined by US was the most sensitive of all methods for assessing the MMT grade.

  5. Central motor control failure in fibromyalgia: a surface electromyography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buskila Dan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and stiffness at multiple sites, tender points in characteristic locations, and the frequent presence of symptoms such as fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess whether the myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in patients affected by FM are central or peripheral in origin. Methods Eight female patients aged 55.6 ± 13.6 years (FM group and eight healthy female volunteers aged 50.3 ± 9.3 years (MCG were studied by means of non-invasive surface electromyography (s-EMG involving a linear array of 16 electrodes placed on the skin overlying the biceps brachii muscle, with muscle fatigue being evoked by means of voluntary and involuntary (electrically elicited contractions. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs, motor unit action potential conduction velocity distributions (mean ± SD and skewness, and the mean power frequency of the spectrum (MNF were estimated in order to assess whether there were any significant differences between the two groups and contraction types. Results The motor pattern of recruitment during voluntary contractions was altered in the FM patients, who also showed fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue (normalised conduction velocity rate of changes: -0.074 ± 0.052%/s in FM vs -0.196 ± 0.133%/s in MCG; normalised MNF rate of changes: -0.29 ± 0.16%/s in FM vs -0.66 ± 0.34%/s in MCG. Mean conduction velocity distribution and skewnesses values were higher (p Conclusion The apparent paradox of fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in FM is the electrophysiological expression of muscle remodelling in terms of the prevalence of slow conducting fatigue-resistant type I fibres. As the only between-group differences concerned voluntary contractions, they are probably more related to central motor control failure than muscle membrane alterations, which suggests pathological muscle fibre remodelling related to altered

  6. Assessment of Carbon/Salt/Adhesive Electrodes for Surface Electromyography Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo; Rood, Ryan; Burnham, Ken; Pennace, John; Chon, Ki

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of novel electrodes for surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements. The electrodes are based on the mixture of carbon powder, quaternary salt, and viscoelastic polymeric adhesive (carbon/salt/adhesive or simply CSA), which when combined, provide the unique advantages of having longer (theoretically infinite) shelf life and potentially lower cost than Ag/AgCl hydrogel electrodes, consistent with FLEXcon's Patent #8 673 184. The 20 subjects were recruited to collect simultaneous recordings of sEMG signals using Ag/AgCl and CSA electrodes, side-by-side on triceps brachii, tibial anterior muscles, biceps brachii, and quadriceps femoris. Although CSA sEMG electrodes showed higher electrode-skin contact impedance for the frequency range of 4 Hz-2 kHz, no significant differences were found in the signals' amplitude between the two electrodes either during relaxation or contraction stages. Furthermore, correlations of the computed linear envelopes (>0.91), rms value envelopes (>0.91), and power spectral densities (>0.95) of the signals were found to be high between the two media. Detected ON- and OFF-times of contraction were also highly correlated (>0.9) and interchangeable (ON-time: bias = -0.02, variance = 0.11; OFF-time: bias = -0.04, variance = 0.23) between the two media. However, CSA sEMG electrodes exhibited a significantly better response to noise (38.3 ± 10.6 dB versus 32.7 ± 15.6 dB) and motion artifacts (24.1 ± 12.1 dB versus 16.6 ± 8.52 dB), and a significantly lower spectral deformation (1.32 ± 0.2 versus 1.46 ± 0.4). Ag/AgCl electrodes showed a significantly more peaked and sensitive response to EMG amplitude (67.9 ± 13.9 dB versus 65.4 ± 14.6 dB). Given no significant differences in many of the measures described earlier and the fact that CSA electrodes have an infinite shelf-life are potentially lower cost, and are more resistant to motion artifacts, the new electrodes provide an attractive alternative to Ag

  7. Facial swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help reduce facial swelling. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have: Sudden, painful, or severe facial ... or if you have breathing problems. The health care provider will ask about your medical and personal history. This helps determine treatment or ...

  8. Wavelet Denoising and Surface Electromyography Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M.S.; Md. Mamun

    2012-01-01

    In this research, Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signal analysis from the right rectus femoris muscle is performed during walk. Wavelet Transform (WT) has been applied for removing noise from the surface SEMG. Gaussianity tests are conducted to understand changes in muscle contraction and to quantify the effectiveness of the noise removal process. Results show that the proposed method can effectively remove noise from the raw SEMG signals for further analysis.

  9. Normalisation method can affect gluteus medius electromyography results during weight bearing exercises in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA): a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Helen P; Huang, Xiaoli; Cummiskey, Andrew; Meldrum, Dara; Malone, Ailish

    2015-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used to assess muscle activation during therapeutic exercise, but data are significantly affected by inter-individual variability and requires normalisation of the sEMG signal to enable comparison between individuals. The purpose of this study was to compare two normalisation methods, a maximal method (maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC)) and non-maximal peak dynamic method (PDM), on gluteus medius (GMed) activation using sEMG during three weight-bearing exercises in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls. Thirteen people with hip OA and 20 controls performed three exercises (Squat, Step-Up, Step-Down). Average root-mean squared EMG amplitude based on MVIC and PDM normalisation was compared between groups for both involved and uninvolved hips using Mann-Whitney tests. Using MVIC normalisation, significantly higher normalised GMed EMG amplitudes were found in the OA group during all Step-up and down exercises on the involved side (p=0.02-0.001) and most of the Step exercises on the uninvolved side (p=0.03-0.04), but not the Squat (p>0.05), compared to controls. Using PDM normalisation, significant between-group differences occurred only for Ascending Squat (p=0.03) on the involved side. MVIC normalisation demonstrated higher inter-trial relative reliability (ICCs=0.78-0.99) than PDM (ICCs=0.37-0.84), but poorer absolute reliability using Standard Error of Measurement. Normalisation method can significantly affect interpretation of EMG amplitudes. Although MVIC-normalised amplitudes were more sensitive to differences between groups, there was greater variability using this method, which raises concerns regarding validity. Interpretation of EMG data is strongly influenced by the normalisation method used, and this should be considered when applying EMG results to clinical populations.

  10. Transradial Amputee Gesture Classification Using an Optimal Number of sEMG Sensors: An Approach Using ICA Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ganesh R; Al-Timemy, Ali H; Nguyen, Hung T

    2016-08-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG)-based pattern recognition studies have been widely used to improve the classification accuracy of upper limb gestures. Information extracted from multiple sensors of the sEMG recording sites can be used as inputs to control powered upper limb prostheses. However, usage of multiple EMG sensors on the prosthetic hand is not practical and makes it difficult for amputees due to electrode shift/movement, and often amputees feel discomfort in wearing sEMG sensor array. Instead, using fewer numbers of sensors would greatly improve the controllability of prosthetic devices and it would add dexterity and flexibility in their operation. In this paper, we propose a novel myoelectric control technique for identification of various gestures using the minimum number of sensors based on independent component analysis (ICA) and Icasso clustering. The proposed method is a model-based approach where a combination of source separation and Icasso clustering was utilized to improve the classification performance of independent finger movements for transradial amputee subjects. Two sEMG sensor combinations were investigated based on the muscle morphology and Icasso clustering and compared to Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) and greedy search algorithm. The performance of the proposed method has been validated with five transradial amputees, which reports a higher classification accuracy ( > 95%). The outcome of this study encourages possible extension of the proposed approach to real time prosthetic applications.

  11. Acute effects of contract-relax PNF and static stretching on flexibility, jump performance and EMG activities: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERIM SOZBIR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case study was to describe the acute effects of contract-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (cRPNF and static stretching (SS on hamstring flexibility, vertical jump performance and electromyography (EMG of vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM and gastrocnemius (GAS in two sedentary males. Each participant completed 8 activities: warm-up, pre-stretching range of motion (ROM of hip, pre-stretching countermovement jump (cMJ, pre-stretching EMG recording, cRPNF or SS procedure, post-stretching ROM of hip, post-stretching cMJ and post-stretching EMG recording. The results of this study revealed that there were no significant increases in ROM of hip (25,34% and 24,19% and no significant decreases in cMJ (-8,67% and -8,17%, EMG activities of VL (-12,52% and -29,34%, VM (-13,02% and -32,80% and GAS (-20,63% and -24,81% following cRPNF and SS. There were no significant differences were found between both experimental groups for all variables (p > 0,05. It was concluded that cRPNF ans SS resulted in similar changes of ROM of the hip joint, cMJ and EMG activities of VL, VM and GAS muscles in sedentary males.

  12. A motion-classification strategy based on sEMG-EEG signal combination for upper-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangxin; Samuel, Oluwarotimi Williams; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Hui; Fang, Peng; Li, Guanglin

    2017-01-07

    Most of the modern motorized prostheses are controlled with the surface electromyography (sEMG) recorded on the residual muscles of amputated limbs. However, the residual muscles are usually limited, especially after above-elbow amputations, which would not provide enough sEMG for the control of prostheses with multiple degrees of freedom. Signal fusion is a possible approach to solve the problem of insufficient control commands, where some non-EMG signals are combined with sEMG signals to provide sufficient information for motion intension decoding. In this study, a motion-classification method that combines sEMG and electroencephalography (EEG) signals were proposed and investigated, in order to improve the control performance of upper-limb prostheses. Four transhumeral amputees without any form of neurological disease were recruited in the experiments. Five motion classes including hand-open, hand-close, wrist-pronation, wrist-supination, and no-movement were specified. During the motion performances, sEMG and EEG signals were simultaneously acquired from the skin surface and scalp of the amputees, respectively. The two types of signals were independently preprocessed and then combined as a parallel control input. Four time-domain features were extracted and fed into a classifier trained by the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) algorithm for motion recognition. In addition, channel selections were performed by using the Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) algorithm to optimize the performance of the proposed method. The classification performance achieved by the fusion of sEMG and EEG signals was significantly better than that obtained by single signal source of either sEMG or EEG. An increment of more than 14% in classification accuracy was achieved when using a combination of 32-channel sEMG and 64-channel EEG. Furthermore, based on the SFS algorithm, two optimized electrode arrangements (10-channel sEMG + 10-channel EEG, 10-channel sEMG + 20-channel

  13. Automated Algorithm for Generalized Tonic–Clonic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Based on sEMG Zero-Crossing Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Hoppe, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Patients are not able to call for help during a generalized tonic–clonic epileptic seizure. Our objective was to develop a robust generic algorithm for automatic detection of tonic–clonic seizures, based on surface electromyography (sEMG) signals suitable for a portable device. Twenty-two seizure......% with a mean detection latency of 13.7 s, while the rate of false detection was limited to 1 false alarm per 24 h. The overall performance of the presented generic algorithm is adequate for clinical implementation.......Patients are not able to call for help during a generalized tonic–clonic epileptic seizure. Our objective was to develop a robust generic algorithm for automatic detection of tonic–clonic seizures, based on surface electromyography (sEMG) signals suitable for a portable device. Twenty-two seizures...... were analyzed from 11 consecutive patients. Our method is based on a high-pass filtering with a cutoff at 150 Hz, and monitoring a count of zero crossings with a hysteresis of $\\pm 50\\,\\mu \\hbox{V}$ . Based on data from one sEMG electrode (on the deltoid muscle), we achieved a sensitivity of 100...

  14. Evaluation of Botulinum Toxin A for Spastic Dipledia by Surface Electromyography%A型肉毒毒素治疗痉挛型双瘫患儿疗效的表面肌电分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周平秋; 张惠佳; 王跑球; 胡继红; 郭春光; 李惠枝

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察A型肉毒毒素(BTX-A)注射治疗痉挛型双瘫前后表面肌电图(sEMG)的变化.方法 50例痉挛型双瘫患儿于小腿三头肌注射BTX-A,治疗前后分别用临床方法和sEMG进行评价.结果 治疗后患儿功能位测试小腿三头肌的肌电积分值降低,测试足背屈角减小.结论 sEMG可以客观评价BTX-A注射后痉挛型双瘫患儿肌张力的变化.%Objective To evaluate the effect of Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A) on spastic diplegia by surface electromyography (sEMG).Methods 50 children with cerebral palsy following spastic diplegia were recruited and injected with BTX-A in triceps surae.They were assessed with the clinical test and the sEMG before and after the treatment.Results After the treatment the integrated electromyography(iEMG) of triceps surae and foot dorsiflexion angle all decreased Conclusion sEMG is an objective tool to assess the change of spasticity in children with diplegia after BTX-A injection.

  15. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05, and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05. This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity.

  16. Patellar bracing affects sEMG activity of leg and thigh muscles during stance phase in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salarie Sker, Fatemeh; Anbarian, Mehrdad; Yazdani, Amir H; Hesari, Pouria; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash

    2017-06-29

    Decreases in patellofemoral pain symptoms with bracing treatment have been established; but, the mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate and long-term effects of the patellar bracing on electromyography (EMG) activity of the Vastus Medialis (VM) and Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris, lateral Gastrocnemius, Biceps Femoris and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles during level walking. 12 eligible women aged 20-30 years with diagnosis of patellofemoral pain participated in the before and after study. Intervention consisted of 8 weeks of patellar bracing. First, patients were tested without brace, then with a brace, and finally eight weeks later without a brace. Surface EMG activation of the selected muscles during level walking was recorded. After eight weeks of patellar bracing, EMG activity of VM muscle was significantly higher when compared to first session without brace (p=0.011) at mid-stance sub-phase. Additionally, EMG activity of ST muscle during first session with brace was significantly lower when compared to first session without brace at mid-stance sub-phase (without brace) (p=0.012). EMG activity of VM muscle after eight weeks of patellar bracing was significantly higher than the first session without brace at late stance and preswing sub-phase (p=0.013). Long-term wearing of patellar bracing increases EMG activity of VM during mid-stance and late stance and preswing sub-phases of gait and immediate effect of patellar brace is decrease of EMG activity of ST muscle during mid-stance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Frenulectomy of the tongue and the influence of rehabilitation exercises on the sEMG activity of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecco, Simona; Baldini, Aberto; Mummolo, Stefano; Marchetti, Enrico; Giuca, Maria Rita; Marzo, Giuseppe; Gherlone, Enrico Felice

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess by surface electromyography (sEMG) the changes in sub-mental, orbicularis oris, and masticatory muscle activity after a lingual frenulectomy. Rehabilitation exercises in subjects with ankyloglossia, characterized by Class I malocclusion, were assessed as well. A total of 24 subjects were selected. Thirteen subjects (mean age 7±2.5years) with Class I malocclusion and ankyloglossia were treated with lingual frenulectomy and rehabilitation exercises, while 11 subjects (mean age 7±0.8years) with normal occlusion and normal lingual frenulum were used as controls. The inclusion criteria for both groups were the presence of mixed dentition and no previous orthodontic treatment. The sEMG recordings were taken at the time of the first visit (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 6months (T2) for the treated group. Recordings were taken at the same time for the control group. Due to the noise inherent with the sEMG recording, special attention was paid to obtain reproducible and standardized recordings. The tested muscles were the masseter, anterior temporalis, upper and lower orbicularis oris, and sub-mental muscles. The sEMG recordings were performed at rest, while kissing, swallowing, opening the mouth, clenching the teeth and during protrusion of the mandible. These recordings were made by placing electrodes in the area of muscle contraction. At T0, the treated group showed different sEMG activity of the muscles with respect to the control group, with significant differences at rest and during some test tasks (pfrenulectomy and rehabilitation exercises seem to affect the function of the orofacial muscles. Improvement in muscle sEMG potentials after treatment was demonstrated by sEMG, which can be considered the correct method to monitor this intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Facial nerve regeneration after facial allotransplantation: A longitudinal clinical and electromyographic follow-up of lip movements during speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Letter, Miet; Vanhoutte, Sarah; Aerts, Annelies; Santens, Patrick; Vermeersch, Hubert; Roche, Nathalie; Stillaert, Filip; Blondeel, Philip; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2017-06-01

    Facial allotransplantation constitutes a reconstructive option after extensive damage to facial structures. Functional recovery has been reported but remains an issue. A patient underwent facial allotransplantation after a ballistic injury with extensive facial tissue damage. Speech motor function was sequentially assessed clinically, along with repeated electromyography of lip movements during a follow-up of 3 years. Facial nerve recovery could be demonstrated within the first month, followed by a gradual increase in electromyographic amplitude and decrease in reaction times. These were accompanied by gradual improvement of clinical assessments. Axonal recovery starts early after transplantation. Electromyographic testing is sensitive in demonstrating this early recovery, which ultimately results in clinical improvements. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of Periodic Leg Movements by Machine Learning Methods Using Polysomnographic Parameters Other Than Leg Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Umut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of channels used for polysomnographic recording frequently causes difficulties for patients because of the many cables connected. Also, it increases the risk of having troubles during recording process and increases the storage volume. In this study, it is intended to detect periodic leg movement (PLM in sleep with the use of the channels except leg electromyography (EMG by analysing polysomnography (PSG data with digital signal processing (DSP and machine learning methods. PSG records of 153 patients of different ages and genders with PLM disorder diagnosis were examined retrospectively. A novel software was developed for the analysis of PSG records. The software utilizes the machine learning algorithms, statistical methods, and DSP methods. In order to classify PLM, popular machine learning methods (multilayer perceptron, K-nearest neighbour, and random forests and logistic regression were used. Comparison of classified results showed that while K-nearest neighbour classification algorithm had higher average classification rate (91.87% and lower average classification error value (RMSE = 0.2850, multilayer perceptron algorithm had the lowest average classification rate (83.29% and the highest average classification error value (RMSE = 0.3705. Results showed that PLM can be classified with high accuracy (91.87% without leg EMG record being present.

  20. Critical Appraisal and Hazards of Surface Electromyography Data Acquisition in Sport and Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Clarys

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this critical appraisal and hazards of surface electromyography (SEMG is to enhance the data acquisition quality in voluntary but complex movements, sport and exercise in particular. The methodological and technical registration strategies deal with telemetry and online data acquisition, the placement of the detection electrodes and the choice of the most adequate normalization mode. Findings compared with the literature suggest detection quality differences between registration methods and between water and air data acquisition allowing for output differences up to 30% between registration methods and up to 25% decrease in water, considering identical measures in air and in water. Various hazards deal with erroneous choices of muscles or electrode placement and the continuous confusion created by static normalization for dynamic motion. Peak dynamic intensities ranged from 111% (in archery to 283% (in giant slalom of a static 100% reference. In addition, the linear relationship between integrated EMG (IEMG as a reference for muscle intensity and muscle force is not likely to exist in dynamic conditions since it is muscle – joint angle – and fatigue dependent. Contrary to expectations, the literature shows 30% of non linear relations in isometric conditions also. SEMG in sport and exercise is highly variable and different from clinical (e.g. neurological EMG. Choices of electrodes, registration methods, muscles, joint angles and normalization techniques may lead to confusing and erroneous or incomparable results.

  1. Case study: Head orientation and neck electromyography for cursor control in persons with high cervical tetraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Williams, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the ability of an individual with a high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI to control a cursor on a computer screen using two different user interfaces: (1 head movements measured via a head-mounted orientation sensor and (2 electromyography (EMG signals from four head and neck muscles acquired using a 4-channel implanted upper-limb neuroprosthesis that had been deployed in an earlier study. The subject moved the cursor to a set of targets on the screen in a two-dimensional, center-out, target-acquisition task, and his performance was evaluated with a variety of performance measures to assess both position and velocity control accuracy. The subject's performance with both command sources was also compared with the performance of a group of nondisabled subjects. Head orientation provided more accurate performance but was less responsive than EMG. Both command sources showed some directionally dependent performance, with movement to diagonally located targets being performed by a series of sequential motions rather than via straight paths. Overall, the SCI subject's performance with each command source was similar to that reported for a nondisabled population using the same interfaces and performing the same task.

  2. Assessment of Parturition with Cervical Light-Induced Fluorescence and Uterine Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Lucovnik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parturition involves increasing compliance (ripening of the uterine cervix and activation of the myometrium. These processes take place in a different time frame. Softening and shortening of the cervix starts in midpregnancy, while myometrial activation occurs relatively close to delivery. Methods currently available to clinicians to assess cervical and myometrial changes are subjective and inaccurate, which often causes misjudgments with potentially adverse consequences. The inability to reliably diagnose true preterm labor leads to unnecessary treatments, missed opportunities to improve neonatal outcome, and inherently biased research of treatments. At term, the likelihood of cesarean delivery depends on labor management, which in turn depends on accurate assessments of cervical change and myometrial contractility. Studies from our group and others show that noninvasive measurements of light-induced fluorescence (LIF of cervical collagen and uterine electromyography (EMG objectively detect changes in the composition of the cervix and myometrial preparedness to labor and are more reliable than clinical observations alone. We present a conceptual model of parturition constructed on cervical LIF and uterine EMG studies. We also explore how these methodologies could be helpful with managing patients experiencing preterm contractions and with optimizing labor management protocols aimed to reduce cesarean section.

  3. Facial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery.

  4. Facial tics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tic - facial; Mimic spasm ... Tics may involve repeated, uncontrolled spasm-like muscle movements, such as: Eye blinking Grimacing Mouth twitching Nose wrinkling Squinting Repeated throat clearing or grunting may also be ...

  5. Facial Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihalache Sergiu; Stoica Mihaela-Zoica

    2014-01-01

    .... From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain...

  6. Eliminating ultrasonic interference from respiratory muscle EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R S; Kieser, T M; Easton, P A

    1998-05-01

    Fine wire recordings of the respiratory muscle electromyogram are often employed to represent muscle activity, and recently ultrasound-sonomicrometry has become a common method of measuring length of respiratory muscles in both acute and chronic preparations. Although recording both EMG and sonomicrometry simultaneously has become standard practice, there has not been any consideration of the potential confounding influence of ultrasound noise upon the recorded EMG spectrum. Activation of the sonomicrometry-ultrasound tranducer introduces a high frequency, high amplitude voltage pulse plus harmonics, which can contaminate the EMG spectrum directly, as well as through aliasing when EMG is sampled directly digitally. We describe the use of a new, combined, wing stabilized sonomicrometry- and EMG measurement transducer to characterize exactly the influence of ultrasound upon the crural diaphragm EMG spectrum, and the development of digital filtering techniques which effectively eliminate the ultrasound interference. Two alternative methods of avoiding ultrasound-EMG interference are also considered. The isolation and elimination of ultrasound-sonomicrometry signal interference may be important in studies where EMG and length are measured together.

  7. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul; Fabricius, Martin; Benedek, Krisztina; Andersen, Noémi; Hjalgrim, Helle; Wolf, Peter

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between convulsive epileptic seizures and convulsive PNES. In this case-control study, surface EMG was recorded from the deltoid muscles during long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring in 25 patients and in 21 healthy controls. A total of 46 clinical episodes were recorded: 28 generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) from 14 patients with epilepsy, and 18 convulsive PNES from 12 patients (one patient had both GTCS and PNES). The healthy controls were simulating GTCS. To quantitatively characterize the signals we calculated the following parameters: root mean square (RMS) of the amplitude, median frequency (MF), coherence, and duration of the seizures, of the clonic EMG discharges, and of the silent periods between the cloni. Based on wavelet analysis, we distinguished between a low-frequency component (LF 2-8 Hz) and a high-frequency component (HF 64-256 Hz). Duration of the seizure, and separation between the tonic and the clonic phases distinguished at group-level but not at individual level between convulsive PNES and GTCS. RMS, temporal dynamics of the HF/LF ratio, and the evolution of the silent periods differentiated between epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures at the individual level. A combination between HF/LF ratio and RMS separated all PNES from the GTCS. A blinded review of the EMG features distinguished correctly between GTCS and convulsive PNES in all cases. The HF/LF ratio and the RMS of the PNES were smaller compared to the simulated seizures. In addition to providing insight into the mechanism of muscle activation during convulsive PNES, these results have diagnostic significance, at the individual level. Surface EMG features can accurately distinguish

  8. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Surface Electromyography for Muscle Fatigue Assessment on the Elbow Joint Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto Triwiyanto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying muscle fatigue plays an important role in preventing the risks associated with musculoskeletal disorders. The effect of elbow-joint angle on time-frequency parameters during a repetitive motion provides valuable information in finding the most accurate position of the angle causing muscle fatigue. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of muscle fatigue on the spectral and time-frequency domain parameters derived from electromyography (EMG signals using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT. Four male participants were recruited to perform a repetitive motion (flexion and extension movements from a non-fatigue to fatigue condition. EMG signals were recorded from the biceps muscle. The recorded EMG signals were then analyzed offline using the complex Morlet wavelet. The time-frequency domain data were analyzed using the time-averaged wavelet spectrum (TAWS and the Scale-Average Wavelet Power (SAWP parameters. The spectral domain data were analyzed using the Instantaneous Mean Frequency (IMNF and the Instantaneous Mean Power Spectrum (IMNP parameters. The index of muscle fatigue was observed by calculating the increase of the IMNP and the decrease of the IMNF parameters. After performing a repetitive motion from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the average of the IMNF value decreased by 15.69% and the average of the IMNP values increased by 84%, respectively. This study suggests that the reliable frequency band to detect muscle fatigue is 31.10-36.19Hz with linear regression parameters of 0.979mV^2Hz^(-1 and 0.0095mV^2Hz^(-1 for R^2 and slope, respectively.

  9. Electromyography analysis of natural mastication behavior using varying mouthful quantities of two types of gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Kaoru; Gao, Zhihong; Ishihara, Sayaka; Funami, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of mouthful quantities and mechanical properties of gels on natural mastication behaviors using electromyography (EMG). Two types of hydrocolloid gels (A and K) with similar fracture loads but different moduli and fracture strains were served to eleven normal women in 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-g masses in a randomized order. EMG activities from both masseter muscles were recorded during natural mastication. Because of the similar fracture loads, the numbers of chews, total muscle activities, and entire oral processing times were similar for similar masses of both gel types. Prior to the first swallow, the more elastic K gel with a higher fracture strain required higher muscle activities than the brittle A gel, which had higher modulus. Majority of subjects had preferred sides of chewing, but all subjects with or without preferred sides used both masseters during the consumption of gels. Similar effects of masses and types of gels were observed in EMG activities of both sides of masseters. Contributions of the dominant side of chewing were diminished with increasing masses of gels, and the mass dependency on ratio of the dominant side was more pronounced with K gel. More repetitions of smaller masses required greater muscle activities and longer periods for the consumption of 24-g gel portions. Reduction in the masses with an increased number of repetitions necessitated slower eating and more mastication to consume the gel portions. These observations suggest that chewing using both sides is more effective and unconsciously reduces mastication times during the consumption of gels.

  10. A multi-modal approach for hand motion classification using surface EMG and accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougner, A; Scheme, E; Chan, A D C; Englehart, K; Stavdahl, Ø

    2011-01-01

    For decades, electromyography (EMG) has been used for diagnostics, upper-limb prosthesis control, and recently even for more general human-machine interfaces. Current commercial upper limb prostheses usually have only two electrode sites due to cost and space limitations, while researchers often experiment with multiple sites. Micro-machined inertial sensors are gaining popularity in many commercial and research applications where knowledge of the postures and movements of the body is desired. In the present study, we have investigated whether accelerometers, which are relatively cheap, small, robust to noise, and easily integrated in a prosthetic socket; can reduce the need for adding more electrode sites to the prosthesis control system. This was done by adding accelerometers to a multifunction system and also to a simplified system more similar to current commercially available prosthesis controllers, and assessing the resulting changes in classification accuracy. The accelerometer does not provide information on muscle force like EMG electrodes, but the results show that it provides useful supplementary information. Specifically, if one wants to improve a two-site EMG system, one should add an accelerometer affixed to the forearm rather than a third electrode.

  11. A Self-adaptive Threshold Method for Automatic Sleep Stage Classification Using EOG and EMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep stages are generally divided into three stages including Wake, REM and NRME. The standard sleep monitoring technology is Polysomnography (PSG. The inconvenience for PSG monitoring limits the usage of PSG in some areas. In this study, we developed a new method to classify sleep stage using electrooculogram (EOG and electromyography (EMG automatically. We extracted right and left EOG features and EMG feature in time domain, and classified them into strong, weak and none types through calculating self-adaptive threshold. Combination of the time features of EOG and EMG signals, we classified sleep stages into Wake, REM and NREM stages. The time domain features utilized in the method were Integrate Value, variance and energy. The experiment of 30 datasets showed a satisfactory result with the accuracy of 82.93% for Wake, NREM and REM stages classification, and the average accuracy of Wake stage classification was 83.29%, 82.11% for NREM stage and 76.73% for REM stage.

  12. EMG pattern classification to control a hand orthosis for functional grasp assistance after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Cassie; Park, Sangwoo; Bishop, Lauri; Stein, Joel; Ciocarlie, Matei

    2017-07-01

    Wearable orthoses can function both as assistive devices, which allow the user to live independently, and as rehabilitation devices, which allow the user to regain use of an impaired limb. To be fully wearable, such devices must have intuitive controls, and to improve quality of life, the device should enable the user to perform Activities of Daily Living. In this context, we explore the feasibility of using electromyography (EMG) signals to control a wearable exotendon device to enable pick and place tasks. We use an easy to don, commodity forearm EMG band with 8 sensors to create an EMG pattern classification control for an exotendon device. With this control, we are able to detect a user's intent to open, and can thus enable extension and pick and place tasks. In experiments with stroke survivors, we explore the accuracy of this control in both non-functional and functional tasks. Our results support the feasibility of developing wearable devices with intuitive controls which provide a functional context for rehabilitation.

  13. Analysis of the EMG Signal During Cyclic Movements Using Multicomponent AM-FM Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagetti, Giorgio; Crippa, Paolo; Curzi, Alessandro; Orcioni, Simone; Turchetti, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Sport, fitness, as well as rehabilitation activities, often require the accomplishment of repetitive movements. The correctness of the exercises is often related to the capability of maintaining the required cadence and muscular force. Failure to maintain the required force, also known as muscle fatigue, is accompanied by a shift in the spectral content of the surface electromyography (EMG) signal toward lower frequencies. This paper presents a novel approach for simultaneously obtaining exercise repetition frequency and evaluating muscular fatigue, as functions of time, by only using the EMG signal. The mean frequency of the amplitude spectrum (MFA) of the EMG signal, considered as a function of time, is directly related to the dynamics of the movement performed and to the fatigue of the involved muscles. If the movement is cyclic, MFA will display the same pattern and its average will tend to decrease. These two effects have been simultaneously modeled by a two-component AM-FM model based on the Hilbert transform. The method was tested on signals recorded using a wireless system applied to healthy subjects performing dumbbell biceps curls, dumbbell lateral rises, and bodyweight squats. Experimental results show the excellent performance of the proposed technique.

  14. Increased jump height and reduced EMG activity with an external focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Gabriele; Dufek, Janet S; Lozano, Leonardo; Pettigrew, Christina

    2010-06-01

    Jump height is increased when performers are given external focus instructions, relative to an internal focus or no focus instructions (Wulf & Dufek, 2009; Wulf, Zachry, Granados, & Dufek, 2007). The purpose of present study was to examine possible underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of this effect by using electromyography (EMG). Participants performed a vertical jump-and-reach task under two conditions in a counterbalanced order: external focus (i.e., focus on the rungs of the measurement device) and internal focus (i.e., focus on the fingers with which the rungs were to be touched). EMG activity of various muscles (anterior tibialis, biceps femoris, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius) was measured during jumps. Jump height was greater with an external compared to an internal focus. While there were no differences in muscle onset times between attentional focus conditions, EMG activity was generally lower with an external focus. These results suggest that neuromuscular coordination is enhanced by an external focus of attention. The present findings add to the evidence that an external focus facilitates the production of effective and efficient movement patterns.

  15. sEMG Feature Analysis on Forearm Muscle Fatigue During Isometric Contractions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    明东; 王欣; 徐瑞; 邱爽; 赵欣; 綦宏志; 周鹏; 张力新; 万柏坤

    2014-01-01

    In order to detect and assess the muscle fatigue state with the surface electromyography (sEMG) character-istic parameters, this paper carried out a series of isometric contraction experiments to induce the fatigue on the fore-arm muscles from four subjects, and recorded the sEMG signals of the flexor carpi ulnaris. sEMG's median frequency (MDF) and mean frequency (MF) were extracted by short term Fourier transform (STFT), and the root mean square (RMS) of wavelet coefficients in the frequency band of 5-45 Hz was obtained by continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The results demonstrate that both MDF and MF show downward trends within 1 min;however, RMS shows an upward trend within the same time. The three parameters are closely correlated with absolute values of mean corre-lation coefficients greater than 0.8. It is suggested that the three parameters above can be used as reliable indicators to evaluate the level of muscle fatigue during isometric contractions.

  16. Change in EMG with skin friction at different frequencies during elbow flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hitoshi; Shimose, Ryota; Tadano, Chigaya; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Muro, Masuo

    2013-06-01

    Modulation of muscle activation in superficial and deeper regions may be induced by tactile stimulation. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in muscle activation with skin friction. Subjects performed an isometric elbow flexion at 30% maximal voluntary cotraction (MVC) with skin friction at different frequencies (0.5-2.7 Hz). Surface electromyography (S-EMG) and intramuscular EMG were obtained from the elbow flexor muscles (BBS: short head of biceps brachii, BBL: long head of biceps brachii, BRA: brachialis). S-EMG activity decreased at a higher frequency of 2.7 Hz and increased linearly with an increase in skin friction frequency (0.5-2.7 Hz) in BBS. A decrease in high-threshold motor unit (HT-MU) firing rate in superficial regions and an increase in low-threshold motor unit (LT-MU) firing rate in deeper regions were observed with skin friction (2.7 Hz) in BBS. The actions of inhibitory interneurons may be influenced by cutaneous afferent input with skin friction. Muscle activation of BBS depended on the intensity of the stimulus. Skin friction over BBS results in an inhibitory response in superficial regions of BBS, most likely due to the increase in firing rate of low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors.

  17. The influence of wrist posture on the time and frequency EMG signal measures of forearm muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Liu, Danuta; Bartuzi, Paweł

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates how altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures of the electromyography (EMG) signal of extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU). Thirteen participants exerted handgrip force related to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in four tests: 20%MVC and 50%MVC in neutral wrist posture and 20%MVC in full wrist flexion and extension. EMG measurements from EDC and FCU were used to calculate normalized values of amplitude (nRMS) and mean and median frequency of the power spectrum (nMPF, nMF). During muscle shortening (wrist flexion for FCU and wrist extension for EDC) nRMS was approximately twofold higher than in neutral posture for FCU and fourfold for EDC. All measures obtained at 20%MVC in neutral posture were significantly different from 20%MVC in wrist flexion for FCU and 20%MVC in wrist extension for EDC (pMVC and 20%MVC at neutral posture (nRMS) were significant for both muscles, although in nMPF and nMF for EDC only. Muscle shortening changed the pattern of statistical significance when the time and frequency domain measures were compared, whereas muscle lengthening did not. It can be concluded that muscle shortening caused by altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures in both muscles. This suggests that in studies using EMG in different wrist postures, changes in the relationship between the time and the frequency measures should be considered.

  18. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity for the evaluation of the infraspinatus muscle and the suprascapular nerve in professional beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajtai, Georg; Wieser, Karl; Ofner, Michael; Raimann, Gustav; Aitzetmüller, Gernot; Jost, Bernhard

    2012-10-01

    Beach volleyball is an overhead sport with a high prevalence of infraspinatus muscle atrophy of the hitting shoulder. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy seems to be caused by a repetitive traction injury of the suprascapular nerve. Early pathological findings might be assessed with surface electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measurements. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fully competitive professional beach volleyball players were assessed with a structured interview, shoulder examination, strength measurements (external rotation and elevation), and neurophysiological examination (surface EMG and NCV of the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles and the suprascapular nerve, respectively) during the Beach Volleyball Grand Slam tournament 2010 in Klagenfurt, Austria. Thirty-five men with an average age of 28 years were examined. Visible infraspinatus atrophy was found in 12 players (34%), of which 8 (23%) had slight atrophy and 4 (11%) had severe atrophy. External rotation (90%; P volleyball players have a high frequency of infraspinatus atrophy (34%) and significantly reduced shoulder strength of the hitting shoulder. These findings are not associated with demographic factors. Electromyography and NCV measurements suggest a suprascapular nerve involvement caused by repetitive strain injuries of the nerve. External rotation strength measurements and NCV measurements can detect a side-to-side difference early, while EMG may show compensation mechanisms for progressive damaging of the suprascapular nerve and, as a result, loss of infraspinatus muscle strength.

  19. Electromyography Collection and Processing Based on DSP%基于DSP的肌电信号采集处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯艳梅; 仲雪飞; 王俊俊; 孙瀚; 赵华平; 张雄

    2014-01-01

    As an important biological signal,electromyography( EMG) has been used widely in bionics,biofeedback, sports medicine and rehabilitation engineering. Recently, the research and development on EMG grow rapidly. Focusing on the collection and analysis of the EMG,the muscle localization can be found to generate strong EMG,i. e. the most suitable position for the placement of the electrode based on the existing data collection amplifying circuit and DSP development platform. MATLAB is used to analyze the EMG signal from 9 gestures,filter the signal and draw the conclusions. The interference sources in the acquisition process are also analyzed and the method of re-ducing interference of the 50 Hz power frequency signal is found.%肌电信号( Electromyography) EMG作为一种重要的生物电信号,已经被广泛应用于仿生学、生物反馈、运动医学和康复工程中。近年来,肌电信号的研究发展日益迅猛。主要研究了肌电信号的采集、分析,基于现有的数据采集放大电路和DSP开发平台,找出肌肉产生肌电信号较强的位置即最合适安放采集电极的位置。本文选择了9种手势动作,运用MATLAB对做不同手势动作时采集的肌电信号进行离线分析,同时对肌电信号进行滤波处理,分析得出结论。对采集过程中的干扰源进行分析,尽可能减少50 Hz工频信号的干扰。

  20. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media interested in ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  1. Children and Facial Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Children and Facial Trauma Children and Facial Trauma Patient Health Information News ... staff at newsroom@entnet.org . What is facial trauma? The term facial trauma means any injury to ...

  2. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  3. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When the skin is injured from a cut or tear the body heals by forming scar tissue. The appearance of the scar can range from ...

  4. Therapeutic effects of the neurological training rehabilitation technique on facial paralysis patients%神经训导康复技术治疗周围性面瘫的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学敏; 赵海红; 孙爱萍; 李欣; 曹效; 王峥; 赵文汝

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察神经训导康复技术(中医导引反馈技术)对周围性面瘫的临床康复效果.方法 30例周围性面瘫患者应用神经训导康复系列技术治疗,包括面部运动程序重建、面部神经训导式PT、局部红外线照射、局部超短波、面部肌肉中频电刺激和面部肌肉自我锻炼,1次/d,共治疗30次.治疗前和治疗结束后采集患侧后面部额肌、笑肌、口轮匝肌、眼轮匝肌表面肌电信号数据,进行面神经Portmann简易功能评分以及面神经House-Brackmann分级评估,数据进行统计学分析.结果 治疗前、后面部额肌、笑肌、口轮匝肌、眼轮匝肌表面肌电信号强度、面神经Portmann简易功能评分和House-Brackmann功能分级差异均有统计学意义[80 ±43比14 ±9,105 ±41比23±14,81 ±55比19 ±21,109 ±42比22±12,(16.2±2.9)分比(7.3±2.2)分](均P <0.01).30例中完全恢复15例(50.0%);部分恢复10例(33.3%),尚好3例(10.0%),差2例(6.7%).结论 神经训导康复技术是康复周围性面瘫患者面神经功能的有效方法.%Objective To observe the effects of the neurological training technique for the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis.Methods Thirty cases of peripheral facial paralysis were treated with neurological training technique,which included neurological training type face PT20 minutes/time,facial neurological training 50 minutes/time,local and infrared ray irradiation 20 minutes/time,local FM 20 minutes/time,facial muscle electrical stimulation 20 minutes/time.Each facial paralysis were treated for total 30 times.The evaluations were made before and after the treatment including the data of surface electromyography signal(sEMG) of facial frontalis muscle,eye muscle,orbicularis oris muscle and smile muscle.The facial nerve portmann simple function score and the facial nerve grading of House-Brackmann efficacy were assessed and analyzed.Results There were significant difference in portmann facial

  5. Cross-Correlation of Motor Activity Signals from dc-Magnetoencephalography, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilmann H. Sander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal and vascular responses due to finger movements were synchronously measured using dc-magnetoencephalography (dcMEG and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (trNIRS. The finger movements were monitored with electromyography (EMG. Cortical responses related to the finger movement sequence were extracted by independent component analysis from both the dcMEG and the trNIRS data. The temporal relations between EMG rate, dcMEG, and trNIRS responses were assessed pairwise using the cross-correlation function (CCF, which does not require epoch averaging. A positive lag on a scale of seconds was found for the maximum of the CCF between dcMEG and trNIRS. A zero lag is observed for the CCF between dcMEG and EMG. Additionally this CCF exhibits oscillations at the frequency of individual finger movements. These findings show that the dcMEG with a bandwidth up to 8 Hz records both slow and faster neuronal responses, whereas the vascular response is confirmed to change on a scale of seconds.

  6. Effects of different movement directions on electromyography recorded from the shoulder muscles while passing the target positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Yoshinari; Kaneko, Fuminari; Watanabe, Kota; Kobayashi, Takuma; Katayose, Masaki; Aoki, Nobuhiro; Shibata, Eriko; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We compared electromyography (EMG) recorded from the shoulder joint muscles in the same position for different movement directions. Fifteen healthy subjects participated. They performed shoulder elevation from 0° to 120°, shoulder depression from 120° to 0°, shoulder horizontal adduction from -15° to 105°, and shoulder horizontal abduction from 105° to -15°. The target positions were 90° shoulder elevation in the 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° planes (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° positions). EMG signals were recorded from the supraspinatus (SSP) muscle by fine-wire electrodes. EMG signals from the infraspinatus (ISP), anterior deltoid, middle deltoid, and posterior deltoid muscles were recorded using active surface electrodes. During elevation and horizontal abduction, the SSP showed significantly higher activity than that shown during depression and during horizontal adduction in the 0°, 30°, and 60° positions. During elevation, the ISP showed significantly higher activity than during depression and during horizontal adduction in the 90° position. During horizontal abduction, the ISP showed significantly higher activity than during depression in the 90° position. When the movement tasks were performed in different movement directions at the same speed, each muscle showed characteristic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Skeletal Class II correction and neuromuscular adaptation with twin-block: A cephalometric and electromyography study in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is believed that significant changes in electromyography (EMG activity are observed at the end of the treatment, which are concomitant with a clinical improvement seen in sagittal jaw relationship during skeletal Class II correction by functional appliances. It is thought that similar interaction occurs between bone shape and muscle activity in the maxillofacial complex this study aims at evaluating the effects of twin-block on correction of skeletal Class II by lateral cephalogram and neuromuscular adaptation by EMG in adult patients. Materials and Methodology: The lateral cephalogram were taken with teeth in occlusion, and neuromuscular adaptation was observed on the basis of EMG recording of the anterior fiber of temporalis and masseter muscles using bipolar electrodes in rest and maximum clenching. All records were collected at pretreatment and after completion of 9 months of the active phase. Results: The amount of skeletal changes contributing to overjet reduction was 33.7%, and dental changes contributing to overjet reduction was 66.3%. Conclusion: The correction of Class II malocclusion for skeletal changes contributing to overjet reduction was 33.7%, and dental changes contributing to overjet reduction was 66.3%.

  8. Optimization of the Motion Trajectory for Standing from a Seated Position by Considering Muscular Load Based on Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Daisuke; Asakura, Yuki; Kitamura, Akira

    Standing from a chair is an important task of daily living for physically handicapped people. In a rehabilitation center, a health care professional is planning motion based on the experience and knowledge so that a patient may stand up with few loads. Therefore, there is a problem that the plan is different occasionally as each health care professional. In this paper, a generation method of motion trajectory to stand from a seated position with few loads by using Genetic Algorithm (GA) was proposed. The human body was expressed as three-rigid-link model. In the model, the ankle, the knee, and the waist were set to the joint. Moreover, Electromyography (EMG) generated from the muscle to drive each joint was measured, and the model between each joint torque and EMG was constructed with the ARX model. The motion trajectory to stand from the seated position was generated by using GA with the evaluation function based on the constructed ARX model. The generated motion trajectory was evaluated by the experimental work with eight healthy subjects. As a result, the effect of the proposed method was objectively verified by subject's EMG. In addition, subjective effect of the proposed method was verified by analysis of variance about subject's impression.

  9. Examination of The Predictive Power of Electromyography and Urodynamic Study in Patients with Cauda Equina Syndrome (Horse Tail Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Khoshuod, Reza Jalil; Zali, Alireza; Seddeghi, Amir Saied; Kabir, Nima Mohseni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cauda equina syndrome is a rare disorder that causes loss of Lumbar plexus function (nerve roots) lower than conus medullaris. No risk factor has been defined for this disease yet. Due to the high morbidity of Cauda equina syndrome and lack of sufficient information about the connection between the disease and urodynamic findings and EMG (Electromyography) findings, the need for this comprehensive study is felt. Objective: The aim is to determine the predictive power of findings resulted from urodynamics and electromyography of perineal region and around sphincter in the clinical cure rate of urination in patients with urinary retention followed by Cauda equina syndrome. Method: Patients referred to Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital during the years 2009 to 2013, in case of having Cauda equina syndrome symptoms (confirmed with Lumbar MRI), were undergone urodynamic examination and perineal electromyography after surgical decompression action. These both assessments (urodynamic study and electromyography) were repeated during the follow-up of 15 patients in the first and sixth months after surgery and findings were compared with each other. Results: Among the Urodynamic findings, Qmax (maximum urine flow) during three studies had a significant relationship with long-term recovery rate of patients (P <0.05). The relationship had been more valuable in follow-ups after one month (P = 0.0001). Also, BCI (Bladder Contractility Index) in all three studies had a significant relationship with clinical improvement in the ability to urinate (P <0.001). The residual urine (PVR) compared to two previous urodynamic findings showed a less significant relationship with clinical cure rate (P = 0.04). Among the findings of muscle-nerve (MUAP Fibrillation, Positive sharp way) none of them had a significant relationship with cure rate. Conclusion: Urodynamic finding, especially Qmax and bladder contractility index, can be considered as predictive indicators for patients

  10. Single fiber electromyography in 78 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔丽英; 刘明生; 汤晓芙

    2004-01-01

    Background Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) is a sensitive technique for detecting abnormalities in neuromuscular transmission and is mainly used in the diagnosis of neuromuscular junction disorders, such as myasthenia gravis. While the process of denervation-reinnervation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) can also result in immature collateral nerve terminals and instability of neuromuscular transmission, the purpose of This study was to investigate the changes and clinical values of SFEMG in patients with ALS.Methods Volitional SFEMG was performed on the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) of 78 patients with ALS (men 52, women 26) who had been previously diagnosed by history, clinical features, and neurophysiological studies. The mean jitter, the percentage of jitter >55 μs, the impulse blocking percentage, and fiber density (FD) were determined. These results were compared to normal controls. In addition, the SFEMG indices were analyzed for correlations with the duration of ALS, the EDC strength score on the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale, and spontaneous activity detected by EMG studies. Results SFEMG indices were abnormal in all patients with ALS. Mean jitter ranged from 30 to 178 μs (mean 80.2 μs); the percentage of jitter >55 μs ranged from 5% to 100% (mean 60.5%). In addition, the impulse blocking percentage ranged from 0% to 90% (mean 28.1%) and FD ranged from 1.4 to 4.1 (mean 2.6). Mean jitter, the percentage of jitter >55 μs, and the blocking percentage in 57 patients with definite or probable ALS were significantly higher than in patients with possible or suspected ALS. MRC scores of the EDC negatively correlated with mean jitter, the percentage of jitter >55 μs, blocking percentage, and FD. Conclusions SFEMG is the most sensitive tool for diagnosing definite or probable ALS. Increased jitter, blocking percentage, and FD can indicate the degree of immature collateral sprouts and motor end plates resulting from the progressive

  11. Facial blindsight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eSolcà

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people’s categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex.

  12. Rejuvenecimiento facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Daniel Jacubovsky, Dr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento facial es un proceso único y particular a cada individuo y está regido en especial por su carga genética. El lifting facial es una compleja técnica desarrollada en nuestra especialidad desde principios de siglo, para revertir los principales signos de este proceso. Los factores secundarios que gravitan en el envejecimiento facial son múltiples y por ello las ritidectomías o lifting cérvico faciales descritas han buscado corregir los cambios fisonómicos del envejecimiento excursionando, como se describe, en todos los planos tisulares involucrados. Esta cirugía por lo tanto, exige conocimiento cabal de la anatomía quirúrgica, pericia y experiencia para reducir las complicaciones, estigmas quirúrgicos y revisiones secundarias. La ridectomía facial ha evolucionado hacia un procedimiento más simple, de incisiones más cortas y disecciones menos extensas. Las suspensiones musculares han variado en su ejecución y los vectores de montaje y resección cutánea son cruciales en los resultados estéticos de la cirugía cérvico facial. Hoy estos vectores son de tracción más vertical. La corrección de la flaccidez va acompañada de un interés en reponer el volumen de la superficie del rostro, en especial el tercio medio. Las técnicas quirúrgicas de rejuvenecimiento, en especial el lifting facial, exigen una planificación para cada paciente. Las técnicas adjuntas al lifting, como blefaroplastias, mentoplastía, lipoaspiración de cuello, implantes faciales y otras, también han tenido una positiva evolución hacia la reducción de riesgos y mejor éxito estético.

  13. Comparison of an EMG-based and a stress-based method to predict shoulder muscle forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Malfroy Camine, Valérie; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The estimation of muscle forces in musculoskeletal shoulder models is still controversial. Two different methods are widely used to solve the indeterminacy of the system: electromyography (EMG)-based methods and stress-based methods. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of these two methods on the prediction of muscle forces, glenohumeral load and joint stability after total shoulder arthroplasty. An EMG-based and a stress-based method were implemented into the same musculoskeletal shoulder model. The model replicated the glenohumeral joint after total shoulder arthroplasty. It contained the scapula, the humerus, the joint prosthesis, the rotator cuff muscles supraspinatus, subscapularis and infraspinatus and the middle, anterior and posterior deltoid muscles. A movement of abduction was simulated in the plane of the scapula. The EMG-based method replicated muscular activity of experimentally measured EMG. The stress-based method minimised a cost function based on muscle stresses. We compared muscle forces, joint reaction force, articular contact pressure and translation of the humeral head. The stress-based method predicted a lower force of the rotator cuff muscles. This was partly counter-balanced by a higher force of the middle part of the deltoid muscle. As a consequence, the stress-based method predicted a lower joint load (16% reduced) and a higher superior-inferior translation of the humeral head (increased by 1.2 mm). The EMG-based method has the advantage of replicating the observed cocontraction of stabilising muscles of the rotator cuff. This method is, however, limited to available EMG measurements. The stress-based method has thus an advantage of flexibility, but may overestimate glenohumeral subluxation.

  14. An Overview of Laryngeal Muscle Single Fiber Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Sharaf, Aboubakar G

    2015-08-01

    Needle electromyography is an important tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases and has also been applied successfully in the evaluation of the vocal cord paralysis. Laryngeal electromyography, initially described by Weddell, is used to determine the cause of vocal cord paralysis and to differentiate organic from nonorganic causes of speech disorders. This test allows the diagnosis of lower motor neuron and nerve paralysis as well as myopathies. Laryngeal electromyography also helps to determine the prognosis of paralysis caused by traumatic injury of the laryngeal nerves and is used for guidance during botulinum toxin injection in spasmodic dysphonias. Single fiber electromyography is used to diagnose abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission and is applied in the study the architecture of the motor unit in muscles. This article reviews the techniques of laryngeal muscles single fiber electromyography, provides limited informative data, and discusses its potential value in the evaluation of patients with dysphonia.

  15. A patient-specific EMG-driven neuromuscular model for the potential use of human-inspired gait rehabilitation robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ye; Xie, Shengquan; Zhang, Yanxin

    2016-03-01

    A patient-specific electromyography (EMG)-driven neuromuscular model (PENm) is developed for the potential use of human-inspired gait rehabilitation robots. The PENm is modified based on the current EMG-driven models by decreasing the calculation time and ensuring good prediction accuracy. To ensure the calculation efficiency, the PENm is simplified into two EMG channels around one joint with minimal physiological parameters. In addition, a dynamic computation model is developed to achieve real-time calculation. To ensure the calculation accuracy, patient-specific muscle kinematics information, such as the musculotendon lengths and the muscle moment arms during the entire gait cycle, are employed based on the patient-specific musculoskeletal model. Moreover, an improved force-length-velocity relationship is implemented to generate accurate muscle forces. Gait analysis data including kinematics, ground reaction forces, and raw EMG signals from six adolescents at three different speeds were used to evaluate the PENm. The simulation results show that the PENm has the potential to predict accurate joint moment in real-time. The design of advanced human-robot interaction control strategies and human-inspired gait rehabilitation robots can benefit from the application of the human internal state provided by the PENm.

  16. A Discrete-Time Algorithm for Stiffness Extraction from sEMG and Its Application in Antidisturbance Teleoperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peidong Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new discrete-time algorithm of stiffness extraction from muscle surface electromyography (sEMG collected from human operator’s arms and have applied it for antidisturbance control in robot teleoperation. The variation of arm stiffness is estimated from sEMG signals and transferred to a telerobot under variable impedance control to imitate human motor control behaviours, particularly for disturbance attenuation. In comparison to the estimation of stiffness from sEMG, the proposed algorithm is able to reduce the nonlinear residual error effect and to enhance robustness and to simplify stiffness calibration. In order to extract a smoothing stiffness enveloping from sEMG signals, two enveloping methods are employed in this paper, namely, fast linear enveloping based on low pass filtering and moving average and amplitude monocomponent and frequency modulating (AM-FM method. Both methods have been incorporated into the proposed stiffness variance estimation algorithm and are extensively tested. The test results show that stiffness variation extraction based on the two methods is sensitive and robust to attenuation disturbance. It could potentially be applied for teleoperation in the presence of hazardous surroundings or human robot physical cooperation scenarios.

  17. DCT domain feature extraction scheme based on motor unit action potential of EMG signal for neuromuscular disease classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulah, Abul Barkat Mollah Sayeed Ud; Fattah, Shaikh Anowarul; Zhu, Wei-Ping; Ahmad, M Omair

    2014-01-01

    A feature extraction scheme based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) of electromyography (EMG) signals is proposed for the classification of normal event and a neuromuscular disease, namely the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Instead of employing DCT directly on EMG data, it is employed on the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) extracted from the EMG signal via a template matching-based decomposition technique. Unlike conventional MUAP-based methods, only one MUAP with maximum dynamic range is selected for DCT-based feature extraction. Magnitude and frequency values of a few high-energy DCT coefficients corresponding to the selected MUAP are used as the desired feature which not only reduces computational burden, but also offers better feature quality with high within-class compactness and between-class separation. For the purpose of classification, the K-nearest neighbourhood classifier is employed. Extensive analysis is performed on clinical EMG database and it is found that the proposed method provides a very satisfactory performance in terms of specificity, sensitivity and overall classification accuracy.

  18. sEMG Sensor Using Polypyrrole-Coated Nonwoven Fabric Sheet for Practical Control of Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yinlai; Togane, Masami; Lu, Baoliang; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of using a myoelectric prosthetic hand in daily life is to conveniently measure stable myoelectric signals. This study proposes a novel surface electromyography (sEMG) sensor using polypyrrole-coated nonwoven fabric sheet as electrodes (PPy electrodes) to allow people with disabilities to control prosthetic limbs. The PPy electrodes are sewn on an elastic band to guarantee close contact with the skin and thus reduce the contact electrical impedance between the electrodes and the skin. The sensor is highly customizable to fit the size and the shape of the stump so that people with disabilities can attach the sensor by themselves. The performance of the proposed sensor was investigated experimentally by comparing measurements of Ag/AgCl electrodes with electrolytic gel and the sEMG from the same muscle fibers. The high correlation coefficient (0.87) between the two types of sensors suggests the effectiveness of the proposed sensor. Another experiment of sEMG pattern recognition to control myoelectric prosthetic hands showed that the PPy electrodes are as effective as Ag/AgCl electrodes for measuring sEMG signals for practical myoelectric control. We also investigated the relation between the myoelectric signals' signal-to-noise ratio and the source impedances by simultaneously measuring the source impedances and the myoelectric signals with a switching circuit. The results showed that differences in both the norm and the phase of the source impedance greatly affect the common mode noise in the signal. PMID:28220058

  19. Tension-type headache: pain, fatigue, tension, and EMG responses to mental activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansevicius, D; Westgaard, R H; Sjaastad, O M

    1999-06-01

    Twenty patients with tension-type headache (14 chronic and 6 episodic) and 20 group-matched controls were selected for this study. They participated in a 1-hour, complex, two-choice, reaction-time test, as well as 5-minute pretest and 20-minute posttest periods. Subjects reported any pain in the forehead, temples, neck, and shoulders, as well as any feelings of fatigue and tension during the pretest, and every 10 minutes during the test and posttest by visual analog scales. Superficial electromyography was recorded simultaneously from positions representing the frontal and temporal muscles, neck (mostly splenius), and trapezius muscles. The location of pain corresponded to the position of the electrodes, but extended over a larger area. The test provoked pain in the forehead, neck, and shoulders of patients, i.e., pain scores from these regions increased significantly during the test. The pain scores continued to increase posttest. In patients, the EMG response of the trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test) was elevated relative to pretest. In controls, only the frontal muscles showed an EMG test response. Patients showed significantly higher EMG responses than controls in the neck (whole test period) and trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test period). There were significant differences in pain and fatigue scoring between patients and controls in all three periods and in tension scoring posttest. Fatigue correlated with pain, with increasing significance for all locations examined, while tension was mainly associated with the neck pain. The meaning of the variables "tension" and "fatigue" in headache, and their association with recorded muscle activity in various regions is discussed. The EMG response of the trapezius muscle to the test is discussed in comparison with similar responses observed in patients with other pain syndromes.

  20. [The effect of EMG level by EMG biofeedback with progressive muscle relaxation training on tension headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, U J; Kim, N C; Kim, H S

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess if EMG biofeedback training with progressive muscle relaxation training is effective in reducing the EMG level in patients with tension headaches. This study which lasted from 23 October to 30 December 1989, was conducted on 10 females who were diagnosed as patients with tension headaches and selected from among volunteers at C. University in Seoul. The process of the study was as follows: First, before the treatment, the baseline was measured for two weeks and the level of EMG was measured five times in five minutes. And then EMG biofeedback training was used for six weeks, 12 sessions in all, and progressive muscle relaxation was done at home by audio tape over eight weeks. Each session was composed of a 5-minute baseline, two 5-minute EMG biofeedback training periods and a 5-minute self-control stage. Each stage was followed by a five minute rest period. So each session took a total of 40 minutes. The EMG level was measured by EMG biofeedback (Autogenic-Cyborg: M 130 EMG module). The results were as follows: 1. The average age of the subjects was 44.1 years and the average history of headache was 10.6 years (range: 6 months-20 years). 2. The level of EMG was lowest between the third and the fourth week of the training except in Cases I and IV. 3. The patients began to show a nonconciliatory attitude at the first session of the fifth week of the training.

  1. Gesture Based Control and EMG Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Chang, Mindy H.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents two probabilistic developments for use with Electromyograms (EMG). First described is a new-electric interface for virtual device control based on gesture recognition. The second development is a Bayesian method for decomposing EMG into individual motor unit action potentials. This more complex technique will then allow for higher resolution in separating muscle groups for gesture recognition. All examples presented rely upon sampling EMG data from a subject's forearm. The gesture based recognition uses pattern recognition software that has been trained to identify gestures from among a given set of gestures. The pattern recognition software consists of hidden Markov models which are used to recognize the gestures as they are being performed in real-time from moving averages of EMG. Two experiments were conducted to examine the feasibility of this interface technology. The first replicated a virtual joystick interface, and the second replicated a keyboard. Moving averages of EMG do not provide easy distinction between fine muscle groups. To better distinguish between different fine motor skill muscle groups we present a Bayesian algorithm to separate surface EMG into representative motor unit action potentials. The algorithm is based upon differential Variable Component Analysis (dVCA) [l], [2] which was originally developed for Electroencephalograms. The algorithm uses a simple forward model representing a mixture of motor unit action potentials as seen across multiple channels. The parameters of this model are iteratively optimized for each component. Results are presented on both synthetic and experimental EMG data. The synthetic case has additive white noise and is compared with known components. The experimental EMG data was obtained using a custom linear electrode array designed for this study.

  2. Three-year-olds' rapid facial electromyographic responses to emotional facial expressions and body postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geangu, Elena; Quadrelli, Ermanno; Conte, Stefania; Croci, Emanuela; Turati, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Rapid facial reactions (RFRs) to observed emotional expressions are proposed to be involved in a wide array of socioemotional skills, from empathy to social communication. Two of the most persuasive theoretical accounts propose RFRs to rely either on motor resonance mechanisms or on more complex mechanisms involving affective processes. Previous studies demonstrated that presentation of facial and bodily expressions can generate rapid changes in adult and school-age children's muscle activity. However, to date there is little to no evidence to suggest the existence of emotional RFRs from infancy to preschool age. To investigate whether RFRs are driven by motor mimicry or could also be a result of emotional appraisal processes, we recorded facial electromyographic (EMG) activation from the zygomaticus major and frontalis medialis muscles to presentation of static facial and bodily expressions of emotions (i.e., happiness, anger, fear, and neutral) in 3-year-old children. Results showed no specific EMG activation in response to bodily emotion expressions. However, observing others' happy faces led to increased activation of the zygomaticus major and decreased activation of the frontalis medialis, whereas observing others' angry faces elicited the opposite pattern of activation. This study suggests that RFRs are the result of complex mechanisms in which both affective processes and motor resonance may play an important role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of muscle fatigue as assessed by electromyography and mechanomyography during continuous and intermittent low-force contractions: effects of the feedback mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Jørgensen, Lars Vincents; Søgaard, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the significance of low-force continuous or intermittent static contraction and feedback mode (visual or proprioceptive) on the development of muscle fatigue as assessed by electromyography (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG). Visual (force control......) and proprioceptive (displacement control) feedback was investigated during intermittent (6 s contraction, 4 s rest) and continuous static contractions at 10% and 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Mean force, force fluctuation, rating of perceived exertion and root mean square (RMS) and mean power...... and MPF values versus time were observed with proprioceptive feedback compared with visual feedback. The findings suggest that (1) the EMG and MMG signals give complementary information about localised muscle fatigue at low-level contraction: they responded differently in terms of changes in the time...

  4. Avaliação eletromiográfica com eletrodos de captação de superfície dos músculos masseter, temporal e bucinador de lactentes em situação de aleitamento natural e artificial Surface electromyography of facial muscles during natural and artificial feeding of infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane F. Gomes

    2006-04-01

    , classified into the following groups: 1 exclusive breastfeeding; 2 breastfeeding plus bottle-feeding; and 3 exclusive breastfeeding plus cup feeding. Surface electromyography was performed during infant feeding. The Krushal-Wallis test was used, complemented by multiple paired comparisons of the groups. A 5% significance level was chosen for the tests. RESULTS: Statistically higher results were verified in the breastfeeding group in relation to the bottle-feeding one, both in the range of movement and the mean contraction of the masseter. With regard to the temporalis muscle, statistically higher results were found in the breastfeeding group comparatively to the bottle-feeding one. As to the buccinator muscle, statistically higher results were observed in the breastfeeding group in relation to the bottle-feeding one, although in this case, the difference concerned only the range of contraction. CONCLUSION: The similarities between the muscle activity in the breastfeeding and in the cup-feeding groups suggests that cup-feeding can be used as an alternative infant feeding method, being better than bottle-feeding, due to the hyperactivity of the buccinator muscle, which could result in changes to the structural growth and development of the stomatognathic system functions.

  5. Deep Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Electromyography Data: A Resource for the Classification of Movements for Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Cognolato, Matteo; Müller, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Natural control methods based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and pattern recognition are promising for hand prosthetics. However, the control robustness offered by scientific research is still not sufficient for many real life applications, and commercial prostheses are capable of offering natural control for only a few movements. In recent years deep learning revolutionized several fields of machine learning, including computer vision and speech recognition. Our objective is to test its methods for natural control of robotic hands via sEMG using a large number of intact subjects and amputees. We tested convolutional networks for the classification of an average of 50 hand movements in 67 intact subjects and 11 transradial amputees. The simple architecture of the neural network allowed to make several tests in order to evaluate the effect of pre-processing, layer architecture, data augmentation and optimization. The classification results are compared with a set of classical classification methods applied on the same datasets. The classification accuracy obtained with convolutional neural networks using the proposed architecture is higher than the average results obtained with the classical classification methods, but lower than the results obtained with the best reference methods in our tests. The results show that convolutional neural networks with a very simple architecture can produce accurate results comparable to the average classical classification methods. They show that several factors (including pre-processing, the architecture of the net and the optimization parameters) can be fundamental for the analysis of sEMG data. Larger networks can achieve higher accuracy on computer vision and object recognition tasks. This fact suggests that it may be interesting to evaluate if larger networks can increase sEMG classification accuracy too. PMID:27656140

  6. Deep Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Electromyography Data: A Resource for the Classification of Movements for Prosthetic Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Cognolato, Matteo; Müller, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Natural control methods based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and pattern recognition are promising for hand prosthetics. However, the control robustness offered by scientific research is still not sufficient for many real life applications, and commercial prostheses are capable of offering natural control for only a few movements. In recent years deep learning revolutionized several fields of machine learning, including computer vision and speech recognition. Our objective is to test its methods for natural control of robotic hands via sEMG using a large number of intact subjects and amputees. We tested convolutional networks for the classification of an average of 50 hand movements in 67 intact subjects and 11 transradial amputees. The simple architecture of the neural network allowed to make several tests in order to evaluate the effect of pre-processing, layer architecture, data augmentation and optimization. The classification results are compared with a set of classical classification methods applied on the same datasets. The classification accuracy obtained with convolutional neural networks using the proposed architecture is higher than the average results obtained with the classical classification methods, but lower than the results obtained with the best reference methods in our tests. The results show that convolutional neural networks with a very simple architecture can produce accurate results comparable to the average classical classification methods. They show that several factors (including pre-processing, the architecture of the net and the optimization parameters) can be fundamental for the analysis of sEMG data. Larger networks can achieve higher accuracy on computer vision and object recognition tasks. This fact suggests that it may be interesting to evaluate if larger networks can increase sEMG classification accuracy too.

  7. Identification and agreement of first turn point by mathematical analysis applied to heart rate, carbon dioxide output and electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio R. Zamuner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The second heart rate (HR turn point has been extensively studied, however there are few studies determining the first HR turn point. Also, the use of mathematical and statistical models for determining changes in dynamic characteristics of physiological variables during an incremental cardiopulmonary test has been suggested. OBJECTIVES: To determine the first turn point by analysis of HR, surface electromyography (sEMG, and carbon dioxide output ( using two mathematical models and to compare the results to those of the visual method. METHOD: Ten sedentary middle-aged men (53.9±3.2 years old were submitted to cardiopulmonary exercise testing on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer until exhaustion. Ventilatory variables, HR, and sEMG of the vastus lateralis were obtained in real time. Three methods were used to determine the first turn point: 1 visual analysis based on loss of parallelism between and oxygen uptake ( ; 2 the linear-linear model, based on fitting the curves to the set of data (Lin-Lin ; 3 a bi-segmental linear regression of Hinkley' s algorithm applied to HR (HMM-HR, (HMM- , and sEMG data (HMM-RMS. RESULTS: There were no differences between workload, HR, and ventilatory variable values at the first ventilatory turn point as determined by the five studied parameters (p>0.05. The Bland-Altman plot showed an even distribution of the visual analysis method with Lin-Lin , HMM-HR, HMM-CO2, and HMM-RMS. CONCLUSION: The proposed mathematical models were effective in determining the first turn point since they detected the linear pattern change and the deflection point of , HR responses, and sEMG.

  8. Evaluation method for the proficiency level of an operating myoelectric hand using EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Kahori; Kato, Ryu; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the proficiency level of an operating myoelectric hand, we proposed an evaluation index consisting of the accuracy and the reproducibility of electromyography (EMG) signal patterns. Our proposed method is not an absolute evaluation because we use bio-signals, so it is necessary to verify the correlation between the proposed index and performance evaluation to confirm the usefulness of the index. Therefore, we conducted classification tests on eight forearm motions and verified the correlation between the proposed method and the classification rate. There was a strong correlation between the accuracy and the classification rate. In addition, if the accuracy was high, high reproducibility led to an increase in the classification rate. We conclude that the proposed method can evaluate the proficiency level of a myoelectric hand.

  9. Sensitivity of EMG-EMG coherence to detect the common oscillatory drive to hand muscles in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kevin G; Massey, William V; Walters, Tygh J; Collins, Joseph D

    2012-05-01

    Multichannel surface electromyograms (EMGs) were used to examine the sensitivity of EMG-EMG coherence to infer changes in common oscillatory drive to hand muscles in young and older adults. Previous research has shown that measures of coherence calculated from different neurophysiological signals are influenced by the age of the subject, the visual feedback provided to the subject, and the task being performed. The change in the magnitude of EMG-EMG coherence across experimental conditions is often interpreted as a change in the oscillatory drive to motoneuron pools of a pair of muscles. However, signal processing (e.g., full-wave rectification) and electrode location are also reported to influence EMG-EMG coherence, which could decrease the sensitivity of EMG-EMG coherence to infer a change in common oscillatory drive to motoneurons. In this study, multichannel EMGs were used to compare EMG-EMG coherence in young (n = 11) and older (n = 10) adults during index finger abduction and pinch grip tasks performed at 2 and 3.5 N with a low and a high visual feedback gain. We found that, across all conditions, EMG-EMG coherence was influenced by electrode location (P hand muscles with surface EMGs.

  10. Diagnostic significance of urethral sphincter electromyography and external anal sphincter electromyography in patients with multiple system atrophy%多系统萎缩患者的尿道括约肌和肛门括约肌肌电图对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱峰; 戚晓昆; 李丽萍; 刘建国; 姚伟

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较多系统萎缩(MSA)患者尿道括约肌肌电图(US-EMG)和肛门括约肌肌电图(EAS-EMG)变化特征.方法 对拟诊的9例MSA患者行US-EMG和EAS-EMG测定.分别测定运动单位的平均时限、平均波幅、轻收缩波幅、多相波以及大力收缩募集电位共5组数据,并统计分析组间差异.结果 9例MSA患者US-EMG与EAS-EMG两种检查方法均证实7例患者肌电图结果呈神经源性损伤,两种检查结果中平均波幅[( 1063.44±499.92) μV与(634.89±265.07) μV]、多相波[中位数(四分位数间距),分别为0(0,20%)与57% (28%,63%)]差异有统计学意义(t=2.567,P=0.033;t =2.833,P=0.012).结论 US-EMG和EAS-EMG在MSA诊断中均具有较特异的诊断价值,虽然US-EMG检查实施有一定技巧性和难度,但其轻收缩波幅等指标的异常对于仅有排尿障碍而无便秘的MSA可能具有更为显著的诊断价值.%Objective To assess the significance of urethral sphincter electromyography (US-EMG) and external anal sphincter electromyography (EAS-EMG) for the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA).Methods US-EMG and EAS-EMG were performed in 9 patients who were diagnosed as MSA.Duration,motor unit action potentials amplitude,polyphasicity,as well as recruited pattern and amplitude during powerful contraction were recorded and analyzed.Results Among 9 patients who were diagnosed as MSA,7 cases showed neural injury by both US-EMG and EAS-EMG.There was significant difference of electromyographic findings between US-EMG group and EAS-EMG group (average volatility (μV):1063.44 ±499.92 vs 634.89 ±265.07; polyphasic wave:0(0,20% ) vs 57% (28%,63% ) ; t =2.567,P=0.033;t =2.833,P=0.012).Conclusions Although US-EMG may be difficult to perform,US-EMG may have the same specificity as EAS-EMG for the diagnosis of MSA,especially for the diagnosis of MSA patients only with urination disorders,who are involved in Onuf neclear according to some of the abnormal indexes.

  11. Face to face: blocking facial mimicry can selectively impair recognition of emotional expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, Lindsay M; Winkielman, Piotr; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2007-01-01

    People spontaneously mimic a variety of behaviors, including emotional facial expressions. Embodied cognition theories suggest that mimicry reflects internal simulation of perceived emotion in order to facilitate its understanding. If so, blocking facial mimicry should impair recognition of expressions, especially of emotions that are simulated using facial musculature. The current research tested this hypothesis using four expressions (happy, disgust, fear, and sad) and two mimicry-interfering manipulations (1) biting on a pen and (2) chewing gum, as well as two control conditions. Experiment 1 used electromyography over cheek, mouth, and nose regions. The bite manipulation consistently activated assessed muscles, whereas the chew manipulation activated muscles only intermittently. Further, expressing happiness generated most facial action. Experiment 2 found that the bite manipulation interfered most with recognition of happiness. These findings suggest that facial mimicry differentially contributes to recognition of specific facial expressions, thus allowing for more refined predictions from embodied cognition theories.

  12. Surface raw electromyography has a moderate discriminatory capacity for differentiating between healthy individuals and those with TMD: a diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Ratón, Mónica; Mora, Maria J; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; López-Cedrún, José; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2014-06-01

    The use of surface electromyography (sEMG) to identify subjects with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is controversial. The main objective of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of EMG to differentiate between healthy subjects and those with TMD. This study evaluated 53 individuals with TMD who were referred to the university service and who fulfilled the eligibility criteria during the period of the study. Thirty-eight dental students were also recruited satisfying same eligibility criteria but without TMD. The inclusion criteria were to be fully dentate, have normal occlusion, and be righthanded. The exclusion criteria were periodontal pathology, caries or damaged dental tissues, orthodontic therapy, maxillofacial disease, botulinum A toxin therapy, and psychological disorders. The means of the masseter muscles, right (RM) and left (LM), and temporalis muscles, right (RT) and left (LT), and intraindividual indexes during resting and during clenching were calculated. Raw sEMG activity was used to determine the cutoff points and calculate the diagnostic accuracy of sEMG. The diagnostic accuracy of these variables for a diagnosis of TMD was evaluated by using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under it (AUC). A new transformed diagnostic variable was obtained by using the Generalized Additive Models (GAM). Optimal cutoff points were obtained where the sensitivity and specificity were similar and by the Youden index. The highest estimated AUC was 0.660 (95% CI 0.605-0.871) corresponding to the rLT variable during rest. When rLT and rACTIVITY (differences divided by sums of temporalis versus masseter muscles) were considered as a linear combination, the AUC increased to 0.742 (95% CI; 0.783-0.934). In conclusion, the raw sEMG evaluation of rest provided moderate sensitivity and specificity to discriminate between healthy individuals and those with TMD. The use of the indexes (mainly assessing the dominance of

  13. Analysis of the aerobic-anaerobic transition in elite cyclists during incremental exercise with the use of electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, A.; Sanchez, O.; Carvajal, A.; Chicharro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the validity and reliability of surface electromyography (EMG) as a new non-invasive determinant of the metabolic response to incremental exercise in elite cyclists. The relation between EMG activity and other more conventional methods for analysing the aerobic-anaerobic transition such as blood lactate measurements (lactate threshold (LT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA)) and ventilatory parameters (ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2 (VT1 and VT2)) was studied. METHODS: Twenty eight elite road cyclists (age 24 (4) years; VO2MAX 69.9 (6.4) ml/kg/min; values mean (SD)) were selected as subjects. Each of them performed a ramp protocol (starting at 0 W, with increases of 5 W every 12 seconds) on a cycle ergometer (validity study). In addition, 15 of them performed the same test twice (reliability study). During the tests, data on gas exchange and blood lactate levels were collected to determine VT1, VT2, LT, and OBLA. The root mean squares of EMG signals (rms-EMG) were recorded from both the vastus lateralis and the rectus femoris at each intensity using surface electrodes. RESULTS: A two threshold response was detected in the rms-EMG recordings from both muscles in 90% of subjects, with two breakpoints, EMGT1 and EMGT2, at around 60-70% and 80-90% of VO2MAX respectively. The results of the reliability study showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) between mean values of EMGT1 and EMGT2 obtained in both tests. Furthermore, no significant differences (p > 0.05) existed between mean values of EMGT1, in the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, and VT1 and LT (62.8 (14.5) and 69.0 (6.2) and 64.6 (6.4) and 68.7 (8.2)% of VO2MAX respectively), or between mean values of EMGT2, in the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, and VT2 and OBLA (86.9 (9.0) and 88.0 (6.2) and 84.6 (6.5) and 87.7 (6.4)% of VO2MAX respectively). CONCLUSION: rms-EMG may be a useful complementary non-invasive method for analysing the aerobic- anaerobic transition

  14. Between-day reliability of triceps surae responses to standing perturbations in people post-stroke and healthy controls: A high-density surface EMG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, A; Pollock, C L; Vieira, T M; Ivanova, T D; Garland, S J

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of triceps surae electromyographic responses to standing perturbations in people after stroke and healthy controls is unknown. High-Density surface Electromyography (HDsEMG) is a technique that records electromyographic signals from different locations over a muscle, overcoming limitations of traditional surface EMG such as between-day differences in electrode placement. In this study, HDsEMG was used to measure responses from soleus (SOL, 18 channels) and medial and lateral gastrocnemius (MG and LG, 16 channels each) in 10 people after stroke and 10 controls. Timing and amplitude of the response were estimated for each channel of the grids. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and normalized Standard Error of Measurement (SEM%) were calculated for each channel individually (single-channel configuration) and on the median of each grid (all-channels configuration). Both timing (single-channel: ICC=0.75-0.96, SEM%=5.0-9.1; all-channels: ICC=0.85-0.97; SEM%=3.5-6.2%) and amplitude (single-channel: ICC=0.60-0.91, SEM%=25.1-46.6; ICC=0.73-0.95, SEM%=19.3-42.1) showed good-to-excellent reliability. HDsEMG provides reliable estimates of EMG responses to perturbations both in individuals after stroke and in healthy controls; reliability was marginally better for the all-channels compared to the single-channel configuration.

  15. Changes in joint angle, muscle-tendon complex length, muscle contractile tissue displacement, and modulation of EMG activity during acute whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Darryl J; Loram, Ian D; Stannard, Stephen R; Rittweger, Jörn

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that vibration causes small changes in muscle length, but to the best of our knowledge, these have yet to be demonstrated during whole-body vibration (WBV). This was an observational study to determine whether acute WBV would result in muscle lengthening. We hypothesized that acute WBV would increase electromyography (EMG) activity concurrently with measurable changes in muscle contractile length. Nine healthy males performed two conditions on a Galileo vibration machine for 15 s at 0 HZ (resting) and 6 HZ at a set knee angle of 18 degrees. Muscle tendon complex length, contractile tissue displacement of the medial gastrocnemius muscle, and EMG of soleus, tibialis anterior, and vastus lateralis muscles were measured. At 6 HZ the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle tendon complex (MTC) amplitude (375 microm) was significantly greater (P EMG modulation were found for all muscles during the 6 HZ compared to the 0 HZ condition. The major finding was that approximately 50% of the elongation occurred within the muscle itself and was associated with preceding changes in EMG. This indicates muscle lengthening may be a prerequisite for eliciting stretch reflexes. In conclusion, there is a temporal association between EMG activity and muscle contractile tissue displacement where low-frequency WBV results in small muscle length changes and increases muscle activation.

  16. Force-EMG changes during sustained contractions of a human upper airway muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kori; DelloRusso, Christiana; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2009-02-01

    Human upper airway and facial muscles support breathing, swallowing, speech, mastication, and facial expression, but their endurance performance in sustained contractions is poorly understood. The muscular fatigue typically associated with task failure during sustained contractions has both central and intramuscular causes, with the contribution of each believed to be task dependent. Previously we failed to show central fatigue in the nasal dilator muscles of subjects that performed intermittent maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Here we test the hypothesis that central mechanisms contribute to the fatigue of submaximal, sustained contractions in nasal dilator muscles. Nasal dilator muscle force and EMG activities were recorded in 11 subjects that performed submaximal contractions (20, 35, and 65% MVC) until force dropped to or=3 s, which we defined as task failure. MVC and twitch forces (the latter obtained by applying supramaximal shocks to the facial nerve) were recorded before the trial and at several time points over the first 10 min of recovery. The time to task failure was inversely related to contraction intensity. MVC force was depressed by roughly 30% at task failure in all three trials, but recovered within 2 min. Twitch force fell by 30-44% depending on contraction intensity and remained depressed after 10 min of recovery, consistent with low-frequency fatigue. Average EMG activity increased with time, but never exceeded 75% of the maximal, pretrial level despite task failure. EMG mean power frequency declined by 20-25% in all trials, suggesting reduced action potential conduction velocity at task failure. In contrast, the maximal evoked potential did not change significantly in any of the tasks, indicating that the EMG deficit at task failure was due largely to mechanisms proximal to the neuromuscular junction. Additional experiments using the interpolated twitch technique suggest that subjects can produce about 92% of the maximal evocable force

  17. Stretchable Multichannel Electromyography Sensor Array Covering Large Area for Controlling Home Electronics with Distinguishable Signals from Multiple Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namyun; Lim, Taehoon; Song, Kwangsun; Yang, Sung; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-17

    Physiological signals provide important information for biomedical applications and, more recently, in the form of wearable electronics for active interactions between bodies and external environments. Multiple physiological sensors are often required to map distinct signals from multiple points over large areas for more diverse applications. In this paper, we present a reusable, multichannel, surface electromyography (EMG) sensor array that covers multiple muscles over relatively large areas, with compliant designs that provide different levels of stiffness for repetitive uses, without backing layers. Mechanical and electrical characteristics along with distinct measurements from different muscles demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. The results should be useful to actively control devices in the environment with one array of wearable sensors, as demonstrated with home electronics.

  18. A Study on EMG-based Biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Su Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics is a technology that recognizes user's information by using unique physical features of his or her body such as face, fingerprint, and iris. It also uses behavioral features such as signature, electrocardiogram (ECG, electromyogram (EMG, and electroencephalogram (EEG. Among them, the EMG signal is a sign generated when the muscles move, which can be used in various fields such as motion recognition, personal identification, and disease diagnosis. In this paper, we analyze EMG-based biometrics and implement a motion recognition and personal identification system. The system extracted features using non-uniform filter bank and Waveform Length (WL, and reduces the dimension using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA. Afterward, it classified the features using Euclidean Distance (ED, Support Vector Machine (SVM and K Nearest Neighbors (KNN. As a result of the motion recognition experiment, 95% of acquired EMG data and 84.66% of UCI data were obtained and as a result of the personal recognition experiment, 85% of acquired EMG data and 88.66% of UCI data were obtained.

  19. Automated Detection and Evaluation of Swallowing Using a Combined EMG/Bioimpedance Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Schultheiss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developing an automated diagnostic and therapeutic instrument for treating swallowing disorders requires procedures able to reliably detect and evaluate a swallow. We tested a two-stage detection procedure based on a combined electromyography/bioimpedance (EMBI measurement system. EMBI is able to detect swallows and distinguish them from similar movements in healthy test subjects. Study Design. The study was planned and conducted as a case-control study (EA 1/019/10, and EA1/160/09, EA1/161/09. Method. The study looked at differences in swallowing parameters in general and in the event of penetration during swallows in healthy subjects and in patients with an oropharyngeal swallowing disorder. A two-stage automated swallow detection procedure which used electromyography (EMG and bioimpedance (BI to reliably detect swallows was developed. Results. Statistically significant differences between healthy subjects and patients with a swallowing disorder were found in swallowing parameters previously used to distinguish between swallowing and head movements. Our two-stage algorithm was able to reliably detect swallows (sensitivity = 96.1%, specificity = 97.1% on the basis of these differences. Discussion. Using a two-stage detection procedure, the EMBI measurement procedure is able to detect and evaluate swallows automatically and reliably. The two procedures (EMBI + swallow detection could in future form the basis for automated diagnosis and treatment (stimulation of swallowing disorders.

  20. History of electromyography and nerve conduction studies: A tribute to the founding fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamel, Mohamed; Warren, Paula Province

    2017-09-01

    The early development of nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG) was linked to the discovery of electricity. This relationship had been concluded by observing the effect of applying electricity to the body of an animal and discovering that nerves and muscles themselves could produce electricity. We attempt to review the historical evolution of NCS and EMG over the last three centuries by reviewing the landmark publications of Galvani, Adrian, Denny-Brown, Larrabee, and Lambert. In 1771, Galvani showed that electrical stimulation of animal muscle tissue produced contraction and, thereby, the concept of animal electricity was born. In 1929, Adrian devised a method to record a single motor unit potential by connecting concentric needle electrodes to an amplifier and a loud speaker. In 1938, Denny-Brown described the fasciculation potentials and separated them from fibrillations. Toward the end of World War II, Larrabee began measuring the compound muscle action potential in healthy and injured nerves of war victims. In 1957, Lambert and Eaton described the electrophysiologic features of a new myasthenic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma. Overall, research on this topic was previously undertaken by neurophysiologists and then later by neurologists, with Adrian most likely being the first neurologist to be involved. The field greatly benefited from the invention of equipment that was capable of amplifying small bioelectrical currents by the beginning of the 20th century. Significant scientific and technical advances were later made during and after World War II which provided a large patient population with nerve injuries to study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An experimental investigation into electromyography, constitutive relationship and morphology of crucian carp for biomechanical "digital fish"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng; Yin, Xiezhen; Tong, Binggang

    2011-05-01

    Currently, the integrated biomechanical studies on fish locomotion come into focus, so it is urgent to provide reliable and systematic experimental results, and to establish a biomechanical "digital fish" database for some typical fish species. Accordingly, based on the control framework of "Neural Control — Active Contraction of Muscle — Passive Deformation", the electromyography (EMG) signals, the mechanical properties and the constitutive relationship of skin, muscle, and body trunk, as well as morphological parameters of crucian carp, are investigated with experiments, from which a simplified database of biomechanical "digital fish" is established. First, the EMG signals from three lateral superficial red muscles of crucian carp, which was evolving in the C-start movement, were acquired with a self-designing amplifier. The modes of muscle activity were also investigated. Secondly, the Young's modulus and the reduced relaxation function of crucian carp's skin and muscle were determined by failure tests and relaxation tests in uniaxial tensile ways, respectively. Viscoelastic models were adopted to deduce the constitutive relationship. The mechanical properties and the angular stiffness of different sites on the crucian carp's body trunk were obtained with dynamic bending experiments, where a self-designing dynamic bending test machine was employed. The conclusion was drawn regarding the body trunk of crucian carp under dynamic bending deformation as an approximate elastomer. According to the above experimental results, a possible benefit of body effective stiffness increasing with a little energy dissipation was discussed. Thirdly, the distribution of geometric parameters and weight parameters for a single experimental individual and multiple individuals of crucian carp was studied with experiments. Finally, considering all the above results, generic experimental data were obtained by normalization, and a preliminary biomechanical "digital fish" database for

  2. Do Dynamic Compared to Static Facial Expressions of Happiness and Anger Reveal Enhanced Facial Mimicry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Rymarczyk

    Full Text Available Facial mimicry is the spontaneous response to others' facial expressions by mirroring or matching the interaction partner. Recent evidence suggested that mimicry may not be only an automatic reaction but could be dependent on many factors, including social context, type of task in which the participant is engaged, or stimulus properties (dynamic vs static presentation. In the present study, we investigated the impact of dynamic facial expression and sex differences on facial mimicry and judgment of emotional intensity. Electromyography recordings were recorded from the corrugator supercilii, zygomaticus major, and orbicularis oculi muscles during passive observation of static and dynamic images of happiness and anger. The ratings of the emotional intensity of facial expressions were also analysed. As predicted, dynamic expressions were rated as more intense than static ones. Compared to static images, dynamic displays of happiness also evoked stronger activity in the zygomaticus major and orbicularis oculi, suggesting that subjects experienced positive emotion. No muscles showed mimicry activity in response to angry faces. Moreover, we found that women exhibited greater zygomaticus major muscle activity in response to dynamic happiness stimuli than static stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that people mimic positive emotions and confirm the importance of dynamic stimuli in some emotional processing.

  3. Surface electromyography pattern of human swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadaro Alessandro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiology of swallowing is characterized by a complex and coordinated activation of many stomatognathic, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles. Kinetics and electromyographic studies have widely investigated the pharyngeal and laryngeal pattern of deglutition in order to point out the differences between normal and dysphagic people. In the dental field, muscular activation during swallowing is believed to be the cause of malocclusion. Despite the clinical importance given to spontaneous swallowing, few physiologic works have studied stomatognathic muscular activation and mandibular movement during spontaneous saliva swallowing. The aim of our study was to investigate the activity patterns of the mandibular elevator muscles (masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, the submental muscles, and the neck muscles (sternocleidomastoid muscles in healthy people during spontaneous swallowing of saliva and to relate the muscular activities to mandibular movement. Methods The spontaneous swallowing of saliva of 111 healthy individuals was analyzed using surface electromyography (SEMG and a computerized kinesiography of mandibular movement. Results Fifty-seven of 111 patients swallowed without occlusal contact (SNOC and 54 individuals had occlusal contact (SOC. The sternocleidomastoid muscles showed a slight, but constant activation during swallowing. The SEMG of the submental and sternocleidomastoid muscles showed no differences between the two groups. The SEMG of the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles showed significant differences (p Conclusion The data suggest that there is not a single "normal" or "typical" pattern for spontaneous saliva swallowing. The polygraph seemed a valuable, simple, non-invasive and reliable tool to study the physiology of swallowing.

  4. Ocular correction effects on EMG activity of stomatognathic muscles in children with functional mandibular lateral- deviation: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, A; Cattaneo, R; Spadaro, A; D'Andrea, P; Marzo, G; Gatto, R

    2006-06-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the ocular correction effects on electromyography activity of anterior temporal, masseter, sternocleidomastoid and anterior digastric muscles in children with functional mandibular lateral-deviation. This study was performed on 32 subjects, aged between 8 and 12 years with functional lateral deviation of mandible and oculo-extrinsic muscular tone disorders. After complete ophthalmologic evaluation and ocular correction prescription, the children were randomly divided into two groups: study and control. In the study group (16 subjects) EMG activity at rest was recorded in the following conditions: with eyes closed; with eyes open; with ocular correction modified through electromyographic control. In the control group (16 subjects) EMG activity at rest was recorded in the following conditions: with eyes closed; with eyes open; with conventional ocular correction. Data were acquired in 15-seconds trial using a SEMG K7, while the subjects maintained rest dental position. Both groups presented a significative correlation between value of lateral-deviation and the degree of ocular-extrinsic muscular tone disorders (r=0.69). In addition, a significant statistical increase of EMG activity at rest with eyes open in both groups was observed in the anterior temporal left and right. A significant decrease of EMG activity with open eyes was observed only with ocular correction upon electromyographic control (study group). The findings, expressed as Symmetry Index, showed a significant increase of muscles imbalance right/left with conventional methods of ocular correction (p corrective lenses, could have an important consequence in clinical diagnostic and therapeutic behaviour because anterior temporal muscles are important in postural position of the mandible. Instead EMG corrective lenses could improve tonus and balance of stomatognathic muscles and, therefore, support the functionality of orthodontic treatment. Moreover, the data

  5. A frequency and pulse-width co-modulation strategy for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation based on sEMG time-domain features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Hai-Peng; Bao, Xue-Liang; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used as a control signal in neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) systems to enhance the voluntary control and proprioceptive sensory feedback of paralyzed patients. Most sEMG-controlled NMES systems use the envelope of the sEMG signal to modulate the stimulation intensity (current amplitude or pulse width) with a constant frequency. The aims of this study were to develop a strategy that co-modulates frequency and pulse width based on features of the sEMG signal and to investigate the torque-reproduction performance and the level of fatigue resistance achieved with our strategy. Approach. We examined the relationships between wrist torque and two stimulation parameters (frequency and pulse width) and between wrist torque and two sEMG time-domain features (mean absolute value (MAV) and number of slope sign changes (NSS)) in eight healthy volunteers. By using wrist torque as an intermediate variable, customized and generalized transfer functions were constructed to convert the two features of the sEMG signal into the two stimulation parameters, thereby establishing a MAV/NSS dual-coding (MNDC) algorithm. Wrist torque reproduction performance was assessed by comparing the torque generated by the algorithms with that originally recorded during voluntary contractions. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring the decline percentage of the peak torque and by comparing the torque time integral of the response to test stimulation trains before and after fatigue sessions. Main Results. The MNDC approach could produce a wrist torque that closely matched the voluntary wrist torque. In addition, a smaller decay in the wrist torque was observed after the MNDC-coded fatigue stimulation was applied than after stimulation using pulse-width modulation alone. Significance. Compared with pulse-width modulation stimulation strategies that are based on sEMG detection, the MNDC strategy is more effective for both voluntary muscle

  6. Use of surface electromyography in phonation studies: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balata, Patricia Maria Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface electromyography has been used to assess the extrinsic laryngeal muscles during chewing and swallowing, but there have been few studies assessing these muscles during phonation. Objective: To investigate the current state of knowledge regarding the use of surface electromyography for evaluation of the electrical activity of the extrinsic muscles of the larynx during phonation by means of an integrative review. Method: We searched for articles and other papers in the PubMed, Medline/Bireme, and Scielo databases that were published between 1980 and 2012, by using the following descriptors: surface electromyography and voice, surface electromyography and phonation, and surface electromyography and dysphonia. The articles were selectedon the basis ofinclusion and exclusion criteria. Data Synthesis: This was carried out with a cross critical matrix. We selected 27 papers,i.e., 24 articles and 3 theses. The studies differed methodologically with regards to sample size and investigation techniques, making it difficult to compare them, but showed differences in electrical activity between the studied groups (dysphonicsubjects, non-dysphonicsubjects, singers, and others. Conclusion: Electromyography has clinical applicability when technical precautions with respect to application and analysis are obeyed. However, it is necessary to adopt a universal system of assessment tasks and related measurement techniques to allow comparisons between studies.

  7. Pediatric facial nerve rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-11-01

    Facial paralysis is a rare but severe condition in the pediatric population. Impaired facial movement has multiple causes and varied presentations, therefore individualized treatment plans are essential for optimal results. Advances in facial reanimation over the past 4 decades have given rise to new treatments designed to restore balance and function in pediatric patients with facial paralysis. This article provides a comprehensive review of pediatric facial rehabilitation and describes a zone-based approach to assessment and treatment of impaired facial movement.

  8. Does quantitative EMG differ myotonic dystrophy type 2 and type 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmidt-Salkowska, Elzbieta; Gawel, Malgorzata; Lusakowska, Anna; Nojszewska, Monika; Lipowska, Marta; Sulek, Anna; Krysa, Wioletta; Rajkiewicz, Marta; Seroka, Andrzej; Kaminska, Anna M

    2014-10-01

    Genetic testing is considered the only reliable diagnostic approach in myotonic dystrophy. However it has recently been reported that a considerable number of patients with genetically proven types of the disease have unusual phenotypic presentation. The aim of our study was to evaluate motor unit reorganization reflected by various electrophysiological abnormalities in myotonic dystrophies and to compare findings between type 1 (DM 1) and type 2 myotonic dystrophy (DM2). Quantitative electromyography (EMG) recordings in 63 patients (33 with DM1 and 30 with DM2) from the biceps brachii (BB), rectus femoris (RF), first dorsal interosseus (FDI), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were analyzed. Mean amplitude and size index (SI) of motor unit potentials recorded in TA and RF muscles, mean potential duration in TA, and mean SI and the number of outliers with amplitude above the normal range in BB were significantly increased in DM2 as compared to DM1. Myotonic discharges were recorded more frequently in DM1 than in DM2. EMG findings significantly differ between DM1 and DM2. The presence of high amplitude potentials in lower limb muscles in DM2 patients, atypical for myogenic muscle lesions, could be explained by muscle fiber hypertrophy observed in muscle biopsies.

  9. A Hybrid FPGA-Based System for EEG- and EMG-Based Online Movement Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhrle, Hendrik; Tabie, Marc; Kim, Su Kyoung; Kirchner, Frank; Kirchner, Elsa Andrea

    2017-01-01

    A current trend in the development of assistive devices for rehabilitation, for example exoskeletons or active orthoses, is to utilize physiological data to enhance their functionality and usability, for example by predicting the patient’s upcoming movements using electroencephalography (EEG) or electromyography (EMG). However, these modalities have different temporal properties and classification accuracies, which results in specific advantages and disadvantages. To use physiological data analysis in rehabilitation devices, the processing should be performed in real-time, guarantee close to natural movement onset support, provide high mobility, and should be performed by miniaturized systems that can be embedded into the rehabilitation device. We present a novel Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) -based system for real-time movement prediction using physiological data. Its parallel processing capabilities allows the combination of movement predictions based on EEG and EMG and additionally a P300 detection, which is likely evoked by instructions of the therapist. The system is evaluated in an offline and an online study with twelve healthy subjects in total. We show that it provides a high computational performance and significantly lower power consumption in comparison to a standard PC. Furthermore, despite the usage of fixed-point computations, the proposed system achieves a classification accuracy similar to systems with double precision floating-point precision. PMID:28671632

  10. Gluteus minimus: an intramuscular EMG investigation of anterior and posterior segments during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semciw, Adam I; Green, Rodney A; Murley, George S; Pizzari, Tania

    2014-02-01

    Gluteus minimus is believed to consist of two structurally and functionally unique segments (anterior and posterior); however there is a lack of electromyography (EMG) research that attempts to verify current theoretical knowledge of this muscle. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the function of gluteus minimus during gait, and to determine whether anterior and posterior segments are functionally independent. Bipolar fine wire intramuscular EMG electrodes were inserted into anterior and posterior gluteus minimus segments of fifteen healthy volunteers (9 males) according to previously verified guidelines. Participants completed a series of four walking trials, followed by maximum voluntary isometric contractions in five different positions. Temporal and amplitude variables for each segment were compared across the gait cycle with independent t-tests. The relative contribution of each segment to the maximum resisted trials was compared with Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Anterior and posterior segments were contracting at different relative intensities for three of the five maximum resisted trials (effect size = 0.39 to 0.62, P gait cycle (effect size = 0.96 to 1.03, P phase (effect size = 0.83, P = 0.034). Gluteus minimus is therefore composed of functionally independent segments. These results build on contemporary theoretical knowledge and may signify hip stabilising roles for each segment across different phases of the gait cycle.

  11. Asymmetry in stimulus and response conflict processing across the adult lifespan: ERP and EMG evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killikelly, Clare; Szűcs, Dénes

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that conflict processing improves from childhood to adulthood and declines from adulthood to old age. However the neural mechanisms underlying this lifespan asymmetry were previously unexplored. We combined event-related potentials (ERPs) and electromyography (EMG) to examine lifespan changes in stimulus and response conflict processing using a modified Stroop task. We used a Stroop task that a priori dissociated stimulus and response conflict. Delayed P3b latency and increased amplitude revealed that middle age adults have a deficit in stimulus processing. Additionally a sustained P3a across frontal and central electrodes occurred only in middle age adults indicating the recruitment of frontal activity. Conversely, decreased lateralized readiness potential (LRP) amplitude and increased EMG activity in the incorrect hand in adolescents reveal protracted development of response processing into late adolescence. The N450, a measure of conflict processing, was found to be sensitive to both stimulus and response conflict. Altogether these results provide evidence for asymmetrical differences in stimulus and response conflict processing across adolescence, young adulthood and middle age.

  12. Recurrence quantification analysis and support vector machines for golf handicap and low back pain EMG classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Serranho, Pedro; Cabri, Jan; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    The quantification of non-linear characteristics of electromyography (EMG) must contain information allowing to discriminate neuromuscular strategies during dynamic skills. There are a lack of studies about muscle coordination under motor constrains during dynamic contractions. In golf, both handicap (Hc) and low back pain (LBP) are the main factors associated with the occurrence of injuries. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of support vector machines SVM on EMG-based classification to discriminate Hc (low and high handicap) and LBP (with and without LPB) in the main phases of golf swing. For this purpose recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) features of the trunk and the lower limb muscles were used to feed a SVM classifier. Recurrence rate (RR) and the ratio between determinism (DET) and RR showed a high discriminant power. The Hc accuracy for the swing, backswing, and downswing were 94.4±2.7%, 97.1±2.3%, and 95.3±2.6%, respectively. For LBP, the accuracy was 96.9±3.8% for the swing, and 99.7±0.4% in the backswing. External oblique (EO), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST) and rectus femoris (RF) showed high accuracy depending on the laterality within the phase. RQA features and SVM showed a high muscle discriminant capacity within swing phases by Hc and by LBP. Low back pain golfers showed different neuromuscular coordination strategies when compared with asymptomatic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of two gluteus maximus EMG maximum voluntary isometric contraction positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret Contreras

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak electromyography (EMG of the most commonly-used position in the literature, the prone bent-leg (90° hip extension against manual resistance applied to the distal thigh (PRONE, to a novel position, the standing glute squeeze (SQUEEZE.Methods. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the upper and lower gluteus maximus of thirteen recreationally active females (age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg, before three maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC trials for each position were obtained in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion.Results. No statistically significant (p < 0.05 differences were observed between PRONE (upper: 91.94%; lower: 94.52% and SQUEEZE (upper: 92.04%; lower: 85.12% for both the upper and lower gluteus maximus. Neither the PRONE nor SQUEEZE was more effective between all subjects.Conclusions. In agreement with other studies, no single testing position is ideal for every participant. Therefore, it is recommended that investigators employ multiple MVIC positions, when possible, to ensure accuracy. Future research should investigate a variety of gluteus maximus MVIC positions in heterogeneous samples.

  14. A comparison of two gluteus maximus EMG maximum voluntary isometric contraction positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak electromyography (EMG) of the most commonly-used position in the literature, the prone bent-leg (90°) hip extension against manual resistance applied to the distal thigh (PRONE), to a novel position, the standing glute squeeze (SQUEEZE). Methods. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the upper and lower gluteus maximus of thirteen recreationally active females (age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg), before three maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials for each position were obtained in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Results. No statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed between PRONE (upper: 91.94%; lower: 94.52%) and SQUEEZE (upper: 92.04%; lower: 85.12%) for both the upper and lower gluteus maximus. Neither the PRONE nor SQUEEZE was more effective between all subjects. Conclusions. In agreement with other studies, no single testing position is ideal for every participant. Therefore, it is recommended that investigators employ multiple MVIC positions, when possible, to ensure accuracy. Future research should investigate a variety of gluteus maximus MVIC positions in heterogeneous samples.

  15. High efficiency and simple technique for controlling mechanisms by EMG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, N.; Álvarez, A.; Balacco, J.; Mercado, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Dugarte, E.; Javier, F.; Ceballos, G.; Olivares, A.

    2016-04-01

    This article reports the development of a simple and efficient system that allows control of mechanisms through electromyography (EMG) signals. The novelty about this instrument is focused on individual control of each motion vector mechanism through independent electronic circuits. Each of electronic circuit does positions a motor according to intensity of EMG signal captured. This action defines movement in one mechanical axis considered from an initial point, based on increased muscle tension. The final displacement of mechanism depends on individual’s ability to handle the levels of muscle tension at different body parts. This is the design of a robotic arm where each degree of freedom is handled with a specific microcontroller that responds to signals taken from a defined muscle. The biophysical interaction between the person and the final positioning of the robotic arm is used as feedback. Preliminary tests showed that the control operates with minimal positioning error margins. The constant use of system with the same operator showed that the person adapts and progressively improves at control technique.

  16. A self-adaptive foot-drop corrector using functional electrical stimulation (FES) modulated by tibialis anterior electromyography (EMG) dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Wu, Bian; Lou, Xinxin; Zhao, Ting; Li, Jianhua; Xu, Zhisheng; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2013-02-01

    We developed a functional electrical stimulator for correcting the gait patterns of patients with foot-drop problem. The stimulating electrical pulses of the system are modulated to evoke contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, by emulating the normal patterns. The modulation is adaptive, i.e. the system can predict the user's step frequency and the generated stimulation can match each step in real-time. In this study, step data from 11 young healthy volunteers were acquired, and five prediction algorithms were evaluated by the acquired data, including the average of Previous N steps (P-N), the Previous Nth step (P-Nth), General Regression Neural Network (GRNN), Autoregressive (AR) and Kalman filter (KF). The algorithm with the best efficiency-accuracy trade-off (P-N, when N=5) was implemented in the FES system. System evaluation results obtained from a post-stroke patient with foot-drop showed that the system of this study demonstrated better performance on gait pattern correction than the methods widely adopted in commercial products.

  17. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Yanjuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromyography (EMG pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. Methods With five unilateral transradial (TR amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. Results With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9% as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for

  18. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more to fully heal and achieve maximum improved appearance. Facial plastic surgery makes it possible to correct facial flaws that can undermine self-confidence. Changing how your scar looks can help change ...

  19. Facial attractiveness: General patterns of facial preferences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kościński, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    This review covers universal patterns in facial preferences. Facial attractiveness has fascinated thinkers since antiquity, but has been the subject of intense scientific study for only the last quarter of a century...

  20. [Surgical facial reanimation after persisting facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Facial reanimation following persistent facial paralysis can be managed with surgical procedures of varying complexity. The choice of the technique is mainly determined by the cause of facial paralysis, the age and desires of the patient. The techniques most commonly used are the nerve grafts (VII-VII, XII-VII, cross facial graft), dynamic muscle transfers (temporal myoplasty, free muscle transfert) and static suspensions. An intensive rehabilitation through specific exercises after all procedures is essential to archieve good results.

  1. Surface electromyography pattern of human swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Spadaro, Alessandro; Giannoni, Mario

    2008-03-26

    The physiology of swallowing is characterized by a complex and coordinated activation of many stomatognathic, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles. Kinetics and electromyographic studies have widely investigated the pharyngeal and laryngeal pattern of deglutition in order to point out the differences between normal and dysphagic people. In the dental field, muscular activation during swallowing is believed to be the cause of malocclusion.Despite the clinical importance given to spontaneous swallowing, few physiologic works have studied stomatognathic muscular activation and mandibular movement during spontaneous saliva swallowing.The aim of our study was to investigate the activity patterns of the mandibular elevator muscles (masseter and anterior temporalis muscles), the submental muscles, and the neck muscles (sternocleidomastoid muscles) in healthy people during spontaneous swallowing of saliva and to relate the muscular activities to mandibular movement. The spontaneous swallowing of saliva of 111 healthy individuals was analyzed using surface electromyography (SEMG) and a computerized kinesiography of mandibular movement. Fifty-seven of 111 patients swallowed without occlusal contact (SNOC) and 54 individuals had occlusal contact (SOC). The sternocleidomastoid muscles showed a slight, but constant activation during swallowing. The SEMG of the submental and sternocleidomastoid muscles showed no differences between the two groups. The SEMG of the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles showed significant differences (p swallowing was significantly higher in the SNOC subjects. Gender and age were not related to electromyographic activation. Healthy SOC and SNOC behaved in different ways. The data suggest that there is not a single "normal" or "typical" pattern for spontaneous saliva swallowing. The polygraph seemed a valuable, simple, non-invasive and reliable tool to study the physiology of swallowing.

  2. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography: turns and amplitude analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statham, Melissa McCarty; Rosen, Clark A; Nandedkar, Sanjeev D; Munin, Michael C

    2010-10-01

    Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) is primarily a qualitative examination, with no standardized approach to interpretation. The objectives of our study were to establish quantitative norms for motor unit recruitment in controls and to compare with interference pattern analysis in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (VFP). Retrospective case-control study We performed LEMG of the thyroarytenoid-lateral cricoarytenoid muscle complex (TA-LCA) in 21 controls and 16 patients with unilateral VFP. Our standardized protocol used a concentric needle electrode with subjects performing variable force TA-LCA contraction. To quantify the interference pattern density, we measured turns and mean amplitude per turn for ≥10 epochs (each 500 milliseconds). Logarithmic regression analysis between amplitude and turns was used to calculate slope and intercept. Standard deviation was calculated to further define the confidence interval, enabling generation of a linear-scale graphical "cloud" of activity containing ≥90% of data points for controls and patients. Median age of controls and patients was similar (50.7 vs. 48.5 years). In controls, TA-LCA amplitude with variable contraction ranged from 145-1112 μV, and regression analysis comparing mean amplitude per turn to root-mean-square amplitude demonstrated high correlation (R = 0.82). In controls performing variable contraction, median turns per second was significantly higher compared to patients (450 vs. 290, P = .002). We first present interference pattern analysis in the TA-LCA in healthy adults and patients with unilateral VFP. Our findings indicate that motor unit recruitment can be quantitatively measured within the TA-LCA. Additionally, patients with unilateral VFP had significantly reduced turns when compared with controls.

  3. Facial porokeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Dafnis C; Haley, Jennifer C; Chiu, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    A 34-year-old man from El Salvador was referred to our clinic with a 10-year history of a pruritic erythematous facial eruption. He reported increased pruritus and scaling of lesions when exposed to the sun. He worked as a construction worker and admitted to frequent sun exposure. Physical examination revealed well-circumscribed erythematous to violaceous papules with raised borders and atrophic centers localized to the nose (Figure 1). He did not have lesions on the arms or legs. He did not report a family history of similar lesions. A biopsy specimen was obtained from the edge of a lesion on the right ala. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimen showed acanthosis of the epidermis with focal invagination of the corneal layer and a homogeneous column of parakeratosis in the center of that layer consistent with a cornoid lamella (Figure 2). Furthermore, the granular layer was absent at the cornoid lamella base. The superficial dermis contained a sparse, perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. No evidence of dysplasia or malignancy was seen. These findings supported a diagnosis of porokeratosis. The patient underwent a trial of cryotherapy with moderate improvement of the facial lesions.

  4. Use of electromyography to detect muscle exhaustion in finishing barrows fed ractopamine HCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, J A; Broxterman, R M; McCoy, G M; Craig, J C; Phelps, K J; Burnett, D D; Vaughn, M A; Barstow, T J; O'Quinn, T G; Woodworth, J C; DeRouchey, J M; Rozell, T G; Gonzalez, J M

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of dietary ractopamine HCl (RAC) on muscle fiber characteristics and electromyography (EMG) measures of finishing barrow exhaustion when barrows were subjected to increased levels of activity. Barrows ( = 34; 92 ± 2 kg initial BW) were assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: a conventional swine finishing diet containing 0 mg/kg ractopamine HCl (CON) or a diet formulated to meet the requirements of finishing barrows fed 10 mg/kg RAC (RAC+). After 32 d on feed, barrows were individually moved around a track at 0.79 m/s until subjectively exhausted. Wireless EMG sensors were affixed to the deltoideus (DT), triceps brachii lateral head (TLH), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and semitendinosus (ST) muscles to measure median power frequency (MdPF) and root mean square (RMS) as indicators of action potential conduction velocity and muscle fiber recruitment, respectively. After harvest, samples of each muscle were collected for fiber type, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and capillary density analysis. Speed was not different ( = 0.82) between treatments, but RAC+ barrows reached subjective exhaustion earlier and covered less distance than CON barrows ( 0.29). There was a treatment × muscle interaction ( = 0.04) for end-point RMS values. The RAC diet did not change end-point RMS values in the DT or TLH ( > 0.37); however, the diet tended to decrease and increase end-point RMS in the ST and TFL, respectively ( fiber type, SDH, or capillary density measures ( > 0.10). Muscles of RAC+ barrows tended to have less type I fibers and more capillaries per fiber ( fibers of RAC+ barrows were larger ( fibers and larger type I, IIA, and IIX fibers ( fibers of the ST also contained less SDH compared with the other muscles ( fibers in the ST, possibly due to fibers being larger and less oxidative in metabolism. Size increases in type I and IIA fibers with no change in oxidative capacity could also contribute to early exhaustion of RAC

  5. EMG signal amplitude normalization technique in stretch-shortening cycle movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, G T; Marshall, R N; Singer, K P

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of functional movements using surface electromyography (EMG) often involves recording both eccentric and concentric muscle activity during a stretch-shorten cycle (SSC). The techniques used for amplitude normalization are varied and are independent of the type of muscle activity involved. The purpose of this study was: (i) to determine the effect of 11 amplitude normalization techniques on the coefficient of variation (CV) during the eccentric and concentric phases of the SSC; and (ii) to establish the effect of the normalization techniques on the EMG signal under variable load and velocity. The EMG signal of the biceps brachii of eight normal subjects was recorded under four SSC conditions and three levels of isometric contraction. The 11 derived normalization values were total rms, mean rms and peak rms (100 ms time constant) for the isometric contractions and the mean rms and peak rms values of the ensemble values for each set of isotonic contractions. Normalization using maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), irrespective of rms processing (total, mean or peak), demonstrated greater CV above the raw data for both muscle actions. Mean ensemble values and submaximal isometric recordings reduced the CV of concentric data. No amplitude normalization technique reduced the CV for eccentric data under loaded conditions. An ANOVA demonstrated significant (P concentric raw data and an interaction (P < 0.05) for raw eccentric data. No significant effects were demonstrated for changes in velocity when the data were normalized using mean rms values. The reduction of the CV should not be at the expense of true biological variance and current normalization techniques poorly serve the analysis of eccentric muscle activity during the SSC. Copyright © 1993. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effective low-power wearable wireless surface EMG sensor design based on analog-compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-12-17

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1) they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2) they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3) they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS) architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL) framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR). In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD) to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for the reconstruction process.

  7. Effective Low-Power Wearable Wireless Surface EMG Sensor Design Based on Analog-Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Balouchestani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface Electromyography (sEMG is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1 they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2 they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3 they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC. At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR. In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR for the reconstruction process.

  8. Real-time muscle state estimation from EMG signals during isometric contractions using Kalman filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegaldo, Luciano L

    2017-08-01

    State-space control of myoelectric devices and real-time visualization of muscle forces in virtual rehabilitation require measuring or estimating muscle dynamic states: neuromuscular activation, tendon force and muscle length. This paper investigates whether regular (KF) and extended Kalman filters (eKF), derived directly from Hill-type muscle mechanics equations, can be used as real-time muscle state estimators for isometric contractions using raw electromyography signals (EMG) as the only available measurement. The estimators' amplitude error, computational cost, filtering lags and smoothness are compared with usual EMG-driven analysis, performed offline, by integrating the nonlinear Hill-type muscle model differential equations (offline simulations-OS). EMG activity of the three triceps surae components (soleus, gastrocnemius medialis and gastrocnemius lateralis), in three torque levels, was collected for ten subjects. The actualization interval (AI) between two updates of the KF and eKF was also varied. The results show that computational costs are significantly reduced (70x for KF and 17[Formula: see text] for eKF). The filtering lags presented sharp linear relationships with the AI (0-300 ms), depending on the state and activation level. Under maximum excitation, amplitude errors varied in the range 10-24% for activation, 5-8% for tendon force and 1.4-1.8% for muscle length, reducing linearly with the excitation level. Smoothness, measured by the ratio between the average standard variations of KF/eKF and OS estimations, was greatly reduced for activation but converged exponentially to 1 for the other states by increasing AI. Compared to regular KF, extended KF does not seem to improve estimation accuracy significantly. Depending on the particular application requirements, the most appropriate KF actualization interval can be selected.

  9. EMG analysis of peroneal and tibialis anterior muscle activity prior to foot contact during functional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoda, T A; Hansen, A J; Birrer, D A

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the pre-activity of the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) prior to foot contact during three conditions. Twenty-six subjects (age 22 +/- 2 yrs; 15 male, 11 female) with no lower extremity injuries reported for data collection. Data were collected from each subject's dominant leg using surface electromyography (EMG). EMG electrodes were applied over the test muscles using a standard protocol. A heel-toe strike transducer was affixed to the bottom of the subject's shoe. The subject completed two randomized trials of walking on a treadmill (5.6 kph), jogging on a treadmill (9.3 kph) and drop landing from a 38 cm box. Isometric reference positions (IRPs) were recorded for the TA, PL, and PB. Muscle data were normalized to IRPs and the average processed EMG for the 200 ms prior to heel strike during walking and jogging and prior to toe strike when dropping from the box was used for analysis. A one-way repeated measures MANOVA was used to detect differences in pre-activity of the muscles between the three conditions. Univariate tests were used to determine differences for each muscle and Tukey's was applied post hoc to determine individual effect differences. The MANOVA revealed significant differences among the three conditions (F2.50 = 10.770; P < .0005). Average TA activity was significantly higher during jogging (Tukey's; P < .0005). Significant differences existed between each condition for the TA. Average PL and PB activity was significantly higher when drop landing (Tukey's; P < .0005). There was no significant difference between walking and jogging for the PL and PB. The amount of muscle pre-activity occurring before heel or toe strike provides useful information for the examination of reaction times to unexpected inversion during dynamic activities.

  10. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  11. The Assessment of Muscular Effort, Fatigue, and Physiological Adaptation Using EMG and Wavelet Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan B Graham

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α is a transcription factor co-activator that helps coordinate mitochondrial biogenesis within skeletal muscle following exercise. While evidence gleaned from submaximal exercise suggests that intracellular pathways associated with the activation of PGC-1α, as well as the expression of PGC-1α itself are activated to a greater extent following higher intensities of exercise, we have recently shown that this effect does not extend to supramaximal exercise, despite corresponding increases in muscle activation amplitude measured with electromyography (EMG. Spectral analyses of EMG data may provide a more in-depth assessment of changes in muscle electrophysiology occurring across different exercise intensities, and therefore the goal of the present study was to apply continuous wavelet transforms (CWTs to our previous data to comprehensively evaluate: 1 differences in muscle electrophysiological properties at different exercise intensities (i.e. 73%, 100%, and 133% of peak aerobic power, and 2 muscular effort and fatigue across a single interval of exercise at each intensity, in an attempt to shed mechanistic insight into our previous observations that the increase in PGC-1α is dissociated from exercise intensity following supramaximal exercise. In general, the CWTs revealed that localized muscle fatigue was only greater than the 73% condition in the 133% exercise intensity condition, which directly matched the work rate results. Specifically, there were greater drop-offs in frequency, larger changes in burst power, as well as greater changes in burst area under this intensity, which were already observable during the first interval. As a whole, the results from the present study suggest that supramaximal exercise causes extreme localized muscular fatigue, and it is possible that the blunted PGC-1α effects observed in our previous study are the result of fatigue

  12. Surface EMG-based Sketching Recognition Using Two Analysis Windows and Gene Expression Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongliang; Chen, Yumiao

    2016-01-01

    Sketching is one of the most important processes in the conceptual stage of design. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of sketching process and outcomes; whereas surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals associated with sketching have received little attention. In this study, we propose a method in which 11 basic one-stroke sketching shapes are identified from the sEMG signals generated by the forearm and upper arm muscles from 4 subjects. Time domain features such as integrated electromyography, root mean square and mean absolute value were extracted with analysis windows of two length conditions for pattern recognition. After reducing data dimensionality using principal component analysis, the shapes were classified using Gene Expression Programming (GEP). The performance of the GEP classifier was compared to the Back Propagation neural network (BPNN) and the Elman neural network (ENN). Feature extraction with the short analysis window (250 ms with a 250 ms increment) improved the recognition rate by around 6.4% averagely compared with the long analysis window (2500 ms with a 2500 ms increment). The average recognition rate for the eleven basic one-stroke sketching patterns achieved by the GEP classifier was 96.26% in the training set and 95.62% in the test set, which was superior to the performance of the BPNN and ENN classifiers. The results show that the GEP classifier is able to perform well with either length of the analysis window. Thus, the proposed GEP model show promise for recognizing sketching based on sEMG signals. PMID:27790083

  13. An EMG-driven musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces and knee joint moments in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David G; Besier, Thor F

    2003-06-01

    This paper examined if an electromyography (EMG) driven musculoskeletal model of the human knee could be used to predict knee moments, calculated using inverse dynamics, across a varied range of dynamic contractile conditions. Muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms of 13 muscles crossing the knee joint were determined from joint kinematics using a three-dimensional anatomical model of the lower limb. Muscle activation was determined using a second-order discrete non-linear model using rectified and low-pass filtered EMG as input. A modified Hill-type muscle model was used to calculate individual muscle forces using activation and muscle tendon lengths as inputs. The model was calibrated to six individuals by altering a set of physiologically based parameters using mathematical optimisation to match the net flexion/extension (FE) muscle moment with those measured by inverse dynamics. The model was calibrated for each subject using 5 different tasks, including passive and active FE in an isokinetic dynamometer, running, and cutting manoeuvres recorded using three-dimensional motion analysis. Once calibrated, the model was used to predict the FE moments, estimated via inverse dynamics, from over 200 isokinetic dynamometer, running and sidestepping tasks. The inverse dynamics joint moments were predicted with an average R(2) of 0.91 and mean residual error of approximately 12 Nm. A re-calibration of only the EMG-to-activation parameters revealed FE moments prediction across weeks of similar accuracy. Changing the muscle model to one that is more physiologically correct produced better predictions. The modelling method presented represents a good way to estimate in vivo muscle forces during movement tasks.

  14. Effective Low-Power Wearable Wireless Surface EMG Sensor Design Based on Analog-Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1) they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2) they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3) they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS) architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL) framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR). In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD) to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for the reconstruction process. PMID:25526357

  15. EMG-based simultaneous and proportional estimation of wrist/hand kinematics in uni-lateral trans-radial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning; Vest-Nielsen, Johnny L G; Muceli, Silvia; Farina, Dario

    2012-06-28

    We propose a method for estimating wrist kinematics during dynamic wrist contractions from multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG). The algorithm extracts features from the surface EMG and uses dedicated multi-layer perceptron networks to estimate individual joint angles of the 3 degrees of freedom (DoFs) of the wrist. The method was designed with the aim of proportional and simultaneous control of multiple DoFs of active prostheses by unilateral amputees. Therefore, the proposed approach was tested in both unilateral transradial amputees and in intact-limbed control subjects. It was shown that the joint angles at the 3 DoFs of amputees can be estimated from surface EMG recordings , during mirrored bi-lateral contractions that simultaneously and proportionally articulated the 3 DoFs. The estimation accuracies of amputee subjects with long stumps were 62.5% ± 8.50% across all 3 DoFs, while accuracies of the intact-limbed control subjects were 72.0% ± 8.29%. The estimation results from intact-limbed subjects were consistent with earlier studies. The results from the current study demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed myoelectric control approach to provide a more intuitive myoelectric control strategy for unilateral transradial amputees.

  16. EMG-based simultaneous and proportional estimation of wrist/hand kinematics in uni-lateral trans-radial amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Ning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a method for estimating wrist kinematics during dynamic wrist contractions from multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG. The algorithm extracts features from the surface EMG and uses dedicated multi-layer perceptron networks to estimate individual joint angles of the 3 degrees of freedom (DoFs of the wrist. The method was designed with the aim of proportional and simultaneous control of multiple DoFs of active prostheses by unilateral amputees. Therefore, the proposed approach was tested in both unilateral transradial amputees and in intact-limbed control subjects. It was shown that the joint angles at the 3 DoFs of amputees can be estimated from surface EMG recordings , during mirrored bi-lateral contractions that simultaneously and proportionally articulated the 3 DoFs. The estimation accuracies of amputee subjects with long stumps were 62.5% ± 8.50% across all 3 DoFs, while accuracies of the intact-limbed control subjects were 72.0% ± 8.29%. The estimation results from intact-limbed subjects were consistent with earlier studies. The results from the current study demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed myoelectric control approach to provide a more intuitive myoelectric control strategy for unilateral transradial amputees.

  17. Motor Function Evaluation of Hemiplegic Upper-Extremities Using Data Fusion from Wearable Inertial and Surface EMG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanran; Zhang, Xu; Gong, Yanan; Cheng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang

    2017-03-13

    Quantitative evaluation of motor function is of great demand for monitoring clinical outcome of applied interventions and further guiding the establishment of therapeutic protocol. This study proposes a novel framework for evaluating upper limb motor function based on data fusion from inertial measurement units (IMUs) and surface electromyography (EMG) sensors. With wearable sensors worn on the tested upper limbs, subjects were asked to perform eleven straightforward, specifically designed canonical upper-limb functional tasks. A series of machine learning algorithms were applied to the recorded motion data to produce evaluation indicators, which is able to reflect the level of upper-limb motor function abnormality. Sixteen healthy subjects and eighteen stroke subjects with substantial hemiparesis were recruited in the experiment. The combined IMU and EMG data yielded superior performance over the IMU data alone and the EMG data alone, in terms of decreased normal data variation rate (NDVR) and improved determination coefficient (DC) from a regression analysis between the derived indicator and routine clinical assessment score. Three common unsupervised learning algorithms achieved comparable performance with NDVR around 10% and strong DC around 0.85. By contrast, the use of a supervised algorithm was able to dramatically decrease the NDVR to 6.55%. With the proposed framework, all the produced indicators demonstrated high agreement with the routine clinical assessment scale, indicating their capability of assessing upper-limb motor functions. This study offers a feasible solution to motor function assessment in an objective and quantitative manner, especially suitable for home and community use.

  18. Observations on muscle pain in man, with particular reference to pain during needle electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, J C

    1970-08-01

    Muscle pain receptors have been studied in man. During the advance of an EMG needle pain is most regularly experienced as the muscle fascia is pierced. Further advancing the needle is usually quite painless. However, there are scantily distributed points within the muscle (`pain spots') which may give rise to pain if encountered by the advancing needle. The nature of the responsible receptors is obscure but it is likely that pain may sometimes be caused by activation of nerve fibres (presumably from these receptors) coursing through the muscle rather than by activation of the receptors themselves. Intramuscular bleeding is unlikely to contribute often to the pain of needle electromyography. Mechanically sensitive `pain spots' are more painful than other areas when stimulated electrically or injected with hypertonic (6%) saline. This suggests a common receptor. The high electrical threshold and relative invulnerability to pressure of afferent fibres from these receptors suggest that they are mainly of small diameter. These findings are discussed in relation to experimental work on pressure-pain receptors in animals.

  19. A Review of EMG recording technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imteyaz Ahmad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Electromayogram signals are frequently used to evaluate muscle injuries. They are also used extensively in biofeedback training equipment. This study investigates the electrical activity of muscles and the interrelationship of muscles and nerve fibers. Muscle potentials are observed and measured on an oscilloscope.By placing electrodes in to a skeletal muscle we can monitor the electrical activity of the muscle. EMG is used to detect muscular disorder along with muscular abnormalities caused by other system disease such as nerve dysfunction. Neuro muscular disorder also can be known with the help of EMG. EMG is also used for diagnose of Neuro muscular performance. It is observed that there is alternating relationship between the contractions of biceps and triceps the relaxation of one forces the contraction of the other. EMG signals have been recorded atthe various positions like point Biceps, point triceps and point contractions. The frequency range of the muscle spikes covers a bandwidth from DC to over 2 KHz. This recording belongs to a normal subject.

  20. Analysis of EMG measurements during bicycle pedalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, M; Hull, M L

    1986-01-01

    Activity of eight leg muscles has been monitored for six test subjects while pedalling a bicycle on rollers in the laboratory. Each electromyogram (EMG) data channel was digitized at a sampling rate of 2 kHz by a minicomputer. Data analysis entailed generating plots of both EMG activity regions and integrated EMG (IEMG). For each test subject, data were recorded for five cases of pedalling conditions. The different pedalling conditions were defined to explore a variety of research hypotheses. This exploration has led to the following conclusions: Muscular activity levels of the quadriceps are influenced by the type of shoes worn and activity levels increase with soft sole shoes as opposed to cycling shoes with cleats and toeclips. EMG activity patterns are not strongly related to pedalling conditions (i.e. load, seat height and shoe type). The level of muscle activity, however, is significantly affected by pedalling conditions. Muscular activity bears a complex relationship with seat height and quadriceps activity level decreases with greater seat height. Agonist (i.e. hamstrings) and antagonist (i.e. quadriceps) muscles of the hip/knee are active simultaneously during leg extension. Regions of peak activity levels, however, do not overlap. The lack of significant cocontraction of agonist/antagonist muscles enables muscle forces during pedalling action to be computed by solving a series of equilibrium problems over different regions of the crank cycle. Regions are defined and a solution procedure is outlined.

  1. Insight into the function of the obturator internus muscle in humans: observations with development and validation of an electromyography recording technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Paul W; McLean, Linda; Hodder, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    There are no direct recordings of obturator internus muscle activity in humans because of difficult access for electromyography (EMG) electrodes. Functions attributed to this muscle are based on speculation and include hip external rotation/abduction, and a role in stabilization as an "adjustable ligament" of the hip. Here we present (1) a technique to insert intramuscular EMG electrodes into obturator internus plus (2) the results of an investigation of obturator internus activity relative to that of nearby hip muscles during voluntary hip efforts in two hip positions and a weight-bearing task. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted with ultrasound guidance into obturator internus, gluteus maximus, piriformis and quadratus femoris in ten participants. Participants performed ramped and maximal isometric hip efforts (open kinetic chain) into flexion/extension, abduction/adduction, and internal/external rotation, and hip rotation to end range in standing. Analysis of the relationship between activity of the obturator internus and the other hip muscles provided evidence of limited contamination of the recordings with crosstalk. Obturator internus EMG amplitude was greatest during hip extension, then external rotation then abduction, with minimal to no activation in other directions. Obturator internus EMG was more commonly the first muscle active during abduction and external rotation than other muscles. This study describes a viable and valid technique to record obturator internus EMG and provides the first evidence of its activation during simple functions. The observation of specificity of activation to certain force directions questions the hypothesis of a general role in hip stabilisation regardless of force direction.

  2. Detection of non-standard EMG profiles in walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, A.L.; Elzinga, H.; Grimmius, W.; Halbertsma, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The amplitude of an EMG and the temporal pattern can be used when considering if an EMG profile is normal or not. In the method described in this paper a gain factor of the complete EMG profile was determined and then the profile normalised with this gain factor. This normalised individual profile w

  3. Detection of non-standard EMG profiles in walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, A.L.; Elzinga, H.; Grimmius, W.; Halbertsma, J.P.

    The amplitude of an EMG and the temporal pattern can be used when considering if an EMG profile is normal or not. In the method described in this paper a gain factor of the complete EMG profile was determined and then the profile normalised with this gain factor. This normalised individual profile

  4. Early Stroke Rehabilitation of the Upper Limb Assisted with an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation-Robotic Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qiuyang; Hu, Xiaoling; Lai, Qian; Ng, Stephanie C; Zheng, Yongping; Poon, Waisang

    2017-01-01

    Effective poststroke motor rehabilitation depends on repeated limb practice with voluntary efforts. An electromyography (EMG)-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-robot arm was designed for the multi-joint physical training on the elbow, the wrist, and the fingers. To investigate the training effects of the device-assisted approach on subacute stroke patients and to compare the effects with those achieved by the traditional physical treatments. This study was a pilot randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Subacute stroke participants were randomly assigned into two groups, and then received 20-session upper limb training with the EMG-driven NMES-robotic arm (NMES-robot group, n = 14) or the time-matched traditional therapy (the control, n = 10). For the evaluation of the training effects, clinical assessments including Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and Function Independence Measurement (FIM) were conducted before, after the rehabilitation training, and 3 months later. Session-by-session EMG parameters in the NMES-robot group, including normalized co-contraction Indexes (CI) and EMG activation level of target muscles, were used to monitor the progress in muscular coordination patterns. Significant improvements were obtained in FMA (full score and shoulder/elbow), ARAT, and FIM [P  0.279] for both groups. Significant improvement in FMA wrist/hand was only observed in the NMES-robot group (P  0.24), and remained at an elevated level when assessed 3 months later. The EMG parameters indicated a release of muscle co-contraction in the muscle pairs of biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis and biceps brachii and triceps brachii, as well as a reduction of muscle activation level in the wrist flexor in the NMES-robot group. The NMES-robot-assisted training was effective for early stroke upper limb rehabilitation and promoted independence in the daily living

  5. Effect of the Enveloppe Linguale Nocturne on atypical swallowing: surface electromyography and computerised postural test evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, D; Mastrovincenzo, M; Sabatucci, A; Parziale, V; Chimenti, C

    2010-09-01

    Swallowing is a neuromuscular mechanism regulated by many nervous reflex arcs. Persistence of child swallowing at the end of dental eruption is called atypical swallowing (AS). This condition is related to a dysfunction of vertical maxillary growth called open bite. The authors treated this malocclusion with the Enveloppe Linguale Nocturne (ELN), or tongue positioner, created by Dr. Bonnet. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of ELN on swallowing and the postural variation obtained by its use. Seven patients affected by AS were evaluated. Surface Electromyography (sEMG) testing was performed on each patient with different tongue positions, and swallowing was evaluated with and without the ELN. A surface Electromyograph (Biopack) with 8 channels was used (4 channels for the right muscles and 4 for the left) on 4 groups of muscles: temporals, masseters (MM), submental (SUB) and sternocleidmastoids. On each patient a postural test using a computerised Postural test (Lizard) was also performed. Statistical analysis was done using the Graph pad Instat 3 both for sEMG activity and for computerised postural analysis. All seven subjects had different results in the sEMG and footrest tests. The sEMG test results indicated that muscle activation and swallowing duration varied greatly with the use of ELN, with a reduction of time of swallow act (p = 0.002) and variation in contraction of muscles. Mean MM activation was higher without ELN than in tests performed with the appliance (p = 0.002). Mean SUB activation was higher with than without ELN (p = 0.0033). ELN has a therapeutic effect on posture too. Computerised postural test without device showed in all patients an alteration of barycentre as well as an elevated oscillatory record (A mmq; V mms). With ELN footrest kilogram difference (p = 0.0110), Oscillatory Area (P = 0.0102) and velocity of oscillation (P = 0.0102) presented a great reduction in respect to patients record without ELN. With ELN the tongue

  6. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  7. Facial Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalache Sergiu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During their lifetime, people learn to recognize thousands of faces that they interact with. Face perception refers to an individual's understanding and interpretation of the face, particularly the human face, especially in relation to the associated information processing in the brain. The proportions and expressions of the human face are important to identify origin, emotional tendencies, health qualities, and some social information. From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain. Our main goal is to put emphasis on presenting human faces specialized studies, and also to highlight the importance of attractiviness in their retention. We will see that there are many factors that influence face recognition.

  8. Electromyography of swallowing with fine wire intramuscular electrodes in healthy human: activation sequence of selected hyoid muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Haruhi; González-Fernández, Marlís; Matsuo, Koichiro; Brodsky, Martin B; Yoda, Mitsumasa; Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Hideto; Hiraoka, Takashi; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have reported the activation sequence of the swallowing muscles in healthy human participants. We examined temporal characteristics of selected hyoid muscles using fine wire intramuscular electromyography (EMG). Thirteen healthy adults were studied using EMG of the anterior belly of digastric (ABD), geniohyoid (GH), sternohyoid (SH), and masseter (MA, with surface electrodes) while ingesting thin liquid, banana, tofu, and cookie (3 trials each). Onset timing was measured from rectified and integrated EMG. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA with Bonferroni correction. When drinking thin liquid, MA, GH, and ABD were activated almost simultaneously, but SH was activated later (using GH onset as 0 s, MA -0.07 (-0.20 to 0.17) second [median (interquartile range)]; ABD 0.00 (-0.10 to 0.07) second; SH 0.17 (0.02 to 0.37) second; P < 0.01). With solid foods, MA contraction preceded GH and ABD; SH was last and delayed relative to liquid swallows (GH 0 s; MA -0.17 (-0.27 to 0.07) second; ABD 0.00 (-0.03 to 0.03) second; SH 0.37 (0.23 to 0.50) second; P < 0.01). The role of the MA differs between solids and liquids so the variation in its timing is expected. The synchronous contraction of GH and ABD was consistent with their role in hyolaryngeal elevation. The SH contracted later with solids, perhaps because if the longer duration of the swallow. The consistent pattern among foods supports the concept of a central pattern generator for pharyngeal swallowing.

  9. [Peripheral facial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Ballivet de Régloix, S; Champagne, C; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Kossowski, M

    2013-06-01

    Facial palsy can be defined as a decrease in function of the facial nerve, the primary motor nerve of the facial muscles. When the facial palsy is peripheral, it affects both the superior and inferior areas of the face as opposed to central palsies, which affect only the inferior portion. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The prognosis is good in most cases. In cases with significant cosmetic sequelae, a variety of surgical procedures are available (such as hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, temporalis myoplasty and Tenzel external canthopexy) to rehabilitate facial aesthetics and function.

  10. Towards optimal multi-channel EMG electrode configurations in muscle force estimation: a high density EMG study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudenmann, D.; Kingma, I.; Stegeman, D.F.; Dieen, J.H. van

    2005-01-01

    Surface EMG is an important tool in biomechanics, kinesiology and neurophysiology. In neurophysiology the concept of high-density EMG (HD-EMG), using two dimensional electrode grids, was developed for the measurement of spatiotemporal activation patterns of the underlying muscle and its motor units

  11. Towards optimal multi-channel EMG electrode configurations in muscle force estimation: a high density EMG study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudenmann, D.; Kingma, I.; Stegeman, D.F.; Dieen, J.H. van

    2005-01-01

    Surface EMG is an important tool in biomechanics, kinesiology and neurophysiology. In neurophysiology the concept of high-density EMG (HD-EMG), using two dimensional electrode grids, was developed for the measurement of spatiotemporal activation patterns of the underlying muscle and its motor units

  12. Surface Electromyography Feature Extraction Based on Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Akhavan Mahdavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the vast variety of EMG signal applications such as rehabilitation of people suffering from some mobility limitations, scientists have done much research on EMG control system. In this regard, feature extraction of EMG signal has been highly valued as a significant technique to extract the desired information of EMG signal and remove unnecessary parts. In this study, Wavelet Transform (WT has been applied as the main technique to extract Surface EMG (SEMG features because WT is consistent with the nature of EMG as a nonstationary signal. Furthermore, two evaluation criteria, namely, RES index (the ratio of a Euclidean distance to a standard deviation and scatter plot are recruited to investigate the efficiency of wavelet feature extraction. The results illustrated an improvement in class separability of hand movements in feature space. Accordingly, it has been shown that only the SEMG features extracted from first and second level of WT decomposition by second order of Daubechies family (db2 yielded the best class separability.

  13. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively.

  14. Evaluating the Training Effects of Two Swallowing Rehabilitation Therapies Using Surface Electromyography--Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) Exercise and the Shaker Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Wei Ping; Yoon, Wai Lam; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of two dysphagia interventions, the Chin Tuck against Resistance (CTAR) and Shaker exercises, were evaluated based on two principles in exercise science-muscle-specificity and training intensity. Both exercises were developed to strengthen the suprahyoid muscles, whose contractions facilitate the opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, thereby improving bolus transfer. Thirty-nine healthy adults performed two trials of both exercises in counter-balanced order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings were simultaneously collected from suprahyoid muscle group and sternocleidomastoid muscle during the exercises. Converging results using sEMG amplitude analyses suggested that the CTAR was more specific in targeting the suprahyoid muscles than the Shaker exercise. Fatigue analyses on sEMG signals further indicated that the suprahyoid muscle group were equally or significantly fatigued (depending on metric), when participants carried out CTAR compared to the Shaker exercise. Importantly, unlike during Shaker exercise, the sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly less activated and fatigued during CTAR. Lowering the chin against resistance is therefore sufficiently specific and intense to fatigue the suprahyoid muscles.

  15. Paracetamol 325 mg/tramadol 37.5 mg effect on pain during needle electromyography: a double-blind crossover clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar, Seyed Sadeq; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Faghihi-Kashani, Sara; Majedi, Hossein; Ahmadi, Mona; Agah, Elmira; Tafakhori, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Needle insertion during electromyography (EMG) may cause varying levels of pain that could lead to inaccurate assessment and premature termination of the procedure. The aim of this study is to compare paracetamol 325 mg/tramadol 37.5 mg with placebo in relieving pain before EMG. This is a randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial; forty-four healthy individuals, including 27 males with a mean age of 35.3 years (range 18-59 years), entered this study. The needles were inserted unilaterally 2 h after administration of two analgesic tablets of paracetamol 325 mg/tramadol 37.5 mg or two placebo tablets. The pain was scored through a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) immediately and 2 h after the procedure. The side effects were also recorded. Within a week, the procedure was repeated on the other upper limb, changing the treatment and placebo. The immediate and 2-h VAS scores were notably lower after administration of treatment compared to placebo (immediate pain: 17.5 ± 12.8 vs. 32.1 ± 16.0, P tramadol 37.5 mg administration prior to EMG could effectively alleviate pain. Further application of this medication in patients with neuromuscular disorders would warrant additional clinical trials, particularly considering the adverse events.

  16. A Comparison of Gluteus Maximus, Biceps Femoris, and Vastus Lateralis Electromyography Amplitude for the Barbell, Band, and American Hip Thrust Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2016-06-01

    Bridging exercise variations are well researched and commonly employed for both rehabilitation and sport performance. However, resisted bridge exercise variations have not yet been compared in a controlled experimental study. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the differences in upper and lower gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis electromyography (EMG) amplitude for the barbell, band, and American hip thrust variations. Thirteen healthy female subjects (age = 28.9 y; height = 164.3 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg) familiar with the hip thrust performed 10 repetitions of their 10-repetition maximum of each variation in a counterbalanced and randomized order. The barbell hip thrust variation elicited statistically greater mean gluteus maximus EMG amplitude than the American and band hip thrusts, and statistically greater peak gluteus maximus EMG amplitude than the band hip thrust (P ≤ .05), but no other statistical differences were observed. It is recommended that resisted bridging exercise be prescribed according to the individual's preferences and desired outcomes.

  17. Hybrid fusion of linear, non-linear and spectral models for the dynamic modeling of sEMG and skeletal muscle force: an application to upper extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potluri, Chandrasekhar; Anugolu, Madhavi; Schoen, Marco P; Subbaram Naidu, D; Urfer, Alex; Chiu, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Estimating skeletal muscle (finger) forces using surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals poses many challenges. In general, the sEMG measurements are based on single sensor data. In this paper, two novel hybrid fusion techniques for estimating the skeletal muscle force from the sEMG array sensors are proposed. The sEMG signals are pre-processed using five different filters: Butterworth, Chebychev Type II, Exponential, Half-Gaussian and Wavelet transforms. Dynamic models are extracted from the acquired data using Nonlinear Wiener Hammerstein (NLWH) models and Spectral Analysis Frequency Dependent Resolution (SPAFDR) models based system identification techniques. A detailed comparison is provided for the proposed filters and models using 18 healthy subjects. Wavelet transforms give higher mean correlation of 72.6 ± 1.7 (mean ± SD) and 70.4 ± 1.5 (mean ± SD) for NLWH and SPAFDR models, respectively, when compared to the other filters used in this work. Experimental verification of the fusion based hybrid models with wavelet transform shows a 96% mean correlation and 3.9% mean relative error with a standard deviation of ± 1.3 and ± 0.9 respectively between the overall hybrid fusion algorithm estimated and the actual force for 18 test subjects' k-fold cross validation data.

  18. Prediction of Above-elbow Motions in Amputees, based on Electromyographic(EMG Signals, Using Nonlinear Autoregressive Exogenous (NARX Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Akbari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In order to improve the quality of life of amputees, biomechatronic researchers and biomedical engineers have been trying to use a combination of various techniques to provide suitable rehabilitation systems. Diverse biomedical signals, acquired from a specialized organ or cell system, e.g., the nervous system, are the driving force for the whole system. Electromyography(EMG, as an experimental technique,is concerned with the development, recording, and analysis of myoelectric signals. EMG-based research is making progress in the development of simple, robust, user-friendly, and efficient interface devices for the amputees. Materials and Methods Prediction of muscular activity and motion patterns is a common, practical problem in prosthetic organs. Recurrent neural network (RNN models are not only applicable for the prediction of time series, but are also commonly used for the control of dynamical systems. The prediction can be assimilated to identification of a dynamic process. An architectural approach of RNN with embedded memory is Nonlinear Autoregressive Exogenous (NARX model, which seems to be suitable for dynamic system applications. Results Performance of NARX model is verified for several chaotic time series, which are applied as input for the neural network. The results showed that NARX has the potential to capture the model of nonlinear dynamic systems. The R-value and MSE are  and  , respectively. Conclusion  EMG signals of deltoid and pectoralis major muscles are the inputs of the NARX  network. It is possible to obtain EMG signals of muscles in other arm motions to predict the lost functions of the absent arm in above-elbow amputees, using NARX model.

  19. Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Nahlieli, Oded; Eliav, Eli

    2006-10-17

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints. Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude) of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation) were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40) and control group of healthy adults (n = 40). The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05). The mean of electric activity (in muV) of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups. Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral

  20. Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahlieli Oded

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Surface electromyographic (sEMG studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints. Methods Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40 and control group of healthy adults (n = 40. Results The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05. The mean of electric activity (in μV of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups. Conclusion Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and

  1. The Smart Gut: Tracking Affective Associative Learning with Measures of "Liking", Facial Electromyography, and Preferential Looking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armel, K. Carrie; Pulido, Carmen; Wixted, John T.; Chiba, Andrea A.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate here that initially neutral items can acquire "specific" value based on their associated outcomes, and that responses of physiological systems to such previously meaningless stimuli can rapidly reflect this associative history. Each participant participated in an associative learning task in which four neutral abstract pictures were…

  2. An EMG-based robot control scheme robust to time-varying EMG signal features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J

    2010-05-01

    Human-robot control interfaces have received increased attention during the past decades. With the introduction of robots in everyday life, especially in providing services to people with special needs (i.e., elderly, people with impairments, or people with disabilities), there is a strong necessity for simple and natural control interfaces. In this paper, electromyographic (EMG) signals from muscles of the human upper limb are used as the control interface between the user and a robot arm. EMG signals are recorded using surface EMG electrodes placed on the user's skin, making the user's upper limb free of bulky interface sensors or machinery usually found in conventional human-controlled systems. The proposed interface allows the user to control in real time an anthropomorphic robot arm in 3-D space, using upper limb motion estimates based only on EMG recordings. Moreover, the proposed interface is robust to EMG changes with respect to time, mainly caused by muscle fatigue or adjustments of contraction level. The efficiency of the method is assessed through real-time experiments, including random arm motions in the 3-D space with variable hand speed profiles.

  3. Conditioning and sampling issues of EMG signals in motion recognition of multifunctional myoelectric prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglin; Li, Yaonan; Yu, Long; Geng, Yanjuan

    2011-06-01

    Historically, the investigations of electromyography (EMG) pattern recognition-based classification of intentional movements for control of multifunctional prostheses have adopted the filter cut-off frequency and sampling rate that are commonly used in EMG research fields. In practical implementation of a multifunctional prosthesis control, it is desired to have a higher high-pass cut-off frequency to reduce more motion artifacts and to use a lower sampling rate to save the data processing time and memory of the prosthesis controller. However, it remains unclear whether a high high-pass cut-off frequency and a low-sampling rate still preserve sufficient neural control information for accurate classification of movements. In this study, we investigated the effects of high-pass cut-off frequency and sampling rate on accuracy in identifying 11 classes of arm and hand movements in both able-bodied subjects and arm amputees. Compared to a 5-Hz high-pass cut-off frequency, excluding the EMG components below 60 Hz decreased the average accuracy of 0.1% in classifying the 11 movements across able-bodied subjects and increased the average accuracy of 0.1 and 0.4% among the transradial (TR) and shoulder disarticulation (SD) amputees, respectively. Using a 500 Hz instead of a 1-kHz sampling rate, the average classification accuracy only dropped about 2.0% in arm amputees. The combination of sampling rate and high-pass cut-off frequency of 500 and 60 Hz only resulted in about 2.3% decrease in average accuracy for TR amputees and 0.4% decrease for SD amputees in comparison to the generally used values of 1 kHz and 5 Hz. These results suggest that the combination of sampling rate of 500 Hz and high-pass cut-off frequency of 60 Hz should be an optimal selection in EMG recordings for recognition of different arm movements without sacrificing too much of classification accuracy which can also remove most of motion artifacts and power-line interferences for improving the

  4. Surgical-Allogeneic Facial Reconstruction: Facial Transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato; Daniela Micheline Dos Santos; Lisiane Cristina Bannwart; Marcela Filié Haddad; Leonardo Viana Pereira; Aljomar José Vechiato Filho

    2014-01-01

    Several factors including cancer, malformations and traumas may cause large facial mutilation. These functional and aesthetic deformities negatively affect the psychological perspectives and quality of life of the mutilated patient. Conventional treatments are prone to fail aesthetically and functionally. The recent introduction of the composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA), which uses transplanted facial tissues of healthy donors to recover the damaged or non-existent facial tissue of mu...

  5. Lateral skull base chondroblastoma resected with facial nerve posterior transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnot, J; Langlois, O; Tollard, E; Crahes, M; Auquit-Auckbur, I; Marie, J-P

    2017-05-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare tumor that can involve the temporal bone. Because it is a benign tumor, functional surgery must be proposed. We report a case of a patient with a massive chondroblastoma operated on with preservation of the facial nerve, and description of the surgical technique. A 37-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of a growing left pre-auricular mass and hearing loss. Neuroimaging showed an osteolytic mass invading the temporal bone and temporomandibular joint. Excision was performed via a transpetrosal and transcochlear approach with posterior transposition of the facial nerve. EMG monitoring was effective in preventing facial palsy. Four years later, no sign of recurrence was observed. Chondroblastoma is a locally aggressive tumor, especially when located in the petrous bone and temporomandibular joint. The suggested treatment is a complete excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Using Laryngeal Electromyography to Differentiate Presbylarynges from Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, Sheila V.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Differential diagnosis of patients over 64 years of age reporting hoarseness is challenging. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) was used to determine the status of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves. The authors hypothesized that individuals with hoarseness but normal LEMG would have measures similar to those of patients from…

  7. [Electromyographic (EMG) electrode impedance and EMG activity from anterior temporal muscle and masseter muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, T; Alvarado Larrinaga, G; Nishida, F; Nishino, M

    1989-01-01

    The value and change with time of the impedance of surface EMG electrodes and the effects of their difference between the bipolar electrodes on the electromyographic activity from the anterior temporal muscle and the masseter muscle in six adult male subjects with normal occlusion were studied. The results were as follows: 1. In the anterior temporal muscle, if the impedance of the electrode was under 20 k omega it was stable from just after the electrode disc was applied to the skin. In the masseter muscle, if the impedance was under 30 k omega it became stable within two minutes after the electrode was applied. 2. The difference of impedance between the bipolar EMG electrodes did not correlate with EMG activity.

  8. Evaluation of neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea using chin surface electromyography of polysomnography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Guo-ping; YE Jing-ying; HAN De-min; WANG Xiao-yi; ZHANG Yu-huan; LI Yan-ru

    2013-01-01

    Background It is believed that defects in upper airway neuromuscular control play a role in sleep apnea pathogenesis.Currently,there is no simple and non-invasive method for evaluating neuromuscular activity for the purpose of screening in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.This study was designed to assess the validity of chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography in evaluating the neuromuscular activity of obstructive sleep apnea subjects and probe the neuromuscular contribution in the pathogenesis of the condition.Methods The chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography during normal breathing and obstructive apnea were quantified in 36 male patients with obstructive sleep apnea.The change of chin surface electromyography from normal breathing to obstructive apnea was expressed as the percent compensated electromyography value,where the percent compensated electromyography value =(normal breath surface electromyography-apnea surface electromyography)/normal breath surface electromyography,and the percent compensated electromyography values among subjects were compared.The relationship between sleep apnea related parameters and the percent compensated electromyography value was examined.Results The percent compensated electromyography value of the subjects varied from 1% to 90% and had a significant positive correlation with apnea hypopnea index (R2=0.382,P <0.001).Conclusions Recording and analyzing chin surface electromyography by routine polysomnography is a valid way of screening the neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.The neuromuscular contribution is different among subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

  9. Total Facial Nerve Decompression for Severe Traumatic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of 10 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of traumatic facial nerve disorders is challenging. Facial nerve decompression is indicated if 90–95% loss of function is seen at the very early period on ENoG or if there is axonal degeneration on EMG lately with no sign of recovery. Middle cranial or translabyrinthine approach is selected depending on hearing. The aim of this study is to present retrospective review of 10 patients with sudden onset complete facial paralysis after trauma who underwent total facial nerve decompression. Operation time after injury is ranging between 16 and105 days. Excitation threshold, supramaximal stimulation, and amplitude on the paralytic side were worse than at least %85 of the healthy side. Six of 11 patients had HBG-II, one patient had HBG-I, 3 patients had HBG-III, and one patient had HBG-IV recovery. Stretch, compression injuries with disruption of the endoneurial tubules undetectable at the time of surgery and lack of timely decompression may be associated with suboptimal results in our series.

  10. A Novel Phonology- and Radical-Coded Chinese Sign Language Recognition Framework Using Accelerometer and Surface Electromyography Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sign language recognition (SLR is an important communication tool between the deaf and the external world. It is highly necessary to develop a worldwide continuous and large-vocabulary-scale SLR system for practical usage. In this paper, we propose a novel phonology- and radical-coded Chinese SLR framework to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous SLR using accelerometer (ACC and surface electromyography (sEMG sensors. The continuous Chinese characters, consisting of coded sign gestures, are first segmented into active segments using EMG signals by means of moving average algorithm. Then, features of each component are extracted from both ACC and sEMG signals of active segments (i.e., palm orientation represented by the mean and variance of ACC signals, hand movement represented by the fixed-point ACC sequence, and hand shape represented by both the mean absolute value (MAV and autoregressive model coefficients (ARs. Afterwards, palm orientation is first classified, distinguishing “Palm Downward” sign gestures from “Palm Inward” ones. Only the “Palm Inward” gestures are sent for further hand movement and hand shape recognition by dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm and hidden Markov models (HMM respectively. Finally, component recognition results are integrated to identify one certain coded gesture. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SLR framework with a vocabulary scale of 223 characters can achieve an averaged recognition accuracy of 96.01% ± 0.83% for coded gesture recognition tasks and 92.73% ± 1.47% for character recognition tasks. Besides, it demonstrats that sEMG signals are rather consistent for a given hand shape independent of hand movements. Hence, the number of training samples will not be significantly increased when the vocabulary scale increases, since not only the number of the completely new proposed coded gestures is constant and limited, but also the transition movement which connects

  11. A Novel Phonology- and Radical-Coded Chinese Sign Language Recognition Framework Using Accelerometer and Surface Electromyography Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Juan; Chen, Xun; Liu, Aiping; Peng, Hu

    2015-09-15

    Sign language recognition (SLR) is an important communication tool between the deaf and the external world. It is highly necessary to develop a worldwide continuous and large-vocabulary-scale SLR system for practical usage. In this paper, we propose a novel phonology- and radical-coded Chinese SLR framework to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous SLR using accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors. The continuous Chinese characters, consisting of coded sign gestures, are first segmented into active segments using EMG signals by means of moving average algorithm. Then, features of each component are extracted from both ACC and sEMG signals of active segments (i.e., palm orientation represented by the mean and variance of ACC signals, hand movement represented by the fixed-point ACC sequence, and hand shape represented by both the mean absolute value (MAV) and autoregressive model coefficients (ARs)). Afterwards, palm orientation is first classified, distinguishing "Palm Downward" sign gestures from "Palm Inward" ones. Only the "Palm Inward" gestures are sent for further hand movement and hand shape recognition by dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm and hidden Markov models (HMM) respectively. Finally, component recognition results are integrated to identify one certain coded gesture. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SLR framework with a vocabulary scale of 223 characters can achieve an averaged recognition accuracy of 96.01% ± 0.83% for coded gesture recognition tasks and 92.73% ± 1.47% for character recognition tasks. Besides, it demonstrats that sEMG signals are rather consistent for a given hand shape independent of hand movements. Hence, the number of training samples will not be significantly increased when the vocabulary scale increases, since not only the number of the completely new proposed coded gestures is constant and limited, but also the transition movement which connects successive signs needs no

  12. Design of microcontroller-based EMG and the analysis of EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Nihal Fatma; Hardalaç, Firat

    2002-04-01

    In this work, a microcontroller-based EMG designed and tested on 40 patients. When the patients are in rest, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis was applied to EMG signals recorded from right leg peroneal region. The histograms are constructed from the results of the FFT analysis. The analysis results shows that the amplitude of fibrillation potential of the muscle fiber of 30 patients measured from peroneal region is low and the duration is short. This is the reason why the motor nerves degenerated and 10 patients were found to be healthy.

  13. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  14. Comparison of EMG activity on abdominal muscles during plank exercise with unilateral and bilateral additional isometric hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Eui-Ryong; Jung, In-Gui; Seo, Eun-Young; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise on the abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy young men participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to monitor the activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), the internal oblique (IO), and the external oblique (EO) muscles. The participants performed three types of plank exercise; the standard plank exercise, the plank exercise with bilateral isometric hip adduction, and the plank exercise with unilateral isometric hip adduction. All abdominal muscle activity was significantly increased during the plank exercise combined with the bilateral and unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the standard plank exercise (pmuscle activity was significantly increased during the unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the bilateral isometric hip adduction (pabdominal muscle activity. In particular, the unilateral isometric hip adduction is a more beneficial exercise than the bilateral isometric hip adduction.

  15. Platform for the study of virtual task-oriented motion and its evaluation by EEG and EMG biopotentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Garcia, Ivan; Aguilar-Leal, Omar; Hernandez-Reynoso, Ana G; Madrigal, Jimena; Fuentes, Rita Q; Huegel, Joel C; Garcia-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a platform to study the relationship between upper limb kinematic and biopotential measurements. The platform comprises of a haptic joystick, biopotential acquisition systems and 3D rendered virtual tasks that require user interaction. The haptic joystick, named TeeR, reproduces the pronation-supination and flexion-extension movements of the human arm, which are directly mapped to a 2D graphic display. The biopotential acquisition system is able to record electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) signals and synchronize them with kinematic data obtained from the Tee-R. The 3D virtual tasks are designed to obtain performance measurements from the user interaction. We include an example that depicts the possibilities of application for the study of event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS) based on EEG during motor tasks.

  16. An Investigative Redesign of the ECG and EMG Signal Conditioning Circuits for Two-fault Tolerance and Circuit Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, Edward M.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to make the elctrocardiography (ECG) and the electromyography (EMG) signal conditioning circuits two-fault tolerant and to update the circuitry. The present signal conditioning circuits provide at least one level of subject protection against electrical shock hazard but at a level of 100 micro-A (for voltages of up to 200 V). However, it is necessary to provide catastrophic fault tolerance protection for the astronauts and to provide protection at a current level of less that 100 micro-A. For this study, protection at the 10 micro-A level was sought. This is the generally accepted value below which no possibility of microshock exists. Only the possibility of macroshock exists in the case of the signal conditioners. However, this extra amount of protection is desirable. The initial part deals with current limiter circuits followed by an investigation into the signal conditioner specifications and circuit design.

  17. Curved Microneedle Array-Based sEMG Electrode for Robust Long-Term Measurements and High Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Taewan; Kim, Dong Sung; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2015-07-06

    Surface electromyography is widely used in many fields to infer human intention. However, conventional electrodes are not appropriate for long-term measurements and are easily influenced by the environment, so the range of applications of sEMG is limited. In this paper, we propose a flexible band-integrated, curved microneedle array electrode for robust long-term measurements, high selectivity, and easy applicability. Signal quality, in terms of long-term usability and sensitivity to perspiration, was investigated. Its motion-discriminating performance was also evaluated. The results show that the proposed electrode is robust to perspiration and can maintain a high-quality measuring ability for over 8 h. The proposed electrode also has high selectivity for motion compared with a commercial wet electrode and dry electrode.

  18. Curved Microneedle Array-Based sEMG Electrode for Robust Long-Term Measurements and High Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjae Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface electromyography is widely used in many fields to infer human intention. However, conventional electrodes are not appropriate for long-term measurements and are easily influenced by the environment, so the range of applications of sEMG is limited. In this paper, we propose a flexible band-integrated, curved microneedle array electrode for robust long-term measurements, high selectivity, and easy applicability. Signal quality, in terms of long-term usability and sensitivity to perspiration, was investigated. Its motion-discriminating performance was also evaluated. The results show that the proposed electrode is robust to perspiration and can maintain a high-quality measuring ability for over 8 h. The proposed electrode also has high selectivity for motion compared with a commercial wet electrode and dry electrode.

  19. 肛门和尿道括约肌肌电图对多系统萎缩的诊断价值%Comparative study on diagnostic significance of urethral sphincter versus external anal sphincter electromyography in patients with multiple system atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱峰; 刘建国; 李丽萍; 宋东东; 姚伟; 戚晓昆

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of external anal sphincter electromyography (EAS-EMG) versus urethral sphincter electromyography (US-EMG) in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA).Methods A total of 27 MSA patients were examined with EAS and US-EMG as treatment group while 28 non-MSA subjects as control group.Spontaneous activities during relaxation,mean duration and amplitude of motor unit potential (MUP),percentage of polyphasicity and variations during strong contraction were recorded and analyzed statistically.Results There was significant difference in light contraction between MSA and non-MSA cases on both EAS-EMG and US-EMG(EAS-EMG,P < 0.001 ; USEMG,P =0.002).Meanwhile,strong contraction and percentage of polyphasicity showed significant differences between MSA and non-MSA cases on EAS-EMG only(strong contraction,P =0.016; percentage of polyphasicity,P =0.004).EAS-EMG showed more significant changes in neurogenic injury than USEMG.Conclusion US-EMG and EAS-EMG are valuable for the diagnosis of MSA.The differences of multiple parameters of EAS-EMG were more significant than those of US-EMG for MSA cases.US-EMG may serve as a supplement of EAS-EMG in case of restriction.%目的 比较肛门和尿道括约肌肌电图(EAS and US-EMG)对多系统萎缩(MSA)的诊断价值.方法 对2010年6月至2013年1月海军总医院神经科临床确诊的27例MSA患者进行EAS-EMG和US-EMG检查,同时选取同一时期28例非MSA患者为对照进行相应的检查.统计比较两组患者EAS-EMG和US-EMG中轻收缩时运动单位平均时限、平