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Sample records for facial discoid lupus

  1. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus

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    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Share | Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition of sores ... diagnosis because other conditions can look like discoid lupus erythematosus. If the skin biopsy shows discoid lupus erythematosus, ...

  2. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus

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    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Share | Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition of ... occur. A small percentage of patients with discoid lupus can develop disease of the internal organs, which ...

  3. Lupus, discoid on a child's face (image)

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    The round or disk shaped (discoid) rash of lupus produces red, raised patches with scales. The pores ( ... The majority (approximately 90%) of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more ...

  4. Lupus, discoid on the face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by red, raised patches with adherent scales. The skin pores (follicles) may be plugged, and scarring often occurs in older lesions. Approximately 90% of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more generalized involvement in ...

  5. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the

  6. Discoid lupus erythematosus exacerbated by X-ray irradiation

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    Eedy, D J; Corbett, J R

    1988-05-01

    The authors describe a patient, previously known to have discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) developing a LE rash in the precise distribution of radiation therapy given for the treatment of a bronchogenic neoplasm.

  7. Discoid lupus erythematosus exacerbated by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eedy, D.J.; Corbett, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a patient, previously known to have discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) developing a LE rash in the precise distribution of radiation therapy given for the treatment of a bronchogenic neoplasm. (author)

  8. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Upper Eyelid Edema and Erythema

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    Abbas Darjani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE is an autoimmune disorder that usually occurs on sun exposed areas of head and neck. Infrequently it could be presented by palpebral involvement and rarely unilateral upper eye lid edema and erythema have been reported as the sole manifestation of DLE. We describe a 38-year-old woman with chronic left upper eye lid edema and erythema from one year ago which was induced by steroid injection for left eyebrow alopecia. Histopathologic and direct immunofluorescent studies were made on palpebral skin tissue and confirmed DLE diagnosis. Antinuclear antibody (ANA titer was 1/160 with speckled pattern. She was treated by oral hydroxychloroquine (400 mg daily with moderate improvement after three months. We should think about DLE in cases with chronic upper eye lid edema and erythema. The aim of this case report is to emphasize that ophthalmologist and dermatologists should be aware of different presentations of DLE in the periorbital area to prevent misdiagnosis.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of R-salbutamol for topical treatment of discoid lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jemec, G B E; Ullman, S; Goodfield, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a recent open pilot trial, R-salbutamol sulphate, a well-known molecule with anti-inflammatory effects, was tested successfully on patients with therapy-resistant discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of R-salbutamol cream 0.5% vs. placebo...

  10. DNA repair and U.V.-light sensitivity of the lymphocytes in discoid lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horkay, I.; Nagy, E.; Tamasi, P.; Szabo, M.; Csongor, J.

    1975-01-01

    Excision repair and cell damage induced by U.V.-light were studied in peripheral lymphocyte cultures derived from patients with discoid lupus erythematosus. Radioactivity was measured by means of a Packard liquid-scintillation counter, cell damage after U.V.-irradiation was estimated by vital staining with trypan-blue and by decrease of the cell-count. Repair incorporation of mostly normal rate could be demonstrated in the lymphocyte cultures of all the 22 patients with discoid lupus erythematosus. The cell damaging effect of U.V.-light was more increased in these cultures than in those of the normal controls. The repair inhibiting effect of chloroquine administered orally in therapeutic doses to the patients was generally slight and incidental. The possible correlation of the findings is discussed

  11. Grupos sanguíneos e lúpus eritematoso crônico discoide Blood groups and discoid lupus erythematosus

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    Andréia de Almeida Tamega

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Lesão discoide é a manifestação cutânea mais comum do lúpus eritematoso, e formas cutâneas crônicas apresentam características imunológicas próprias, direcionadas ao polo Th1. Diversas doenças possuem associação com grupos sanguíneos, o que não foi ainda estudado no lúpus discoide. OBJETIVO: Investigar a associação entre tipos sanguíneos (ABO e Rh e lúpus eritematoso discoide. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo tipo transversal envolvendo tipagem sanguínea ABO e Rh, inquérito de dados clínicos e dosagem de FAN e C4 de portadores de lúpus discoide sem critérios de doença sistêmica, atendidos em hospital universitário. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 69 pacientes, sendo 71,0% do sexo feminino (p 1:160, em 31,9%; e níveis baixos de C4, em 8,7%. Não houve diferença significativa entre as frequências dos grupos sanguíneos dos pacientes e da população local; entretanto, o grupo A foi associado às formas disseminadas da doença (OR 4,1 e p Background: Discoid lesion is the commonest cutaneous finding in lupus erythematosus and chronic types have their own immunological features, with Th1 inflammation profile. Although many diseases have association with blood-group systems, this fact was not enlightened in discoid lupus erythematosus. Objective: To investigate the association between blood groups (ABO and Rh and discoid lupus erythematosus. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study assessing clinical information, blood group systems (ABO and Rh, FAN and C4 serum levels from discoid lupus patients without characteristics of systemic disease, was carried out at a clinic from a Brazilian university hospital. Results: Sixty-nine patients were enrolled in the study, 71.0% were females (p1:160 in 31.9%, and low levels of C4 in 8.7%. There was no significant difference between the frequency of blood groups from discoid lupus patients and local population, however, blood group A was associated to

  12. Genetic similarities and differences between discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus patients within the Polish population

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    Katarzyna Skonieczna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many studies have shown that some SNPs might be a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, but little is known about potential susceptibility loci of the skin types of the disease. Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE is the most common form of the cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Nevertheless, a genetic contribution to DLE is not fully recognized. Aim: We aimed to analyze three SNPs located in the STAT4 (rs7574865, ITGAM (rs1143679 and TNXB (rs1150754 genes in both DLE and SLE patients from Poland. Material and methods: SNPs were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Statistical significance of the differences between patient and control groups in both allele and genotype frequencies were calculated using two tailed Fisher’s exact test. The correction for multiple testing by the Bonferroni adjustment and odds ratio were also calculated. Results : For the first time, we have shown that the polymorphisms located in the STAT4 (rs7574865, but not in the ITGAM (rs1143679 nor the TNXB (rs1150754 genes, might be associated with the development of DLE within the Polish population. The variation of the three investigated SNPs was found to be associated with SLE in our dataset. Conclusions : The results of our study suggest differences in the molecular background between DLE and SLE within the Polish population.

  13. Genetic similarities and differences between discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus patients within the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Czajkowski, Rafał; Kaszewski, Sebastian; Gawrych, Mariusz; Jakubowska, Aneta; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    Many studies have shown that some SNPs might be a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but little is known about potential susceptibility loci of the skin types of the disease. Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is the most common form of the cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Nevertheless, a genetic contribution to DLE is not fully recognized. We aimed to analyze three SNPs located in the STAT4 (rs7574865), ITGAM (rs1143679) and TNXB (rs1150754) genes in both DLE and SLE patients from Poland. SNPs were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Statistical significance of the differences between patient and control groups in both allele and genotype frequencies were calculated using two tailed Fisher's exact test. The correction for multiple testing by the Bonferroni adjustment and odds ratio were also calculated. For the first time, we have shown that the polymorphisms located in the STAT4 (rs7574865), but not in the ITGAM (rs1143679) nor the TNXB (rs1150754) genes, might be associated with the development of DLE within the Polish population. The variation of the three investigated SNPs was found to be associated with SLE in our dataset. The results of our study suggest differences in the molecular background between DLE and SLE within the Polish population.

  14. Visualization of dermal alteration in skin lesions with discoid lupus erythematosus by multiphoton microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L H; Yu, H B; Zhu, X Q; Zhuo, S M; Chen, J X; Wang, Y Y; Yang, Y H

    2013-01-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic dermatological disease which lacks valid methods for early diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. Considering the collagen and elastin disorder due to mucin deposition of DLE, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging techniques were employed to obtain high-resolution collagen and elastin images from the dermis. The content and distribution of collagen and elastin were quantified to characterize the dermal pathological status of skin lesions with DLE in comparison with normal skin. Our results showed a significant difference between skin lesions with DLE and normal skin in terms of the morphological structure of collagen and elastin in the dermis, demonstrating the possibility of MPM for noninvasively tracking the pathological process of DLE even in its early stages and evaluating the therapeutic efficacy at the molecular level. (paper)

  15. A rare case of unilateral discoid lupus erythematosus mimicking lupus vulgaris.

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    Verma, Parul; Pathania, Sucheta; Kubba, Asha

    2017-11-08

    Discoidlupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic type of cutaneous lupus erythematosus which can present in various morphologies, and the diagnosis can be rather confounding. Prompt evaluation and treatment is necessary to prevent disfigurement and systemic involvement associated with DLE. The following case presented a diagnostic dilemma as the lesion mimicked lupus vulgaris. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. [Soluble interleukin 2 receptor as activity parameter in serum of systemic and discoid lupus erythematosus].

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    Blum, C; Zillikens, D; Tony, H P; Hartmann, A A; Burg, G

    1993-05-01

    The evaluation of disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is important for selection of the appropriate therapeutic regimen. In addition to the clinical picture, various laboratory parameters are taken into account. However, no validated criteria for the evaluation of the disease activity in SLE have yet been established. Recently, serum levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) have been proposed as a potential parameter for disease activity in SLE. However, the studies reported on this subject so far have focused mainly on certain subsets of the disease, and the evaluation of the disease activity was based on a very limited number of parameters. In the present study, we determined serum levels of sIL-2R in 23 patients with SLE and 30 patients with discoid LE (DLE). Evaluation of disease activity in SLE was based on a comprehensive scale which considered numerous clinical signs and laboratory parameters. In SLE, serum levels of sIL-2R showed a better correlation with disease activity than all the other parameters investigated, including proteinuria, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum globulin concentration, titre of antibodies against double-stranded DNA, serum albumin concentration, serum complement levels and white blood cell count. For the first time, we report on elevated serum levels of sIL-2R in DLE, which also correlated with disease activity.

  17. Successful Treatment of Resistant Discoid Lupus Erythematous (DLE With Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT: A Case Report

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    Nooshafarin Kazemikhoo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Lupus is a chronic autoimmune illness characterized by production of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens. Lupus may also only appear as a skin disease. Discoid lupus erythematous (DLE, the most common form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematous is characterized by patches of persistent erythema, adherent scaling, follicular plugging and, in the later stages scaring and atrophy. Case Presentation The case was a 33-year-old female with two years history of DLE, who referred to the laser clinic of Milad hospital with acute flare of skin lesions since seven months ego. She had four lesions (three with local alopecia, scaling and itching and one with atrophy. Serological studies for antinuclear antibodies and anti Ro/SS-A antibody were negative. After five sessions of treatment with infrared (830 nm; 200 mw and red light (630 nm; 20 mw diode laser in addition to intravenous red light laser (655 nm; 2 mw for 20 minutes and laser acupuncture with infrared diode laser (1 J/cm2 for six acupuncture points every other day, the beneficial effects started to appear, and after nine sessions, local itching of the lesions had stopped. Through a total of 27 sessions of treatment, the lesions improved completely with highly satisfactory results; and drug-therapy held to be continued. No disease flare up was seen after the one-year follow up. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on low-level laser therapy (LLLT treatment of DLE. Low-level laser therapy may be effective in treating inflammatory lesions such as cutaneous lesions of discoid lupus erythematous. More studies with higher sample size are needed to clarify the role of low level lasers in treating such lesions.

  18. Long-term response to hydroxychloroquine in patients with discoid lupus erythematosus.

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    Wahie, S; Meggitt, S J

    2013-09-01

    The recommended first-line oral therapy for discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is the antimalarial hydroxychloroquine. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published information regarding the long-term (i.e. > 6 months) response of DLE to hydroxychloroquine in clinical practice. To describe the long-term clinical response of DLE to hydroxychloroquine after 6 months of use. A multicentre retrospective cohort study was conducted in patients with DLE who had received treatment with hydroxychloroquine. All patients were recruited and interviewed by a single investigator and response to hydroxychloroquine assessed by the same individual through a retrospective review of case notes using a specified protocol. A total of 200 patients with DLE were recruited (F:M = 4 : 1) with a median age at diagnosis of 40 years (range 16-81) and median follow-up of 8 years (range 0·5-37). An adequate clinical response to hydroxychloroquine was recorded in 91 patients (45·5%) but nonresponse occurred in 85 patients (42·5%). The remainder of patients either had partial response or withdrew from therapy due to toxicity or were unclassifiable. Importantly, of those individuals that did respond to hydroxychloroquine within the first 6 months of use, almost one in five eventually lost their response, despite continued administration, after a median interval of 2 years. These patients often regained disease control if treated with a combination of hydroxychloroquine and mepacrine. Of those that did not respond to hydroxychloroquine within the first 6 months of use, almost one in 10 became eventual responders either after continued administration for up to 2 years or when rechallenged on hydroxychloroquine. The remaining nonresponders relied frequently on oral corticosteroid. In this cohort of patients with DLE, long-term clinical response to hydroxychloroquine occurred in less than 50% of patients. Nonresponders to hydroxychloroquine frequently required oral steroid to achieve disease

  19. Alopecia Areata and Discoid Lupus Erythematosus in a Patient with Vitiligo

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    K Pavithran

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52 year old male who had been having - vitiligo for 20 years, developed alopecia universalis since 4 years and disseminated discoid IUPUS erythematosus since 2 years. The coexistence of these three diseases in the same patient lends credence to the contention that auto′ unity may play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  20. Prognostic implications of active discoid lupus erythematosus and malar rash at the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Results from a prospective cohort study.

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    Drucker, A M; Su, J; Mussani, F; Siddha, S K; Gladman, D D; Urowitz, M B

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) may have prognostic implications for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine the impact of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and malar rash on SLE disease activity. Data were analyzed from the Toronto Lupus Clinic prospective cohort study. We compared SLE patients with active DLE or malar rash at SLE diagnosis to SLE patients who never developed CLE. Outcomes were assessed at one and five years, including Adjusted Mean Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (AMS). A total of 524 SLE patients (284 without CLE, 65 with DLE, and 175 with malar rash) were included. Mean AMS scores in patients without CLE at one and five years were 5.96 ± 5.06 and 4.00 ± 3.52, which did not differ significantly from scores at one (6.93 ± 5.31, p = 0.17) and five years (4.29 ± 2.62, p = 0.63) in the DLE group. In patients with malar rash, AMS scores at one (8.30 ± 6.80, p < 0.001) and five years (5.23 ± 3.06, p = 0.004) were higher than controls without CLE. Malar rash may be a marker of more severe systemic disease over time, while DLE has no significant impact on general SLE disease activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Squamous Cell Cancer Arising in an African American Male Cheek from Discoid Lupus: A Rare Case and Review of the Literature

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    Emanuel A. Shapera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old African American male with Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE presented to the dermatology clinic for a rapidly enlarging left cheek mass. The mass failed to resolve with conservative measures. A biopsy revealed poorly differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC. He was referred to Head and Neck Surgery and successfully underwent a resection with free flap reconstruction. Postoperatively he did well. Squamous cell skin carcinomas arising from lesions of Discoid Lupus are rare and aggressive tumors with greater likelihood of metastases. Cases have been reported among patients with different clinical characteristics; we present a rare case arising in an African American male on the face and involving the ear.

  2. Podoplanin Expression Is Correlated With the Progression of Chronic Discoid Lupus Erythematosus to Lip Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

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    Gao, Xing; Ma, Liwei; Zhou, Zengtong; Jian, Xinchun; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lip discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a potentially malignant disorder that can develop into lip squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Podoplanin is a specific marker for lymphatic endothelial cells and plays a role in cancer progression. The objective of this study was to determine the immunoexpression of podoplanin in samples of patients with DLE and its correlation with the risk of progression to LSCC. In a retrospective study, podoplanin expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in samples from 52 patients with DLE, including 44 patients with untransformed DLE and 8 patients with malignant transformed DLE. Ten samples of normal oral mucosa and 10 samples of LSCC were used as normal and cancer controls, respectively. The results showed that podoplanin expression was observed in 12 of 44 (27.3%) patients with untransformed DLE and in 7 of 8 (87.5%) patients with transformed DLE (P = .002). Podoplanin was not expressed in normal oral mucosa, but it was overexpressed in all of the 10 patients with LSCC. Regression analysis revealed that podoplanin expression was significantly associated with an 18.67-fold increase in the risk of malignant progression (95% confidence interval = 2.07-168.10; P = .009). In summary, podoplanin expression is significantly associated with malignant transformation of DLE into LSCC. Thus, podoplanin expression may identify a subgroup with a high risk of malignant progression of DLE. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus: a retrospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Ajaykumar B; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Petersen, Ivy A; Jensen, Ashley W; Osborn, Thomas G; Miller, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). A retrospective review was performed of patients with DLE who received radiotherapy at our institution between 1980 and 2005. Patients with other connective tissue disorders were excluded. Control patients were matched 2:1 with the DLE treatment courses based on age, cancer diagnosis, year of treatment, radiotherapy dose, and sex. Acute (within 30 days from the completion of radiotherapy) and late toxicities were evaluated for each treatment course using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Twelve patients with DLE received a total of 15 radiotherapy courses. The median follow-up time was 2.6 years (range, 0.0-15.2 years). Acute toxicity of any organ was observed in 10 (67%) treatment courses, of which 2 (13%) were Grade 3 or higher. Acute Grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 8 courses (53%). Late toxicity of any organ was observed in 7 of 12 (58%) evaluable treatment courses, of which 3 (23%) were grade 3 or higher. Late grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 5 (42%) courses. No patient experienced acute or late Grade 3 or higher dermatologic toxicity. The rates of any organ or dermatologic acute and late toxicity were not significantly different between DLE and control treatment courses. Our findings do not suggest an increased risk of toxicity to the skin or other organs in patients with DLE receiving radiotherapy

  4. Acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus: a retrospective case-control study

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    Patel Ajaykumar B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients with DLE who received radiotherapy at our institution between 1980 and 2005. Patients with other connective tissue disorders were excluded. Control patients were matched 2:1 with the DLE treatment courses based on age, cancer diagnosis, year of treatment, radiotherapy dose, and sex. Acute (within 30 days from the completion of radiotherapy and late toxicities were evaluated for each treatment course using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Results Twelve patients with DLE received a total of 15 radiotherapy courses. The median follow-up time was 2.6 years (range, 0.0-15.2 years. Acute toxicity of any organ was observed in 10 (67% treatment courses, of which 2 (13% were Grade 3 or higher. Acute Grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 8 courses (53%. Late toxicity of any organ was observed in 7 of 12 (58% evaluable treatment courses, of which 3 (23% were grade 3 or higher. Late grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 5 (42% courses. No patient experienced acute or late Grade 3 or higher dermatologic toxicity. The rates of any organ or dermatologic acute and late toxicity were not significantly different between DLE and control treatment courses. Conclusions Our findings do not suggest an increased risk of toxicity to the skin or other organs in patients with DLE receiving radiotherapy.

  5. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  6. Comparative analysis of the quality of life of patients with discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus with skin injuries Análise comparativa da qualidade de vida de pacientes portadores de lúpus eritematoso discóide e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico com lesões cutâneas

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    Priscila Reis Martins

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with cutaneous and vascular lesions. Both discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE and systemic lupus (SLE affect the skin. Visible skin lesions in young women can cause loss of self esteem. In the present study we aimed to evaluate and compare the quality of life in SLE and LED through an observational study of 64 patients. These patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1: SLE (n = 38; group 2: DLE (n = 26 and then completed the quality of life questionnaire - Dermatology Life Quality Index or DLQI. It was found that patients with DLE have a worse quality of life than patients with SLE. It is believed that this fact is generated by the difference in the spectrum of injuries.Lúpus eritematoso é uma doença auto-imune de etiologia desconhecida, com lesões cutâneovasculares. Tanto o Lúpus Eritematoso Discóide (LED como o Sistêmico (LES acometem a pele. Lesões cutâneas visíveis em mulheres jovens podem causar perda de auto estima. No presente estudo procurou-se avaliar e comparar a qualidade de vida em 64 pacientes com LED e LES através de um estudo observacional. Esses pacientes foram divididos em 2 grupos: Grupo 1: LES (n=38; grupo 2: LED (n=26. A seguir aplicou-se o questionário de qualidade de vida - Dermatology Life Quality Índex ou DLQI. Verificou-se que pacientes com LED têm pior qualidade de vida que pacientes com LES Acredita-se que este fato seja gerado pela diferença no espectro de suas lesões.

  7. Kutan lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development of...... hydroxychloroquine....

  8. Kutan lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development...

  9. MRI of discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Ootani, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Tadatsuka; Tomoda, Kaname; Tsukaguchi, Isao; Mitomo, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the MR examinations of 10 patients (17 knees) with surgically documented discoid lateral meniscus of the knee joint. As MRI of the knee is being used more often, the criteria for diagnosis of this entity with MRI need to be established. We tried to define MRI criteria for the detection of discoid menisci by performing numerical measurements of MR images on a display screen. The transverse diameter of the midbody of a discoid lateral meniscus averaged 21.9 mm (normal control: 8.6 mm), and its proportion to the transverse width of the tibia averaged 29.4% (normal control: 12.0%). The measurable difference in height between the discoid and the medial meniscus was negligible. The number of sagittal sections on which the anterior and posterior horns connected varied from two to five in cases of discoid lateral meniscus, and from zero to two in normal controls. Among these parameters, the transverse diameter and its proportion of the transverse width of the tibia proved to be the most reliable. We concluded that a discoid meniscus is indicated if a transverse diameter of a lateral meniscus exceeds 15 mm (proportion to the tibia: 20%). (author)

  10. Discoid Meniscus Associated With Achondroplasia.

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    Hoernschemeyer, Daniel G; Atanda, Alfred; Dean-Davis, Ellen; Gupta, Sumit K

    2016-05-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common skeletal dysplasia. This form of dwarfism is caused by a point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, leading to inhibition of endochondral ossification for these patients. This results in a normal trunk height but shortened limbs. The discoid meniscus may be an important associated finding to better understand the common complaints of leg pain for these patients. Although the incidence for a discoid meniscus is between 3% and 5% for the general population, it is unknown with achondroplasia. This case series includes 4 patients, with ages ranging from adolescence to early adulthood, with symptoms of knee pain that were not attributable to some of the more common findings seen in this patient population. Typically, patients with achondroplasia who experience knee pain are evaluated for more common and well-known etiologies such as genu varum, ligamentous instability, and neurogenic claudication. However, the authors propose that symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus should be added to the differential diagnosis for lower-extremity pain in the achondroplasia population. A thorough history and physical examination, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging, can aid in making the diagnosis. Treatment with arthroscopic debridement, saucerization of the meniscus, and repair for unstable injuries has yielded good outcomes for this patient population. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e498-e503.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lupus) English Español 繁體中文 한국어 tiếng Việt Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus) Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus) Lupus can affect many body parts, ...

  12. Discoid meniscus of the knee: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Moon; Kang, Heung Sik; Ahn, Joong Mo; Seong, Sang Cheol

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of the discoid meniscus, the authors reviewed 31 cases of discoid menisci diagnosed by MR imaging among which 16 cases received arthroscopy. Using knee surface coil, sagittal T1, T2 and proton density images and coronal T1 weighted images were obtained with 18 cm FOV and 4 mm/ 1 mm thickness/gap. A discoid meniscus was considered if three or more contiguous sagittal images demonstrated continuity of the meniscus between the anterior and posterior horns or the diameter of the mid-portion of the meniscus exceeded 15 mm on the coronal image. The authors also observed the associated abnormalities including tears of meniscus and ligament, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects. All discoid menisci were lateral menisci and torn discoid lateral menisci were present in 26 cases (83%). In two cases, tears of the contralateral medial meniscus were present. The tears of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects were present in 4, 2, 4, and 5 cases respectively. All collateral ligaments were intact. In conclusion MR imaging was useful for the detection of discoid meniscus and associated abnormalities

  13. Ipsilateral Medial and Lateral Discoid Meniscus with Medial Meniscus Tear

    OpenAIRE

    Shimozaki, Kengo; Nakase, Junsuke; Ohashi, Yoshinori; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Discoid meniscus is a well-documented knee pathology, and there are many cases of medial or lateral discoid meniscus reported in the literature. However, ipsilateral concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus. Case Report: A 27-year-old Japanese man complained of pain on medial joint space in his right knee that was diagnosed as a complete medial ...

  14. Oral manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S; O'Shea, F; Galvin, S; Wynne, B

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal involvement is commonly seen in patients with lupus; however, oral examination is often forgotten. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within oral lupoid plaques has been described, emphasizing the importance of identifying and treating oral lupus. We undertook a retrospective single-centre study looking at oral findings in patients attending our multidisciplinary lupus clinic between January 2015 and April 2016. A total of 42 patients were included. The majority of patients were female (88%) and had a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (62%). Half of the patients had positive oral findings, 26% had no oral examination documented, and 24% had documented normal oral examinations. Our findings suggest that oral pathology is common in this cohort of patients. Regular oral examination is warranted to identify oral lupus and provide treatment. Associated diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome may also be identified. Patients should be encouraged to see their general dental practitioners on a regular basis for mucosal review. Any persistent ulcer that fails to respond to treatment or hard lump needs urgent histopathological evaluation to exclude malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. [Lupus erythematosus panniculitis presenting as palpebral edema and parotiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pastor, G; Valcuende, F; Tomás, G; Moreno, M

    2007-10-01

    Lupus erythematosus panniculitis or lupus erythematosus profundus is characterized by inflammation of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue. It can occur in isolation or associated with chronic systemic or discoid lupus erythematosus. It usually consists of nodules and hardened subcutaneous plaques on the forehead, cheeks, proximal extremities, and buttocks. Periorbital and parotid involvement are rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with lupus erythematosus panniculitis who presented with palpebral edema and involvement of the periocular fat and parotid gland.

  16. Comparison of the insertion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus: discoid versus non-discoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nam-Hong; Yang, Bong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Young; Lee, Chae-Chul; Lee, Chang-Yk; Victoroff, Brian N

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the insertion sites of the posterior horn between discoid and non-discoid lateral meniscus using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two hundred and twenty-seven patients who had MRI scans before surgery and underwent arthroscopy were enroled in this study. A coronal view showing the narrowest width of the midbody of the lateral meniscus was chosen to measure the widths of the entire tibial plateau and the midbody of the lateral meniscus. Considering the ratio of the meniscal width to the tibial plateau width, the patients were divided into non-discoid, incomplete discoid, and complete discoid groups. On a coronal view accurately showing the insertion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, a distance between the peak of the lateral tibial eminence and the centre of the insertion of the posterior horn, and a width of the lateral tibial plateau between the lateral edge of the tibial plateau and the peak of the lateral tibial eminence were measured. The insertion centre of the posterior horn was located more medially in the incomplete and complete discoid groups than in the non-discoid group (p = 0.003, 0.010, respectively). When individual differences in the knee size were corrected, the insertion centre of the posterior horn in the incomplete discoid and complete discoid groups was located more medially than in the non-discoid group (p = 0.009, 0.003, respectively). The insertion centre of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is located more medially to the apex of the lateral tibial eminence in the discoid group than in the non-discoid group. This finding needs to be considered for an accurate position of the posterior horn of lateral meniscus during the lateral meniscal allograft transplantation. IV.

  17. A comparison of facial color pattern and gazing behavior in canid species suggests gaze communication in gray wolves (Canis lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayoko Ueda

    Full Text Available As facial color pattern around the eyes has been suggested to serve various adaptive functions related to the gaze signal, we compared the patterns among 25 canid species, focusing on the gaze signal, to estimate the function of facial color pattern in these species. The facial color patterns of the studied species could be categorized into the following three types based on contrast indices relating to the gaze signal: A-type (both pupil position in the eye outline and eye position in the face are clear, B-type (only the eye position is clear, and C-type (both the pupil and eye position are unclear. A-type faces with light-colored irises were observed in most studied species of the wolf-like clade and some of the red fox-like clade. A-type faces tended to be observed in species living in family groups all year-round, whereas B-type faces tended to be seen in solo/pair-living species. The duration of gazing behavior during which the facial gaze-signal is displayed to the other individual was longest in gray wolves with typical A-type faces, of intermediate length in fennec foxes with typical B-type faces, and shortest in bush dogs with typical C-type faces. These results suggest that the facial color pattern of canid species is related to their gaze communication and that canids with A-type faces, especially gray wolves, use the gaze signal in conspecific communication.

  18. Hair and Scalp Changes in Cutaneous and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udompanich, Siriorn; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Suchonwanit, Poonkiat

    2018-06-09

    Cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) commonly involves the hair and scalp. Alopecia can result from direct activity of disease on the scalp or from the state of physical stress in the form of telogen effluvium. Discoid lupus erythematosus and lupus panniculitis/profundus are known to cause scarring alopecia, while accumulation of recent studies has shown that non-scarring alopecia in SLE may have different subtypes, comprising lupus erythematosus-specific and lupus erythematosus-nonspecific changes on histology. This review aims to summarize the clinical pattern, trichoscopic, histopathological, and direct immunofluorescence features of different types of alopecia in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as exploring their relationship with SLE disease activity.

  19. The MR diagnosis of discoid lateral meniscus of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Ohtani, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamamoto, Tadasi; Tsukaguchi, Isao; Nakamura, Hitonobu.

    1992-01-01

    To establish the criteria for the diagnosis of discoid lateral meniscus, we introduced a discriminant analysis to our statistical study. Materials included surgically proved 38 discoid lateral menisci and 36 normal menisci imaged by means of MR. Numerical measurements were performed interactively on the MR monitor with eight possible parameters of these parameters, a discriminant analysis revealed that the transverse width of the lateral meniscus on the coronal image was the best parameter. Our study showed that discoid lateral meniscus should be present if the transverse width of the lateral meniscus exceeded 14.3 mm. (author)

  20. Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in men and most often strikes during the child-bearing years. Nine out of 10 people who have lupus are women. Lupus is also more common in people of African or Asian background. African Americans and Asian Americans ...

  1. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  2. Different Types of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Different types of lupus Lupus Foundation of America September 18, 2017 Resource ... lupus. Learn more about each type below. Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic lupus is the most common form ...

  3. MR imaging appearance of discoid menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.; Mink, J.H.; Deutsch, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Although discoid menisci of the knee have been recognized with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, there are no MR criteria for their diagnosis. In this paper the authors define a discord meniscus as three or more 5-mm-thick interleaved sagittal sections that demonstrate continuity of the meniscus between the anterior and posterior horns. High-resolution coronal images allow more graphic depiction of the abnormally wide meniscus. They present a total of 29 cases imaged with MR. In approximately one-third of their cases, the measurable height difference between the discoid meniscus and the adjacent meniscus was at least 2 mm. Surgical correlation revealed only two discrepancies between MR imaging and arthrography

  4. A three-dimensional gradient refocused 3D volume imaging of discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Ootani, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Tadatsuka; Tomoda, Kaname; Tsukaguchi, Isao; Mitomo, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    An axial 3D volume scan with MRI was applied to the evaluation of discoid lateral meniscus of the knee. By 0.7 mm-thick thin sliced and gapless images with volume scan, characteristically elongated appearance of discoid lateral meniscus was clearly depicted. These MR findings completely accorded with those on arthroscopy. Our conclusion is that an axial 3D volume scan was essential to the diagnosis of discoid lateral meniscus. (author)

  5. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... A recent large Australian series! on lupus nephritis emphasises .... patent capillary lumina and thickened capillary walls. ... (Australia). 135. 27. 58. 15. This study (RSA). 51. 33. 63. 4 have been documented.2-5 All included patients with lupus nephritis, but while the series from Natal' gave a detailed list.

  6. The Inverted Discoid Meniscus Segment: Clinical, Radiographic, and Arthroscopic Description of a Hidden Tear Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMont, Lauren; Ellis, Henry; Wise, Kelsey; Wilson, Philip

    2016-06-01

    A flipped, or inverted, meniscus segment is easily visualized in the normal meniscus. However, an inverted discoid meniscus segment may be difficult to appreciate because the tear occurs more centrally and leaves more meniscal rim; thus, it may be undertreated if not addressed during arthroscopy. To describe findings on clinical history, radiographs, MRI, and arthroscopy of a lateral discoid meniscus with an inverted segment and compare them with characteristics of a lateral discoid meniscus without an inverted segment. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Between 2009 and 2012, a retrospective series of 121 consecutive knee arthroscopies for symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were reviewed for the presence of an inverted fragment. Chart review of clinical presentation, operative reports, radiographic images, and arthroscopic images was performed. Comparative analysis of the clinical presentation between lateral discoid menisci with an inverted segment and noninverted lateral discoid menisci was performed by use of Fisher exact test and Mann-Whitney test. Nineteen patients with an inverted discoid meniscus segment (14 males, 5 females; average age, 15.0 years; range, 9.5-17.0 years) were compared with 102 patients with a noninverted discoid meniscus (53 males, 49 females; average age, 12.3 years; range, 5-17.0 years) (P = .011 for sex and P meniscus patients with an inverted segment had activity-related knee pain. Only 4 patients (21.0%) reported mechanical symptoms. Patients with an inverted discoid segment, compared with patients with discoid menisci without inverted segments, were more likely to have instability and effusion (P = .012 and P meniscus patients with an inverted segment (94.7%) had an injury, while only 41.2% of patients with noninverted symptomatic discoid menisci had an injury (P meniscus. During arthroscopy, the inverted discoid segment appeared normal, without a tear; upon probing, however, the inverted segment could be exposed. An

  7. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Alakes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement. The skin is the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, alopecia, disfigurement, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific or may be non specific (LE non specific. Acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific has a strong association with systemic disease and non-specific skin lesions always indicate disease activity for which patients present to rheumatologists and internists. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for most efficient management. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the patterns and prevalence of skin lesions in patients with SLE and to assess the relationship between skin lesions and other systemic involvement. Materials and Methods: At the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, IPGME&R in Kolkata, 150 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (updated 1982 were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between January 2002 and January 2007. Results: Skin lesions were important clinical features. About 45 patients (30% presented with skin lesions although all patients had skin lesions during the follow-up period. Skin changes noted were as follows: Lupus specific lesions: malar rash in 120 patients (80%, photosensitive dermatitis in 75 patients (50%, generalized maculopapular rash in 40 patients (26.67%, discoid rash in 30 patients (20%, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE in 5 patients (3.34%, lupus profundus in 5 patients (3.34%. The lupus non-specific lesions were non-scarring alopecia in 130 patients (86.67%, oral ulcers in 85 patients (56.67%, vasculitic lesions in 50 patients (33.34%, bullous lesions in 15 patients (10%, Raynaud′s phenomenon in 10 patients (6

  8. Familial Discoid Medial Meniscus Tear in Three Members of a Family: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with ...

  9. Atypically thick and high location of the Wrisberg ligament in patients with a complete lateral discoid meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Jong Won; Ahn, Jin Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the relationship between a discoid lateral meniscus and a thickened Wrisberg ligament with a higher location on the medial femoral condyle. Between July 2002 and February 2006, 100 consecutive patients who had a complete lateral discoid meniscus and another 100 patients without a discoid lateral meniscus (control group) were included. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all of the magnetic resonance images, paying particular attention to the presence and thickness of the Wrisberg ligament and the location of the attachment of the Wrisberg ligament to the medial femoral condyle (types I, II, or III). We assumed that type I Wrisberg ligaments had a higher location. All 141 patients had a Wrisberg ligament (71%). There were 73 patients (73%) in the discoid group and 68 patients (68%) in the non-discoid group. The mean thickness of the Wrisberg ligament in the patients in the discoid and non-discoid groups was 2.1 mm (range, 0.4-4.7 mm; median, 2.1 mm) and 1.6 mm (range, 0.4-4.5 mm; median, 1.3 mm), respectively. The Wrisberg ligaments of the discoid group were thicker than the non-discoid group (p=0.0002). The Wrisberg ligament was attached to the upper part of the medial femoral condyle in the discoid group more often than in the non-discoid group (p<0.0001). (orig.)

  10. Prevalence of Discoid Meniscus During Arthroscopy for Isolated Lateral Meniscal Pathology in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Henry B; Wise, Kelsey; LaMont, Lauren; Copley, Lawson; Wilson, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Meniscus tears in the young patient are becoming more prevalent. Knowledge of presenting characteristics and morphology can affect treatment decisions. The purpose of this study was to review and evaluate all the isolated lateral meniscus pathology that required arthroscopic treatment in a pediatric sports medicine practice and compare presenting characteristics between those with a discoid meniscus and those with normal meniscal morphology. We performed a retrospective review of all isolated lateral meniscus arthroscopic procedures from 2003 to 2012 in a high-volume pediatric sports practice. Presentation, radiographs, and intraoperative findings were reviewed. The prevalence and clinical findings of a discoid meniscus in this population and among all age groups were compared with those with a meniscus tear occurring in a normal meniscus. Two hundred and sixty-one arthroscopies were performed for symptomatic isolated lateral menisci pathology. Of these, 75% were discoid in nature; the remainder was tears occurring in normal menisci. Ninety-six of 99 patients (97%) with lateral meniscus pathology under the age of 13 had a discoid meniscus and 66% presented with no injury. There was a transition within the population at 14 years of age, with a rise in the incidence of normal meniscal body tears. Even after this transition point, meniscal pathology incidence remained notable; 59% of isolated lateral meniscus pathology in patients between the ages of 14 and 16 years old were a discoid meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for discoid meniscus (3 consecutive sagittal cuts or coronal mid-compartment measure) were unreliable after the age of 13 years old. The ratio of complete to incomplete discoids in all age groups was 4 to 3. In conclusion, discoid menisci have a high prevalence in isolated lateral meniscus pathology requiring knee arthroscopy. Clinical presentation, imaging, characteristics, and treatment may be different among different age groups. In the

  11. Discoid lupus erythematosus-like lesions in carriers of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, J. H.; Weening, R. S.; Krieg, S. R.; Bos, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 16 carriers of the X-linked cytochrome-b558 negative variant of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Of the 15 who answered the questionnaire and from data of one additional case, 70% reported recurrent aphthous stomatitis and 63% had recurrent skin eruptions. Five of the

  12. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... will benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. Our study found hypertension, which persisted at the most recent follow-up, to be associated with a poor outcome, as was poor renal function both at biopsy and follow-up. Leaker er al. I found that survival in lupus nephritis is unaffected by age, sex, nephrotic ...

  13. Lupus panniculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondello, Eduardo; Vega, Alejandro de la; Eyheremendy, EduardoP.

    2002-01-01

    Lupus panniculitis (LP) is a benign entity. To our knowledge LP has not been reported in the radiology literature. Our objective is to describe imaging findings as previous articles have not focused on this aspect. Computed Tomography and MR imaging demonstrate lipoatrophy and isolated areas with inflammatory activity in the subcutaneous tissue. (author)

  14. Evaluation of posterior lateral femoral condylar hypoplasia using axial MRI images in patients with complete discoid meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihong; Chen, Dongyang; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Hypoplasia of the lateral femoral condyle has been reported in discoid lateral meniscus patients, but associated imaging findings in the axial plane have not been characterized. In this study, we aimed to identify differences in the lateral femoral condyle between patients with discoid lateral meniscus and those with normal menisci using axial MRI images. Twenty-three patients (24 knees) with complete discoid lateral meniscus, 43 (45 knees) with incomplete discoid lateral meniscus, and 50 with normal menisci (50 knees) were enrolled and distributed into three groups. Two new angles, posterior lateral condylar angle (PLCA) and posterior medial condylar angle (PMCA), were measured on axial MRI images; the posterior condylar angle (PCA) was also measured. Differences between the three groups in the PLCA, PMCA, PCA, and PLCA/PMCA were analysed. The predictive value of PLCA and PLCA/PMCA for complete discoid lateral meniscus was assessed. In the complete discoid lateral meniscus group, PLCA and PLCA/PMCA were significantly smaller compared with the normal meniscus group and the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group compared with the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group (P meniscus. Hypoplasia of the posterior lateral femoral condyle is typically seen in patients with complete discoid lateral meniscus. PLCA and PLCA/PMCA can be measured from axial MRI images and used as excellent predictive parameters for complete discoid lateral meniscus. Diagnostic study, Level III.

  15. Children & Teens (with Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nine. blog Lupus at school: A guide for parents and kids Advice for communicating with your child's school about their lupus and ... teens on adjusting to life with lupus For teens, living with lupus can require some major ... in school Advice from parents and education experts on 504 and Individualized Education ...

  16. Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus Tears in Children With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanda, Alfred; Wallace, Maegen; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William

    2016-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia that presents to the pediatric orthopaedist. More than half of achondroplasia patients are affected with knee pain. It is thought that the majority of this pain may be due to spinal stenosis, hip pathology, or knee malalignment. Discoid menisci can be a source of lateral knee joint pain in skeletally immature patients in general. We present the first case series of patients with achondroplasia who had symptomatic discoid lateral menisci treated with arthroscopic knee surgery. The charts of 6 patients (8 knees) with achondroplasia who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery for symptomatic discoid lateral menisci were collected. History and physical examination data, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and operative reports were reviewed. Meniscal tear configuration and treatment type (meniscectomy vs. repair) were noted. Each patient was found to have a tear of the discoid meniscus. All menisci were treated with saucerization. In addition, meniscal repair was performed in 2 cases, partial meniscectomy in 3 cases, and subtotal meniscectomy in 3 cases. Two patients had bilateral discoid meniscal tears which were treated. Average follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1 to 4.5 y) and the average pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (pedi-IKDC) score was 85.3% (range, 75% to 95.4%). At final follow-up, all patients were pain free and able to return to full activities. Discoid meniscus tears may be a source of lateral joint line pain in patients with achondroplasia. These injuries can be successfully treated with arthroscopic surgery in this patient population. Future studies need to be done to determine the exact incidence of discoid menisci in achondroplasia patients and also to determine whether there is a genetic relationship between the 2 conditions. Level IV-case series.

  17. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, H

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is "autoimmunity." Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of these

  18. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is “autoimmunity.” Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of

  19. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy . This is a condition in which the facial ... speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, ...

  20. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  1. Treatment Algorithms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchan, Chayawee; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Bernatsky, Sasha R; Smith, C Douglas; Hudson, Marie; Inanç, Murat; Rothfield, Naomi F; Nash, Peter T; Furie, Richard A; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Chandran, Vinod; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Pope, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    To establish agreement on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. SLE experts (n = 69) were e-mailed scenarios and indicated preferred treatments. Algorithms were constructed and agreement determined (≥50% respondents indicating ≥70% agreement). Initially, 54% (n = 37) responded suggesting treatment for scenarios; 13 experts rated agreement with scenarios. Fourteen of 16 scenarios had agreement as follows: discoid lupus: first-line therapy was topical agents and hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids then azathioprine and subsequently mycophenolate (mofetil); uncomplicated cutaneous vasculitis: initial treatment was glucocorticoids ± hydroxychloroquine ± methotrexate, followed by azathioprine or mycophenolate and then cyclophosphamide; arthritis: initial therapy was hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids, then methotrexate and subsequently rituximab; pericarditis: first-line therapy was nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, then glucocorticoids with/without hydroxychloroquine, then azathioprine, mycophenolate, or methotrexate and finally belimumab or rituximab, and/or a pericardial window; interstitial lung disease/alveolitis: induction was glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide, then rituximab or intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG), and maintenance followed with azathioprine or mycophenolate; pulmonary hypertension: glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide and an endothelin receptor antagonist were initial therapies, subsequent treatments were phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and then prostanoids and rituximab; antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: standard anticoagulation with/without hydroxychloroquine, then a thrombin inhibitor for venous thrombosis, versus adding aspirin or platelet inhibition drugs for arterial events; mononeuritis multiplex and central nervous system vasculitis: first-line therapy was glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide followed by maintenance with azathioprine or mycophenolate, and

  2. Lupus erythematosus and localized scleroderma coexistent at the same sites: a rare presentation of overlap syndrome of connective-tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Anabella; Lynch, Peter J; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-05-01

    Overlap syndromes are known to occur with connective-tissue diseases (CTDs). Rarely, the overlap occurs at the same tissue site. We report the case of a patient with clinical and histopathologic findings consistent with the presence of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and localized scleroderma within the same lesions. Based on our case and other reported cases in the literature, the following features are common in patients with an overlap of lupus erythematosus (LE) and localized scleroderma: predilection for young women, photodistributed lesions, DLE, linear morphology clinically, and positivity along the dermoepidermal junction on direct immunofluorescence. Most patients showed good response to antimalarials, topical steroids, or systemic steroids.

  3. Living with Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Lupus Affects the Body Lupus and the Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing Overlapping Diseases Reproductive Health Self-Advocacy Treatment Options all resource types Videos Articles Downloadable PDFs Slideshow Q & A List Personal Stories ...

  4. Lupus Foundation of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store Read About Our $3.8M Commitment to Stem Cell Research. Learn More Committed to Advancing Research on Lupus ... person with lupus? Get Answers Latest News & Stories Research News | Nov. 16, 2017 Major Lupus Stem Cell Study Receives Funding $3.8 million committed by ...

  5. Hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by hepatic lipase in discoidal and spheroidal recombinant high-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, J T; Thuren, T Y; Jerome, W G; Hantgan, R R; Grant, K; Waite, M

    1997-10-07

    Hepatic lipase (HL) hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) was studied in recombinant high-density lipoprotein particles (r-HDL). r-HDL were made from cholate mixed micelles that contained PC, apo AI, and, in some cases, unesterified cholesterol. r-HDL were characterized using chemical composition, nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The r-HDL were found to be discoidal and in the size range of native HDL. Upon treatment of cholesterol-containing r-HDL with lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), to form cholesteryl ester, the discoidal r-HDL became spheroidal. The effects of r-HDL morphology and size on HL activity were studied on r-HDL made of palmitoyloleoyl-PC, unesterified cholesterol, cholesteryl ester, and apolipoprotein AI. Spheroidal r-HDL were hydrolyzed at a faster rate than discoidal r-HDL. Protein-poor r-HDL were hydrolyzed by HL at a faster rate than protein rich r-HDL. Unesterified cholesterol had no apparent effect on particle PC hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of different species of PC [dipalmitoyl (DPPC), dioleoyl(DOPC), palmitoylarachidonoyl (PAPC), and palmitoyloleoyl (POPC)] in r-HDL was also investigated. In discoidal r-HDL, we found that POPC >/= DOPC = PAPC/DPPC. However, in LCAT-treated spheroidal r-HDL, POPC = DOPC > PAPC/DPPC. In both discoidal and spheroidal rHDL, DPPC containing r-HDL were not hydrolyzed to a significant extent. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the physico-chemical properties of particles (such as phospholipid packing and phospholipid acyl composition) play a significant role in hydrolysis of HDL phospholipid by HL and, therefore, in reverse cholesterol transport.

  6. Cost effectiveness of meniscal allograft for torn discoid lateral meniscus in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith; Gold, Heather T

    2016-09-01

    A discoid meniscus is more prone to tears than a normal meniscus. Patients with a torn discoid lateral meniscus are at increased risk for early onset osteoarthritis requiring total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Optimal management for this condition is controversial given the up-front cost difference between the two treatment options: the more expensive meniscal allograft transplantation compared with standard partial meniscectomy. We hypothesize that meniscal allograft transplantation following excision of a torn discoid lateral meniscus is more cost-effective compared with partial meniscectomy alone because allografts will extend the time to TKA. A decision analytic Markov model was created to compare the cost effectiveness of two treatments for symptomatic, torn discoid lateral meniscus: meniscal allograft and partial meniscectomy. Probability estimates and event rates were derived from the scientific literature, and costs and benefits were discounted by 3%. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to test model robustness. Over 25 years, the partial meniscectomy strategy cost $10,430, whereas meniscal allograft cost on average $4040 more, at $14,470. Partial meniscectomy postponed TKA an average of 12.5 years, compared with 17.30 years for meniscal allograft, an increase of 4.8 years. Allograft cost $842 per-year-gained in time to TKA. Meniscal allografts have been shown to reduce pain and improve function in patients with discoid lateral meniscus tears. Though more costly, meniscal allografts may be more effective than partial meniscectomy in delaying TKA in this model. Additional future long term clinical studies will provide more insight into optimal surgical options.

  7. An observational study on MR images of the effect of the discoid meniscus on articular cartilage thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, David Babajide; Jeyapalan, K; Oni, Olusola O A

    2011-06-01

    The discoid meniscus is known to affect the morphology and mechanics of the knee compartment in which it is housed. To determine whether it also is determinative of the articular cartilage thickness, measurements were made on MR images. There was no statistically significant difference in femoral or tibial articular cartilage thickness between compartments with normal meniscus and compartments with discoid meniscus. These findings suggest that mechanical disturbances wrought by the discoid shape do not have a 'Wolff law' effect. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Lupus among Asians and Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Lupus among Asians and Hispanics Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... compared with white women. Signs and Symptom of Lupus Lupus can affect people of all ages. However, ...

  9. Diet and Nutrition With Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Pinterest Email Print Diet and nutrition with lupus Lupus Foundation of America April 19, 2018 Resource ... living Recipe collection Guidance on alcohol use with lupus Moderate use of alcohol is usually not a ...

  10. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Living With Lupus KidsHealth / For Parents / Living With Lupus What's in ... disease for both doctors and their patients. About Lupus A healthy immune system produces proteins called antibodies ...

  11. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  12. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  13. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Sophie; Gill, Hameet S; Fialkov, Jeffery A; Matic, Damir B; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2016-02-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of some of the changes in aspects of facial fracture management. 2. Assess a patient presenting with facial fractures. 3. Understand indications and timing of surgery. 4. Recognize exposures of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton. 5. Identify methods for repair of typical facial fracture patterns. 6. Discuss the common complications seen with facial fractures. Restoration of the facial skeleton and associated soft tissues after trauma involves accurate clinical and radiologic assessment to effectively plan a management approach for these injuries. When surgical intervention is necessary, timing, exposure, sequencing, and execution of repair are all integral to achieving the best long-term outcomes for these patients.

  14. Clinical and immunological characteristics of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients in Jamaica: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, K C; Ferguson, T S; Stewart, H D; Myers, A A; De Ceulaer, K

    2017-11-01

    Background Epidemiological studies in systemic lupus erythematosus have been reported in the literature in many countries and ethnic groups. Although systemic lupus erythematosus in Jamaica has been described in the past, there has not been a detailed evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus patients in urban Jamaica, a largely Afro-Caribbean population. The goal of this study was to describe the clinical features, particularly disease activity, damage index and immunological features, of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus subjects. Methods 150 adult patients (≥18 years) followed in rheumatology clinic at a tertiary rheumatology hospital centre (one of two of the major public referral centres in Jamaica) and the private rheumatology offices in urban Jamaica who fulfilled Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria were included. Data were collected by detailed clinical interview and examination and laboratory investigations. Hence demographics, SLICC criteria, immunological profile, systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and SLICC/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) damage index (SDI) were documented. Results Of the 150 patients, 145 (96.7%) were female and five (3.3%) were male. The mean age at systemic lupus erythematosus onset was 33.2 ± 10.9. Mean disease duration was 11.3 ± 8.6 years. The most prevalent clinical SLICC criteria were musculoskeletal, with 141 (94%) of subjects experiencing arthralgia/arthritis, followed by mucocutaneous manifestations of alopecia 103 (68.7%) and malar rash 46 (30.7%), discoid rash 45 (30%) and photosensitivity 40 (26.7%). Lupus nephritis (biopsy proven) occurred in 42 (28%) subjects and 25 (16.7%) met SLICC diagnostic criteria with only positive antinuclear antibodies/dsDNA antibodies and lupus nephritis on renal biopsy. The most common laboratory SLICC criteria were positive antinuclear antibodies 136 (90.7%) followed by anti-dsDNA antibodies 95 (63.3%) and

  15. Facial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  17. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... psychological problems (including personality changes, paranoia, mania, and schizophrenia), seizures, transverse myelitis, and paralysis and stroke. Treatment There is no cure for lupus. Treatment is symptomatic. With a combination ...

  18. Sirenomelia associated with discoid adrenal and lumbar meningocoele: An autopsy report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nelofar; Mandal, Bappa; Das, Ram Narayan; Bera, Goutam; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Chatterjee, Uttara

    2017-11-01

    Mermaid syndrome or Sirenomelia is a rare congenital deformity in which the legs are fused and bears resemblance to mermaid's tail. It carries a poor prognosis, due to associated urogenital and gastrointestinal abnormalities. An early antenatal diagnosis using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can help in termination of pregnancy. Embryologically, it is considered as the extreme form of caudal regression syndrome due to the persistence of vitelline artery. Here, we report a case of Sirenomelia associated with bilateral renal agenesis along with the rare findings of discoid adrenal, lumbar meningocoele and abnormalities of the hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Case report 483: Discoid lateral meniscus (DLM), medially displaced, with complex tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M.A.; Buckwalter, K.A.; Braunstein, E.M.; Wojtys, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old girl who presented with persistent pain in the left knee was demonstrated to have a discoid lateral meniscus (DLM). The sagittal MR images demonstrated the oval shape of the meniscus, consistent with the typical arthrographic appearance. The coronal images showed that the main substance of the meniscus was displaced medially, with overgrowth of the articular cartilage at the lateral aspect of the joint. The medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle was concave to accommodate the abnormal meniscus. These findings are consistent with long-standing, medial displacement of the torn meniscus. The literature concerning DLM, an uncommon variant, was reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  20. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports ...

  1. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  2. Facial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  3. Symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus: a clinical and arthroscopic study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) is relatively common in East Asia..Symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus (SDLM) is an important indication for knee arthroscopic surgery. However, studies investigating SDLM are rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and intra-articular variants of SDLM in a Chinese population. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with SDLM from January 2005 to December 2014 in our hospital. Clinical variables included gender, age, duration, age of onset, affected side, symptoms and trauma history as well as arthroscopic findings: DLM types, tear patterns and concomitant medial meniscus tear, which were evaluated and compared statistically. Of the 496 consecutive participants with SDLM, females outnumbered males (69.6 % vs. 30.4 %). The age of onset ranged from 3 to 80 years (median, 31 years), and was significantly higher in females than in males (p meniscus tear (11, 2.2 %), at a significantly higher age compared with patients without tear (median, 57 years vs. 33 years, p meniscus.

  4. Rejuvenecimiento facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Daniel Jacubovsky, Dr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento facial es un proceso único y particular a cada individuo y está regido en especial por su carga genética. El lifting facial es una compleja técnica desarrollada en nuestra especialidad desde principios de siglo, para revertir los principales signos de este proceso. Los factores secundarios que gravitan en el envejecimiento facial son múltiples y por ello las ritidectomías o lifting cérvico faciales descritas han buscado corregir los cambios fisonómicos del envejecimiento excursionando, como se describe, en todos los planos tisulares involucrados. Esta cirugía por lo tanto, exige conocimiento cabal de la anatomía quirúrgica, pericia y experiencia para reducir las complicaciones, estigmas quirúrgicos y revisiones secundarias. La ridectomía facial ha evolucionado hacia un procedimiento más simple, de incisiones más cortas y disecciones menos extensas. Las suspensiones musculares han variado en su ejecución y los vectores de montaje y resección cutánea son cruciales en los resultados estéticos de la cirugía cérvico facial. Hoy estos vectores son de tracción más vertical. La corrección de la flaccidez va acompañada de un interés en reponer el volumen de la superficie del rostro, en especial el tercio medio. Las técnicas quirúrgicas de rejuvenecimiento, en especial el lifting facial, exigen una planificación para cada paciente. Las técnicas adjuntas al lifting, como blefaroplastias, mentoplastía, lipoaspiración de cuello, implantes faciales y otras, también han tenido una positiva evolución hacia la reducción de riesgos y mejor éxito estético.

  5. Reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Urtiaga Abad, Juan Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    El presente proyecto trata sobre uno de los campos más problemáticos de la inteligencia artificial, el reconocimiento facial. Algo tan sencillo para las personas como es reconocer una cara conocida se traduce en complejos algoritmos y miles de datos procesados en cuestión de segundos. El proyecto comienza con un estudio del estado del arte de las diversas técnicas de reconocimiento facial, desde las más utilizadas y probadas como el PCA y el LDA, hasta técnicas experimentales que utilizan ...

  6. FACIAL PAIN·

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -As the conditions which cause pain in the facial structures are many and varied, the ... involvement of the auriculo-temporal nerve and is usually relieved by avulsion of that .... of its effects. If it is uspected that a lesion in the po terior fossa ma ...

  7. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Alexandra; Kao, Amy H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is the least understood, yet perhaps the most prevalent manifestation of lupus. The pathogenesis of NPSLE is multifactorial and involves various inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and immune complexes resulting in vasculopathic, cytotoxic and autoantibody-mediated neuronal injury. The management of NPSLE is multimodal and has not been subjected to rigorous study. Different treatment regimens include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. For refractory NPSLE, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, and rituximab have been used. Adjunctive symptomatic treatment complements these therapies by targeting mood disorders, psychosis, cognitive impairment, seizures or headaches. Several new biological agents are being tested including Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets B lymphocyte stimulator. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, treatment, and new potential therapies for neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22379459

  8. Early Lupus Project - A multicentre Italian study on systemic lupus erythematosus of recent onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, G D; Prevete, I; Piga, M; Iuliano, A; Bettio, S; Bortoluzzi, A; Coladonato, L; Tani, C; Spinelli, F R; Fineschi, I; Mathieu, A

    2015-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a high degree of variability at onset that is problematic for a correct and prompt diagnosis. We undertook this project with the purpose of collecting an inception cohort of Italian patients with recent-onset SLE, in order to obtain information on the main clinical and serological characteristics at the beginning of the disease. In this first report we describe the characteristics of this cohort at study entry. All patients with a diagnosis of SLE (1997 ACR criteria) and a disease duration less than 12 months were consecutively enrolled between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 in a multicentre prospective study. Information on clinical and serological characteristics at study entry and then every six months was collected into a specific electronic database. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Openstat program. Among 122 patients enrolled (103 F) 94.3% were Caucasians. Mean age (SD) of patients at study entry was 37.3 (14.3) years, mean age at disease onset was 34.8 (14.3) years, mean age at diagnosis was 36.9 (14.3) years, and mean disease duration was 2.9 (3.9) months. The frequency of the manifestations included in the 1997 ACR criteria was as follows: ANA 97.5%, immunologic disorders (anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, antiphospholipid antibodies) 85.2%, arthritis 61.8%, haematologic disorders 55.7%, malar rash 31.1%, photosensitivity 29.5%, serositis 27%, renal disorders 27%, oral/nasal ulcers 11.5%, neurologic disorders 8.2%, and discoid rash 5.7%. The cumulative frequency of mucocutaneous symptoms was 77.8%. At enrolment, autoantibody frequency was: ANA 100%, anti-dsDNA 83.6%, anti-SSA 28%, anticardiolipin 24.5%, anti-nRNP 20.4%, anti-beta2GPI 17.2%, lupus anticoagulant 16.3%, anti-Sm 16%, and anti-SSB 13.1%. In this paper we describe the main clinical and serological characteristics of an Italian inception cohort of patients with recent-onset SLE. At disease onset, mucocutaneous

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus in an African Caribbean population: incidence, clinical manifestations, and survival in the Barbados National Lupus Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Cindy; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hambleton, Ian R; Nicholson, George D; Liang, Matthew H

    2012-08-01

    To assess the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the predominantly African Caribbean population of Barbados. A national registry of all patients diagnosed with SLE was established in 2007. Complete case ascertainment was facilitated by collaboration with the island's sole rheumatology service, medical practitioners, and the lupus advocacy group. Informed consent was required for inclusion. Between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2009, there were 183 new cases of SLE (98% African Caribbean) affecting 172 women and 11 men for unadjusted annual incidence rates of 12.21 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 10.46-14.18) and 0.84 (95% CI 0.42-1.51) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Excluding pediatric cases (ages <18 years), the unadjusted incidence rate among women was 15.14 per 100,000 person-years. The principal presenting manifestations were arthritis (84%), nephritis (47%), pleuritis (41.5%), malar rash (36.4%), and discoid lesions (33.1%). Antinuclear antibody positivity was 95%. The overall 5-year survival rate was 79.9% (95% CI 69.6-87.1), decreasing to 68% in patients with nephritis. A total of 226 persons with SLE were alive at the end of the study for point prevalences of 152.6 (95% CI 132.8-174.5) and 10.1 (95% CI 5.4-17.2) per 100,000 among women and men, respectively. Rates of SLE in Barbadian women are among the highest reported to date, with clinical manifestations similar to African American women and high mortality. Further study of this population and similar populations of West African descent might assist our understanding of environmental, genetic, and health care issues underpinning disparities in SLE. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic lupus erythematosus Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease that causes inflammation ...

  11. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  12. Lupus induced by medicaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas D, Carlos Alberto; Perafan B, Pablo Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 55 years old female patient who consulted by fever syndrome, artralgias and the presence of high tittles positives antinuclear antibodies. She had arterial hypertension in treatment with captopril. We suspected the clinical diagnoses of drug-induced lupus; the withdraw of captopril was associated with the remission of the clinical and laboratory manifestations

  13. Chilblain lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of chilblain lupus erythematosus (CLE were seen in females aged 33 years and 18 years. Photosensitivity, chronicity and aggravation in winters were present in both cases. Histopathology revealed follicular keratosis, atrophy and extensive liquefaction of basal cells. Oral pradinisolone with chloroquine resulted in marked improvement in the skin lesions.

  14. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical... ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment... of medical products for the treatment of lupus nephritis. Dated: June 22, 2012. Leslie Kux, Assistant...

  15. Kidney disease in lupus is not always 'lupus nephritis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Anders (Hans-Joachim); J.J. Weening (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn lupus erythematosus, elevated serum creatinine levels and urinary abnormalities implicate a kidney disorder, which may not always be lupus nephritis as defined by the current classification of the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society. The signs of renal

  16. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise From; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE with concomitant or subsequent lupus nephritis (LN) in Denmark during 1995.2011, using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR).  Methods. To assess the incidence of SLE, we identified all persons aged...

  17. Lesões palpebrais no lúpus eritematoso Lid lesions in lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Beckhauser

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O envolvimento cutâneo do lúpus eritematoso, quando aparece de maneira isolada em pálpebra, pode ser de difícil diagnóstico. Diagnósticos errôneos são comuns, principalmente o de blefarite resistente a tratamento. Todavia o diagnóstico precoce é importante no sentido de evitar a cicatrização e possíveis seqüelas nas delicadas estruturas locais. Descrevem-se três casos de lesões palpebrais em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso, e, em cada uma das situações, essa lesão teve um significado clínico diferente. Nas duas primeiras pacientes, firmou-se o diagnóstico de lesão discóide pela biópsia. Na terceira paciente encontrou-se um carcinoma basocelular.The cutaneous involvement of lupus erythematosus is difficult to diagnose when it appears isolated in the eyelid. Misdiagnosis is common, confusions arising mainly with chronic resistant blepharitis. Yet the early diagnosis is important to avoid scarring and damage to the delicate local structures. We present three patients with lupus and eyelid cutaneous lesions, each of them with a different clinical significance. In the first two patients it was possible to diagnose discoid lesion through skin biopsy. In the third, a basocelular carcinoma was found.

  18. Quantitative analysis of the difference between an intact complete discoid lateral meniscus and a torn complete discoid meniscus on MR imaging: a feasibility study for a new classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Hee; Choi, Sang-Hee; Woo, Sook Young

    2010-01-01

    To determine the quantitative difference between an intact complete discoid lateral meniscus (CDLM) and a torn CDLM on MR imaging. Between May 2005 to November 2009, 137 patients with a CDLM (107 intact CDLM and 30 torn CDLM) and 92 patients with a normal meniscus were included in this study. The evaluated parameters were the height of the posterior horn of the lateral and medial menisci on the sagittal images and their ratio as assessed by two observers twice at an interval of 1 month. Each parameter was analyzed based on the Kruskal Wallis test, and the analysis using the mixed model. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the interobserver reliabilities at session 2. The mean heights of the posterior horn of the lateral and medial menisci on the sagittal images for an intact CDLM, a torn CLDM, and a normal meniscus were 6.5, 7.3, 5.7 and 6.6, 6.4, 6.7 mm at session 1, respectively. The mean heights of the posterior horn of the lateral and medial menisci on the sagittal images for an intact CDLM, a torn CDLM, and a normal meniscus for both observers were 6.5, 7.2, 5.7 and 6.6, 6.3, 6.8 mm at session 2, respectively. The ratio of the height of the lateral to the height of the medial meniscus for an intact CDLM at both sessions for both observers was 1.0. The ratios were 1.2 and 0.8 for a torn CDLM and for a normal meniscus, respectively, at both sessions for observer 1. The ratios were 1.2 and 0.9 for a torn CDLM and for a normal meniscus, respectively, at session 2 for observer 2. The heights of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus on the sagittal images and the ratios of the heights of the lateral to the medial menisci in all three groups were statistically significantly different for both sessions (p < 0.0001). The interobserver ICCs for each parameter of both an intact CDLM and a torn CDLM at session 2 showed high correlations (p < 0.0001). The height of the lateral meniscus and the ratio of the height of the lateral to the height

  19. Headache in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Urowitz, Murray B; O'Keeffe, Aidan G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).......To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)....

  20. Pro: Cyclophosphamide in lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Based on efficacy and toxicity considerations, both low-dose pulse cyclophosphamide as part of the Euro-Lupus Nephritis protocol and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with corticosteroids may be considered for induction of remission in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis. The long-term follow-up

  1. THE CAROLINA LUPUS STUDY (CLU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolina Lupus (CLU) Study, an epidemiologic study of risk factors for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a severe, chronic, systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women and African-Americans. The CLU Study focuses on measures of endogenous hormone ex...

  2. Prognostic factors in lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Starklint, Henrik; Halberg, Poul

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis.......To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis....

  3. Novel changes in discoidal high density lipoprotein morphology: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catte, Andrea; Patterson, James C; Jones, Martin K; Jerome, W Gray; Bashtovyy, Denys; Su, Zhengchang; Gu, Feifei; Chen, Jianguo; Aliste, Marcela P; Harvey, Stephen C; Li, Ling; Weinstein, Gilbert; Segrest, Jere P

    2006-06-15

    ApoA-I is a uniquely flexible lipid-scavenging protein capable of incorporating phospholipids into stable particles. Here we report molecular dynamics simulations on a series of progressively smaller discoidal high density lipoprotein particles produced by incremental removal of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine via four different pathways. The starting model contained 160 palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholines and a belt of two antiparallel amphipathic helical lipid-associating domains of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. The results are particularly compelling. After a few nanoseconds of molecular dynamics simulation, independent of the starting particle and method of size reduction, all simulated double belts of the four lipidated apoA-I particles have helical domains that impressively approximate the x-ray crystal structure of lipid-free apoA-I, particularly between residues 88 and 186. These results provide atomic resolution models for two of the particles produced by in vitro reconstitution of nascent high density lipoprotein particles. These particles, measuring 95 angstroms and 78 angstroms by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, correspond in composition and in size/shape (by negative stain electron microscopy) to the simulated particles with molar ratios of 100:2 and 50:2, respectively. The lipids of the 100:2 particle family form minimal surfaces at their monolayer-monolayer interface, whereas the 50:2 particle family displays a lipid pocket capable of binding a dynamic range of phospholipid molecules.

  4. Cryptic Disc Structures Resembling Ediacaran Discoidal Fossils from the Lower Silurian Hellefjord Schist, Arctic Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Kirkland

    Full Text Available The Hellefjord Schist, a volcaniclastic psammite-pelite formation in the Caledonides of Arctic Norway contains discoidal impressions and apparent tube casts that share morphological and taphonomic similarities to Neoproterozoic stem-holdfast forms. U-Pb zircon geochronology on the host metasediment indicates it was deposited between 437 ± 2 and 439 ± 3 Ma, but also indicates that an inferred basal conglomerate to this formation must be part of an older stratigraphic element, as it is cross-cut by a 546 ± 4 Ma pegmatite. These results confirm that the Hellefjord Schist is separated from underlying older Proterozoic rocks by a thrust. It has previously been argued that the Cambrian Substrate Revolution destroyed the ecological niches that the Neoproterozoic frond-holdfasts organisms occupied. However, the discovery of these fossils in Silurian rocks demonstrates that the environment and substrate must have been similar enough to Neoproterozoic settings that frond-holdfast bodyplans were still ecologically viable some hundred million years later.

  5. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus serositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, V.H.S.; Robins, P.D.; Sweeney, D.J. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The imaging appearances of a case of systemic lupus erythematosus, which manifested initially as a serositis, is described. Barium small bowel study showed segments of spiculation with tethering, angulation, and obstruction. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen confirmed ascites. It was also useful in demonstrating free fluid, bowel wall oedema, and serosal thickening . Follow up scanning to demonstrate resolution of changes may also be of value. The definitive diagnosis was made on the basis of marked elevation of antinuclear and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  7. The Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune complex GN that develops as a frequent complication of SLE. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis involves a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. The extrarenal etiology of systemic lupus is based on multiple combinations of genetic variants that compromise those mechanisms normally assuring immune tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. This loss of tolerance becomes clinically detectable by the presence of antinuclear antibodies. In addition, nucleic acids released from netting or apoptotic neutrophils activate innate and adaptive immunity via viral nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors. Therefore, many clinical manifestations of systemic lupus resemble those of viral infection. In lupus, endogenous nuclear particles trigger IFN-α signaling just like viral particles during viral infection. As such, dendritic cells, T helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells all contribute to the aberrant polyclonal autoimmunity. The intrarenal etiology of lupus nephritis involves antibody binding to multiple intrarenal autoantigens rather than the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local antibody production add to intrarenal complement activation as renal immunopathology progresses. Here we provide an update on the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to lupus nephritis and provide the rationale for the latest and novel treatment strategies. PMID:23929771

  8. Lupus nephritis in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthman, I W; Muffarij, A A; Mudawar, W A; Nasr, F W; Masri, A F

    2001-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of the clinicopathological characteristics of 50 systemic lupus erythematosus patients with nephritis who underwent a kidney biopsy and were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center, in Lebanon, between 1979 and 1999. There were 43 females and seven males, with a median age of 24 y. Renal histology slides from these patients were assessed according to the World Health Organization classification, and were distributed as follows: class I (n = 3, 6%); class II (n = 14, 28%); class III (n = 11, 22%); class IV (n = 19, 38%); class V (n = 1, 2%); class VI (n = 2, 4%). All the patients received oral prednisone, in addition the following treatments were used: pulse intravenous (i.v.) cyclophosphamide (n = 23, 46%); azathioprine (n = 22, 44%); pulse i.v. steroids (n = 19, 38%); chloroquine sulfate (n = 17, 34%); methotrexate (n = 5, 10%); and plasmapheresis (n = 2, 4%). The median duration of follow-up was 5 y (range 1-33 y). On their last evaluation, out of 37 patients who were followed, 20 patients (54%) had controlled disease, eight patients (22%) were still on active medical treatment, four patients (11%) were on chronic hemodialysis, and five patients (13%) had died. Unlike three other Arab populations studies from Kuwait, United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, where the most frequent histopathologic abnormality was class III, diffuse proliferative LN (class IV) was the most common type of lupus nephritis in Lebanon, similarly to reports from USA, France, Netherlands, South Africa, Thailand and Taiwan.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Symptomatic Patients After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Torn Discoid Lateral Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Rack; Bin, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Nam-Ki

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the change in the thickness and width of the residual meniscus using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus (DLM), to assess whether the degeneration of the articular cartilage in the lateral compartment of the knee progressed, and to evaluate clinical results. Among the patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for DLM between January 1997 and December 2011, those who were aged 40 or below at surgery were followed up for at least 3 years, and received at least 2 follow-up MRIs that were retrospectively reviewed. MRIs were done in symptomatic knees. Using MRI, the relative thickness and width were measured in the anterior horn, midportion, and posterior horn. To determine whether the degeneration of the lateral compartment would progress, the articular cartilage was graded based on the Outerbridge classification in MRIs. The clinical results were evaluated using the Lysholm score. A total of 20 patients (21 knees) were included. The average follow-up period was 6.8 years. In residual meniscus, the relative thickness of the midportion decreased from 9.0% ± 2.4% to 7.3% ± 2.3% (P meniscus. A progression of degeneration in the lateral compartment was observed. However, the clinical results did not present significant changes. In symptomatic patients after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for DLM, the thickness and width of the residual meniscus decreases over time. The arthritic change of the lateral compartment of the knee progressed. However, the change in the size of the residual meniscus was of unknown clinical significance. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and atherosclerotic lesions targeting effects of tanshinone IIA discoidal and spherical biomimetic high density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; He, Hongliang; Liu, Jianping; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Suyang; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Wu, Zimei

    2013-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) have been successfully reconstructed to deliver a large number of lipophilic drugs. Here, discoidal and spherical recombinant HDL loaded with cardiovascular drug tanshinone IIA (TA) were constructed (TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL), respectively. And next their in vitro physiochemical and biomimetic properties were characterized. Furthermore, pharmacokinetics, atherosclerotic lesions targeting effects and antiatherogenic efficacies were elaborately performed and compared in atherosclerotic New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In vitro characterizations results showed that both TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL had nano-size diameter, high entrapment efficiency (EE) and drug-loading capacity (DL). Additionally, similar to their native counterparts, TA-d-rHDL maintained remodeling behaviors induced by lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and TA leaked during remodeling behaviors. Pharmacokinetic studies manifested that both TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL markedly improved pharmacokinetic behaviors of TA in vivo. Ex vivo imaging demonstrated that both d-rHDL and s-rHDL bound more avidly to atherosclerotic lesions than to normal vessel walls, and s-rHDL had better targeting effect than d-rHDL. Pharmacodynamic tests illustrated that both TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL had much stronger antiatherogenic efficacies than conventional TA nanostructured lipid carriers (TA-NLC), TA liposomes (TA-L) and commercially available preparation Sulfotanshinone Sodium Injection (SSI). Moreover, TA-s-rHDL had more potent antiatherogenic efficacies than TA-d-rHDL. Collectively our studies indicated that rHDL could be exploited as potential delivery vehicles of TA targeting atherosclerotic lesions as well as synergistically improving efficacies, especially for s-rHDL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tsokos GC, ed. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 54. Habif TP. Connective tissue diseases. ... TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster ...

  12. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the patient has HIV or hepatitis. Facial Fractures Sports injuries can cause potentially serious broken bones or fractures of the face. Common symptoms of facial fractures include: swelling and bruising, ...

  13. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  14. Historia del Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Rodríguez Gama

    2004-09-01

    Se encontrarán los lectores con una gran cantidad y calidad de biografías sobre investigaciones, médicos y científicos que han enfrentado el reto de tratar de entender y tratar el lupus, desde los médicos clásicos como Hipócrates, Galeno y Celso, los protodermatólogos Daniel Turner, Jean Astruc, Antoine Lorry y Josef von Plenk; el primer dematológo Robert Willam y médicos de los siglos XVIII y XIX como Thomas Bateman, Jean Lous Alibert, Theódore Biett, Olive Rayer, Pierre Cazenave, Antoine Bazin, Ferdinand von Hebra, Moriz Kaposi, Ernest Besnier, Alfred Fournier, Louis Brocq, Jean Darier, el clasificador Jonathan Hutchinson, Paul Unna, William Osler, Emanuel Libman, George Baehr y así decenas de colosos de la ciencia médica, cuyas historias son descritas minuciosamente por el Dr. Iglesias...

  15. [Systemic lupus erythematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukác, J; Rovenský, J; Lukácová, O; Kozáková, D

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) is chronic autoimmune disease, characteristic by production of autoantibodies against different autoantigens. Etiopathogenesis in not precise determinated, but genetic, immunologic, hormonal factors or influence of environment are assumed. It manifests by various symptoms and it can affect whichever organ or system in the body. Clinical manifestation are due chronic inflammation in the tissues, which is caused first of all by deposit of immunocomplex and by cytotoxic damage. At the last decades the mortality of patients with SLE is markly lower and their live is prolong. In spite of this diagnostic, to follow up and therapy of this disease is complicated and it requires the colaboration of more branches of medicine.

  16. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  17. An unusual presentation of juvenile lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malleshwar Bottu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of juvenile lupus varies widely ranging between 4 and 250 per 100,000 population. Most common organ involvement in juvenile lupus is kidney. Neurological, cutaneous and hematological involvements are also involved. Skeletal muscle involvement in the form of myositis is rare. Myositis as presenting manifestation in juvenile lupus is also unusual. Herein, we report one such case wherein myositis preceded the onset of lupus nephritis

  18. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  19. Lupus nephritis management guidelines compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, Suzanne; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bertsias, George K; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Gordon, Caroline; Lightstone, Liz; Tesar, Vladimir; Jayne, David R

    2016-06-01

    In the past years, many (randomized) trials have been performed comparing the treatment strategies for lupus nephritis. In 2012, these data were incorporated in six different guidelines for treating lupus nephritis. These guidelines are European, American and internationally based, with one separate guideline for children. They offer information on different aspects of the management of lupus nephritis including induction and maintenance treatment of the different histological classes, adjunctive treatment, monitoring of the patient, definitions of response and relapse, indications for (repeat) renal biopsy, and additional challenges such as the presence of vascular complications, the pregnant SLE patient, treatment in children and adolescents and considerations about end-stage renal disease and transplantation. In this review, we summarize the guidelines, determine the common ground between them, highlight the differences and discuss recent literature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  20. Lupus panniculitis involving the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, Josep M.; Gomez, Antonio; Torrubia, Sofia; Salinas, Teresa; Clotet, Montse; Lerma, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Lupus panniculitis is an unusual immunological disease that characteristically affects the subcutaneous fat and occurs in 2% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a case of lupus panniculitis involving the breast, which represents a very uncommon location. Mammographically, it presented as a suspicious irregular mass involving the subcutaneous fat pad with skin thickening. High echogenicity constituted the most relevant sonographic finding. To the best of our knowledge, the magnetic resonance (MR) features have not been previously described. High signal intensity was found on both T1- and T2-weighted precontrast MR images. A dynamic contrast-enhanced study revealed a suspicious focal mass with irregular margins and rim enhancement, with a type 3 time-signal intensity curve. Differential diagnosis with carcinoma and fat necrosis and the value of core biopsy are discussed. (orig.)

  1. BERTAHAN DENGAN LUPUS: GAMBARAN RESILIENSI PADA ODAPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggun Resdasari Prasetyo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease in which an abnormal immune system can cause inflammation on several organ or body systems. The risk of mortality rate caused by Lupus is high and late diagnosis is also prevalent which impact the psychological aspect of individual affected with Lupus (so-called Odapus. Therefore, resiliency is needed; that is individual ability to survive and keep optimistic attitude towards recovery. This study aims to describe the resiliency of the affected individuals with Lupus. This is a qualitative study. Eight persons affected with Lupus who were still coping with Lupus participated in this study. The results indicated that subjects developed a negatives constructs to adapt with Lupus. Therefore, psychological intervention is needed to improve their resiliency.

  2. Facial Transplantation Surgery Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotranspla...

  3. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Radiotherapy, and the Risk of Acute and Chronic Toxicity: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinn, Melva E.; Gold, Douglas G. M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute and chronic toxic effects of radiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 21 consecutive patients with SLE, who had received 34 courses of external beam radiotherapy and one low-dose-rate prostate implant, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with discoid lupus erythematosus were excluded. Results: Median survival was 2.3 years and median follow-up 5.6 years. Eight (42%) of 19 patients evaluable for acute toxicity during radiotherapy experienced acute toxicity of Grade 1 or greater, and 4 (21%) had acute toxicity of Grade 3 or greater. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22-72%) and 56% (95% CI, 28-81%), respectively. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was 28% (95% CI, 18-60%) and 40% (95% CI, 16-72%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed that chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater correlated with SLE renal involvement (p < 0.006) and possibly with the presence of five or more American Rheumatism Association criteria (p < 0.053). Chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater correlated with an absence of photosensitivity (p < 0.02), absence of arthritis (p < 0.03), and presence of a malar rash (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The risk of acute and chronic toxicity in patients with SLE who received radiotherapy was moderate but was not prohibitive of the use of radiotherapy. Patients with more advanced SLE may be at increased risk for chronic toxicity

  4. [Facial tics and spasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; van Dijk, J Marc C; Elting, Jan Willem J; de Koning-Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-01-01

    Facial tics and spasms are socially incapacitating, but effective treatment is often available. The clinical picture is sufficient for distinguishing between the different diseases that cause this affliction.We describe three cases of patients with facial tics or spasms: one case of tics, which are familiar to many physicians; one case of blepharospasms; and one case of hemifacial spasms. We discuss the differential diagnosis and the treatment possibilities for facial tics and spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, because of the associated social incapacitation. Botulin toxin should be considered as a treatment option for facial tics and a curative neurosurgical intervention should be considered for hemifacial spasms.

  5. Initial digital vasculitis in a large multicenter cohort of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To assess clinical digital vasculitis (DV as an initial manifestation of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE within a large population. Methods: Multicenter cross-sectional study including 852 cSLE patients (ACR criteria followed in ten Pediatric Rheumatology centers in São Paulo State, Brazil. Results: DV was observed in 25/852 (3% cSLE patients. Periungual hemorrhage was diagnosed in 12 (48%, periungual infarction in 7 (28%, tip finger ulceration in 4 (16%, painful nodules in 1 (4% and gangrene in 1 (4%. A poor outcome, with digital resorption, occurred in 5 (20%. Comparison of patients with and without DV revealed higher frequency of malar rash (80% vs. 53%, p = 0.008, discoid rash (16% vs. 4%, p = 0.017, photosensitivity (76% vs. 45%, p = 0.002 and other cutaneous vasculitides (80% vs. 19%, p 0.05. SLEDAI-2K median, DV descriptor excluded, was significantly lower in patients with DV compared to those without this manifestation [10 (0-28 vs. 14 (0-58, p = 0.004]. Visceral vasculitis or death were not observed in this cSLE cohort. The frequency of cyclophosphamide use (0% vs. 18%, p = 0.014 was significantly lower in the DV group. Conclusion: Our large multicenter study identified clinical DV as one of the rare initial manifestation of active cSLE associated with a mild multisystemic disease, in spite of digital resorption in some of these patients.

  6. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  7. Lymphoma risk in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joseph, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine disease activity versus treatment as lymphoma risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: We performed case-cohort analyses within a multisite SLE cohort. Cancers were ascertained by regional registry linkages. Adjusted HRs for lymphoma were generated...

  8. Systemisk lupus erythematosus og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease which most often affects women of childbearing age. Pregnancy is therefore an important issue for the patient and the responsible physician. Pregnancy outcomes in women with SLE has improved significantly over the latest decades...

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Green, A; Junker, P

    1998-01-01

    A population based cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was recruited from a for epidemiological purposes representative Danish region. Patients were ascertained from 4 different sources with a high degree of completeness as estimated by using capture-recapture analysis...

  10. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new...

  11. Facial talon cusps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T

    1997-12-01

    This is a report of two patients with isolated facial talon cusps. One occurred on a permanent mandibular central incisor; the other on a permanent maxillary canine. The locations of these talon cusps suggests that the definition of a talon cusp include teeth in addition to the incisor group and be extended to include the facial aspect of teeth.

  12. A facial marker in facial wasting rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauso, Raffaele; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; Freda, Nicola; Rusciani, Antonio; Curinga, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    Facial lipoatrophy is one of the most distressing manifestation for HIV patients. It can be stigmatizing, severely affecting quality of life and self-esteem, and it may result in reduced antiretroviral adherence. Several filling techniques have been proposed in facial wasting restoration, with different outcomes. The aim of this study is to present a triangular area that is useful to fill in facial wasting rehabilitation. Twenty-eight HIV patients rehabilitated for facial wasting were enrolled in this study. Sixteen were rehabilitated with a non-resorbable filler and twelve with structural fat graft harvested from lipohypertrophied areas. A photographic pre-operative and post-operative evaluation was performed by the patients and by two plastic surgeons who were "blinded." The filled area, in both patients rehabilitated with structural fat grafts or non-resorbable filler, was a triangular area of depression identified between the nasolabial fold, the malar arch, and the line that connects these two anatomical landmarks. The cosmetic result was evaluated after three months after the last filling procedure in the non-resorbable filler group and after three months post-surgery in the structural fat graft group. The mean patient satisfaction score was 8.7 as assessed with a visual analogue scale. The mean score for blinded evaluators was 7.6. In this study the authors describe a triangular area of the face, between the nasolabial fold, the malar arch, and the line that connects these two anatomical landmarks, where a good aesthetic facial restoration in HIV patients with facial wasting may be achieved regardless of which filling technique is used.

  13. Advances in facial reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, James R; Tollefson, Travis T

    2006-08-01

    Facial paralysis often has a significant emotional impact on patients. Along with the myriad of new surgical techniques in managing facial paralysis comes the challenge of selecting the most effective procedure for the patient. This review delineates common surgical techniques and reviews state-of-the-art techniques. The options for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face must be examined in the context of several patient factors, including age, overall health, and patient desires. The best functional results are obtained with direct facial nerve anastomosis and interpositional nerve grafts. In long-standing facial paralysis, temporalis muscle transfer gives a dependable and quick result. Microvascular free tissue transfer is a reliable technique with reanimation potential whose results continue to improve as microsurgical expertise increases. Postoperative results can be improved with ancillary soft tissue procedures, as well as botulinum toxin. The paper provides an overview of recent advances in facial reanimation, including preoperative assessment, surgical reconstruction options, and postoperative management.

  14. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Toward a universal, automated facial measurement tool in facial reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Tessa A; Urban, Luke S

    2012-01-01

    To describe a highly quantitative facial function-measuring tool that yields accurate, objective measures of facial position in significantly less time than existing methods. Facial Assessment by Computer Evaluation (FACE) software was designed for facial analysis. Outputs report the static facial landmark positions and dynamic facial movements relevant in facial reanimation. Fifty individuals underwent facial movement analysis using Photoshop-based measurements and the new software; comparisons of agreement and efficiency were made. Comparisons were made between individuals with normal facial animation and patients with paralysis to gauge sensitivity to abnormal movements. Facial measurements were matched using FACE software and Photoshop-based measures at rest and during expressions. The automated assessments required significantly less time than Photoshop-based assessments.FACE measurements easily revealed differences between individuals with normal facial animation and patients with facial paralysis. FACE software produces accurate measurements of facial landmarks and facial movements and is sensitive to paralysis. Given its efficiency, it serves as a useful tool in the clinical setting for zonal facial movement analysis in comprehensive facial nerve rehabilitation programs.

  16. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  17. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep the head elevated when lying down, to use cold compresses to reduce swelling, and to avoid any activity that places undue stress on the area of the incision. Depending on the surgery performed and the site of the scar, the facial plastic surgeon will explain the types of activities to ...

  18. Single-leaf partial meniscectomy in extensive horizontal tears of the discoid lateral meniscus: Does decreased peripheral meniscal thickness affect outcomes? (Mean four-year follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Won; Chun, Yong-Min; Choi, Chong-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Min; Han, Joon-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate whether single-leaf partial meniscectomy in horizontal tears along the entire discoid lateral meniscus has any advantages in clinical and radiological results compared with other meniscectomies in discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 145 patients with a horizontal tear pattern in symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven patients had undergone full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy (group A), 60 had undergone conventional partial meniscectomy (saucerization) maintaining peripheral meniscal height (group B), and 58 patients had undergone total meniscectomy (group C). Each patient was evaluated with the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective grading, and modified Kellgren-Lawrence grade in plain radiography at their last follow-up. Group C had inferior functional results to groups A and B on the Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective score. There was no significant difference between groups A and B. Group C fared significantly worse than groups A and B (p=0.003, pmeniscus tears, the full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy group had no adverse results compared with the total meniscectomy group and was not significantly different compared to the conventional partial meniscectomy group. Cohort study. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U. S.; Hariram,; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. Purpose: To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Materials and Methods: Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected rando...

  20. The Sarawak lupus cohort: clinical features and disease patterns of 633 SLE patients in a single tertiary centre from East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, C L; Ling, G R; Aishah, Wan Sharifah

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been well studied in West Malaysian populations but lacking in East Malaysian populations. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical features and disease patterns of patients with SLE in a multiethnic East Malaysian population in Sarawak. All SLE patients who were treated in Sarawak General Hospital were reviewed in a retrospective longitudinal study using a standard protocol from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2013. There were a total of 633 patients in our study with the female to male ratio of 12:1. Our study patients were of multiethnic origins with predominant Chinese ethnic group. They had a mean age of 36.9 ± 13.2 years and a mean duration of illness of 7.2 ± 6.0 years. The main involvements were haematological (74.2 %), malar rash (64.0 %) and renal (58.6 %). Chinese patients were less likely to have discoid lupus, pleuritis and pericarditis, while Malay patients were more likely to have arthritis. Bidayuh patients were more likely to have oral ulcer. Secondary antiphospholipid syndrome was more common in Chinese. The majority of patients were in clinical remission with low SDI. There were 58 deaths (9.2 %) during 2006-2013 with the main causes of death being flare of disease and infection.

  1. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Persistent facial pains, especially temporomandibular disorders (TMD), are common conditions. As dentists are responsible for the treatment of most of these disorders, up-to date knowledge on the latest advances in the field is essential for successful diagnosis and management. The review covers...... TMD, and different neuropathic or putative neuropathic facial pains such as persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia, trigeminal neuralgia and painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy. The article presents an overview of TMD pain as a biopsychosocial condition, its prevalence......, clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  2. Traumatic facial nerve neuroma with facial palsy presenting in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H; Burger, Peter C; Boahene, Derek Kofi; Niparko, John K

    2010-07-01

    To describe the management of traumatic neuroma of the facial nerve in a child and literature review. Sixteen-month-old male subject. Radiological imaging and surgery. Facial nerve function. The patient presented at 16 months with a right facial palsy and was found to have a right facial nerve traumatic neuroma. A transmastoid, middle fossa resection of the right facial nerve lesion was undertaken with a successful facial nerve-to-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis. The facial palsy improved postoperatively. A traumatic neuroma should be considered in an infant who presents with facial palsy, even in the absence of an obvious history of trauma. The treatment of such lesion is complex in any age group but especially in young children. Symptoms, age, lesion size, growth rate, and facial nerve function determine the appropriate management.

  3. Facial colliculus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupinderjeet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient presented with horizontal diplopia and conjugate gaze palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed acute infarct in right facial colliculus which is an anatomical elevation on the dorsal aspect of Pons. This elevation is due the 6th cranial nerve nucleus and the motor fibres of facial nerve which loop dorsal to this nucleus. Anatomical correlation of the clinical symptoms is also depicted in this report.

  4. Facial infiltrative lipomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haloi, A.K.; Ditchfield, M.; Pennington, A.; Philips, R.

    2006-01-01

    Although there are multiple case reports and small series concerning facial infiltrative lipomatosis, there is no composite radiological description of the condition. Radiological evaluation of facial infiltrative lipomatosis using plain film, sonography, CT and MRI. We radiologically evaluated four patients with facial infiltrative lipomatosis. Initial plain radiographs of the face were acquired in all patients. Three children had an initial sonographic examination to evaluate the condition, followed by MRI. One child had a CT and then MRI. One child had abnormalities on plain radiographs. Sonographically, the lesions were seen as ill-defined heterogeneously hypoechoic areas with indistinct margins. On CT images, the lesions did not have a homogeneous fat density but showed some relatively more dense areas in deeper parts of the lesions. MRI provided better delineation of the exact extent of the process and characterization of facial infiltrative lipomatosis. Facial infiltrative lipomatosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis of vascular or lymphatic malformation when a child presents with unilateral facial swelling. MRI is the most useful single imaging modality to evaluate the condition, as it provides the best delineation of the exact extent of the process. (orig.)

  5. ENDOCARDITIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMEL Harzallah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is one of the most prevalent forms of cardiac involvement in patients with lupus, as it is considered as one a life-threatening complication. Libman-Sacks endocarditis is common. Infective endocarditis can also cause complications within immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study is to determine particularities of endocarditis in patients with lupus and to look for distinguishing features between infectious or immunological origin. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with lupus presenting endocarditis. Lupus was diagnosed according to the American college of rheumatology criteria. The diagnosis of endocarditis was made based on the modified Duke criteria. The present case report studies seven cases of endocarditis. Six of these patients are women and the other one is a man. They are aged meanly of 29.4 years (extremes: 20-36. Fever was present in all the cases with a new cardiac murmur in six cases and a modification of its intensity in one case. Biologic inflammatory syndrome was present in six cases. Cardiac ultrasound performed in six cases made the diagnosis of endocarditis which involved the left heart valves in five cases and the right heart valves in one case. Valvular insufficiency was identified in six patients. The valve involvement was mitral in two cases, mitro-aortic in two others, aortic in the fifth one and tricuspid in the sixth one. Endocarditis was infectious in 4 cases, thanks to positive blood culture. The germs identified were gram negative bacilli in two cases, anaerobic organism in one case and gram positive cocci in one case. Candida albicans was isolated in one case. Libman-Sacks endocarditis was objectified in three cases. A combination of Libman-Sacks endocarditis with infectious endocarditis was diagnosed in one case. The treatment consisted of antibiotics in four cases with surgery in two cases. The outcome was favorable in five cases and fatal in the two others. Endocarditis in lupus

  6. Unusual presentation of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish; Agarwal, Indira

    2007-01-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare blistering condition with a distinctive combination of clinical, histological and immunopathologic features that together constitute a unique bullous disease phenotype. It is often associated with autoimmunity to type VII collagen. Here we report a child who presented with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. Rapid resolution of the blisters occurred following treatment with dapsone. PMID:18028550

  7. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  8. Biomarkers for Lupus Nephritis: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chiu Mok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney disease is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Despite the improvement in the medical care of SLE in the past two decades, the prognosis of lupus nephritis remains unsatisfactory. Besides exploring more effective but less toxic treatment modalities that will further improve the remission rate, early detection and treatment of renal activity may spare patients from intensive immunosuppressive therapies and reduce renal damage. Conventional clinical parameters such as creatinine clearance, proteinuria, urine sediments, anti-dsDNA, and complement levels are not sensitive or specific enough for detecting ongoing disease activity in the lupus kidneys and early relapse of nephritis. Thus, novel biomarkers are necessary to enhance the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of lupus renal disease, prognostic stratification, monitoring of treatment response, and detection of early renal flares. This paper reviews promising biomarkers that have recently been evaluated in longitudinal studies of lupus nephritis.

  9. Lupus mastitis - peculiar radiological and pathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Fatani, Mohamed I; Shakour, Bothaina Abdul

    2009-01-01

    Lupus mastitis is a form of lupus profundus that is seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. It usually presents as a swelling (or swellings) in the breasts, with or without pain. The condition is recurrent and progresses along with the underlying disease, with fat necrosis, calcification, fibrosis, scarring, and breast atrophy. Lupus mastitis is often confused with malignancy and lymphoma and, in our part of the world, with tuberculosis. Confusion is especially likely when it occurs in an unusual clinical setting. In this article, we present a case that presented with unique radiological, pathological, and clinical features. Awareness of the various manifestations of lupus mastitis is essential if unnecessary interventions such as biopsies and surgeries, and their consequences, are to be avoided

  10. Does high location and thickness of the Wrisberg ligament affect discoid lateral meniscus tear type based on peripheral detachment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Dong Uk; Lee, Do Kyung; Kim, Jun Ho

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) types based on peripheral detachment and anatomic features of Wrisberg ligament (WL) such as location and thickness based on magnetic resonance image (MRI). A total of 322 knees in 292 patients were reviewed. Patients were divided into four DLM types according to peripheral detachment: no shift (type 1), anterocentral shift (type 2), posterocentral shift (type 3) and central shift (type 4). We reviewed all MRI concentrating on the presence, location (high or low location), running angle, thickness of WL, and WL/posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) thickness ratio. The relationship between DLM types and anatomic features of WL were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. According to DLM types based on peripheral detachment, 149 knees were type 1, 38 were type 2, 79 were type 3, and 56 were type 4. Among the 322 knees, 302 (93.8%) had WL on MRI. In DLM patients, type 3 showed a statistically significant (Plocation of WL. In addition, type 3 had significantly larger (Plocation and thick WL are related to posterocentral shift type of DLM based on peripheral detachment. Based on our results, the high location and thick WL might provide information to surgeons in predicting the direction of peripheral detachment in symptomatic DLM patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Apolipoprotein A-I configuration and cell cholesterol efflux activity of discoidal lipoproteins depend on the reconstitution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Luz Ángela; Prieto, Eduardo Daniel; Cabaleiro, Laura Virginia; Garda, Horacio Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Discoidal high-density lipoproteins (D-HDL) are critical intermediates in reverse cholesterol transport. Most of the present knowledge of D-HDL is based on studies with reconstituted lipoprotein complexes of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) obtained by cholate dialysis (CD). D-HDL can also be generated by the direct microsolubilization (DM) of phospholipid vesicles at the gel/fluid phase transition temperature, a process mechanistically similar to the "in vivo" apoAI lipidation via ABCA1. We compared the apoA-I configuration in D-HDL reconstituted with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine by both procedures using fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements with apoA-I tryptophan mutants and fluorescently labeled cysteine mutants. Results indicate that apoA-I configuration in D-HDL depends on the reconstitution process and are consistent with a "double belt" molecular arrangement with different helix registry. As reported by others, a configuration with juxtaposition of helices 5 of each apoAI monomer (5/5 registry) predominates in D-HDL obtained by CD. However, a configuration with helix 5 of one monomer juxtaposed with helix 2 of the other (5/2 registry) would predominate in D-HDL generated by DM. Moreover, we also show that the kinetics of cholesterol efflux from macrophage cultures depends on the reconstitution process, suggesting that apoAI configuration is important for this HDL function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An interesting case of systemic lupus erythematosus in a patient with Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Jefferson da Rocha; Figueiredo, Marília Andrade; Espindula, Aline; Gallottini, Marina; Ortega, Karem López

    2018-03-01

    Moebius' syndrome (MS) is characterized by a nonprogressive facial palsy associated with impairment in eye abduction, which can be uni- or bilateral. Some authors raise the possibility that patients with MS may suffer from social stigmatism due to their facial dysmorphism and that constant teasing and bullying perpetrated by people in the same social circle are adjuvants in the development of low self-esteem, behavioral problems, and even psychiatric disorders. Psychological stress, anxiety, and depression are factors contributing to both development and impairment of autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this work is to report the case of a patient with MS who developed SLE. In the present case report, we have emphasized the importance of both clinical dental examination and surgeon-dentist in the early diagnosis of systemic diseases by considering that these conditions can affect both syndromic and normoreactive patients. © 2018 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  15. Facial transplantation surgery introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-06-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea.

  16. Caricaturing facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A J; Rowland, D; Young, A W; Nimmo-Smith, I; Keane, J; Perrett, D I

    2000-08-14

    The physical differences between facial expressions (e.g. fear) and a reference norm (e.g. a neutral expression) were altered to produce photographic-quality caricatures. In Experiment 1, participants rated caricatures of fear, happiness and sadness for their intensity of these three emotions; a second group of participants rated how 'face-like' the caricatures appeared. With increasing levels of exaggeration the caricatures were rated as more emotionally intense, but less 'face-like'. Experiment 2 demonstrated a similar relationship between emotional intensity and level of caricature for six different facial expressions. Experiments 3 and 4 compared intensity ratings of facial expression caricatures prepared relative to a selection of reference norms - a neutral expression, an average expression, or a different facial expression (e.g. anger caricatured relative to fear). Each norm produced a linear relationship between caricature and rated intensity of emotion; this finding is inconsistent with two-dimensional models of the perceptual representation of facial expression. An exemplar-based multidimensional model is proposed as an alternative account.

  17. Mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Que, Tak Lun; Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong; Lam, Wing Yin

    2003-10-01

    To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. A Medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "Mucorales," "Rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 +/- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 +/- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, Rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. Mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin B and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.

  18. The influence of different facial components on facial aesthetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faure, J.C.; Rieffe, C.; Maltha, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Facial aesthetics have an important influence on social behaviour and perception in our society. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of facial symmetry and inter-ocular distance on the assessment of facial aesthetics, factors that are often suggested as major contributors to

  19. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Computer facial animation

    CERN Document Server

    Parke, Frederic I

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive work provides the fundamentals of computer facial animation and brings into sharper focus techniques that are becoming mainstream in the industry. Over the past decade, since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant developments by academic research groups and in the film and games industries leading to the development of morphable face models, performance driven animation, as well as increasingly detailed lip-synchronization and hair modeling techniques. These topics are described in the context of existing facial animation principles. The second ed

  1. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  2. Usefulness of meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio on coronal MRI in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.J.; Lee, S.Y.; Park, N.-H.; Chung, E.C.; Park, J.Y.; Kim, M.S.; Lee, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical utility of the meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio (L/M ratio) of the lateral meniscus in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus (IDLM) as compared with the arthroscopic diagnosis, meniscal width to tibial diameter ratio (L/T ratio) and conventional lateral meniscus width criteria. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 41 patients with IDLM who underwent knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy, as well as 50 controls with normal lateral menisci. MRI examinations were interpreted independently by two radiologists, both of whom were blinded to clinical information and radiological reports. Assessment of meniscal width (L), maximal transverse diameter of the lateral meniscus (M), and transverse diameter of the tibia (T) was carried out on central coronal sections that were observed to pass through the medial collateral ligament. L/M and L/T ratios were calculated. These results were correlated with arthroscopic findings and analysed statistically using categorical regression analysis and non-parametric correlation analysis. Using arthroscopic findings as the standard of reference, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for: (1) 12, 13, 14, and 15 mm meniscal width thresholds; (2) 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% L/M ratio thresholds; and (3) 15%, 18%, 20%, and 25% L/T ratio thresholds. Results: The mean L/M ratio of the IDLM was approximately 67% and was statistically significantly higher than the control (44%). The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 50%. The mean L/T ratio of the IDLM was approximately 23% and was statistically significant. The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 18%. The threshold of 13 mm of meniscal width also showed high sensitivity and high specificity. Conclusion: The use of the L/M ratio or L/T ratio in combination with meniscal width criteria may be a useful method for evaluating IDLM

  3. Human Ro60 (SSA2) genomic organization and sequence alterations, examined in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, T P; Ashton, G H S; Kondeatis, E; Vaughan, R W; Hughes, G R V; Khamashta, M A; Hawk, J L M; McGregor, J M; McGrath, J A

    2002-02-01

    The Ro 60 kDa protein (Ro60 or SSA2) is the major component of the Ro ribonucleoprotein (Ro RNP) complex, to which an immune response is a specific feature of several autoimmune diseases. The genomic organization and any sequence variation within the DNA encoding Ro60 are unknown. To characterize the Ro60 gene structure and to assess whether any sequence alterations might be associated with serum anti-Ro antibody in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE), thus potentially providing new insight into disease pathogenesis. The cDNA sequence for Ro60 was obtained from the NCBI database and used for a BLAST search for a clone containing the entire genomic sequence. The intron-exon borders were confirmed by designing intronic primer pairs to flank each exon, which were then used to amplify genomic DNA for automated sequencing from 36 caucasian patients with SCLE (anti-Ro positive) and 49 with discoid LE (DLE, anti-Ro negative), in addition to 36 healthy caucasian controls. Heteroduplex analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from patients and controls spanning all Ro60 exons (1-8) revealed a common bandshift in the PCR products spanning exon 7. Sequencing of the corresponding PCR products demonstrated an A > G substitution at nucleotide position 1318-7, within the consensus acceptor splice site of exon 7 (GenBank XM001901). The allele frequencies were major allele A (0.71) and minor allele G (0.29) in 72 control chromosomes, with no significant differences found between SCLE patients, DLE patients and controls. The genomic organization of the DNA encoding the Ro60 protein is described, including a common polymorphism within the consensus acceptor splice site of exon 7. Our delineation of a strategy for the genomic amplification of Ro60 forms a basis for further examination of the pathological functions of the Ro RNP in autoimmune disease.

  4. Prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus among patients of hypothyroidism in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudrajit Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hypothyroidism is a common public health problem in India. With iodine sufficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis is becoming the most important etiology of hypothyroidism. Often, thyroiditis is associated with other systemic autoimmune diseases. Aims: We undertook thisobservational study to find the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE amongst the hypothyroid patients at our Institution. Settings and Design: This is probably the first study of its kind from India. Materials and Methods: 185 patients with diagnosed hypothyroidism were included and screening for SLE was done by standard epidemiological criteria. Majority of the patients (63.8% were young adults (20-40 years. Statistical Analysis Used: Two by two contingency tables were analyzed by Chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test as needed. Logistic regression model was used considering the presence of SLE as a dependent variable. Results: Eleven (5.94% patients were found to have SLE. However, anti nuclear factor was positive in 145 cases (78.4%. Of the patients with SLE, 8 (72.7% were found to be anti TPO positive, but the titers of ANF and anti TPO did not correlate. Presence of discoid rash, haematological criteria and presence of antibodies like anti-dsDNA were significantly correlated with the presence of SLE in hypothyroid patients. Presence of ANF was also correlated with the grade of goiter (r=0.62; P<0.05. Also four patients with SLE had a positive family history (OR=9.37. Logistic regression model showed anti-TPO has OR=1.54 (P=0.02 for the development of SLE. Conclusions: Prevalence of SLE in hypothyroid patients is high compared to the general population, especially, as thyroiditis is very common in SLE.

  5. Paralisia facial bilateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.

  6. Diplegia facial traumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.

  7. Recognizing Facial Slivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad-Gutnick, Sharon; Harmatz, Elia Samuel; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Yovel, Galit; Sinha, Pawan

    2018-07-01

    We report here an unexpectedly robust ability of healthy human individuals ( n = 40) to recognize extremely distorted needle-like facial images, challenging the well-entrenched notion that veridical spatial configuration is necessary for extracting facial identity. In face identification tasks of parametrically compressed internal and external features, we found that the sum of performances on each cue falls significantly short of performance on full faces, despite the equal visual information available from both measures (with full faces essentially being a superposition of internal and external features). We hypothesize that this large deficit stems from the use of positional information about how the internal features are positioned relative to the external features. To test this, we systematically changed the relations between internal and external features and found preferential encoding of vertical but not horizontal spatial relationships in facial representations ( n = 20). Finally, we employ magnetoencephalography imaging ( n = 20) to demonstrate a close mapping between the behavioral psychometric curve and the amplitude of the M250 face familiarity, but not M170 face-sensitive evoked response field component, providing evidence that the M250 can be modulated by faces that are perceptually identifiable, irrespective of extreme distortions to the face's veridical configuration. We theorize that the tolerance to compressive distortions has evolved from the need to recognize faces across varying viewpoints. Our findings help clarify the important, but poorly defined, concept of facial configuration and also enable an association between behavioral performance and previously reported neural correlates of face perception.

  8. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; Pmean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  9. Periosteal reaction in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, M.; Neustadter, L.; Dalinka, M.; Kricun, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report three patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and periosteal reaction. Two of the three cases had systemic vasculitis and the third had local ischemia with ischemic necrosis. (orig.)

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute Adrenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    presented to us with a history of anorexia, progressive darkening of the face ... to us in an acute hypoadrenal state and was found to have Systemic lupus erythematosus with renal involvement. .... Textbook of Endocrinology. 11th ed. Saunders: ...

  11. I Am Newly Diagnosed with Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding the Right Doctor Flares Lupus and the Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing Self-Advocacy Signs and Symptoms Treatment Options all resource types Articles Downloadable PDFs Q & A List Blog Personal Stories ...

  12. Renal Tubular Function in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immune' diseases such as. Sjogren's syndrome,'" systemic lupus erythematosus. (SLE),3 alveolitis' and chronic active hepatitis.' The reported abnormalities of renal tubular function include impairment of acid excretion and urinary concentration.

  13. Systemisk lupus erythematosus i Fyns Amt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Anne B.; Green, Anders; Junker, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has never been investigated in Denmark, whereas international studies have reached divergent results. In the study patients were ascertained from diagnosis-based registers of inpatients and outpatients, notifications from physicians...

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as morbid jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, A.; Carney, M. W.; Denman, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus and presenting with morbid jealousy is described. There was evidence of cerebral lupus. Her physical and mental symptoms responded to a combination of chlorpromazine and steroids. The morbid mental process was probably caused by her physical condition while the content of her disordered thought and behaviour was determined by her introverted premorbid personality, religiosity, unhappy childhood experiences and frustrated desire for children. PMID:7413541

  15. Hypoparathyroidism associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarian, M; Laxer, R M; Kooh, S W; Silverman, E D

    1995-11-01

    We describe a 15-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who presented with hypocalcemia and a generalized seizure in the setting of an intercurrent illness and active central nervous system lupus. She was subsequently found to have idiopathic hypoparathyroidism. The association of SLE with hypoparathyroidism is extremely rare and this case represents the first pediatric report of this rare association. We suggest there may be a common underlying pathophysiological process linking these diseases.

  16. Radiological changes in systemic lupus erythematosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, R.; Freyschmidt, J.; Suedhof-Mueller, G.; Menninger, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1981-01-01

    In a study of 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosis, radiologically demonstrable lung changes and pleural effusions were found in 50%. Changes in the peripheral skeleton, such as osteoporosis, erosions or mutilations, were seen in only two patients. Our radiological analysis has shown that systemic lupus erythematosis does not produce changes in the joints, but is responsible for abnormalities in the lungs, as well as for pericardial and pleural effusions. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiological changes in systemic lupus erythematosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, R; Freyschmidt, J; Suedhof-Mueller, G; Menninger, H

    1981-05-01

    In a study of 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosis, radiologically demonstrable lung changes and pleural effusions were found in 50%. Changes in the peripheral skeleton, such as osteoporosis, erosions or mutilations, were seen in only two patients. Our radiological analysis has shown that systemic lupus erythematosis does not produce changes in the joints, but is responsible for abnormalities in the lungs, as well as for pericardial and pleural effusions.

  18. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ui-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Sun-Hee; Gwak, Gyeong-Tae

    2018-01-20

    The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  19. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by...

  20. Epidemiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus and the associated risk of systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M Prütz; Möller, S; Bygum, A

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this paper are to describe the epidemiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and its subtypes in Denmark, and to investigate the probability of receiving a subsequent diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the related time course. Methods A nationwide...

  1. Pregnancy complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  2. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed...

  3. Graviditetskomplikationer hos en patient med systemisk lupus erythematosus og lupus nefritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  4. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  5. OSTEOPOROSIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE form a high risk group osteoporosis (OP. Its main causes are autoimmune inflammation, concomitant pathology, and their treatment. When OP occurs in SLE, bone mass loss is shown to occur early and is associated with the use of glucocorticosteroids (GC. To prevent OP, all patients with SLE should modify their lifestyle. To verify bone changes, densitometry is performed in patients who have risk factors of OP and/or a menopause. Calcium preparations and vitamin D are used to prevent OP; bisphosphonates that significantly reduce the risk of fractures of the vertebral column and femoral neck are employed for therapy of OP. A SLE patient with gluco-corticoid-induced OP and a good effect of bisphophonate treatment is described.

  6. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  7. Humor in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Cristiano S; Li, Rui; Lawrie, Sarah; Bar-Or, Amit; Clarke, Ann E; Da Costa, Deborah; Banerjee, Devi; Bernatsky, Sasha; Lee, Jennifer L; Pineau, Christian A

    2015-03-01

    Humor has neurophysiological effects influencing the release of cortisol, which may have a direct impact on the immune system. Laughter is associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines both in the general population and in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the effects of humor on serum cytokines [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and cortisol levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), after a standard intervention (120 min of visual comedy). We enrolled 58 females with SLE from consecutive patients assessed in the Montreal General Hospital lupus clinic. The subjects who consented to participate were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (watching 120 min of comedy) or control group (watching a 120 min documentary). Measurements of cytokine and serum cortisol levels as well as 24-h urine cortisol were taken before, during, and after the interventions. We compared serum cytokine levels and serum and 24-h urine cortisol levels in the humor and control groups and performed regression analyses of these outcomes, adjusting for demographics and the current use of prednisone. There were no significant differences between the control and humor groups in demographics or clinical variables. Baseline serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and B-cell activating factor were also similar in both groups. There was no evidence of a humor effect in terms of decreasing cytokine levels, although there was some suggestion of lowered cortisol secretion in the humor group based the 24-h urinary cortisol levels in a subgroup. In contrast to what has been published for RA, we saw no clear effects of humor in altering cytokine levels in SLE, although interesting trends were seen for lower cortisol levels after humor intervention compared with the control group.

  8. A 12-year retrospective review of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprapaph, K; Sawatwarakul, S; Vachiramon, V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features, laboratory findings, systemic manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary care center in Thailand. Methods We performed a retrospective review from 2002 to 2014 of all patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for bullous systemic lupus erythematosus to evaluate for the clinical characteristics, extracutaneous involvement, histopathologic features, immunofluorescence pattern, serological abnormalities, internal organ involvement, treatments and outcome. Results Among 5149 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and/or systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 developed vesiculobullous lesions. Ten patients had validation of the diagnosis of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus, accounting for 0.19%. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus occurred after the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in six patients with a median onset of 2.5 months (0-89). Four out of 10 patients developed bullous systemic lupus erythematosus simultaneously with systemic lupus erythematosus. Hematologic abnormalities and renal involvement were found in 100% and 90%, respectively. Polyarthritis (40%) and serositis (40%) were less frequently seen. Systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, antimalarials and dapsone offered resolution of cutaneous lesions. Conclusion Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is an uncommon presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blistering can occur following or simultaneously with established systemic lupus erythematosus. We propose that clinicians should carefully search for systemic involvement, especially hematologic and renal impairment, in patients presenting with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

  9. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-01-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis

  10. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  11. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  12. A geochemical study of the Ediacaran discoidal fossil Aspidella preserved in limestones: Implications for its taphonomy and paleoecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, N; Gill, B C; Grazhdankin, D; Rogov, V; Xiao, S

    2017-07-01

    The Ediacara biota features the rise of macroscopic complex life immediately before the Cambrian explosion. One of the most abundant and widely distributed elements of the Ediacara biota is the discoidal fossil Aspidella, which is interpreted as a subsurface holdfast possibly anchoring a frondose epibenthic organism. It is a morphologically simple fossil preserved mainly in siliciclastic rocks, which are unsuitable for comprehensive stable isotope geochemical analyses to decipher its taphonomy and paleoecology. In this regard, three-dimensionally preserved Aspidella fossils from upper Ediacaran limestones of the Khatyspyt Formation in the Olenek Uplift of northern Siberia offer a rare opportunity to leverage geochemistry for insights into their taphonomy and paleoecology. To take advantage of this opportunity, we analyzed δ 13 C carb , δ 18 O carb , δ 13 C org , δ 34 S pyr , and iron speciation of the Khatyspyt Aspidella fossils and surrounding sediment matrix in order to investigate whether they hosted microbial symbionts, how they were fossilized, and the redox conditions of their ecological environments. Aspidella holdfasts and surrounding sediment matrix show indistinguishable δ 13 C org values, suggesting they did not host and derive significant amount of nutrients from microbial symbionts such as methanogens, methylotrophs, or sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. δ 13 C carb , δ 18 O carb , and δ 34 S pyr data, along with petrographic observations, suggest that microbial sulfate reduction facilitated the preservation of Aspidella by promoting early authigenic calcite cementation in the holdfasts before matrix cementation and sediment compaction. Iron speciation data are equivocal, largely because of the low total iron concentrations. However, consideration of published sulfur isotope and biomarker data suggests that Aspidella likely lived in non-euxinic waters. It is possible that Aspidella was an opportunistic organism, colonizing the seafloor in large

  13. Anatomia del nervo faciale

    OpenAIRE

    Barbut , J.; Tankere , F.; Bernat , I.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Il nervo faciale è al centro della pratica quotidiana in oto-rino-laringoiatria. La sua singolare fisiologia e la sua patologia fanno di questo paio di nervi cranici un soggetto appassionante in cui alcuni si sono specializzati. La precisa conoscenza della sua anatomia, il cui percorso è tortuoso e presenta molte relazioni con altri elementi nobili, è un prerequisito indispensabile per il suo approccio, sia in chirurgia cervicale che in quella otologica che in quella n...

  14. Facial Symmetry: An Illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Reddy Admala

    2013-01-01

    Materials and methods: A sample of 120 patients (60 males and 60 females; mean age, 15 years; range, 16-22 years who had received orthodontic clinical examination at AME′s Dental College and Hospital were selected. Selection was made in such a way that following malocclusions with equal sexual distribution was possible from the patient database. Patients selected were classified into skeletal Class I (25 males and 25 females, Class II (25 males and 25 females and Class III (10 males and 10 females based on ANB angle. The number was predecided to be the same and also was based on the number of patients with following malocclusions reported to the department. Differences in length between distances from the points at which ear rods were inserted to the facial midline and the perpendicular distance from the softtissue menton to the facial midline were measured on a frontofacial photograph. Subjects with a discrepancy of more than three standard deviations of the measurement error were categorized as having left- or right-sided laterality. Results: Of subjects with facial asymmetry, 74.1% had a wider right hemiface, and 51.6% of those with chin deviation had left-sided laterality. These tendencies were independent of sex or skeletal jaw relationships. Conclusion: These results suggest that laterality in the normal asymmetry of the face, which is consistently found in humans, is likely to be a hereditary rather than an acquired trait.

  15. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  16. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian, with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25. Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI, Malaysian Chinese (MC and Malaysian Malay (MM were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05 but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1% were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5% short and 81 (28.3% long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts.1 Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%; 2 Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3 Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4 All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5 No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  17. Adolescents with HIV and facial lipoatrophy: response to facial stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Claudio Gabana-Silveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of facial stimulation over the superficial muscles of the face in individuals with facial lipoatrophy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and with no indication for treatment with polymethyl methacrylate. METHOD: The study sample comprised four adolescents of both genders ranging from 13 to 17 years in age. To participate in the study, the participants had to score six or less points on the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. The facial stimulation program used in our study consisted of 12 weekly 30-minute sessions during which individuals received therapy. The therapy consisted of intra- and extra-oral muscle contraction and stretching maneuvers of the zygomaticus major and minor and the masseter muscles. Pre- and post-treatment results were obtained using anthropometric static measurements of the face and the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. RESULTS: The results suggest that the therapeutic program effectively improved the volume of the buccinators. No significant differences were observed for the measurements of the medial portion of the face, the lateral portion of the face, the volume of the masseter muscle, or Facial Lipoatrophy Index scores. CONCLUSION: The results of our study suggest that facial maneuvers applied to the superficial muscles of the face of adolescents with facial lipoatrophy associated with HIV improved the facial area volume related to the buccinators muscles. We believe that our results will encourage future research with HIV patients, especially for patients who do not have the possibility of receiving an alternative aesthetic treatment.

  18. Dutch guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tellingen, A.; Voskuyl, A. E.; Vervloet, M. G.; Bijl, M.; de Sevaux, R. G. L.; Berger, S. P.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Berden, J. H. M.

    Proliferative lupus nephritis is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite improvements in the management of lupus nephritis, a significant number of the patients do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy and progress to end-stage renal

  19. Burden of lupus on work: Issues in the employment of individuals with lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neelam; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-10-17

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or Lupus is one of the leading causes of work disability in the United States, accounting for about 20% of the more than estimated 1.5 million Americans with a work disability. The symptoms of lupus can have a profound impact on the person's employment. Impacts of lupus are more pronounced among young and middle-adulthood. Studies have shown that loss in work hours cost the nation nearly $13 billion annually. The loss also impacts the individual's work, quality of life, self-management, and self-efficacy. In this article, the author describes the financial burden of lupus. The article also describes the substantial impact of lupus on employment outcomes for individuals living with the condition. The author also reviews major signs and symptoms of disease and their impact on employment. Findings from this research can be used to identify various accommodations and strategies for individuals to prevent flare-ups. The paper presents innovative strategies that include early interventions and how employers andco-workers can provide helpful support that includes job accommodations to individuals with lupus.

  20. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  1. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  3. B cell signature during inactive systemic lupus is heterogeneous: toward a biological dissection of lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Garaud

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosous (SLE is an autoimmune disease with an important clinical and biological heterogeneity. B lymphocytes appear central to the development of SLE which is characterized by the production of a large variety of autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia. In mice, immature B cells from spontaneous lupus prone animals are able to produce autoantibodies when transferred into immunodeficient mice, strongly suggesting the existence of intrinsic B cell defects during lupus. In order to approach these defects in humans, we compared the peripheral B cell transcriptomas of quiescent lupus patients to normal B cell transcriptomas. When the statistical analysis is performed on the entire group of patients, the differences between patients and controls appear quite weak with only 14 mRNA genes having a false discovery rate ranging between 11 and 17%, with 6 underexpressed genes (PMEPA1, TLR10, TRAF3IP2, LDOC1L, CD1C and EGR1. However, unforced hierarchical clustering of the microarrays reveals a subgroup of lupus patients distinct from both the controls and the other lupus patients. This subgroup has no detectable clinical or immunological phenotypic peculiarity compared to the other patients, but is characterized by 1/an IL-4 signature and 2/the abnormal expression of a large set of genes with an extremely low false discovery rate, mainly pointing to the biological function of the endoplasmic reticulum, and more precisely to genes implicated in the Unfolded Protein Response, suggesting that B cells entered an incomplete BLIMP1 dependent plasmacytic differentiation which was undetectable by immunophenotyping. Thus, this microarray analysis of B cells during quiescent lupus suggests that, despite a similar lupus phenotype, different biological roads can lead to human lupus.

  4. Increased risk of depression in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J H; Egeberg, A; Kofoed, K

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reported prevalences of depression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) range widely, while the prevalence of depression in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) remains severely understudied. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether patients with SLE or CLE have increased risk...... of primary and secondary care, analyses of risk for depression and antidepressant use were performed in Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, prior depression, and prior antidepressant use. RESULTS: A total of 3,489 patients with lupus erythematosus were...

  5. Facial soft tissue analysis among various vertical facial patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeelani, W.; Fida, M.; Shaikh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The emergence of soft tissue paradigm in orthodontics has made various soft tissue parameters an integral part of the orthodontic problem list. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare various facial soft tissue parameters on lateral cephalograms among patients with short, average and long facial patterns. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on the lateral cephalograms of 180 adult subjects divided into three equal groups, i.e., short, average and long face according to the vertical facial pattern. Incisal display at rest, nose height, upper and lower lip lengths, degree of lip procumbency and the nasolabial angle were measured for each individual. The gender differences for these soft tissue parameters were determined using Mann-Whitney U test while the comparison among different facial patterns was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Significant differences in the incisal display at rest, total nasal height, lip procumbency, the nasolabial angle and the upper and lower lip lengths were found among the three vertical facial patterns. A significant positive correlation of nose and lip dimensions was found with the underlying skeletal pattern. Similarly, the incisal display at rest, upper and lower lip procumbency and the nasolabial angle were significantly correlated with the lower anterior facial height. Conclusion: Short facial pattern is associated with minimal incisal display, recumbent upper and lower lips and acute nasolabial angle while the long facial pattern is associated with excessive incisal display, procumbent upper and lower lips and obtuse nasolabial angle. (author)

  6. The LupusQoL and associations with demographics and clinical measurements in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhone, Kathleen; Castelino, Madhura; Abbott, Janice; Bruce, Ian N; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shelmerdine, Joanna; Peers, Kate; Isenberg, David; Ferenkeh-Koroma, Ada; Griffiths, Bridget; Akil, Mohammed; Maddison, Peter; Gordon, Caroline; Teh, Lee-Suan

    2010-11-01

    Having developed and validated a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measure for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the LupusQoL, we determined its relationship to demographic and clinical measurements in a group of patients with SLE. A group of 322 outpatients completed the LupusQoL. Demographic (age, sex, marital status, ethnicity) and clinical variables (disease duration, disease activity, damage) were recorded. Associations between the 8 LupusQoL domains and age, disease duration, disease activity, and damage were explored using Spearman's correlation coefficients. Differences in LupusQoL scores were examined for sex and marital status using the Mann-Whitney U test. Ethnic groups were compared using ANOVA. All domains of LupusQoL were impaired, with fatigue (56.3) being the worst affected and body image (80.0) the least. The correlations between the LupusQoL domain scores and age (r = -0.01 to -0.22) and disease duration (r = 0 to 0.16) were absent or weak. Similarly, there were no significant differences in the LupusQoL scores regarding sex, marital status, or the 3 main ethnic groups (Black-Caribbean, Asian, White). Although there were statistically significant correlations between the scores of the LupusQoL domains and some scores of the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group index (r = -0.22 to 0.09) and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (r = -0.29 to 0.21), these were weak. HRQOL was impaired in this cohort of outpatients with SLE as assessed by the validated lupus-specific LupusQoL. There were no clinically important associations between the 8 domains of the LupusQoL and clinical or demographic variables in this group of patients. Thus, the LupusQoL is a relatively independent outcome measure in patients with SLE.

  7. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Holm Sandholdt, Linda; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......: To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  8. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency, characteristics, and outcome of mood disorders, as well as clinical and autoantibody associations, in a multiethnic/racial, prospective inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Patients were assessed annually for mood...... disorders (4 types, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and 18 other neuropsychiatric events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College...... was associated with Asian race/ethnicity (P = 0.01) and treatment with immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.003). Mood disorders were associated with lower mental health and mental component summary scores but not with the SLEDAI-2K, SDI, or lupus autoantibodies. Among the 232 patients with depression, 168 (72...

  9. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  10. [Cardiac tamponade disclosing systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eddine, M; Bennis, A; Soulami, S; Chraibi, N

    1996-02-01

    Cardiac tamponade secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus is rare and has a very serious prognosis. The authors report a case of cardiac tamponade confirmed by echocardiography, which constituted the presenting sign of systemic lupus erythematosus in a 20-year-old patient, who required emergency pericardial aspiration. The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was established on the basis of the combination of pericardial involvement, non-erosive arthritis, leukopenia with lymphopenia, presence of LE cells and anti-native DNA antibodies and positive antinuclear antibody titre of 1/2560. The clinical course was favourable in response to 3 months of corticosteroid treatment. The possibility of SLE should be considered in any case of cardiac tamponade in a young patient in which the aetiology is not explained.

  11. Nummular Dermatitis (Discoid Eczema)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus in a male patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibarani, H.; Zubir, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Female to male ratio is approximately 9:1.A 20 years old male was admitted to HAM Hospital 3 months ago with chief complaint pain in both knees joint. After anamneses, physical examination and laboratory test the patient was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient tested positive for ANA and anti-ds-DNA antibody test. The patient was with giving non-biologic DMARDS @myfortic 360mg, methylprednisolone, chloroquine and other symptomatic drugs.

  13. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-09

    Jun 9, 2013 ... Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention.

  14. [Multidisciplinary approach of facial injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Schreurs, R.; Lapid, O.; Saeed, P.; Adriaensen, G.F.; Hoefnagels, F.M.; Jong, V.M. de

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately one quarter of polytrauma patients has facial injuries, which usually lead to loss of form and function. Several specialties are involved in the acute and reconstructive phases of facial injuries, such as oral and maxillofacial surgery, otorhinolaryngology, plastic surgery,

  15. Colesteatoma causando paralisia facial Cholesteatoma causing facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gurgel Testa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial causada pelo colesteatoma é pouco freqüente. As porções do nervo mais acometidas são a timpânica e a região do 2º joelho. Nos casos de disseminação da lesão colesteatomatosa para o epitímpano anterior, o gânglio geniculado é o segmento do nervo facial mais sujeito à injúria. A etiopatogenia pode estar ligada à compressão do nervo pelo colesteatoma seguida de diminuição do seu suprimento vascular como também pela possível ação de substâncias neurotóxicas produzidas pela matriz do tumor ou pelas bactérias nele contidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, as características clínicas e o tratamento da paralisia facial decorrente da lesão colesteatomatosa. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo envolvendo dez casos de paralisia facial por colesteatoma selecionados através de levantamento de 206 descompressões do nervo facial com diferentes etiologias, realizadas na UNIFESP-EPM nos últimos dez anos. RESULTADOS: A incidência de paralisia facial por colesteatoma neste estudo foi de 4,85%,com predominância do sexo feminino (60%. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 39 anos. A duração e o grau da paralisia (inicial juntamente com a extensão da lesão foram importantes em relação à recuperação funcional do nervo facial. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico precoce é fundamental para que ocorra um resultado funcional mais adequado. Nos casos de ruptura ou intensa fibrose do tecido nervoso, o enxerto de nervo (auricular magno/sural e/ou a anastomose hipoglosso-facial podem ser sugeridas.Facial paralysis caused by cholesteatoma is uncommon. The portions most frequently involved are horizontal (tympanic and second genu segments. When cholesteatomas extend over the anterior epitympanic space, the facial nerve is placed in jeopardy in the region of the geniculate ganglion. The aetiology can be related to compression of the nerve followed by impairment of its

  16. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, I.; Sahintuerk, F.; Sennaroglu, L.; Boyvat, F.; Guersel, B.; Besim, A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  17. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  18. Diplegia facial traumatica Traumatic facial diplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.A case of traumatic facial diplegia with left partial loss of hearing following head injury is reported. X-rays showed fractures on the occipital and left temporal bones. A review of traumatic facial paralysis is made.

  19. Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... W. Clark NIAMS For our readers who have lupus or are the loved ones of someone with ...

  20. Lupus and Depression: Know the Signs and How to Get Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Share on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Lupus and depression: Know the signs and how to ... free of lupus. Facts about clinical depression and lupus Between 15 and 60 percent of people with ...

  1. Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents fast facts 1 Lupus occurs when the body's immune system attacks the ...

  2. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease.

  3. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  4. How do women with lupus manage fatigue?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, Anne Ørnholt; Midtgaard, Julie; Hougaard, Karin Sørig

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Half of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) consider fatigue to be the most disabling disease symptom. To develop and promote strategies to prevent and control fatigue, this study aimed to describe how women with SLE manage the experience of fatigue. Methods: Four focus...

  5. The frequency and outcome of lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Su, Li

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine nephritis outcomes in a prospective multi-ethnic/racial SLE inception cohort. METHODS: Patients in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort (≤15 months of SLE diagnosis) were assessed annually for estimated glomerular filtration rate (e...

  6. Does facial resemblance enhance cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Giang

    Full Text Available Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces. A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system.

  7. Guillain–Barré syndrome occurring synchronously with systemic lupus erythematosus as initial manifestation treated successfully with low-dose cyclophosphamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE is frequently encountered in clinical practice; a widespread immunological response can involve any organ system, sometimes leading to rare and diagnostically challenging presentations. We describe a 38-year-old female who presented with symmetric numbness and tingling of the hands and feet, and cervical pain. Imaging studies were not diagnostic of any serious underlying pathology. The patient developed ascending paresis involving lower extremities and cranial muscles (dysphagia and facial weakness. Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS was diagnosed on the basis of electromyography and lumbar puncture showing albuminocytologic dissociation. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG were administered for 5 days. Supported by anti-dsDNA antibody, oral ulcers, proteinuria of 0.7 g in 24 h, and neurological manifestation, she was diagnosed with lupus. After completion of IVIG, she received pulse-dose corticosteroids and one dose of low-dose cyclophosphamide. Her neurological symptoms improved and she had complete neurological recovery several months after her initial presentation. Literature search provides evidence of co-occurrence of lupus and GBS occurring mostly later in the course of the disease. However, GBS as initial manifestation of SLE is exceedingly rare and less understood. The association of GBS with lupus is important to recognize for rapid initiation of appropriate therapy and for consideration of immunosuppressive therapy which may affect the outcome.

  8. Facial Action Units Recognition: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Shan, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many approaches to facial expression recognition focus on assessing the six basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, and surprise). Real-life situations proved to produce many more subtle facial expressions. A reliable way of analyzing the facial behavior is the Facial Action Coding

  9. Microbial biofilms on silicone facial prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Facial disfigurements can result from oncologic surgery, trauma and congenital deformities. These disfigurements can be rehabilitated with facial prostheses. Facial prostheses are usually made of silicones. A problem of facial prostheses is that microorganisms can colonize their surface. It is hard

  10. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  11. Facial transplantation for massive traumatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Daniel S; Chi, John J

    2013-10-01

    This article describes the challenges of facial reconstruction and the role of facial transplantation in certain facial defects and injuries. This information is of value to surgeons assessing facial injuries with massive soft tissue loss or injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Persistent idiopathic facial pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Wolfram, Frauke; Heinskou, Tone Bruvik

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP) is a poorly understood chronic orofacial pain disorder and a differential diagnosis to trigeminal neuralgia. To address the lack of systematic studies in PIFP we here report clinical characteristics and neuroimaging findings in PIFP. Methods...... pain 7 (13%), hypoesthesia 23 (48%), depression 16 (30%) and other chronic pain conditions 17 (32%) and a low prevalence of stabbing pain 21 (40%), touch-evoked pain 14 (26%) and remission periods 10 (19%). The odds ratio between neurovascular contact and the painful side was 1.4 (95% Cl 0.4–4.4, p = 0.......565) and the odds ratio between neurovascular contact with displacement of the trigeminal nerve and the painful side was 0.2 (95% Cl 0.0–2.1, p = 0.195). Conclusion: PIFP is separated from trigeminal neuralgia both with respect to the clinical characteristics and neuroimaging findings, as NVC was not associated...

  13. Facial recognition in education system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  14. [Presurgical orthodontics for facial asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrère, H

    2003-03-01

    As with the treatment of all facial deformities, orthodontic pre-surgical preparation for facial asymmetry should aim at correcting severe occlusal discrepancies not solely on the basis of a narrow occlusal analysis but also in a way that will not disturb the proposed surgical protocol. In addition, facial asymmetries require specific adjustments, difficult to derive and to apply because of their inherent atypical morphological orientation of both alveolar and basal bony support. Three treated cases illustrate different solutions to problems posed by pathological torque: this torque must be considered with respect to proposed surgical changes, within the framework of their limitations and their possible contra-indications.

  15. Possible Protective Effect of Hydroxychloroquine on Retarding the Occurrence of Integument Damage in Lupus: Data from LUMINA, a Multiethnic Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; González, Luis A.; Zhang, Jie; Vilá, Luis M.; Reveille, John D.; McGwin, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the features predictive of time-to-integument damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) from a multiethnic cohort (LUMINA). Methods SLE LUMINA patients (n=580), age ≥16 years, disease duration ≤5 years at baseline (T0), of African American, Hispanic and Caucasian ethnicity were studied. Integument damage was defined per the SLICC damage index (scarring alopecia, extensive skin scarring and skin ulcers lasting at least six months); factors associated with time-to-its occurrence were examined by Cox proportional univariable and multivariable (main model) hazards regression analyses. Two alternative models were also examined; in model 1 all patients, regardless of when integument damage occurred (n=94), were included; in model 2 a time-varying approach (GEE) was employed. Results Thirty-nine (6.7%) of 580 patients developed integument damage over a mean (SD) total disease duration of 5.9 (3.7) years and were included in the main multivariable regression model. After adjusting for discoid rash, nailfold infarcts, photosensitivity and Raynaud’s phenomenon (significant in the univariable analyses), disease activity over time [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.17; 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.09–1.26)] was associated with a shorter time-to-integument damage whereas hydroxychloroquine use (HR=0.23, 95% CI 0.12–0.47) and Texan-Hispanic (HR=0.35; 95% CI 0.14–0.87) and Caucasian ethnicities (HR=0.37; 95% CI 0.14–0.99) were associated with a longer time. Results of the alternative models were consistent with those of the main model albeit in model 2 the association with hydroxychloroquine was not significant. Conclusions Our data indicate that hydroxychloroquine use is possibly associated with a delay in integument damage development in patients with SLE. PMID:20391486

  16. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  17. Facial exercises for facial rejuvenation: a control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Marie-Camille; Van den Brande, Helen; Boone, Barbara; Van Borsel, John

    2013-01-01

    Facial exercises are a noninvasive alternative to medical approaches to facial rejuvenation. Logopedists could be involved in providing these exercises. Little research has been conducted, however, on the effectiveness of exercises for facial rejuvenation. This study assessed the effectiveness of 4 exercises purportedly reducing wrinkles and sagging of the facial skin. A control group study was conducted with 18 participants, 9 of whom (the experimental group) underwent daily training for 7 weeks. Pictures taken before and after 7 weeks of 5 facial areas (forehead, nasolabial folds, area above the upper lip, jawline and area under the chin) were evaluated by a panel of laypersons. In addition, the participants of the experimental group evaluated their own pictures. Evaluation included the pairwise presentation of pictures before and after 7 weeks and scoring of the same pictures by means of visual analogue scales in a random presentation. Only one significant difference was found between the control and experimental group. In the experimental group, the picture after therapy of the upper lip was more frequently chosen to be the younger-looking one by the panel. It cannot be concluded that facial exercises are effective. More systematic research is needed. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  19. Sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter Bjørn; Pilegaard, Hans K; Ladegaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background. Facial blushing is one of the most peculiar of human expressions. The pathophysiology is unclear, and the prevalence is unknown. Thoracoscopic sympathectomy may cure the symptom and is increasingly used in patients with isolated facial blushing. The evidence base for the optimal level...... of targeting the sympathetic chain is limited to retrospective case studies. We present a randomized clinical trial. Methods. 100 patients were randomized (web-based, single-blinded) to rib-oriented (R2 or R2-R3) sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing at two university hospitals during a 6-year period...... between R2 and R2-R3 sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing. Both were effective, and QOL increased significantly. Despite very frequent side effects, the vast majority of patients were satisfied. Surprisingly, many patients experienced mild recurrent symptoms within the first year; this should...

  20. Measuring facial expression of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-12-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress.

  1. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  2. A Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus-Like Eruption Induced by Hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Daniel A; Mosser-Goldfarb, Joy L

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a medication with many well-described cutaneous side effects, notably the dermatomyositis-like eruption known as hydroxyurea dermopathy. Although systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported with hydroxyurea use, cutaneous lupus has not. We report a novel case of chronic cutaneous lupus induced by hydroxyurea and propose that this is a side effect that is distinct from hydroxyurea dermopathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Autologous Fat Transfer in a Patient with Lupus Erythematosus Profundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimi Yoon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus profundus, a form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, is a rare inflammatory disease involving in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissues. It primarily affects the head, proximal upper arms, trunk, thighs, and presents as firm nodules, 1 to 3 cm in diameter. The overlying skin often becomes attached to the subcutaneous nodules and is drawn inward to produce deep, saucerized depressions. We present a rare case of lupus erythematosus profundus treated with autologous fat transfer.

  4. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. METHODS: Information...... in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement was the strongest serological association with renal involvement. These data support the usefulness of anti-C1q in SLE, especially in lupus nephritis....

  5. Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0205 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lisa Laury-Kleintop...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0205 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Systemic lupus erythematosus, autoantibodies. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF

  6. Recent insights into the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Kathy L.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Harley, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variation was first shown to be part of the cause of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) in the 1970s with associations in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Almost four decades later, and with the help of increasingly powerful genetic approaches, more than 25 genes are now known to contribute to the mechanisms that predispose individuals to lupus. Over half of these loci have been discovered in the past two years, underscoring the extraordinary success of recent genome...

  7. Representing affective facial expressions for robots and embodied conversational agents by facial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C.; Ham, J.R.C.; Postma, E.O.; Midden, C.J.H.; Joosten, B.; Goudbeek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Affective robots and embodied conversational agents require convincing facial expressions to make them socially acceptable. To be able to virtually generate facial expressions, we need to investigate the relationship between technology and human perception of affective and social signals. Facial

  8. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U S; Hariram; Malkunje, Laxman R; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-07-01

    Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected randomly for this study. On the basis of examination and investigations a suitable management approach involving rest and observation, open or closed reduction and immobilization, trans-osseous (TO) wiring, mini bone plate fixation, splinting and replantation, elevation and fixation of zygoma, etc. were carried out. In our study fall was the predominant cause for most of the facial injuries in children. There was a 1.09% incidence of facial injuries in children up to 16 years of age amongst the total patients. The age-wise distribution of the fracture amongst groups (I, II and III) was found to be 26.67%, 51.67% and 21.67% respectively. Male to female patient ratio was 3:1. The majority of the cases of facial injuries were seen in Group II patients (6-11 years) i.e. 51.67%. The mandibular fracture was found to be the most common fracture (0.60%) followed by dentoalveolar (0.27%), mandibular + midface (0.07) and midface (0.02%) fractures. Most of the mandibular fractures were found in the parasymphysis region. Simple fracture seems to be commonest in the mandible. Most of the mandibular and midface fractures in children were amenable to conservative therapies except a few which required surgical intervention.

  9. Peripheral facial palsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Akıncı, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus

  11. Occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Danish community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustrup, H; Voss, A; Green, A

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and annual incidence of definite systemic lupus erythematosus (D-SLE) and incomplete SLE (I-SLE) in a community-based lupus cohort of predominantly Nordic ancestry in an 8-year prospective study from 1995 to 2003, and also to calculate the annual transition......-years at risk [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44-7.55]. Conclusions: Denmark is a low-incidence lupus area but lupus prevalence is increasing slowly. I-SLE is a disease variant that may eventually convert into D-SLE....

  12. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  13. Remembering facial configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, V; Doyle, T; Dench, N; Burton, M

    1991-02-01

    Eight experiments are reported showing that subjects can remember rather subtle aspects of the configuration of facial features to which they have earlier been exposed. Subjects saw several slightly different configurations (formed by altering the relative placement of internal features of the face) of each of ten different faces, and they were asked to rate the apparent age and masculinity-femininity of each. Afterwards, subjects were asked to select from pairs of faces the configuration which was identical to one previously rated. Subjects responded strongly to the central or "prototypical" configuration of each studied face where this was included as one member of each test pair, whether or not it had been studied (Experiments 1, 2 and 4). Subjects were also quite accurate at recognizing one of the previously encountered extremes of the series of configurations that had been rated (Experiment 3), but when unseen prototypes were paired with seen exemplars subjects' performance was at chance (Experiment 5). Prototype learning of face patterns was shown to be stronger than that for house patterns, though both classes of patterns were affected equally by inversion (Experiment 6). The final two experiments demonstrated that preferences for the prototype could be affected by instructions at study and by whether different exemplars of the same face were shown consecutively or distributed through the study series. The discussion examines the implications of these results for theories of the representation of faces and for instance-based models of memory.

  14. Lupus nephritis, pregnancy and rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Dorado

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available La nefritis lúpica (NL proliferativa es una de las complicaciones más graves del LES. La respuesta terapéutica con los esquemas clásicos no existe en el 20 al 70% de los casos, siendo la amplitud de dicho rango explicada por variaciones étnicas, falta de consenso en la definición de remisión, diferencias en los tiempos de tratamiento, seguimiento y en la clase de NL. En presencia de NL recidivante o refractaria los tratamientos y el nivel de evidencia sobre su eficacia son más limitados. Rituximab es un anticuerpo monoclonal quimérico (ratón-humano dirigido contra el antígeno CD 20 localizado en la superficie celular de los linfocitos B. Estos participan en la patogénesis del LES a partir de su maduración en células plasmáticas, producción de anticuerpos, secreción de citoquinas proinflamatorias, presentación de autoantígenos a las células T y en la activación de células T. La administración de rituximab genera un rápido y sostenido descenso de los linfocitos B CD 20+ circulantes y una reducción de los títulos de auto-anticuerpos. Se reportó una disminución significativa en los niveles de antiDNA a partir de la semana 14 y de los niveles de IgM, sin compromiso de IgG ni de IgA. Se detectó droga activa en sangre periférica luego de la semana 24 de la última infusión. La depleción de linfocitos B se puede mantener por 6 meses, su reconstitución es heterogénea y puede tardar más de un año. Esta linfopenia selectiva tendría un valor predictivo de respuesta terapéutica, la remisión clínica prolongada tendría asociación con repoblación incompleta de células B de memoria varios años luego del tratamiento. En estudios observacionales realizados en pacientes con NL refractaria se reportó respuesta terapéutica con rituximab entre 67-77 % luego de 6 a 12 meses de seguimiento. Sin embargo los resultados del estudio Lupus Nephritis Assesment with Rituximab (LUNAR, randomizado controlado, a doble ciego

  15. Extensive hypertrophic lupus erythematosus: Atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus (LE is a disease with a wide spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations. Clinical features of patients with LE show a great variation, and for this reason it is difficult to develop a unifying concept of this disease. Our objective is to present a case of hypertrophic LE with atypical morphology and extensive involvement, who responded favorably to isotretinoin. Diagnosis of hypertrophic lupus erythematosus (HLE was confirmed by characteristic histopathological findings. Combination therapy with isotretinoin and hydroxychloroquine resulted in flattening and repression of previously refractory skin lesions. Sometimes, HLE lesions may present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. In long standing lesions, squamous cell carcinoma may arise. Therefore, HLE requires adequate therapy with clinical and histopathological follow up.

  16. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  17. Enhancing facial features by using clear facial features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofoo, Fanar Fareed Hanna

    2017-09-01

    The similarity of features between individuals of same ethnicity motivated the idea of this project. The idea of this project is to extract features of clear facial image and impose them on blurred facial image of same ethnic origin as an approach to enhance a blurred facial image. A database of clear images containing 30 individuals equally divided to five different ethnicities which were Arab, African, Chines, European and Indian. Software was built to perform pre-processing on images in order to align the features of clear and blurred images. And the idea was to extract features of clear facial image or template built from clear facial images using wavelet transformation to impose them on blurred image by using reverse wavelet. The results of this approach did not come well as all the features did not align together as in most cases the eyes were aligned but the nose or mouth were not aligned. Then we decided in the next approach to deal with features separately but in the result in some cases a blocky effect was present on features due to not having close matching features. In general the available small database did not help to achieve the goal results, because of the number of available individuals. The color information and features similarity could be more investigated to achieve better results by having larger database as well as improving the process of enhancement by the availability of closer matches in each ethnicity.

  18. Ocular findings in systemic lupus erythemato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir S. Shoughy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease. Ocular complications occur in up to one-third of patients with SLE. The ocular findings may represent the initial manifestation of the disease and may lead to severe ocular morbidity and loss of vision. Early diagnosis and prompt management of patients with SLE are mandatory and require collaboration between the ophthalmologist and the rheumatologist.

  19. Ocular findings in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease. Ocular complications occur in up to one-third of patients with SLE. The ocular findings may represent the initial manifestation of the disease and may lead to severe ocular morbidity and loss of vision. Early diagnosis and prompt management of patients with SLE are mandatory and require collaboration between the ophthalmologist and the rheumatologist.

  20. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul [Hanyang Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow.

  1. Sweet syndrome revealing systemic lupus erythematosus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, N

    2015-02-01

    Sweet Syndrome is an acute inflammatory skin eruption which is rare in children. We report a case of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) that presented with Sweet syndrome. This case is a unique presentation of a common disorder which provides a new facet for the differential diagnosis of SLE in children. It is also the first paediatric case to be reported in a Caucasian child.

  2. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow

  3. [Idiopathic facial paralysis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, I; Chakroun, A; Ayedi, S; Ben Rhaiem, Z; Mnejja, M; Charfeddine, I; Hammami, B; Ghorbel, A

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy is the most common cause of facial nerve palsy in children. Controversy exists regarding treatment options. The objectives of this study were to review the epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as the outcome of idiopathic facial palsy in children to suggest appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted on children with a diagnosis of idiopathic facial palsy from 2007 to 2012. A total of 37 cases (13 males, 24 females) with a mean age of 13.9 years were included in this analysis. The mean duration between onset of Bell's palsy and consultation was 3 days. Of these patients, 78.3% had moderately severe (grade IV) or severe paralysis (grade V on the House and Brackmann grading). Twenty-seven patients were treated in an outpatient context, three patients were hospitalized, and seven patients were treated as outpatients and subsequently hospitalized. All patients received corticosteroids. Eight of them also received antiviral treatment. The complete recovery rate was 94.6% (35/37). The duration of complete recovery was 7.4 weeks. Children with idiopathic facial palsy have a very good prognosis. The complete recovery rate exceeds 90%. However, controversy exists regarding treatment options. High-quality studies have been conducted on adult populations. Medical treatment based on corticosteroids alone or combined with antiviral treatment is certainly effective in improving facial function outcomes in adults. In children, the recommendation for prescription of steroids and antiviral drugs based on adult treatment appears to be justified. Randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population are recommended to define a strategy for management of idiopathic facial paralysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  5. Hydroxychloroquine in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, C; Moroni, G

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an alkalinizing lysosomatropic drug that accumulates in lysosomes where it inhibits some important functions by increasing the pH. HCQ has proved to be effective in a number of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Areas covered: In this review the mechanisms of action, the efficacy, and the safety of HCQ in the management of patients with SLE have been reviewed. HCQ may reduce the risk of flares, allow the reduction of the dosage of steroids, reduce organ damage, and prevent the thrombotic effects of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The drug is generally safe and may be prescribed to pregnant women. However, some cautions are needed to prevent retinopathy, a rare but serious complication of the prolonged use of HCQ. Expert opinion: HCQ may offer several advantages not only in patients with mild SLE but can also exert important beneficial effects in lupus patients with organ involvement and in pregnant women. The drug has a low cost and few side effects. These characteristics should encourage a larger use of HCQ, also in lupus patients with organ involvement.

  6. Thymus function in drug-induced lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R L; Salomon, D R; Guerrero, R S

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmunity develops when a lupus-inducing drug is introduced into the thymus of normal mice, but the relevance of this model to the human disorder is unclear in part because it is widely assumed that the thymus is non-functional in the adult. We compared thymus function in 10 patients with symptomatic procainamide-induced lupus to that in 13 asymptomatic patients who only developed drug-induced autoantibodies. T cell output from the thymus was quantified using a competitive polymerase chain reaction that detects T cell receptor DNA excision circles in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Despite the advanced age of the patient population under study, newly generated T cells were detected in all subjects. Although there was no overall quantitative difference between the symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, we found a positive correlation between the level of T cell receptor excision circles in peripheral lymphocytes and serum IgG anti-chromatin antibody activity in patients with drug-induced lupus. The association between autoantibodies and nascent peripheral T cells supports the requirement for T cells in autoantibody production. Our observations are consistent with findings in mice in which autoreactive T cells derived from drug-induced abnormalities in T cell development in the thymus.

  7. Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Emese; Bhattoa, Harjit P; Bettembuk, Peter; Balogh, Adam; Szegedi, Gyula

    2002-03-10

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder which may be affected by hormonal changes, such as those of pregnancy. Women with SLE have increased adverse pregnancy outcomes. A retrospective analysis of the gynecologic and immunologic case history of 140 women with SLE and the outcome of 263 pregnancies in 99 women with SLE. In patients diagnosed with SLE, the proportion of pregnancies ending with live birth at term decreased to one-third compared with three quarters in those without a diagnosis of SLE and the incidence of pre-term deliveries and spontaneous abortions increased by 6.8 and 4.7 times, respectively. When SLE was associated with secondary antiphospholipid (APL) syndrome, and lupus anticoagulant (LA) or beta2-glycoprotein antibodies were present, a further increase in the incidence of pregnancy loss was observed. Pregnancy did not cause a flare-up of SLE in all cases, the disease remained stable in about 30% of the patients. Lupus was mild in the majority of the women who carried out their pregnancy to term. We also observed mothers with active SLE who successfully carried out pregnancies to term. These findings accord with previous literature and should inform rheumatologists, obstetricians and neonatologists who guide patients in their reproductive decisions.

  8. Catatonia due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Pinto Cabral Júnior Rabello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Discuss neuropsychiatric aspects and differential diagnosis of catatonic syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a pediatric patient. Methods Single case report. Result A 13-year-old male, after two months diagnosed with SLE, started to present psychotic symptoms (behavioral changes, hallucinations and delusions that evolved into intense catatonia. During hospitalization, neuroimaging, biochemical and serological tests for differential diagnosis with metabolic encephalopathy, neurological tumors and neuroinfections, among other tests, were performed. The possibility of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, steroid-induced psychosis and catatonia was also evaluated. A complete reversal of catatonia was achieved after using benzodiazepines in high doses, associated with immunosuppressive therapy for lupus, which speaks in favor of catatonia secondary to autoimmune encephalitis due to lupus. Conclusion Although catatonia rarely is the initial clinical presentation of SLE, the delay in recognizing the syndrome can be risky, having a negative impact on prognosis. Benzodiazepines have an important role in the catatonia resolution, especially when associated with parallel specific organic base cause treatment. The use of neuroleptics should be avoided for the duration of the catatonic syndrome as it may cause clinical deterioration.

  9. Lupus and leprosy: beyond the coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F M; Gomez, V E; Albuquerque, E M N; Klumb, E M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2015-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that presents an increased susceptibility to infections which may trigger reactivation. Disease flares have been mostly associated with parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, EBV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, but it is probable that many other agents may also induce innate and adaptive immune system stimulation including the production of autoantibodies as ANA, anti nDNA and anti-ß2-GPI mainly in lepromatous leprosy. Mycobacterium leprae not only may determine symptoms that mimic lupus flares, including autoantibodies production, but could also act as a trigger for lupus reactivation; however, its association is still not fully explored. As demonstrated for tuberculosis, it is quite possible that molecular mimicry may also be involved in the interface of these two diseases. Some studies reported shared epitopes among idiotypes derived from 8E7 and TH9 lepromatous antibodies and those obtained from SLE patients, and it could partially explain the triggering phenomenon of SLE caused by M. leprae. We report and discuss three Brazilian patients whose disease was inactive and presented disease flares concurrently with the diagnosis of leprosy.

  10. [The history of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  12. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by trauma or after resection of a tumor. All patients were submitted to a primary nerve reconstruction except 7 patients, where late reconstruction was performed two weeks to four months after the initial surgery. The follow-up period was at least two years. For facial nerve interpositional graft technique, we achieved facial function HB grade III in eight patients and grade IV in three patients. Synkinesis was found in eight patients, and facial contracture with synkinesis was found in two patients. In regards to hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer using different modifications, we achieved facial function HB grade III in nine patients and grade IV in two patients. Facial contracture, synkinesis and tongue atrophy were found in three patients, and synkinesis was found in five patients. However, those who had primary direct facial-hypoglossal end-to-side anastomosis showed the best result without any neurological deficit. Among various reanimation techniques, when indicated, direct end-to-side facial-hypoglossal anastomosis through epineural suturing is the most effective technique with excellent outcomes for facial reanimation and preservation of tongue movement, particularly when performed as a primary technique. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients through clinical and laboratorial evaluation, ultrasonography, radiological and endoscopic examination. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, either outpatients or inpatients at the Department of Rheumatology of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina from Universidade de São Paulo were evaluated as to clinical and laboratorial data. All patients were submitted to ultrasonographic evaluation of the upper urinary tract, radiological and endoscopic examinations of the middle and lower urinary tracts. Rresults: Mean age of patients varied between 13 and 62 years (median = 29 years. Thirty-six were females and three were males. The disease varied from 6 months to 22 years (median three years and one month. Clinical and laboratory activity of the disease was present in 30 patients. Twenty-two patients had the diagnosis of lupus established for three years or more. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic and all had received corticosteroids for treatment at least once. Twenty-three received antimalarial drugs; ten received cytostatics, and seven patients received non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Upper urinary tract ultrasonography was normal in all cases but one with staghorn calculus associated with neurogenic bladder secondary to neurological involvement by the disease. Vesicoureteral reflux was observed in two cases. Other two patients had significant post-voiding residual urine, both with neurogenic bladder secondary to nervous system involvement by lupus. The average bladder maximum capacity in an awaken patient was 342 mL, and was decreased in 18.9% of cases. This subgroup of patients presented a greater frequency of urinary symptoms and greater use of cytostatic drugs (Z > Z5%. A pathognomonic cystoscopic pattern of bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus could not be established. Cystoscopic aspects similar to those seen in the initial or minor

  14. Research Progress on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Complicated with Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weisan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in treatment standardization of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infections and serious complications became the leading cause of death related to this disease, exceeding those of renal involvement and lupus encephalopathy. SLE coinfection is mainly related to defects in humoral immunity and cellular immunity, SLE disease activity, and doses of hormone and immune inhibitors.

  15. Case Report: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We hereby report a case of a 20 year‑old female who presented to us in an acute hypoadrenal state and was found to have Systemic lupus erythematosus with renal involvement. Patient was successfully managed with steroids and improved clinically. Keywords: Addison's disease, Autoimmune diseases, Systemic lupus ...

  16. Cardiac tamponade as an initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Diego M; Carrion, Andres F

    2012-06-12

    Clinical manifestations of pericardial disease may precede other signs and symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Although pericardial effusion is one of the most common cardiac problems in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, haemodynamically significant effusions manifesting as cardiac tamponade are rare and require prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  18. Dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus: just another comorbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Koumaras, Charalambos; Gladman, Dafna D; Urowitz, Murray B

    2016-04-01

    Among traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, dyslipidemia is believed to decisively affect the long-term prognosis of lupus patients, not only with regard to cardiovascular events but also by influencing other manifestations, such as lupus nephritis. The aim of this study was to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, evidence for its impact on atherosclerosis manifestations and management of dyslipidemia in lupus patients. English-restricted MEDLINE database search (Medical Subject Headings: lupus or systemic lupus erythematosus and dyslipidemia or hyperlipidemia). The prevalence of dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ranges from 36% at diagnosis to 60% or even higher after 3 years, depending on definition. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms are implicated, including antibodies against lipoprotein lipase and cytokines affecting the balance between pro- and anti-atherogenic lipoproteins. Dyslipidemia has a clear impact on clinical cardiovascular disease and surrogate markers for subclinical atherosclerosis. Moreover, it negatively affects end-organ damage (kidneys and brain). Treatment with statins yielded contradictory results as per minimizing cardiovascular risk. Dyslipidemia is a significant comorbidity of lupus patients with multiple negative effects in the long term. Its treatment represents a modifiable risk factor; prompt and adequate treatment can minimize unnecessary burden in lupus patients, thus reducing hospitalizations and their overall morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suppression of Remodeling Behaviors with Arachidonic Acid Modification for Enhanced in vivo Antiatherogenic Efficacies of Lovastatin-loaded Discoidal Recombinant High Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Zhang, Mengyuan; Liu, Lisha; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Wenli

    2015-10-01

    A series of in vitro evaluation in our previous studies had proved that arachidonic acid (AA) modification could suppress the remodeling behaviors of lovastatin-loaded discoidal reconstituted high density lipoprotein (LT-d-rHDL) by restraining the reactivity with lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) for reducing undesired drug leakage. This study focuses on the investigation of AA-modified LT-d-rHDL (AA-LT-d-rHDL) in atherosclerotic New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit models to explore whether AA modification could enhance drug targeting delivery and improve antiatherogenic efficacies in vivo. After pharmacokinetics of AA-LT-d-rHDL modified with different AA amount were investigated in atherosclerotic NZW rabbits, atherosclerotic lesions targeting property was assessed by ex vivo imaging of aortic tree and drug distribution. Furthermore, their antiatherogenic efficacies were elaborately evaluated and compared by typical biochemical indices. With AA modification amount augmenting, circulation time of AA-LT-d-rHDL was prolonged, and drug accumulation in the target locus was increased, eventually the significant appreciation in antiatherogenic efficacies were further supported by lower level of bad cholesterol, decreased atherosclerotic lesions areas and mean intima-media thickness (MIT), markedly attenuated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein expression and macrophage infiltration. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that AA-LT-d-rHDL could enhance drug accumulation in atherosclerotic lesion and impede atherosclerosis progression more effectively.

  20. Prognosis and predictors of convulsion among pediatric lupus nephritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Einollahi, Behzad; Taheri, Saeed; Panahi, Yunes; Maddani, Abbas; Esfahani, Taher; Sharifi-Bonab, Mir Mohsen

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to analyze features and outcome of convulsion in pediatric lupus nephritis patients. We retrospectively reviewed data of 14 Iranian children with lupus nephritis who developed seizures and compared them with a group of the same number of well matched pediatric lupus nephritis patients. Higher serum creatinine levels and higher frequencies of anemia and lymphopenia were observed in the convulsion group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the only risk factor for development of convulsion in pediatric lupus patients with nephritis was lymphopenia. Survival analysis showed that convulsion had no impact on patient and renal function outcomes in our pediatric lupus nephritis subjects. In conclusion, we found that lymphopenia is a predictive factor for convulsion occurrence in our patients and special attention to neurological status assessment may be needed in this situation. (author)

  1. Nablus mask-like facial syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allanson, Judith; Smith, Amanda; Hare, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS) has many distinctive phenotypic features, particularly tight glistening skin with reduced facial expression, blepharophimosis, telecanthus, bulky nasal tip, abnormal external ear architecture, upswept frontal hairline, and sparse eyebrows. Over the last few...

  2. Economic evaluation of lupus nephritis in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort using a multistate model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barber, Megan R W; Hanly, John G; Su, Li

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the long-term costs of lupus nephritis (LN). These were compared between patients with and without LN based on multistate modelling. METHODS: Patients from 32 centres in 11 countries were enrolled in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC...

  3. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboshanif Mohamed

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients. All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB grade VI, either caused by trauma or after resection of a tumor. All patients were submitted to a primary nerve reconstruction except 7 patients, where late reconstruction was performed two weeks to four months after the initial surgery. The follow-up period was at least two years. Results: For facial nerve interpositional graft technique, we achieved facial function HB grade III in eight patients and grade IV in three patients. Synkinesis was found in eight patients, and facial contracture with synkinesis was found in two patients. In regards to hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer using different modifications, we achieved facial function HB grade III in nine patients and grade IV in two patients. Facial contracture, synkinesis and tongue atrophy were found in three patients, and synkinesis was found in five patients. However, those who had primary direct facial-hypoglossal end-to-side anastomosis showed the best result without any neurological deficit. Conclusion: Among various reanimation techniques, when indicated, direct end-to-side facial-hypoglossal anastomosis through epineural suturing is the most effective technique with excellent outcomes for facial reanimation and preservation of tongue movement, particularly when performed as a primary technique.

  4. Dermal fillers for facial soft tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, patients are demanding not only enhancement to their dental (micro) esthetics, but also their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Soft tissue augmentation via dermal filling agents may be used to correct facial defects such as wrinkles caused by age, gravity, and trauma; thin lips; asymmetrical facial appearances; buccal fold depressions; and others. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles, history, techniques, materials, complications, and clinical controversies regarding dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation.

  5. Facial skin care products and cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-01-01

    Facial skin care products and cosmetics can both aid or incite facial dermatoses. Properly selected skin care can create an environment for barrier repair aiding in the re-establishment of a healing biofilm and diminution of facial redness; however, skin care products that aggressively remove intercellular lipids or cause irritation must be eliminated before the red face will resolve. Cosmetics are an additive variable either aiding or challenging facial skin health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tir8/Sigirr prevents murine lupus by suppressing the immunostimulatory effects of lupus autoantigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Pfeiffer, Stephanie; Savarese, Emina; Krug, Anne; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The Sigirr gene (also known as Tir8) encodes for an orphan receptor of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin 1 receptor family that inhibits TLR-mediated pathogen recognition in dendritic cells. Here, we show that Sigirr also inhibits the activation of dendritic cells and B cells upon exposure to RNA and DNA lupus autoantigens. To evaluate the functional role of Sigirr in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we generated Sigirr-deficient C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. These mice developed a progressive lymphoproliferative syndrome followed by severe autoimmune lung disease and lupus nephritis within 6 mo of age as compared with the minor abnormalities observed in C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. Lack of Sigirr was associated with enhanced activation of dendritic cells and increased expression of multiple proinflammatory and antiapoptotic mediators. In the absence of Sigirr, CD4 T cell numbers were increased and CD4+CD25+ T cell numbers were reduced. Furthermore, lack of Sigirr enhanced the activation and proliferation of B cells, including the production of autoantibodies against multiple nuclear lupus autoantigens. These data identify Sigirr as a novel SLE susceptibility gene in mice. PMID:18644972

  7. Facial aging: A clinical classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiffman Melvin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classification of facial aging is to have a simple clinical method to determine the severity of the aging process in the face. This allows a quick estimate as to the types of procedures that the patient would need to have the best results. Procedures that are presently used for facial rejuvenation include laser, chemical peels, suture lifts, fillers, modified facelift and full facelift. The physician is already using his best judgment to determine which procedure would be best for any particular patient. This classification may help to refine these decisions.

  8. Gut Microbiota in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin M; Edwards, Michael R; Mu, Qinghui; Yu, Yang; Vieson, Miranda D; Reilly, Christopher M; Ahmed, S Ansar; Bankole, Adegbenga A

    2018-02-15

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been observed in a number of autoimmune diseases. However, the role of the gut microbiota in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypical autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation in multiple organs of the body, remains elusive. Here we report the dynamics of the gut microbiota in a murine lupus model, NZB/W F1, as well as intestinal dysbiosis in a small group of SLE patients with active disease. The composition of the gut microbiota changed markedly before and after the onset of lupus disease in NZB/W F1 mice, with greater diversity and increased representation of several bacterial species as lupus progressed from the predisease stage to the diseased stage. However, we did not control for age and the cage effect. Using dexamethasone as an intervention to treat SLE-like signs, we also found that a greater abundance of a group of lactobacilli (for which a species assignment could not be made) in the gut microbiota might be correlated with more severe disease in NZB/W F1 mice. Results of the human study suggest that, compared to control subjects without immune-mediated diseases, SLE patients with active lupus disease possessed an altered gut microbiota that differed in several particular bacterial species (within the genera Odoribacter and Blautia and an unnamed genus in the family Rikenellaceae ) and was less diverse, with increased representation of Gram-negative bacteria. The Firmicutes / Bacteroidetes ratios did not differ between the SLE microbiota and the non-SLE microbiota in our human cohort. IMPORTANCE SLE is a complex autoimmune disease with no known cure. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been reported for both mice and humans with SLE. In this emerging field, however, more studies are required to delineate the roles of the gut microbiota in different lupus-prone mouse models and people with diverse manifestations of SLE. Here, we report changes in the gut microbiota in NZB/W F1 lupus-prone mice and a

  9. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kamide

    2012-01-01

    tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear.

  10. Control de accesos mediante reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    En esta memoria expone el trabajo que se ha llevado a cabo para intentar crear un sistema de reconocimiento facial. This paper outlines the work carried out in the attempt of creating a facial recognition system. En aquesta memòria exposa el treball que s'ha dut a terme en l'intent de crear un sistema de reconeixement facial.

  11. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Leer en Español: La ...

  12. Facial Pain Followed by Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report with Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    GV, Sowmya; BS, Manjunatha; Goel, Saurabh; Singh, Mohit Pal; Astekar, Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the commonest cranial nerve motor neuropathy. The causes range from cerebrovascular accident to iatrogenic damage, but there are few reports of facial nerve paralysis attributable to odontogenic infections. In majority of the cases, recovery of facial muscle function begins within first three weeks after onset. This article reports a unique case of 32-year-old male patient who developed facial pain followed by unilateral facial nerve paralysis due to odontogen...

  13. Facial expressions and pair bonds in hylobatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkiewicz, Brittany; Skollar, Gabriella; Reichard, Ulrich H

    2018-06-06

    Facial expressions are an important component of primate communication that functions to transmit social information and modulate intentions and motivations. Chimpanzees and macaques, for example, produce a variety of facial expressions when communicating with conspecifics. Hylobatids also produce various facial expressions; however, the origin and function of these facial expressions are still largely unclear. It has been suggested that larger facial expression repertoires may have evolved in the context of social complexity, but this link has yet to be tested at a broader empirical basis. The social complexity hypothesis offers a possible explanation for the evolution of complex communicative signals such as facial expressions, because as the complexity of an individual's social environment increases so does the need for communicative signals. We used an intraspecies, pair-focused study design to test the link between facial expressions and sociality within hylobatids, specifically the strength of pair-bonds. The current study compared 206 hr of video and 103 hr of focal animal data for ten hylobatid pairs from three genera (Nomascus, Hoolock, and Hylobates) living at the Gibbon Conservation Center. Using video footage, we explored 5,969 facial expressions along three dimensions: repertoire use, repertoire breadth, and facial expression synchrony [FES]. We then used focal animal data to compare dimensions of facial expressiveness to pair bond strength and behavioral synchrony. Hylobatids in our study overlapped in only half of their facial expressions (50%) with the only other detailed, quantitative study of hylobatid facial expressions, while 27 facial expressions were uniquely observed in our study animals. Taken together, hylobatids have a large facial expression repertoire of at least 80 unique facial expressions. Contrary to our prediction, facial repertoire composition was not significantly correlated with pair bond strength, rates of territorial synchrony

  14. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  15. Eagle's syndrome with facial palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Hashim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome (ES is a rare disease in which the styloid process is elongated and compressing adjacent structures. We describe a rare presentation of ES in which the patient presented with facial palsy. Facial palsy as a presentation of ES is very rare. A review of the English literature revealed only one previously reported case. Our case is a 39-year-old male who presented with left facial palsy. He also reported a 9-year history of the classical symptoms of ES. A computed tomography scan with three-dimensional reconstruction confirmed the diagnoses. He was started on conservative management but without significant improvement. Surgical intervention was offered, but the patient refused. It is important for otolaryngologists, dentists, and other specialists who deal with head and neck problems to be able to recognize ES despite its rarity. Although the patient responded to a treatment similar to that of Bell's palsy because of the clinical features and imaging, ES was most likely the cause of his facial palsy.

  16. Facial sculpting and tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jean D A; Carruthers, Alastair

    2005-11-01

    Until recently, deep facial sculpting was exclusively the domain of surgical interventions. Recent advances in the available array of dermal and subdermal fillers combined with an esthetic appreciation by both surgeons and nonsurgeons alike of the positive effect of filling the volume-depleted face have led to an expansion in the indications for the use of soft tissue augmenting agents. Subdermal support of the lateral two-thirds of the brow, the nasojugal fold, the malar and buccal fat pads, the lateral lip commissures, and the perioral region, including the pre-jowl sulcus, all restore youthful facial contour and harmony. An important advance in technique is the subdermal rather than the intradermal injection plane. "Instant" facial sculpting giving a brow-lift, cheek-lift, lip expansion, and perioral augmentation is possible using modern soft tissue augmenting agents. The softer, more relaxed appearance contrasts to the somewhat "pulled" appearance of subjects who have had surgical overcorrections. Treatments can be combined with botulinum toxin and other procedures if required. Newer advances in the use of fillers include the use of fillers injected in the subdermal plane for "lunchtime" facial sculpting. Using the modern esthetic filler compounds, which are biodegradable but longer lasting, subjects can have a "rehearsal" treatment or make it ongoing. Some individuals, such as those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lipoatrophy or those who desire to obtain a longer-lasting effect, may elect to use a nonbiodegradable filling agent.

  17. Asyndromic Bilateral Transverse Facial Cleft

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-23

    of this atypical cleft is unknown although the frequency ... on Tuesday, April 23, 2013, IP: 41.132.185.55] || Click here to download free Android application for this journal ... Facial cleft remains a source of social anxiety and in the past has lead ...

  18. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  19. Complex Odontome Causing Facial Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeya Patil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common non-cystic odontogenic lesions representing 70% of all odontogenic tumors. Often small and asymptomatic, they are detected on routine radiographs. Occasionally they become large and produce expansion of bone with consequent facial asymmetry. We report a case of such a lesion causing expansion of the mandible in an otherwise asymptomatic patient.

  20. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial…

  1. Facial Prototype Formation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inn, Donald; And Others

    This study examined memory representation as it is exhibited in young children's formation of facial prototypes. In the first part of the study, researchers constructed images of faces using an Identikit that provided the features of hair, eyes, mouth, nose, and chin. Images were varied systematically. A series of these images, called exemplar…

  2. Pseudotumoural hypertrophic neuritis of the facial nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Zanoletti, E; Mazzoni, A; Barbò, R

    2008-01-01

    In a retrospective study of our cases of recurrent paralysis of the facial nerve of tumoural and non-tumoural origin, a tumour-like lesion of the intra-temporal course of the facial nerve, mimicking facial nerve schwannoma, was found and investigated in 4 cases. This was defined as, pseudotumoral hypertrophic neuritis of the facial nerve. The picture was one of recurrent acute facial palsy with incomplete recovery and imaging of a benign tumour. It was different from the well-known recurrent ...

  3. Possibilities of pfysiotherapy in facial nerve paresis

    OpenAIRE

    ZIFČÁKOVÁ, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis addresses paresis of the facial nerve. The facial nerve paresis is a rather common illness, which cannot be often cured without consequences despite all the modern treatments. The paresis of the facial nerve occurs in two forms, central and peripheral. A central paresis is a result of a lesion located above the motor nucleus of the facial nerve. A peripheral paresis is caused by a lesion located either in the location of the motor nucleus or in the course of the facial ner...

  4. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  6. Bone health, vitamin D and lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is high. This is likely due to photoprotection measures in addition to intrinsic factors of the disease. Low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of low bone mineral density and fracture. Vitamin D deficiency could also have undesirable effects on patients' immune response, enhancing mechanisms of loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Vitamin D levels should be periodically monitored and patients should be treated with the objective of reaching vitamin D levels higher than 30-40 ng/ml. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Extreme Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sung Huang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Only a few cases of hypertriglyceridemia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE have been reported. We report a case of a 13-year-old girl suffering from SLE associated with severe hypertriglyceridemia. The persistent hypertriglyceridemia was extremely well tolerated. As a result of steroid treatment, serum triglycerides fell dramatically from a high of 5601 mg/dL to 75 mg/dL despite the patient switching to a free diet. We considered the presence of an autoantibody to lipoprotein lipase and commenced immunosuppression. The role of steroids in completely correcting deficient lipoprotein lipase activity is discussed.

  8. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE

  10. Brain MR imaging of systemic lupus erythematodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ueda, Fumiaki; Arai, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kadoya, Masumi; Matsui, Osamu; Takashima, Tsutomu

    1996-01-01

    Brain MR imaging of 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematodus (SLE) were reviewed. Two major findings was obtained. One was deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH) and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH), the other was cerebral infarction. In comparison with the same age group, relatively severe brain atrophy was also observed. It was thought that these findings were induced from the vasculitis caused by SLE. However, the influence of the steroid therapy could not be excluded. No definite correlation between MR findings and clinical symptoms were seen. In conclusion, when we interpret brain MR imaging of the patients with SLE, special attention should be paid to their age. (author)

  11. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus : histological, immunohistochemical and direct immunofluorescence analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia Fogagnolo

    2015-01-01

    Resumo: O lúpus eritematoso cutâneo (LEC) é classificado em agudo, subagudo, crônico e túmido. A sequência de eventos que deflagram a autoimunidade é pouco entendida. Neste trabalho foram estudados os aspectos histológicos, de imunofluorescência direta (IFD) e imuno-histoquímicos no LEC discoide (subtipo mais comum da forma crônica),subagudo e túmido, relacionando-os com a presença ou não de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES) concomitante, visando compreender melhor a imunopatogênese destes su...

  12. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  13. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  14. Operant conditioning of facial displays of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Miriam; Rainville, Pierre; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The operant model of chronic pain posits that nonverbal pain behavior, such as facial expressions, is sensitive to reinforcement, but experimental evidence supporting this assumption is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a healthy population a) whether facial pain behavior can indeed be operantly conditioned using a discriminative reinforcement schedule to increase and decrease facial pain behavior and b) to what extent these changes affect pain experience indexed by self-ratings. In the experimental group (n = 29), the participants were reinforced every time that they showed pain-indicative facial behavior (up-conditioning) or a neutral expression (down-conditioning) in response to painful heat stimulation. Once facial pain behavior was successfully up- or down-conditioned, respectively (which occurred in 72% of participants), facial pain displays and self-report ratings were assessed. In addition, a control group (n = 11) was used that was yoked to the reinforcement plans of the experimental group. During the conditioning phases, reinforcement led to significant changes in facial pain behavior in the majority of the experimental group (p .136). Fine-grained analyses of facial muscle movements revealed a similar picture. Furthermore, the decline in facial pain displays (as observed during down-conditioning) strongly predicted changes in pain ratings (R(2) = 0.329). These results suggest that a) facial pain displays are sensitive to reinforcement and b) that changes in facial pain displays can affect self-report ratings.

  15. Cell-assisted lipotransfer for facial lipoatrophy: efficacy of clinical use of adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kotaro; Sato, Katsujiro; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kurita, Masakazu; Inoue, Keita; Suga, Hirotaka; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Hirohi, Toshitsugu; Harii, Kiyonori

    2008-09-01

    Lipoinjection is a promising treatment, but its efficacy in recontouring facial lipoatrophy remains to be established. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of lipoinjection and supplementation of adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) to adipose grafts. To overcome drawbacks of autologous lipoinjection, we have developed a novel strategy called cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL). In CAL, stromal vascular fraction containing ASCs was freshly isolated from half of an aspirated fat sample and attached to the other half of aspirated fat sample with the fat acting as a scaffold. This process converts relatively ASC-poor aspirated fat into ASC-rich fat. We performed conventional lipoinjection (non-CAL; n=3) or CAL (n=3) on six patients with facial lipoatrophy due to lupus profundus or Parry-Romberg syndrome. All patients obtained improvement in facial contour, but the CAL group had a better clinical improvement score than did the non-CAL patients, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (p=.11). Adipose necrosis was found in one non-CAL case who took perioperative oral corticosteroids. Our results suggest that CAL is both effective and safe and potentially superior to conventional lipoinjection for facial recontouring. The authors have indicated no significant interest with commercial supporters.

  16. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  17. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Roehm, P.C.; Mends, F.; Hagiwara, M.; Fatterpekar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell’s palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers

  18. Facial Displays Are Tools for Social Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, Carlos; Fridlund, Alan J

    2018-05-01

    Based on modern theories of signal evolution and animal communication, the behavioral ecology view of facial displays (BECV) reconceives our 'facial expressions of emotion' as social tools that serve as lead signs to contingent action in social negotiation. BECV offers an externalist, functionalist view of facial displays that is not bound to Western conceptions about either expressions or emotions. It easily accommodates recent findings of diversity in facial displays, their public context-dependency, and the curious but common occurrence of solitary facial behavior. Finally, BECV restores continuity of human facial behavior research with modern functional accounts of non-human communication, and provides a non-mentalistic account of facial displays well-suited to new developments in artificial intelligence and social robotics. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Misrecognition of facial expressions in delinquents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuura Naomi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have suggested impairment in facial expression recognition in delinquents, but controversy remains with respect to how such recognition is impaired. To address this issue, we investigated facial expression recognition in delinquents in detail. Methods We tested 24 male adolescent/young adult delinquents incarcerated in correctional facilities. We compared their performances with those of 24 age- and gender-matched control participants. Using standard photographs of facial expressions illustrating six basic emotions, participants matched each emotional facial expression with an appropriate verbal label. Results Delinquents were less accurate in the recognition of facial expressions that conveyed disgust than were control participants. The delinquents misrecognized the facial expressions of disgust as anger more frequently than did controls. Conclusion These results suggest that one of the underpinnings of delinquency might be impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions, with a specific bias toward interpreting disgusted expressions as hostile angry expressions.

  20. The existential experience of everyday life with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Jacobsen, Søren; Birkelund, Regner

    2018-05-01

    To explore from the perspective of women the nature of basic existential conditions while living with systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus has an unpredictable disease course and is documented to cause an existential rearrangement of life. The significance of changes in existential conditions and related experiences are unclear in the context of nursing and women with systemic lupus erythematosus. A qualitative design guided by Van Manen's hermeneutic-phenomenological methodology. Individual in-depth interviews with 15 women diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and of various ages, disease durations and severities were undertaken from September 2013 - October 2015. Data were analysed following van Manen's phenomenological approach and using drawing as an interpretive tool. The main existential experience was interpreted as a person "moving with the waves of systemic lupus erythematosus" constituted by the themes "oscillating between presence and absence of systemic lupus erythematosus," "recognizing space and bodily possibilities and limitations" and "being enriched through relationships and activities." When systemic lupus erythematosus was flaring, well-being was threatened and a laborious time to escape the feeling of a setback-in-life persisted long after the disease was medically under control. Daily life with systemic lupus erythematosus is conditioned by a prominent need to be in existential motion, related to the absence and presence of systemic lupus erythematosus. The experience of a setback-in-life by illness might challenge well-being and indicates that periods of disease flares or disturbing symptoms are critical time points to provide support. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Rejuvenecimiento facial en "doble sigma" "Double ogee" facial rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Ramírez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Las técnicas subperiósticas descritas por Tessier revolucionaron el tratamiento del envejecimiento facial, recomendando esta vía para tratar los signos tempranos del envejecimiento en pacientes jóvenes y de mediana edad. Psillakis refinó la técnica y Ramírez describió un método más seguro y eficaz de lifting subperióstico, demostrando que la técnica subperióstica de rejuveneciento facial se puede aplicar en el amplio espectro del envejecimiento facial. La introducción del endoscopio en el tratamiento del envejecimiento facial ha abierto una nueva era en la Cirugía Estética. Hoy la disección subperióstica asistida endocópicamente del tercio superior, medio e inferior de la cara, proporciona un medio eficaz para la reposición de los tejidos blandos, con posibilidad de aumento del esqueleto óseo craneofacial, menor edema facial postoperatorio, mínima lesión de las ramas del nervio facial y mejor tratamiento de las mejillas. Este abordaje, desarrollado y refinado durante la última década, se conoce como "Ritidectomía en Doble Sigma". El Arco Veneciano en doble sigma, bien conocido en Arquitectura desde la antigüedad, se caracteriza por ser un trazo armónico de curva convexa y a continuación curva cóncava. Cuando se observa una cara joven, desde un ángulo oblicuo, presenta una distribución característica de los tejidos, previamente descrita para el tercio medio como un arco ojival arquitectónico o una curva en forma de "S". Sin embargo, en un examen más detallado de la cara joven, en la vista de tres cuartos, el perfil completo revela una "arco ojival doble" o una sigma "S" doble. Para ver este recíproco y multicurvilíneo trazo de la belleza, debemos ver la cara en posición oblicua y así poder ver ambos cantos mediales. En esta posición, la cara joven presenta una convexidad característica de la cola de la ceja que confluye en la concavidad de la pared orbitaria lateral formando así el primer arco (superior

  2. Neurological Disease in Lupus: Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Sarah; Wiseman, Stewart; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dhaun, Neeraj; Hunt, David P J

    2018-01-01

    The brain and nervous system are important targets for immune-mediated damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in a complex spectrum of neurological syndromes. Defining nervous system disease in lupus poses significant challenges. Among the difficulties to be addressed are a diversity of clinical manifestations and a lack of understanding of their mechanistic basis. However, despite these challenges, progress has been made in the identification of pathways which contribute to neurological disease in SLE. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of neurological disease in lupus will inform both classification and approaches to clinical trials.

  3. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio E.

    2004-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2 * gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  4. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...... biopsies from 35 patients with lupus nephritis by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Five samples of normal kidney tissue served as control specimens. We did not observe apoptotic glomerular cells in any...... cells constitute a quantitatively important source of auto-antibody-inducing nuclear auto-antigens in human lupus nephritis....

  5. Neurological Disease in Lupus: Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Sarah; Wiseman, Stewart; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dhaun, Neeraj; Hunt, David P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The brain and nervous system are important targets for immune-mediated damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in a complex spectrum of neurological syndromes. Defining nervous system disease in lupus poses significant challenges. Among the difficulties to be addressed are a diversity of clinical manifestations and a lack of understanding of their mechanistic basis. However, despite these challenges, progress has been made in the identification of pathways which contribute to neurological disease in SLE. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of neurological disease in lupus will inform both classification and approaches to clinical trials. PMID:29928273

  6. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus onset patterns in Vietnamese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dung, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Loan, Huynh Thoai; Nielsen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    to have systemic lupus erythematosus (f/m = 4/1) were referred to the Ho Chi Minh City Children's Hospital No.1 during a 12-month period in 2009. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (SD = 2.5). Thirty-seven (82%) fulfilled criteria for lupus nephritis (LN). At diagnosis, impressively high...... No. 1 during a16 month period from 2008-2009. These patients had a strikingly high prevalence of Coombs positive anaemia, a high prevalence of lupus nephritis, and very high SLEDAI and ECLAM scores at the time of diagnosis. While there may be referral biases, our Vietnamese SLE patients appear...

  7. Health-related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: development and validation of a lupus specific symptom checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Schreurs, K. M. G.; de Glas-Vos, J. W.; Hagen, E. C.; van den Wall Bake, A. W. L.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; van den Hoogen, F. H. J.; Bijl, M.; van Houwelingen, J. C.; Snoek, F. J.; Berden, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable and sensitive measures are needed to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No lupus specific questionnaires are available. This study describes the development and validation of a disease-specific questionnaire for lupus patients, which

  8. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  9. CT findings at lupus mesenteric vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, S.F.; Lee, T.Y.; Cheng, T.T.; Ng, S.H.; Lai, H.M.; Cheng, Y.F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of early CT findings of lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) and to assess the utility of CT in the management of this uncommon entity. Methods: Abdominal CT was performed within 1-4 days (average 2.2 days) of the onset of severe abdominal pain and tenderness in 15 women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Prompt high-dose i.v. corticosteroid in 11 patients after the CT diagnosis of LMV was made. CT was performed after abdominal symptoms subsided. Results: Eleven cases revealed CT features suggestive of LMV including conspicuous prominence of mesentric vessels with palisade pattern or comb-like appearance (CT comb sign) supplying focal or diffuse dilated bowel loops (n=11), ascites with slightly increased peritoneal enhancement (n=11), small bowel wall thickening (n=10) with double halo or target sign (n=8). Follow-up CT before high-dose steroid therapy revealed complete or marked resolution of the abnormal CT findings. Conclusion: CT is helpful for confirming the diagnosis of LMV, especially the comb sign which may be an early sign. Bowel ischemia due to LMV is less ominous than previously expected, and the abnormal CT findings were reversible when early diagnosis and prompt i.v. steroid therapy could be achieved. (orig.)

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Definitions, Contexts, Conflicts, Enigmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2018-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inadequately defined syndrome. Etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. SLE is on the other hand a seminal syndrome that has challenged immunologists, biologists, genetics, and clinicians to solve its nature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple, etiologically unlinked manifestations. Unexpectedly, they seem to occur in different stochastically linked clusters, although single gene defects may promote a smaller spectrum of symptoms/criteria typical for SLE. There is no known inner coherence of parameters (criteria) making up the disease. These parameters are, nevertheless, implemented in The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria to classify SLE. Still, SLE is an abstraction since the ACR or SLICC criteria allow us to define hundreds of different clinical SLE phenotypes. This is a major point of the present discussion and uses “The anti-dsDNA antibody” as an example related to the problematic search for biomarkers for SLE. The following discussion will show how problematic this is: the disease is defined through non-coherent classification criteria, its complexity is recognized and accepted, its pathogenesis is plural and poorly understood. Therapy is focused on dominant symptoms or organ manifestations, and not on the syndrome itself. From basic scientific evidences, we can add substantial amount of data that are not sufficiently considered in clinical medicine, which may change the paradigms linked to what “The Anti-DNA antibody” is—and is not—in context of the imperfectly defined syndrome SLE. PMID:29545801

  11. CT findings at lupus mesenteric vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, S.F. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Lee, T.Y. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Cheng, T.T. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Rheumatology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Ng, S.H. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Lai, H.M. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Rheumatology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Cheng, Y.F. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Tsai, C.C. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of early CT findings of lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) and to assess the utility of CT in the management of this uncommon entity. Methods: Abdominal CT was performed within 1-4 days (average 2.2 days) of the onset of severe abdominal pain and tenderness in 15 women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Prompt high-dose i.v. corticosteroid in 11 patients after the CT diagnosis of LMV was made. CT was performed after abdominal symptoms subsided. Results: Eleven cases revealed CT features suggestive of LMV including conspicuous prominence of mesentric vessels with palisade pattern or comb-like appearance (CT comb sign) supplying focal or diffuse dilated bowel loops (n=11), ascites with slightly increased peritoneal enhancement (n=11), small bowel wall thickening (n=10) with double halo or target sign (n=8). Follow-up CT before high-dose steroid therapy revealed complete or marked resolution of the abnormal CT findings. Conclusion: CT is helpful for confirming the diagnosis of LMV, especially the comb sign which may be an early sign. Bowel ischemia due to LMV is less ominous than previously expected, and the abnormal CT findings were reversible when early diagnosis and prompt i.v. steroid therapy could be achieved. (orig.).

  12. On lupus, vitamin D and leukopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Juliana A; Heimovski, Flavia; Skare, Thelma L

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation is among the noncalcemic effects of vitamin D. So, this vitamin may play a role in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To study the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE and its association with clinical, serological and treatment profile as well as with disease activity. Serum OH vitamin D3 levels were measured in 153 SLE patients and 85 controls. Data on clinical, serological and treatment profile of lupus patients were obtained through chart review. Blood cell count and SLEDAI (SLE disease activity index) were measured simultaneously with vitamin D determination. SLE patients have lower levels of vitamin D than controls (p=0.03). In univariate analysis serum vitamin D was associated with leukopenia (p=0.02), use of cyclophosphamide (p=0.007) and methotrexate (p=0.03). A negative correlation was verified with prednisone dose (p=0.003). No association was found with disease activity measured by SLEDAI (p=0.88). In a multiple regression study only leukopenia remained as an independent association (B=4.04; p=0.02). A negative correlation of serum vitamin level with granulocyte (p=0.01) was also found, but not with lymphocyte count (p=0.33). SLE patients have more deficiency of vitamin D than controls. This deficiency is not associated with disease activity but with leucopenia (granulocytopenia). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. [Immunodiagnostic methods in lupus erythematosus disseminatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, H; Schwenke, H; Helbig, W

    1975-12-01

    In 27 patients with lupus erythematodes diseminatus the determinations of the LE-cells according to the macromethod (Zimmer and Hargraves) and the micromethod (Mudrik and co-workers) were compared with the demonstration of antinuclear factors according to the indirect immunofluorescence and immune enzyme technique. The sensitiveness of the two last-mentioned immunomorphological methods is somewhat larger. In these cases the size of the titre of the antinuclear factor almost always correlates positively with the number of the LE-cells. For the purpose of the initial diagnostics and the judgment of the course a morphological method cannot be renounced, since in the acute episode a high consumption of the antinuclear factor the immunological methods negatively correlate with the number of the LE-cells. The immune enzyme technique is to be recommended on account of the smaller expenditure, permanence of the preparations and high sensitiveness as alternative method of the immunofluorescence technique. In the micromethod the large variation is opposite to the advantage of the slight quantity of blood and to an always existing evaluability. Investigations of the lymphocytes of patients with lupus erythematodes disseminatus by means of the lymphocyte transformation test and the determination of the B-cells with the help of the direct immune peroxidase technique refer to the close pathogenetic connections of cellular and humoral immune reactions in this disease.

  14. Facial Expression at Retrieval Affects Recognition of Facial Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng eChen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that memory can be modulated by emotional stimuli at the time of encoding and consolidation. For example, happy faces create better identity recognition than faces with certain other expressions. However, the influence of facial expression at the time of retrieval remains unknown in the literature. To separate the potential influence of expression at retrieval from its effects at earlier stages, we had participants learn neutral faces but manipulated facial expression at the time of memory retrieval in a standard old/new recognition task. The results showed a clear effect of facial expression, where happy test faces were identified more successfully than angry test faces. This effect is unlikely due to greater image similarity between the neutral learning face and the happy test face, because image analysis showed that the happy test faces are in fact less similar to the neutral learning faces relative to the angry test faces. In the second experiment, we investigated whether this emotional effect is influenced by the expression at the time of learning. We employed angry or happy faces as learning stimuli, and angry, happy, and neutral faces as test stimuli. The results showed that the emotional effect at retrieval is robust across different encoding conditions with happy or angry expressions. These findings indicate that emotional expressions affect the retrieval process in identity recognition, and identity recognition does not rely on emotional association between learning and test faces.

  15. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus; Calcificacoes intracranianas macicas em um paciente com lupus eritematoso sistemico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica. Servico de Radiologia Medica]. E-mail: gasparetto@hotmail.com; Ono, Sergio E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-12-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2{sup *} gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  16. The serum levels of connective tissue growth factor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F-M; Yu, F; Tan, Y; Liu, G; Zhao, M-H

    2014-06-01

    The expression of connective tissue growth factor mRNA in human kidneys may serve as an early marker for lupus nephritis progression. Therefore, we speculated that connective tissue growth factor may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. In this study, we set out to investigate the associations between serum connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. Serum samples from patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus, renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis and healthy control subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum connective tissue growth factor levels. The associations between connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of the patients were further analysed. The levels of serum connective tissue growth factor in patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis were both significantly higher than those in the normal control group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 22.8 ± 3.0 ng/ml, plupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 44.1 ± 46.8 ng/ml, p = 0.183). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were significantly higher in lupus nephritis patients with the following clinical manifestations, including anaemia (51.3 ± 51.4 ng/ml vs. 23.4 ± 9.7 ng/ml, plupus nephritis (63.3 ± 63.4 ng/ml vs. 38.3 ± 37.9 ng/ml, p = 0.035, respectively). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were negatively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.46, plupus nephritis (plupus and correlated with chronic renal interstitial injury and doubling of serum creatinine in patients with lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Cardiovascular events prior to or early after diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in the systemic lupus international collaborating clinics cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Anderson, N M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of myocardial infarction (MI) prior to the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and within the first 2 years of follow-up. METHODS: The systemic lupus international collaborating clinics (SLICC) atherosclerosis inception cohort enters patients within......% CI 2.38 to 23.57) remained significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: In some patients with lupus, MI may develop even before the diagnosis of SLE or shortly thereafter, suggesting that there may be a link between autoimmune inflammation and atherosclerosis....

  18. [Surgical treatment in otogenic facial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Dong; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Zhai, Meng-Yao; Lü, Wei; Qi, Fang; Jiang, Hong; Zha, Yang; Shen, Peng

    2008-06-01

    To study the character of facial nerve palsy due to four different auris diseases including chronic otitis media, Hunt syndrome, tumor and physical or chemical factors, and to discuss the principles of the surgical management of otogenic facial nerve palsy. The clinical characters of 24 patients with otogenic facial nerve palsy because of the four different auris diseases were retrospectively analyzed, all the cases were performed surgical management from October 1991 to March 2007. Facial nerve function was evaluated with House-Brackmann (HB) grading system. The 24 patients including 10 males and 14 females were analysis, of whom 12 cases due to cholesteatoma, 3 cases due to chronic otitis media, 3 cases due to Hunt syndrome, 2 cases resulted from acute otitis media, 2 cases due to physical or chemical factors and 2 cases due to tumor. All cases were treated with operations included facial nerve decompression, lesion resection with facial nerve decompression and lesion resection without facial nerve decompression, 1 patient's facial nerve was resected because of the tumor. According to HB grade system, I degree recovery was attained in 4 cases, while II degree in 10 cases, III degree in 6 cases, IV degree in 2 cases, V degree in 2 cases and VI degree in 1 case. Removing the lesions completely was the basic factor to the surgery of otogenic facial palsy, moreover, it was important to have facial nerve decompression soon after lesion removal.

  19. Skin lesion resembling malignant atrophic papulosis in lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutre, M S; Beylot, C; Bioulac, P; Busquet, M; Conte, M

    1987-01-01

    This case demonstrates, as do the 3 others reported in literature, that a diagnosis of malignant atrophic papulosis can only be made once the possibility of a lupus erythematosus has been totally excluded.

  20. Perihepatitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenwaelder, M.; Stuckey, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    The imaging findings of a 29-year-old woman with known systemic lupus erythematosus, and a clinical presentation and CT appearances consistent with perihepatitis are presented Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  1. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patients...

  2. New aspects in the clinical spectrum of neonatal lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is a rare, passively acquired autoimmune disease, caused by maternal autoantibodies. Characteristic clinical features of NLE are transient rash and congenital heart block (CHB), but also hematological abnormalities and hepatobiliary dysfunction may occur...

  3. Type I Interferon in the Pathogenesis of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have applied insights from studies of the innate immune response to define type I interferon (IFN-I), with IFN-α the dominant mediator, as central to the pathogenesis of this prototype systemic autoimmune disease. Genetic association data identify regulators of nucleic acid degradation and components of TLR-independent, endosomal TLR-dependent, and IFN-I signaling pathways as contributors to lupus disease susceptibility. Together with a gene expression signature characterized by IFNI-induced gene transcripts in lupus blood and tissue, those data support the conclusion that many of the immunologic and pathologic features of this disease are a consequence of a persistent self-directed immune reaction driven by IFN-I and mimicking a sustained anti-virus response. This expanding knowledge of the role of IFN-I and the innate immune response suggests candidate therapeutic targets that are being tested in lupus patients. PMID:24907379

  4. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... ... pregnancy. Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, ... pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia/eclampsia and small for date deliveries. ... changes in a background of APL syndrome.

  5. Clinical features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of this study was to determine the most common features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus ... Conclusion: Most of the findings correlate with similar studies worldwide. .... Sciences, University of the Free State to conduct the study.

  6. The existential experience of everyday life with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Hall, Elisabeth; Jacobsen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    with systemic lupus erythematosus and of various ages, disease durations and severities were undertaken from September 2013 - October 2015. Data were analysed following van Manen's phenomenological approach and using drawing as an interpretive tool. Findings: The main existential experience was interpreted......Aim: To explore from the perspective of women the nature of basic existential conditions while living with systemic lupus erythematosus. Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus has an unpredictable disease course and is documented to cause an existential rearrangement of life. The significance...... of changes in existential conditions and related experiences are unclear in the context of nursing and women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Design: A qualitative design guided by Van Manen's hermeneutic-phenomenological methodology. Method: Individual in-depth interviews with 15 women diagnosed...

  7. Cell death in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2017-12-01

    Nephritis is one of the most severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). One key characteristic of lupus nephritis (LN) is the deposition of immune complexes containing nucleic acids and/or proteins binding to nucleic acids and autoantibodies recognizing these molecules. A variety of cell death processes are implicated in the generation and externalization of modified nuclear autoantigens and in the development of LN. Among these processes, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis, NETosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy have been proposed to play roles in tissue damage and immune dysregulation. Cell death occurs in healthy individuals during conditions of homeostasis yet autoimmunity does not develop, at least in part, because of rapid clearance of dying cells. In SLE, accelerated cell death combined with a clearance deficiency may lead to the accumulation and externalization of nuclear autoantigens and to autoantibody production. In addition, specific types of cell death may modify autoantigens and alter their immunogenicity. These modified molecules may then become novel targets of the immune system and promote autoimmune responses in predisposed hosts. In this review, we examine various cell death pathways and discuss how enhanced cell death, impaired clearance, and post-translational modifications of proteins could contribute to the development of lupus nephritis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Perineural extension of facial melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Bevilacqua, Paula

    2005-05-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a pigmented cutaneous lesion on the right side of his face along with right facial numbness. Histological examination revealed malignant melanoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed perineural extension along the entire course of the maxillary division of the right trigeminal nerve. This is a rare but important manifestation of the spread of head and neck malignancy. (orig.)

  9. Early Prediction of Lupus Nephritis Using Advanced Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Gupta IR . Evaluation of activity, chronicity and tubulointerstitial indices for childhood lupus nephritis. Pediatr Nephrol 2008;23:83–91. 34. Isenberg DA...University of Okla- homa Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City: Drs. Michael Hen- drickson and James N. Jarvis (data collection); Tracy Fuelling...Duffy CM, Bernard C, Gupta IR : Evaluation of activity, chronicity and tubulointerstitial indices for childhood lupus nephritis. Pediatr Nephrol 2008

  10. Minocycline induced lupus with yellow colored chylous exudative pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Starobin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety years old male was admitted to hospital due to breathlessness. The prominent findings were extensive blue-grey skin pigmentation and large left chylothorax. Drug induced lupus was diagnosed due to either minocycline chronic treatment or no alternative illness to explain his sub-acute disease. Minocycline therapy was stopped with gradual improvement of pleural effusion and skin discoloration. This case is the first presentation of minocycline induced lupus with chylothorax.

  11. Effect of ethnicity on clinical presentation and risk of antiphospholipid syndrome in Roma and Caucasian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano-Gamero, Victoria; Pardo-Cabello, Alfredo J; Vargas-Hitos, José A; Zamora-Pasadas, Mónica; Navarrete-Navarrete, Nuria; Sabio, José M; Jáimez-Gámiz, Laura; Ríos-Fernandez, Raquel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ayala-Gutierrez, M Mar; de Ramón, Enrique; Colodro-Ruíz, Agustín; Micó-Giner, Luisa; Castillo-Palma, María J; Robles-Marhuenda, Ángel; Luna-Del Castillo, Juan de Dios; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan

    2017-06-07

    To determine if there are ethnic differences in the prevalence of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), clinical presentation and autoantibody profile between Roma and Caucasian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A cross-sectional study was conducted including data from Roma and Caucasian SLE patients consecutively attending six hospitals in Spain. Socio-demographic characteristics, prevalence of APS, clinical and analytical features of SLE and APS were compared between ethnic groups. Data from 52 Roma and 98 Caucasian SLE patients were included. Roma SLE patients had a higher risk (odds ratio 2.56, 95% CI 1.02-6.39) and prevalence of APS (28.8% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.027). Furthermore, Roma SLE patients had a statistically significant higher prevalence of abortions (23.5% vs. 10.2%, P = 0.049). In relation to other APS diagnostic criteria, Roma SLE patients had a non-statistically significant higher prevalence of fetal deaths (14.3% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.106) and thrombotic events (21.1% vs. 12.2%, P = 0.160). In relation to SLE clinical features, Roma patients had a significantly higher prevalence of arthritis (75% vs. 57.1%, P = 0.034) and non-significant higher prevalence of serositis (44.2% vs. 29.6%, P = 0.104), discoid lesions (11.5% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.191), oral ulcers (46.1% vs. 34.7%, P = 0.218) and livedo reticularis (21.1% vs. 15.3%, P = 0.374). No statistically significant differences were found in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index or the autoimmune serological profile. Prevalence and risk of APS were significantly higher in Roma SLE patients. Furthermore, Roma patients had a significantly higher prevalence of abortions and a non-significant higher prevalence of fetal deaths and thrombotic events. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. The Pathology of T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the production of a wide array of autoantibodies. Thus, the condition was traditionally classified as a “B-cell disease”. Compelling evidence has however shown that without the assistance of the helper T lymphocytes, it is indeed difficult for the “helpless” B cells to become functional enough to trigger SLE-related inflammation. T cells have been recognized to be crucial in the pathogenicity of SLE through their capabilities to communicate with and offer enormous help to B cells for driving autoantibody production. Recently, a number of phenotypic and functional alterations which increase the propensity to trigger lupus-related inflammation have been identified in lupus T cells. Here, potential mechanisms involving alterations in T-cell receptor expressions, postreceptor downstream signalling, epigenetics, and oxidative stress which favour activation of lupus T cells will be discussed. Additionally, how regulatory CD4+, CD8+, and γδ T cells tune down lupus-related inflammation will be highlighted. Lastly, while currently available outcomes of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic agents which manipulate the T cells such as calcineurin inhibitors indicate that they are at least as efficacious and safe as conventional immunosuppressants in treating lupus glomerulonephritis, larger clinical trials are undoubtedly required to validate these as-yet favourable findings.

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Primary Care Approach to Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nguyet-Cam Vu; Ghetu, Maria V; Bieniek, Marzena L

    2016-08-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that affects many systems, including the skin, musculoskeletal, renal, neuropsychiatric, hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and reproductive systems. Family physicians should be familiar with the manifestations of lupus to aid in early diagnosis, monitoring patients with mild disease, recognizing warning signs that require referral to a rheumatologist, and helping to monitor disease activity and treatment in patients with moderate to severe disease. The American College of Rheumatology has 11 classification criteria for lupus. If a patient meets at least four criteria, lupus can be diagnosed with 95% specificity and 85% sensitivity. All patients with lupus should receive education, counseling, and support. Hydroxychloroquine is the cornerstone of treatment because it reduces disease flares and other constitutional symptoms. Low-dose glucocorticoids can be used to treat most manifestations of lupus. The use of immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents depends on the body systems affected. Patients with mild disease that does not involve major organ systems can be monitored by their family physician. Patients with increased disease activity, complications, or adverse effects from treatment should be referred to a rheumatologist. To optimize treatment, it is important that a rheumatologist coordinate closely with the patient's family physician to improve chronic care as well as preventive health services.

  14. Síndrome de dolor facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. F. Eugenio Tenhamm

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El dolor o algia facial constituye un síndrome doloroso de las estructuras cráneo faciales bajo el cual se agrupan un gran número de enfermedades. La mejor manera de abordar el diagnóstico diferencial de las entidades que causan el dolor facial es usando un algoritmo que identifica cuatro síndromes dolorosos principales que son: las neuralgias faciales, los dolores faciales con síntomas y signos neurológicos, las cefaleas autonómicas trigeminales y los dolores faciales sin síntomas ni signos neurológicos. Una evaluación clínica detallada de los pacientes, permite una aproximación etiológica lo que orienta el estudio diagnóstico y permite ofrecer una terapia específica a la mayoría de los casos

  15. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  16. Agency and facial emotion judgment in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenichi; Masuda, Takahiko; Li, Liman Man Wai

    2013-06-01

    Past research showed that East Asians' belief in holism was expressed as their tendencies to include background facial emotions into the evaluation of target faces more than North Americans. However, this pattern can be interpreted as North Americans' tendency to downplay background facial emotions due to their conceptualization of facial emotion as volitional expression of internal states. Examining this alternative explanation, we investigated whether different types of contextual information produce varying degrees of effect on one's face evaluation across cultures. In three studies, European Canadians and East Asians rated the intensity of target facial emotions surrounded with either affectively salient landscape sceneries or background facial emotions. The results showed that, although affectively salient landscapes influenced the judgment of both cultural groups, only European Canadians downplayed the background facial emotions. The role of agency as differently conceptualized across cultures and multilayered systems of cultural meanings are discussed.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, M.E.; Bydder, G.M.; Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders

  19. Facial neuroma masquerading as acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Eli T; Kaur, Gurvinder; Ivan, Michael E; Bloch, Orin; Cheung, Steven W; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-10-01

    Facial nerve neuromas are rare benign tumors that may be initially misdiagnosed as acoustic neuromas when situated near the auditory apparatus. We describe a patient with a large cystic tumor with associated trigeminal, facial, audiovestibular, and brainstem dysfunction, which was suspicious for acoustic neuroma on preoperative neuroimaging. Intraoperative investigation revealed a facial nerve neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle and internal acoustic canal. Gross total resection of the tumor via retrosigmoid craniotomy was curative. Transection of the facial nerve necessitated facial reanimation 4 months later via hypoglossal-facial cross-anastomosis. Clinicians should recognize the natural history, diagnostic approach, and management of this unusual and mimetic lesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlgen, U; Yayla, M E; Ateş, A; Okatan, İ E; Yurteri, E U; Torgutalp, M; Keleşoğlu, A B D; Turgay, T M; Kınıklı, G

    2018-04-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic and non-gestational manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant were identified and grouped as systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-APS), systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/lupus anticoagulant without antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-aPL), and systemic lupus erythematosus with negative aPLs (SLE-No aPL). Groups were compared in terms of non-thrombotic systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and laboratory features retrospectively. Results A total of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 26 with SLE-APS, 25 with SLE-aPL, and 99 with SLE-No aPL, were identified. Livedo reticularis, neurologic involvement, and thrombocytopenia were more common in antiphospholipid antibody positive systemic lupus erythematosus cases. Malar rash, arthritis, and pleuritis were more common in the SLE-No aPL, SLE-APS, and SLE-aPL groups, respectively. Positivity rates and titers of specific antiphospholipid antibodies did not differ between the SLE-APS and SLE-aPL groups. Conclusions Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome or persistent antiphospholipid antibodies may be related to non-thrombotic and non-gestational systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus plus antiphospholipid syndrome and persistent antiphospholipid antibodies without antiphospholipid syndrome also differ in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations.

  1. Lack of recording of systemic lupus erythematosus in the death certificates of lupus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Alén, J; Alarcón, G S; Campbell, R; Fernández, M; Reveille, J D; Cooper, G S

    2005-09-01

    To determine to what extent the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in deceased lupus patients is under-reported in death certificates, and the patient characteristics associated with such an occurrence. The death certificates of 76 of the 81 deceased SLE patients from two US lupus cohorts (LUMINA for Lupus in Minorities: Nature vs Nurture and CLU for Carolina Lupus Study), including 570 and 265 patients, respectively, were obtained from the Offices of Vital Statistics of the states where the patients died (Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas). Both cohorts included patients with SLE as per the American College of Rheumatology criteria, aged > or =16 yr, and disease duration at enrolment of < or =5 yr. The median duration of follow-up in each cohort at the time of these analyses ranged from 38.1 to 53.0 months. Standard univariable analyses were performed comparing patients with SLE recorded anywhere in the death certificate and those without it. A multivariable logistic regression model was performed to identify the variables independently associated with not recording SLE in death certificates. In 30 (40%) death certificates, SLE was not recorded anywhere in the death certificate. In univariable analyses, older age was associated with lack of recording of SLE in death certificates [mean age (standard deviation) 50.9 (15.6) years and 39.1 (18.6) yr among those for whom SLE was omitted and included on the death certificates, respectively, P = 0.005]. Patients without health insurance, those dying of a cardiovascular event and those of Caucasian ethnicity were also more likely to be in the non-recorded group. In the multivariable analysis, variables independently associated with not recording SLE as cause of death were older age [odds ratio = (95% confidence interval) 1.043 (1.005-1.083 per yr increase); P = 0.023] and lack of health insurance [4.649 (1.152-18.768); P = 0.031]. A high proportion of SLE diagnoses are not

  2. Influence of gravity upon some facial signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Bazin, R; Piot, B

    2015-06-01

    Facial clinical signs and their integration are the basis of perception than others could have from ourselves, noticeably the age they imagine we are. Facial modifications in motion and their objective measurements before and after application of skin regimen are essential to go further in evaluation capacities to describe efficacy in facial dynamics. Quantification of facial modifications vis à vis gravity will allow us to answer about 'control' of facial shape in daily activities. Standardized photographs of the faces of 30 Caucasian female subjects of various ages (24-73 year) were successively taken at upright and supine positions within a short time interval. All these pictures were therefore reframed - any bias due to facial features was avoided when evaluating one single sign - for clinical quotation by trained experts of several facial signs regarding published standardized photographic scales. For all subjects, the supine position increased facial width but not height, giving a more fuller appearance to the face. More importantly, the supine position changed the severity of facial ageing features (e.g. wrinkles) compared to an upright position and whether these features were attenuated or exacerbated depended on their facial location. Supine station mostly modifies signs of the lower half of the face whereas those of the upper half appear unchanged or slightly accentuated. These changes appear much more marked in the older groups, where some deep labial folds almost vanish. These alterations decreased the perceived ages of the subjects by an average of 3.8 years. Although preliminary, this study suggests that a 90° rotation of the facial skin vis à vis gravity induces rapid rearrangements among which changes in tensional forces within and across the face, motility of interstitial free water among underlying skin tissue and/or alterations of facial Langer lines, likely play a significant role. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Fran

  3. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  4. The caregiver burden in lupus: findings from UNVEIL, a national online lupus survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sawah, S; Daly, R P; Foster, S A; Naegeli, A N; Benjamin, K; Doll, H; Bond, G; Moshkovich, O; Alarcón, G S

    2017-01-01

    Lupus imposes a substantial burden on patients; however, little is known about its impact on those caring for patients with the disease. In this study, we examined the impact 'caring for patients with lupus' has on caregivers from their own perspective. UNVEIL was a one-time online national cross-sectional survey developed in partnership with the Lupus Foundation of America and fielded targeting the US Lupus Foundation of America constituents in 2014. Eligible caregivers were adults who self-identified as unpaid caregivers of patients with lupus. Eligible caregivers had to complete a series of sociodemographic questions as well as a series of well established outcome measures, such as the Short Form 12v2 Health Survey, the Work Productivity and Activity Index, the Caregiver Burden Inventory, and the Perceived Benefits of Caregiving Scale. A total of 253 caregivers completed the survey. The majority of caregivers (90.1%) were aged 60 years or younger, more than half (54.2%) were men, and more than half (59.7%) identified themselves as either a spouse or a partner to the patient with lupus they were caring for. Overall health-related quality of life was close to the norm mean of the general US population. Caregivers who were employed missed an average of 12.8% of paid work time due to caregiving responsibilities and reported a 33.5% reduction in on-the-job effectiveness. Nearly half of the caregivers surveyed (49.4%) indicated that their caregiving responsibilities impacted their ability to socialize with friends, and almost all caregivers (97.6%) reported experiencing increased anxiety and stress in relation to their caregiving role. Caregiving for patients with lupus has a substantial impact on the work productivity and the social and emotional functioning of caregivers. Healthcare professionals and policymakers should continually assess the impact of healthcare decisions on the well-being of those caring for patients with lupus. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojan, George; Petri, Michelle

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypical systemic autoimmune disease with a significant disease burden across the world among different ethnic, racial, and age groups. The pathophysiological understanding of SLE is constantly evolving and with it, the need for a better definition of the disease itself, for understanding the risk among the different affected populations, and for identifying the factors responsible for the damage accrual through the years. More accurate estimates of incidence and prevalence of SLE among different ethnicities and minority groups not only in the USA, but also in Europe, Middle East, and Asia have provided new insights into the disease burden around the world. Despite advances in treatment, mortality among SLE patients remains high with significant ethnic and geographic variations. Sex, race, and ethnicity significantly affect SLE incidence, prevalence, and mortality.

  6. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author).

  7. [NEUROPSYCHIATRIC MANIFESTATIONS OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjer, Rafael; Shriki Tal, Liron; Gizunterman, Alex; Amital, Daniela; Amital, Howard; Kotler, Moshe

    2017-12-01

    This review deals with the neuropsychiatric disorders resulting from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that impacts all systems in the human body, including the central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in SLE are a common complication of the disease. This complication has significant implications for the severity of the illness. In most cases no thorough psychiatric assessment is performed during initial evaluation of the disease and no protocol or clear guidelines for treating the psychiatric symptoms in SLE are available. Early diagnosis of the psychiatric symptoms in SLE is critical since absence of treatment may result in severe psychiatric complications. Clinical pharmacological studies are needed in order to develop guidelines for treating psychiatric symptoms in SLE.

  8. Biological Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototypic inflammatory autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem involvement and fluctuating disease activity. Symptoms range from rather mild manifestations such as rash or arthritis to life-threatening end-organ manifestations. Despite new and improved therapy having positively impacted the prognosis of SLE, a subgroup of patients do not respond to conventional therapy. Moreover, the risk of fatal outcomes and the damaging side effects of immunosuppressive therapies in SLE call for an improvement in the current therapeutic management. New therapeutic approaches are focused on B-cell targets, T-cell downregulation and costimulatory blockade, cytokine inhibition, and the modulation of complement. Several biological agents have been developed, but this encouraging news is associated with several disappointments in trials and provide a timely moment to reflect on biologic therapy in SLE.

  9. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko

    1989-01-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author)

  10. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  11. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting facial characteristics from complex polygenic variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Wolffhechel, Karin Marie Brandt; Pers, Tune

    2015-01-01

    Research into the importance of the human genome in the context of facial appearance is receiving increasing attention and has led to the detection of several Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of importance. In this work we attempt a holistic approach predicting facial characteristics from...... genetic principal components across a population of 1,266 individuals. For this we perform a genome-wide association analysis to select a large number of SNPs linked to specific facial traits, recode these to genetic principal components and then use these principal components as predictors for facial...

  13. Desarrollo de un sistema de reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Vivas Imparato, Abdón Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo principal alrededor del cual se desenvuelve este proyecto es el desarrollo de un sistema de reconocimiento facial. Entre sus objetivos específicos se encuentran: realizar una primera aproximación sobre las técnicas de reconocimiento facial existentes en la actualidad, elegir una aplicación donde pueda ser útil el reconocimiento facial, diseñar y desarrollar un programa en MATLAB que lleve a cabo la función de reconocimiento facial, y evaluar el funcionamiento del sistema desarroll...

  14. Social Use of Facial Expressions in Hylobatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Linda; Waller, Bridget M.; Oña, Leonardo; Burrows, Anne M.; Liebal, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates use various communicative means in interactions with others. While primate gestures are commonly considered to be intentionally and flexibly used signals, facial expressions are often referred to as inflexible, automatic expressions of affective internal states. To explore whether and how non-human primates use facial expressions in specific communicative interactions, we studied five species of small apes (gibbons) by employing a newly established Facial Action Coding System for hylobatid species (GibbonFACS). We found that, despite individuals often being in close proximity to each other, in social (as opposed to non-social contexts) the duration of facial expressions was significantly longer when gibbons were facing another individual compared to non-facing situations. Social contexts included grooming, agonistic interactions and play, whereas non-social contexts included resting and self-grooming. Additionally, gibbons used facial expressions while facing another individual more often in social contexts than non-social contexts where facial expressions were produced regardless of the attentional state of the partner. Also, facial expressions were more likely ‘responded to’ by the partner’s facial expressions when facing another individual than non-facing. Taken together, our results indicate that gibbons use their facial expressions differentially depending on the social context and are able to use them in a directed way in communicative interactions with other conspecifics. PMID:26978660

  15. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing, E-mail: ydqahmu@gmail.com

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. Oral candidiasis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangtham, M; Magder, L S; Petri, M A

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the frequency of oral candidiasis and the association between demographic variables, disease-related variables, corticosteroid treatment, other treatments and the occurrence of oral candidiasis in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort. In this large prospective cohort study of 2258 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), demographic and clinical associates of oral candidiasis were estimated by univariate, multivariate and within-person regression models. There were 53,548 cohort visits. Oral candidiasis was diagnosed at 675 visits (1.25%) in 325 (14%) of the patients. In the multivariate analyses, oral candidiasis was associated with African-American ethnicity, SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity, high white blood cell count, a history of bacterial infection, prednisone use and immunosuppressive use. The urine protein by urine dip stick was higher in SLE patients with oral candidiasis. Considering only patients who had candidiasis at some visits in a 'within-person' analysis, candidiasis was more frequent in visits with higher SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity, high white blood cell count, proteinuria by urine dip stick, a history of bacterial infection and prednisone use. The use of hydroxychloroquine was associated with a lower risk of oral candidiasis, but was not statistically significant (p = 0.50) in the within-person analysis models. This study identified multiple risk factors for oral candidiasis in SLE. Inspection of the oral cavity for signs of oral candidiasis is recommended especially in SLE patients with active disease, proteinuria, high white blood cell count, taking prednisone, immunosuppressive drugs or antibiotics. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. [CD4 lymphocytopenia in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sofia; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Marinho, António; Farinha, Fátima; Almeida, Isabel; Correia, João; Barbosa, Paulo; Mendonça, Teresa; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory chronic disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies, immunocomplex production and organ injury. Several alterations of the immune system have been described, namely of CD4 T cells, with particular focus on regulatory subgroup. Quantify peripheral CD4 T cells in a population of patients with SLE and correlate it with lupus activity, affected organs, therapeutics and infections. Retrospective study involving all SLE patients seen in the clinical immunology outpatient clinic of the Hospital Geral Santo António, Porto that has done some peripheral blood flow cytometry study. Twenty-nine patients have been evaluated, 16 were taking glucocorticoids and six immunossupressors. The mean SLEDAI at the study time was nine and the ECLAM was three. Thirty-one percent of the patients had leukopenia, 76% lymphocytopenia and the same number CD4 depletion. Fifty-five percent of the patients had CD4 levels lower than 500/mm3, 31% lower than 200/mm3. All patients with SLEDAI > or = 20 and ECLAM > or = 4 had CD4 counts inferior to 500/mm3 and all patients with inactive disease had CD4 superior to 500/mm3. There have been three opportunistic infections: cryptococcal meningitis, pulmonary aspergilosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, all in patients with CD4 counts lower than 500/mm3. Decreased CD4 T cells counts have been very common in this study population. There is an inverse relation between CD4 cells counts and disease activity. Opportunistic infections occurred in patients with severe CD4 depletion.

  19. Facial EMG responses to dynamic emotional facial expressions in boys with disruptive behavior disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wied, de M.; Boxtel, van Anton; Zaalberg, R.; Goudena, P.P.; Matthys, W.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the assumption that facial mimicry is a key factor in emotional empathy, and clinical observations that children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) are weak empathizers, the present study explored whether DBD boys are less facially responsive to facial expressions of emotions than

  20. Lupus eritematoso sistêmico associado a miastenia gravis: relato de caso Systemic lupus erythematosus and myasthenia gravis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIO F. DE CARVALHO

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma mulher branca de 24 anos de idade admitida com lupus eritematoso sistêmico (com 4 anos de evolução de doença e início recente de miastenia gravis. São discutidos os principais diagnósticos diferenciais para a fraqueza muscular e a fadiga apresentadas por esta paciente. Uma revisão de literatura abordando a associação de miastenia gravis e lupus eritematoso é feita, com ênfase às características clínicas desses pacientes e ao papel do timoma e timectomia no desenvolvimento de lupus eritematoso em pacientes previamente miastênicos.We report the case of a 24-year-old white woman admitted with a four year diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and the recent onset of myasthenia gravis discussing the main differential diagnosis of weakness and fatigue in this patient. A review of literature approaching the association of myasthenia gravis and systemic lupus erythematosus is also done with emphasis on the clinical characteristics of these patients and the role of thymoma and thymectomy in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus in myasthenic patients.

  1. Enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Kato, Tsutomu; Ushiro, Koichi; Kitajiri, Masanori; Yamashita, Toshio; Kumazawa, Tadami; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1991-01-01

    We performed Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations at several stages in 40 patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome). In 38 of the 40 patients, one and more enhanced region could be seen in certain portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone on the affected side, whereas no enhanced regions were seen on the intact side. Correlations between the timing of the MRI examination and the location of the enhanced regions were analysed. In all 6 patients examined by MRI within 5 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, enhanced regions were present in the meatal portion. In 3 of the 8 patients (38%) examined by MRI 6 to 10 days after the onset of facial palsy, enhanced areas were seen in both the meatal and labyrinthine portions. In 8 of the 9 patients (89%) tested 11 to 20 days after the onset of palsy, the vertical portion was enhanced. In the 12 patients examined by MRI 21 to 40 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, the meatal portion was not enhanced while the labyrinthine portion, the horizontal portion and the vertical portion were enhanced in 5 (42%), 8 (67%) and 11 (92%), respectively. Enhancement in the vertical portion was observed in all 5 patients examined more than 41 days after the onset of facial palsy. These results suggest that the central portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone tends to be enhanced in the early stage of facial nerve palsy, while the peripheral portion is enhanced in the late stage. These changes of Gd-DTPA enhanced regions in the facial nerve may suggest dromic degeneration of the facial nerve in peripheral facial nerve palsy. (author)

  2. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  3. Branches of the Facial Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Geun In; Park, Hye Jin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review the name of the branches, to review the classification of the branching pattern, and to clarify a presence percentage of each branch of the facial artery, systematically. In a PubMed search, the search terms "facial," AND "artery," AND "classification OR variant OR pattern" were used. The IBM SPSS Statistics 20 system was used for statistical analysis. Among the 500 titles, 18 articles were selected and reviewed systematically. Most of the articles focused on "classification" according to the "terminal branch." Several authors classified the facial artery according to their terminal branches. Most of them, however, did not describe the definition of "terminal branch." There were confusions within the classifications. When the inferior labial artery was absent, 3 different types were used. The "alar branch" or "nasal branch" was used instead of the "lateral nasal branch." The angular branch was used to refer to several different branches. The presence as a percentage of each branch according to the branches in Gray's Anatomy (premasseteric, inferior labial, superior labial, lateral nasal, and angular) varied. No branch was used with 100% consistency. The superior labial branch was most frequently cited (95.7%, 382 arteries in 399 hemifaces). The angular branch (53.9%, 219 arteries in 406 hemifaces) and the premasseteric branch were least frequently cited (53.8%, 43 arteries in 80 hemifaces). There were significant differences among each of the 5 branches (P < 0.05) except between the angular branch and the premasseteric branch and between the superior labial branch and the inferior labial branch. The authors believe identifying the presence percentage of each branch will be helpful for surgical procedures.

  4. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the mastoid facial nerve canal mimicking a facial nerve schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew L; Bharatha, Aditya; Aviv, Richard I; Nedzelski, Julian; Chen, Joseph; Bilbao, Juan M; Wong, John; Saad, Reda; Symons, Sean P

    2009-07-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma of the skull base is a rare entity. Involvement of the temporal bone is particularly rare. We present an unusual case of progressive facial nerve paralysis with imaging and clinical findings most suggestive of a facial nerve schwannoma. The lesion was tubular in appearance, expanded the mastoid facial nerve canal, protruded out of the stylomastoid foramen, and enhanced homogeneously. The only unusual imaging feature was minor calcification within the tumor. Surgery revealed an irregular, cystic lesion. Pathology diagnosed a chondromyxoid fibroma involving the mastoid portion of the facial nerve canal, destroying the facial nerve.

  5. Evaluating fatigue in lupus-prone mice: preliminary assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Allison; Larson, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating condition suffered by many as the result of chronic disease, yet relatively little is known about its biological basis or how to effectively manage its effects. This study sought to evaluate chronic fatigue by using lupus-prone mice and testing them at three different time periods. Lupus-prone mice were chosen because fatigue affects over half of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Eleven MLR⁺/(+) (genetic controls) and twelve MLR/MpJ-Fas/J (MRL/lpr; lupus-prone) mice were tested three times: once at 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age. All mice were subjected to a variety of behavioral tests including: forced swim, post-swim grooming, running wheel, and sucrose consumption; five of the MLR⁺/(+) and five of the MLR/lpr mice were also tested on a fixed ratio-25 operant conditioning task. MRL/lpr mice showed more peripheral symptoms of lupus than controls, particularly lymphadenopathy and proteinuria. Lupus mice spent more time floating during the forced swim test and traveled less distance in the running wheel at each testing period. There were no differences between groups in post-swim grooming or in number of reinforcers earned in the operant conditioning task indicating the behavioral changes were not likely due simply to muscle weakness or motivation. Correlations between performance in the running wheel, forced swim test and sucrose consumption were conducted and distance traveled in the running wheel was consistently negatively correlated with time spent floating. Based on these data, we conclude that the lupus-prone mice were experiencing chronic fatigue and that running wheel activity and floating during a forced swim test can be used to evaluate fatigue, although these data cannot rule out the possibility that both fatigue and a depressive-like state were mediating these effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of audiovestibular dysfunction in children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Ghada Ibrahim; Mohamed, Somaia Tawfik; Awwad, Khaled Salah; Mohamed, Rehab Fetoh

    2013-09-01

    Inner ear dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosis patients has been reported but audiovestibular involvement is not well documented especially in pediatrics. This study was designed to evaluate silent audiovestibular dysfunction among SLE children. Case control study examined in allergy and immunology clinic; pediatrics hospital and audiovestibular clinic; Ain Shams University from January 2009 to December 2010. Thirty-five systemic lupus erythematosus children (diagnosed according to American College of Rheumatology); age group 8-16 years, were randomly selected. Five of them were excluded due to one or more exclusion criteria (previous otitis media, stroke, lupus cerebritis, meningitis or encephalitis, audiovestibular symptom). Ten of them refused enrollment or could not complete full battery. Seventeen females and three males, mean age 12.9 ± 2.6 years, completed the study. Control group included 20 normal subjects, age and sex matched. Full clinical assessment, basic audiological evaluation and vestibular testing (videonystagmography VNG and computerized dynamic posturography CDP) were conducted for children included in the study. Five systemic lupus erythematosus patients had sensorineural hearing loss strongly associated with +ve antiphospholipid antibody and two had conductive hearing loss. Two children in control group had conductive hearing loss (p=0.05). Abnormal VNG findings was significantly higher among systemic lupus erythematosus children (40%) compared to controls (0%) and associated with +ve antiphospholipid antibodies (χ(2)=10, p=0.002, Fisher exact test=0.003). Twenty-five percentage of systemic lupus erythematosus children had abnormal CDP findings reflecting impaired balance function associated with positive antiphospholipid antibodies showing significant statistical difference compared to controls (0% affection) (χ(2)=5.7, p=0.017, Fisher exact test=0.047). Silent audiovestibular dysfunction is prevalent among systemic lupus

  7. Facial image identification using Photomodeler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Andersen, Marie; Lauritsen, Helle Petri

    2003-01-01

    consist of many images of the same person taken from different angles. We wanted to see if it was possible to combine such a suite of images in useful 3-D renderings of facial proportions.Fifteen male adults were photographed from four different angles. Based on these photographs, a 3-D wireframe model......We present the results of a preliminary study on the use of 3-D software (Photomodeler) for identification purposes. Perpetrators may be photographed or filmed by surveillance systems. The police may wish to have these images compared to photographs of suspects. The surveillance imagery will often...

  8. [Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus - diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka, Magdalena

    Nervous system involvement in lupus belongs to its severe complications and significantly impacts its prognosis. Neuropsychiatric lupus includes 19 disease manifestations concerning both central and peripheral nervous system. This paper presents clinical aspects of central nervous system involvement in lupus. It reviews its epidemiology, risk factors and principles of diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Successful treatment of massive ascites due to lupus peritonitis with hydroxychloroquine in old- onset lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Sonia; Bdioui, Fethia; Ouaz, Afef; Loghmari, Hichem; Mahjoub, Sylvia; Saffar, Hamouda

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is an auto-immune disease with multiple organ involvements that occurs mainly in young women. Literature data suggest that serositis is more frequent in late-onset SLE. However, peritoneal serositis with massive ascites is an extremely rare manifestation. We report a case of old-onset lupus peritonitis treated successfully by Hydroxychloroquine. A 77-year-old Tunisian woman was hospitalized because of massive painful ascites. Her family history did not include any autoimmune disease. She was explored 4 years prior to admission for exudative pleuritis of the right lung without any established diagnosis. Physical examination showed only massive ascites. Laboratory investigations showed leucopenia: 3100/mm3, lymphopenia: 840/mm3 and trace protein (0.03 g/24 h). Ascitic fluid contained 170 cells mm(3) (67% lymphocytes), 46 g/L protein, but no malignant cells. The main etiologies of exudative ascites were excluded. She had markedly elevated anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) titer of 1/1600 and a significantly elevated titer of antibody to double-stranded DNA (83 IU/mL) with hypo-complementemia (C3 levl was at 67 mg/dL). Antibody against the Smith antigen was also positive. Relying on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with SLE and treated with Hydroxychloroquine 200 mg daily in combination with diuretics. One month later, there was no detectable ascitic fluid and no pleural effusions. Five months later she remained free from symptoms while continuing to take chloroquine. This case was characterized by old age of onset of SLE, the extremely rare initial presentation with lupus peritonitis and massive painful ascites with dramatic response to only hydroxychloroquine treatment.

  10. Facial Affect Displays during Tutoring Sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghijsen, M.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2005-01-01

    An emotionally intelligent tutoring system should be able to provide feedback to students, taking into account relevant aspects of the mental state of the student. Facial expressions, put in context, might provide some cues with respect to this state. We discuss the analysis of the facial expression

  11. Case Report: Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention. Key words: Magnet ...

  12. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  13. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... the facial nerve has tremendous regenerative ability. The paretic, or flaccid, ... fresh axoplasm moving into it from the cell-body. Only when the axon .... tivity of the ear to sound, homolateral to the facial paralysis. The cause is ...

  14. Genomics of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Insights Gained by Studying Monogenic Young-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Linda T; Silverman, Earl D

    2017-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic, autoimmune, multisystem disease with a heterogeneous clinical phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple susceptibility loci, but these explain a fraction of the estimated heritability. This is partly because within the broad spectrum of SLE are monogenic diseases that tend to cluster in patients with young age of onset, and in families. This article highlights insights into the pathogenesis of SLE provided by these monogenic diseases. It examines genetic causes of complement deficiency, abnormal interferon production, and abnormalities of tolerance, resulting in monogenic SLE with overlapping clinical features, autoantibodies, and shared inflammatory pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lupus erythematosus cell preparation, antinuclear factor and antideoxyribonucleic acid antibody incongruity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Y C

    1983-01-01

    'Total antinuclear antibody' (ANF) is detected by the fluorescent antinuclear antibody technique which is a screening test, positive in 99% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) sera. The LE factor (positive in 75% of SLE sera), like the anti-DNA antibody, is an antinuclear antibody but directed against DNA-histone. ANF-negative SLE is a clinical entity with absence of these antibodies. A false negative ANF, in the presence of high titre anti-DNA antibody and/or LE cells, is illustrated in two cases of SLE. Postulated mechanisms for this phenomenon are interference in ANF detection by rheumatoid factor, and the prozone effect on the immunofluorescent tests.

  16. The Prevalence of Cosmetic Facial Plastic Procedures among Facial Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayer, Roxana; Sand, Jordan P; Han, Albert; Nabili, Vishad; Keller, Gregory S

    2018-04-01

    This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cosmetic facial plastic surgery use among facial plastic surgeons. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency with which facial plastic surgeons have cosmetic procedures themselves. A secondary aim is to determine whether trends in usage of cosmetic facial procedures among facial plastic surgeons are similar to that of nonsurgeons. The study design was an anonymous, five-question, Internet survey distributed via email set in a single academic institution. Board-certified members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) were included in this study. Self-reported history of cosmetic facial plastic surgery or minimally invasive procedures were recorded. The survey also queried participants for demographic data. A total of 216 members of the AAFPRS responded to the questionnaire. Ninety percent of respondents were male ( n  = 192) and 10.3% were female ( n  = 22). Thirty-three percent of respondents were aged 31 to 40 years ( n  = 70), 25% were aged 41 to 50 years ( n  = 53), 21.4% were aged 51 to 60 years ( n  = 46), and 20.5% were older than 60 years ( n  = 44). Thirty-six percent of respondents had a surgical cosmetic facial procedure and 75% has at least one minimally invasive cosmetic facial procedure. Facial plastic surgeons are frequent users of cosmetic facial plastic surgery. This finding may be due to access, knowledge base, values, or attitudes. By better understanding surgeon attitudes toward facial plastic surgery, we can improve communication with patients and delivery of care. This study is a first step in understanding use of facial plastic procedures among facial plastic surgeons. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Development of the Korean Facial Emotion Stimuli: Korea University Facial Expression Collection 2nd Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Min Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Developing valid emotional facial stimuli for specific ethnicities creates ample opportunities to investigate both the nature of emotional facial information processing in general and clinical populations as well as the underlying mechanisms of facial emotion processing within and across cultures. Given that most entries in emotional facial stimuli databases were developed with western samples, and given that very few of the eastern emotional facial stimuli sets were based strictly on the Ekman’s Facial Action Coding System, developing valid emotional facial stimuli of eastern samples remains a high priority.Aims: To develop and examine the psychometric properties of six basic emotional facial stimuli recruiting professional Korean actors and actresses based on the Ekman’s Facial Action Coding System for the Korea University Facial Expression Collection-Second Edition (KUFEC-II.Materials And Methods: Stimulus selection was done in two phases. First, researchers evaluated the clarity and intensity of each stimulus developed based on the Facial Action Coding System. Second, researchers selected a total of 399 stimuli from a total of 57 actors and actresses, which were then rated on accuracy, intensity, valence, and arousal by 75 independent raters.Conclusion: The hit rates between the targeted and rated expressions of the KUFEC-II were all above 80%, except for fear (50% and disgust (63%. The KUFEC-II appears to be a valid emotional facial stimuli database, providing the largest set of emotional facial stimuli. The mean intensity score was 5.63 (out of 7, suggesting that the stimuli delivered the targeted emotions with great intensity. All positive expressions were rated as having a high positive valence, whereas all negative expressions were rated as having a high negative valence. The KUFEC II is expected to be widely used in various psychological studies on emotional facial expression. KUFEC-II stimuli can be obtained through

  18. MR imaging of the intraparotid facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    Using a 1.5T MR imaging system, seven normal volunteers and 6 patients with parotid tumors were studied and their intraparotid facial nerves were directly imaged. The findings were evaluated by T1-weighted axial, sagittal and oblique images. The facial nerve appeared to be relatively hypointensive within the highsignal parotid parenchyma, and the main trunks of the facial nerves were observed directly in all the cases examined. Their main divisions were detected in all the volunteers and 5 of 6 patients were imaged obliquely. The facial nerves run in various fashions and so the oblique scan planes were determined individually to detect this running figure directly. To verify our observations, surgical findings of the facial nerve were compared with the MR images or results. (author)

  19. Variant facial artery in the submandibular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadgaonkar, Rajanigandha; Rai, Rajalakshmi; Prabhu, Latha V; Bv, Murlimanju; Samapriya, Neha

    2012-07-01

    Facial artery has been considered to be the most important vascular pedicle in facial rejuvenation procedures and submandibular gland (SMG) resection. It usually arises from the external carotid artery and passes from the carotid to digastric triangle, deep to the posterior belly of digastric muscle, and lodges in a groove at the posterior end of the SMG. It then passes between SMG and the mandible to reach the face after winding around the base of the mandible. During a routine dissection, in a 62-year-old female cadaver, in Kasturba Medical College Mangalore, an unusual pattern in the cervical course of facial artery was revealed. The right facial artery was found to pierce the whole substance of the SMG before winding around the lower border of the mandible to enter the facial region. Awareness of existence of such a variant and its comparison to the normal anatomy will be useful to oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

  20. Facial Animations: Future Research Directions & Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Rehman, Amjad; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, computer facial animation is used in a significant multitude fields that brought human and social to study the computer games, films and interactive multimedia reality growth. Authoring the computer facial animation, complex and subtle expressions are challenging and fraught with problems. As a result, the current most authored using universal computer animation techniques often limit the production quality and quantity of facial animation. With the supplement of computer power, facial appreciative, software sophistication and new face-centric methods emerging are immature in nature. Therefore, this paper concentrates to define and managerially categorize current and emerged surveyed facial animation experts to define the recent state of the field, observed bottlenecks and developing techniques. This paper further presents a real-time simulation model of human worry and howling with detail discussion about their astonish, sorrow, annoyance and panic perception.

  1. Preoperative embolization of facial angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causmano, F.; Bruschi, G.; De Donatis, M.; Piazza, P.; Bassi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Preoperative embolization was performed on 27 patients with facial angiomas supplied by the external carotid branches. Sixteen were males and 11 females; 13 of these angiomas were high-flow arterio-venous (A-V), 14 were low-flow capillary malformations. Fourteen patients underwent surgical removal after preoperative embolization; in this group embolization was carried out with Spongel in 3 cases and with Lyodura in 11 cases. In 12 of these patients the last angiographic examination was performed 3-6 years later: angiography evidenced no recurrence in 8 cases (67%), while in 3 cases (25%) there was capillary residual angioma of negligible size. Treatment was unsuccessful in one patient only, due to the large recurrent A-V angioma. Thirteen patients underwent embolization only, which was carried out with Lyodura in 10 cases, and with Ivalon in 3 cases. On 12 of these patients the last angiographic study was performed 2-14 months later: there was recurrent A-V angioma in 5 patients (42%), who underwent a subsequent embolization; angiography evidenced no recurrence in the other 7 patients (58%). In both series, the best results were obtained in the patients with low-flow capillary angiomas. Embolization and subsequent surgical removal are the treatment of choice for facial angiomas; embolization alone is useful in the management of surgically inacessible vascular malformations, and it can be the only treatment in patients with small low-flow angiomas when distal occlusion of the feeding vessel with Lyodura or Ivalon particles is performed

  2. Embarazo y lupus eritematoso sistémico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Campillo Motilva

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available El lupus eritematoso sistémico es una enfermedad autoinmune y sistémica, que se presenta con frecuencia en mujeres jóvenes y por tanto en su etapa reproductiva; se asocia a un alto riesgo de morbilidad y mortalidad perinatal. Las complicaciones más frecuentes son los abortos, la muerte fetal, la prematurez, el retardo del crecimiento intrauterino y el lupus neonatal. Los anticuerpos potencialmente perjudiciales sobre la gestación son los antifosfolípidos (anticoagulante lúpico y anticardiolipinas y anti-Ro y anti-La. Con un correcto asesoramiento preconcepcional y un adecuado seguimiento durante el embarazo y el puerperio, se puede encarar con una gran probabilidad de éxito la maternidad en estas pacientes.Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune and systemic disease that appears frequently in young women and, therefore, during the reproductive stage. It is associated with a high risk of morbidity and perinatal mortality. The most common complications are abortions, fetal death, prematurity, retarded intrauterine growth and neonatal lupus.The potentially harmful antibodies for gestation are the antiphospholipids (lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipins and anti-Ro and anti-La. With a correct preconceptional counselling and an adequate follow-up during pregnancy and puerperium, maternity may be faced with great probabilities of success in these patients.

  3. Understanding lupus nephritis: diagnosis, management, and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok CC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chi Chiu MokDepartment of Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital and Center for Assessment and Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases, Pok Oi Hospital, Hong Kong, ChinaAbstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE predominantly affects women in their reproductive years. Renal disease (glomerulonephritis is one of the most frequent and serious manifestations of SLE. Of the various histological types of lupus glomerulonephritis, diffuse proliferative nephritis carries the worst prognosis. Combined with high-dose prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has emerged as a first-line immunosuppressive treatment, although data regarding the efficacy of MMF on the long-term preservation of renal function are forthcoming. Cyclophosphamide is reserved for more severe forms of lupus nephritis, such as crescentic glomerulonephritis with rapidly deteriorating renal function, patients with significant renal function impairment at presentation, and refractory renal disease. Evidence for the calcineurin inhibitors in the treatment of lupus nephritis is weaker, and it concerns patients who are intolerant or recalcitrant to other agents. While further controlled trials are mandatory, B cell modulation therapies, such as rituximab, belimumab and epratuzumab are confined to refractory disease. Non-immunosuppressive measures, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, vigorous blood pressure control, prevention and treatment of hyperlipidemia and osteoporosis, are equally important.Keywords: lupus, nephritis, nephropathy, glomerulonephritis, treatment, therapy, women

  4. Perceived functional impact of abnormal facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Marlene; Borah, Gregory L

    2003-06-01

    Functional facial deformities are usually described as those that impair respiration, eating, hearing, or speech. Yet facial scars and cutaneous deformities have a significant negative effect on social functionality that has been poorly documented in the scientific literature. Insurance companies are declining payments for reconstructive surgical procedures for facial deformities caused by congenital disabilities and after cancer or trauma operations that do not affect mechanical facial activity. The purpose of this study was to establish a large, sample-based evaluation of the perceived social functioning, interpersonal characteristics, and employability indices for a range of facial appearances (normal and abnormal). Adult volunteer evaluators (n = 210) provided their subjective perceptions based on facial physical appearance, and an analysis of the consequences of facial deformity on parameters of preferential treatment was performed. A two-group comparative research design rated the differences among 10 examples of digitally altered facial photographs of actual patients among various age and ethnic groups with "normal" and "abnormal" congenital deformities or posttrauma scars. Photographs of adult patients with observable congenital and posttraumatic deformities (abnormal) were digitally retouched to eliminate the stigmatic defects (normal). The normal and abnormal photographs of identical patients were evaluated by the large sample study group on nine parameters of social functioning, such as honesty, employability, attractiveness, and effectiveness, using a visual analogue rating scale. Patients with abnormal facial characteristics were rated as significantly less honest (p = 0.007), less employable (p = 0.001), less trustworthy (p = 0.01), less optimistic (p = 0.001), less effective (p = 0.02), less capable (p = 0.002), less intelligent (p = 0.03), less popular (p = 0.001), and less attractive (p = 0.001) than were the same patients with normal facial

  5. Facial orientation and facial shape in extant great apes: a geometric morphometric analysis of covariation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaux, Dimitri; Guy, Franck; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vignaud, Patrick; Ducrocq, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the bony face is complex, its morphology being influenced in part by the rest of the cranium. Characterizing the facial morphological variation and craniofacial covariation patterns in extant hominids is fundamental to the understanding of their evolutionary history. Numerous studies on hominid facial shape have proposed hypotheses concerning the relationship between the anterior facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. In this study we test these hypotheses in a sample of adult specimens belonging to three extant hominid genera (Homo, Pan and Gorilla). Intraspecific variation and covariation patterns are analyzed using geometric morphometric methods and multivariate statistics, such as partial least squared on three-dimensional landmarks coordinates. Our results indicate significant intraspecific covariation between facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. Hominids share similar characteristics in the relationship between anterior facial shape and facial block orientation. Modern humans exhibit a specific pattern in the covariation between anterior facial shape and basicranial flexion. This peculiar feature underscores the role of modern humans' highly-flexed basicranium in the overall integration of the cranium. Furthermore, our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a relationship between the reduction of the value of the cranial base angle and a downward rotation of the facial block in modern humans, and to a lesser extent in chimpanzees.

  6. [Peripheral facial nerve lesion induced long-term dendritic retraction in pyramidal cortico-facial neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Múnera, Alejandro; Troncoso, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Little evidence is available concerning the morphological modifications of motor cortex neurons associated with peripheral nerve injuries, and the consequences of those injuries on post lesion functional recovery. Dendritic branching of cortico-facial neurons was characterized with respect to the effects of irreversible facial nerve injury. Twenty-four adult male rats were distributed into four groups: sham (no lesion surgery), and dendritic assessment at 1, 3 and 5 weeks post surgery. Eighteen lesion animals underwent surgical transection of the mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve. Dendritic branching was examined by contralateral primary motor cortex slices stained with the Golgi-Cox technique. Layer V pyramidal (cortico-facial) neurons from sham and injured animals were reconstructed and their dendritic branching was compared using Sholl analysis. Animals with facial nerve lesions displayed persistent vibrissal paralysis throughout the five week observation period. Compared with control animal neurons, cortico-facial pyramidal neurons of surgically injured animals displayed shrinkage of their dendritic branches at statistically significant levels. This shrinkage persisted for at least five weeks after facial nerve injury. Irreversible facial motoneuron axonal damage induced persistent dendritic arborization shrinkage in contralateral cortico-facial neurons. This morphological reorganization may be the physiological basis of functional sequelae observed in peripheral facial palsy patients.

  7. Retracted Association of STAT4 gene polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus / lupus nephritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei; Qin, Yuan-Han; Zhou, Jia-Fan

    2014-04-16

    The association of STAT4 gene polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) / lupus nephritis (LN) results from the published studies is still conflicting. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between STAT4 rs7574865, rs16833431, rs11889341, rs8179673, rs10168266, rs7582694, rs3821236, rs7601754 gene polymorphism and SLE / LN, and to explore whether STAT4 gene polymorphism could become a predictive marker for SLE / LN risk. Association studies were identified from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and CBM-disc (China Biological Medicine Database) as of September 1, 2013, and eligible investigations were synthesized using meta-analysis method. 24 investigations were identified for the analysis of association between STAT4 gene polymorphism and SLE, consisting of 31190 patients with SLE and 43940 controls. In STAT4 rs7574865, there was a marked association between T allele or TT genotype and SLE susceptibility (T: OR=1.53, 95% CI: 1.30-1.79, Prs7574865 gene polymorphism was not associated with the LN risk. Our results indicate that T allele or TT homozygous is a significant risk genetic molecular marker to predict the SLE susceptibility and GG genotype is a valuable marker to against the SLE risk, but the association was not found for LN. However, more investigations are required to further clarify the association of the T allele or TT homozygous with SLE / LN susceptibility. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Reproducibility of the dynamics of facial expressions in unilateral facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagha, M A; Ju, X; Morley, S; Ayoub, A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of non-verbal facial expressions in unilateral facial paralysis using dynamic four-dimensional (4D) imaging. The Di4D system was used to record five facial expressions of 20 adult patients. The system captured 60 three-dimensional (3D) images per second; each facial expression took 3-4seconds which was recorded in real time. Thus a set of 180 3D facial images was generated for each expression. The procedure was repeated after 30min to assess the reproducibility of the expressions. A mathematical facial mesh consisting of thousands of quasi-point 'vertices' was conformed to the face in order to determine the morphological characteristics in a comprehensive manner. The vertices were tracked throughout the sequence of the 180 images. Five key 3D facial frames from each sequence of images were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the first and second capture of each facial expression to assess the reproducibility of facial movements. Corresponding images were aligned using partial Procrustes analysis, and the root mean square distance between them was calculated and analyzed statistically (paired Student t-test, PFacial expressions of lip purse, cheek puff, and raising of eyebrows were reproducible. Facial expressions of maximum smile and forceful eye closure were not reproducible. The limited coordination of various groups of facial muscles contributed to the lack of reproducibility of these facial expressions. 4D imaging is a useful clinical tool for the assessment of facial expressions. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Refractory Angioedema in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Habibagahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema secondary to C1 inhibitor deficiency has been rarely reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. A genetic defect of C1 inhibitor produces hereditary angioedema, which is usually presented with cutaneous painless edema, but edema of the genital area, gastrointestinal and laryngeal tracts have also been reported. In lupus patients, angioedema may be the result of an acquired type of C1 inhibitor deficiency, most probably due to antibody formation directed against the C1 inhibitor molecule. Herein we report a new case of lupus nephritis that developed angioedema and a rapid course of disease progression with acute renal failure and alveolar hemorrhage without response to high dose steroid and plasmapheresis.

  10. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus, morphea profunda and psoriasis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arpa, Mónica; Flores-Terry, Miguel A; Ramos-Rodríguez, Claudia; Franco-Muñoz, Monserrat; González-Ruiz, Lucía; Ramírez-Huaranga, Marco Aurelio

    2018-04-03

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory dermatosis that may be associated with a number of diseases. Recent studies provide evidence that there is a greater frequency of autoimmune diseases, but association with autoimmune connective tissue diseases is uncommon. The coexistence of psoriasis and lupus erythematosus is rare. Besides, the occurrence of morphea has rarely been reported in patients with lupus or psoriasis. We report a woman with cutaneous lupus and morphea profunda associated with psoriasis, with an excellent response to methotrexate, and review the literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiologic findings in late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Weissman, B.N.; Sosman, J.L.; Schur, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly has a different clinical and serologic course from that in young patients. Radiographic findings in patients in whom the diagnosis was made after age 50 were compared with findings in younger patients to see if the radiologic patterns are also different. The only significant radiographic difference between the two groups was that the older group had a greater incidence of soft-tissue swelling of the hands and wrists (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in osteopenia, erosion, soft-tissue calcification, alignment abnormalities, or intrathoracic findings. Of 24 patients over age 50, two developed lymphoma and another developed multiple myeloma. The data agree with clinical observations that there is a higher incidence of arthritis in late-onset lupus, but clinical findings of increased incidence of pleuropericardial disease are not confirmed radiographically. The coincidence of hematologic malignancy with late-onset lupus in this series is noteworthy

  12. Lupus community panel proposals for optimising clinical trials: 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Joan T; Manzi, Susan; Aranow, Cynthia; Askenase, Anca; Bruce, Ian; Chakravarty, Eliza; Chong, Ben; Costenbader, Karen; Dall’Era, Maria; Ginzler, Ellen; Hanrahan, Leslie; Kalunian, Ken; Merola, Joseph; Raymond, Sandra; Rovin, Brad; Saxena, Amit; Werth, Victoria P

    2018-01-01

    Formidable impediments stand in the way of treatment development for lupus. These include the unwieldy size of current trials, international competition for scarce patients, complex outcome measures and a poor understanding of these outcomes in the world at large. The heterogeneity of the disease itself coupled to superimposition of variegated background polypharmacy has created enough immunological noise to virtually ensure the failure of lupus treatment trials, leaving an understandable suspicion that at least some of the results in testing failed drugs over the years may not have been negative, but merely uninterpretable. The authors have consulted with many clinical trial investigators, biopharmaceutical developers and stakeholders from government and voluntary sectors. This paper examines the available evidence that supports workable trial designs and proposes approaches to improve the odds of completing interpretable treatment development programs for lupus. PMID:29657738

  13. Association of Sweet's Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Barton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder but can also be drug induced, associated with hematopoetic malignancies and myelodysplastic disorders, and more, infrequently, observed in autoimmune disorders. Sweet's syndrome has been reported in three cases of neonatal lupus, three cases of hydralazine-induced lupus in adults, and in nine pediatric and adult systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. We describe three additional adult cases of Sweet's associated with SLE and provide a focused review on nondrug-induced, nonneonatal SLE and Sweet's. In two of three new cases, as in the majority of prior cases, the skin rash of Sweet's paralleled underlying SLE disease activity. The pathogenesis of Sweet's remains elusive, but evidence suggests that cytokine dysregulation may be central to the clinical and pathological changes in this condition, as well as in SLE. Further research is needed to define the exact relationship between the two conditions.

  14. Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus, 1995-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Laustrup, H; Hjelmborg, J

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveThe objective of this paper is to investigate survival and causes of death in a Danish lupus population.MethodsTwo hundred and fifteen SLE patients (94% Caucasians) were followed prospectively for up to 16 years. Thirty-eight patients died. Survival rate and causes of death were analysed......%) and malignancies (13%). Deaths due to infections and active SLE were rare and predominated within the first seven years after diagnosis and before age 40, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed after 20 years' follow-up.ConclusionThis study shows that despite progress in lupus management, including direct access...... to specialized hospital care and increased use of hydroxychloroquine, mortality in lupus patients is still increased. Main causes of death were active disease and infections among the young and newly diagnosed, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed in longstanding disease....

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-01-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental

  16. Bilateral acute lupus pneumonitis in a case of rhupus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhupus syndrome, the overlap of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, is an extremely uncommon condition. Organ damages found due to SLE are usually mild in rhupus. Lupus pneumonitis in rhupus syndrome has not been reported worldwide. We are reporting a 23-year-old female with bilateral symmetric erosive arthritis, oral ulcer, alopecia, polyserositis, anemia, leucopenia, positive RA-factor, anti nuclear antibody (ANA and anti ds-DNA. She presented with acute onset dyspnea, high fever, chest pain, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypoxia and respiratory alkalosis. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT-thorax showed bilateral, basal consolidation with air bronchogram. Repeated sputum and single broncho alveolar lavage (BAL fluid examination revealed no organism or Hemosiderin-laden macrophage. The diagnosis of rhupus was confirmed by combined manifestations of RA and SLE, and the diagnosis of acute lupus pneumonitis was established by clinico-radiological picture and by excluding other possibilities.

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus diagnostics in the ‘omics’ era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriens, Cristina; Mohan, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease affecting multiple organ systems. Currently, diagnosis relies upon meeting at least four out of eleven criteria outlined by the ACR. The scientific community actively pursues discovery of novel diagnostics in the hope of better identifying susceptible individuals in early stages of disease. Comprehensive studies have been conducted at multiple biological levels including: DNA (or genomics), mRNA (or transcriptomics), protein (or proteomics) and metabolites (or metabolomics). The ‘omics’ platforms allow us to re-examine systemic lupus erythematosus at a greater degree of molecular resolution. More importantly, one is hopeful that these ‘omics’ platforms may yield newer biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus that can help clinicians track the disease course with greater sensitivity and specificity. PMID:24860621

  18. Acute macular neuroretinopathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H; Lee, S C; Kim, M

    2016-04-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN) is a rare disorder that presents with abrupt visual change with wedge-shaped or flower-like lesions pointing towards the fovea. Ischemic insults to the retinal capillary plexus may be important for development of this disease. While many case reports have been published on AMN, none have described AMN in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we report a case of AMN associated with newly-diagnosed SLE. We speculate that in patients with lupus flares, immune complex-mediated vascular injury and microvascular thrombosis may disrupt the deep retinal capillary network, causing ischemic damages to the outer retina and leading to the development of AMN. AMN can develop in patients with lupus flares, and must be considered as an SLE-associated ophthalmologic complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of AMN associated with SLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined

  20. Brain MR imaging in systemic lupus erythematous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Ae; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Kyung Hwon; Kim, Sung Kwon; Lee, Jung Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Sang Hoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-09-15

    To present MR imaging findings of intracranial lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE), a retrospective study was performed on MR images of 33 SLE patients with neurologic symptoms and signs. MR imaging was performed on either a 0.5 T (21 patients) or 2.0 T unit (12 patients), using T1-weighted, proton-density-weighted, and T2-weighted spin echo sequences in all patients. In seven patients, post-contrast T1-weighted images were also obtained after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The main MR findings consisted of focal lesions suggesting ischemia/infarct (15 patients), diffuse brain atrophy (8), and findings associated with infection (4). The MR findings were normal in 11 patients (33%). The focal lesions suggesting ischemia/infarcts presumably secondary to vasculitis were distributed in the cortex or subcortical white matter (7 patients), deep periventricular white matter (3), or in both areas (5). Most of the focal lesions were multiple and small in size. The findings associated with infection were variable and included communicating hydrocephalus, meningeal enhancement, granuloma, etc. MR findings of SLE were non-specific and therefore clinical correlation is needed when evaluating SLE in MR.

  1. The management of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Stacy P; Schanberg, Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Most children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) now survive into adulthood, leading the pediatric rheumatology community to focus on preventing long-term complications of SLE, including atherosclerosis, obesity, and osteoporosis, and their treatment. Unfortunately, because of the paucity of data in pediatric SLE, little is known about epidemiology, long-term outcome, and optimal treatment. Most research focuses on adults with SLE, but pediatric SLE differs significantly from adult SLE in many aspects, including disease expression, approaches to pharmacologic intervention, management of treatment toxicity, and psychosocial issues. Children and adolescents with SLE require specialized, multidisciplinary care. Treatment can be optimized by early recognition of disease flares and complications, minimizing medication toxicity, educating families about prevention, promoting school performance, addressing concerns about reproductive health, and negotiating the transition to adult-centered medical care. Developmentally appropriate concerns about pain, appearance, and peers often affect treatment adherence and must be addressed by the health-care team. Research in pediatric SLE is desperately needed and provides a unique opportunity to understand how developmental immunology and the hormonal changes associated with puberty affect the pathophysiology of SLE.

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus and splenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnizo Z, Pilar; Ramirez R, Francisco Alejandro; Ramirez G, Luis Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease in which there is an increase risk of infections by common germ as by opportunistic germs. This fact is explained by the alterations in the humoral and cellular immunity, and phagocytic mononuclear system due to the disease and the immunosuppressive therapy use for its treatment. Multiple infectious processes have been describes in patients with SLE and within them, the splenic abscess, although in few cases. Usually its presence is associated with an underlying disease such as sepsis or peritonitis, with multiple outcomes. Due to its low frequency as well as the unusual presentation, we reported a case of a solitary splenic abscess documented by ultrasound in a teenager with SLE and immunosuppressive treatment, without any underlying infection, who presents with fever, abdominal pain, leucocytosis and elevation of acute phase reactants. He received antibiotic therapy with clindamycin and ceftriaxone and percutaneous drainage of the abscess guided by ultrasound and sent to culture in which grew non-typificable anaerobe germs, with a favorable evolution after 5 year of follow up

  3. Unmet medical needs in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of diverse manifestations, with onset usually in young women in the third to fourth decade of life. The chronic nature of this relapsing remitting disease leads to organ damage accrual over time. Mortality and morbidity are increased in patients with SLE compared with the general population. Therapeutic advances over the last few decades have led to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Five-year survival has improved to over 90% from a low of 50% in the 1950s. However, multiple aspects of the management of SLE patients are still far from optimal. Early diagnosis remains a challenge; diagnostic delays leading to delay in definitive treatment are common. Monitoring treatment remains problematic due to the paucity of sensitive biomarkers. Current treatment regimens rely heavily on corticosteroids, even though corticosteroids are well known to cause organ damage. Treatment of refractory disease manifestations such as nephritis, recalcitrant cutaneous lesions and neurological involvement require new approaches with greater efficacy. Cognitive dysfunction is common in SLE patients, but early recognition and adequate treatment are yet to be established. Premature accelerated atherosclerosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Fatigue is one of the most disabling symptoms, and contributes to the poor quality of life in patients with SLE. Ongoing research in SLE faces many challenges, including enrollment of homogeneous patient populations, use of reliable outcome measures and a standard control arm. The current review will highlight some of the outstanding unmet challenges in the management of this complex disease. PMID:23281889

  4. Verrucous form of chilblain lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pock, L; Petrovská, P; Becvár, R; Mandys, V; Hercogová, J

    2001-09-01

    A 45-year-old woman had symmetrical livid plaques with yellowish hyperkeratoses for 5 years, which progressed on to the fingers and toes and on the soles of the feet. Two years later creamy, whitish areas and maceration appeared on the buccal mucosa and the lips. A skin biopsy revealed massive collagen hyaline degeneration in the perivascular area, hyperkeratosis and hypergranulosis, small lymphocyte infiltrates with several melanophages and extravasates of erythrocytes in the upper corium in perivascular areas and hydropic degeneration of basal keratinocytes. The findings using direct immunofluorescence were compatible with lupus erythematosus (LE). Laboratory investigation showed a slight leucopenia and thrombopenia, a slightly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hypocomplementaemia C3 and C4, a high titre of rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies positivity of extractable nuclear antigen. The results reflected probably the development of a systemic form of the disease. The patient was successfully managed by methylprednisolone and hydroxychloroquine. After 1 year of therapy, a new skin biopsy revealed a substantial reduction of hyperkeratosis and hyaline degeneration of collagen tissue in the perivascular areas. The combination of the extensive hyperkeratosis and hyalinization thus seems to be features of the long-lasting, untreated lesions in chilblain LE.

  5. Lupus anticoagulants: first French interlaboratory Etalonorme survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussi, J; Roisin, J P; Goguel, A

    1996-06-01

    In 1994, the, French National Quality Control Group for Hematology, Etalonorme, conducted a large-scale interlaboratory survey concerning the detection of lupus anticoagulants (LA) involving all the 4,500 French laboratories. Each laboratory received the same batch of a lyophilized citrated plasma (94B3) prepared from a patient with LA that had been confirmed by all the techniques used in the intralaboratory study. In the interlaboratory survey, the screening test was activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT); mean APTT calculated from the results reported by 4,029 labs was prolonged (clotting ratio = 1.44) with a large dispersion (coefficients of variation = 18.8%). APTT of the mixture 94B3 + normal plasma were performed by 2,698 laboratories. No correction of APTT was obtained (R = 1.36, Rosner index = 24) with a wide variation between reagents (17 kaolin. This survey allowed Etalonorme to inform French biologists and draft an educational program for the biologic detection of LA and the identification of its mechanism of action.

  6. Quantity discrimination in wolves (Canis lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina eUtrata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantity discrimination has been studied extensively in different non-human animal species. In the current study, we tested eleven hand-raised wolves (Canis lupus in a two-way choice task. We placed a number of food items (one to four sequentially into two opaque cans and asked the wolves to choose the larger amount. Moreover, we conducted two additional control conditions to rule out non-numerical properties of the presentation that the animals might have used to make the correct choice. Our results showed that wolves are able to make quantitative judgments at the group, but also at the individual level even when alternative strategies such as paying attention to the surface area or time and total amount are ruled out. In contrast to previous canine studies on dogs (Canis familiaris and coyotes (Canis latrans, our wolves’ performance did not improve with decreasing ratio, referred to as Weber’s law. However, further studies using larger quantities than we used in the current setup are still needed to determine whether and when wolves’ quantity discrimination conforms to Weber’s law.

  7. [Biological disturbances during the lupus-associated pancreatitis: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayagh, Sanae; Benchekroun, Leila; Bouabdellah, Mounya; Jaouhar, Nezha; El Aoufi, Farida; El Oufir, Fatiha; Alaoui, Meryem; Adnaoui, Mohammed; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2015-01-01

    We report in this paper the case of female patient, hypertriglyceridemia associated with milky serum and hyperglycemia have been the alarm signal of a lupus-associated pancreatitis, the confirmation of this entity was done with elevated rate of serum lipase activity. It is about a 33 years age female. She has as unique antecedent a lupus diagnosed on January of the same. The patient was admitted on august 2013 for another episode of lupus associated to the lower lamb edema with a rate of C3 at 0.4 g/L (0.82-1,93) and C4 at 0.05 g/L (0.15-0.57). One day after the beginning of the corticotherapy, the patient presented hyperthermia, ataxis and behavior troubles, epigastric and articular pains and vomiting. Biochemical tests found hyperglycemia at 38.9 mmol/L (3.9-6.1), dyslipidemia with hypertriglyceridemia at 15.7 mmol/L (0.3-1.7) and total cholesterol rate at 5.2 mmol/L (<5.2) associated with milky serum. Haematological tests objective normocytic normochromic anemia with 81 g/L of hemoglobin, lymphopenia at 0.88 G/L and normal platelet rate. Lupus associated pancreatitis was suggested and confirmed biologically with an hyperlipasemia at 180 UI/L (8-78) and radiologicaly with the image of focal hepatic steatosis. We conclude that on the presence of lupus, gastrointestinal and/or biological signs must motivate the measurement of the serum lipase activity as quickly as possible to assess the diagnosis of lupus-associated pancreatitis.

  8. Invasive fungal infections in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Alza, Y; Sánchez-Bautista, J; Fajardo-Rivero, J F; Figueroa, C L

    2018-06-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Complications, such as invasive fungal infections usually occur in patients with a greater severity of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk variables associated with invasive fungal infections in a Colombian systemic lupus erythematosus population. Materials and methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study that evaluated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for six years. The primary outcome was invasive fungal infection. Descriptive, group comparison and bivariate analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Results Two hundred patients were included in this study; 84.5% of the patients were women and the median age was 36 years; 68% of the subjects had haematological complications; 53.3% had nephropathy; 45% had pneumopathy and 28% had pericardial impairment; 7.5% of patients had invasive fungal infections and the most frequently isolated fungus was Candida albicans. Pericardial disease, cyclophosphamide use, high disease activity, elevated ESR, C3 hypocomplementemia, anaemia and lymphopenia had a significant association with invasive fungal infection ( P lupus erythematosus, which was higher than that reported in other latitudes. In this population the increase in disease activity, the presence of pericardial impairment and laboratory alterations (anaemia, lymphopenia, increased ESR and C3 hypocomplementemia) are associated with a greater possibility of invasive fungal infections. Regarding the use of drugs, unlike other studies, in the Colombian population an association was found only with the previous administration of cyclophosphamide. In addition, patients with invasive fungal infections and systemic lupus erythematosus had a higher prevalence of mortality and hospital readmission compared with patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without invasive fungal infection.

  9. Facial Expression Recognition Through Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Perveen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions communicate non-verbal cues which play an important role in interpersonal relations. Automatic recognition of facial expressions can be an important element of normal human-machine interfaces it might likewise be utilized as a part of behavioral science and in clinical practice. In spite of the fact that people perceive facial expressions for all intents and purposes immediately solid expression recognition by machine is still a challenge. From the point of view of automatic recognition a facial expression can be considered to comprise of disfigurements of the facial parts and their spatial relations or changes in the faces pigmentation. Research into automatic recognition of the facial expressions addresses the issues encompassing the representation and arrangement of static or dynamic qualities of these distortions or face pigmentation. We get results by utilizing the CVIPtools. We have taken train data set of six facial expressions of three persons and for train data set purpose we have total border mask sample 90 and 30 border mask sample for test data set purpose and we use RST- Invariant features and texture features for feature analysis and then classified them by using k- Nearest Neighbor classification algorithm. The maximum accuracy is 90.

  10. The identification of unfolding facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Schmidt, Susanna; Viviani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We asked whether the identification of emotional facial expressions (FEs) involves the simultaneous perception of the facial configuration or the detection of emotion-specific diagnostic cues. We recorded at high speed (500 frames s-1) the unfolding of the FE in five actors, each expressing six emotions (anger, surprise, happiness, disgust, fear, sadness). Recordings were coded every 10 frames (20 ms of real time) with the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al 2002, Salt Lake City, UT: Research Nexus eBook) to identify the facial actions contributing to each expression, and their intensity changes over time. Recordings were shown in slow motion (1/20 of recording speed) to one hundred observers in a forced-choice identification task. Participants were asked to identify the emotion during the presentation as soon as they felt confident to do so. Responses were recorded along with the associated response times (RTs). The RT probability density functions for both correct and incorrect responses were correlated with the facial activity during the presentation. There were systematic correlations between facial activities, response probabilities, and RT peaks, and significant differences in RT distributions for correct and incorrect answers. The results show that a reliable response is possible long before the full FE configuration is reached. This suggests that identification is reached by integrating in time individual diagnostic facial actions, and does not require perceiving the full apex configuration.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial nerve schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew L; Aviv, Richard I; Chen, Joseph M; Nedzelski, Julian M; Yuen, Heng-Wai; Fox, Allan J; Bharatha, Aditya; Bartlett, Eric S; Symons, Sean P

    2009-12-01

    This study characterizes the magnetic resonance (MR) appearances of facial nerve schwannoma (FNS). We hypothesize that the extent of FNS demonstrated on MR will be greater compared to prior computed tomography studies, that geniculate involvement will be most common, and that cerebellar pontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) involvement will more frequently result in sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Retrospective study. Clinical, pathologic, and enhanced MR imaging records of 30 patients with FNS were analyzed. Morphologic characteristics and extent of segmental facial nerve involvement were documented. Median age at initial imaging was 51 years (range, 28-76 years). Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 14 patients (47%), and the diagnosis reached in the remainder by identification of a mass, thickening, and enhancement along the course of the facial nerve. All 30 lesions involved two or more contiguous segments of the facial nerve, with 28 (93%) involving three or more segments. The median segments involved per lesion was 4, mean of 3.83. Geniculate involvement was most common, in 29 patients (97%). CPA (P = .001) and IAC (P = .02) involvement was significantly related to SNHL. Seventeen patients (57%) presented with facial nerve dysfunction, manifesting in 12 patients as facial nerve weakness or paralysis, and/or in eight with involuntary movements of the facial musculature. This study highlights the morphologic heterogeneity and typical multisegment involvement of FNS. Enhanced MR is the imaging modality of choice for FNS. The neuroradiologist must accurately diagnose and characterize this lesion, and thus facilitate optimal preoperative planning and counseling.

  12. A dynamic appearance descriptor approach to facial actions temporal modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Bihan; Valstar, Michel; Martinez, Brais; Pantic, Maja

    Both the configuration and the dynamics of facial expressions are crucial for the interpretation of human facial behavior. Yet to date, the vast majority of reported efforts in the field either do not take the dynamics of facial expressions into account, or focus only on prototypic facial

  13. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  14. Type I interferon signature in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezalel, Shira; Guri, Keren Mahlab; Elbirt, Daniel; Asher, Ilan; Sthoeger, Zev Moshe

    2014-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) are primarily regarded as an inhibitor of viral replication. However, type I IFN, mainly IFNalpha, plays a major role in activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multi-systemic, inflammatory autoimmune disease with undefined etiology. SLE is characterized by dysregulation of both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. An increased expression of type I IFN-regulated genes, termed IFN signature, has been reported in patients with SLE. We review here the role of IFNalpha in the pathogenesis and course of SLE and the possible role of IFNalpha inhibition as a novel treatment for lupus patients.

  15. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  16. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small...... number of patients with NPSLE. Here we measured serum NN in samples from a larger population of patients with SLE and NP events to see whether elevated serum NN could be a marker for NPSLE. METHODS: We obtained serum samples from patients in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics (SLICC...

  17. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial...... of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from...

  18. Facial nerve problems and Bell's palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, DV; Venter, C; Valenas, O

    2015-01-01

    Bell's palsy is paralysis or weakness of muscle at the hemifacial level, a form of temporary facial paralysis, probable a virus infection or trauma, to one or two facial nerves. Damage to the facial nerve innervating the muscles on one side of the face result in a flabby appearance, fell the respective hemiface. Nerve damage can also affect the sense of taste and salivary and lacrimal secretion. This condition begins suddenly, often overnight, and usually gets better on its own within a few w...

  19. Análisis facial en ortodoncia

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Corbetto, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Las consideraciones sobre estética facial han sido conceptos inseparables de los principios y de la práctica de la ortodoncia y hoy en día se hace necesario enfatizar la importancia del análisis facial como examen complementario indispensable para el diagnóstico y planeamiento ortodóntico, resaltando que la mejora de la morfología facial debe ser el objetivo del tratamiento de las maloclusion es. Según Baldwin 5 el paciente busca en un tratamiento ortodóntico la ...

  20. Computed tomography of the facial canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    The radiological details of the facial canal was investigated by computed tomography. In the first part of this study, dry skulls were used to delineate the full course of the facial canal by computed tomography. In the second part of this study, the patients with chronic otitis media and secondary cholesteatoma were evaluated. The labyrinthine and tympanic parts of the canal were well demonstrated with the axial scanning, and the mastoid part with the coronal scanning. Moreover, computed tomography showed excellent delineation of the middle ear contents. In patients with secondary cholesteatoma, the destructions of the intratympanic course of the bony facial canal were also assessed preoperatively. (author)

  1. Heartbeat Rate Measurement from Facial Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat Rate (HR) reveals a person’s health condition. This paper presents an effective system for measuring HR from facial videos acquired in a more realistic environment than the testing environment of current systems. The proposed method utilizes a facial feature point tracking method...... by combining a ‘Good feature to track’ and a ‘Supervised descent method’ in order to overcome the limitations of currently available facial video based HR measuring systems. Such limitations include, e.g., unrealistic restriction of the subject’s movement and artificial lighting during data capture. A face...

  2. 3D Facial Pattern Analysis for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    et al. (2001) proposed a two-level Garbor wavelet network (GWN) to detect eight facial features. In Bhuiyan et al. (2003) six facial features are...Toyama, K., Krüger, V., 2001. Hierarchical Wavelet Networks for Facial Feature Localization. ICCV’01 Workshop on Recognition, Analysis and... pathological  (red) and normal structure (blue) (b)  signed distance map (negative distance indicates the  pathological  shape is inside) (c) raw

  3. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies.

  4. Fusing Facial Features for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Ahmad Dargham

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is an important biometric method because of its potential applications in many fields, such as access control, surveillance, and human-computer interaction. In this paper, a face recognition system that fuses the outputs of three face recognition systems based on Gabor jets is presented. The first system uses the magnitude, the second uses the phase, and the third uses the phase-weighted magnitude of the jets. The jets are generated from facial landmarks selected using three selection methods. It was found out that fusing the facial features gives better recognition rate than either facial feature used individually regardless of the landmark selection method.

  5. Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction: CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disbro, M.A.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Osborn, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction may have a clinically apparent or occult cause. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 36 patients with peripheral facial nerve dysfunction to obtain information on the location of the suspected lesion and the number, sequence, and type of radiographic evaluations performed. Inadequate clinical evaluations before computed tomography (CT) was done and unnecessary CT examinations were also noted. They have suggested a practical clinical and radiographic scheme to evaluate progressive peripheral facial dysfunction with no apparent cause. If this scheme is applied, unnecessary radiologic tests and delays in diagnosis and treatment may be avoided.

  6. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy.

  7. Ressecção de endometriose intestinal com dupla ressecção discoide com grampeador circular: relato de casodoi: 10.20513/2447-6595.2016v56n1p52-54

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Cruz de Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A endometriose é uma doença inflamatória que pode cursar com uma variedade de sintomas álgicos pélvico-abdominais e com infertilidade. As lesões intestinais normalmente possuem um caráter mais agressivo que as de demais localizações, o que as faz serem, muitas vezes, refratárias ao tratamento conservador, tornando a ressecção cirúrgica das lesões a melhor opção. A técnica cirúrgica a ser usada objetiva a remoção completa dos endometriomas, a restauração da anatomia e a preservação da função orgânica. A cirurgia minimamente invasiva por laparoscopia é uma alternativa adequada para reduzir a morbidade associada aos procedimentos abertos tradicionais. O subtipo de endometriose com acometimento intestinal constitui desafio terapêutico mais complexo. As opções no tratamento cirúrgico incluem: shaving do nódulo de endometriose intestinal, ressecção discoide do nódulo por grampeador circular e ressecção segmentar intestinal com anastomose término-terminal. O objetivo deste relato é demonstrar a viabilidade técnica de ressecção de endometriose intestinal com dupla ressecção discoide com grampeador circular em paciente em que se realizou laparoscopia para tratamento de endometriose pélvica.

  8. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  9. A Deep Learning Perspective on the Origin of Facial Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Breuer, Ran; Kimmel, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions play a significant role in human communication and behavior. Psychologists have long studied the relationship between facial expressions and emotions. Paul Ekman et al., devised the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) to taxonomize human facial expressions and model their behavior. The ability to recognize facial expressions automatically, enables novel applications in fields like human-computer interaction, social gaming, and psychological research. There has been a tremend...

  10. Manifestaciones pulmonares del Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erithematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Molina

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available En esta revisión se describen las diversas manifestacionespulmonares del Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico; se Incluyen tanto los cuadrosrelacionados con la enfermedad (pleuritis con o sin derrame, neumonitis lúpicaaguda, enfermedad intersticlaidifusa, hipertensión pulmonar, disfunción diafragmática,atelectasia y hemorragia pulmonar como los asociados a ella (infección, edemapulmonar urémico, embolismo pulmonar, neumotórax, pseudolinfoma y sarcoidosis.Se consideran someramente aspectos clínicos, patológicos, patogénicos,diagnósticos y terapéuticos. En cuanto a los últimos se enfatizan algunasconsideraciones generales de importancia en el manejo de estos pacientes; sonellas: la necesidad de descartar ante todo la posibilidad de un proceso Infecciosoy de emplear antibióticos de amplio espectro hasta excluir1o; la de agotarrecursos hasta establecer un diagnóstico definitivo y la de recurrir a laterapia inmunosupresora una vez excluida la infección O cuando no ha habidorespuesta a los antibióticos adecuados

    The various pulmonary manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus are described in this review; it includes related (pleurisy with/without effusion, acute lupus pneumonitis, diffuse interstitial disease, pulmonary hypertension, diaphragmatic dysfunction, atelectasis, pulmonary hemorrhage as well as associated (infection, uremic pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, pseudolymphoma, sarcoldosis, miscellaneous conditions. Clinical, pathological, pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects are con. sidered. Emphasis is done on certain general therapeutic considerations, namely: to rule out the possibillty of an infectious process and use wide-spectrum antibiotics until certainty is acquired that it is not present; to use every available diagnostic resource until a definite diagnosis Is established

  11. Quantitative facial asymmetry: using three-dimensional photogrammetry to measure baseline facial surface symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Helena O; Morrison, Clinton S; Linden, Olivia; Phillips, Benjamin; Chang, Johnny; Byrne, Margaret E; Sullivan, Stephen R; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Although symmetry is hailed as a fundamental goal of aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, our tools for measuring this outcome have been limited and subjective. With the advent of three-dimensional photogrammetry, surface geometry can be captured, manipulated, and measured quantitatively. Until now, few normative data existed with regard to facial surface symmetry. Here, we present a method for reproducibly calculating overall facial symmetry and present normative data on 100 subjects. We enrolled 100 volunteers who underwent three-dimensional photogrammetry of their faces in repose. We collected demographic data on age, sex, and race and subjectively scored facial symmetry. We calculated the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the native and reflected faces, reflecting about a plane of maximum symmetry. We analyzed the interobserver reliability of the subjective assessment of facial asymmetry and the quantitative measurements and compared the subjective and objective values. We also classified areas of greatest asymmetry as localized to the upper, middle, or lower facial thirds. This cluster of normative data was compared with a group of patients with subtle but increasing amounts of facial asymmetry. We imaged 100 subjects by three-dimensional photogrammetry. There was a poor interobserver correlation between subjective assessments of asymmetry (r = 0.56). There was a high interobserver reliability for quantitative measurements of facial symmetry RMSD calculations (r = 0.91-0.95). The mean RMSD for this normative population was found to be 0.80 ± 0.24 mm. Areas of greatest asymmetry were distributed as follows: 10% upper facial third, 49% central facial third, and 41% lower facial third. Precise measurement permitted discrimination of subtle facial asymmetry within this normative group and distinguished norms from patients with subtle facial asymmetry, with placement of RMSDs along an asymmetry ruler. Facial surface symmetry, which is poorly assessed

  12. Diferential diagnosis in atypical facial pain: a clinical study Diagnóstico diferencial em dor facial atípica: estudo clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cláudio Marinho Nóbrega

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: To evaluate a sample of patients with atypical facial pain (AFP in comparison to patients with symptomatic facial pain (SFP. METHOD: 41 patients with previous diagnostic of AFP were submitted to a standardized evaluation protocol, by a multidisciplinary pain team. RESULTS: 21 (51.2% were considered AFP and 20 (48.8% (SFP received the following diagnosis: 8 (40.0% had temporomandibular disorders (TMD; 3 (15.0% had TMD associated to systemic disease (fibromyalgia, systemic erythematosus lupus; 4 (20.0% had neuropathy after ear, nose and throat (ENT surgery for petroclival tumor; 2 (10.0% had Wallenberg syndrome; 1 (5.0% had intracranial tumor; 1 (5.0% had oral cancer (epidermoid carcinoma, and 1 (5.0% had burning mouth syndrome (BMS associated to fibromyalgia. Spontaneous descriptors of pain were not different between AFP and SFP groups (p=0.82. Allodynia was frequent in SFP (p=0.05 and emotion was the triggering factor most prevalent in AFP (p=0.06. AFP patients had more traumatic events previously to pain (p=0.001. CONCLUSION: AFP patients had more: a traumatic events previously to pain onset, and b emotions as a triggering factor for pain. These data support the need of trained health professionals in multidisciplinary groups for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of these patients.OBJETIVO: Avaliar uma amostra de pacientes com dor facial atípica (DFA e compará-la a outra com dor facial sintomática (DFS. MÉTODO: 41 pacientes com diagnóstico prévio de DFA foram submetidos a um protocolo padronizado de avaliação aplicado por uma equipe multidisciplinar. RESULTADOS: 21 (51,2% foram mantidos com o diagnóstico de DFA e 20 (48,8% (DFS receberam os seguintes diagnósticos: 8 (40.0% tinham disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM; 3 (15,0% tinham DTM associada a doença sistêmica (fibromialgia, lupus eritematoso sistêmico; 4 (20,0% tinham neuropatia após cirurgia otorrinolaringológica (ORL para tumor petroclival; 2 (10,0% tinham s

  13. Greater perceptual sensitivity to happy facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Stephen; Ekstrom, Tor; Chen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Perception of subtle facial expressions is essential for social functioning; yet it is unclear if human perceptual sensitivities differ in detecting varying types of facial emotions. Evidence diverges as to whether salient negative versus positive emotions (such as sadness versus happiness) are preferentially processed. Here, we measured perceptual thresholds for the detection of four types of emotion in faces--happiness, fear, anger, and sadness--using psychophysical methods. We also evaluated the association of the perceptual performances with facial morphological changes between neutral and respective emotion types. Human observers were highly sensitive to happiness compared with the other emotional expressions. Further, this heightened perceptual sensitivity to happy expressions can be attributed largely to the emotion-induced morphological change of a particular facial feature (end-lip raise).

  14. Facial soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-09

    Sep 9, 2013 ... Objectives: To successfully meet expectations on facial esthetics, it is important to ... by questionnaire and identification cards that were given ..... Zekic E. The use of parental data in evaluation of the craniofacial structures.

  15. A study on facial expressions recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing

    2017-09-01

    In terms of communication, postures and facial expressions of such feelings like happiness, anger and sadness play important roles in conveying information. With the development of the technology, recently a number of algorithms dealing with face alignment, face landmark detection, classification, facial landmark localization and pose estimation have been put forward. However, there are a lot of challenges and problems need to be fixed. In this paper, a few technologies have been concluded and analyzed, and they all relate to handling facial expressions recognition and poses like pose-indexed based multi-view method for face alignment, robust facial landmark detection under significant head pose and occlusion, partitioning the input domain for classification, robust statistics face formalization.

  16. Voice disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena S F C de Macedo

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic disease characterized by progressive tissue damage. In recent decades, novel treatments have greatly extended the life span of SLE patients. This creates a high demand for identifying the overarching symptoms associated with SLE and developing therapies that improve their life quality under chronic care. We hypothesized that SLE patients would present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can reduce life quality, identifying a potential SLE-related dysphonia could be relevant for the appraisal and management of this disease. We measured objective vocal parameters and perceived vocal quality with the GRBAS (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain scale in SLE patients and compared them to matched healthy controls. SLE patients also filled a questionnaire reporting perceived vocal deficits. SLE patients had significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonics to noise ratio, as well as increased jitter and shimmer. All subjective parameters of the GRBAS scale were significantly abnormal in SLE patients. Additionally, the vast majority of SLE patients (29/36 reported at least one perceived vocal deficit, with the most prevalent deficits being vocal fatigue (19/36 and hoarseness (17/36. Self-reported voice deficits were highly correlated with altered GRBAS scores. Additionally, tissue damage scores in different organ systems correlated with dysphonic symptoms, suggesting that some features of SLE-related dysphonia are due to tissue damage. Our results show that a large fraction of SLE patients suffers from perceivable dysphonia and may benefit from voice therapy in order to improve quality of life.

  17. Unsupervised learning of facial expression components

    OpenAIRE

    Egede, Joy Onyekachukwu

    2013-01-01

    The face is one of the most important means of non-verbal communication. A lot of information can be gotten about the emotional state of a person just by merely observing their facial expression. This is relatively easy in face to face communication but not so in human computer interaction. Supervised learning has been widely used by researchers to train machines to recognise facial expressions just like humans. However, supervised learning has significant limitations one of which is the fact...

  18. Temporomandibular disorders, facial pain, and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Steven D

    2012-05-01

    Headaches and facial pain are common in the general population. In many cases, facial pain can be resultant from temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have identified an association between headaches and temporomandibular joint disorders suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these 2 maladies. The aim of this paper is to elucidate potential commonalities of these disorders and to provide a brief overview of an examination protocol that may benefit the headache clinician in daily practice. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  19. Dynamic Facial Expression of Emotion Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Broekens, Joost; Qu, Chao; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Facial emotion expression for virtual characters is used in a wide variety of areas. Often, the primary reason to use emotion expression is not to study emotion expression generation per se, but to use emotion expression in an application or research project. What is then needed is an easy to use and flexible, but also validated mechanism to do so. In this report we present such a mechanism. It enables developers to build virtual characters with dynamic affective facial expressions. The mecha...

  20. Paralisia facial periférica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jarjura Jorge Jr.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Os autores fazem uma revisão sobre o anatomo fisiologia, os diagnósticos clinico e eletrofisiológico da Paralisia Facial Periférica assim como relacionam as afecções envolvidas no processo, discutindo seu tratamento clinico e cirúrgico. Em seguida relatam 5 casos de diversas etiologias tratados no ambulatório de Paralisia Facial da Disciplina de Otorrinolaringologia da FCMB da PUC-SP.

  1. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Gidley, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomograph...

  2. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia Tanas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patien...... generation of MPs may partake in the pathology of SLE and that new diagnostic, monitoring, and treatment strategies targeting these processes may be advantageous....

  3. Crusted scabies in a chid with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurimar C.F. Wanke

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available A child with systemic lupus erythematosus who has been treated with prednisone for three years, developed crusted scabies. Scrapings from lesions revealed Sarcoptes scabiei adult mites mad eggs. The patient died with septicemia and renal failure soon after starting topical 20% sulfur. A marked improvement was observed in the cutaneous lesions.

  4. A Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Confused with Infective Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel Serin; Kevser Kutlu Tatar; Tayyibe Saler

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease resulting from immune system-mediated tissue damage. Clinical findings of SLE can involve skin, kidney, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, serosal membranes, and the hematologic and immune systems. In the differential diagnosis, other connective tissue diseases, infective endocarditis, infections such as viral hepatitis, endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis, and some malignant tumors should...

  5. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langefeld, Carl D.; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Graham, Deborah S. Cunninghame; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Howard, Timothy D.; Ramos, Paula S.; Croker, Jennifer A.; Morris, David L.; Sandling, Johanna K.; Almlof, Jonas Carlsson; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo M.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Babini, Alejandra M.; Baca, Vicente; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; Bijl, Marc; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Catoggio, Luis; Cervera, Ricard; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M.; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Da Silva, Berta Martins; de la Rua Figueroa, Inigo; Doria, Andrea; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Endreffy, Emoke; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Fortin, Paul R.; Freedman, Barry I.; Frostegard, Johan; Garcia, Mercedes A.; Garcia de la Torre, Ignacio; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Guthridge, Joel M.; Huggins, Jennifer L.; James, Judith A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Karp, David R.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Laustrup, Helle; Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Li, Quan-Zhen; Maradiaga-Cecena, Marco A.; Martin, Javier; McCune, Joseph M.; McWilliams, David R.; Merrill, Joan T.; Miranda, Pedro; Moctezuma, Jose F.; Nath, Swapan K.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Orozco, Lorena; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Petri, Michelle; Pineau, Christian A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Pope, Janet; Raj, Prithvi; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Russell, Laurie P.; Sabio, Jose M.; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Scorza, Raffaella; Seldin, Michael F.; Sjowall, Christopher; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Thompson, Susan D.; Toloza, Sergio M. A.; Truedsson, Lennart; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Vila, Luis M.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael H.; Wither, Joan E.; Bhangale, Tushar; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Rioux, John D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Ronnblom, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Tsao, Betty P.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Silverman, Earl D.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Harley, John B.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Graham, Robert R.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify 58

  6. Case Report: An atypical case of systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease that can be a diagnostic conundrum. Case report: We describe a patient who presented with recurrent fleeting exudative and hemorrhagic pleural effusion. It took multiple visits over 3 months and renal biopsy to con rm the diagnosis of SLE.

  7. Echocardiographic evaluation of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, S.; Malik, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac disease occurs in various forms and is a common cause of death in systemic lupus erythematosus. The objective was to detect cardiac abnormalities by transthoracic echocardiography and determine their association in SLE patients. We conducted a transthoracic echocardiographic study in 48 inpatients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical and serological evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of lupus was done in all patients. There were 44 women (91.6%) and 4 men with a mean age of 26 years. Anti ds DNA was positive in 34 patients (68.75%). Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormality in 28 patients (58.33%). Of these, 16 patients (57%) had pericardial involvement with variable amount of effusion. Twelve patients (43%) had some valvular involvement and some degree of myocardial systolic dysfunction was found in 12 patients (43%). Only 4 patients (14%) had all three abnormalities. Anti ds DNA was positive in 71% of patients with cardiac abnormalities. Cardiac involvement is common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Serological abnormalities had an association with cardiac abnormalities, and were found to be more prevalent in young patients. (author)

  8. THE LUPUS TRANSIT SURVEY FOR HOT JUPITERS: RESULTS AND LESSONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Weldrake, David T. F.; Tingley, Brandon W.; Lewis, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a deep, wide-field transit survey targeting 'Hot Jupiter' planets in the Lupus region of the Galactic plane conducted over 53 nights concentrated in two epochs separated by a year. Using the Australian National University 40-inch telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), the survey covered a 0.66 deg 2 region close to the Galactic plane (b = 11 0 ) and monitored a total of 110,372 stars (15.0 ≤ V ≤ 22.0). Using difference imaging photometry, 16,134 light curves with a photometric precision of σ < 0.025 mag were obtained. These light curves were searched for transits, and four candidates were detected that displayed low-amplitude variability consistent with a transiting giant planet. Further investigations, including spectral typing and radial velocity measurements for some candidates, revealed that of the four, one is a true planetary companion (Lupus-TR-3), two are blended systems (Lupus-TR-1 and 4), and one is a binary (Lupus-TR-2). The results of this successful survey are instructive for optimizing the observational strategy and follow-up procedure for deep searches for transiting planets, including an upcoming survey using the SkyMapper telescope at SSO.

  9. Micromanagement of lupus autoimmunity by microRNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, N.

    2012-01-01

    De observaties die Nan Shen deed in zijn promotieonderzoek verschaffen nieuwe inzichten in het ontstaan van de auto-immuunziekte systemische lupus erythematodes (SLE). Ook dragen ze bij aan De observaties die Nan Shen deed in zijn promotieonderzoek verschaffen nieuwe inzichten in het ontstaan van de

  10. Integrative medicine for managing the symptoms of lupus nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae-Young; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Integrative medicine is claimed to improve symptoms of lupus nephritis. No systematic reviews have been performed for the application of integrative medicine for lupus nephritis on patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thus, this review will aim to evaluate the current evidence on the efficacy of integrative medicine for the management of lupus nephritis in patients with SLE. Methods and analyses: The following electronic databases will be searched for studies published from their dates of inception February 2018: Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), as well as 6 Korean medical databases (Korea Med, the Oriental Medicine Advanced Search Integrated System [OASIS], DBpia, the Korean Medical Database [KM base], the Research Information Service System [RISS], and the Korean Studies Information Services System [KISS]), and 1 Chinese medical database (the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI]). Study selection, data extraction, and assessment will be performed independently by 2 researchers. The risk of bias (ROB) will be assessed using the Cochrane ROB tool. Dissemination: This systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated both electronically and in print. The review will be updated to inform and guide healthcare practice and policy. Trial registration number: PROSPERO 2018 CRD42018085205 PMID:29595669

  11. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  12. Pericarditis as initial clinical manifestation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, recurrent multi- systemic ... present with many years' history of nonspecific symptoms that are frequently attributed to other ... the assumed diagnoses of peptic ulcer disease, reflux oesophagitis, gastritis and ... The jugular venous pressure was not elevated. The apex beat ...

  13. The lupus anticoagulant in a population of healthy Nigerian adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Keywords: lupus coagulant; aPTT; KCT; antiphospholipid syndrome. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine Vol. 3 (1) 2005: pp. 45-48. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aipm.v3i1.39077 · AJOL African ...

  14. New developments in lupus-associated antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockshin, M. D.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is the disease in which the antiphospholipid syndrome was first described more than 20 years ago and which is the most frequent underlying disorder in secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. With respect to pathogenic concepts and treatment, the subjects of this review, no

  15. Paraoxonase 1 activity and genotyping in systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by an enhanced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Human serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an antioxidant enzyme closely associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL), has been implicated in the prevention of low density ...

  16. What People with Lupus Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caucasian women and is also more common in women of Hispanic, Asian, and Native American descent. African American and Hispanic ... percent of the people affected with lupus are women, a group already at increased risk ... Management Strategies Strategies for the prevention and treatment of ...

  17. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Mosca, Marta; Bertsias, George

    2014-01-01

    guidance for healthcare providers and administrators. Thus, an initiative to evaluate possible therapeutic targets and develop treat-to-target guidance was believed to be highly appropriate in the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients as well. Specialists in rheumatology, nephrology...

  18. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  19. Evaluation of TRAF6 in a large multiancestral lupus cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namjou, Bahram; Choi, Chan-Bum; Harley, Isaac T W

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease with significant immune system aberrations resulting from complex heritable genetics as well as environmental factors. We undertook to study the role of TRAF6 as a candidate gene for SLE, since it plays a major role in several...

  20. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, P; Sargent, E N; Boylen, T; Jaramillo, D

    1987-08-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor.

  1. Autoantibody Profiling in Lupus Patients using Synthetic Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klecka, Martin; Thybo, Christina; Macaubas, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Autoantibodies to nuclear components of cells (antinuclear antibodies, ANA), including DNA (a-DNA), are widely used in the diagnosis and subtyping of certain autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Despite clinical use over decades, precise, reproducible measurement of a...

  2. Aquaporin-4-autoimmunity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Jarius, Sven; Laustrup, Helle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum immunoglobulin G targeting the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the central nervous system (CNS) is a biomarker for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disease (NMOSD). Co-existence of NMOSD with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) putatively suggests susceptibility...

  3. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Voss, Anne; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Deficiencies of innate immune molecules like mannan binding lectin (MBL) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) and MBL belong to the same family of innate immune molecules - the collectins, which share important...

  4. Grasping the Existential Experience of Living with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander

    Dette projekt havde til formål at undersøge eksistentielle vilkår hos kvinder med sygdommen, systemisk lupus erythematosus, herunder hvordan disse vilkår blev erfaret gennem et langvarigt sygdomsforløb. Data blev konstrueret gennem 3 konsekutive, personlige interview sessions på dag 0, efter 6 og...

  5. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langefeld, Carl D; Ainsworth, Hannah C; Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify...

  6. A Size-Luminosity Relationship for Protoplanetary Disks in Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Marie; Andrews, Sean

    2018-01-01

    The sizes of the 340 GHz continuum emission from 56 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star-forming region were measured by modeling their ALMA visibility profiles. We describe the mechanism for these measurements and some preliminary results regarding the correlation between the continuum luminosities and sizes.

  7. Gastrointestinal manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Chalem, Philippe; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the history of the gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus since century XIX to our days, making a review of every organ and system involved, with special emphasis in gastropathy, enteritis, ileitis, malabsorption syndrome vasculitis bowel vasculopathy, mesenteric thrombosis, pancreatitis, ascites, peritonitis autoimmune hepatitis and more

  8. Tofacitinib Ameliorates Murine Lupus and Its Associated Vascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Smith, Carolyne K; Blanco, Luz; Zhao, Wenpu; Brooks, Stephen R; Thacker, Seth G; Abdalrahman, Zarzour; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Tsai, Wanxia L; Trier, Anna M; Nunez, Leti; Mast, Laurel; Hoffmann, Victoria; Remaley, Alan T; O'Shea, John J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Gadina, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its associated premature vascular damage. No drug to date targets both systemic inflammatory disease and the cardiovascular complications of SLE. Tofacitinib is a JAK inhibitor that blocks signaling downstream of multiple cytokines implicated in lupus pathogenesis. While clinical trials have shown that tofacitinib exhibits significant clinical efficacy in various autoimmune diseases, its role in SLE and the associated vascular pathology remains to be characterized. MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice were administered tofacitinib or vehicle by gavage for 6 weeks (therapeutic arm) or 8 weeks (preventive arm). Nephritis, skin inflammation, serum levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, mononuclear cell phenotype and gene expression, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) release, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and endothelial differentiation were compared in treated and untreated mice. Treatment with tofacitinib led to significant improvement in measures of disease activity, including nephritis, skin inflammation, and autoantibody production. In addition, tofacitinib treatment reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon responses in splenocytes and kidney tissue. Tofacitinib also modulated the formation of NETs and significantly increased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation. The drug was effective in both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Tofacitinib modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses, ameliorates murine lupus, and improves vascular function. These results indicate that JAK inhibitors have the potential to be beneficial in SLE and its associated vascular damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk of congenital heart block in infants. ↓ Number and severity of lupus flares. TG = triglycerides; VLDL = very lowdensity lipoproteins; TC = total cholesterol; .... immunosuppressive therapy, whereas ischaemic events may require anticoagulation. Moreover, SLE is a wellknown risk factor for depres sion, anxiety and fatigue ...

  10. Prevalence and pattern of Lupus erythematosus cell positivity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and pattern of lupus erythematosus (LE) cell positivity in diseases in Ile-Ife, Osun state was carried out between January 1999 and June 2004 (5½ years). A total of 96 patients with different diseases were screened for LE cell using standard techniques. Of this number, 63 (65.6%) were females and 33 ...

  11. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, with episodic course. It is characterized by periods of relative quiescence and periods of exacerbations which may involve any organ or system. About a young woman with a clinical delirium state, we revised the clinical neuropsychiatric features of SLE in the literature.

  12. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...

  13. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Jaramillo, D.

    1987-01-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor. (orig.) [de

  15. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Marta; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    on May 8, 2012 to discuss whether a treat-to-target approach could be applied in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (T2T/SLE), define a research agenda, and establish a plan for moving forward. In the present paper, observations raised at the meeting and literature data on potential...

  16. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low.

  17. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  18. Automated facial acne assessment from smartphone images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohammad; Vasefi, Fartash; Valdebran, Manuel; Huang, Kevin; Zhang, Haomiao; Kemp, William; MacKinnon, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    A smartphone mobile medical application is presented, that provides analysis of the health of skin on the face using a smartphone image and cloud-based image processing techniques. The mobile application employs the use of the camera to capture a front face image of a subject, after which the captured image is spatially calibrated based on fiducial points such as position of the iris of the eye. A facial recognition algorithm is used to identify features of the human face image, to normalize the image, and to define facial regions of interest (ROI) for acne assessment. We identify acne lesions and classify them into two categories: those that are papules and those that are pustules. Automated facial acne assessment was validated by performing tests on images of 60 digital human models and 10 real human face images. The application was able to identify 92% of acne lesions within five facial ROIs. The classification accuracy for separating papules from pustules was 98%. Combined with in-app documentation of treatment, lifestyle factors, and automated facial acne assessment, the app can be used in both cosmetic and clinical dermatology. It allows users to quantitatively self-measure acne severity and treatment efficacy on an ongoing basis to help them manage their chronic facial acne.

  19. Forensic Facial Reconstruction: The Final Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonia; Gupta, Vineeta; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Tyagi, Nutan

    2015-09-01

    Forensic facial reconstruction can be used to identify unknown human remains when other techniques fail. Through this article, we attempt to review the different methods of facial reconstruction reported in literature. There are several techniques of doing facial reconstruction, which vary from two dimensional drawings to three dimensional clay models. With the advancement in 3D technology, a rapid, efficient and cost effective computerized 3D forensic facial reconstruction method has been developed which has brought down the degree of error previously encountered. There are several methods of manual facial reconstruction but the combination Manchester method has been reported to be the best and most accurate method for the positive recognition of an individual. Recognition allows the involved government agencies to make a list of suspected victims'. This list can then be narrowed down and a positive identification may be given by the more conventional method of forensic medicine. Facial reconstruction allows visual identification by the individual's family and associates to become easy and more definite.

  20. Serious Infections among Adult Medicaid Beneficiaries with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Candace H.; Hiraki, Linda T.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Marty, Francisco M.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Kim, Seoyoung C.; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While serious infections are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the epidemiology in a nationwide cohort of SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) patients has not been examined. Methods Using the Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) database, 2000-2006, we identified patients 18-64 years with SLE and a subset with LN. We ascertained hospitalized serious infections using validated algorithms, and 30-day mortality rates. We used Poisson regression to calculate infection incidence rates (IR), and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for first infection, adjusted for sociodemographics, medication use, and a SLE-specific risk adjustment index. Results We identified 33,565 patients with SLE and 7,113 with LN. There were 9,078 serious infections in 5,078 SLE patients and 3,494 infections in 1,825 LN patients. The infection IR per 100 person-years was 10.8 in SLE and 23.9 in LN. In adjusted models, in SLE, we observed increased risks of infection among males compared to females (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.20-1.47), in Blacks compared to Whites (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.21), and glucocorticoid users (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.43-1.61) and immunosuppressive users (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20) compared with non-users. Hydroxychloroquine users had a reduced risk of infection compared to non-users (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.68-0.77). The 30-day mortality rate per 1,000 person-years among those hospitalized with infections was 21.4 in SLE and 38.7 in LN. Conclusion In this diverse, nationwide cohort of SLE patients, we observed a substantial burden of serious infections with many subsequent deaths. PMID:25772621