WorldWideScience

Sample records for facial bony lamella

  1. The bony crescent sign - a new sign of facial nerve schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, A.; Fagan, P.

    1992-01-01

    Schwannomas are relatively uncommon intracranial tumours. They most commonly involve the acoustic nerve followed in frequency by the trigeminal nerve. Other cranial nerves are rarely involved. Facial nerve schwannomas occurring within the petrous temporal bone are very rare. Their diagnosis may be missed prospectively even when appropriate computerized tomography (CT) scans are performed. Even in retrospect the site of abnormality may be difficult to identify, especially if there is an associated middle ear mass such as a cholesteatoma. In the 4 cases presented the facial nerve schwannoma was seen on high resolution CT as a soft tissue mass bounded anteriorly by a thin rim of bone. This bony crescent sign is a previously undescribed feature of facial nerve schwannoma which appears to be strongly indicative of the presence of this tumour. Recognition of this sign makes these tumours arising in the region of the geniculate ganglion easy to diagnose prospectively. 12 refs., 6 figs

  2. Classifying and Standardizing Panfacial Trauma With a New Bony Facial Trauma Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Garrett G A; Fishero, Brian A; Park, Stephen S; Sochor, Mark; Heltzel, Sara B; Christophel, J Jared

    2017-01-01

    The practice of facial trauma surgery would benefit from a useful quantitative scale that measures the extent of injury. To develop a facial trauma scale that incorporates only reducible fractures and is able to be reliably communicated to health care professionals. A cadaveric tissue study was conducted from October 1 to 3, 2014. Ten cadaveric heads were subjected to various degrees of facial trauma by dropping a fixed mass onto each head. The heads were then imaged with fine-cut computed tomography. A Bony Facial Trauma Scale (BFTS) for grading facial trauma was developed based only on clinically relevant (reducible) fractures. The traumatized cadaveric heads were then scored using this scale as well as 3 existing scoring systems. Regression analysis was used to determine correlation between degree of incursion of the fixed mass on the cadaveric heads and trauma severity as rated by the scoring systems. Statistical analysis was performed to determine correlation of the scores obtained using the BFTS with those of the 3 existing scoring systems. Scores obtained using the BFTS were not correlated with dentition (95% CI, -0.087 to 1.053; P = .08; measured as absolute number of teeth) or age of the cadaveric donor (95% CI, -0.068 to 0.944; P = .08). Facial trauma scores. Among all 10 cadaveric specimens (9 male donors and 1 female donor; age range, 41-87 years; mean age, 57.2 years), the facial trauma scores obtained using the BFTS correlated with depth of penetration of the mass into the face (odds ratio, 4.071; 95% CI, 1.676-6.448) P = .007) when controlling for presence of dentition and age. The BFTS scores also correlated with scores obtained using 3 existing facial trauma models (Facial Fracture Severity Scale, rs = 0.920; Craniofacial Disruption Score, rs = 0.945; and ZS Score, rs = 0.902; P trauma scales. Scores obtained using the BFTS were not correlated with dentition (odds ratio, .482; 95% CI, -0.087 to 1.053; P = .08; measured

  3. Reconstruction of bony facial contour deficiencies with polymethylmethacrylate implants: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy C. C. Abdo Filho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial trauma can be considered one of the most serious aggressions found in the medical centers due to the emotional consequences and the possibility of deformity. In craniofacial surgery, the use of autologous bone is still the first choice for reconstructing bony defects or irregularities. When there is a shortage of donor bone or a patient refuses an intracranial operation, alloplastic materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA can be used. The PMMA prosthesis can be pre-fabricated, bringing advantages such as reduction of surgical time, easy technical handling and good esthetic results. This paper describes the procedures for rehabilitating a patient with PMMA implants in the region of the face, recovering the facial contours and esthetics of the patient.

  4. Phylogenetic classification of bony fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Wiley, Edward O; Arratia, Gloria; Acero, Arturo; Bailly, Nicolas; Miya, Masaki; Lecointre, Guillaume; Ortí, Guillermo

    2017-07-06

    Fish classifications, as those of most other taxonomic groups, are being transformed drastically as new molecular phylogenies provide support for natural groups that were unanticipated by previous studies. A brief review of the main criteria used by ichthyologists to define their classifications during the last 50 years, however, reveals slow progress towards using an explicit phylogenetic framework. Instead, the trend has been to rely, in varying degrees, on deep-rooted anatomical concepts and authority, often mixing taxa with explicit phylogenetic support with arbitrary groupings. Two leading sources in ichthyology frequently used for fish classifications (JS Nelson's volumes of Fishes of the World and W. Eschmeyer's Catalog of Fishes) fail to adopt a global phylogenetic framework despite much recent progress made towards the resolution of the fish Tree of Life. The first explicit phylogenetic classification of bony fishes was published in 2013, based on a comprehensive molecular phylogeny ( www.deepfin.org ). We here update the first version of that classification by incorporating the most recent phylogenetic results. The updated classification presented here is based on phylogenies inferred using molecular and genomic data for nearly 2000 fishes. A total of 72 orders (and 79 suborders) are recognized in this version, compared with 66 orders in version 1. The phylogeny resolves placement of 410 families, or ~80% of the total of 514 families of bony fishes currently recognized. The ordinal status of 30 percomorph families included in this study, however, remains uncertain (incertae sedis in the series Carangaria, Ovalentaria, or Eupercaria). Comments to support taxonomic decisions and comparisons with conflicting taxonomic groups proposed by others are presented. We also highlight cases were morphological support exist for the groups being classified. This version of the phylogenetic classification of bony fishes is substantially improved, providing resolution

  5. Bony sequestrum: A radiologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennin, Felicie; Bousson, Valerie; Parlier, Caroline; Jomaah, Nabil; Khanine, Vanessa; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Lariboisiere Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2011-08-15

    According to a pathological definition, a bony sequestrum is defined as a piece of devitalized bone that has been separated from the surrounding bone during the process of necrosis. However, the radiological definition of a sequestrum is different and refers to an image of calcification visible within a lucent lesion, completely separated from the surrounding bone, without referring to the vascular status and histological nature of the calcified tissue. The term ''button sequestrum'' has been used in calvarial lesions. The prototype conditions that may present with a bony sequestrum are osteomyelitis and skeletal tuberculosis. Other conditions such as radiation necrosis, eosinophilic granuloma, metastatic carcinoma, primary lymphoma of bone, aggressive fibrous tumors may also manifest as osteolytic lesions containing a sequestrum. In addition, some primary bone tumors produce a matrix that may mineralize and sometimes simulate a bone sequestrum. These include osteoid tumors (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma), cartilaginous tumors (chondroma and chondroblastoma), lipomatous tumors (lipoma), and benign fibrous tumors (fibromyxoma, myxoma, and desmoplastic fibroma). Therefore, various conditions may present at imaging as a small area of osteolysis containing central calcifications. However, a careful analysis of the sequestrum as well as the associated clinical and radiological findings often enables to point toward a limited number of conditions. (orig.)

  6. Medial depression with bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sun Young; Lee, Young Uk; Youn, Eun Kyung; Suh, Sang Gyung; Kim, Dong Hyun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and CT findings of the medial depression and bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation. 1472 PNS CTs of the patients with symptoms of chronic sinusitis were retrospectively evaluated. The total incidence of depressed lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation was 3.5%(52/1472) on PNS CT. There was a statistically significant correlation between the increasing age and the incidence of depressed lamina papyracea. Depression of lamina papyracea anterior to the basal lamella were more common than those of the posterior depression. Associated findings were herniation of adjacent fatty tissue in all cases and the medial bowing and hypertrophied configuration of the medial rectus muscle without significant herniation in 19 cases(34%). Nontraumatic, asymptomatic depression with bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation is not uncommon with the incidence of 3.5%. Recognition of its existence and degree may be helpful in avoiding various ocular complication during ethmoid surgery

  7. Bony ankylosis following thermal and electrical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balen, P.F.; Helms, C.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Objective. Bony ankylosis has been described following trauma, paralysis, psoriasis, Reiter's syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Reports of bony ankylosis following thermal and electrical injury are limited.Design and patients. Thirteen cases of burn-related joint ankylosis in four patients are presented.Conclusion. Patients with burns from thermal or electrical injury may develop bony ankylosis among other radiographic manifestations. This bony ankylosis may result either from bridging extra-articular heterotopic ossification with preservation of the underlying joint or from intra-articular fusion due to joint destruction. (orig.)

  8. Bony ankylosis of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Do; Yoon, Young Nam; Um, Ki Doo; Ra, Jong Ill; Lee, Wan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    Ankylosis of joint is defined as limited movement due to infection, trauma, or surgical procedure. A 59-year-old female with a chief complaint of limited movements during mouth opening had a positive history of trauma to her right TMJ area about 5 years ago. From that time, progressive mouth opening limitation and intermittent pain have occurred. At the time of admission the patient showed mandibular deviation to the right side during mouth opening, with a maximum opening limited to 5 mm. On plain radiographs, right condylar enlargement and joint space reduction by newly formed bony tissues were observed. CT scans showed right condylar enlargement, cortical sclerosis, and thickening of the condyle, articular fossa and articular eminence.

  9. [Presurgical orthodontics for facial asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrère, H

    2003-03-01

    As with the treatment of all facial deformities, orthodontic pre-surgical preparation for facial asymmetry should aim at correcting severe occlusal discrepancies not solely on the basis of a narrow occlusal analysis but also in a way that will not disturb the proposed surgical protocol. In addition, facial asymmetries require specific adjustments, difficult to derive and to apply because of their inherent atypical morphological orientation of both alveolar and basal bony support. Three treated cases illustrate different solutions to problems posed by pathological torque: this torque must be considered with respect to proposed surgical changes, within the framework of their limitations and their possible contra-indications.

  10. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  11. Modelling the acoustical response of lossy lamella-crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The sound propagation properties of lossy lamella-crystals are analysed theoretically utilizing a rig- orous wave expansion formalism and an effective medium approach. We investigate both sup- ported and free-standing crystal slab structures and predict high absorption for a broad range...... of frequencies. A detailed derivation of the formalism is presented, and we show how the results obtained in the subwavelength and superwavelength regimes qualitatively can be reproduced by homogenizing the lamella-crystals. We come to the conclusion that treating this structure within the metamaterial limit...... only makes sense if the crystal filling fraction is sufficiently large to satisfy an effective medium approach....

  12. A technique for the quantification of the 3D connectivity of thin articulations in bony sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloul, Asmaa; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Hojjat, Seyed-Parsa; Whyne, Cari M

    2010-04-19

    The anatomy and development of cranial and facial sutures have been studied in detail using histological sections, 2D radiographs and more recently CT imaging. However, little attention has been paid to evaluating and quantifying the connectivity of these thin cortical bone articulations. More recent technological advances such as micro-CT imaging has the potential to be used to provide quantitative measurements of 3D connectivity in bony articulations. This study presents a new technique for quantifying the connectivity of bony projections inside cranial and facial sutures using a combination of skeletonization, thinning algorithms and 3D intensity mapping. The technique is demonstrated in five sutures through semi-automated analysis and image processing of microCT scans. In the sagittal, coronal and frontozygomatic sutures an average bone connectivity of 6.6-11.6% was found with multiple bony projections providing an interlocking structure between adjacent bones. Much higher bone connectivity was present in the zygomaticotemporal and zygomaticomaxillary sutures (22.7-37.4%) with few bony projections. This method combining microCT scanning and image processing techniques was successfully used to quantify the connectivity of thin bone articulations and allowed detailed assessment of sutural fusion in 3D. The wider application of this technique may allow quantification of connectivity in other structures, in particular fracture healing of long bones. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Roehm, P.C.; Mends, F.; Hagiwara, M.; Fatterpekar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell’s palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers

  14. Problems of lamella flanges in steel bridge construction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křístek, V.; Škaloud, Miroslav; Urushadze, Shota; Kunrt, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2016), s. 11-15 ISSN 2217-8139 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01035S Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : bridges * lamella flanges * repeated loading * breathing * limit states Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://scindeks-clanci.ceon.rs/data/pdf/0543-0798/2016/0543-07981601011K.pdf

  15. Effects of drying methods of lamellas used in multilayer parquet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flat sawn green lamellas with 5 and 2 mm thicknesses, which were cut away from Iroko lumber by means of thin cutting frame saw, were dried with 3 different drying methods such as drying in lumber drying kiln, jet ventilated automatic veneer roller dryer and veneer press dryer. Effect of drying temperature on surface ...

  16. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy . This is a condition in which the facial ... speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, ...

  17. Computed tomographic features of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve in pediatric patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Tatsuo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diameters of the various bony canals of the inner ear in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and establish criteria for detecting hypoplasia of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve. Measurements obtained in 118 patients without inner ear malformations among 160 patients with unilateral SNHL were analyzed. The diameters of the internal auditory canal and the bony canals of the cochlear, vestibular, and facial nerves were measured on transverse or coronal computed tomographic images. Mean values (±standard deviation (SD)) were compared between the affected and unaffected ears, and statistical analysis was done. The diameter of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve was significantly smaller in affected ears than in unaffected ears (P<0.01). The affected ears could be divided into groups with (72 ears) and without (46 ears) bony canal stenosis. Most (60%) of the patients with unilateral SNHL showed a significant difference in the diameters of the bony canals of the cochlear nerve between the affected and unaffected sides; moreover, the mean value was significantly smaller in affected ears. The diameter of <1.7 mm on transverse images or <1.8 mm on coronal images suggests hypoplasia. (author)

  18. Computed tomography of the facial canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    The radiological details of the facial canal was investigated by computed tomography. In the first part of this study, dry skulls were used to delineate the full course of the facial canal by computed tomography. In the second part of this study, the patients with chronic otitis media and secondary cholesteatoma were evaluated. The labyrinthine and tympanic parts of the canal were well demonstrated with the axial scanning, and the mastoid part with the coronal scanning. Moreover, computed tomography showed excellent delineation of the middle ear contents. In patients with secondary cholesteatoma, the destructions of the intratympanic course of the bony facial canal were also assessed preoperatively. (author)

  19. Extraordinary absorption of sound in porous lamella-crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Romero-García, V.; Picó, R.

    2014-01-01

    . Experimental measurements show that strong all-angle sound absorption with almost zero reflectance takes place for a frequency range exceeding two octaves. We demonstrate that lowering the crystal filling fraction increases the wave interaction time and is responsible for the enhancement of intrinsic material......We present the design of a structured material supporting complete absorption of sound with a broadband response and functional for any direction of incident radiation. The structure which is fabricated out of porous lamellas is arranged into a low-density crystal and backed by a reflecting support...

  20. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy.

  1. Morphometric Measurements of Bony Nasolacrimal Canal in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ela, Araz Server; Cigdem, Kalaycik Ertugay; Karagoz, Yesim; Yigit, Ozgur; Longur, Ecem Sevim

    2018-05-01

    Morphology and dimensions of the bony nasolacrimal canal duct (BNLD) as a key factor in the development of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. We aimed to obtain detailed morphometric analysis of BNLD in children without nasolacrimal duct pathology by using computed tomography and provide standard measurements by means of age which could be utilized in planning management or in invasive interventions. Picture Archiving Communication Systems database of our hospital's radiology department was searched for this retrospective study. Subjects were under 18 years of age who had undergone a paranasal, maxillofacial, or temporal bone high-resolution computed tomography scan in last 2 years with various indications. Those with fractures including facial bones and/or nasolacrimal canal or history of nasolacrimal duct pathology were excluded from the study. We measured the diameter, angle, and surface area of BNLD. A total number of 136 subjects (86 boys, 50 girls) were included in the study. The average age was 7.3 ± 5.1 years. We documented statistically significantly positive correlation between all measured diameters and ages (P  0.050). Our study demonstrated that development of BNLD continues during childhood, regardless of gender.

  2. Bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible as a sequelae of noma: A rare case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B.; Awasthi, Ujjwala Rastogi; Mody, Bharat M.; Suma, Gundareddy N.; Garg, Shruti [Dept. of Medicine and Radiology, ITS Center for Dental Studies and Research, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Noma is a gangrenous disease of the orofacial region that leads to severe facial tissue destruction and is a significant cause of death among children. With the advent of modern antibiotics and improved nutrition, children with noma may survive into adulthood, but must face the challenge of undergoing repair of the sequelae of noma. This report describes a case of bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible in a 28-year-old female patient, which was a sequelae of a childhood case of noma.

  3. Dynamics of interacting edge defects in copolymer lamellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; McGraw, Joshua D.; Rowe, Ian D. W.

    2011-03-01

    It is known that terraces at the interface of lamella forming diblock copolymers do not make discontinuous jumps in height. Rather, their profiles are smoothly varying. The width of the transition region between two lamellar heights is typically several hundreds of nanometres, resulting from a balance between surface tension, chain stretching penalties, and the enthalpy of mixing. What is less well known in these systems is what happens when two transition regions approach one another. In this study, we show that time dependent experimental data of interacting copolymer lamellar edges is consistent with a model that assumes a repulsion between adjacent edges. The range of the interaction between edge defects is consistent with the profile width of noninteracting diblock terraces. Financial support from NSERC of Canada is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Evaporation-driven clustering of microscale pillars and lamellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young, E-mail: hyk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    As a liquid film covering an array of micro- or nanoscale pillars or lamellae evaporates, its meniscus pulls the elastic patterns together because of capillary effects, leading to clustering of the slender microstructures. While this elastocapillary coalescence may imply various useful applications, it is detrimental to a semiconductor manufacturing process called the spin drying, where a liquid film rinses patterned wafers until drying. To understand the transient mechanism underlying such self-organization during and after liquid evaporation, we visualize the clustering dynamics of polymer micropatterns. Our visualization experiments reveal that the patterns clumped during liquid evaporation can be re-separated when completely dried in some cases. This restoration behavior is explained by considering adhesion energy of the patterns as well as capillary forces, which leads to a regime map to predict whether permanent stiction would occur. This work does not only extend our understanding of micropattern stiction, but also suggests a novel path to control and prevent pattern clustering.

  5. Facial orientation and facial shape in extant great apes: a geometric morphometric analysis of covariation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaux, Dimitri; Guy, Franck; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vignaud, Patrick; Ducrocq, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the bony face is complex, its morphology being influenced in part by the rest of the cranium. Characterizing the facial morphological variation and craniofacial covariation patterns in extant hominids is fundamental to the understanding of their evolutionary history. Numerous studies on hominid facial shape have proposed hypotheses concerning the relationship between the anterior facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. In this study we test these hypotheses in a sample of adult specimens belonging to three extant hominid genera (Homo, Pan and Gorilla). Intraspecific variation and covariation patterns are analyzed using geometric morphometric methods and multivariate statistics, such as partial least squared on three-dimensional landmarks coordinates. Our results indicate significant intraspecific covariation between facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. Hominids share similar characteristics in the relationship between anterior facial shape and facial block orientation. Modern humans exhibit a specific pattern in the covariation between anterior facial shape and basicranial flexion. This peculiar feature underscores the role of modern humans' highly-flexed basicranium in the overall integration of the cranium. Furthermore, our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a relationship between the reduction of the value of the cranial base angle and a downward rotation of the facial block in modern humans, and to a lesser extent in chimpanzees.

  6. Imaging symptomatics in recurrent facial nerve neuritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavchev, D.

    2001-01-01

    Gaining better insight into the etiology and pathogenesis of recurrent facial nerve neuritis requires the use of an appropriate imaging modality of examination. This is retrospective analysis of 106 patients with recurrent n. facialis neuritis, studied by conventional x-ray methods, including: segment roentgenography according to Schuller, Stenverse, Biezalski (in children), and hypocyloidal directly enlarged polytomography, with emphasis laid on their role in the diagnostic algorithm of study. Assessment is done of the Fallopian canal width and course, with a special reference to adjacent bony structures, having essential practical bearing on planning interventions for decompression of the nerve and chronic otomastoiditis treatment. In 30 % of the patients are observed inflammatory changes in the parafacial bony structures as an expression of inflammatory otogenic etiology of recurrent n. facialis neuritis, and in 7 % - eburneization of bony structures. The symptom of improved Fallopian canal visibility is documented in cases presenting chronic inflammatory processes involving parafacial cellular structures. (author)

  7. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  8. Femtosecond laser cutting of multiple thin corneal stromal lamellae for endothelial bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Gauthier, Anne-Sophie; Peocʼh, Michel; Dumollard, Jean-Marc; Acquart, Sophie; Montard, Romain; Delbosc, Bernard; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of cutting multiple thin stromal lamellae in human donor corneas using a commercial femtosecond laser (FSL) to provide cell carriers for future endothelial graft bioengineering. Eight edematous organ-cultured corneas not suitable for grafting for endothelial reasons were mounted on a Ziemer anterior chamber and cut with a Z6 FSL with 6 successive parallel cuts, from depth to surface. Target thickness of each lamella ranged from 100 to 150 μm depending on initial corneal thickness. Thickness was measured using anterior segment optical coherence tomography before and after cutting on mounted corneas, and on each stromal lamella after detachment. Scanning electron microscopy observation was performed on 4 lamellae and histological cross sections on 1 cornea before detachment. A median of 5 (minimum 3, maximum 7) lamellae was obtained per cornea. All lamellae still attached were the most posterior ones, suggesting that FSL was less efficient because of light scattering by edematous stroma. Cut precision and postdetachment swelling were correlated with anterior-posterior position within the cornea. Median lamella thickness was 127 μm (56-222 μm) before detachment and 196 μm (80-304 μm) after detachment. Surface state was consistent with previously reported FSL lamellar cuts during Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty. Up to 7 thin lamellae can be cut in stored corneas with an FSL. This method, once optimized primarily by using deswelled, more transparent corneas, could prove effective for recycling unsuitable donor corneas in corneal bioengineering processes.

  9. Traumatic facial nerve palsy: CT patterns of facial nerve canal fracture and correlation with clinical severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Cheol; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Hyun Min; Lee, Young Suk; Lee, Jee Young [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To analyse the patterns of facial nerve canal injury seen at temporal bone computed tomography (CT) in patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy and to correlate these with clinical manifestations and outcome. Thirty cases of temporal bone CT in 29 patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy were analyzed with regard to the patterns of facial nerve canal involvement. The patterns were correlated with clinical grade, the electroneurographic (ENoG) findings, and clinical outcome. For clinical grading, the House-Brackmann scale was used, as follows:grade I-IV, partial palsy group; grade V-VI, complete palsy group. The electroneuronographic findings were categorized as mild to moderate (below 90%) or severe (90% and over) degeneration. In 25 cases, the bony wall of the facial nerve canals was involved directly (direct finding): discontinuity of the bony wall was onted in 22 cases, bony spicules in ten, and bony wall displacement in five. Indirect findings were canal widening in nine cases and adjacent bone fracture in two. In one case, there were no direct or indirect findings. All cases in which there was complete palsy (n=8) showed one or more direct findings including spicules in six, while in the incomplete palsy group (n=22), 17 cases showed direct findings. In the severe degeneration group (n=13), on ENog, 12 cases demonstrated direct findings, including spicules in nine cases. In 24 patients, symptoms of facial palsy showed improvement at follow up evaluation. Four of the five patients in whom symptoms did not improve had spicules. Among ten patients with spicules, five underwent surgery and symptoms improved in four of these; among the five patients not operated on , symptoms did not improve in three. In most patients with facial palsy after temporal bone injury, temporal bone CT revealed direct or indirect facial nerve canal involvement, and in complete palsy or severe degeneration groups, there were direct findings in most cases. We believe that meticulous

  10. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  11. Importance of bony analysis for interpreting ear CT scans: part three; ORL - tomodensitometrie de l'oreille. Interet de l'analyse osseuse dans l'interpretation des scanners de l'oreille (troisieme partie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serhal, M.; Dordea, M.; Cymbalista, M. [Hopital de Montfermeil, Service de Radiologie, 93 - Montfermeil (France); Halimi, P. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Iffenecker, C. [Clinique Radiologique, 62 - Boulogne sur Mer (France); Bensimon, J.L

    2003-02-01

    The accurate description of bony changes in ear CT scans has a great diagnostic and therapeutic impact. The third part shows the way to analyze bone remodeling when CT scan is performed for tumors in the vicinity of the temporal bone, for intra temporal lesions of the facial nerve and for external auditory canal malformations. It demonstrates how bony analysis should be included in postoperative report of ear CT scan. The importance of bony signs in tumors and pseudo tumors of the inner ear are outlined. (authors)

  12. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Sophie; Gill, Hameet S; Fialkov, Jeffery A; Matic, Damir B; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2016-02-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of some of the changes in aspects of facial fracture management. 2. Assess a patient presenting with facial fractures. 3. Understand indications and timing of surgery. 4. Recognize exposures of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton. 5. Identify methods for repair of typical facial fracture patterns. 6. Discuss the common complications seen with facial fractures. Restoration of the facial skeleton and associated soft tissues after trauma involves accurate clinical and radiologic assessment to effectively plan a management approach for these injuries. When surgical intervention is necessary, timing, exposure, sequencing, and execution of repair are all integral to achieving the best long-term outcomes for these patients.

  13. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keum Won [Pohang Medical Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hae Kwan [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis.

  14. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keum Won; Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Cheong, Hae Kwan

    2001-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis

  15. Ultrastructural relationships between the receptor nerve fiber and surrounding lamellae in Krause end-bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, I

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural relationship between the receptor nerve fiber and the surrounding lamellae in Krause end-bulbs was discussed. Many sites of specialized junctions of symmetrical or asymmetrical type along the receptor nerve fiber and the surrounding lamellae were found. In addition, in close vicinity to them, spine-like digitations of the receptor nerve fiber, filled mainly with small clear vesicles, were observed. Mitochondrion-like cholinesterase-positive structures bulging in some cytoplasmic lamellae were also found. It is suggested that a functional link might exist between the specialized junctions, digitations and mitochrondrion-like structures in the transformation of external mechanical stimuli into nerve impulses.

  16. Bony orbital distances among the Filipino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Constance M; Jimenez, David F; Laskey, Antoinette; Alcantara, Briccio G; Braddock, Stephen R

    2002-03-01

    Six hundred and seventy seven radiographs were selected from the logs of films taken in a major hospital in Metro Manila, Philippines over the course of the previous year. Two hundred and eighty-eight female and 389 male, healthy Filipinos between the ages of birth and twenty years were selected based on the availability of a modified Waters' projection and lateral skull film taken at the same time. Measurements for the lateral orbital wall were made at the site of the suture on the medial surface of the zygomatic bone. The medial orbital wall measurement was the distance between the dacrya using a correction factor formula of CF = D-d/D where D is the target film distance and d is the object film distance (1). The actual bony measurements were calculated. The data was gathered and plotted according to sex and in age in years. Graphs were generated using SAS over a graph software. Lines were smooth using cubic spline technique developed by Reinsch with the smoothest value of 75 (2). The mean plus two, four, and six standard deviations were included in each of the curves.

  17. Incidental bony pathology when reporting trauma orthopantomograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macanovic, M.; Gangidi, S.; Porter, G.; Brown, S.; Courtney, D.; Porter, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radiologists frequently report orthopantomograms (OPTs) and other views of the mandible, most often in patients who have suffered facial trauma. These examinations may reveal incidental pathology. It is important that radiologists are aware of the radiological appearances and the clinical significance of these lesions. In this review we will present examples of the more common odontogenic lesions including: radicular cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, dentigerous cyst, ameloblastoma, and also examples of non-odontogenic pathology: bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) and chronic osteomyelitis. Although some of the lesions will require computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for further lesion characterization and evaluation of the surrounding tissues, we are going to focus on the plain film appearances. We will also briefly discuss the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and treatment of these lesions.

  18. Incidental bony pathology when reporting trauma orthopantomograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macanovic, M., E-mail: mladenmaca@gmail.co [Derriford Hospital NHS Trust, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Gangidi, S.; Porter, G.; Brown, S.; Courtney, D. [Derriford Hospital NHS Trust, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Porter, J. [Community Dental Service, Plymouth Primary Care Trust, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Radiologists frequently report orthopantomograms (OPTs) and other views of the mandible, most often in patients who have suffered facial trauma. These examinations may reveal incidental pathology. It is important that radiologists are aware of the radiological appearances and the clinical significance of these lesions. In this review we will present examples of the more common odontogenic lesions including: radicular cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, dentigerous cyst, ameloblastoma, and also examples of non-odontogenic pathology: bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) and chronic osteomyelitis. Although some of the lesions will require computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for further lesion characterization and evaluation of the surrounding tissues, we are going to focus on the plain film appearances. We will also briefly discuss the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and treatment of these lesions.

  19. Facial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  1. Avifauna of Boni-Dodori National Reserves, Lamu and Garissa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    observers conducted a 60 min walk along a designated path in open ... rophoneus viridis were recorded in the Boni-Dodori area for the first time. ..... Mouse-coloured Sunbird Cyanomitra veroxii * .... Expedition Field techniques: Bird Surveys.

  2. Blunt chest trauma: bony injury in the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreik, Nasri H; Francis, Irene; Ray, Arun; Rogers, Benedict A; Ricketts, David M

    2016-02-01

    The management of blunt chest trauma is an evolving concept with no clear current guidelines. This article explores the bony injuries associated with this, focusing on rib fractures and flail segments and the themes around investigation and best management.

  3. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid proliferative lesions are rather common in bony fishes but disagreement exists in the fish pathology community concerning diagnostic criteria for hyperplastic versus neoplastic lesions. To simplify the diagnosis of proliferative thyroid lesions and to reduce confusion reg...

  4. Conservative Treatment for Bony Healing in Pediatric Lumbar Spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2017-06-15

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. The aim of this study was to investigate recent outcomes of conservative treatment for bony healing in pediatric patients with lumbar spondylolysis (LS) and to identify the problems that need to be resolved. Several diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for LS have been developed recently, leading to better outcomes for bony healing. Overall, 63 consecutive pediatric patients (53 boys and 10 girls) with LS (average age: 13.8 years; range: 6-17 years) were analyzed. Diagnosis and staging (very early, early, progressive, and terminal) were based on multidetector computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For all patients except those with terminal-stage pars defect, conservative treatment included rest, avoidance of sports, and the use of a thoraco-lumbo-sacral-type trunk brace. Follow-up MRI was performed monthly. When the signal changes resolved, CT scans were obtained to assess bony healing. Three patients dropped out during the study period. A total of 60 patients were included (50 boys and 10 girls) in this study (follow-up rate: 95.2%), with 86 instances of LS (very early: 36, early: 16, progressive: 15, terminal: 19) in 65 laminae. In the very early stage, the bony healing rate was 100%, and average treatment period was 2.5 months (range: 1-7 months). In the early stage, the bony healing rate was 93.8%, and the average treatment period was 2.6 months (range: 1-6 months). In the progressive stage, the bony healing rate was 80.0%, and the average treatment period was 3.6 months (range: 3-5 months). The average overall recurrence rate was 26.1%. All patients showing recurrence eventually achieved bony healing. High bony healing rates and short treatment periods were observed with conservative treatment in pediatric patients with LS. However, the recurrence rates were relatively high. This issue should be targeted in future studies. 2.

  5. Relationship of bony trabecular characteristics and age to bone mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Hoon; Song, Young Han; Yoon, Young Nam; Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do

    2006-01-01

    Bony strength is dependent on bone mass and bony structure. So this study was designed to investigate the relationship between the bone mass and bony mass and bony trabecular characteristics. Study subjects were 51 females (average age 68.6 years) and 20 males (average age 66.4 years). Bony mineral density (BMD, grams/cm 2 ) of proximal femur was measured by a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected from the digitized radiographs of proximal femur. A customized computer program processed morphologic operations (MO) of ROIs. 44 skeletal variables of MO were calculated from ROIs on the Ward's triangle and greater trochanter of femur. WHO BMD classes were predicted by MO variables of the same ROI. Classification and Regression Tree analysis was used for calculating weighted kappa values, sensitivity and specificity of MO. The discriminating factors of morphologic operation were branch point, branch point [per cm sq]. Age also played important role in distinguishing osteoporotic classes. The sensitivity of MO at Ward's triangle and Greater Trochanter was 91.8%, 65.6%, respectively. The specificity of MO was 100% at Ward's triangle and Greater Trochanter. Bony trabecular characteristics obtained using radiological bone morphometric analysis seem to be related to bone mass

  6. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports ...

  7. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  8. Facial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  9. Rejuvenecimiento facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Daniel Jacubovsky, Dr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento facial es un proceso único y particular a cada individuo y está regido en especial por su carga genética. El lifting facial es una compleja técnica desarrollada en nuestra especialidad desde principios de siglo, para revertir los principales signos de este proceso. Los factores secundarios que gravitan en el envejecimiento facial son múltiples y por ello las ritidectomías o lifting cérvico faciales descritas han buscado corregir los cambios fisonómicos del envejecimiento excursionando, como se describe, en todos los planos tisulares involucrados. Esta cirugía por lo tanto, exige conocimiento cabal de la anatomía quirúrgica, pericia y experiencia para reducir las complicaciones, estigmas quirúrgicos y revisiones secundarias. La ridectomía facial ha evolucionado hacia un procedimiento más simple, de incisiones más cortas y disecciones menos extensas. Las suspensiones musculares han variado en su ejecución y los vectores de montaje y resección cutánea son cruciales en los resultados estéticos de la cirugía cérvico facial. Hoy estos vectores son de tracción más vertical. La corrección de la flaccidez va acompañada de un interés en reponer el volumen de la superficie del rostro, en especial el tercio medio. Las técnicas quirúrgicas de rejuvenecimiento, en especial el lifting facial, exigen una planificación para cada paciente. Las técnicas adjuntas al lifting, como blefaroplastias, mentoplastía, lipoaspiración de cuello, implantes faciales y otras, también han tenido una positiva evolución hacia la reducción de riesgos y mejor éxito estético.

  10. Reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Urtiaga Abad, Juan Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    El presente proyecto trata sobre uno de los campos más problemáticos de la inteligencia artificial, el reconocimiento facial. Algo tan sencillo para las personas como es reconocer una cara conocida se traduce en complejos algoritmos y miles de datos procesados en cuestión de segundos. El proyecto comienza con un estudio del estado del arte de las diversas técnicas de reconocimiento facial, desde las más utilizadas y probadas como el PCA y el LDA, hasta técnicas experimentales que utilizan ...

  11. A nano lamella NbTi–NiTi composite with high strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiang [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Advanced Copper and Tungsten Materials, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Institute of Applied Physics of Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing and Department of Materials Science and engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Jiang, Daqiang [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing and Department of Materials Science and engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Hao, Shijie; Yu, Cun; Zhang, Junsong [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing and Department of Materials Science and engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Ren, Yang [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lu, Deping; Xie, Shifang [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Advanced Copper and Tungsten Materials, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Institute of Applied Physics of Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Cui, Lishan, E-mail: lishancui63@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing and Department of Materials Science and engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China)

    2015-05-01

    A hypereutectic Nb{sub 60}Ti{sub 24}Ni{sub 16} (at%) alloy was prepared by vacuum induction melting, and a nano lamellae NbTi–NiTi composite was obtained by hot-forging and wire-drawing of the ingot. Microscopic analysis showed that NbTi and NiTi nano lamellae distributed alternatively in the composite, and aligned along the wire axial direction, with a high volume fraction (~70%) of NbTi nano lamellae. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that stress induced martensitic transformation occurred upon loading, which would effectively weaken the stress concentration at the interface and avoid the introduction of defects into the nano reinforced phase. Then the embedded NbTi nano lamellae exhibited a high elastic strain up to 2.72%, 1.5 times as high as that of the Nb nanowires embedded in a conventional plastic matrix, and the corresponding stress carried by NbTi was evaluated as 2.53 GPa. The high volume fraction of NbTi nano lamellae improved the translation of high strength from the nano reinforced phase into bulk properties of the composite, with a platform stress of ~1.7 GPa and a fracture strength of ~1.9 GPa.

  12. FACIAL PAIN·

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -As the conditions which cause pain in the facial structures are many and varied, the ... involvement of the auriculo-temporal nerve and is usually relieved by avulsion of that .... of its effects. If it is uspected that a lesion in the po terior fossa ma ...

  13. Bony Regeneration of the Sella after Transsphenoidal Pituitary Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia-Cherif, Mehdi; Delpierre, Isabelle; Hassid, Sergio; De Witte, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the possible bony regrowth of the sella after transsphenoidal surgery without any intraoperative sellar reconstruction. Radiologic findings of the sella were reviewed in patients with pituitary tumors treated by transsphenoidal surgery. In 17 patients who had postoperative cranial computed tomography scans, bony regeneration of the sellar floor was evaluated by comparing immediate and late postoperative scans. The bony opening reduction was measured in transverse and sagittal planes. The median bony opening diameter in the transverse plane was 8.8 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 5.7-11.4) on the first scan and 4.2 mm (IQR 0.8-6.8) on the second scan. In the sagittal plane, it was 4.8 mm (IQR 1.8-6.8) on the first scan and 2.9 mm (IQR 1.6-3.9) on the second scan. These changes occurred in a median time of 36 months (IQR 22-42). There was a statistically significant decrease of the bony opening diameters in both the transverse and sagittal planes (P transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Higher acid-chlorite reactivity of cell corner middle lamella lignin in black spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2007-01-01

    To determine if there was a delignification behavior difference between secondary wall (S2) and middle lamella (cell corner or CC) lignin, black spruce cross-sections were acid-chlorite delignified and the tissue was evaluated in-situ by Raman imaging. Lignin concentration in S2 and CC was determined in numerous latewood cell areas in the two hour delignified cross...

  15. Effect of surface roughness on drying speed of drying lamellas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lamellas, which are defined as top layers of multilayer parquet and favourable to wood veneer can be dried in jet ventilated automatic veneer roller dryer due to short drying period. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of surface roughness on the drying speed of the veneer roller dryer. Quercus spp.

  16. David Lynchi lamella / Slavoj Žižek ; tõlkinud Hasso Krull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Žižek, Slavoj, 1949-

    1996-01-01

    Režissöör ja tema filmide psühhoanalüütiline analüüs, tõlge kogumikust "Reading Seminar XI. Lacan's Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis", 1995. Lisad : tõlkija seletab sõna "lamella" tähenduse, Aare Ermeli koostatud režissööri filmograafia (mittetäielik)

  17. [Orthognathic surgery, master-piece of maxillo-facial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reychler, H

    2001-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery is this field of the maxillofacial surgery which aims to reposition the jaws or some segments of these jaws when masticatory dysfunctions are evident. This tridimensional repositioning in the craniofacial skeleton allows to restore the masticatory function by means of osteotomies, which must be followed either by preoperative simulated bony displacements or by callus bone distraction. Not only are the functional benefits evident on the dental, articular and neuromuscular levels, but also a facial esthetic harmony can almost be obtained.

  18. The spectrum of allergy to South African bony fish (Teleosti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volunteer population-based cohort in the Western Cape. Participants. 105 volunteer subjects with suspected fish allergy were recruited by advertising in the local press. Main outcome. Species-specific bony fish allergy was confirmed or refuted by DBPCFC. Results. The four most common seafood species reported to cause ...

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function.

  20. Bony exostosis of the atlas with resultant cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavotinek, J.P.; Sage, M.R.; Brophy, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    A case of tenth and twelfth nerve compression secondary to a bony exostosis of the first cervical vertebra is described. This uncommon phenomenon serves to outline the importance of imaging the course of a cranial nerve when no intracranial abnormality is demonstrable on CT or MRI. The radiologic features of spinal osteochondromas are reviewed. (orig.)

  1. The bony labyrinth of the middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Rolf; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    We performed 3D virtual reconstructions based on CT scans to study the bony labyrinth morphology in 14 individuals from the large middle Pleistocene hominin sample from the site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins represent early members of the Neandertal clade and provide an opportunity to compare the data with the later in time Neandertals, as well as Pleistocene and recent humans more broadly. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins do not differ from the Neandertals in any of the variables related to the absolute and relative sizes and shape of the semicircular canals. Indeed, the entire Neandertal clade seems to be characterized by a derived pattern of canal proportions, including a relatively small posterior canal and a relatively large lateral canal. In contrast, one of the most distinctive features observed in Neandertals, the low placement of the posterior canal (i.e., high sagittal labyrinthine index), is generally not present in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins. This low placement is considered a derived feature in Neandertals and is correlated with a more vertical orientation of the ampullar line (LSCm  PPp), and third part of the facial canal (LSCm < FC3). Some variation is present within the Atapuerca (SH) sample, however, with a few individuals approaching the Neandertal condition more closely. In addition, the cochlear shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins is low, indicating a reduction in the height of the cochlea. Although the phylogenetic polarity of this feature is less clear, the low shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins may be a derived feature. Regardless, cochlear height subsequently increased in Neandertals. In contrast to previous suggestions, the expanded data in the present study indicate no difference across the genus Homo in the angle of inclination of the cochlear basal turn (COs < LSCm). Principal components analysis largely confirms these observations. While not

  2. Analysis of low-energy and high-frequency femtosecond laser for the construction of deep anterior donor corneal lamellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Victor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and reliability of a low-energy femtosecond laser with a high repetition rate for construction of deep anterior donor corneal lamellae. Methods: This was a prospective laboratory investigation. Twenty-five human corneal buttons were femtosecond laser cut to create thick anterior lamellae (diameter, 10mm; thickness, 500µm. The laser cuts were made using an LDV® femtosecond laser in a Ziemer® anterior chamber. To obtain a better edge, the lamellae were trephined with an 8mm trephine (Katena®. The central corneal thickness and the anterior lamellae were measured using a Mitutoyo® thickness gauge with an accuracy of 0.001mm. Results: The central thickness of the 25 corneas ranged from 500 to 705µm (mean, 584 ± 51µm. The thickness of the anterior lamellae ranged from 420 to 480µm (mean, 455 ± 12.7µm. The anterior lamellae diameters were 7.90 ± 0.1mm, and all laser cuts were round. The lamellar interfaces appeared regular by surgical microscopy. There were no cases of inter-lamellar adhesion. Conclusion: The LDV® femtosecond laser appears to be a safe and reliable instrument for cutting deep anterior lamellae from donor corneoscleral buttons. Minimal variation in donor lamellar depth with the laser will be useful for creating donor corneal tissue for deeper anterior lamellar keratoplasty or endothelial keratoplasty surgery or both from a single donor cornea.

  3. Management of segmental bony defects: the role of osteoconductive orthobiologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael D

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge about, and the availability of, orthobiologic materials has increased exponentially in the last decade. Although previously confined to the experimental or animal-model realm, several orthobiologics have been shown to be useful in a variety of clinical situations. As surgical techniques in vascular anastomosis, soft-tissue coverage, limb salvage, and fracture stabilization have improved, the size and frequency of bony defects (commensurate with the severity of the initial injury) have increased, as well. Because all methods of managing segmental bony defects have drawbacks, a need remains for a readily available, void-filling, inexpensive bone substitute. Such a bone substitute fulfills a permissive role in allowing new bone to grow into a given defect. Such potential osteoconductive materials include ceramics, calcium sulfate or calcium phosphate compounds, hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bone, corals, and recently developed polymers. Some materials that have osteoinductive properties, such as demineralized bone matrix, also display prominent osteoconductive properties.

  4. Imaging of the hip and bony pelvis. Techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). MRI Centre; Johnson, K.J. [Princess of Wales Birmingham Children' s Hospital (United Kingdom); Whitehouse, R.W. (eds.) [Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook on imaging of the bony pelvis and hip joint that provides a detailed description of the techniques and imaging findings relevant to this complex anatomical region. In the first part of the book, the various techniques and procedures employed for imaging the pelvis and hip are discussed in detail. The second part of the book documents the application of these techniques to the diverse clinical problems and diseases encountered. Among the many topics addressed are congenital and developmental disorders including developmental dysplasia of the hip, irritable hip and septic arthritis, Perthes' disease and avascular necrosis, slipped upper femoral epiphysis, bony and soft tissue trauma, arthritis, tumours and hip prostheses. Each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert in the field, and a wealth of illustrative material is included. This book will be of great value to musculoskeletal and general radiologists, orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. (orig.)

  5. Lithographically-generated 3D lamella layers and their structural color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang; Lu, Bingrui; Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Xu, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the structural color from the multilayer nanophotonic structures in Morpho butterfly wing scales, 3D lamellae layers in dielectric polymers (polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA) with n ~ 1.5 were designed and fabricated by standard top-down electron beam lithography with one-step exposure followed by an alternating development/dissolution process of PMMA/LOR (lift-off resist) multilayers. This work offers direct proof of the structural blue/green color via lithographically-replicated PMMA/air multilayers, analogous to those in real Morpho butterfly wings. The success of nanolithography in this work for the 3D lamellae structures in dielectric polymers not only enables us to gain deeper insight into the mysterious blue color of the Morpho butterfly wings, but also breaks through the bottleneck in technical development toward broad applications in gas/liquid sensors, 3D meta-materials, coloring media, and infrared imaging devices, etc.

  6. Design of a lamella settler for biomass recycling in continuous ethanol fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabera, J; Iznaola, M A

    1989-04-20

    The design and application of a settler to a continuous fermentation process with yeast recycle were studied. The compact lamella-type settler was chosen to avoid large volumes associated with conventional settling tanks. A rationale of the design method is covered. The sedimentation area was determined by classical batch settling rate tests and sedimentation capacity calculation. Limitations on the residence time of the microorganisms in the settler, rather than sludge thickening considerations, was the approach employed for volume calculation. Fermentation rate tests with yeast after different sedimentation periods were carried out to define a suitable residence time. Continuous cell recycle fermentation runs, performed with the old and new sedimentation devices, show that lamella settler improves biomass recycling efficiency, being the process able to operate at higher sugar concentrations and faster dilution rates.

  7. Between Organism and Sky: Oscar Bony, 1965-1976

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Quiles

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Bony was a key figure in the generation of avant-garde artists who famously broke with the Instituto Torcuato Di Tella in the wake of censorship at Experiencias ’68. He was also the official photographer for RCA’s affiliate record label in Argentina between 1967 and 1973, producing publicity for a new wave of rock n’ roll bands and solo popular music acts including Los Gatos and Arco Iris. Attending to key phases in his artistic oeuvre as well as close readings of his expertly crafted popular images, this article attempts to bridge these seemingly irreconcilable aspects of Bony’s practice. At first glance, his rock photography, known as el estilo Bony, has little relation to his art, and is perhaps even its political antithesis: “creative” work in the service of a top-down business model. Yet a closer look at both endeavors yields a lasting interplay between flesh and concept—at the grain of the work, a dialectic between incontrovertible index and crafted, calculated image—that was the artist’s central preoccupation in the fraught decade between the military coups. As such, Bony provides an opportunity to recover a category often absent from the Argentine art of this moment: the body, factual and libidinal.

  8. Wind rotor power station BONI-ShHV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    Wind rotor power station (WRPS) BONI-ShHV has following advantages : the increase of installation stability by rise of wind velocity and rotation speed of rotor due to gyroscopic effect; the absence noise and vibration; the safety for birds and animals; ability of compact installation and creation of series of wind power dams with higher capacity; the simplicity and fast assembling and putting into operation. The price of 1 k W of installing capacity is lower about 2.5-3 times compare to usual WRPS due to simple kinematic scheme. WRPS has high specific output of electrical energy due to use of low and long existing wind velocity and due to short storms, giving greater power. It has ability to be replayed when average annual wind velocity is above 5.5 m/s in comparison with propeller WRPS, which are never repaying. WRPS BONI-ShHV are made on the plants of Republic of Kazakhstan, and tested in wind velocity range up 45 m/s, have experience of 3 years of operation, showing their reliability and effectiveness. The repayment period of individual WRPS BONI-0.5/6 ShHV is from 10 month to 1 year depending on average annual velocity

  9. Canine hip dysplasia: significance of early bony spurring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to call attention to new bone production that often occurs early in the sequence of pathological changes associated with canine hip dysplasia. New bone production extending to bony remodeling, as well as femoral head subluxation, both occur in the sequence of pathologic changes associated with canine hip dysplasia. Subluxation is considered primary, while osteoarthrosis is a secondary feature, and both are used in the diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia. This report concerns the significance of the presence of a solitary bony osteophyte, or spur, that is frequently evident on the caudal aspect of the femoral neck as viewed on the conventional ventrodorsal projection. This report utilizes findings from pelvic radiographs of 605 dogs (five breeds). There was a greater frequency (54%)of this bony change in cases diagnosed radiographically as dysplastic than in cases diagnosed as normal(15%).Thus, it is suggested that this minimal radiographic change can be used as an indicator of early canine hip dysplasia, especially in the absence of subluxation of the femoral head

  10. A task for laser cutting of lamellae with TruLaser 1030

    OpenAIRE

    Lazov, Lyubomir; Deneva, Hristina; Narica, Pavels

    2015-01-01

    The growing development of manufacturing, automotive, aerospace and other sectors in the industry generates the necessity to continuously expanding on modifications of electrical machinery and equipments which are used in them, as well as to improve their performance and reliability. The report presents some results from a study to the process of laser cutting through melting on lamellae for rotor and stator packages by using the laser system TruLaser 1030. Some functional dependencies are of...

  11. Non-cooperative immobilization of residual water bound in lyophilized photosynthetic lamellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harańczyk, Hubert; Baran, Ewelina; Nowak, Piotr; Florek-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Leja, Anna; Zalitacz, Dorota; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2015-12-01

    This study applied 1H-NMR in time and in frequency domain measurements to monitor the changes that occur in bound water dynamics at decreased temperature and with increased hydration level in lyophilizates of native wheat photosynthetic lamellae and in photosynthetic lamellae reconstituted from lyophilizate. Proton relaxometry (measured as free induction decay = FID) distinguishes a Gaussian component S within the NMR signal (o). This comes from protons of the solid matrix of the lamellae and consists of (i) an exponentially decaying contribution L1 from mobile membrane protons, presumably from lipids, and from water that is tightly bound to the membrane surface and thus restricted in mobility; and (ii) an exponentially decaying component L2 from more mobile, loosely bound water pool. Both proton relaxometry data and proton spectroscopy show that dry lyophilizate incubated in dry air, i.e., at a relative humidity (p/p0) of 0% reveals a relatively high hydration level. The observed liquid signal most likely originates from mobile membrane protons and a tightly bound water fraction that is sealed in pores of dry lyophilizate and thus restricted in mobility. The estimations suggest that the amount of sealed water does not exceed the value characteristic for the main hydration shell of a phospholipid. Proton spectra collected for dry lyophilizate of photosynthetic lamellae show a continuous decrease in the liquid signal component without a distinct freezing transition when it is cooled down to -60ºC, which is significantly lower than the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature [Bronshteyn, V.L. et al. Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1853].

  12. A Simple Thermoplastic Substrate Containing Hierarchical Silica Lamellae for High-Molecular-Weight DNA Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Yi; Burke, Jeffrey M; Gleitsman, Kristin; Friedrich, Sarah M; Liu, Kelvin J; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2016-12-01

    An inexpensive, magnetic thermoplastic nanomaterial is developed utilizing a hierarchical layering of micro- and nanoscale silica lamellae to create a high-surface-area and low-shear substrate capable of capturing vast amounts of ultrahigh-molecular-weight DNA. Extraction is performed via a simple 45 min process and is capable of achieving binding capacities up to 1 000 000 times greater than silica microparticles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Novel in-situ lamella fabrication technique for in-situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Megan; Daly, Dermot; Rummel, Andreas; McCarthy, Eoin K; McAuley, Cathal; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2018-03-29

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy is rapidly emerging as the premier technique for characterising materials in a dynamic state on the atomic scale. The most important aspect of in-situ studies is specimen preparation. Specimens must be electron transparent and representative of the material in its operational state, amongst others. Here, a novel fabrication technique for the facile preparation of lamellae for in-situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation using focused ion beam milling is developed. This method involves the use of rotating microgrippers during the lift-out procedure, as opposed to the traditional micromanipulator needle and platinum weld. Using rotating grippers, and a unique adhesive substance, lamellae are mounted onto a MEMS device for in-situ TEM annealing experiments. We demonstrate how this technique can be used to avoid platinum deposition as well as minimising damage to the MEMS device during the thinning process. Our technique is both a cost effective and readily implementable alternative to the current generation of preparation methods for in-situ liquid, electrical, mechanical and thermal experimentation within the TEM as well as traditional cross-sectional lamella preparation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Innovative use of lamella clarifiers for central stormwater treatment in separate sewer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gebhard

    2014-01-01

    Lamella settlers have been used in the past few years for the sedimentation of particles in wastewater and stormwater applications. A new and very innovative approach for the treatment of stormwater flows is proposed which extends the portfolio of solutions beyond traditional settling tanks. Surface runoff is stored in a sewer or a basin and finally treated in a small but continuously operated lamella clarifier. The low throughput flow will yield good treatment efficiency at a small footprint. The possibilities of using existing storage volume in a storm sewer, as well as the structural flexibility of the arrangement are decisive benefits. As a large operational advantage, the lamellae may be cleaned mechanically, e.g. by pivoting under water. Finally, the flow and the sludge which will be sent to the downstream treatment plant will be minimized. A new comparative simulation method is proposed in order to assess an equivalent degree of stormwater treatment, either by achieving an equal annual volume of treated stormwater or, more directly, an equal amount of spilled pollutant load. The new solution is compared with a traditional settling tank according to current German design rules. Additionally, a case study from a real installation will be presented.

  15. Repairing a Facial Cleft by Polyether-Ether-Ketone Implant Combined With Titanium Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Tang, Weiwei; Li, Zhengkang

    2018-05-15

    The Tessier Number 4 cleft is one of the rarest, most complex craniofacial anomalies that presents difficulties in surgical treatment. In this article, we report a case of simultaneous facial depression, eye displacement, and medial canthus deformity. In this case, the maxillary bony defect was reconstructed using computer-assisted design computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) material, and the orbital floor defect was repaired with AO prefabricated titanium mesh. Additionally, the medial canthus was modified with canthopexy and a single Z-plasty flap. Owing to its relative rarity and varied clinical presentations, no definitive operative methods have been accepted for Tessier No. 4 facial cleft. This study presents the combination of CAD-CAM manufactured PEEK material and titanium mesh as an alternative approach for reconstructing the bony defect of Tessier No. 4 facial clefts.

  16. Cohesion between two clay lamellae: From Primitive Model to Full Molecular Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, Benoit; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland; Van Damme, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The objective of this work is to investigate the range of validity of various models to describe accurately the cohesion between two charged clay lamellae. These models, in order of increasing complexity, are the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, the primitive model, the explicit solvent primitive model and the full molecular model. We aim at providing a clear picture of which physical mechanisms play a significant role for various interlayer spacings, surface charges and cationic charges. The up-scaling of the mechanical properties starting from the lamellar microstructure of a smectite is usually performed within the framework of the DLVO theory. In this case, the interaction between two charged lamellae with cations between them is the sum of the repulsive double layer electrostatic interaction and of the attractive Van der Waals interaction. However, the Primitive Model shows that concentration fluctuations of counter-ions can generate a strongly attractive ionic correlation force. The Primitive Model is a Monte-Carlo simulation of hydrated counter-ions between two infinite charges surfaces and the water is implicitly modeled by scaling all electrostatic interactions by the dielectric permittivity of bulk water. Nevertheless, for very small inter-layer spacings (1 nm), molecular simulations and experiments show that water is organized in a layered structure and does not behave like bulk water. Therefore, we investigate the role of the solvent in the cohesion of clay lamellae. For this purpose, we use a modified version of the original Primitive Model in which the solvent is modeled by point-dipoles: This model is called the Explicit Solvent Primitive Model. We consider four different systems: A Na + -montmorillonite, a Ca 2+ -montmorillonite, a Na + -vermiculite, a Ca 2+ -vermiculite. The vermiculite layers are twice as charged as the montmorillonite layers. We use a full molecular model as a

  17. Impact of Bony Stress Injuries on Professional Basketball Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Moin; Madden, Kim; Rogowski, Joseph P.; Stotts, Jeff; Burrus, Matthew Tyrrell; Samani, Marisa; Sikka, Robby Singh; Bedi, Asheesh

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Players in the National Basketball Association (NBA) subject their lower extremities to significant repetitive loading during the season as well as during off-season training. Little is known about the incidence and impact of lower extremity bony stress injuries in these athletes. Methods: Using the player injury database maintained by the NBA Players’ Association, all bony stress injuries from 1992 to May 2016 were identified. Those not involving the lower extremity were excluded from the study. Stress fractures and stress reactions were grouped together. Number of games missed due to the injury as well as player statistics including points per game (ppg), assists per game (apg), steals per game (spg), and blocks per game (bpg) were collected from two years prior to the injury to two years after the injury. Results: 76 lower extremity bony stress injuries were identified involving 75 different NBA players with an average player age of 25.4 ± 4.1 years. 55.3% (42/76) involved the foot, 21.1% (16/76) involved the ankle or fibula, 17.1% (13/76) involved the tibia, and 6.6% (5/76) involved either the knee or patella. The majority of injuries occurred in season 82.9% (63/76) with half of the injuries occurring within the first 6 weeks of the season. 38.2% (29/76) of these injuries were managed surgically. An average of 25.1 ± 21.3 games were missed. 19.7% (15/76) of patients who sustained a stress fracture also had a subsequent injury. 29.2% (21/76) of players were not able to return to professional basketball after the season in which the injury was sustained; however, those who were able to return to the same level of play did not see a significant change in performance as measured by ppg, apg, spg, or bpg when comparing the season prior to the injury and either one or two years after the injury. Stress injuries to the foot carried the worst prognosis, 57.1% (12/21) of those unable to return to professional basketball sustained such an injury

  18. Rejuvenecimiento facial en "doble sigma" "Double ogee" facial rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Ramírez

    2007-03-01

    facial nerve branches and improved aesthetic correction of the sagging cheek structures. This approach, refined over the past decade, has come to be known as the "Double Ogee" rhytidectomy technique. The ogee arch is well-known in architecture from the antiquity and is characterized for being a harmonic line convex curve and later curved concave. The youthful face, when viewed at an oblique angle, maintains a characteristic distribution of tissues, previously described in the midface by an architectural ogee or single S-shaped curve. However, on more precise examination, the entire contour the youthful face generates follows a "double ogee" or double sigma when analyzed in three-quarter view. To view this reciprocal multi-curvilinear line of beauty, the face must be viewed in an oblique position that allows visualization of both medial canthi. In this position, the youthful face demonstrates a characteristic convexity of the tail of the brow that flows into a concavity of the lateral orbital wall (the upper ogee. This is joined by the convexity of the upper midface that flows into the concavity of the lower midface (the lower ogee. Patients with considerable aging and ptosis of the central facial structures can benefit most from our endoscopic approach. The eyebrows, eyelid commisures, nasoglabellar soft tissues, nose, nasolabial folds, cheeks, angle of the mouth and jowls are effectively treated with this approach. Tear through deformities, as well as deep infraorbital hollows can be corrected too. Additionally is quite effective for patients undergoing secondary or tertiary facelift procedures, those requiring immediate skin resurfacing, and those requiring soft tissue augmentation. Patients who demostrate skeletal and soft tissue desproportion can benefit from endoscopic lifting techniques. The exposed bony structures can be augmented or reduced as needed. The authors recommend this approach in patients with alloplastic facial implants that require removal or exchange

  19. Radiology of Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Rickets and Other Bony Fragility States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Alistair D

    2015-01-01

    This section gives an overview of radiological findings in bony fragility states, with a special focus on osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and rickets. Conventional radiological assessment of bone density is inaccurate and imprecise and only reliably detects severe osteopaenia. However, other aspects of bone structure and morphology can be assessed, and it is possible to distinguish between osteopaenic and osteomalacic states. OI is a heterogeneous group of disorders of type 1 collagen formation and processing that are characterised by varying degrees of bony fragility, with presentations varying from perinatal lethality to asymptomatic. Radiological diagnosis of severe forms is usually straightforward, but that of milder disease may be challenging because specific features are often absent. However, a multidisciplinary approach is usually successful. Features of OI, including Wormian bones, skull base deformities, vertebral involvement and long bone fractures and deformities, are reviewed in this section. Rickets is best defined as a disorder of the growth plate characterised by the impaired apoptosis of hypertrophied chondrocytes. Vitamin D deficiency is a common cause of rickets. The patho-anatomical basis of radiological findings in rickets is reviewed and illustrated. Rickets is frequently accompanied by hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia. Rickets used to be classified as calciopaenic or phosphopaenic but is now referred to as parathyroid hormone or fibroblast growth factor 23 mediated, respectively [1]. The radiological features of the two forms are reviewed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J N; Sharp, M F; Ruethers, T; Taki, A; Campbell, D E; Lopata, A L

    2017-03-01

    Allergy to bony fish is common and probably increasing world-wide. The major heat-stable pan-fish allergen, parvalbumin (PV), has been identified and characterized for numerous fish species. In contrast, there are very few reports of allergic reactions to cartilaginous fish despite widespread consumption. The molecular basis for this seemingly low clinical cross-reactivity between these two fish groups has not been elucidated. PV consists of two distinct protein lineages, α and β. The α-lineage of this protein is predominant in muscle tissue of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), while β-PV is abundant in muscle tissue of bony fish (Osteichthyes). The low incidence of allergic reactions to ingested rays and sharks is likely due to the lack of molecular similarity, resulting in reduced immunological cross-reactivity between the two PV lineages. Structurally and physiologically, both protein lineages are very similar; however, the amino acid homology is very low with 47-54%. Furthermore, PV from ancient fish species such as the coelacanth demonstrates 62% sequence homology to leopard shark α-PV and 70% to carp β-PV. This indicates the extent of conservation of the PV isoforms lineages across millennia. This review highlights prevalence data on fish allergy and sensitization to fish, and details the molecular diversity of the two protein lineages of the major fish allergen PV among different fish groups, emphasizing the immunological and clinical differences in allergenicity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Giant Atretic Occipital Lipoencephalocele in an Adult with Bony Outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimkar, Kshama; Sood, Dinesh; Soni, Pawan; Chauhan, Narvir; Surya, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    We present unique case of a giant extracranial atretic occipital lipoencephalocele in an adult patient with new bone formation within it which was not associated with any developmental malformation of brain. Resection of the lipoencephalocele was performed for esthetic reasons. 18 year old female patient presented to the surgery OPD with complains of a large mass in the occipital region present since birth. It was of size of a betel nut at the time of birth and gradually increased in size over a long period of time. It was painless and not associated with any other constitutional symptoms. On examination the rounded fluctuant mass was present in the midline in occipital region covered with alopecic skin with dimpling in the overlying skin. On MRI there was mass showing both T1 and T2 hyperintense signal area suggestive of fat component. Herniation of meninges and atretic brain parenchyma was also seen through a defect in the occipital bone in the midline. There was a Y shaped bony outgrowth seen arising from occipital bone into the mass which was quite unusual in association with an atretic lipoencephalocele. A large lipoencephalocele with bony outgrowth in an adult patient is a rare presentation of atreic occipital encephalocele.

  2. Mathematical model of human osteon and its validation by nanomechanical testing of bone lamella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korsa, R.; Lukeš, J.; Šepitka, J.; Kytýř, Daniel; Mareš, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 17, SUPP. 1 (2014), s. 24-25 ISSN 1025-5842. [Congress of the Societe-de-Biomecanique /39./. Valenciennes, 27.08.2014-29.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2305 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : osteon * lamella * micromechanics * elastic constants * nanoindentation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.770, year: 2014 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10255842.2014.931078#.VBq66E0cRaQ

  3. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the patient has HIV or hepatitis. Facial Fractures Sports injuries can cause potentially serious broken bones or fractures of the face. Common symptoms of facial fractures include: swelling and bruising, ...

  4. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  5. Breakdown of middle lamella pectin by (●) OH during rapid abscission in Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshiya; Koibuchi, Mizuki; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Ueda, Junichi; Uheda, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    Azolla, a small water fern, abscises its roots and branches within 30 min upon treatment with various stresses. This study was conducted to test whether, in the rapid abscission that occurs in Azolla, breakdown of wall components of abscission zone cells by (●) OH is involved. Experimentally generated (●) OH caused the rapid separation of abscission zone cells from detached roots and the rapid shedding of roots from whole plants. Electron microscopic observations revealed that (●) OH rapidly and selectively dissolved a well-developed middle lamella between abscission zone cells and resultantly caused rapid cell separation and shedding. Treatment of abscission zones of Impatiens leaf petiole with (●) OH also accelerated the separation of abscission zone cells. However, compared with that of Azolla roots, accelerative effects in Impatiens were weak. A large amount of (●) OH was cytochemically detected in abscission zone cells both of Azolla roots and of Impatiens leaf petioles. These results suggest that (●) OH is involved in the cell separation process not only in the rapid abscission in Azolla but also in the abscission of Impatiens. However, for rapid abscission to occur, a well-developed middle lamella, a unique structure, which is sensitive to the attack of (●) OH, might be needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Bony injuries in trauma patients diagnosed by radiological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amponsah, G.; Gorleku, P. N.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the incidence of bony injuries in trauma patients who had plain radiographs done at the Central Regional Hospital in Cape Coast. This is a retrospective study based on plain radiographs taken by trauma patients who reported to the Central Regional Hospital. The case notes of all patients with a discharge diagnosis of Road Traffic Accident or trauma of all aetiologies that presented to the hospital between January 2005 and December 2011 were retrieved, and those patients that had skeletal radiographic examinations were included in this study. The total number of cases seen was 1,133. The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 72 years. Sixty-nine (6.1%) of the patients were between 1 and 4 years old, with the majority between 20 and 49 years old, constituting 52.3%, with patients 60 years and above at 9.2%. There was statistically significant difference between male and female patients (p=0.001). A total of 912 (80.5%) patients had radiographic examination done out of which only 324 (35.5%) radiographs could be retrieved. There were 106 (32.7%) radiographs with various bony injuries which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Rib fractures represented 19/106 (17.9%) of which 62.5% had multiple rib fractures. Fifty-eight (54.7%) had long bone fractures. Other anatomical sites included the pelvis and the skull. Conclusion: Trauma is a major public health problem in the country, involving mainly the productive age group. Unnecessary exposure to X-rays is common. Inadequate management of trauma patients negatively impacts on the outcome of trauma patients. Trauma prevention is the best way forward.(au)

  7. Inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty for bony ankylosed elbows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Chadrabose

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bony ankylosis of elbow is challenging and difficult problem to treat. The options are excision arthroplasty and total elbow replacement. We report our midterm results on nine patients, who underwent inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty in our hospital with good functional results. Materials Our case series includes 9 patients (seven males and two females with the mean age of 34 years (13-56 years. Five patients had trauma, two had pyogenic arthritis, one had tuberculous arthritis, and one had pyogenic arthritis following surgical fixation. Results The average duration of follow up is 65 months (45 months-80 months. The mean Mayo's elbow performance score (MEPS preoperatively was 48 (35-70. The MEPS at final follow up was 80 (60-95. With no movement at elbow and fixed in various degrees of either flexion or extension preoperatively, the mean preoperative position of elbow was 64°(30°to 100°. The mean post operative range of motion at final follow up was 27°of extension (20-500, 116°of flexion (1100-1300, and the arc of motion was 88°(800-1000. One patient had ulnar nerve neuropraxia and another patient developed median nerve neuropraxia, and both recovered completely in six weeks. No patient had symptomatic instability of the elbow. All patients were asymptomatic except one patient, who had pain mainly on heavy activities. Conclusion We conclude that inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty is a viable option in the treatment of bony ankylosis of the elbow in young patients.

  8. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully

  9. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully.

  10. Neutron production in the interaction of electrons with a dispersing lamella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto B, T. G.; Baltazar R, A.; Medina C, D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    When a Linac for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages greater than 8 MV, neutrons are produced as secondary radiation. They deposit an undesirable and not negligible dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, cancer treatment with a Linac is done with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section of the reaction (n, γ) is 137 times greater than the reaction (e, e n), most studies have focused on photo neutrons. When a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam that leaves the magnetic baffle is incised in the dispersion foil in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; in their interaction with the lamella the electrons produce photons and these in turn produce neutrons. Due to the radiobiological efficiency of neutrons and the ways in which they interact with matter, is important to determine the neutrons production in Linacs operating in electron mode. The objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of photons and neutrons that occur when a beam of mono-energetic electrons of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm thick located in the center of a 10 cm thick tungsten shell, used to represent the accelerator head. The study was carried out using the Monte Carlo method with the MCNP6 code for electron beams of 12 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 6 point detectors, four were placed in different points equidistant from the center of the lamella and the other two were located at 50 cm and 1 m from the electron beam, simulating the totally closed head. In this work it was found that when a Linac operates with an electron beam of 12 or 18 MeV there is neutron production mainly in the head and in the direction of the beam. (Author)

  11. Exsolution lamellae in volcanic pyroxene; Single phenocryst thermometry for long-lived magmatic reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    I Made, R.; Herrin, J. S.; Tay, Y. Y.; Costa Rodriguez, F.

    2017-12-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the relevant timescales of thermal and chemical evolution of magma below the active volcanoes can help us to better anticipate volcanic eruptions and their likely precursor signals. In recent years, several lines of thermochronological inquiry have converged on a realization that, within many volcanic systems, magmas experience prolonged periods of relatively low-temperature storage prior to eruption during short duration transient events. This prolonged storage at low magmatic temperatures can result in series of solid state phase transformations within minerals, producing a petrologic record of their thermal history. In this example, we observed pigeonite exsolution lamellae in augite phenocrysts from the 2011 eruption of Cordon Caulle volcano, Chile. The small size of these features ( 70nm width and bear exsolution textures and apply this knowledge to understanding the thermal conditions of magma storage in long-lived volcanic reservoirs.

  12. In situ X-ray polymerization: from swollen lamellae to polymer-surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agzenai, Yahya; Lindman, Björn; Alfredsson, Viveka; Topgaard, Daniel; Renamayor, Carmen S; Pacios, Isabel E

    2014-01-30

    The influence of the monomer diallyldimethylammonium chloride (D) on the lamellar liquid crystal formed by the anionic surfactant aerosol OT (AOT) and water is investigated, determining the lamellar spacings by SAXS and the quadrupolar splittings by deuterium NMR, as a function of the D or AOT concentrations. The cationic monomer D induces a destabilization of the AOT lamellar structure such that, at a critical concentration higher than 5 wt %, macroscopic phase separation takes place. When the monomer, which is dissolved in the AOT lamellae, is polymerized in situ by X-ray initiation, a new collapsed lamellar phase appears, corresponding to the complexation of the surfactant with the resulting polymer. A theoretical model is employed to analyze the variation of the interactions between the AOT bilayers and the stability of the lamellar structure.

  13. Annulate lamellae in phloem cells of virus-infected Sonchus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, M P; Hoefert, L L

    1977-07-01

    The occurrence of annulate lamellae (AL) in differentiating phloem of Sonchus oleraceus (Compositae) singly infected with sowthistle yellow vein virus (SYVV) and doubly infected with a combination of SYVV and beet yellow stunt virus is documented by electron microscopy. Cell types in which AL were found were immature sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells. AL were found only in cells that also contained SYVV particles although a direct association between the virus and AL was not apparent. The substructure of the AL and the relationships between the AL and the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum are similar to those reported in other descriptions of this organelle in the literature. This report appears to be the first one concerning the association of AL with a plant virus disease.

  14. Radiographic Study on the Bony Changes of Mandibular Condyle Head in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moo Soon; You, Dong Soo

    1989-01-01

    The author has studied radiographic bony changes of mandibular condyle head in temporomandibular disorder patients using Oblique lateral transcranial projection, Orthopantomography, and Tomography. The bony change types and the frequencies of occurrence and the incidences of bony changes in three different radiographic techniques were examined. The coincidences of body change types between the Oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram, the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram were also examined. The results were as follows: 1. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years and under 40 years were 24 patients, women were 27 patients, men were 4 patients. 2. The observable cases of bony changes in all three radiographic techniques were 19 cases (50%) of 38 cases and the observable cases of bony changes in only Tomography were 5 cases (13.2%). 3. The most frequent radiographic bony change type was osteophyte and next orders were flattening, erosion, concavity. 4. The positional incidences of bony changes in Tomogram were 31 cases in lateral part and 27 cases in central part. 5. The coincidence of bony change types between the oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram was 80%, and the coincidence between the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram was 76.9%.

  15. Quantitative computed tomography as a test of endurance for evaluation of bony plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo Filho, E.V.; Costa, L.A.V.S.; Oliveira, D.C.; Freitas, P.M.C.; Teixeira, M.W.; Costa, F.S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine the radiodensity of bony plates. The CT scans provided information regarding radiodensity of bony plates and allowed to verify the uniformity of bone mineral density in their scope. The proposed methodology should be considered as another tool for determining the resistance of these biomaterials. (author)

  16. Facial Transplantation Surgery Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotranspla...

  17. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  18. Bony Calvarium as the Sole Site ofMetastases in Squamous Cell Carcinomaof the Uterine Cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Isolated skeletal metastasis to the bony calvarium is extremely rare in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We describe the clinical and imaging findings in a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix with metastases tothe bony calvarium as the sole site of metastasis. The patient was a 65-year-old woman with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix, FIGO stage IIIb, whose initial treatement was chemoradiation therapy. After 22 sessions of external-beam radiation,she developed headaches. On physical examination she had skull bone tenderness. On plain skull X-ray, there were osteolytic bony lesions. Brain MRI showed multiple enhancing skull bone metatstses. Eventually, a whole body bone scintigraphy revealed isolated diffuse increased activity in the bony calvarium. In the literature review, wefound only three similar cases of cervical cancer with scalp metastases and involvement of the bony calvarium.

  19. [Facial tics and spasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; van Dijk, J Marc C; Elting, Jan Willem J; de Koning-Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-01-01

    Facial tics and spasms are socially incapacitating, but effective treatment is often available. The clinical picture is sufficient for distinguishing between the different diseases that cause this affliction.We describe three cases of patients with facial tics or spasms: one case of tics, which are familiar to many physicians; one case of blepharospasms; and one case of hemifacial spasms. We discuss the differential diagnosis and the treatment possibilities for facial tics and spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, because of the associated social incapacitation. Botulin toxin should be considered as a treatment option for facial tics and a curative neurosurgical intervention should be considered for hemifacial spasms.

  20. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  1. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  2. External auditory canal cholesteatoma and keratosis obturans: the role of imaging in preventing facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, Edward D; Hanson, Matthew B

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to compare the clinical characteristics of external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC) with those of a similar entity, keratosis obturans (KO). We also sought to identify those aspects of each disease that may lead to complications. We identified 6 patients in each group. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of bony erosion and the proximity of disease to vital structures. All 6 patients in the EACC group had their diagnosis confirmed by computed tomography (CT), which demonstrated widening of the bony external auditory canal; 4 of these patients had critical erosion of bone adjacent to the facial nerve. Of the 6 patients with KO, only 2 had undergone CT, and neither exhibited any significant bony erosion or expansion; 1 of them developed osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and adjacent temporomandibular joint. Another patient manifested KO as part of a dermatophytid reaction. The essential component of treatment in all cases of EACC was microscopic debridement of the ear canal. We conclude that EACC may produce significant erosion of bone with exposure of vital structures, including the facial nerve. Because of the clinical similarity of EACC to KO, misdiagnosis is possible. Temporal bone imaging should be obtained prior to attempts at debridement of suspected EACC. Increased awareness of these uncommon conditions is warranted to prompt appropriate investigation and prevent iatrogenic complications such as facial nerve injury.

  3. Fabricating interstitial-free steel with simultaneous high strength and good ductility with homogeneous layer and lamella structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Zhen-Zhe; Wang, Yuhui

    2017-01-01

    to cold rolled one) and a uniform elongation around 17% can be realized. Microstructural observation by electron back-scatter diffraction revealed a characteristic hierarchical layer + heterogeneous lamella structure, namely L2 structure. The reasons for the good mechanical properties were discussed....

  4. Hornet cuticle - a composite structure comprised of a series of duplex lamellae attenuating toward the interior of the body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishay, JS; Kirshboim, S; Steinberg, D; Kalicharan, D; Jongebloed, WL

    Our study deals with the ultramicroscopic structure of the yellow pigmented cuticular stripes on the abdomen of the oriental hornet Vespa orientalis (Hymenoptera, Vespinae). The abdominal cuticle is composed of numerous (more than 25) lamellae which progressively attenuate as one proceeds from the

  5. Two dynamic morphotypes of sarcoma cells, asymmetric stellate and triangle with leading lamella, are related to malignancy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Eva; Zicha, D.; Chaloupková, Alena; Matoušková, Eva; Veselý, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2003), s. 33-49 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/99/0368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : morphotypes * stellate * lamella Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2003

  6. Surface ultrastructure of the gill filaments and the secondary lamellae of the catfish, Rita rita, and the carp, Cirrhinus mrigala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Usha; Mittal, Swati; Mittal, Ajay Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Surface ultrastructures of gill filaments and secondary lamellae of Rita rita and Cirrhinus mrigala, inhabiting different ecological habitat, were investigated to unravel adaptive modifications. R. rita is a sluggish, bottom dwelling carnivorous catfish, which inhabits regions of river with accumulations of dirty water. It retains its viability for long time if taken out of water. C. mrigala is an active bottom dwelling Indian major carp, which lives in relatively clean water and dies shortly after taken out of water. In R. rita, gill septa between gill filaments are reduced. Microridges on epithelial cells covering gill filaments are often continuous and arranged concentrically. Secondary lamellae are extensive. The epithelium appears corrugated, show irregular elevations and shallow depressions, and microridges on epithelial cells appear fragmented. In C. mrigala, in contrast, the gill septa are extensive. Microridges on epithelial cells covering gill filaments are fragmented. Secondary lamellae are less extensive. The epithelium appears smooth and microridges on epithelial cells are relatively inconspicuous. These differences have been considered adaptive modification in relation to habit and ecological niches inhabited by two fish species. Presence of mucous goblet cells on gill filaments is discussed in relation to their functions including precipitation of the sediments and preventing clogging of gill filaments. Infrequent mucous goblet cells in the epithelium of secondary lamellae in two fish species are considered an adaptation, minimizing thickness of the epithelium to reduce barrier between blood and water for favoring gasses exchange with increased efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Stepwise Swelling of a Thin Film of Lamellae-Forming Poly(styrene-b-butadiene) in Cyclohexane Vapor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di, Zhenyu; Posselt, Dorthe; Smilgies, Detlef-M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the swelling of a thin film of lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-butadiene) in cyclohexane vapor. The vapor pressure and thus the degree of swelling of the film are increased in a stepwise manner using a custom-built sample cell. The resulting structural changes during and after each...

  8. Origin of spinel lamella and/or inclusions in olivine of harzburgite form the Pauza ultramafic rocks from the Kurdistan region, northeastern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Y.; Maekawa, H.; Karim, K.

    2009-04-01

    Exsolution lamellae and octahedral inclusions of chromian spinel occur in olivine of harzburgite of the Pauza ultramafic rocks, Kurdistan region, northeastern Iraq. The lamella is up to 80μm long and up to 50 μm wide. The lamellae and octahedral inclusions of chromian spinel are distributed heterogeneously in the host olivine crystal. They are depleted in Al2O3 relative to the subhedral spinel grains in the matrix and spinel lamella in orthopyroxene. Olivine (Fo92 - 93) with spinel lamellae occurs as fine-grained crystals around orthopyroxene, whereas olivine (Fo90-91) free from spinel is found in matrix. Based on back-scattered images analyses, enrichments of both Cr # and Fe+3 in the chromian spinel lamella in olivine (replacive olivine) relative to that in adjacent orthopyroxene. As well as the compositions of chromian spinel lamellae host olivine are more Mg-rich than the matrix olivine. Furthermore the restriction of olivine with spinel lamellae and octahedral inclusions on around orthopyroxene, and the similarity of spinel lamella orientations in both olivine and adjacent orthopyroxene. This study concludes that the spinel inclusions in olivine are remnant (inherited from former orthopyroxene) spinel exsolution lamella in orthopyroxene, that has been formed in upper mantle conditions ( T = 1200 °C, P = 2.5 GPa ). Replacive olivine are formed by reaction of ascending silica poor melt and orthopyroxene in harzburgite as pressure decrease the solubility of silica-rich phase (orthopyroxene) in the system increase, therefore ascending melt dissolve pyroxene with spinel exsolution lamella and precipitate replacive olivine with spinel inclusions. We can conclude that the olivines with spinel lamella are not necessary to be original and presenting ultrahigh-pressure and/or ultra deep-mantle conditions as previously concluded. It has been formed by melting of orthopyroxene (orthopyroxene with spinel exsolution lamella = olivine with spinel lamellae and octahedral

  9. Facial talon cusps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T

    1997-12-01

    This is a report of two patients with isolated facial talon cusps. One occurred on a permanent mandibular central incisor; the other on a permanent maxillary canine. The locations of these talon cusps suggests that the definition of a talon cusp include teeth in addition to the incisor group and be extended to include the facial aspect of teeth.

  10. Airway Obstruction and the Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Deformity: Contributions by the Bony Septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Michael T; Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed M; Murage, Kariuki; Kula, Katherine S; Tholpady, Sunil; Havlik, Robert J; Flores, Roberto L

    2015-07-01

    Patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP) deformities commonly develop nasal airway obstruction, necessitating septoplasty at the time of definitive rhinoplasty. We assessed the contribution of the bony septum to airway obstruction using computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT). A 2-year retrospective review of all subjects with unilateral CLP who underwent CBCT imaging (n = 22) and age-matched controls (n = 9) who underwent CT imaging was conducted. Control CT scans were used to determine the segment of nasal septum comprised almost entirely of bone. The CBCT of the nasal airway was assessed using Dolphin software to determine the contribution of the bony septum to septal deviation and airway obstruction. The nasal septum posterior to the midpoint between anterior and posterior nasal spine is comprised of 96% bone. The nasal airway associated with this posterior bony segment was 43.1% (P < 0.001) larger by volume on the non-cleft side in patients with unilateral CLP. The average septal deviation within the posterior bony segment was 5.4 mm, accounting for 74.4% of the maximal deviation within the nasal airway. The average airway stenosis within the posterior bony nasal airway was 0.45 mm (0-2.2 mm). In patients with unilateral CLP, the bony nasal septum can demonstrate significant deviation and airway stenosis. Surgeons should consider a bony septoplasty in their treatment algorithm in unilateral CLP patients who have reached skeletal maturity.

  11. A facial marker in facial wasting rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauso, Raffaele; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; Freda, Nicola; Rusciani, Antonio; Curinga, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    Facial lipoatrophy is one of the most distressing manifestation for HIV patients. It can be stigmatizing, severely affecting quality of life and self-esteem, and it may result in reduced antiretroviral adherence. Several filling techniques have been proposed in facial wasting restoration, with different outcomes. The aim of this study is to present a triangular area that is useful to fill in facial wasting rehabilitation. Twenty-eight HIV patients rehabilitated for facial wasting were enrolled in this study. Sixteen were rehabilitated with a non-resorbable filler and twelve with structural fat graft harvested from lipohypertrophied areas. A photographic pre-operative and post-operative evaluation was performed by the patients and by two plastic surgeons who were "blinded." The filled area, in both patients rehabilitated with structural fat grafts or non-resorbable filler, was a triangular area of depression identified between the nasolabial fold, the malar arch, and the line that connects these two anatomical landmarks. The cosmetic result was evaluated after three months after the last filling procedure in the non-resorbable filler group and after three months post-surgery in the structural fat graft group. The mean patient satisfaction score was 8.7 as assessed with a visual analogue scale. The mean score for blinded evaluators was 7.6. In this study the authors describe a triangular area of the face, between the nasolabial fold, the malar arch, and the line that connects these two anatomical landmarks, where a good aesthetic facial restoration in HIV patients with facial wasting may be achieved regardless of which filling technique is used.

  12. Advances in facial reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, James R; Tollefson, Travis T

    2006-08-01

    Facial paralysis often has a significant emotional impact on patients. Along with the myriad of new surgical techniques in managing facial paralysis comes the challenge of selecting the most effective procedure for the patient. This review delineates common surgical techniques and reviews state-of-the-art techniques. The options for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face must be examined in the context of several patient factors, including age, overall health, and patient desires. The best functional results are obtained with direct facial nerve anastomosis and interpositional nerve grafts. In long-standing facial paralysis, temporalis muscle transfer gives a dependable and quick result. Microvascular free tissue transfer is a reliable technique with reanimation potential whose results continue to improve as microsurgical expertise increases. Postoperative results can be improved with ancillary soft tissue procedures, as well as botulinum toxin. The paper provides an overview of recent advances in facial reanimation, including preoperative assessment, surgical reconstruction options, and postoperative management.

  13. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Algodystrophy in children and young adults with isotopic bony hypofixation. A propos of 5 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doury, P.; Pattin, S.; Eulry, F.; Granier, R.; Gaillard, F.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report 5 observations of young adults 3 teen-agers and 2 children suffering from algodystrophy, and in whom isotopic exploration of the skeleton disclosed a clear bony hypofixation during the entire evolution. These observations confirm their 1981 work concerning a young adult suffering from algodystrophy with isotopic bony hypofixation. Recent Canadian and American studies emphasize also the frequency of isotopic hypofixation in children algodystrophy. It seems, therefore, that isotopic bony hypofixation (linked perhaps to a decreased blood flow), is rather specific of algodystrophy in young subjects [fr

  15. Toward a universal, automated facial measurement tool in facial reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Tessa A; Urban, Luke S

    2012-01-01

    To describe a highly quantitative facial function-measuring tool that yields accurate, objective measures of facial position in significantly less time than existing methods. Facial Assessment by Computer Evaluation (FACE) software was designed for facial analysis. Outputs report the static facial landmark positions and dynamic facial movements relevant in facial reanimation. Fifty individuals underwent facial movement analysis using Photoshop-based measurements and the new software; comparisons of agreement and efficiency were made. Comparisons were made between individuals with normal facial animation and patients with paralysis to gauge sensitivity to abnormal movements. Facial measurements were matched using FACE software and Photoshop-based measures at rest and during expressions. The automated assessments required significantly less time than Photoshop-based assessments.FACE measurements easily revealed differences between individuals with normal facial animation and patients with facial paralysis. FACE software produces accurate measurements of facial landmarks and facial movements and is sensitive to paralysis. Given its efficiency, it serves as a useful tool in the clinical setting for zonal facial movement analysis in comprehensive facial nerve rehabilitation programs.

  16. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  17. Improved ductility of a transformation-induced-plasticity steel by nanoscale austenite lamellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Y.F., E-mail: shenyf@smm.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Y.D. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Sun, X. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Wang, Y.D.; Zuo, L. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Materials Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    TRIP (transformation-induced-plasticity) steel with a chemical composition of 0.19C–0.30Si–1.76Mn–1.52Al (weight percentage, wt%) have been treated by intercritical annealing and austempering process. The microstructures of the obtained samples consist of the ferrite, the bainite and the retained austenite phase. The volume fractions of the bainite and the retained austenite gradually increase with increasing the temperature of the intercritical annealing. Consequently, significantly different mechanical properties have been observed. The sample annealed at 820 °C (for 120 s) and partitioned at 400 °C (for 300 s) has the best combination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS, ∼682 MPa) and elongation to failure (∼70%) with about 26% of bainitic ferrite plates and 17% retained austenite in its microstructure. The retained austenite has a lamella morphology with 100‒300 nm in thickness and 2‒5 µm in length. On the contrary, the sample annealed at the same temperature without the partitioning process yields much lower UTS and elongation to failure.

  18. Nanofabrication and coloration study of artificial Morpho butterfly wings with aligned lamellae layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-18

    The bright and iridescent blue color from Morpho butterfly wings has attracted worldwide attentions to explore its mysterious nature for long time. Although the physics of structural color by the nanophotonic structures built on the wing scales has been well established, replications of the wing structure by standard top-down lithography still remains a challenge. This paper reports a technical breakthrough to mimic the blue color of Morpho butterfly wings, by developing a novel nanofabrication process, based on electron beam lithography combined with alternate PMMA/LOR development/dissolution, for photonic structures with aligned lamellae multilayers in colorless polymers. The relationship between the coloration and geometric dimensions as well as shapes is systematically analyzed by solving Maxwell's Equations with a finite domain time difference simulator. Careful characterization of the mimicked blue by spectral measurements under both normal and oblique angles are carried out. Structural color in blue reflected by the fabricated wing scales, is demonstrated and further extended to green as an application exercise of the new technique. The effects of the regularity in the replicas on coloration are analyzed. In principle, this approach establishes a starting point for mimicking structural colors beyond the blue in Morpho butterfly wings.

  19. Crack detection in oak flooring lamellae using ultrasound-excited thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlberg, Tobias; Thurley, Matthew; Popovic, Djordje; Hagman, Olle

    2018-01-01

    Today, a large number of people are manually grading and detecting defects in wooden lamellae in the parquet flooring industry. This paper investigates the possibility of using the ensemble methods random forests and boosting to automatically detect cracks using ultrasound-excited thermography and a variety of predictor variables. When friction occurs in thin cracks, they become warm and thus visible to a thermographic camera. Several image processing techniques have been used to suppress the noise and enhance probable cracks in the images. The most successful predictor variables captured the upper part of the heat distribution, such as the maximum temperature, kurtosis and percentile values 92-100 of the edge pixels. The texture in the images was captured by Completed Local Binary Pattern histograms and cracks were also segmented by background suppression and thresholding. The classification accuracy was significantly improved from previous research through added image processing, introduction of more predictors, and by using automated machine learning. The best ensemble methods reach an average classification accuracy of 0.8, which is very close to the authors' own manual attempt at separating the images (0.83).

  20. Nanofabrication and coloration study of artificial Morpho butterfly wings with aligned lamellae layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    The bright and iridescent blue color from Morpho butterfly wings has attracted worldwide attentions to explore its mysterious nature for long time. Although the physics of structural color by the nanophotonic structures built on the wing scales has been well established, replications of the wing structure by standard top-down lithography still remains a challenge. This paper reports a technical breakthrough to mimic the blue color of Morpho butterfly wings, by developing a novel nanofabrication process, based on electron beam lithography combined with alternate PMMA/LOR development/dissolution, for photonic structures with aligned lamellae multilayers in colorless polymers. The relationship between the coloration and geometric dimensions as well as shapes is systematically analyzed by solving Maxwell’s Equations with a finite domain time difference simulator. Careful characterization of the mimicked blue by spectral measurements under both normal and oblique angles are carried out. Structural color in blue reflected by the fabricated wing scales, is demonstrated and further extended to green as an application exercise of the new technique. The effects of the regularity in the replicas on coloration are analyzed. In principle, this approach establishes a starting point for mimicking structural colors beyond the blue in Morpho butterfly wings.

  1. Relation Between the Molopo Farms and Bushveld Complexes: An Analysis of Pyroxene Exsolution Lamellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, I.; Feineman, M. D.; Nyblade, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Molopo Farms Complex (MFC) is a layered igneous intrusion in Botswana, considered to be related to the nearby South African Bushveld Complex (BC) due to their similarities. The BC has been researched in depth for its economic deposits of platinum group elements (PGEs), while the under-researched MFC has no PGEs and is under 200 m of sediment. This study aims to increase knowledge about the MFC regarding the theory that the BC and MFC come from the same parental magma body by showing similar cooling history in the exsolution of pyroxenes. Using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) paired with an energy-dispersive detector (EDS), thin sections of pyroxenes with exsolution lamellae from both complexes were observed in terms of chemical composition and microtextures. MFC pyroxenes were then compared to literature data of BC pyroxenes. The pyroxenes are closely related, indicating that the MFC and the BC cooled at a similar rate and come from the same parental magma body. Further research can expand on these findings to prove that the MFC and BC are from the same magma.

  2. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep the head elevated when lying down, to use cold compresses to reduce swelling, and to avoid any activity that places undue stress on the area of the incision. Depending on the surgery performed and the site of the scar, the facial plastic surgeon will explain the types of activities to ...

  3. Arthroscopic Anterior Shoulder Stabilization With Incorporation of a Comminuted Bony Bankart Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Lansdown, Drew; Bernardoni, Eamon D.; Cotter, Eric J.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2017-01-01

    Bony Bankart lesions are a common finding in patients with anterior glenohumeral dislocation. Although there are no defined guidelines, small bony Bankart fractures are typically treated arthroscopically with suture anchors. The 2 main techniques used are double- and single-row suture anchor stabilization, with debate over superiority. Biomechanical studies have shown improved reduction and stabilization with the double-row over the single-row suture anchor technique; however, this has not be...

  4. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U. S.; Hariram,; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. Purpose: To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Materials and Methods: Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected rando...

  5. Guided tissue regeneration for periodontal infra-bony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, I G; Worthington, H V; Giedrys-Leeper, E; Tucker, R J

    2006-04-19

    Conventional treatment of destructive periodontal (gum) disease arrests the disease but does not usually regain the bone support or connective tissue lost in the disease process. Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a surgical procedure that specifically aims to regenerate the periodontal tissues when the disease is advanced and could overcome some of the limitations of conventional therapy. To assess the efficacy of GTR in the treatment of periodontal infra-bony defects measured against conventional surgery (open flap debridement (OFD)) and factors affecting outcomes. We conducted an electronic search of the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2004. Handsearching included Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and bibliographies of all relevant papers and review articles up to April 2004. In addition, we contacted experts/groups/companies involved in surgical research to find other trials or unpublished material or to clarify ambiguous or missing data and posted requests for data on two periodontal electronic discussion groups. Randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) of at least 12 months duration comparing guided tissue regeneration (with or without graft materials) with open flap debridement for the treatment of periodontal infra-bony defects. Furcation involvements and studies specifically treating aggressive periodontitis were excluded. Screening of possible studies and data extraction was conducted independently. The methodological quality of studies was assessed in duplicate using individual components and agreement determined by Kappa scores. Methodological quality was used in sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of the conclusions. The Cochrane Oral Health Group statistical guidelines were followed and the results expressed as mean differences (MD and 95% CI) for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR and 95% CI) for dichotomous outcomes calculated using

  6. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  7. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Persistent facial pains, especially temporomandibular disorders (TMD), are common conditions. As dentists are responsible for the treatment of most of these disorders, up-to date knowledge on the latest advances in the field is essential for successful diagnosis and management. The review covers...... TMD, and different neuropathic or putative neuropathic facial pains such as persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia, trigeminal neuralgia and painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy. The article presents an overview of TMD pain as a biopsychosocial condition, its prevalence......, clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  8. Nano-indentation creep properties of the S2 cell wall lamina and compound corner middle lamella [abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Jakes; Charles R. Frihart; James F. Beecher; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Bulk wood properties are derived from an ensemble of processes taking place at the micron-scale, and at this level the properties differ dramatically in going from cell wall layers to the middle lamella. To better understand the properties of these micron-scaled regions of wood, we have developed a unique set of nano-indentation tools that allow us to measure local...

  9. Traumatic facial nerve neuroma with facial palsy presenting in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H; Burger, Peter C; Boahene, Derek Kofi; Niparko, John K

    2010-07-01

    To describe the management of traumatic neuroma of the facial nerve in a child and literature review. Sixteen-month-old male subject. Radiological imaging and surgery. Facial nerve function. The patient presented at 16 months with a right facial palsy and was found to have a right facial nerve traumatic neuroma. A transmastoid, middle fossa resection of the right facial nerve lesion was undertaken with a successful facial nerve-to-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis. The facial palsy improved postoperatively. A traumatic neuroma should be considered in an infant who presents with facial palsy, even in the absence of an obvious history of trauma. The treatment of such lesion is complex in any age group but especially in young children. Symptoms, age, lesion size, growth rate, and facial nerve function determine the appropriate management.

  10. Facial colliculus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupinderjeet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient presented with horizontal diplopia and conjugate gaze palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed acute infarct in right facial colliculus which is an anatomical elevation on the dorsal aspect of Pons. This elevation is due the 6th cranial nerve nucleus and the motor fibres of facial nerve which loop dorsal to this nucleus. Anatomical correlation of the clinical symptoms is also depicted in this report.

  11. Effect of amorphous lamella on the crack propagation behavior of crystalline Mg/amorphous Mg-Al nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-Yang, Song; Yu-Long, Li

    2016-02-01

    The effects of amorphous lamella on the crack propagation behavior in crystalline/amorphous (C/A) Mg/Mg-Al nanocomposites under tensile loading are investigated using the molecular dynamics simulation method. The sample with an initial crack of orientation [0001] is considered here. For the nano-monocrystal Mg, the crack growth exhibits brittle cleavage. However, for the C/A Mg/Mg-Al nanocomposites, the ‘double hump’ behavior can be observed in all the stress-strain curves regardless of the amorphous lamella thickness. The results indicate that the amorphous lamella plays a critical role in the crack deformation, and it can effectively resist the crack propagation. The above mentioned crack deformation behaviors are also disclosed and analyzed in the present work. The results here provide a strategy for designing the high-performance hexagonal-close-packed metal and alloy materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372256 and 11572259), the 111 Project (Grant No. B07050), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-12-1046), and the Program for New Scientific and Technological Star of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2012KJXX-39).

  12. Formation process of lamella structures by deformation in an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Tomota, Y.

    1995-01-01

    For Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloys, it was previously found by HREM study that the formation of the nanometric lamella structures consisting of f.c.c. and h.c.p. phase is very important to exhibit good shape memory effect. In the present work, the formation process of such lamella structures has been studied in detail. The results are as follows. The transformation is initiated by random formation of extremely thin martensite plates with 1-2 nm width and then these plates are clustered and some of them coalesce to form thicker martensite plates with increasing deformation. The clustered regions are 400-600 nm wide and will correspond to the above mentioned lamella structures. These clustered regions are considered also to correspond to the thinnest martensite plate observable with optical microscope. In the optical microscopic scale, the thin martenite plates with the smallest width are formed rather uniformly in an austenite grain, and with further increasing deformation, they are clustered and coalesce into thicker plates with 3-8 μm width. (orig.)

  13. Facial infiltrative lipomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haloi, A.K.; Ditchfield, M.; Pennington, A.; Philips, R.

    2006-01-01

    Although there are multiple case reports and small series concerning facial infiltrative lipomatosis, there is no composite radiological description of the condition. Radiological evaluation of facial infiltrative lipomatosis using plain film, sonography, CT and MRI. We radiologically evaluated four patients with facial infiltrative lipomatosis. Initial plain radiographs of the face were acquired in all patients. Three children had an initial sonographic examination to evaluate the condition, followed by MRI. One child had a CT and then MRI. One child had abnormalities on plain radiographs. Sonographically, the lesions were seen as ill-defined heterogeneously hypoechoic areas with indistinct margins. On CT images, the lesions did not have a homogeneous fat density but showed some relatively more dense areas in deeper parts of the lesions. MRI provided better delineation of the exact extent of the process and characterization of facial infiltrative lipomatosis. Facial infiltrative lipomatosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis of vascular or lymphatic malformation when a child presents with unilateral facial swelling. MRI is the most useful single imaging modality to evaluate the condition, as it provides the best delineation of the exact extent of the process. (orig.)

  14. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  16. Facial transplantation surgery introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-06-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea.

  17. Caricaturing facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A J; Rowland, D; Young, A W; Nimmo-Smith, I; Keane, J; Perrett, D I

    2000-08-14

    The physical differences between facial expressions (e.g. fear) and a reference norm (e.g. a neutral expression) were altered to produce photographic-quality caricatures. In Experiment 1, participants rated caricatures of fear, happiness and sadness for their intensity of these three emotions; a second group of participants rated how 'face-like' the caricatures appeared. With increasing levels of exaggeration the caricatures were rated as more emotionally intense, but less 'face-like'. Experiment 2 demonstrated a similar relationship between emotional intensity and level of caricature for six different facial expressions. Experiments 3 and 4 compared intensity ratings of facial expression caricatures prepared relative to a selection of reference norms - a neutral expression, an average expression, or a different facial expression (e.g. anger caricatured relative to fear). Each norm produced a linear relationship between caricature and rated intensity of emotion; this finding is inconsistent with two-dimensional models of the perceptual representation of facial expression. An exemplar-based multidimensional model is proposed as an alternative account.

  18. The influence of different facial components on facial aesthetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faure, J.C.; Rieffe, C.; Maltha, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Facial aesthetics have an important influence on social behaviour and perception in our society. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of facial symmetry and inter-ocular distance on the assessment of facial aesthetics, factors that are often suggested as major contributors to

  19. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Gon; Choi, Hang Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence

  20. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Gon; Choi, Hang Moon [School of Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence.

  1. Incidence of dehiscence of the bony roof of the superior semicircular canal by CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akira

    2003-01-01

    Dehiscence of the bony roof of the superior semicircular canal (SSCC) is rare, but it has been recognized by otologists since Minor et al first described superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS). In this study, dehiscence of the bony roof of SSCC was incidentally detected in three patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo out of 49 serial patients with vertigo and dizziness by multi-slice computed tomography. Although detection of dehiscence of the SSCC by ultra-high-resolution CT imaging of the temporal bones has been required for a diagnosis of SCDS, this study showed that dehiscence of the bony roof of the SSCC can be an incidental finding and therefore is not specific for SCDS. (author)

  2. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, YeNa; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, 892, Dongnam-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 23 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Computer facial animation

    CERN Document Server

    Parke, Frederic I

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive work provides the fundamentals of computer facial animation and brings into sharper focus techniques that are becoming mainstream in the industry. Over the past decade, since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant developments by academic research groups and in the film and games industries leading to the development of morphable face models, performance driven animation, as well as increasingly detailed lip-synchronization and hair modeling techniques. These topics are described in the context of existing facial animation principles. The second ed

  4. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Trenga, Anthony P.; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A.; Abel, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. Methods All patients aged ?13 years (n?=?75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003?2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiograph...

  5. Bony morphology of the hip in professional ballet dancers compared to athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2017-07-01

    To compare hip bony morphology between ballet dancers and a sporting control group and to determine the relationship with hip pain. Thirty-three professional ballet dancers and 33 age- and sex-matched athletes completed questionnaires, including the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS), and underwent clinical testing and 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging to measure acetabular coverage with lateral centre edge angles, femoral head-neck junction concavity with alpha angles at anterior and superior positions, femoral neck-shaft angles, and acetabular version angles. Bony morphological measures fell within normal ranges. Dancers had higher neck-shaft angles (dancers 134.6 ± 4.6°/athletes130.8 ± 4.7°, p = 0.002), lower acetabular version angles (13.5 ± 4.7°/17.1 ± 4.7°, p = 0.003), lower superior alpha angles (38.9 ± 6.9°/46.7 ± 10.6°, p ballet dancers have hip bony morphology that differentiates them from athletes. Hip pain correlated poorly with bony morphology. • Ballet dancers have hip bony morphology that may allow extreme hip motion. • Morphological parameter means fell within normal reference intervals in dancers. • Bony morphology correlates poorly with hip pain. • The risk of hip injury due to abnormal morphology requires prospective studies.

  6. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  7. Melorheostosis of the hand with complicating bony spur formation and bursal inflammation: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameen, S.; Anderson, S.E.; Nagy, L.; Gerich, U.

    2002-01-01

    A 37-year old woman presented with intolerable pain associated with a slowly growing mass on the dorsum of the right hand. The radiographs were characteristic of melorheostosis involving the third and fourth metacarpals, with a cortical bony projection extending from the base of the third metacarpal eroding slightly into the fourth metacarpal, associated with bursal formation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an inflamed bursal collection adjacent to the spur. This region corresponded to the patient's severe clinical, focal pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in which melorheostosis of the hand has been associated with bony spur formation and complicated by an inflamed bursa. (orig.)

  8. Paralisia facial bilateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.

  9. Diplegia facial traumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.

  10. Recognizing Facial Slivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad-Gutnick, Sharon; Harmatz, Elia Samuel; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Yovel, Galit; Sinha, Pawan

    2018-07-01

    We report here an unexpectedly robust ability of healthy human individuals ( n = 40) to recognize extremely distorted needle-like facial images, challenging the well-entrenched notion that veridical spatial configuration is necessary for extracting facial identity. In face identification tasks of parametrically compressed internal and external features, we found that the sum of performances on each cue falls significantly short of performance on full faces, despite the equal visual information available from both measures (with full faces essentially being a superposition of internal and external features). We hypothesize that this large deficit stems from the use of positional information about how the internal features are positioned relative to the external features. To test this, we systematically changed the relations between internal and external features and found preferential encoding of vertical but not horizontal spatial relationships in facial representations ( n = 20). Finally, we employ magnetoencephalography imaging ( n = 20) to demonstrate a close mapping between the behavioral psychometric curve and the amplitude of the M250 face familiarity, but not M170 face-sensitive evoked response field component, providing evidence that the M250 can be modulated by faces that are perceptually identifiable, irrespective of extreme distortions to the face's veridical configuration. We theorize that the tolerance to compressive distortions has evolved from the need to recognize faces across varying viewpoints. Our findings help clarify the important, but poorly defined, concept of facial configuration and also enable an association between behavioral performance and previously reported neural correlates of face perception.

  11. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; Pmean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  12. Stepwise swelling of a thin film of lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b- butadiene) in cyclohexane vapor

    KAUST Repository

    Di, Zhenyu; Posselt, Dorthe; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Li, Ruipeng; Rauscher, Markus; Potemkin, Igor I.; Papadakis, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the swelling of a thin film of lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-butadiene) in cyclohexane vapor. The vapor pressure and thus the degree of swelling of the film are increased in a stepwise manner using a custom-built sample cell. The resulting structural changes during and after each step were followed in situ using time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). During the first step, the lamellar thickness increases strongly, before it decreases again. At the same time, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the diffuse Bragg reflection along the film normal has a sharp maximum. These observations point to the formation of new lamellae. During the subsequent swelling steps, the lamellar thickness overshoots only weakly. The behavior thus resembles qualitatively our previous results on a similar thin film during swelling in saturated vapor of cyclohexane; however, it deviates from earlier theoretical predictions. We propose a theory that is quantitatively correct for the description of the dependence of the lamellar thickness on the polymer volume fraction in the late stage of the swelling steps. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Stepwise swelling of a thin film of lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b- butadiene) in cyclohexane vapor

    KAUST Repository

    Di, Zhenyu

    2012-06-26

    We investigated the swelling of a thin film of lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-butadiene) in cyclohexane vapor. The vapor pressure and thus the degree of swelling of the film are increased in a stepwise manner using a custom-built sample cell. The resulting structural changes during and after each step were followed in situ using time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). During the first step, the lamellar thickness increases strongly, before it decreases again. At the same time, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the diffuse Bragg reflection along the film normal has a sharp maximum. These observations point to the formation of new lamellae. During the subsequent swelling steps, the lamellar thickness overshoots only weakly. The behavior thus resembles qualitatively our previous results on a similar thin film during swelling in saturated vapor of cyclohexane; however, it deviates from earlier theoretical predictions. We propose a theory that is quantitatively correct for the description of the dependence of the lamellar thickness on the polymer volume fraction in the late stage of the swelling steps. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. The Effects of Cation Ratios on Root Lamella Suberization in Rice (Oryza sativa L. with Contrasting Salt Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Momayezi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice is an important produced cereal in the world. We evaluated the effect of salt compositions including NaCl and Na2SO4 on suberin lamellae as a major barrier to radial ion and water movements in two rice genotypes representing contrasting salt tolerance levels under salinity stress. Two rice genotypes, Fajr as salt tolerant and Khazar as salt sensitive, were transplanted in sand culture under glasshouse condition. Rice seedlings were treated with five salt compositions including NaCl, Na2SO4, 1 : 1, 1 : 2, and 2 : 1 molar ratios for 40 days. It was proven that suberin lamellae in endodermis of root cell wall were thickened with Na2SO4 treatment. The results demonstrated that the number of passage cells was higher in Fajr genotype than that in Khazar genotype under saline condition. Calcium concentration in root tissue decreased as the SO42- concentration in root media increased. It can be concluded that Fajr genotype is able to keep some passage cells open to maintain Ca2+ uptake. The Ca2+/Na+ ratio in shoot tissue can be also a reliable index for the early recognition of salt stress in these rice genotypes.

  15. [Inconformity between soft tissue defect and bony defect in incomplete cleft palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Ma, Lian

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the inconformity between soft tissue defect and bony defect by observing the cleft extent of palate with complete secondary palate bony cleft in incomplete cleft palate patient. The patients with incomplete cleft palate treated in Hospital of Stomatology Peking University from July 2012 to June 2013 were reviewed, of which 75 cases with complete secondary palate bony cleft were selected in this study. The CT scan and intraoral photograph were taken before operation. The patients were classified as four types according to the extent of soft tissue defect. Type 1: soft tissue defect reached incisive foremen region, Type 2 was hard and soft cleft palate, Type 3 soft cleft palate and Type 4 submucous cleft palate. Type 1 was defined as conformity group (CG). The other three types were defined as inconformity group (ICG) and divided into three subgroups (ICG-I), (ICG-II) and (ICG-III). Fifty-seven patients were in ICG group, and the rate of inconformity was 76% (57/75). The percentage of ICG-I, ICG-II and ICG-III was 47% (27/57), 23% (13/57) and 30% (17/57), respevtively. There are different types of soft tissue deformity with complete secondary palate bony cleft. The inconformity between soft tissue and hard tissue defect exits in 3/4 of isolated cleft palate patients.

  16. "Sub Specie Boni": The Comfort Zone of Self-Belief--A Dimension in Counseling Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, James Lee

    1996-01-01

    Claims that self-defeating behavior is a rational attempt to satisfy early, introjected messages about the type of person one is, arising from a desire for things perceived as good--sub specie boni. Examines the notion of the comfort zone, toxic shame, and therapists' responsibility to nourish acceptable joy. (RJM)

  17. Condylar bony changes in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a CBCT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Diagnosis of osteoarthritis most commonly depends on clinical and radiographic findings. The present study attempted to observe the bony changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients from all age groups. The first-visit clinical records and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 440 TMJs from 220 consecutive TMJ patients were reviewed retrospectively. The most frequent condylar bony change observed was sclerosis (133 joints, 30.2%) followed by surface erosion (129 joints, 29.3%), flattening of the articular surface (112 joints, 25.5%), and deviation in form (58 joints, 13.2%), which included 33 TMJs in a cane-shape, 16 with a lateral or medial pole depression, 6 with posterior condylar surface flattening, and 3 with a bifid-shaped condyle. Fifty-three joints (12.0%) showed hypoplastic condyles but only 1 joint showed hyperplasia. Osteophyte was found in 35 joints (8.0%) and subcortical cyst in 24 joints (5.5%), 5 of which had surface erosion as well. One hundred nineteen joints (27.0%) had only one kind of condylar bony change, 66 joints (15.0%) had two, 52 joints (11.8%) had three, 12 joints (5.0%) had four, and 6 joints (1.4%) had five kinds of condylar bony changes at the same time. Eighty-five (65.9%) of 129 joints with surface erosion had pain recorded at the chief complaint. With more widespread use of CBCT, more specific or detailed guidelines for osteoarthritis are needed.

  18. Condylar bony changes in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a CBCT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of osteoarthritis most commonly depends on clinical and radiographic findings. The present study attempted to observe the bony changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients from all age groups. The first-visit clinical records and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 440 TMJs from 220 consecutive TMJ patients were reviewed retrospectively. The most frequent condylar bony change observed was sclerosis (133 joints, 30.2%) followed by surface erosion (129 joints, 29.3%), flattening of the articular surface (112 joints, 25.5%), and deviation in form (58 joints, 13.2%), which included 33 TMJs in a cane-shape, 16 with a lateral or medial pole depression, 6 with posterior condylar surface flattening, and 3 with a bifid-shaped condyle. Fifty-three joints (12.0%) showed hypoplastic condyles but only 1 joint showed hyperplasia. Osteophyte was found in 35 joints (8.0%) and subcortical cyst in 24 joints (5.5%), 5 of which had surface erosion as well. One hundred nineteen joints (27.0%) had only one kind of condylar bony change, 66 joints (15.0%) had two, 52 joints (11.8%) had three, 12 joints (5.0%) had four, and 6 joints (1.4%) had five kinds of condylar bony changes at the same time. Eighty-five (65.9%) of 129 joints with surface erosion had pain recorded at the chief complaint. With more widespread use of CBCT, more specific or detailed guidelines for osteoarthritis are needed.

  19. Natural resources utilization by the Aweer in Boni-lungi and Dodori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to record the utilization of Boni-Lungi and Dodori National Reserves by the Aweer community. Results indicate the procuring of a wide gamut of provisional, regulatory, cultural and supportive services from these reserves by the community ranging from wood forest products utilized in construction to ...

  20. Value of diffusion weighted MRI in differentiating benign from malignant bony tumors and tumor like lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Zaki Kotb

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: DWI has been proven to be highly useful in the differentiation of benign, malignant bone tumors and tumor like bony lesions. Measurement of ADC values improves the accuracy of the diagnosis of bone tumors and tumor like lesions. Moreover, measurement of ADC values can be used in the follow up of tumors and their response to therapy.

  1. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ui-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Sun-Hee; Gwak, Gyeong-Tae

    2018-01-20

    The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  2. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by...

  3. Comparison of megavoltage position verification for prostate irradiation based on bony anatomy and implanted fiducials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, Aart J.; Dehnad, Homan; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A. van; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The patient position during radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer can be verified with the help of portal images acquired during treatment. In this study we quantify the clinical consequences of the use of image-based verification based on the bony anatomy and the prostate target itself. Patients and methods: We analysed 2025 portal images and 23 computed tomography (CT) scans from 23 patients with prostate cancer. In all patients gold markers were implanted prior to CT scanning. Statistical data for both random and systematic errors were calculated for displacements of bones and markers and we investigated the effectiveness of an off-line correction protocol. Results: Standard deviations for systematic marker displacement are 2.4 mm in the lateral (LR) direction, 4.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction and 3.7 mm in the caudal-cranial direction (CC). Application of off-line position verification based on the marker positions results in a shrinkage of the systematic error to well below 1 mm. Position verification based on the bony anatomy reduces the systematic target uncertainty to 50% in the AP direction and in the LR direction. No reduction was observed in the CC direction. For six out of 23 patients we found an increase of the systematic error after application of bony anatomy-based position verification. Conclusions: We show that even if correction based on the bony anatomy is applied, considerable margins have to be set to account for organ motion. Our study highlights that for individual patients the systematic error can increase after application of bony anatomy-based position verification, whereas the population standard deviation will decrease. Off-line target-based position verification effectively reduces the systematic error to well below 1 mm, thus enabling significant margin reduction

  4. First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada’s Western Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Gottfried, Michael D.; Hutchison, J. Howard; Brochu, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada’s High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early – middle Eocene (∼53–50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada’s easternmost Arctic – Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada’s westernmost Arctic Island – Banks Island, Northwest Territories – they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. Principal Findings We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower – middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Conclusions/Significance These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early – middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence

  5. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J; Gottfried, Michael D; Hutchison, J Howard; Brochu, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada's westernmost Arctic Island - Banks Island, Northwest Territories - they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower - middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early - middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence time between the two extant alligatorid lineages Alligator

  6. Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Dalstra, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010.......Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010....

  7. CAT & MAUS: A novel system for true dynamic motion measurement of underlying bony structures with compensation for soft tissue movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rui; Monk, Paul; Murray, David; Noble, J Alison; Mellon, Stephen

    2017-09-06

    Optoelectronic motion capture systems are widely employed to measure the movement of human joints. However, there can be a significant discrepancy between the data obtained by a motion capture system (MCS) and the actual movement of underlying bony structures, which is attributed to soft tissue artefact. In this paper, a computer-aided tracking and motion analysis with ultrasound (CAT & MAUS) system with an augmented globally optimal registration algorithm is presented to dynamically track the underlying bony structure during movement. The augmented registration part of CAT & MAUS was validated with a high system accuracy of 80%. The Euclidean distance between the marker-based bony landmark and the bony landmark tracked by CAT & MAUS was calculated to quantify the measurement error of an MCS caused by soft tissue artefact during movement. The average Euclidean distance between the target bony landmark measured by each of the CAT & MAUS system and the MCS alone varied from 8.32mm to 16.87mm in gait. This indicates the discrepancy between the MCS measured bony landmark and the actual underlying bony landmark. Moreover, Procrustes analysis was applied to demonstrate that CAT & MAUS reduces the deformation of the body segment shape modeled by markers during motion. The augmented CAT & MAUS system shows its potential to dynamically detect and locate actual underlying bony landmarks, which reduces the MCS measurement error caused by soft tissue artefact during movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the facial artery following bilateral temporomandibular joint replacement: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanit Anand

    2017-03-01

    Case report: A 59-year-old male presented to our department with bony ankylosis of his temporomandibular joints bilaterally as a result of previous osteomyelitis. He underwent bilateral temperomandibular joint replacements in a two-stage procedure. Six weeks post discharge he presented to the emergency department in haemorrhagic shock, having lost significant blood volume from a pulsatile lesion over his right mandible. Computed tomography angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the right facial artery. He proceeded to emergent embolisation with resolution of the pseudoaneurysm.

  9. Anatomia del nervo faciale

    OpenAIRE

    Barbut , J.; Tankere , F.; Bernat , I.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Il nervo faciale è al centro della pratica quotidiana in oto-rino-laringoiatria. La sua singolare fisiologia e la sua patologia fanno di questo paio di nervi cranici un soggetto appassionante in cui alcuni si sono specializzati. La precisa conoscenza della sua anatomia, il cui percorso è tortuoso e presenta molte relazioni con altri elementi nobili, è un prerequisito indispensabile per il suo approccio, sia in chirurgia cervicale che in quella otologica che in quella n...

  10. Facial Symmetry: An Illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Reddy Admala

    2013-01-01

    Materials and methods: A sample of 120 patients (60 males and 60 females; mean age, 15 years; range, 16-22 years who had received orthodontic clinical examination at AME′s Dental College and Hospital were selected. Selection was made in such a way that following malocclusions with equal sexual distribution was possible from the patient database. Patients selected were classified into skeletal Class I (25 males and 25 females, Class II (25 males and 25 females and Class III (10 males and 10 females based on ANB angle. The number was predecided to be the same and also was based on the number of patients with following malocclusions reported to the department. Differences in length between distances from the points at which ear rods were inserted to the facial midline and the perpendicular distance from the softtissue menton to the facial midline were measured on a frontofacial photograph. Subjects with a discrepancy of more than three standard deviations of the measurement error were categorized as having left- or right-sided laterality. Results: Of subjects with facial asymmetry, 74.1% had a wider right hemiface, and 51.6% of those with chin deviation had left-sided laterality. These tendencies were independent of sex or skeletal jaw relationships. Conclusion: These results suggest that laterality in the normal asymmetry of the face, which is consistently found in humans, is likely to be a hereditary rather than an acquired trait.

  11. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian, with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25. Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI, Malaysian Chinese (MC and Malaysian Malay (MM were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05 but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1% were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5% short and 81 (28.3% long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts.1 Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%; 2 Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3 Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4 All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5 No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  12. Adolescents with HIV and facial lipoatrophy: response to facial stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Claudio Gabana-Silveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of facial stimulation over the superficial muscles of the face in individuals with facial lipoatrophy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and with no indication for treatment with polymethyl methacrylate. METHOD: The study sample comprised four adolescents of both genders ranging from 13 to 17 years in age. To participate in the study, the participants had to score six or less points on the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. The facial stimulation program used in our study consisted of 12 weekly 30-minute sessions during which individuals received therapy. The therapy consisted of intra- and extra-oral muscle contraction and stretching maneuvers of the zygomaticus major and minor and the masseter muscles. Pre- and post-treatment results were obtained using anthropometric static measurements of the face and the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. RESULTS: The results suggest that the therapeutic program effectively improved the volume of the buccinators. No significant differences were observed for the measurements of the medial portion of the face, the lateral portion of the face, the volume of the masseter muscle, or Facial Lipoatrophy Index scores. CONCLUSION: The results of our study suggest that facial maneuvers applied to the superficial muscles of the face of adolescents with facial lipoatrophy associated with HIV improved the facial area volume related to the buccinators muscles. We believe that our results will encourage future research with HIV patients, especially for patients who do not have the possibility of receiving an alternative aesthetic treatment.

  13. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  14. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  15. Direct assembly of in situ templated CdSe quantum dots via crystalline lamellae structure of polyamide 66

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheval, Nicolas; Brooks, Richard [University of Nottingham, Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Faculty of Engineering (United Kingdom); Fahmi, Amir, E-mail: Amir.Fahmi@hochschule-Rhein-waal.de [Rhein-Waal University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Technology and Bionics (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    A simple concept is proposed for templating in situ synthesised CdSe quantum dots (QDs) into an organised nano-pattern using the crystalline lamellae structure of polyamide 66 (PA66). The morphology obtained for PA66 and the hybrid material on Si/SiO{sub x} solid substrate was characterised by means of atomic force microscope. Controlling the PA66 concentration in solution and the organic-inorganic interactions are found to be the keys factors to direct the assembly of CdSe QDs along the PA66 linear crystalline structure. This simple approach could be opened a new avenue for a large spectrum of innovative high-tech applications.

  16. Large-visual-angle microstructure inspired from quantitative design of Morpho butterflies' lamellae deviation using the FDTD/PSO method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Chen, Weixin; Gu, Jiajun; Liu, Qinglei; Deng, Tao; Zhang, Di

    2013-01-15

    The wide angular range of the treelike structure in Morpho butterfly scales was investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)/particle-swarm-optimization (PSO) analysis. Using the FDTD method, different parameters in the Morpho butterflies' treelike structure were studied and their contributions to the angular dependence were analyzed. Then a wide angular range was realized by the PSO method from quantitatively designing the lamellae deviation (Δy), which was a crucial parameter with angular range. The field map of the wide-range reflection in a large area was given to confirm the wide angular range. The tristimulus values and corresponding color coordinates for various viewing directions were calculated to confirm the blue color in different observation angles. The wide angular range realized by the FDTD/PSO method will assist us in understanding the scientific principles involved and also in designing artificial optical materials.

  17. Prostate position relative to pelvic bony anatomy based on intraprostatic gold markers and electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallenkamp, John M.; Herman, Michael G.; Kruse, Jon J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the relative positions and motions of the prostate, pelvic bony anatomy, and intraprostatic gold fiducial markers during daily electronic portal localization of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients were treated supine with definitive external radiotherapy according to an on-line target localization protocol using three or four intraprostatic gold fiducial markers and an electronic portal imaging device. Daily pretherapy and through-treatment electronic portal images (EPIs) were obtained for each of four treatment fields. The patients' pelvic bony anatomy, intraprostatic gold markers, and a best visual match to the target (i.e., prostate) were identified on simulation digitally reconstructed radiographs and during daily treatment setup and delivery. These data provided quantitative inter- and intrafractional analysis of prostate motion, its position relative to the bony anatomy, and the individual intraprostatic fiducial markers. Treatment planning margins, with and without on-line localization, were subsequently compared. Results: A total of 22,266 data points were obtained from daily pretherapy and through-treatment EPIs. The pretherapy three-dimensional (3D) average displacement of the fiducial markers, as a surrogate for the prostate, was 5.6 mm, which improved to 2.8 mm after use of the localization protocol. The bony anatomy 3D average displacement was 4.4 mm both before and after localization to the prostate (p = 0.46). Along the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and right-left (RL) axes, the average prostate displacement improved from 2.5, 3.7, and 1.9 mm, respectively, before localization to 1.4, 1.6, and 1.1 mm after (all p < 0.001). The pretherapy to through-treatment position of the bony landmarks worsened from 1.7 to 2.5 mm (p < 0.001) in the SI axis, remained statistically unchanged at 2.8 mm (p = 0.39) in the AP axis, and improved from 2.0 to 1.2 mm in the RL axis (p < 0.001). There

  18. X-ray and neutron tomography on the bony inner ear of baleen whales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlt, Tobias; Wieder, Frank; Hampe, Oliver; Manke, Ingo; Ritsche, Indira; Fahlke, Julia M.

    2018-01-01

    During their evolution whales and dolphins developed a highly specialized hearing organ for orientation in their deep sea territory covering a broad acoustic spectrum. The internal anatomy of the periotic bone, especially the morphology of the cochlea, has a significant influence on the hearing capability of mammals. The bony and fossilized cochleae of several fossil representatives of extinct baleen whales (e.g., Cetotheriidae) and modern rorquals (Balaenopteridae) and right whales, as well as cochleae of an archaeocete and some land mammals are investigated by X-ray and neutron tomography in order to record morphological changes that may be responsible for the development of low frequency hearing. Differences in the cochlear morphology have been determined by means of morphometric parameters, such as the number of turns, the length of the cochlea, and the curvature of the cochlear canal. In particular, X-ray tomography enables a high resolution display of the bony inner ear.

  19. Facial soft tissue analysis among various vertical facial patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeelani, W.; Fida, M.; Shaikh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The emergence of soft tissue paradigm in orthodontics has made various soft tissue parameters an integral part of the orthodontic problem list. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare various facial soft tissue parameters on lateral cephalograms among patients with short, average and long facial patterns. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on the lateral cephalograms of 180 adult subjects divided into three equal groups, i.e., short, average and long face according to the vertical facial pattern. Incisal display at rest, nose height, upper and lower lip lengths, degree of lip procumbency and the nasolabial angle were measured for each individual. The gender differences for these soft tissue parameters were determined using Mann-Whitney U test while the comparison among different facial patterns was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Significant differences in the incisal display at rest, total nasal height, lip procumbency, the nasolabial angle and the upper and lower lip lengths were found among the three vertical facial patterns. A significant positive correlation of nose and lip dimensions was found with the underlying skeletal pattern. Similarly, the incisal display at rest, upper and lower lip procumbency and the nasolabial angle were significantly correlated with the lower anterior facial height. Conclusion: Short facial pattern is associated with minimal incisal display, recumbent upper and lower lips and acute nasolabial angle while the long facial pattern is associated with excessive incisal display, procumbent upper and lower lips and obtuse nasolabial angle. (author)

  20. Bony defect of palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S; Ma, L; Zhou, X; Sun, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize bony defects of the palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients (SMCP) by three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction and to classify the range of bony defects. Forty-eight consecutive non-operated SMCP patients were included. Diagnosis was based on the presence of at least one of three classical signs of SMCP: bifid uvula, a translucent zone in the midline of the soft palate, and a palpable 'V' notch on the posterior border of the bony palate. Patients were imaged using spiral CT. 3D reconstruction models were created of the palate and vomer. The sagittal extent of the bony cleft in SMCP was classified into four types: type I, no V-shaped hard palate cleft (8.3%); type II, cleft involving the partial palate (43.8%); type III, cleft involving the complete palate and extending to the incisive foramen (43.8%); type IV, cleft involving the complete palate and the alveolar bone (4.2%). The extent of the vomer defect was classified into three types: type A, vomer completely fused with the palate (8.3%); type B, vomer partially fused with the palate (43.8%); type C, vomer not fused with the palate up to the incisive foramen (47.9%). Significant variability in hard palate defects in SMCP is the rule rather than the exception. The association of velopharyngeal insufficiency with anatomical malformations may be complex. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of bony trabecular characteristics using bone morphometry and micro-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young Han; Lee, Wan; Lee, Chang Jin; Ji, Jung Hyun; Lee, Byung Do

    2007-01-01

    The research was done to investigate the effectiveness of 2D bony morphometry and microstructure of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) on the osteoporotic bony change. We performed the bone morphometric analysis of proximal femur in ovariectomized rabbits with BMD and micro-CT examination. Twenty-one female (Newzeland, about 16 weeks old, 2.9-3.4 kg) rabbits were used. Three rabbits were sacrificed on the day when experiment began (Basline). The remaining 18 rabbits were divided into two groups. One group was ovariectomized bilaterally (OVX) and the other animals were subjected to sham operation (Sham). Bone specimens were obtained from the right and left femur of sacrificed rabbits. At intervals of 1,2,3,5,6 months respectively, BMD tests were performed on the proximal on the proximal femur by using PIXImus 2 (GE Lunar Co. USA), 2-dimensional bone morphometric analysis by custom computer program and 2D / 3D bone structure analysis by micro-CT (Skyscan1072, Antwerpen, Belgium). Statistical analysis was carried out for the correlation between bone morphometry, micro-CT and BMD. BV/TV, Tb.Th, Tb.N of micro-CT parameters showed higher values in sham group than OVX group. N.Nd/Ar.RI, N.NdNd, N.NdTm, N. TmTm, PmB/Ar.RI, 3-D BoxSlope of 2D morphometric parameters showed higher values in Sham group than OVX group. The micro-CT parameters of Tb.Sp. Tb.N were statistically significant correlated with BMD respectively. Several 2D morphometric parameters were statistically significant correlated with BMD respectively. Several parameters of 2D bony morphometry and micro-CT showed effective aspects on the osteoporotic bony change

  2. Valor predicts the thyroid hormones in the evolution the transplant bony marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.A.; Carnot, J.; De Castro, R.; Morera, M.L.; Garcia, I.

    1998-01-01

    In this work you values the valor I predict the thyroid hormones in the bony marrow transplant evolution as factors the metabolisms oxidative and the synthesis albumins. The patients received conditioning treatments to the transplant and in the postoperational. The received radiations were 1000 cGy lateral cube, with blocking lung, to those that were subjected 3 sessions irradiation, they are practiced a transplant marrow allogeneic

  3. Radiographic detection of artificial intra-bony defects in the edentulous area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, N; Jacobs, R; Coucke, W; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    2009-03-01

    Since intra-bony pathologies might jeopardize implant outcome, their preoperative detection is crucial. In sixteen human cadaver bloc sections from upper and lower jaws, artificial defects with progressively increasing size (n=7) have been created. From each respective defect, analogue and digital intra-oral radiographs were taken, the latter processed via a periodontal filter and afterwards presented in black-white as well as in colour, resulting in three sets of 7 images per bloc section. Eight observers were asked to diagnosis an eventual defect on randomly presented radiographs, and at another occasion to rank each set based on the defect size. The clinicians were only able to identify a defect, when the junctional area was involved, except for bony pieces with a very homogeneous structure. For longitudinal evaluation of healing bone (e.g. after tooth extraction), colour digital images can be recommended. These observations indicate that intra-oral radiographs are not always reliable for the detection of any intra-bony defect.

  4. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean ± SD) was 4.0 ± 2.1 mm and 3.5 ± 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r ≥ 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 ± 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT

  5. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-09

    Jun 9, 2013 ... Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention.

  6. [Multidisciplinary approach of facial injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Schreurs, R.; Lapid, O.; Saeed, P.; Adriaensen, G.F.; Hoefnagels, F.M.; Jong, V.M. de

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately one quarter of polytrauma patients has facial injuries, which usually lead to loss of form and function. Several specialties are involved in the acute and reconstructive phases of facial injuries, such as oral and maxillofacial surgery, otorhinolaryngology, plastic surgery,

  7. Nucleation and thickening of shear bands in nano-scale twin/matrix lamellae of a Cu-Al alloy processed by dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, C.S.; Tao, N.R.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2010-01-01

    dislocation structure (DDS) into a nano-sized (sub)grain structure (NGS). On the two sides of a core region, two transition layers (TRLs) exist where the T/M lamellae experienced much less shear strain. The interface boundaries separating the core region and the TRLs are characterized by very large shear...

  8. Small-angle neutron scattering study of the ultrastructure of chloroplast thylakoid membranes - Periodicity and structural flexibility of the stroma lamellae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posselt, Dorthe; Nagy, Gergely; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The multilamellar organization of freshly isolated spinach and pea chloroplast thylakoid membranes was studied using small-angle neutron scattering. A broad peak at similar to 0.02 angstrom(-1) is ascribed to diffraction from domains of ordered, unappressed stroma lamellae, revealing a repeat dis...

  9. Observations on the bony bridging of the jugular foramen in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodo, Y

    1986-02-01

    The anatomical nature and pattern of incidence of bony bridging of the jugular foramen was investigated using 64 fetal crania aged nine months to term and 222 adult crania of Japanese. In addition, the region of the jugular foramen of an adult cadaver was carefully dissected in order to clarify the relationship between the cranial nerves passing through the jugular foramen and the intrajugular processes of the jugular foramen. The general conclusions concerning the anatomical nature of the bony bridging of the jugular foramen were as follows. (1) The intrajugular process of the temporal bone is situated posterior to the triangular depression (as described in Gray's Anatomy) of the petrous part. (2) The bony bridging of the jugular foramen is established by the contact of the intrajugular process of the temporal bone with the bony process of the occipital bone projecting either from just above the hypoglossal canal (Type I) or from posterior to the hypoglossal canal (Type III). (3) If both the processes of the occipital bone reach the intrajugular process of the temporal bone simultaneously, the jugular foramen is divided into three compartments. (4) In the case of Type I bridging, the anteromedial compartment transmits the glossopharyngeal nerve, while the posterolateral compartment gives passage to the vagus nerve, the accessory nerve and the internal jugular vein. (5) In the case of Type II bridging, the anteromedial compartment contains the glossopharyngeal, vagus and accessory nerves, and the posterolateral compartment transmits the internal jugular vein. (6) When tripartite division of the jugular foramen occurs, the anteromedial compartment transmits the glossopharyngeal nerve, the middle compartment contains the vagus and accessory nerves, and the posterolateral compartment transmits the internal jugular vein. Concerning the pattern of incidence of jugular foramen bridging in the Japanese fetal and adult cranial series, this is similar to that of the bony

  10. Correction of facial and mandibular asymmetry using a computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing prefabricated titanium implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jason; Hatamleh, Muhanad; Alwahadni, Ahed; Srinivasan, Dilip

    2014-05-01

    Patients with significant craniofacial asymmetry may have functional problems associated with their occlusion and aesthetic concerns related to the imbalance in soft and hard tissue profiles. This report details a case of facial asymmetry secondary to left mandible angle deficiency due to undergoing previous radiotherapy. We describe the correction of the bony deformity using computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing custom-made titanium onlay using novel direct metal laser sintering. The direct metal laser sintering onlay proved a very accurate operative fit and showed a good aesthetic correction of the bony defect with no reported complications postoperatively. It is a useful low-morbidity technique, and there is no resorption or associated donor-site complications.

  11. Colesteatoma causando paralisia facial Cholesteatoma causing facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gurgel Testa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial causada pelo colesteatoma é pouco freqüente. As porções do nervo mais acometidas são a timpânica e a região do 2º joelho. Nos casos de disseminação da lesão colesteatomatosa para o epitímpano anterior, o gânglio geniculado é o segmento do nervo facial mais sujeito à injúria. A etiopatogenia pode estar ligada à compressão do nervo pelo colesteatoma seguida de diminuição do seu suprimento vascular como também pela possível ação de substâncias neurotóxicas produzidas pela matriz do tumor ou pelas bactérias nele contidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, as características clínicas e o tratamento da paralisia facial decorrente da lesão colesteatomatosa. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo envolvendo dez casos de paralisia facial por colesteatoma selecionados através de levantamento de 206 descompressões do nervo facial com diferentes etiologias, realizadas na UNIFESP-EPM nos últimos dez anos. RESULTADOS: A incidência de paralisia facial por colesteatoma neste estudo foi de 4,85%,com predominância do sexo feminino (60%. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 39 anos. A duração e o grau da paralisia (inicial juntamente com a extensão da lesão foram importantes em relação à recuperação funcional do nervo facial. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico precoce é fundamental para que ocorra um resultado funcional mais adequado. Nos casos de ruptura ou intensa fibrose do tecido nervoso, o enxerto de nervo (auricular magno/sural e/ou a anastomose hipoglosso-facial podem ser sugeridas.Facial paralysis caused by cholesteatoma is uncommon. The portions most frequently involved are horizontal (tympanic and second genu segments. When cholesteatomas extend over the anterior epitympanic space, the facial nerve is placed in jeopardy in the region of the geniculate ganglion. The aetiology can be related to compression of the nerve followed by impairment of its

  12. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, I.; Sahintuerk, F.; Sennaroglu, L.; Boyvat, F.; Guersel, B.; Besim, A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  13. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  14. Expression of beta-keratin mRNAs and proline uptake in epidermal cells of growing scales and pad lamellae of gecko lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Toni, Mattia; Valle, Luisa Dalla

    2007-01-01

    Beta-keratins form a large part of the proteins contained in the hard beta layer of reptilian scales. The expression of genes encoding glycine–proline-rich beta-keratins in normal and regenerating epidermis of two species of gecko lizards has been studied by in situ hybridization. The probes localize mRNAs in differentiating oberhautchen and beta cells of growing scales and in modified scales, termed pad lamellae, on the digits of gecko lizards. In situ localization at the ultrastructural level shows clusters of gold particles in the cytoplasm among beta-keratin filaments of oberhautchen and beta cells. They are also present in the differentiating elongation or setae of oberhautchen cells present in pad lamellae. Setae allow geckos to adhere and climb vertical surfaces. Oberhautchen and beta cells also incorporate tritiated proline. The fine localization of the beta-keratin mRNAs and the uptake of proline confirms the biomolecular data that identified glycine–proline-rich beta-keratin in differentiating beta cells of gecko epidermis. The present study also shows the presence of differentiating and metabolically active cells in both inner and outer oberhautchen/beta cells at the base of the outer setae localized at the tip of pad lamellae. The addition of new beta and alpha cells to the corneous layer near the tip of the outer setae explains the anterior movement of the setae along the apical free-margin of pad lamellae. The rapid replacement of setae ensures the continuous usage of the gecko's adhesive devices, the pad lamellae, during most of their active life. PMID:17553098

  15. Diplegia facial traumatica Traumatic facial diplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.A case of traumatic facial diplegia with left partial loss of hearing following head injury is reported. X-rays showed fractures on the occipital and left temporal bones. A review of traumatic facial paralysis is made.

  16. Does facial resemblance enhance cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Giang

    Full Text Available Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces. A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system.

  17. Facial Action Units Recognition: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Shan, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many approaches to facial expression recognition focus on assessing the six basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, and surprise). Real-life situations proved to produce many more subtle facial expressions. A reliable way of analyzing the facial behavior is the Facial Action Coding

  18. Microbial biofilms on silicone facial prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Facial disfigurements can result from oncologic surgery, trauma and congenital deformities. These disfigurements can be rehabilitated with facial prostheses. Facial prostheses are usually made of silicones. A problem of facial prostheses is that microorganisms can colonize their surface. It is hard

  19. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  20. Facial transplantation for massive traumatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Daniel S; Chi, John J

    2013-10-01

    This article describes the challenges of facial reconstruction and the role of facial transplantation in certain facial defects and injuries. This information is of value to surgeons assessing facial injuries with massive soft tissue loss or injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Persistent idiopathic facial pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Wolfram, Frauke; Heinskou, Tone Bruvik

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP) is a poorly understood chronic orofacial pain disorder and a differential diagnosis to trigeminal neuralgia. To address the lack of systematic studies in PIFP we here report clinical characteristics and neuroimaging findings in PIFP. Methods...... pain 7 (13%), hypoesthesia 23 (48%), depression 16 (30%) and other chronic pain conditions 17 (32%) and a low prevalence of stabbing pain 21 (40%), touch-evoked pain 14 (26%) and remission periods 10 (19%). The odds ratio between neurovascular contact and the painful side was 1.4 (95% Cl 0.4–4.4, p = 0.......565) and the odds ratio between neurovascular contact with displacement of the trigeminal nerve and the painful side was 0.2 (95% Cl 0.0–2.1, p = 0.195). Conclusion: PIFP is separated from trigeminal neuralgia both with respect to the clinical characteristics and neuroimaging findings, as NVC was not associated...

  2. Facial recognition in education system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  3. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  4. Bony vibration stimulation test combined with magnetic resonance imaging. Can discography be replaced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrjämä, M; Tervonen, O; Kurunlahti, M; Vanharanta, H

    1997-04-01

    The results of two noninvasive methods, magnetic resonance imaging and a bony vibration test, were compared with discographic pain provocation findings. To evaluate whether the combination of magnetic resonance imaging and vibration pain provocation tests could be used to replace discography in low back pain diagnostics. Magnetic resonance imaging gives a wealth of visual information on anatomic changes of the spine with often unknown clinical significance. Discographic examination of the spine is still the only widely accepted diagnostic method that can relate the pathoanatomic changes to the patient's clinical pain. Internal anular rupture has been shown to be one of the sources of back pain. The bony vibration test of the spinal processes has been shown correlate well with discographic pain provocation tests in cases of internal anular rupture. The three lowest lumbar discs of 33 patients with back pain were examined by means of magnetic resonance imaging and a bony vibration stimulation test, and the results were compared with those from computed tomography-discography. In cases of intradiscal magnetic resonance imaging findings, the vibration provocation test showed a sensitivity of 0.88 and a specificity of 0.50 compared with the discographic pain provocation test. If the patients with previous back surgery were excluded, the specificity was 0.75. In the cases of total anular rupture, the sensitivity was 0.50, and the specificity was 0.33. The combination of the two noninvasive methods, vibration stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging, gives more information on the origin of the back pain than magnetic resonance imaging alone. The pathoanatomic changes seen in magnetic resonance imaging can be correlated with the patient's disorder more reliably using the vibration provocation test in the cases of partial anular ruptures. The use of discography can be limited mostly to cases with total anular ruptures detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Comparative Anatomy of the Bony Labyrinth (Inner Ear) of Placental Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdale, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation is a naturally occurring phenomenon that is observable at all levels of morphology, from anatomical variations of DNA molecules to gross variations between whole organisms. The structure of the otic region is no exception. The present paper documents the broad morphological diversity exhibited by the inner ear region of placental mammals using digital endocasts constructed from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT). Descriptions cover the major placental clades, and linear, angular, and volumetric dimensions are reported. Principal Findings The size of the labyrinth is correlated to the overall body mass of individuals, such that large bodied mammals have absolutely larger labyrinths. The ratio between the average arc radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals and body mass of aquatic species is substantially lower than the ratios of related terrestrial taxa, and the volume percentage of the vestibular apparatus of aquatic mammals tends to be less than that calculated for terrestrial species. Aspects of the bony labyrinth are phylogenetically informative, including vestibular reduction in Cetacea, a tall cochlear spiral in caviomorph rodents, a low position of the plane of the lateral semicircular canal compared to the posterior canal in Cetacea and Carnivora, and a low cochlear aspect ratio in Primatomorpha. Significance The morphological descriptions that are presented add a broad baseline of anatomy of the inner ear across many placental mammal clades, for many of which the structure of the bony labyrinth is largely unknown. The data included here complement the growing body of literature on the physiological and phylogenetic significance of bony labyrinth structures in mammals, and they serve as a source of data for future studies on the evolution and function of the vertebrate ear. PMID:23805251

  6. Facial exercises for facial rejuvenation: a control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Marie-Camille; Van den Brande, Helen; Boone, Barbara; Van Borsel, John

    2013-01-01

    Facial exercises are a noninvasive alternative to medical approaches to facial rejuvenation. Logopedists could be involved in providing these exercises. Little research has been conducted, however, on the effectiveness of exercises for facial rejuvenation. This study assessed the effectiveness of 4 exercises purportedly reducing wrinkles and sagging of the facial skin. A control group study was conducted with 18 participants, 9 of whom (the experimental group) underwent daily training for 7 weeks. Pictures taken before and after 7 weeks of 5 facial areas (forehead, nasolabial folds, area above the upper lip, jawline and area under the chin) were evaluated by a panel of laypersons. In addition, the participants of the experimental group evaluated their own pictures. Evaluation included the pairwise presentation of pictures before and after 7 weeks and scoring of the same pictures by means of visual analogue scales in a random presentation. Only one significant difference was found between the control and experimental group. In the experimental group, the picture after therapy of the upper lip was more frequently chosen to be the younger-looking one by the panel. It cannot be concluded that facial exercises are effective. More systematic research is needed. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. A Bony Landmark 'RAI Triangle' to Prevent 'Misplaced and Misdirected' Medial Cut in SSRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Arakeri, Gururaj; Khaji, Shahanavaj I

    2011-03-01

    'Rai triangle', a new anatomic landmark on the medial surface of the ramus of the mandible which when identified and taken into consideration, may have a definite advantage. This is especially in terms of performing the medial horizontal cut which is an important and integral part of the sagittal split ramus osteotomy so as to avoid a bad split. The objective of this article is to propose an easily identifiable bony land mark, which is closely related to lingula of mandible that may ease the procedure of osteotomy and avoid bad splits.

  8. Comparison of planar images and SPECT with bayesean preprocessing for the demonstration of facial anatomy and craniomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.T.; Ortendahl, D.A.; Hattner, R.S.; Faulkner, D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Craniomandiublar disorders involving the facial anatomy may be difficult to demonstrate in planar images. Although bone scanning is generally more sensitive than radiography, facial bone anatomy is complex and focal areas of increased or decreased radiotracer may become obscured by overlapping structures in planar images. Thus SPECT appears ideally suited to examination of the facial skeleton. A series of patients with craniomandibular disorders of unknown origin were imaged using 20 mCi Tc-99m MDP. Planar and SPECT (Siemens 7500 ZLC Orbiter) images were obtained four hours after injection. The SPECT images were reconstructed with a filtered back-projection algorithm. In order to improve image contrast and resolution in SPECT images, the rotation views were pre-processed with a Bayesean deblurring algorithm which has previously been show to offer improved contrast and resolution in planar images. SPECT images using the pre-processed rotation views were obtained and compared to the SPECT images without pre-processing and the planar images. TMJ arthropathy involving either the glenoid fossa or the mandibular condyle, orthopedic changes involving the mandible or maxilla, localized dental pathosis, as well as changes in structures peripheral to the facial skeleton were identified. Bayesean pre-processed SPECT depicted the facial skeleton more clearly as well as providing a more obvious demonstration of the bony changes associated with craniomandibular disorders than either planar images or SPECT without pre-processing

  9. Anatomical study of the facial nerve canal in comparison to the site of the lesion in Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowsky, Krsto; Branica, Srećko; Batelja, Lovorka; Dawidowsky, Barbara; Kovać-Bilić, Lana; Simunić-Veselić, Anamarija

    2011-03-01

    The term Bell's palsy is used for the peripheral paresis of the facial nerve and is of unknown origin. Many studies have been performed to find the cause of the disease, but none has given certain evidence of the etiology. However, the majority of investigators agree that the pathophysiology of the palsy starts with the edema of the facial nerve and consequent entrapment of the nerve in the narrow facial canal in the temporal bone. In this study the authors wanted to find why the majority of the paresis are suprastapedial, i.e. why the entrapment of the nerve mainly occurs in the proximal part of the canal. For this reason they carried out anatomical measurements of the facial canal diameter in 12 temporal bones. By use of a computer program which measures the cross-sectional area from the diameter, they proved that the width of the canal is smaller at its proximal part. Since the nerve is thicker at that point because it contains more nerve fibers, the authors conclude that the discrepancy between the nerve diameter and the surrounding bony walls in the suprastapedial part of the of the canal would, in cases of a swollen nerve after inflammation, cause the facial palsy.

  10. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  11. Sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter Bjørn; Pilegaard, Hans K; Ladegaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background. Facial blushing is one of the most peculiar of human expressions. The pathophysiology is unclear, and the prevalence is unknown. Thoracoscopic sympathectomy may cure the symptom and is increasingly used in patients with isolated facial blushing. The evidence base for the optimal level...... of targeting the sympathetic chain is limited to retrospective case studies. We present a randomized clinical trial. Methods. 100 patients were randomized (web-based, single-blinded) to rib-oriented (R2 or R2-R3) sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing at two university hospitals during a 6-year period...... between R2 and R2-R3 sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing. Both were effective, and QOL increased significantly. Despite very frequent side effects, the vast majority of patients were satisfied. Surprisingly, many patients experienced mild recurrent symptoms within the first year; this should...

  12. Measuring facial expression of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-12-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress.

  13. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  14. Representing affective facial expressions for robots and embodied conversational agents by facial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C.; Ham, J.R.C.; Postma, E.O.; Midden, C.J.H.; Joosten, B.; Goudbeek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Affective robots and embodied conversational agents require convincing facial expressions to make them socially acceptable. To be able to virtually generate facial expressions, we need to investigate the relationship between technology and human perception of affective and social signals. Facial

  15. Concertina effect and facial aging: nonlinear aspects of youthfulness and skeletal remodeling, and why, perhaps, infants have jowls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessa, J E; Zadoo, V P; Yuan, C; Ayedelotte, J D; Cuellar, F J; Cochran, C S; Mutimer, K L; Garza, J R

    1999-02-01

    The effect of aging on the orbitomaxillary region is evaluated in the present study. The observation was made that infants look like aged individuals in terms of the midface soft-tissue contours of the midface. Because preliminary work has shown that the facial skeleton remodels throughout life, this observation led to the hypothesis that infants and older individuals appear similar because they have comparable skeletal dimensions, specifically in the orbitomaxillary region. The design is a retrospective analysis of three-dimensional computed tomographic scan data. Three groups of male subjects were studied: infant, ages 1 to 12 months (n = 5); youthful, ages 15 to 24 years (n = 13); and old, ages 53 to 76 years (n = 12). Orbital and zygomaticomaxillary vertical dimensions were measured in both medial and lateral planes between fixed anatomical landmarks. Results were compared by using analysis of variance, Student-Newman-Keuls, and Student's t tests. The findings show that skeletal remodeling is such that the ratio of the maxillary height to orbital height is greatest during youth; during infancy and old age, there is a short maxilla relative to a larger orbit. This finding is significant in the medial plane from orbital rim to pyriform aperture (p definition of facial youthfulness. Infants are born with a short maxilla relative to a large orbit, and the maxillary wall is angled posteriorly. This ratio and angle change from infancy until youth, when there is a balance between the bony skeletal support and the overlying soft-tissue envelope, i.e., the skin, facial muscles, and adipose tissue. It is when skeletal remodeling continues past this point that a disharmony occurs. Because the ratio of maxilla/orbit, and the angle of the maxillary wall, in the older person reverts toward that of an infant, the attainment of youth occurs partly in a nonlinear or multimodal manner. This work is part of an emerging concept of facial aging, which we would term an integrated

  16. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U S; Hariram; Malkunje, Laxman R; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-07-01

    Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected randomly for this study. On the basis of examination and investigations a suitable management approach involving rest and observation, open or closed reduction and immobilization, trans-osseous (TO) wiring, mini bone plate fixation, splinting and replantation, elevation and fixation of zygoma, etc. were carried out. In our study fall was the predominant cause for most of the facial injuries in children. There was a 1.09% incidence of facial injuries in children up to 16 years of age amongst the total patients. The age-wise distribution of the fracture amongst groups (I, II and III) was found to be 26.67%, 51.67% and 21.67% respectively. Male to female patient ratio was 3:1. The majority of the cases of facial injuries were seen in Group II patients (6-11 years) i.e. 51.67%. The mandibular fracture was found to be the most common fracture (0.60%) followed by dentoalveolar (0.27%), mandibular + midface (0.07) and midface (0.02%) fractures. Most of the mandibular fractures were found in the parasymphysis region. Simple fracture seems to be commonest in the mandible. Most of the mandibular and midface fractures in children were amenable to conservative therapies except a few which required surgical intervention.

  17. The relationship of transverse sinus stenosis to bony groove dimensions provides an insight into the aetiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Stewart, V.R.; O' Flynn, E.A.M. [King' s College Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, Ruskin Wing, London (United Kingdom); Siddiqui, M.A. [Southern General Hospital, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Transverse sinus tapered narrowings are frequently identified in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH); however, it remains unclear whether they are primary stenoses or whether they occur secondary to raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Computed tomographic venography demonstrates both the morphology of the venous system and the adjacent bony grooves so it may provide an insight into the aetiology of these transverse sinus stenoses. Tapered transverse sinus narrowings (>50%) were studied in 19 patients without IIH and 14 patients with IIH. Computed tomography vascular studies were reviewed and the dimensions of the venous sinuses and bony grooves at the sites of maximum and minimum transverse sinus area dimensions were recorded. There was demonstrated to be a strong correlation of bony groove height with venous sinus height at the largest portions of the transverse sinus in both IIH patients and non-IIH subjects as well as at the transverse sinus narrowing in non-IIH subjects. There was a discordant relationship between bony groove height and venous sinus height at the site of transverse sinus stenoses in IIH patients. In 5/23 IIH transverse sinus stenoses, the bony groove height was proportionate to that seen in non-IIH subjects. There were a further 8/23 cases where the small or absent sinus was associated with an absent bony groove. Transverse sinus tapered narrowings in subjects without IIH and in the majority of patients with IIH were associated with proportionately small or absent grooves, and these are postulated to be primary or fixed. Some patients with IIH demonstrate tapered transverse sinus stenoses with disproportionately large bony grooves, suggesting a secondary or acquired narrowing. This implies a varied aetiology for the transverse sinus stenoses of IIH. (orig.)

  18. The relationship of transverse sinus stenosis to bony groove dimensions provides an insight into the aetiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Stewart, V.R.; O'Flynn, E.A.M.; Siddiqui, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transverse sinus tapered narrowings are frequently identified in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH); however, it remains unclear whether they are primary stenoses or whether they occur secondary to raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Computed tomographic venography demonstrates both the morphology of the venous system and the adjacent bony grooves so it may provide an insight into the aetiology of these transverse sinus stenoses. Tapered transverse sinus narrowings (>50%) were studied in 19 patients without IIH and 14 patients with IIH. Computed tomography vascular studies were reviewed and the dimensions of the venous sinuses and bony grooves at the sites of maximum and minimum transverse sinus area dimensions were recorded. There was demonstrated to be a strong correlation of bony groove height with venous sinus height at the largest portions of the transverse sinus in both IIH patients and non-IIH subjects as well as at the transverse sinus narrowing in non-IIH subjects. There was a discordant relationship between bony groove height and venous sinus height at the site of transverse sinus stenoses in IIH patients. In 5/23 IIH transverse sinus stenoses, the bony groove height was proportionate to that seen in non-IIH subjects. There were a further 8/23 cases where the small or absent sinus was associated with an absent bony groove. Transverse sinus tapered narrowings in subjects without IIH and in the majority of patients with IIH were associated with proportionately small or absent grooves, and these are postulated to be primary or fixed. Some patients with IIH demonstrate tapered transverse sinus stenoses with disproportionately large bony grooves, suggesting a secondary or acquired narrowing. This implies a varied aetiology for the transverse sinus stenoses of IIH. (orig.)

  19. Peripheral facial palsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Akıncı, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  1. Palaeobiology of Hyaenodon exiguus (Hyaenodonta, Mammalia) based on morphometric analysis of the bony labyrinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Cathrin; Nagel, Doris; Gunnell, Gregg; Weber, Gerhard W; Kriwet, Jürgen; Morlo, Michael; Bastl, Katharina

    2017-02-01

    Species of the extinct genus Hyaenodon were among the largest carnivorous mammals from the Late Eocene through Early Miocene in North America, Europe and Asia. The origin, phylogeny and palaeobiology of Hyaenodonta are still ambiguous. Most previous studies focused on teeth and dental function in these highly adapted species, which might be influenced by convergent morphologies. The anatomy of the bony labyrinth in vertebrates is generally quite conservative and, additionally, was used in functional-morphological studies. This study provides the first anatomical description of the bony labyrinth of the extinct European species Hyaenodon exiguus in comparison to selected extant carnivoran taxa discussed from a functional-morphological perspective. Hyaenodon exiguus may have occupied a hyaena-like dietary niche with a semi-arboreal lifestyle, based on the relative height, width and length of the semicircular canals of the inner ear. However, this contradicts previous functional-morphological studies focusing on the diameter of the canals, which presumably represent the signal of locomotion mode. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  2. Bony manifestation of rickets in a sunny city - a case report from Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhosain Afrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is disease that occurs in growing bones in which defective mineralization occurs in both the bone and the cartilage of the epiphyseal growth plate, resulting in the retardation of growth and skeletal deformities. Rickets is more common in areas with less sunlight. However, this case report presents a case of the bony manifestation of rickets with the intake of vitamin D supplements in Yazd, a city in central Iran that has sunshine almost every day. A patient was referred to an out-patient general pediatric clinic for deformities of the legs and growth disturbance, with his height far below the normal range. The changes that were most evident in his X-rays were the bowing of the long bones of the legs and forearms and the cupping of the wrist metaphyseal region. In summary, we present a patient with bony manifestation of rickets despite living in a sunny area and taking vitamin D supplements. Thus, it is important to remember that rickets is still a common disease among children in Iran. More studies of this issue should be conducted, including the identification of abnormal cases and rescheduling vitamin D supplementation programs.

  3. Bony manifestation of rickets in a sunny city - a case report from Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhosain Afrand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is disease that occurs in growing bones in which defective mineralization occurs in both the bone and the cartilage of the epiphyseal growth plate, resulting in the retardation of growth and skeletal deformities. Rickets is more common in areas with less sunlight. However, this case report presents a case of the bony manifestation of rickets with the intake of vitamin D supplements in Yazd, a city in central Iran that has sunshine almost every day. A patient was referred to an out-patient general pediatric clinic for deformities of the legs and growth disturbance, with his height far below the normal range. The changes that were most evident in his X-rays were the bowing of the long bones of the legs and forearms and the cupping of the wrist metaphyseal region. In summary, we present a patient with bony manifestation of rickets despite living in a sunny area and taking vitamin D supplements. Thus, it is important to remember that rickets is still a common disease among children in Iran. More studies of this issue should be conducted, including the identification of abnormal cases and rescheduling vitamin D supplementation programs

  4. Selected ophthalmic diagnostic tests, bony orbit anatomy, and ocular histology in sambar deer (Rusa unicolor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriá, Arianne P; Gomes Junior, Deusdete C; Oliveira, Alberto Vinícius D; Curvelo, Victor P; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Pinna, Melissa H; Meneses, Íris D S; Filho, Emanoel F M; Ofri, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish reference values for diagnostic ophthalmic tests in sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) as well as to describe the most relevant features of the bony orbital anatomy and ocular histology. Twenty healthy animals, free living in a forest reserve, that were captured for clinical evaluation as part of a health survey were evaluated. Schirmer tear test-1 (STT1), conjunctival microbiota, intraocular pressure (IOP), conjunctival cytology, anatomy of the bony orbit, and ocular histology were studied. Mean ± SD STT1 and IOP values were 18.8 ± 4.7 mm and 11.4 ± 2.8 mmHg, respectively. IOP was significantly higher in adult (4-8 years) animals (P = 0.04). Bacterial growth was present in 100% of the samples, with a prevalence for Staphylococcus sp. and Bacillus sp. The conjunctival cytology revealed predominance of columnar epithelial cells with mild pigmentation. The sambar deer orbit is completely encompassed by bone. The ocular histology was very similar to most mammalians. The findings in this study will be useful in the diagnosis of ocular diseases in Rusa unicolor. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  5. [Custom-made implant for complex facial reconstruction: A case of total replacement of temporo-mandibular joint, zygomatic arch and malar bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillier, D; Moris, V; See, L-A; Girodon, M; Wajszczak, B-L; Zwetyenga, N

    2017-02-01

    Total prosthetic replacement of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) has become a common procedure, but it is usually limited to the TMJ itself. We report about one case of complex prosthetic joint reconstruction extending to the neighbouring bony structures. A 57-year-old patient, operated several times for a cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia, presented with a recurring TMJ ankylosis and a complexe latero-facial bone loss on the right side. We performed a reconstruction procedure including the TMJ, the zygomatic arch and the malar bone by mean of custom made composite prosthesis (chrome-cobalt-molybdenum-titanium and polyethylene). Five years postoperatively, mouth opening, nutrition, pain and oral hygiene were significantly improved. Nowadays technical possibilities allow for complex facial alloplastic reconstructions with good medium term results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Remembering facial configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, V; Doyle, T; Dench, N; Burton, M

    1991-02-01

    Eight experiments are reported showing that subjects can remember rather subtle aspects of the configuration of facial features to which they have earlier been exposed. Subjects saw several slightly different configurations (formed by altering the relative placement of internal features of the face) of each of ten different faces, and they were asked to rate the apparent age and masculinity-femininity of each. Afterwards, subjects were asked to select from pairs of faces the configuration which was identical to one previously rated. Subjects responded strongly to the central or "prototypical" configuration of each studied face where this was included as one member of each test pair, whether or not it had been studied (Experiments 1, 2 and 4). Subjects were also quite accurate at recognizing one of the previously encountered extremes of the series of configurations that had been rated (Experiment 3), but when unseen prototypes were paired with seen exemplars subjects' performance was at chance (Experiment 5). Prototype learning of face patterns was shown to be stronger than that for house patterns, though both classes of patterns were affected equally by inversion (Experiment 6). The final two experiments demonstrated that preferences for the prototype could be affected by instructions at study and by whether different exemplars of the same face were shown consecutively or distributed through the study series. The discussion examines the implications of these results for theories of the representation of faces and for instance-based models of memory.

  7. Repair of pars defects by segmental transverse wiring for athletes with symptomatic spondylolysis: relationship between bony union and postoperative symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Akira; Miyamoto, Kei; Sadamasu, Aya; Nozawa, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Fushimi, Kazunari; Hosoe, Hideo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2012-04-20

    Retrospective study of surgery for spondylolysis patients. To assess clinical outcome of bony union using multislice computed tomography after segmental wiring fixation. How bony union affects surgical outcome of spondylolysis repair is unclear. Forty-four athletes with symptomatic spondylolysis (33 men and 11 women; mean age, 24.2 ± 5.4 years) who underwent segmental wiring fixation were evaluated retrospectively at a mean follow-up of 85 ± 17 months. The level of spondylolysis was L5 in 42 cases, and both L4 and L5 in 2 cases, giving a total of 46 operative levels of vertebrae. Bony union using axial and sagittal reconstruction images of computed tomography, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for back pain, and complications were reviewed. State of bony union was classified as bilateral union, unilateral union, or nonunion. The total score and the improvement ratio of the JOA score were compared among the 3 groups. Bilateral bony union was obtained in 29 cases (31 of 46 vertebrae, 67.4%). Six cases (13%) showed unilateral union, and 9 cases (19.6%) showed nonunion. JOA score increased significantly after surgery in all groups, average improvement rate was 78.9% in the bilateral group, 63.6% in the unilateral group, and 29.8% in the nonunion group; differences among the 3 groups were significant (P spondylolysis repair.

  8. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenga, Anthony P; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A; Abel, Mark F

    2016-08-01

    Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. All patients aged ≤13 years (n = 75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003-2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiographs and MRI were analyzed retrospectively for bone and neural pathology. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare groups for categorical dependent variables. Independent t tests were used for continuous dependent variables. Significance was set at p formation had a higher incidence of cord anomalies (73 %) than failures of formation (50 %) or segmentation (45 %) alone (p = 0.065). Deformities in the sacrococcygeal area had the highest rate of spinal cord anomalies (13 of 15 patients, 87 %). In 35 cases (47 %), MRI revealed additional bony anomalies that were not seen on the radiographs. As the number of bony malformations increased, we found a higher incidence of cord anomalies. Clinicians should have increased suspicion of spinal cord pathology in the presence of mixed failures of segmentation and formation.

  9. Enhancing facial features by using clear facial features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofoo, Fanar Fareed Hanna

    2017-09-01

    The similarity of features between individuals of same ethnicity motivated the idea of this project. The idea of this project is to extract features of clear facial image and impose them on blurred facial image of same ethnic origin as an approach to enhance a blurred facial image. A database of clear images containing 30 individuals equally divided to five different ethnicities which were Arab, African, Chines, European and Indian. Software was built to perform pre-processing on images in order to align the features of clear and blurred images. And the idea was to extract features of clear facial image or template built from clear facial images using wavelet transformation to impose them on blurred image by using reverse wavelet. The results of this approach did not come well as all the features did not align together as in most cases the eyes were aligned but the nose or mouth were not aligned. Then we decided in the next approach to deal with features separately but in the result in some cases a blocky effect was present on features due to not having close matching features. In general the available small database did not help to achieve the goal results, because of the number of available individuals. The color information and features similarity could be more investigated to achieve better results by having larger database as well as improving the process of enhancement by the availability of closer matches in each ethnicity.

  10. [Idiopathic facial paralysis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, I; Chakroun, A; Ayedi, S; Ben Rhaiem, Z; Mnejja, M; Charfeddine, I; Hammami, B; Ghorbel, A

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy is the most common cause of facial nerve palsy in children. Controversy exists regarding treatment options. The objectives of this study were to review the epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as the outcome of idiopathic facial palsy in children to suggest appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted on children with a diagnosis of idiopathic facial palsy from 2007 to 2012. A total of 37 cases (13 males, 24 females) with a mean age of 13.9 years were included in this analysis. The mean duration between onset of Bell's palsy and consultation was 3 days. Of these patients, 78.3% had moderately severe (grade IV) or severe paralysis (grade V on the House and Brackmann grading). Twenty-seven patients were treated in an outpatient context, three patients were hospitalized, and seven patients were treated as outpatients and subsequently hospitalized. All patients received corticosteroids. Eight of them also received antiviral treatment. The complete recovery rate was 94.6% (35/37). The duration of complete recovery was 7.4 weeks. Children with idiopathic facial palsy have a very good prognosis. The complete recovery rate exceeds 90%. However, controversy exists regarding treatment options. High-quality studies have been conducted on adult populations. Medical treatment based on corticosteroids alone or combined with antiviral treatment is certainly effective in improving facial function outcomes in adults. In children, the recommendation for prescription of steroids and antiviral drugs based on adult treatment appears to be justified. Randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population are recommended to define a strategy for management of idiopathic facial paralysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  12. Sea Unsea - Lamella Flock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Tamke, Martin; Riiber, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    their impact on architecture and on other disciplines. The book includes a series of ambitious design projects to illustrate the potential of these processes for architecture. In so doing it seeks to provide a critical framework for an experimental movement in architectural design at a crucial moment in its...

  13. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  14. [The history of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  16. Facial Soft Tissue Measurement in Microgravity-induces Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Pavela, James; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot

    2014-01-01

    Fluid shifts are a well-known phenomenon in microgravity, and one result is facial edema. Objective measurement of tissue thickness in a standardized location could provide a correlate with the severity of the fluid shift. Previous studies of forehead tissue thickness (TTf) suggest that when exposed to environments that cause fluid shifts, including hypergravity, head-down tilt, and high-altitude/lowpressure, TTf changes in a consistent and measurable fashion. However, the technique in past studies is not well described or standardized. The International Space Station (ISS) houses an ultrasound (US) system capable of accurate sub-millimeter measurements of TTf. We undertook to measure TTf during long-duration space flight using a new accurate, repeatable and transferable technique. Methods: In-flight and post-flight B-mode ultrasound images of a single astronaut's facial soft tissues were obtained using a Vivid-q US system with a 12L-RS high-frequency linear array probe (General Electric, USA). Strictly mid-sagittal images were obtained involving the lower frontal bone, the nasofrontal angle, and the osseo-cartilaginous junction below. Single images were chosen for comparison that contained identical views of the bony landmarks and identical acoustical interface between the probe and skin. Using Gingko CADx DICOM viewing software, soft tissue thickness was measured at a right angle to the most prominent point of the inferior frontal bone to the epidermis. Four independent thickness measurements were made. Conclusions: Forehead tissue thickness measurement by ultrasound in microgravity is feasible, and our data suggest a decrease in tissue thickness upon return from microgravity environment, which is likely related to the cessation of fluid shifts. Further study is warranted to standardize the technique with regard to the individual variability of the local anatomy in this area.

  17. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by trauma or after resection of a tumor. All patients were submitted to a primary nerve reconstruction except 7 patients, where late reconstruction was performed two weeks to four months after the initial surgery. The follow-up period was at least two years. For facial nerve interpositional graft technique, we achieved facial function HB grade III in eight patients and grade IV in three patients. Synkinesis was found in eight patients, and facial contracture with synkinesis was found in two patients. In regards to hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer using different modifications, we achieved facial function HB grade III in nine patients and grade IV in two patients. Facial contracture, synkinesis and tongue atrophy were found in three patients, and synkinesis was found in five patients. However, those who had primary direct facial-hypoglossal end-to-side anastomosis showed the best result without any neurological deficit. Among various reanimation techniques, when indicated, direct end-to-side facial-hypoglossal anastomosis through epineural suturing is the most effective technique with excellent outcomes for facial reanimation and preservation of tongue movement, particularly when performed as a primary technique. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of platelet-rich fibrin on healing of intra-bony defects treated with anorganic bovine bone mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Yasemin; Uraz, Ahu; Taner, I Levent; Çulhaoğlu, Rana

    2017-01-26

    Anorganic bovine bone mineral (ABBM) is extensively used in the treatment of intra-bony defects. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a new-generation platelet concentrate with a simplified technique. Although certain studies have reported the use of PRF in the treatment of intra-bony defects, to date, none of them have evaluated its additive effects with ABBM. Therefore, a randomised, split-mouth clinical trial was conducted to compare healing of intra-bony defects treated with an ABBM-PRF combination with healing of those treated with ABBM alone. By using a split-mouth design, 15 paired intra-bony defects were randomly treated with either ABBM alone (control group) or ABBM-PRF combination (test group). Following clinical parameters and radiographical measurements were recorded at baseline and 6 months after treatment: plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), clinical attachment level (CAL), vertical bone loss, depth of defect and defect angle. Preoperative clinical and radiographical measurements were similar for the test and control groups. Statistically significant reductions in GI, PD, CAL, vertical bone loss, depth of intra-bony defect and widening of defect angle were detected after treatment in both groups. With respect to inter-group analysis, gain in CAL was significantly greater in the test group than in the control group, whereas no inter-group differences were observed in any other parameter. The results of this study indicate that both therapies are effective in the treatment of intra-bony defects.

  19. A tomographic study of positional and bony changes in the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Nam Kyu; Kim Min Suk; Koh, Kwang Joon

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to aid in the evaluation of prognosis of temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery. For this study, 20 patients (40 TMJ) who undergone orthognathic surgery were examined. Preoperative and postoperative tomograms of TMJ were taken. And the subjects were divided into 3 groups according to postoperative periods. The obtained results were as follows : 1. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in joint spaces in each group and between groups (P<0.05). 2. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative ratio of joint spaces (P<0.05).3. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in the range of motion of condylar head (P<0.05). 4. The bony changes of condylar head were observed in 14 (35%) condyles (6 erosion, 2 flattening, 5 double contour, 1 osteophyte).

  20. A tomographic study of positional and bony changes in the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Nam Kyu; Kim Min Suk; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonpook National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to aid in the evaluation of prognosis of temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery. For this study, 20 patients (40 TMJ) who undergone orthognathic surgery were examined. Preoperative and postoperative tomograms of TMJ were taken. And the subjects were divided into 3 groups according to postoperative periods. The obtained results were as follows : 1. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in joint spaces in each group and between groups (P<0.05). 2. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative ratio of joint spaces (P<0.05).3. There were no significant differences between preoperative and postoperative changes in the range of motion of condylar head (P<0.05). 4. The bony changes of condylar head were observed in 14 (35%) condyles (6 erosion, 2 flattening, 5 double contour, 1 osteophyte).

  1. Bony changes in cows affected with chronic fluorine poisoning caused by industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasarov, E; Tatarov, B; Dimitrov, G; Kantschev, L; Kovatschev, K

    1972-01-01

    Cows affected with chronic fluorine poisoning were thoroughly examined and the findings ff clinical, anatomical-pathological, x-ray, chemical and histological examinations are reported with particular reference to changes of skeletal bones. The most significant bony changes were periosteal hyperostosis on metacarpal and metatarsal bones, local resorption of the compact substance which appeared to have a sponge-like pattern, and a destructive process in the areas surrounding Havers' and Volkmann's canals. Changes of the trabecular pattern were observed in the spongy substance of the above mentioned bones. Trabeculae showed signs of atrophy - they were thinned or coarsely thickened - and their contours were well contrasted. Regularly shaped osteons were not frequently found in the spongy substance. Marked narrowing of the medullary canal was seen.

  2. Endoscopic Modified Medial Maxillectomy for Fungal Ball of the Hypoplastic Maxillary Sinus With Bony Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Ikushima, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Daiki; Shimizu, Yuichi; Arakawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Katori, Yukio; Ohyama, Kenji

    2018-05-01

    Sinus fungal ball is defined as noninvasive chronic rhino-sinusitis with a clump of mold in the paranasal sinuses, typically affecting the maxillary sinus. Fairly good outcomes of endoscopic surgery have been reported where the ball is removed through the antrostomy. However, the affected sinus tends to have a smaller cavity and thicker bony walls. As such, it is often challenging to maintain a window size that is sufficient to control possible recurrence. The endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy procedure was applied to a 61-year old and a 70-year old female patient with maxillary sinus fungal ball. Using this method, we created a much larger inferior meatal antrostomy without difficulty. The window provided us with an endoscopic view of the whole sinus and complete eradication of the lesion. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy is useful as a surgical procedure for maxillary sinus fungal ball and should be considered for better outcomes.

  3. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  4. Myelotoxicity of Samarium Sm153 lexidronam in patients with painful bony metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ghachem, T.; Mhiri, A.; Slim, I.; Bahloul, A.; Yeddes, I.; Elbez, I.; Meddeb, I.; Ben Slimene, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction: the management of bone pain includes analgesia, radiation, hormones, radiofrequency (RF) ablation, chemotherapy, and surgery. Bone pain palliation therapy with radiopharmaceuticals is a cost-effective systemic therapy to relieve pain from skeletal metastases with a consequent decrease in morbidity and an improvement in quality of life. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of myelotoxicity of samarium lexidronam (Sm 153 ) in patients with painful bony metastasis. Methods: we reviewed 116 patients aged from 14 to 87 years old, 91 males (78%) and 25 females (22%), having received 1 to 4 treatments of Sm 153 (37 MBq/kg) for painful bony metastases from different primitive tumors: 67 cases of prostate cancer (57.7%), 22 cases of breast cancer (18.9%), 10 cases of pulmonary cancer (8.6%) and others in 14.6% of cases. Clinical follow-up was available for 159 treatments, consisting on blood count each week over at least two months, in order to evaluate myelotoxicity according to WHO classification. Results: no patients had grade 4 toxicity after its cures. A grade 2-3 myelotoxicity was observed after 52 treatments (34%) during the second week and after 50 treatments (32.6%) during the fourth week with a satisfactory reversibility. At 10 weeks of treatment, myelotoxicity was reclassified from 0 to 2 for 139 cures (90,8%). Moreover, we found that prior treatment with radiotherapy or chemotherapy did not affect the rates of myelotoxicity. Conclusion: multiple treatments with samarium Sm 153 lexidronam had no significant effect on myelotoxicity. Patients with bone predominant metastatic disease may survive for extended periods of time and may safely be treated with multiple modalities of therapy. (authors)

  5. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo

    1995-01-01

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  6. Human bony labyrinth is an indicator of population history and dispersal from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León, Marcia S; Koesbardiati, Toetik; Weissmann, John David; Milella, Marco; Reyna-Blanco, Carlos S; Suwa, Gen; Kondo, Osamu; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; White, Tim D; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2018-04-17

    The dispersal of modern humans from Africa is now well documented with genetic data that track population history, as well as gene flow between populations. Phenetic skeletal data, such as cranial and pelvic morphologies, also exhibit a dispersal-from-Africa signal, which, however, tends to be blurred by the effects of local adaptation and in vivo phenotypic plasticity, and that is often deteriorated by postmortem damage to skeletal remains. These complexities raise the question of which skeletal structures most effectively track neutral population history. The cavity system of the inner ear (the so-called bony labyrinth) is a good candidate structure for such analyses. It is already fully formed by birth, which minimizes postnatal phenotypic plasticity, and it is generally well preserved in archaeological samples. Here we use morphometric data of the bony labyrinth to show that it is a surprisingly good marker of the global dispersal of modern humans from Africa. Labyrinthine morphology tracks genetic distances and geography in accordance with an isolation-by-distance model with dispersal from Africa. Our data further indicate that the neutral-like pattern of variation is compatible with stabilizing selection on labyrinth morphology. Given the increasingly important role of the petrous bone for ancient DNA recovery from archaeological specimens, we encourage researchers to acquire 3D morphological data of the inner ear structures before any invasive sampling. Such data will constitute an important archive of phenotypic variation in present and past populations, and will permit individual-based genotype-phenotype comparisons. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo [Department of Dentistry, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  8. [Prevalence and clinical characteristics of oral bony outgrowth in a Moroccan population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oualalou, Y; Azaroual, M F; Zaoui, F; Chbicheb, S; Berrada, S

    2014-11-01

    Oral bony outgrowths (OBOs) are localized bony protuberances that arise from the cortical plate. Various types of OBOs have been described, the precise designation of which depends on anatomic location such as torus palatinus, torus mandibularis, buccal exostosis, or palatal exostosis. We had for aim to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of OBOs in a Moroccan population. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 15 and June 30, 2011 at the Rabat-Salé teaching hospital dental consultation and treatment center, in Morocco. Three hundred and fifty-three patients (160 female and 193 male patients), 11 to 82 years of age, were examined clinically and radiologically to determine the presence of OBO. Twenty-four patients (6.8%) presented with OBOs. The prevalence for exostosis, torus mandibularis, torus palatinus, and associated OBOs was 3.1%, 2%, 0.8%, and 0.9% respectively. There was a significant difference (P=0,01) between the average age for patients presenting with OBO (43.2±12 years of age) and the average age for patients without any OBO (36.5±16 years of age). The prevalence of OBOs in female patients (7.3%) was higher than in male patients (6.3%) but the difference was not significant (P=0.439). Patients with occlusal parafunctional activity presented with significantly more OBO (P=0.016). The reported prevalence of OBO is extremely variable, according to age, gender, and ethnic group. The occurrence of OBO could be triggered by genetic factors associated with environmental factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The Evolution of Bony Vertebrate Enhancers at Odds with Their Coding Sequence Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Aisha; Sohail Raza, Muhammad; Ali Abbasi, Amir

    2015-08-06

    Enhancers lie at the heart of transcriptional and developmental gene regulation. Therefore, changes in enhancer sequences usually disrupt the target gene expression and result in disease phenotypes. Despite the well-established role of enhancers in development and disease, evolutionary sequence studies are lacking. The current study attempts to unravel the puzzle of bony vertebrates' conserved noncoding elements (CNE) enhancer evolution. Bayesian phylogenetics of enhancer sequences spotlights promising interordinal relationships among placental mammals, proposing a closer relationship between humans and laurasiatherians while placing rodents at the basal position. Clock-based estimates of enhancer evolution provided a dynamic picture of interspecific rate changes across the bony vertebrate lineage. Moreover, coelacanth in the study augmented our appreciation of the vertebrate cis-regulatory evolution during water-land transition. Intriguingly, we observed a pronounced upsurge in enhancer evolution in land-dwelling vertebrates. These novel findings triggered us to further investigate the evolutionary trend of coding as well as CNE nonenhancer repertoires, to highlight the relative evolutionary dynamics of diverse genomic landscapes. Surprisingly, the evolutionary rates of enhancer sequences were clearly at odds with those of the coding and the CNE nonenhancer sequences during vertebrate adaptation to land, with land vertebrates exhibiting significantly reduced rates of coding sequence evolution in comparison to their fast evolving regulatory landscape. The observed variation in tetrapod cis-regulatory elements caused the fine-tuning of associated gene regulatory networks. Therefore, the increased evolutionary rate of tetrapods' enhancer sequences might be responsible for the variation in developmental regulatory circuits during the process of vertebrate adaptation to land. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  10. Nablus mask-like facial syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allanson, Judith; Smith, Amanda; Hare, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS) has many distinctive phenotypic features, particularly tight glistening skin with reduced facial expression, blepharophimosis, telecanthus, bulky nasal tip, abnormal external ear architecture, upswept frontal hairline, and sparse eyebrows. Over the last few...

  11. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboshanif Mohamed

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients. All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB grade VI, either caused by trauma or after resection of a tumor. All patients were submitted to a primary nerve reconstruction except 7 patients, where late reconstruction was performed two weeks to four months after the initial surgery. The follow-up period was at least two years. Results: For facial nerve interpositional graft technique, we achieved facial function HB grade III in eight patients and grade IV in three patients. Synkinesis was found in eight patients, and facial contracture with synkinesis was found in two patients. In regards to hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer using different modifications, we achieved facial function HB grade III in nine patients and grade IV in two patients. Facial contracture, synkinesis and tongue atrophy were found in three patients, and synkinesis was found in five patients. However, those who had primary direct facial-hypoglossal end-to-side anastomosis showed the best result without any neurological deficit. Conclusion: Among various reanimation techniques, when indicated, direct end-to-side facial-hypoglossal anastomosis through epineural suturing is the most effective technique with excellent outcomes for facial reanimation and preservation of tongue movement, particularly when performed as a primary technique.

  12. Dermal fillers for facial soft tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, patients are demanding not only enhancement to their dental (micro) esthetics, but also their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Soft tissue augmentation via dermal filling agents may be used to correct facial defects such as wrinkles caused by age, gravity, and trauma; thin lips; asymmetrical facial appearances; buccal fold depressions; and others. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles, history, techniques, materials, complications, and clinical controversies regarding dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation.

  13. Facial skin care products and cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-01-01

    Facial skin care products and cosmetics can both aid or incite facial dermatoses. Properly selected skin care can create an environment for barrier repair aiding in the re-establishment of a healing biofilm and diminution of facial redness; however, skin care products that aggressively remove intercellular lipids or cause irritation must be eliminated before the red face will resolve. Cosmetics are an additive variable either aiding or challenging facial skin health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Facial aging: A clinical classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiffman Melvin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classification of facial aging is to have a simple clinical method to determine the severity of the aging process in the face. This allows a quick estimate as to the types of procedures that the patient would need to have the best results. Procedures that are presently used for facial rejuvenation include laser, chemical peels, suture lifts, fillers, modified facelift and full facelift. The physician is already using his best judgment to determine which procedure would be best for any particular patient. This classification may help to refine these decisions.

  15. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kamide

    2012-01-01

    tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear.

  16. Control de accesos mediante reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    En esta memoria expone el trabajo que se ha llevado a cabo para intentar crear un sistema de reconocimiento facial. This paper outlines the work carried out in the attempt of creating a facial recognition system. En aquesta memòria exposa el treball que s'ha dut a terme en l'intent de crear un sistema de reconeixement facial.

  17. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Leer en Español: La ...

  18. Facial Pain Followed by Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report with Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    GV, Sowmya; BS, Manjunatha; Goel, Saurabh; Singh, Mohit Pal; Astekar, Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the commonest cranial nerve motor neuropathy. The causes range from cerebrovascular accident to iatrogenic damage, but there are few reports of facial nerve paralysis attributable to odontogenic infections. In majority of the cases, recovery of facial muscle function begins within first three weeks after onset. This article reports a unique case of 32-year-old male patient who developed facial pain followed by unilateral facial nerve paralysis due to odontogen...

  19. Facial expressions and pair bonds in hylobatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkiewicz, Brittany; Skollar, Gabriella; Reichard, Ulrich H

    2018-06-06

    Facial expressions are an important component of primate communication that functions to transmit social information and modulate intentions and motivations. Chimpanzees and macaques, for example, produce a variety of facial expressions when communicating with conspecifics. Hylobatids also produce various facial expressions; however, the origin and function of these facial expressions are still largely unclear. It has been suggested that larger facial expression repertoires may have evolved in the context of social complexity, but this link has yet to be tested at a broader empirical basis. The social complexity hypothesis offers a possible explanation for the evolution of complex communicative signals such as facial expressions, because as the complexity of an individual's social environment increases so does the need for communicative signals. We used an intraspecies, pair-focused study design to test the link between facial expressions and sociality within hylobatids, specifically the strength of pair-bonds. The current study compared 206 hr of video and 103 hr of focal animal data for ten hylobatid pairs from three genera (Nomascus, Hoolock, and Hylobates) living at the Gibbon Conservation Center. Using video footage, we explored 5,969 facial expressions along three dimensions: repertoire use, repertoire breadth, and facial expression synchrony [FES]. We then used focal animal data to compare dimensions of facial expressiveness to pair bond strength and behavioral synchrony. Hylobatids in our study overlapped in only half of their facial expressions (50%) with the only other detailed, quantitative study of hylobatid facial expressions, while 27 facial expressions were uniquely observed in our study animals. Taken together, hylobatids have a large facial expression repertoire of at least 80 unique facial expressions. Contrary to our prediction, facial repertoire composition was not significantly correlated with pair bond strength, rates of territorial synchrony

  20. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  1. Immediate Single-Tooth Implant Placement in Bony Defects in the Esthetic Zone : A 1-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    Background: This study aims to assess, with regard to marginal bone level (MBL), whether the outcome of immediate implant placement in bony defects in the esthetic zone was non-inferior to delayed implant placement after 1 year. Methods: Forty patients with a failing tooth in the esthetic zone and a

  2. Eagle's syndrome with facial palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Hashim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome (ES is a rare disease in which the styloid process is elongated and compressing adjacent structures. We describe a rare presentation of ES in which the patient presented with facial palsy. Facial palsy as a presentation of ES is very rare. A review of the English literature revealed only one previously reported case. Our case is a 39-year-old male who presented with left facial palsy. He also reported a 9-year history of the classical symptoms of ES. A computed tomography scan with three-dimensional reconstruction confirmed the diagnoses. He was started on conservative management but without significant improvement. Surgical intervention was offered, but the patient refused. It is important for otolaryngologists, dentists, and other specialists who deal with head and neck problems to be able to recognize ES despite its rarity. Although the patient responded to a treatment similar to that of Bell's palsy because of the clinical features and imaging, ES was most likely the cause of his facial palsy.

  3. Facial sculpting and tissue augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jean D A; Carruthers, Alastair

    2005-11-01

    Until recently, deep facial sculpting was exclusively the domain of surgical interventions. Recent advances in the available array of dermal and subdermal fillers combined with an esthetic appreciation by both surgeons and nonsurgeons alike of the positive effect of filling the volume-depleted face have led to an expansion in the indications for the use of soft tissue augmenting agents. Subdermal support of the lateral two-thirds of the brow, the nasojugal fold, the malar and buccal fat pads, the lateral lip commissures, and the perioral region, including the pre-jowl sulcus, all restore youthful facial contour and harmony. An important advance in technique is the subdermal rather than the intradermal injection plane. "Instant" facial sculpting giving a brow-lift, cheek-lift, lip expansion, and perioral augmentation is possible using modern soft tissue augmenting agents. The softer, more relaxed appearance contrasts to the somewhat "pulled" appearance of subjects who have had surgical overcorrections. Treatments can be combined with botulinum toxin and other procedures if required. Newer advances in the use of fillers include the use of fillers injected in the subdermal plane for "lunchtime" facial sculpting. Using the modern esthetic filler compounds, which are biodegradable but longer lasting, subjects can have a "rehearsal" treatment or make it ongoing. Some individuals, such as those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lipoatrophy or those who desire to obtain a longer-lasting effect, may elect to use a nonbiodegradable filling agent.

  4. Asyndromic Bilateral Transverse Facial Cleft

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-23

    of this atypical cleft is unknown although the frequency ... on Tuesday, April 23, 2013, IP: 41.132.185.55] || Click here to download free Android application for this journal ... Facial cleft remains a source of social anxiety and in the past has lead ...

  5. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  6. Complex Odontome Causing Facial Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeya Patil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common non-cystic odontogenic lesions representing 70% of all odontogenic tumors. Often small and asymptomatic, they are detected on routine radiographs. Occasionally they become large and produce expansion of bone with consequent facial asymmetry. We report a case of such a lesion causing expansion of the mandible in an otherwise asymptomatic patient.

  7. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial…

  8. Facial Prototype Formation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inn, Donald; And Others

    This study examined memory representation as it is exhibited in young children's formation of facial prototypes. In the first part of the study, researchers constructed images of faces using an Identikit that provided the features of hair, eyes, mouth, nose, and chin. Images were varied systematically. A series of these images, called exemplar…

  9. Facial Phenotyping by Quantitative Photography Reflects Craniofacial Morphology Measured on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Icelandic Sleep Apnea Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Schwab, Richard J.; Maislin, Greg; Lee, Richard W.W.; Benedikstdsottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I.; Gislason, Thorarinn; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: (1) To determine whether facial phenotype, measured by quantitative photography, relates to underlying craniofacial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk factors, measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) To assess whether these associations are independent of body size and obesity. Design: Cross-sectional cohort. Setting: Landspitali, The National University Hospital, Iceland. Participants: One hundred forty patients (87.1% male) from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who had both calibrated frontal and profile craniofacial photographs and upper airway MRI. Mean ± standard deviation age 56.1 ± 10.4 y, body mass index 33.5 ± 5.05 kg/m2, with on-average severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index 45.4 ± 19.7 h-1). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Relationships between surface facial dimensions (photos) and facial bony dimensions and upper airway soft-tissue volumes (MRI) was assessed using canonical correlation analysis. Photo and MRI craniofacial datasets related in four significant canonical correlations, primarily driven by measurements of (1) maxillary-mandibular relationship (r = 0.8, P photography and MRI. This study confirms that facial photographic phenotype reflects underlying aspects of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities associated with OSA. Therefore, facial photographic phenotyping may be a useful tool to assess intermediate phenotypes for OSA, particularly in large-scale studies. Citation: Sutherland K, Schwab RJ, Maislin G, Lee RW, Benedikstdsottir B, Pack AI, Gislason T, Juliusson S, Cistulli PA. Facial phenotyping by quantitative photography reflects craniofacial morphology measured on magnetic resonance imaging in icelandic sleep apnea patients. SLEEP 2014;37(5):959-968. PMID:24790275

  10. Pseudotumoural hypertrophic neuritis of the facial nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Zanoletti, E; Mazzoni, A; Barbò, R

    2008-01-01

    In a retrospective study of our cases of recurrent paralysis of the facial nerve of tumoural and non-tumoural origin, a tumour-like lesion of the intra-temporal course of the facial nerve, mimicking facial nerve schwannoma, was found and investigated in 4 cases. This was defined as, pseudotumoral hypertrophic neuritis of the facial nerve. The picture was one of recurrent acute facial palsy with incomplete recovery and imaging of a benign tumour. It was different from the well-known recurrent ...

  11. Possibilities of pfysiotherapy in facial nerve paresis

    OpenAIRE

    ZIFČÁKOVÁ, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis addresses paresis of the facial nerve. The facial nerve paresis is a rather common illness, which cannot be often cured without consequences despite all the modern treatments. The paresis of the facial nerve occurs in two forms, central and peripheral. A central paresis is a result of a lesion located above the motor nucleus of the facial nerve. A peripheral paresis is caused by a lesion located either in the location of the motor nucleus or in the course of the facial ner...

  12. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  13. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  14. Comparison of carina-based versus bony anatomy-based registration for setup verification in esophageal cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiels, Mélanie; Jin, Peng; van Gurp, Christianne H; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Alderliesten, Tanja; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the feasibility and geometric accuracy of carina-based registration for CBCT-guided setup verification in esophageal cancer IGRT, compared with current practice bony anatomy-based registration. Included were 24 esophageal cancer patients with 65 implanted fiducial markers, visible on planning CTs and follow-up CBCTs. All available CBCT scans (n = 236) were rigidly registered to the planning CT with respect to the bony anatomy and the carina. Target coverage was visually inspected and marker position variation was quantified relative to both registration approaches; the variation of systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) was estimated. Automatic carina-based registration was feasible in 94.9% of the CBCT scans, with an adequate target coverage in 91.1% compared to 100% after bony anatomy-based registration. Overall, Σ (σ) in the LR/CC/AP direction was 2.9(2.4)/4.1(2.4)/2.2(1.8) mm using the bony anatomy registration compared to 3.3(3.0)/3.6(2.6)/3.9(3.1) mm for the carina. Mid-thoracic placed markers showed a non-significant but smaller Σ in CC and AP direction when using the carina-based registration. Compared with a bony anatomy-based registration, carina-based registration for esophageal cancer IGRT results in inadequate target coverage in 8.9% of cases. Furthermore, large Σ and σ, requiring larger anisotropic margins, were seen after carina-based registration. Only for tumors entirely confined to the mid-thoracic region the carina-based registration might be slightly favorable.

  15. Quantitative computed tomography as a test of endurance for evaluation of bony plates; Utilizacao da tomografia computadorizada quantitativa como teste de resistencia para avaliacao de placas osseas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Filho, E.V.; Costa, L.A.V.S.; Oliveira, D.C. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Freitas, P.M.C. [Escola de Veterinaria - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Teixeira, M.W.; Costa, F.S. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco - Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine the radiodensity of bony plates. The CT scans provided information regarding radiodensity of bony plates and allowed to verify the uniformity of bone mineral density in their scope. The proposed methodology should be considered as another tool for determining the resistance of these biomaterials. (author)

  16. Operant conditioning of facial displays of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Miriam; Rainville, Pierre; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The operant model of chronic pain posits that nonverbal pain behavior, such as facial expressions, is sensitive to reinforcement, but experimental evidence supporting this assumption is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a healthy population a) whether facial pain behavior can indeed be operantly conditioned using a discriminative reinforcement schedule to increase and decrease facial pain behavior and b) to what extent these changes affect pain experience indexed by self-ratings. In the experimental group (n = 29), the participants were reinforced every time that they showed pain-indicative facial behavior (up-conditioning) or a neutral expression (down-conditioning) in response to painful heat stimulation. Once facial pain behavior was successfully up- or down-conditioned, respectively (which occurred in 72% of participants), facial pain displays and self-report ratings were assessed. In addition, a control group (n = 11) was used that was yoked to the reinforcement plans of the experimental group. During the conditioning phases, reinforcement led to significant changes in facial pain behavior in the majority of the experimental group (p .136). Fine-grained analyses of facial muscle movements revealed a similar picture. Furthermore, the decline in facial pain displays (as observed during down-conditioning) strongly predicted changes in pain ratings (R(2) = 0.329). These results suggest that a) facial pain displays are sensitive to reinforcement and b) that changes in facial pain displays can affect self-report ratings.

  17. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  18. Facial Displays Are Tools for Social Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, Carlos; Fridlund, Alan J

    2018-05-01

    Based on modern theories of signal evolution and animal communication, the behavioral ecology view of facial displays (BECV) reconceives our 'facial expressions of emotion' as social tools that serve as lead signs to contingent action in social negotiation. BECV offers an externalist, functionalist view of facial displays that is not bound to Western conceptions about either expressions or emotions. It easily accommodates recent findings of diversity in facial displays, their public context-dependency, and the curious but common occurrence of solitary facial behavior. Finally, BECV restores continuity of human facial behavior research with modern functional accounts of non-human communication, and provides a non-mentalistic account of facial displays well-suited to new developments in artificial intelligence and social robotics. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Misrecognition of facial expressions in delinquents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuura Naomi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have suggested impairment in facial expression recognition in delinquents, but controversy remains with respect to how such recognition is impaired. To address this issue, we investigated facial expression recognition in delinquents in detail. Methods We tested 24 male adolescent/young adult delinquents incarcerated in correctional facilities. We compared their performances with those of 24 age- and gender-matched control participants. Using standard photographs of facial expressions illustrating six basic emotions, participants matched each emotional facial expression with an appropriate verbal label. Results Delinquents were less accurate in the recognition of facial expressions that conveyed disgust than were control participants. The delinquents misrecognized the facial expressions of disgust as anger more frequently than did controls. Conclusion These results suggest that one of the underpinnings of delinquency might be impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions, with a specific bias toward interpreting disgusted expressions as hostile angry expressions.

  20. Is radiographic measurement of bony landmarks reliable for lateral meniscal sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Kim, Taik-Seon; Lim, Hong-Chul; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy of meniscal measurement methods is still in debate. The authors' protocol for radiologic measurements will provide reproducible bony landmarks, and this measurement method of the lateral tibial plateau will correlate with the actual anatomic value. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five samples of fresh lateral meniscus with attached proximal tibia were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Each sample was obtained without damage to the meniscus and bony attachment sites. The inclusion criterion was mild to moderate osteoarthritis in patients with mechanical axis deviation of less than 15°. Knees with lateral compartment osteoarthritic change or injured or degenerated menisci were excluded. For the lateral tibial plateau length measurements, the radiographic beam was angled 10° caudally at neutral rotation, which allowed differentiation of the lateral plateau cortical margins from the medial plateau. The transition points were identified and used for length measurement. The values of length were then compared with the conventional Pollard method and the anatomic values. The width measurement was done according to Pollard's protocol. For each knee, the percentage deviation from the anatomic dimension was recorded. Intraobserver error and interobserver error were calculated. The deviation of the authors' radiographic length measurements from anatomic dimensions was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm. The deviation of Pollard's radiographic length measurements was 4.1 ± 2.0 mm. With respect to accuracy-which represents the frequency of measurements that fall within 10% of measurements-the accuracy of authors' length was 98%, whereas for Pollard's method it was 40%. There was a good correlation between anatomic meniscal dimensions and each radiologic plateau dimensions for lateral meniscal width (R(2) = .790) and the authors' lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .823) and fair correlation for Pollard's lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .660). The reliability of each

  1. CT of the canine lumbosacral spine in extension - flexion rotation; part I: bony window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, W.; Werner, G.

    2002-01-01

    The canine lumbosacral spine is examined radiographically in extended and flexed lateral position as well as ventrodorsally. Superimposition of bones hinders exact evaluation of the lumbosacral intervertebral foramen in case of cauda equina syndrome, especially when degenerative changes overlap. CT or MRI are more and more indicated to get reliable findings because myelography is not always of diagnostic value. For this study twelve dogs (7 German Shepherd dogs, 4 Cross-breds, and 1 Rottweiler) of different age and sex were taken which had been referred for CT examination of the lumbosacral area. Plain radiographs did not show abnormalities. The anaesthetized dogs were positioned in dorsal recumbency with the legs firstly extended and secondly flexed according to flexion-extension radiography. Slice thickness was 2 mm, the CT images were evaluated in both bony and soft tissue windows. Bony window easily showed vertebral bodies, vertebral canal, pedicles, vertebral laminae, and articular processes of L7 and S1. Median height of the vertebral canal did not change during extension or flexion at the level of L7 and the sacrum. Height and width of the intervertebral foramen and width of the interarcual foramen changed markedly from extension to flexion. Lateral recessus of the vertebral canal always could be observed as ventrolateral widening. In sagittal CT scans of the lumbosacral specimen of a normal German Shepherd dog cranial articular processes of the sacrum were detected to be responsible for maximum height or width of the intervertebral foramen. Evolving from the lateral recessus the intervertebral foramen was initially oval-shaped and got rounded and narrowed by the cranial articular process of the sacrum. Position and shape of the cranial articular processes of the sacrum were evaluated. Surface of the cranial articular processes of S1 were found even with articular spaces congruent, but some also appeared slightly concave or convex where incongruity of the

  2. Cervical spinal cord, root, and bony spine injuries: a closed claims analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley J; Palecek, John P; Posner, Karen L; Traynelis, Vincent C; Lee, Lorri A; Sawin, Paul D; Tredway, Trent L; Todd, Michael M; Domino, Karen B

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize cervical cord, root, and bony spine claims in the American Society of Anesthesiologists Closed Claims database to formulate hypotheses regarding mechanisms of injury. All general anesthesia claims (1970-2007) in the Closed Claims database were searched to identify cervical injuries. Three independent teams, each consisting of an anesthesiologist and neurosurgeon, used a standardized review form to extract data from claim summaries and judge probable contributors to injury. Cervical injury claims (n = 48; mean ± SD age 47 ± 15 yr; 73% male) comprised less than 1% of all general anesthesia claims. When compared with other general anesthesia claims (19%), cervical injury claims were more often permanent and disabling (69%; P cervical stenosis) were often present, cord injuries usually occurred in the absence of traumatic injury (81%) or cervical spine instability (76%). Cord injury occurred with cervical spine (65%) and noncervical spine (35%) procedures. Twenty-four percent of cord injuries were associated with the sitting position. Probable contributors to cord injury included anatomic abnormalities (81%), direct surgical complications (24% [38%, cervical spine procedures]), preprocedural symptomatic cord injury (19%), intraoperative head/neck position (19%), and airway management (11%). Most cervical cord injuries occurred in the absence of traumatic injury, instability, and airway difficulties. Cervical spine procedures and/or sitting procedures appear to predominate. In the absence of instability, cervical spondylosis was the most common factor associated with cord injury.

  3. Automated bony region identification using artificial neural networks: reliability and validation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A.; DeVries, Nicole A.; Shivanna, Kiran H. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA (United States); The University of Iowa, Center for Computer-Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Powell, Stephanie M. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA (United States); University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, The University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Magnotta, Vincent A. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA (United States); The University of Iowa, Center for Computer-Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, The University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Ramme, Austin J. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, The University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Adams, Brian D. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA (United States); University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, The University of Iowa, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Iowa City, IA (United States); Grosland, Nicole M. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA (United States); University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, The University of Iowa, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Iowa City, IA (United States); The University of Iowa, Center for Computer-Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The objective was to develop tools for automating the identification of bony structures, to assess the reliability of this technique against manual raters, and to validate the resulting regions of interest against physical surface scans obtained from the same specimen. Artificial intelligence-based algorithms have been used for image segmentation, specifically artificial neural networks (ANNs). For this study, an ANN was created and trained to identify the phalanges of the human hand. The relative overlap between the ANN and a manual tracer was 0.87, 0.82, and 0.76, for the proximal, middle, and distal index phalanx bones respectively. Compared with the physical surface scans, the ANN-generated surface representations differed on average by 0.35 mm, 0.29 mm, and 0.40 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal phalanges respectively. Furthermore, the ANN proved to segment the structures in less than one-tenth of the time required by a manual rater. The ANN has proven to be a reliable and valid means of segmenting the phalanx bones from CT images. Employing automated methods such as the ANN for segmentation, eliminates the likelihood of rater drift and inter-rater variability. Automated methods also decrease the amount of time and manual effort required to extract the data of interest, thereby making the feasibility of patient-specific modeling a reality. (orig.)

  4. Automated bony region identification using artificial neural networks: reliability and validation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A.; DeVries, Nicole A.; Shivanna, Kiran H.; Powell, Stephanie M.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Ramme, Austin J.; Adams, Brian D.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to develop tools for automating the identification of bony structures, to assess the reliability of this technique against manual raters, and to validate the resulting regions of interest against physical surface scans obtained from the same specimen. Artificial intelligence-based algorithms have been used for image segmentation, specifically artificial neural networks (ANNs). For this study, an ANN was created and trained to identify the phalanges of the human hand. The relative overlap between the ANN and a manual tracer was 0.87, 0.82, and 0.76, for the proximal, middle, and distal index phalanx bones respectively. Compared with the physical surface scans, the ANN-generated surface representations differed on average by 0.35 mm, 0.29 mm, and 0.40 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal phalanges respectively. Furthermore, the ANN proved to segment the structures in less than one-tenth of the time required by a manual rater. The ANN has proven to be a reliable and valid means of segmenting the phalanx bones from CT images. Employing automated methods such as the ANN for segmentation, eliminates the likelihood of rater drift and inter-rater variability. Automated methods also decrease the amount of time and manual effort required to extract the data of interest, thereby making the feasibility of patient-specific modeling a reality. (orig.)

  5. Primary bony non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the cervical spine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedrak Mark F

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-Hodgkin lymphoma primarily originating from the bone is exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of primary bone lymphoma presenting with progressive cord compression from an origin in the cervical spine. Herein, we discuss the unusual location in this case, the presenting symptoms, and the management of this disease. Case presentation We report on a 23-year-old Caucasian-American man who presented with two months of night sweats, fatigue, parasthesias, and progressive weakness that had progressed to near quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging demonstrated significant cord compression seen primarily at C7. Surgical management, with corpectomy and dorsal segmental fusion, in combination with adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, halted the progression of the primary disease and preserved neurological function. Histological analysis demonstrated an aggressive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Conclusion Isolated primary bony lymphoma of the spine is exceedingly rare. As in our case, the initial symptoms may be the result of progressive cervical cord compression. Anterior corpectomy with posterolateral decompression and fusion succeeded in preventing progressive neurologic decline and maintaining quality of life. The reader should be aware of the unique presentation of this disease and that surgical management is a successful treatment strategy.

  6. Orbital Tumors Excision without Bony Marginotomy under Local and General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To present our experience of removing middle to deep orbital tumors using a combination of minimally invasive soft tissue approaches, sometimes under local anesthesia. Methods. In this retrospective case series, 30 patients (13 males and 17 females underwent tumor removal through eyelid crease (17 eyes, conjunctival (nine eyes, lateral canthal (two eyes, and transcaruncular (two eyes approaches. All tumors were located in the posterior half of the orbit. Six cases were removed under monitored anesthesia care with local block, and 24 were under general anesthesia. Results. The median (range age and follow-up duration were 48.5 (31–87 years old and 24.5 (4–375 weeks, respectively. Visual acuity and ocular motility showed improvement or no significant change in all but one patient at the latest followup. Confirmed pathologies revealed cavernous hemangioma (15 cases, pleomorphic adenoma (5 cases, solitary fibrous tumor (4 cases, neurofibroma (2 cases, schwannoma (2 cases, and orbital varix (1 case. None of the patients experienced recurrence. Conclusions. Creating a bony marginotomy increases intraoperative exposure of the deep orbit but adds substantial time and morbidity. Benign orbital tumors can often be removed safely through small soft-tissue incisions, without bone removal and under local anesthesia.

  7. Facial Expression at Retrieval Affects Recognition of Facial Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng eChen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that memory can be modulated by emotional stimuli at the time of encoding and consolidation. For example, happy faces create better identity recognition than faces with certain other expressions. However, the influence of facial expression at the time of retrieval remains unknown in the literature. To separate the potential influence of expression at retrieval from its effects at earlier stages, we had participants learn neutral faces but manipulated facial expression at the time of memory retrieval in a standard old/new recognition task. The results showed a clear effect of facial expression, where happy test faces were identified more successfully than angry test faces. This effect is unlikely due to greater image similarity between the neutral learning face and the happy test face, because image analysis showed that the happy test faces are in fact less similar to the neutral learning faces relative to the angry test faces. In the second experiment, we investigated whether this emotional effect is influenced by the expression at the time of learning. We employed angry or happy faces as learning stimuli, and angry, happy, and neutral faces as test stimuli. The results showed that the emotional effect at retrieval is robust across different encoding conditions with happy or angry expressions. These findings indicate that emotional expressions affect the retrieval process in identity recognition, and identity recognition does not rely on emotional association between learning and test faces.

  8. [Surgical treatment in otogenic facial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Dong; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Zhai, Meng-Yao; Lü, Wei; Qi, Fang; Jiang, Hong; Zha, Yang; Shen, Peng

    2008-06-01

    To study the character of facial nerve palsy due to four different auris diseases including chronic otitis media, Hunt syndrome, tumor and physical or chemical factors, and to discuss the principles of the surgical management of otogenic facial nerve palsy. The clinical characters of 24 patients with otogenic facial nerve palsy because of the four different auris diseases were retrospectively analyzed, all the cases were performed surgical management from October 1991 to March 2007. Facial nerve function was evaluated with House-Brackmann (HB) grading system. The 24 patients including 10 males and 14 females were analysis, of whom 12 cases due to cholesteatoma, 3 cases due to chronic otitis media, 3 cases due to Hunt syndrome, 2 cases resulted from acute otitis media, 2 cases due to physical or chemical factors and 2 cases due to tumor. All cases were treated with operations included facial nerve decompression, lesion resection with facial nerve decompression and lesion resection without facial nerve decompression, 1 patient's facial nerve was resected because of the tumor. According to HB grade system, I degree recovery was attained in 4 cases, while II degree in 10 cases, III degree in 6 cases, IV degree in 2 cases, V degree in 2 cases and VI degree in 1 case. Removing the lesions completely was the basic factor to the surgery of otogenic facial palsy, moreover, it was important to have facial nerve decompression soon after lesion removal.

  9. Perineural extension of facial melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Bevilacqua, Paula

    2005-05-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a pigmented cutaneous lesion on the right side of his face along with right facial numbness. Histological examination revealed malignant melanoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed perineural extension along the entire course of the maxillary division of the right trigeminal nerve. This is a rare but important manifestation of the spread of head and neck malignancy. (orig.)

  10. Síndrome de dolor facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. F. Eugenio Tenhamm

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El dolor o algia facial constituye un síndrome doloroso de las estructuras cráneo faciales bajo el cual se agrupan un gran número de enfermedades. La mejor manera de abordar el diagnóstico diferencial de las entidades que causan el dolor facial es usando un algoritmo que identifica cuatro síndromes dolorosos principales que son: las neuralgias faciales, los dolores faciales con síntomas y signos neurológicos, las cefaleas autonómicas trigeminales y los dolores faciales sin síntomas ni signos neurológicos. Una evaluación clínica detallada de los pacientes, permite una aproximación etiológica lo que orienta el estudio diagnóstico y permite ofrecer una terapia específica a la mayoría de los casos

  11. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  12. Agency and facial emotion judgment in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenichi; Masuda, Takahiko; Li, Liman Man Wai

    2013-06-01

    Past research showed that East Asians' belief in holism was expressed as their tendencies to include background facial emotions into the evaluation of target faces more than North Americans. However, this pattern can be interpreted as North Americans' tendency to downplay background facial emotions due to their conceptualization of facial emotion as volitional expression of internal states. Examining this alternative explanation, we investigated whether different types of contextual information produce varying degrees of effect on one's face evaluation across cultures. In three studies, European Canadians and East Asians rated the intensity of target facial emotions surrounded with either affectively salient landscape sceneries or background facial emotions. The results showed that, although affectively salient landscapes influenced the judgment of both cultural groups, only European Canadians downplayed the background facial emotions. The role of agency as differently conceptualized across cultures and multilayered systems of cultural meanings are discussed.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, M.E.; Bydder, G.M.; Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders

  15. Facial neuroma masquerading as acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Eli T; Kaur, Gurvinder; Ivan, Michael E; Bloch, Orin; Cheung, Steven W; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-10-01

    Facial nerve neuromas are rare benign tumors that may be initially misdiagnosed as acoustic neuromas when situated near the auditory apparatus. We describe a patient with a large cystic tumor with associated trigeminal, facial, audiovestibular, and brainstem dysfunction, which was suspicious for acoustic neuroma on preoperative neuroimaging. Intraoperative investigation revealed a facial nerve neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle and internal acoustic canal. Gross total resection of the tumor via retrosigmoid craniotomy was curative. Transection of the facial nerve necessitated facial reanimation 4 months later via hypoglossal-facial cross-anastomosis. Clinicians should recognize the natural history, diagnostic approach, and management of this unusual and mimetic lesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Does bony hip morphology affect the outcome of treatment for patients with adductor-related groin pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian; Nyvold, Per

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adductor-related groin pain and bony morphology such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip dysplasia can coexist clinically. A previous randomised controlled trial in which athletes with adductor-related groin pain underwent either passive treatment (PT) or active treatment (AT......) showed good results in the AT group. The primary purpose of the present study was to evaluate if radiological signs of FAI or hip dysplasia seem to affect the clinical outcome, initially and at 8-12 years of follow-up. METHODS: 47 patients (80%) were available for follow-up. The clinical result......, there was no significant difference in the distribution of Tönnis grades between hips that had an unchanged or improved outcome compared with hips that had a worse outcome over time (p=0.145). CONCLUSIONS: No evidence was found that bony hip morphology related to FAI or dysplasia prevents successful outcome...

  17. Influence of gravity upon some facial signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Bazin, R; Piot, B

    2015-06-01

    Facial clinical signs and their integration are the basis of perception than others could have from ourselves, noticeably the age they imagine we are. Facial modifications in motion and their objective measurements before and after application of skin regimen are essential to go further in evaluation capacities to describe efficacy in facial dynamics. Quantification of facial modifications vis à vis gravity will allow us to answer about 'control' of facial shape in daily activities. Standardized photographs of the faces of 30 Caucasian female subjects of various ages (24-73 year) were successively taken at upright and supine positions within a short time interval. All these pictures were therefore reframed - any bias due to facial features was avoided when evaluating one single sign - for clinical quotation by trained experts of several facial signs regarding published standardized photographic scales. For all subjects, the supine position increased facial width but not height, giving a more fuller appearance to the face. More importantly, the supine position changed the severity of facial ageing features (e.g. wrinkles) compared to an upright position and whether these features were attenuated or exacerbated depended on their facial location. Supine station mostly modifies signs of the lower half of the face whereas those of the upper half appear unchanged or slightly accentuated. These changes appear much more marked in the older groups, where some deep labial folds almost vanish. These alterations decreased the perceived ages of the subjects by an average of 3.8 years. Although preliminary, this study suggests that a 90° rotation of the facial skin vis à vis gravity induces rapid rearrangements among which changes in tensional forces within and across the face, motility of interstitial free water among underlying skin tissue and/or alterations of facial Langer lines, likely play a significant role. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Fran

  18. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  19. Concerning the etiology of bony bridges along the sides of the terminal phalanx of the great toe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1987-06-01

    Besides in acromegaly bony bridges at the terminal phalanx of the great toe occur in one third of cases with peripheral signs of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis with chronic inflammation of the interphalangeal joint of the great toe respectively extraarticular osseous changes in the terminal phalanx of the great toe do not influence the development of such bridges.

  20. [Clinical application of transport distraction osteogenesis arthroplasty in the treatment of temporomandibular joint bony ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cheng; Wang, Xing; Yi, Biao; Li, Zi-li; Wang, Xiao-xia

    2013-03-12

    To explore the clinical application of transport distraction osteogenesis arthroplasty (TDOAP) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. From December 1999 to December 2011, a total of 73 patients (89 sides of TMJ) underwent TDOAP were included. There were 39 males and 34 females with a mean age of 19.6 years (range: 3 - 60). Among them, 27 patients were recurrence cases and 30 cases were accompanied with micrognathia and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The mean preoperative degree of mouth opening was 6.6 mm (range: 1 - 20). After a release of ankylosis, a transport disc was performed and fixed to ramus with a distractor. Distraction began at Days 4 - 8 postoperation. The distraction rhythm and rate were 0.25 mm four times daily. Distraction stopped when planning distance was achieved. And a distractor was maintained in place for 3-6 months after completion of distraction and then removed. Active postoperative training of mouth opening was implemented. The mean distance of distraction was 15.3 mm (range: 12 - 23). The range of mouth opening of 65 patients increased to normal and bone formation in gaps were perfect. The mean follow-up period was 44.8 months (range: 18 - 102). Eight cases were recurrent. And 1/37 over 15 years old and 7/36 under 15 years old had recurrence. TDOAP is an effective treatment for TMJ ankylosis. A pediatric patient, especially recurrent, should be operated after adolescence to decrease recurrence. Micrognathia and OSAHS should be also considered during the treatment of ankylosis.

  1. 18F-FDG PET demonstrates previously unvisualised bony metastases in a lung cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 59-year-old male, presented to his local doctor with the trivial complaint of a persistent dry cough. On clinical examination he was found to have an enlarged right supraclavicular lymph node. He was investigated with chest X-ray, Computerised Tomography (CT) and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) of the palpable node CT showed a right lung mass, bulky hilar, mediastinal, supraclavicular and cervical lymph nodes FNAC was inconclusive due to an insufficient tissue sample, but suggestive of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Hence excisional node biopsy was required which revealed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Subsequent CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis for staging revealed no distant involvement. Therefore radical radiotherapy was planned to treat the locally advanced disease. Prior to treatment a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan was organised by his specialist as a baseline study to monitor therapy progress. Non-Attenuation corrected images of the chest, abdomen and pelvis were obtained 40 minutes post administration of 394 MBq 18 F-FDG, on a Siemens 951/3IR PET scanner. The images were reconstructed using both Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subsets-Expectation Maximization (OSEM) algorithms. The images revealed extensive metastases particularly in the spine and pelvis, besides the known locally advanced thoracic disease A 99m Tc MDP bone scan and plain film radiographs aimed at confirming bony metastases were negative, even though the bone scan noted a slight focus in the right fourth rib. The appearance suggested trauma, but a solitary bone metastasis could not be ruled out MRI of the spine confirmed the PET scan findings. Mr RD was to have curative radical radiotherapy, but after the PET results, it was decided to treat him palliatively. The value of 18 F-FDG PET in staging some cancers such as NSCLC is widely accepted, in this case it was pivotal in altering the patient's management. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New

  2. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-26

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  3. Accurate 3D reconstruction of bony surfaces using ultrasonic synthetic aperture techniques for robotic knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, William; Rowe, Philip; Pierce, Stephen Gareth

    2017-06-01

    Robotically guided knee arthroplasty systems generally require an individualized, preoperative 3D model of the knee joint. This is typically measured using Computed Tomography (CT) which provides the required accuracy for preoperative surgical intervention planning. Ultrasound imaging presents an attractive alternative to CT, allowing for reductions in cost and the elimination of doses of ionizing radiation, whilst maintaining the accuracy of the 3D model reconstruction of the joint. Traditional phased array ultrasound imaging methods, however, are susceptible to poor resolution and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Alleviating these weaknesses by offering superior focusing power, synthetic aperture methods have been investigated extensively within ultrasonic non-destructive testing. Despite this, they have yet to be fully exploited in medical imaging. In this paper, the ability of a robotic deployed ultrasound imaging system based on synthetic aperture methods to accurately reconstruct bony surfaces is investigated. Employing the Total Focussing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focussing Technique (SAFT), two samples were imaged which were representative of the bones of the knee joint: a human-shaped, composite distal femur and a bovine distal femur. Data were captured using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array, which was manipulated around the samples using a robotic positioning system. Three dimensional surface reconstructions were then produced and compared with reference models measured using a precision laser scanner. Mean errors of 0.82mm and 0.88mm were obtained for the composite and bovine samples, respectively, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the approach to deliver the sub-millimetre accuracy required for the application. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Bony Nasolacrimal Canal by Automated Segmentation of Computed Tomography Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Jañez-Garcia

    Full Text Available To apply a fully automated method to quantify the 3D structure of the bony nasolacrimal canal (NLC from CT scans whereby the size and main morphometric characteristics of the canal can be determined.Cross-sectional study.36 eyes of 18 healthy individuals.Using software designed to detect the boundaries of the NLC on CT images, 36 NLC reconstructions were prepared. These reconstructions were then used to calculate NLC volume. The NLC axis in each case was determined according to a polygonal model and to 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree polynomials. From these models, NLC sectional areas and length were determined. For each variable, descriptive statistics and normality tests (Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk were established.Time for segmentation, NLC volume, axis, sectional areas and length.Mean processing time was around 30 seconds for segmenting each canal. All the variables generated were normally distributed. Measurements obtained using the four models polygonal, 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree polynomial, respectively, were: mean canal length 14.74, 14.3, 14.80, and 15.03 mm; mean sectional area 15.15, 11.77, 11.43, and 11.56 mm2; minimum sectional area 8.69, 7.62, 7.40, and 7.19 mm2; and mean depth of minimum sectional area (craniocaudal 7.85, 7.71, 8.19, and 8.08 mm.The method proposed automatically reconstructs the NLC on CT scans. Using these reconstructions, morphometric measurements can be calculated from NLC axis estimates based on polygonal and 2nd, 3rd and 4th polynomial models.

  5. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Constance Franz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived, which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  6. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting facial characteristics from complex polygenic variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Wolffhechel, Karin Marie Brandt; Pers, Tune

    2015-01-01

    Research into the importance of the human genome in the context of facial appearance is receiving increasing attention and has led to the detection of several Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of importance. In this work we attempt a holistic approach predicting facial characteristics from...... genetic principal components across a population of 1,266 individuals. For this we perform a genome-wide association analysis to select a large number of SNPs linked to specific facial traits, recode these to genetic principal components and then use these principal components as predictors for facial...

  8. Desarrollo de un sistema de reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Vivas Imparato, Abdón Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo principal alrededor del cual se desenvuelve este proyecto es el desarrollo de un sistema de reconocimiento facial. Entre sus objetivos específicos se encuentran: realizar una primera aproximación sobre las técnicas de reconocimiento facial existentes en la actualidad, elegir una aplicación donde pueda ser útil el reconocimiento facial, diseñar y desarrollar un programa en MATLAB que lleve a cabo la función de reconocimiento facial, y evaluar el funcionamiento del sistema desarroll...

  9. Social Use of Facial Expressions in Hylobatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Linda; Waller, Bridget M.; Oña, Leonardo; Burrows, Anne M.; Liebal, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates use various communicative means in interactions with others. While primate gestures are commonly considered to be intentionally and flexibly used signals, facial expressions are often referred to as inflexible, automatic expressions of affective internal states. To explore whether and how non-human primates use facial expressions in specific communicative interactions, we studied five species of small apes (gibbons) by employing a newly established Facial Action Coding System for hylobatid species (GibbonFACS). We found that, despite individuals often being in close proximity to each other, in social (as opposed to non-social contexts) the duration of facial expressions was significantly longer when gibbons were facing another individual compared to non-facing situations. Social contexts included grooming, agonistic interactions and play, whereas non-social contexts included resting and self-grooming. Additionally, gibbons used facial expressions while facing another individual more often in social contexts than non-social contexts where facial expressions were produced regardless of the attentional state of the partner. Also, facial expressions were more likely ‘responded to’ by the partner’s facial expressions when facing another individual than non-facing. Taken together, our results indicate that gibbons use their facial expressions differentially depending on the social context and are able to use them in a directed way in communicative interactions with other conspecifics. PMID:26978660

  10. Facial EMG responses to dynamic emotional facial expressions in boys with disruptive behavior disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wied, de M.; Boxtel, van Anton; Zaalberg, R.; Goudena, P.P.; Matthys, W.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the assumption that facial mimicry is a key factor in emotional empathy, and clinical observations that children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) are weak empathizers, the present study explored whether DBD boys are less facially responsive to facial expressions of emotions than

  11. Neutron production in the interaction of electrons with a dispersing lamella; Produccion de neutrones en la interaccion de electrones con una laminilla dispersora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Baltazar R, A.; Medina C, D.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    When a Linac for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages greater than 8 MV, neutrons are produced as secondary radiation. They deposit an undesirable and not negligible dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, cancer treatment with a Linac is done with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section of the reaction (n, γ) is 137 times greater than the reaction (e, e n), most studies have focused on photo neutrons. When a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam that leaves the magnetic baffle is incised in the dispersion foil in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; in their interaction with the lamella the electrons produce photons and these in turn produce neutrons. Due to the radiobiological efficiency of neutrons and the ways in which they interact with matter, is important to determine the neutrons production in Linacs operating in electron mode. The objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of photons and neutrons that occur when a beam of mono-energetic electrons of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm thick located in the center of a 10 cm thick tungsten shell, used to represent the accelerator head. The study was carried out using the Monte Carlo method with the MCNP6 code for electron beams of 12 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 6 point detectors, four were placed in different points equidistant from the center of the lamella and the other two were located at 50 cm and 1 m from the electron beam, simulating the totally closed head. In this work it was found that when a Linac operates with an electron beam of 12 or 18 MeV there is neutron production mainly in the head and in the direction of the beam. (Author)

  12. Presumed Multiple Metasomatism underneath the Colorado Plateau; Decoding from Chemistry and Inclusion/Lamella Mineralogy of Diverse Garnets from the Garnet Ridge, Northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Ogasawara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Various garnets containing the information on mantle petrology and related metasomatism occur at the Garnet Ridge, Colorado Plateau. The origins of garnets range from deep mantle to shallow continental crust. These garnets were delivered by kimberlitic diatreme of 30 Ma (Smith et al. 2004). We have classified the garnets into 10 groups (A to J, see figure) by naked eye observation, major chemistry, minor Na-Ti-P, inclusion/lamella mineralogy. Among them, groups A to D are of mantle origin, E to G of subducted oceanic crust origin, and H to J of continental crust origin. We summarized results as in the followings. A: Cr and pyrope-rich garnet has Cr2O3(0.8-6.3 wt.%) and inclusions of Ol, Cpx, Opx, Ti-Chu/Chn and carbonates, indicating carbonated garnet lherzolites as host. Cr contents negatively correlates with Na-Ti-P contents and occurrence of exsolved Rt, Ilm and crichtonite. This indicates Cr-rich end-member is the most "primitive" mantle garnet before metasomatism. B: Pyrope-rich reddish brown garnet of peridotitic origins was subdivided into 4 subgroups (B1 to B4, see figure). Compositional range in Ca-Mg-Fe triangle expands to Fe-rich side from group A. Exsolved Na-bearing amphibole and inclusions of Ap, carbonates and fluid were identified. These indicate metasomatism of group A. C: Garnet megacryst is coarse-grained garnet (2-10 cm across) with crystal faces. This garnet has wide chemical variation plotted in the center area of Ca-Mg-Fe triangle. D: Garnet aggregate has similar chemistry of group C and is composed of several grains. Grain boundaries of garnet were recognized by Rt, Ilm and other minerals and oscillatory zonings of Ca, Mg, Fe and Na-Ti-P. Fluid inclusions of groups C and D suggest these garnets might crystalized from fluid. E: Garnet in eclogite and F: Garnet in metasomatized eclogite are xenolith samples (the Fallaron Plate origin?). Aggregate of Zo+Ab contained in group E indicates decomposed precursor lawsonite inclusion. G: Quartz

  13. Enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Kato, Tsutomu; Ushiro, Koichi; Kitajiri, Masanori; Yamashita, Toshio; Kumazawa, Tadami; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1991-01-01

    We performed Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations at several stages in 40 patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome). In 38 of the 40 patients, one and more enhanced region could be seen in certain portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone on the affected side, whereas no enhanced regions were seen on the intact side. Correlations between the timing of the MRI examination and the location of the enhanced regions were analysed. In all 6 patients examined by MRI within 5 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, enhanced regions were present in the meatal portion. In 3 of the 8 patients (38%) examined by MRI 6 to 10 days after the onset of facial palsy, enhanced areas were seen in both the meatal and labyrinthine portions. In 8 of the 9 patients (89%) tested 11 to 20 days after the onset of palsy, the vertical portion was enhanced. In the 12 patients examined by MRI 21 to 40 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, the meatal portion was not enhanced while the labyrinthine portion, the horizontal portion and the vertical portion were enhanced in 5 (42%), 8 (67%) and 11 (92%), respectively. Enhancement in the vertical portion was observed in all 5 patients examined more than 41 days after the onset of facial palsy. These results suggest that the central portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone tends to be enhanced in the early stage of facial nerve palsy, while the peripheral portion is enhanced in the late stage. These changes of Gd-DTPA enhanced regions in the facial nerve may suggest dromic degeneration of the facial nerve in peripheral facial nerve palsy. (author)

  14. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  15. Sectional anatomy aid for improvement of decompression surgery approach to vertical segment of facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Zhang, Yi Qun; Liu, Min; Jin, Limin; Huangfu, Mingmei; Liu, Zhenyu; Hua, Peiyan; Liu, Yulong; Hou, Ruida; Sun, Yu; Li, You Qiong; Wang, Yu Fa; Feng, Jia Chun

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find a surgical approach to a vertical segment of the facial nerve (VFN) with a relatively wide visual field and small lesion by studying the location and structure of VFN with cross-sectional anatomy. High-resolution spiral computed tomographic multiplane reformation was used to reform images that were parallel to the Frankfort horizontal plane. To locate the VFN, we measured the distances as follows: from the VFN to the paries posterior bony external acoustic meatus on 5 typical multiplane reformation images, to the promontorium tympani and the root of the tympanic ring on 2 typical images. The mean distances from the VFN to the paries posterior bony external acoustic meatus are as follows: 4.47 mm on images showing the top of the external acoustic meatus, 4.20 mm on images with the best view of the window niche, 3.35 mm on images that show the widest external acoustic meatus, 4.22 mm on images with the inferior margin of the sulcus tympanicus, and 5.49 mm on images that show the bottom of the external acoustic meatus. The VFN is approximately 4.20 mm lateral to the promontorium tympani on images with the best view of the window niche and 4.12 mm lateral to the root of the tympanic ring on images with the inferior margin of the sulcus tympanicus. The other results indicate that the area and depth of the surgical wound from the improved approach would be much smaller than that from the typical approach. The surgical approach to the horizontal segment of the facial nerve through the external acoustic meatus and the tympanic cavity could be improved by grinding off the external acoustic meatus to show the VFN. The VFN can be found by taking the promontorium tympani and tympanic ring as references. This improvement is of high potential to expand the visual field to the facial nerve, remarkably without significant injury to the patients compared with the typical approach through the mastoid process.

  16. Branches of the Facial Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Geun In; Park, Hye Jin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review the name of the branches, to review the classification of the branching pattern, and to clarify a presence percentage of each branch of the facial artery, systematically. In a PubMed search, the search terms "facial," AND "artery," AND "classification OR variant OR pattern" were used. The IBM SPSS Statistics 20 system was used for statistical analysis. Among the 500 titles, 18 articles were selected and reviewed systematically. Most of the articles focused on "classification" according to the "terminal branch." Several authors classified the facial artery according to their terminal branches. Most of them, however, did not describe the definition of "terminal branch." There were confusions within the classifications. When the inferior labial artery was absent, 3 different types were used. The "alar branch" or "nasal branch" was used instead of the "lateral nasal branch." The angular branch was used to refer to several different branches. The presence as a percentage of each branch according to the branches in Gray's Anatomy (premasseteric, inferior labial, superior labial, lateral nasal, and angular) varied. No branch was used with 100% consistency. The superior labial branch was most frequently cited (95.7%, 382 arteries in 399 hemifaces). The angular branch (53.9%, 219 arteries in 406 hemifaces) and the premasseteric branch were least frequently cited (53.8%, 43 arteries in 80 hemifaces). There were significant differences among each of the 5 branches (P < 0.05) except between the angular branch and the premasseteric branch and between the superior labial branch and the inferior labial branch. The authors believe identifying the presence percentage of each branch will be helpful for surgical procedures.

  17. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the mastoid facial nerve canal mimicking a facial nerve schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew L; Bharatha, Aditya; Aviv, Richard I; Nedzelski, Julian; Chen, Joseph; Bilbao, Juan M; Wong, John; Saad, Reda; Symons, Sean P

    2009-07-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma of the skull base is a rare entity. Involvement of the temporal bone is particularly rare. We present an unusual case of progressive facial nerve paralysis with imaging and clinical findings most suggestive of a facial nerve schwannoma. The lesion was tubular in appearance, expanded the mastoid facial nerve canal, protruded out of the stylomastoid foramen, and enhanced homogeneously. The only unusual imaging feature was minor calcification within the tumor. Surgery revealed an irregular, cystic lesion. Pathology diagnosed a chondromyxoid fibroma involving the mastoid portion of the facial nerve canal, destroying the facial nerve.

  18. Facial image identification using Photomodeler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Andersen, Marie; Lauritsen, Helle Petri

    2003-01-01

    consist of many images of the same person taken from different angles. We wanted to see if it was possible to combine such a suite of images in useful 3-D renderings of facial proportions.Fifteen male adults were photographed from four different angles. Based on these photographs, a 3-D wireframe model......We present the results of a preliminary study on the use of 3-D software (Photomodeler) for identification purposes. Perpetrators may be photographed or filmed by surveillance systems. The police may wish to have these images compared to photographs of suspects. The surveillance imagery will often...

  19. Super-Robust Polylactide Barrier Films by Building Densely Oriented Lamellae Incorporated with Ductile in Situ Nanofibrils of Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Hua-Dong; Ji, Xu; Yan, Ding-Xiang; Zhong, Gan-Ji; Hsiao, Benjamin S; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Remarkable combination of excellent gas barrier performance, high strength, and toughness was realized in polylactide (PLA) composite films by constructing the supernetworks of oriented and pyknotic crystals with the assistance of ductile in situ nanofibrils of poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT). On the basis that the permeation of gas molecules through polymer materials with anisotropic structure would be more frustrated, we believe that oriented crystalline textures cooperating with inerratic amorphism can be favorable for the enhancement of gas barrier property. By taking full advantage of intensively elongational flow field, the dispersed phase of PBAT in situ forms into nanofibrils, and simultaneously sufficient row-nuclei for PLA are induced. After appropriate thermal treatment with the acceleration effect of PBAT on PLA crystallization, oriented lamellae of PLA tend to be more perfect in a preferential direction and constitute into a kind of network interconnecting with each other. At the same time, the molecular chains between lamellae tend to be more extended. This unique structure manifests superior ability in ameliorating the performance of PLA film. The oxygen permeability coefficient can be achieved as low as 2 × 10(-15) cm(3) cm cm(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), combining with the high strength, modulus, and ductility (104.5 MPa, 3484 MPa, and 110.6%, respectively). The methodology proposed in this work presents an industrially scalable processing method to fabricate super-robust PLA barrier films. It would indeed push the usability of biopolymers forward, and certainly prompt wider application of biodegradable polymers in the fields of environmental protection such as food packaging, medical packaging, and biodegradable mulch.

  20. [Bony injuries of the thoracic cage in multiple trauma : Incidence, concomitant injuries, course and outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Drost, S; Oppel, P; Grupp, S; Krinner, S; Langenbach, A; Lefering, R; Mauerer, A

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic trauma is considered to be responsible for 25 % of fatalities in multiple trauma and is a frequent injury with an incidence of 50 %. In addition to organ injuries, severe injuries to the bony parts of the thorax also occur and these injuries are described very differently mostly based on single center data. The focus of this study was on a holistic presentation of the prevalence and the incidence of thoracic trauma in patients with multiple trauma from the data of the large collective of the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) with the objective of an analysis of concomitant injuries, therapy options and outcome parameters. A retrospective analysis was carried out based on the data set of the TR-DGU from the years 2009-2013. Inclusion criteria were an injury severity scale (ISS) score ≥ 16 and primary admission to a trauma center but isolated craniocerebral injury was an exclusion criterium. Patients were separated into two groups: those with rib fractures (RF) and those with flail chest (FC). A total of 21,741 patients met the inclusion criteria including 10,474 (48.2 %) suffering from either RF or FC. The mean age was 49.8 ± 19.9 years in the RF group and 54.1 ± 18.2 years in the FC group. Approximately 25 % were female in both groups, 98.1 % were blunt force injuries and the median ISS was 28.0 ± 11.2 in RF and 35.1 ± 14.2 in FC. Shock, insertion of a chest tube, (multi) organ failure and fatality rates were significantly higher in the FC group as were concomitant thoracic injuries, such as pneumothorax and hemothorax. Sternal fractures without rib fractures were less common (3.8 %) than concomitant in the RF (10.1 %) and FC (14 %) groups, as were concomitant fractures of the clavicle and the scapula. Out of all patients 32.6 % showed fractures of the thoracolumbar spine, 26.5 % without rib fractures, 36.6-38.6 % with rib fractures or monolateral FC and 48.6 % concomitant to bilateral FC. Thoracotomy was carried

  1. Facial Affect Displays during Tutoring Sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghijsen, M.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2005-01-01

    An emotionally intelligent tutoring system should be able to provide feedback to students, taking into account relevant aspects of the mental state of the student. Facial expressions, put in context, might provide some cues with respect to this state. We discuss the analysis of the facial expression

  2. Case Report: Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention. Key words: Magnet ...

  3. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  4. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... the facial nerve has tremendous regenerative ability. The paretic, or flaccid, ... fresh axoplasm moving into it from the cell-body. Only when the axon .... tivity of the ear to sound, homolateral to the facial paralysis. The cause is ...

  5. The Prevalence of Cosmetic Facial Plastic Procedures among Facial Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayer, Roxana; Sand, Jordan P; Han, Albert; Nabili, Vishad; Keller, Gregory S

    2018-04-01

    This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cosmetic facial plastic surgery use among facial plastic surgeons. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency with which facial plastic surgeons have cosmetic procedures themselves. A secondary aim is to determine whether trends in usage of cosmetic facial procedures among facial plastic surgeons are similar to that of nonsurgeons. The study design was an anonymous, five-question, Internet survey distributed via email set in a single academic institution. Board-certified members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) were included in this study. Self-reported history of cosmetic facial plastic surgery or minimally invasive procedures were recorded. The survey also queried participants for demographic data. A total of 216 members of the AAFPRS responded to the questionnaire. Ninety percent of respondents were male ( n  = 192) and 10.3% were female ( n  = 22). Thirty-three percent of respondents were aged 31 to 40 years ( n  = 70), 25% were aged 41 to 50 years ( n  = 53), 21.4% were aged 51 to 60 years ( n  = 46), and 20.5% were older than 60 years ( n  = 44). Thirty-six percent of respondents had a surgical cosmetic facial procedure and 75% has at least one minimally invasive cosmetic facial procedure. Facial plastic surgeons are frequent users of cosmetic facial plastic surgery. This finding may be due to access, knowledge base, values, or attitudes. By better understanding surgeon attitudes toward facial plastic surgery, we can improve communication with patients and delivery of care. This study is a first step in understanding use of facial plastic procedures among facial plastic surgeons. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Development of the Korean Facial Emotion Stimuli: Korea University Facial Expression Collection 2nd Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Min Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Developing valid emotional facial stimuli for specific ethnicities creates ample opportunities to investigate both the nature of emotional facial information processing in general and clinical populations as well as the underlying mechanisms of facial emotion processing within and across cultures. Given that most entries in emotional facial stimuli databases were developed with western samples, and given that very few of the eastern emotional facial stimuli sets were based strictly on the Ekman’s Facial Action Coding System, developing valid emotional facial stimuli of eastern samples remains a high priority.Aims: To develop and examine the psychometric properties of six basic emotional facial stimuli recruiting professional Korean actors and actresses based on the Ekman’s Facial Action Coding System for the Korea University Facial Expression Collection-Second Edition (KUFEC-II.Materials And Methods: Stimulus selection was done in two phases. First, researchers evaluated the clarity and intensity of each stimulus developed based on the Facial Action Coding System. Second, researchers selected a total of 399 stimuli from a total of 57 actors and actresses, which were then rated on accuracy, intensity, valence, and arousal by 75 independent raters.Conclusion: The hit rates between the targeted and rated expressions of the KUFEC-II were all above 80%, except for fear (50% and disgust (63%. The KUFEC-II appears to be a valid emotional facial stimuli database, providing the largest set of emotional facial stimuli. The mean intensity score was 5.63 (out of 7, suggesting that the stimuli delivered the targeted emotions with great intensity. All positive expressions were rated as having a high positive valence, whereas all negative expressions were rated as having a high negative valence. The KUFEC II is expected to be widely used in various psychological studies on emotional facial expression. KUFEC-II stimuli can be obtained through

  7. MR imaging of the intraparotid facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    Using a 1.5T MR imaging system, seven normal volunteers and 6 patients with parotid tumors were studied and their intraparotid facial nerves were directly imaged. The findings were evaluated by T1-weighted axial, sagittal and oblique images. The facial nerve appeared to be relatively hypointensive within the highsignal parotid parenchyma, and the main trunks of the facial nerves were observed directly in all the cases examined. Their main divisions were detected in all the volunteers and 5 of 6 patients were imaged obliquely. The facial nerves run in various fashions and so the oblique scan planes were determined individually to detect this running figure directly. To verify our observations, surgical findings of the facial nerve were compared with the MR images or results. (author)

  8. Variant facial artery in the submandibular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadgaonkar, Rajanigandha; Rai, Rajalakshmi; Prabhu, Latha V; Bv, Murlimanju; Samapriya, Neha

    2012-07-01

    Facial artery has been considered to be the most important vascular pedicle in facial rejuvenation procedures and submandibular gland (SMG) resection. It usually arises from the external carotid artery and passes from the carotid to digastric triangle, deep to the posterior belly of digastric muscle, and lodges in a groove at the posterior end of the SMG. It then passes between SMG and the mandible to reach the face after winding around the base of the mandible. During a routine dissection, in a 62-year-old female cadaver, in Kasturba Medical College Mangalore, an unusual pattern in the cervical course of facial artery was revealed. The right facial artery was found to pierce the whole substance of the SMG before winding around the lower border of the mandible to enter the facial region. Awareness of existence of such a variant and its comparison to the normal anatomy will be useful to oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

  9. Facial Animations: Future Research Directions & Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Rehman, Amjad; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, computer facial animation is used in a significant multitude fields that brought human and social to study the computer games, films and interactive multimedia reality growth. Authoring the computer facial animation, complex and subtle expressions are challenging and fraught with problems. As a result, the current most authored using universal computer animation techniques often limit the production quality and quantity of facial animation. With the supplement of computer power, facial appreciative, software sophistication and new face-centric methods emerging are immature in nature. Therefore, this paper concentrates to define and managerially categorize current and emerged surveyed facial animation experts to define the recent state of the field, observed bottlenecks and developing techniques. This paper further presents a real-time simulation model of human worry and howling with detail discussion about their astonish, sorrow, annoyance and panic perception.

  10. Preoperative embolization of facial angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causmano, F.; Bruschi, G.; De Donatis, M.; Piazza, P.; Bassi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Preoperative embolization was performed on 27 patients with facial angiomas supplied by the external carotid branches. Sixteen were males and 11 females; 13 of these angiomas were high-flow arterio-venous (A-V), 14 were low-flow capillary malformations. Fourteen patients underwent surgical removal after preoperative embolization; in this group embolization was carried out with Spongel in 3 cases and with Lyodura in 11 cases. In 12 of these patients the last angiographic examination was performed 3-6 years later: angiography evidenced no recurrence in 8 cases (67%), while in 3 cases (25%) there was capillary residual angioma of negligible size. Treatment was unsuccessful in one patient only, due to the large recurrent A-V angioma. Thirteen patients underwent embolization only, which was carried out with Lyodura in 10 cases, and with Ivalon in 3 cases. On 12 of these patients the last angiographic study was performed 2-14 months later: there was recurrent A-V angioma in 5 patients (42%), who underwent a subsequent embolization; angiography evidenced no recurrence in the other 7 patients (58%). In both series, the best results were obtained in the patients with low-flow capillary angiomas. Embolization and subsequent surgical removal are the treatment of choice for facial angiomas; embolization alone is useful in the management of surgically inacessible vascular malformations, and it can be the only treatment in patients with small low-flow angiomas when distal occlusion of the feeding vessel with Lyodura or Ivalon particles is performed

  11. 面瘫动物模型的研究现状%Research status of animal model of acute peripheral facial paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昕蓉; 张勤修

    2012-01-01

    Acute peripheral facial paralysis is a disease with acute palsy flaccid of mimic muscles due to the damages to facial nerve either at facial nerve nucleus or beyond it. Because facial nerve is the longest cranial nerve which traverses in the bony fallopian canal, any lesion of the facial nerve could cause paralysis of the ipsilateral face. Acute peripheral dysfunction of the facial nerve becomes one of the most common otology diseases. It is hard to locate the lesion of facial nerve and to choose proper therapeutic regiment as soon as possible because of the complexity of the anatomy of facial nerve. So it is necessary to establish acute facial paralysis animal model to prompt further study of this disease. This article approached the methods to found acute facial paralysis animal models, analyzed the deficiencies existing in the models and suggested the new thread of this research.%急性周围性面瘫是面神经核及其以下面神经损伤导致的急性面部表情肌的迟缓性麻痹.因面神经是在骨管内行程最长的颅神经,易受外界因素影响、侵犯,所以急性周围性面瘫是耳科疾病中的常见病.且因面神经行程复杂,增大了面瘫定位和选择治疗方案的难度.急性周围性面瘫动物模型的建立为深入研究面瘫提供了一个手段.本文从面瘫动物造模机制、特点、适用范围及效度、目前存在的问题等方面对现常用的面瘫动物模型的研究现状进行综述.

  12. Perceived functional impact of abnormal facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Marlene; Borah, Gregory L

    2003-06-01

    Functional facial deformities are usually described as those that impair respiration, eating, hearing, or speech. Yet facial scars and cutaneous deformities have a significant negative effect on social functionality that has been poorly documented in the scientific literature. Insurance companies are declining payments for reconstructive surgical procedures for facial deformities caused by congenital disabilities and after cancer or trauma operations that do not affect mechanical facial activity. The purpose of this study was to establish a large, sample-based evaluation of the perceived social functioning, interpersonal characteristics, and employability indices for a range of facial appearances (normal and abnormal). Adult volunteer evaluators (n = 210) provided their subjective perceptions based on facial physical appearance, and an analysis of the consequences of facial deformity on parameters of preferential treatment was performed. A two-group comparative research design rated the differences among 10 examples of digitally altered facial photographs of actual patients among various age and ethnic groups with "normal" and "abnormal" congenital deformities or posttrauma scars. Photographs of adult patients with observable congenital and posttraumatic deformities (abnormal) were digitally retouched to eliminate the stigmatic defects (normal). The normal and abnormal photographs of identical patients were evaluated by the large sample study group on nine parameters of social functioning, such as honesty, employability, attractiveness, and effectiveness, using a visual analogue rating scale. Patients with abnormal facial characteristics were rated as significantly less honest (p = 0.007), less employable (p = 0.001), less trustworthy (p = 0.01), less optimistic (p = 0.001), less effective (p = 0.02), less capable (p = 0.002), less intelligent (p = 0.03), less popular (p = 0.001), and less attractive (p = 0.001) than were the same patients with normal facial

  13. First detection of lamella-gyroid-cylinder phase transition of neat polyethylene-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymers on the basis of synchrotron WAXD/SAXS and infrared/Raman spectral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiyu, Cao; Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Takeda, Shinichi; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Sasaki, Sono; Takata, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    The phase transition behaviour of polyethylene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PE-b-PEO) diblock copolymer with relatively short chain lengths has been studied on the basis of temperature dependent infrared and Raman spectral measurements and synchrotron WAXD/SAXS simultaneous measurements, from which the concrete structural changes were deduced successfully from the various levels of molecular chain conformation, chain packing mode and higher-order structure. The higher-order structure has been found to transform between lamella, perforated lamella, gyroid, cylinder and sphere structures. The inner structural changes occurring in the polyethylene and poly(ethylene oxide) parts have been related with these morphological changes. The morphological transition from lamella to gyroid occurs with keeping the crystalline state of polyethylene parts. This apparently curious transition can be interpreted reasonably by assuming the thermally-activated chain motion in the crystal lattice, which may play an important role as a trigger to induce the morphological change from lamella to gyroid. This idea was supported by the measurement of half-width of Raman anti-symmetric CH 2 stretching band sensitive to the thermal mobility of alkyl chains.

  14. [Peripheral facial nerve lesion induced long-term dendritic retraction in pyramidal cortico-facial neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Múnera, Alejandro; Troncoso, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Little evidence is available concerning the morphological modifications of motor cortex neurons associated with peripheral nerve injuries, and the consequences of those injuries on post lesion functional recovery. Dendritic branching of cortico-facial neurons was characterized with respect to the effects of irreversible facial nerve injury. Twenty-four adult male rats were distributed into four groups: sham (no lesion surgery), and dendritic assessment at 1, 3 and 5 weeks post surgery. Eighteen lesion animals underwent surgical transection of the mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve. Dendritic branching was examined by contralateral primary motor cortex slices stained with the Golgi-Cox technique. Layer V pyramidal (cortico-facial) neurons from sham and injured animals were reconstructed and their dendritic branching was compared using Sholl analysis. Animals with facial nerve lesions displayed persistent vibrissal paralysis throughout the five week observation period. Compared with control animal neurons, cortico-facial pyramidal neurons of surgically injured animals displayed shrinkage of their dendritic branches at statistically significant levels. This shrinkage persisted for at least five weeks after facial nerve injury. Irreversible facial motoneuron axonal damage induced persistent dendritic arborization shrinkage in contralateral cortico-facial neurons. This morphological reorganization may be the physiological basis of functional sequelae observed in peripheral facial palsy patients.

  15. Reproducibility of the dynamics of facial expressions in unilateral facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagha, M A; Ju, X; Morley, S; Ayoub, A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of non-verbal facial expressions in unilateral facial paralysis using dynamic four-dimensional (4D) imaging. The Di4D system was used to record five facial expressions of 20 adult patients. The system captured 60 three-dimensional (3D) images per second; each facial expression took 3-4seconds which was recorded in real time. Thus a set of 180 3D facial images was generated for each expression. The procedure was repeated after 30min to assess the reproducibility of the expressions. A mathematical facial mesh consisting of thousands of quasi-point 'vertices' was conformed to the face in order to determine the morphological characteristics in a comprehensive manner. The vertices were tracked throughout the sequence of the 180 images. Five key 3D facial frames from each sequence of images were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the first and second capture of each facial expression to assess the reproducibility of facial movements. Corresponding images were aligned using partial Procrustes analysis, and the root mean square distance between them was calculated and analyzed statistically (paired Student t-test, PFacial expressions of lip purse, cheek puff, and raising of eyebrows were reproducible. Facial expressions of maximum smile and forceful eye closure were not reproducible. The limited coordination of various groups of facial muscles contributed to the lack of reproducibility of these facial expressions. 4D imaging is a useful clinical tool for the assessment of facial expressions. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-E-J-33: Comparison Between Soft Tissue Alignment and Bony Alignment for Pancreatic Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Y; Crane, C; Krishnan, S; Das, P; Koay, E; Beddar, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose An IGRT modality for pancreatic cancer treatment with dose escalation at our institution is in-room daily CT imaging. The purpose of this study is to assess the difference between soft tissue alignment and bony alignment for pancreatic tumor localization. Methods Eighteen patients with pancreatic tumors who underwent IMRT treatment with an inspiration breath-hold technique between July 2012 and February 2015 are included in this study. Prior to each treatment, a CT scan was acquired. The CT image guidance started with auto-alignment to either the bony anatomy (vertebral bodies) or fiducials (for the six patients with the stent in/near the tumor) and then, when necessary, manual adjustments were made based on soft tissue alignment using clinical software (CT-Assisted Targeting system). The difference between soft tissue alignment and bony/fiducial alignment was evaluated. Results Of all 380 treatments, manual adjustment was made in 225 treatments, ranging from 11% (3 treatments out of 28) to 96% (27 treatments out of 28) per patient. The mean of the difference between soft tissue alignment and bony/fiducial alignment per patient ranged from −3.6 to 0.3 mm, −1.5 to 2.8 mm, and −3.3 to 3.4 mm in the AP, SI, and RL directions, respectively. The maximum difference over all treatments was −9.5, −14.6, and −14.6 mm in the AP, SI, and RL directions, respectively. Conclusion About 60% of the time, manual adjustment based on soft tissue alignment was required. The extent of manual adjustment was usually small but varied significantly from patient to patient. The ultimate goal of the IGRT modality using daily CT imaging is not to fully cover the target but to spare organs-at-risk as much as possible to avoid them moving into higher dose gradients than accepted in the treatment plan. To this end, manual adjustment based on soft tissue alignment is critically important.

  17. A biomechanical analysis of a single-row suture anchor fixation of a large bony bankart lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyskin, Evgeny; Marzo, John M; Howard, Craig; Ehrensberger, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether a single-row suture anchor repair of a bony Bankart lesion comprising 19% of the glenoid length restores peak translational force and glenoid depth compared with the intact shoulder. Nine thawed adult cadaveric shoulders were dissected and mounted in 45° of abduction and 30° of external rotation. A bony Bankart lesion was simulated with an anterior longitudinal osteotomy, parallel to the superoinferior axis of the glenoid, equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length. The humeral head was displaced 10 mm anteriorly at a speed of 2 mm/s with a 50-N compressive load applied. Testing was performed with the glenoid intact, a simulated lesion, and the lesion repaired with 3 single-row suture anchors. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) peak translational force and glenoid depth were reported. The Friedman test and post hoc comparisons with the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for between-group analyses. Peak translational force decreased after osteotomy (13.7 N; IQR, 9.6 to 15.5 N; P = .01) and increased after the repair (18.3 N; IQR, 18.3 to 20.6 N; P = .01) compared with the intact shoulder (23.7 N; IQR, 16.4 to 29.9 N). Glenoid depth significantly decreased after the osteotomy (0.2 mm; IQR, -0.6 to 0.7 mm) compared with baseline (1.7 mm; IQR, 1.3 to 2.0 mm; P = .01) and increased after repair (0.8 mm; IQR, 0.1 to 1.0 mm; P = .03) compared with the osteotomized shoulder. The glenoid depth of the repair was less than the baseline value (P = .01). Repair of an anterior bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length with 3 suture anchors restored the peak translational force needed to anteriorly displace the humerus relative to the glenoid; however, this technique failed to restore the natural glenoid depth in a laboratory setting. Our findings describe the inability of a single-row suture anchor repair to provide anatomic fixation of the bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length

  18. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Fixation of Bony Bankart Lesions: Clinical Outcome, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results, and Return to Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Bangoj, Robert; Martetschläger, Frank; Wörtler, Klaus; Seppel, Gernot; Aboalata, Mohamed; Tischer, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Vogt, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome, return to sporting activity, and postoperative articular cartilage and bony morphology of shoulders that underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of bony Bankart lesions. The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were anterior glenoid rim fractures after traumatic shoulder instability that were treated with arthroscopic suture anchor repair. Patients were surveyed by a questionnaire including sport-specific outcome, Rowe score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, and Oxford Instability Score. Three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging could be performed in 30 patients to assess osseous integration, glenoid reconstruction, and signs of osteoarthritis. From November 1999 to April 2010, 81 patients underwent an anterior bony Bankart repair in our department (50 arthroscopic suture anchor repairs, 5 arthroscopic screw fixations, and 26 open repairs). The 55 arthroscopic repairs comprised a consecutive cohort of patients treated by a single surgeon. Of the 50 patients in the suture anchor group, 45 (90%) were available for evaluation. At 82 ± 31 months postoperatively, the mean Rowe score was 85.9 ± 20.5 points, the mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score was 89.4% ± 14.7%, and the mean Oxford Instability Score was 13.6 ± 5.4 points. Compared with the contralateral shoulder, all scores showed a significantly reduced outcome (P sporting activity after surgery. The number of sports disciplines (P < .001), duration (P = .005), level (P = .02), and risk category (P = .013) showed a significant reduction compared with the pretrauma condition. However, only 19% of patients reported that shoulder complaints were the reason for the reduction in activity. Nonunion occurred in 16.6%, with a higher frequency in patients with chronic lesions (P = .031). Anatomic reduction was achieved in 72%, the medial step-off in patients with nonanatomic reduction averaged 1.8 ± 0.9 mm, and the

  19. SU-E-J-94: Positioning Errors Resulting From Using Bony Anatomy Alignment for Treating SBRT Lung Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, C; Ding, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify patient setups errors based on bony anatomy registration rather than 3D tumor alignment for SBRT lung treatments. Method: A retrospective study was performed for patients treated with lung SBRT and imaged with kV cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) image-guidance. Daily CBCT images were registered to treatment planning CTs based on bony anatomy alignment and then inter-fraction tumor movement was evaluated by comparing shift in the tumor center in the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The PTV V100% was evaluated for each patient based on the average daily tumor displacement to assess the impact of the positioning error on the target coverage when the registrations were based on bony anatomy. Of the 35 patients studied, 15 were free-breathing treatments, 10 used abdominal compression with a stereotactic body frame, and the remaining 10 were performed with BodyFIX vacuum bags. Results: For free-breathing treatments, the range of tumor displacement error is between 1–6 mm in the medial-lateral, 1–13 mm in the anterior-posterior, and 1–7 mm in the superior-inferior directions. These positioning errors lead to 6–22% underdose coverage for PTV - V100% . Patients treated with abdominal compression immobilization showed positional errors of 0–4mm mediallaterally, 0–3mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% underdose ranging between 6–17%. For patients immobilized with the vacuum bags, the positional errors were found to be 0–1 mm medial-laterally, 0–1mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% under dose ranging between 5–6% only. Conclusion: It is necessary to align the tumor target by using 3D image guidance to ensure adequate tumor coverage before performing SBRT lung treatments. The BodyFIX vacuum bag immobilization method has the least positioning errors among the three methods studied when bony anatomy is used for

  20. Facial Expression Recognition Through Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Perveen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions communicate non-verbal cues which play an important role in interpersonal relations. Automatic recognition of facial expressions can be an important element of normal human-machine interfaces it might likewise be utilized as a part of behavioral science and in clinical practice. In spite of the fact that people perceive facial expressions for all intents and purposes immediately solid expression recognition by machine is still a challenge. From the point of view of automatic recognition a facial expression can be considered to comprise of disfigurements of the facial parts and their spatial relations or changes in the faces pigmentation. Research into automatic recognition of the facial expressions addresses the issues encompassing the representation and arrangement of static or dynamic qualities of these distortions or face pigmentation. We get results by utilizing the CVIPtools. We have taken train data set of six facial expressions of three persons and for train data set purpose we have total border mask sample 90 and 30 border mask sample for test data set purpose and we use RST- Invariant features and texture features for feature analysis and then classified them by using k- Nearest Neighbor classification algorithm. The maximum accuracy is 90.

  1. The identification of unfolding facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Schmidt, Susanna; Viviani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We asked whether the identification of emotional facial expressions (FEs) involves the simultaneous perception of the facial configuration or the detection of emotion-specific diagnostic cues. We recorded at high speed (500 frames s-1) the unfolding of the FE in five actors, each expressing six emotions (anger, surprise, happiness, disgust, fear, sadness). Recordings were coded every 10 frames (20 ms of real time) with the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al 2002, Salt Lake City, UT: Research Nexus eBook) to identify the facial actions contributing to each expression, and their intensity changes over time. Recordings were shown in slow motion (1/20 of recording speed) to one hundred observers in a forced-choice identification task. Participants were asked to identify the emotion during the presentation as soon as they felt confident to do so. Responses were recorded along with the associated response times (RTs). The RT probability density functions for both correct and incorrect responses were correlated with the facial activity during the presentation. There were systematic correlations between facial activities, response probabilities, and RT peaks, and significant differences in RT distributions for correct and incorrect answers. The results show that a reliable response is possible long before the full FE configuration is reached. This suggests that identification is reached by integrating in time individual diagnostic facial actions, and does not require perceiving the full apex configuration.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial nerve schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew L; Aviv, Richard I; Chen, Joseph M; Nedzelski, Julian M; Yuen, Heng-Wai; Fox, Allan J; Bharatha, Aditya; Bartlett, Eric S; Symons, Sean P

    2009-12-01

    This study characterizes the magnetic resonance (MR) appearances of facial nerve schwannoma (FNS). We hypothesize that the extent of FNS demonstrated on MR will be greater compared to prior computed tomography studies, that geniculate involvement will be most common, and that cerebellar pontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) involvement will more frequently result in sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Retrospective study. Clinical, pathologic, and enhanced MR imaging records of 30 patients with FNS were analyzed. Morphologic characteristics and extent of segmental facial nerve involvement were documented. Median age at initial imaging was 51 years (range, 28-76 years). Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 14 patients (47%), and the diagnosis reached in the remainder by identification of a mass, thickening, and enhancement along the course of the facial nerve. All 30 lesions involved two or more contiguous segments of the facial nerve, with 28 (93%) involving three or more segments. The median segments involved per lesion was 4, mean of 3.83. Geniculate involvement was most common, in 29 patients (97%). CPA (P = .001) and IAC (P = .02) involvement was significantly related to SNHL. Seventeen patients (57%) presented with facial nerve dysfunction, manifesting in 12 patients as facial nerve weakness or paralysis, and/or in eight with involuntary movements of the facial musculature. This study highlights the morphologic heterogeneity and typical multisegment involvement of FNS. Enhanced MR is the imaging modality of choice for FNS. The neuroradiologist must accurately diagnose and characterize this lesion, and thus facilitate optimal preoperative planning and counseling.

  3. Appearance of bony lesions on 3-D CT reconstructions: a case study in variable renderings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankovich, Nicholas J.; White, Stuart C.

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses conventional 3-D reconstruction for bone visualization and presents a case study to demonstrate the dangers of performing 3-D reconstructions without careful selection of the bone threshold. The visualization of midface bone lesions directly from axial CT images is difficult because of the complex anatomic relationships. Three-dimensional reconstructions made from the CT to provide graphic images showing lesions in relation to adjacent facial bones. Most commercially available 3-D image reconstruction requires that the radiologist or technologist identify a threshold image intensity value that can be used to distinguish bone from other tissues. Much has been made of the many disadvantages of this technique, but it continues as the predominant method in producing 3-D pictures for clinical use. This paper is intended to provide a clear demonstration for the physician of the caveats that should accompany 3-D reconstructions. We present a case of recurrent odontogenic keratocyst in the anterior maxilla where the 3-D reconstructions, made with different bone thresholds (windows), are compared to the resected specimen. A DMI 3200 computer was used to convert the scan data from a GE 9800 CT into a 3-D shaded surface image. Threshold values were assigned to (1) generate the most clinically pleasing image, (2) produce maximum theoretical fidelity (using the midpoint image intensity between average cortical bone and average soft tissue), and (3) cover stepped threshold intensities between these two methods. We compared the computer lesions with the resected specimen and noted measurement errors of up to 44 percent introduced by inappropriate bone threshold levels. We suggest clinically applicable standardization techniques in the 3-D reconstruction as well as cautionary language that should accompany the 3-D images.

  4. A dynamic appearance descriptor approach to facial actions temporal modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Bihan; Valstar, Michel; Martinez, Brais; Pantic, Maja

    Both the configuration and the dynamics of facial expressions are crucial for the interpretation of human facial behavior. Yet to date, the vast majority of reported efforts in the field either do not take the dynamics of facial expressions into account, or focus only on prototypic facial

  5. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  6. Facial nerve problems and Bell's palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, DV; Venter, C; Valenas, O

    2015-01-01

    Bell's palsy is paralysis or weakness of muscle at the hemifacial level, a form of temporary facial paralysis, probable a virus infection or trauma, to one or two facial nerves. Damage to the facial nerve innervating the muscles on one side of the face result in a flabby appearance, fell the respective hemiface. Nerve damage can also affect the sense of taste and salivary and lacrimal secretion. This condition begins suddenly, often overnight, and usually gets better on its own within a few w...

  7. Análisis facial en ortodoncia

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Corbetto, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Las consideraciones sobre estética facial han sido conceptos inseparables de los principios y de la práctica de la ortodoncia y hoy en día se hace necesario enfatizar la importancia del análisis facial como examen complementario indispensable para el diagnóstico y planeamiento ortodóntico, resaltando que la mejora de la morfología facial debe ser el objetivo del tratamiento de las maloclusion es. Según Baldwin 5 el paciente busca en un tratamiento ortodóntico la ...

  8. Heartbeat Rate Measurement from Facial Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat Rate (HR) reveals a person’s health condition. This paper presents an effective system for measuring HR from facial videos acquired in a more realistic environment than the testing environment of current systems. The proposed method utilizes a facial feature point tracking method...... by combining a ‘Good feature to track’ and a ‘Supervised descent method’ in order to overcome the limitations of currently available facial video based HR measuring systems. Such limitations include, e.g., unrealistic restriction of the subject’s movement and artificial lighting during data capture. A face...

  9. 3D Facial Pattern Analysis for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    et al. (2001) proposed a two-level Garbor wavelet network (GWN) to detect eight facial features. In Bhuiyan et al. (2003) six facial features are...Toyama, K., Krüger, V., 2001. Hierarchical Wavelet Networks for Facial Feature Localization. ICCV’01 Workshop on Recognition, Analysis and... pathological  (red) and normal structure (blue) (b)  signed distance map (negative distance indicates the  pathological  shape is inside) (c) raw

  10. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies.

  11. Fusing Facial Features for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Ahmad Dargham

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is an important biometric method because of its potential applications in many fields, such as access control, surveillance, and human-computer interaction. In this paper, a face recognition system that fuses the outputs of three face recognition systems based on Gabor jets is presented. The first system uses the magnitude, the second uses the phase, and the third uses the phase-weighted magnitude of the jets. The jets are generated from facial landmarks selected using three selection methods. It was found out that fusing the facial features gives better recognition rate than either facial feature used individually regardless of the landmark selection method.

  12. Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction: CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disbro, M.A.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Osborn, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction may have a clinically apparent or occult cause. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 36 patients with peripheral facial nerve dysfunction to obtain information on the location of the suspected lesion and the number, sequence, and type of radiographic evaluations performed. Inadequate clinical evaluations before computed tomography (CT) was done and unnecessary CT examinations were also noted. They have suggested a practical clinical and radiographic scheme to evaluate progressive peripheral facial dysfunction with no apparent cause. If this scheme is applied, unnecessary radiologic tests and delays in diagnosis and treatment may be avoided.

  13. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  14. Daily online bony correction is required for prostate patients without fiducial markers or soft-tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M L; Vial, P; Wiltshire, K L; Bell, L J; Blome, S; Kerestes, Z; Morgan, G W; O'Driscoll, D; Shakespeare, T P; Eade, T N

    2011-09-01

    To compare online position verification strategies with offline correction protocols for patients undergoing definitive prostate radiotherapy. We analysed 50 patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing curative prostate radiation treatment, all of whom underwent daily kilovoltage imaging using an on-board imager. For each treatment, patients were set-up initially with skin tattoos and in-room lasers. Orthogonal on-board imager images were acquired and the couch shift to match both bony anatomy and the fiducial markers recorded. The set-up error using skin tattoos and offline bone correction was compared with online bone correction. The fiducial markers were used as the reference. Data from 1923 fractions were analysed. The systematic error was ≤1 mm for all protocols. The average random error was 2-3mm for online bony correction and 3-5mm for skin tattoos or offline-bone. Online-bone showed a significant improvement compared with offline-bone in the number of patients with >5mm set-up errors for >10% (P20% (Pmarkers or daily soft-tissue imaging. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of the bony remodelling of two synthetic biomaterials: aragonite 55% and aragonite 55% with active substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudadesse, H; Derrien, A C; Martin, S; Lucas-Girot, A; Cathelineau, G

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the in vivo behaviour of pure aragonite and vectabone, which is an association of aragonite and an active substance such as gentamicin, was studied to highlight the kinetic resorption of these two biomaterials with 55% of porosity destined for the filling or replacement of bony defects. The synthesis conditions and parameters we used permit us to obtain a biomaterial without a sintering stage. These conditions allow introducing of active substances at the first stage of the elaboration. In this work, the gentamycin antibiotic was associated with calcium carbonate (aragonite 55% with gentamycin) to deliver this active substance on the surgical site for local treatment. The tricalcium phosphate biomaterial was used as the control because of its high biocompatibility. The bony remodelling of these three biomaterials was studied by in vivo experiments. This study was ensured with neutron activation analysis (NAA). The resorption kinetic was elaborated and comparisons of the remodelling biomaterials CaCO 3 55% and CaCO 3 55% with gentamicin (vectabone) and tricalcium phosphate were carried out. The obtained results show that, 6 months after implantation, the mineral composition of vectabone and tricalcium phosphate becomes close to that of young bone. Twelve months after implantation, it becomes similar to that of mature bone

  16. A Deep Learning Perspective on the Origin of Facial Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Breuer, Ran; Kimmel, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions play a significant role in human communication and behavior. Psychologists have long studied the relationship between facial expressions and emotions. Paul Ekman et al., devised the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) to taxonomize human facial expressions and model their behavior. The ability to recognize facial expressions automatically, enables novel applications in fields like human-computer interaction, social gaming, and psychological research. There has been a tremend...

  17. Quantitative facial asymmetry: using three-dimensional photogrammetry to measure baseline facial surface symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Helena O; Morrison, Clinton S; Linden, Olivia; Phillips, Benjamin; Chang, Johnny; Byrne, Margaret E; Sullivan, Stephen R; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Although symmetry is hailed as a fundamental goal of aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, our tools for measuring this outcome have been limited and subjective. With the advent of three-dimensional photogrammetry, surface geometry can be captured, manipulated, and measured quantitatively. Until now, few normative data existed with regard to facial surface symmetry. Here, we present a method for reproducibly calculating overall facial symmetry and present normative data on 100 subjects. We enrolled 100 volunteers who underwent three-dimensional photogrammetry of their faces in repose. We collected demographic data on age, sex, and race and subjectively scored facial symmetry. We calculated the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the native and reflected faces, reflecting about a plane of maximum symmetry. We analyzed the interobserver reliability of the subjective assessment of facial asymmetry and the quantitative measurements and compared the subjective and objective values. We also classified areas of greatest asymmetry as localized to the upper, middle, or lower facial thirds. This cluster of normative data was compared with a group of patients with subtle but increasing amounts of facial asymmetry. We imaged 100 subjects by three-dimensional photogrammetry. There was a poor interobserver correlation between subjective assessments of asymmetry (r = 0.56). There was a high interobserver reliability for quantitative measurements of facial symmetry RMSD calculations (r = 0.91-0.95). The mean RMSD for this normative population was found to be 0.80 ± 0.24 mm. Areas of greatest asymmetry were distributed as follows: 10% upper facial third, 49% central facial third, and 41% lower facial third. Precise measurement permitted discrimination of subtle facial asymmetry within this normative group and distinguished norms from patients with subtle facial asymmetry, with placement of RMSDs along an asymmetry ruler. Facial surface symmetry, which is poorly assessed

  18. Greater perceptual sensitivity to happy facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Stephen; Ekstrom, Tor; Chen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Perception of subtle facial expressions is essential for social functioning; yet it is unclear if human perceptual sensitivities differ in detecting varying types of facial emotions. Evidence diverges as to whether salient negative versus positive emotions (such as sadness versus happiness) are preferentially processed. Here, we measured perceptual thresholds for the detection of four types of emotion in faces--happiness, fear, anger, and sadness--using psychophysical methods. We also evaluated the association of the perceptual performances with facial morphological changes between neutral and respective emotion types. Human observers were highly sensitive to happiness compared with the other emotional expressions. Further, this heightened perceptual sensitivity to happy expressions can be attributed largely to the emotion-induced morphological change of a particular facial feature (end-lip raise).

  19. Facial soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-09

    Sep 9, 2013 ... Objectives: To successfully meet expectations on facial esthetics, it is important to ... by questionnaire and identification cards that were given ..... Zekic E. The use of parental data in evaluation of the craniofacial structures.

  20. A study on facial expressions recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing

    2017-09-01

    In terms of communication, postures and facial expressions of such feelings like happiness, anger and sadness play important roles in conveying information. With the development of the technology, recently a number of algorithms dealing with face alignment, face landmark detection, classification, facial landmark localization and pose estimation have been put forward. However, there are a lot of challenges and problems need to be fixed. In this paper, a few technologies have been concluded and analyzed, and they all relate to handling facial expressions recognition and poses like pose-indexed based multi-view method for face alignment, robust facial landmark detection under significant head pose and occlusion, partitioning the input domain for classification, robust statistics face formalization.

  1. Unsupervised learning of facial expression components

    OpenAIRE

    Egede, Joy Onyekachukwu

    2013-01-01

    The face is one of the most important means of non-verbal communication. A lot of information can be gotten about the emotional state of a person just by merely observing their facial expression. This is relatively easy in face to face communication but not so in human computer interaction. Supervised learning has been widely used by researchers to train machines to recognise facial expressions just like humans. However, supervised learning has significant limitations one of which is the fact...

  2. Temporomandibular disorders, facial pain, and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Steven D

    2012-05-01

    Headaches and facial pain are common in the general population. In many cases, facial pain can be resultant from temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have identified an association between headaches and temporomandibular joint disorders suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these 2 maladies. The aim of this paper is to elucidate potential commonalities of these disorders and to provide a brief overview of an examination protocol that may benefit the headache clinician in daily practice. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  3. Dynamic Facial Expression of Emotion Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Broekens, Joost; Qu, Chao; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Facial emotion expression for virtual characters is used in a wide variety of areas. Often, the primary reason to use emotion expression is not to study emotion expression generation per se, but to use emotion expression in an application or research project. What is then needed is an easy to use and flexible, but also validated mechanism to do so. In this report we present such a mechanism. It enables developers to build virtual characters with dynamic affective facial expressions. The mecha...

  4. Paralisia facial periférica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jarjura Jorge Jr.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Os autores fazem uma revisão sobre o anatomo fisiologia, os diagnósticos clinico e eletrofisiológico da Paralisia Facial Periférica assim como relacionam as afecções envolvidas no processo, discutindo seu tratamento clinico e cirúrgico. Em seguida relatam 5 casos de diversas etiologias tratados no ambulatório de Paralisia Facial da Disciplina de Otorrinolaringologia da FCMB da PUC-SP.

  5. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Gidley, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomograph...

  6. Influence of rotational setup error on tumor shift in bony anatomy matching measured with pulmonary point registration in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Osamu; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Tsujii, Katsutomo

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between the patient rotational error measured with pulmonary point registration and tumor shift after bony anatomy matching in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer. Twenty-six patients with lung cancer who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy were the subjects. On 104 cone-beam computed tomography measurements performed prior to radiation delivery, rotational setup errors were measured with point registration using pulmonary structures. Translational registration using bony anatomy matching was done and the three-dimensional vector of tumor displacement was measured retrospectively. Correlation among the three-dimensional vector and rotational error and vertebra-tumor distance was investigated quantitatively. The median and maximum rotational errors of the roll, pitch and yaw were 0.8, 0.9 and 0.5, and 6.0, 4.5 and 2.5, respectively. Bony anatomy matching resulted in a 0.2-1.6 cm three-dimensional vector of tumor shift. The shift became larger as the vertebra-tumor distance increased. Multiple regression analysis for the three-dimensional vector indicated that in the case of bony anatomy matching, tumor shifts of 5 and 10 mm were expected for vertebra-tumor distances of 4.46 and 14.1 cm, respectively. Using pulmonary point registration, it was found that the rotational setup error influences the tumor shift. Bony anatomy matching is not appropriate for hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy with a tight margin. (author)

  7. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low.

  8. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  9. Automated facial acne assessment from smartphone images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohammad; Vasefi, Fartash; Valdebran, Manuel; Huang, Kevin; Zhang, Haomiao; Kemp, William; MacKinnon, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    A smartphone mobile medical application is presented, that provides analysis of the health of skin on the face using a smartphone image and cloud-based image processing techniques. The mobile application employs the use of the camera to capture a front face image of a subject, after which the captured image is spatially calibrated based on fiducial points such as position of the iris of the eye. A facial recognition algorithm is used to identify features of the human face image, to normalize the image, and to define facial regions of interest (ROI) for acne assessment. We identify acne lesions and classify them into two categories: those that are papules and those that are pustules. Automated facial acne assessment was validated by performing tests on images of 60 digital human models and 10 real human face images. The application was able to identify 92% of acne lesions within five facial ROIs. The classification accuracy for separating papules from pustules was 98%. Combined with in-app documentation of treatment, lifestyle factors, and automated facial acne assessment, the app can be used in both cosmetic and clinical dermatology. It allows users to quantitatively self-measure acne severity and treatment efficacy on an ongoing basis to help them manage their chronic facial acne.

  10. Forensic Facial Reconstruction: The Final Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonia; Gupta, Vineeta; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Tyagi, Nutan

    2015-09-01

    Forensic facial reconstruction can be used to identify unknown human remains when other techniques fail. Through this article, we attempt to review the different methods of facial reconstruction reported in literature. There are several techniques of doing facial reconstruction, which vary from two dimensional drawings to three dimensional clay models. With the advancement in 3D technology, a rapid, efficient and cost effective computerized 3D forensic facial reconstruction method has been developed which has brought down the degree of error previously encountered. There are several methods of manual facial reconstruction but the combination Manchester method has been reported to be the best and most accurate method for the positive recognition of an individual. Recognition allows the involved government agencies to make a list of suspected victims'. This list can then be narrowed down and a positive identification may be given by the more conventional method of forensic medicine. Facial reconstruction allows visual identification by the individual's family and associates to become easy and more definite.

  11. Stability, occurence and step morphology of polymorphs and polytypes of stearic acid. II. Mono-lamella step morphology and composite polymorphic/polytypic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Kimio; Kobayashi, Masamichi; Okada, Masakazu; Sato, Kiyotaka

    1988-02-01

    Surface step morphology of three structural modifications of stearic acid, B(mon), B(orth II) and C(mon), was observed by replica method (TEM). The characteristic simple and interlaced patterns were observed for monoclinic and pseudo-orthorhombic polytypes, respectively. The observation on the C crystals which were transformed from B(orth II) or B(mon) enabled to detect two different modes of lattice displacement involved in composite polymorphic-polytypic transformations from B to C. B(mon) → C(mon) was found to be caused by a collective inclination of the molecules within the lamellar plane followed by the deformation of the subcell of the aliphatic chain, keeping the symmetry-axis unchanged. In contrast, B(orth II) → C(mon) occurs via an alternate rotation of the long-chain molecules in the adjacent lamellae around the c-axis of B(orth II) prototype, keeping the subcell arrangements unchanged. This means that the polytypic structure of a double-layer type was not preserved during the composite B(orth II) → C(mon) transformation. This peculiarity was discussed in terms of the interlamellar instability of a postulated double-layered polytype of the C polymorph.

  12. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  13. Asians' Facial Responsiveness to Basic Tastes by Automated Facial Expression Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Ruicong; Cao, Lianyu; Cao, Gang

    2017-03-01

    Growing evidence shows that consumer choices in real life are mostly driven by unconscious mechanisms rather than conscious. The unconscious process could be measured by behavioral measurements. This study aims to apply automatic facial expression analysis technique for consumers' emotion representation, and explore the relationships between sensory perception and facial responses. Basic taste solutions (sourness, sweetness, bitterness, umami, and saltiness) with 6 levels plus water were used, which could cover most of the tastes found in food and drink. The other contribution of this study is to analyze the characteristics of facial expressions and correlation between facial expressions and perceptive hedonic liking for Asian consumers. Up until now, the facial expression application researches only reported for western consumers, while few related researches investigated the facial responses during food consuming for Asian consumers. Experimental results indicated that facial expressions could identify different stimuli with various concentrations and different hedonic levels. The perceived liking increased at lower concentrations and decreased at higher concentrations, while samples with medium concentrations were perceived as the most pleasant except sweetness and bitterness. High correlations were founded between perceived intensities of bitterness, umami, saltiness, and facial reactions of disgust and fear. Facial expression disgust and anger could characterize emotion "dislike," and happiness could characterize emotion "like," while neutral could represent "neither like nor dislike." The identified facial expressions agree with the perceived sensory emotions elicited by basic taste solutions. The correlation analysis between hedonic levels and facial expression intensities obtained in this study are in accordance with that discussed for western consumers. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging in facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, R.D.; Dillon, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    GD-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging was used to evaluate 11 patients with facial nerve paralysis (five acute idiopathic facial palsy (Bell palsy), three chronic recurrent facial palsy, one acute facial palsy after local radiation therapy, one chronic facial dyskinesia, and one facial neuroma). In eight of 11 patients, there was marked enhancement of the infratemporal facial nerve from the labyrinthine segment to the stylomastoid foramen. Two patients had additional contrast enhancement in the internal auditory canal segment. In one patient, enhancement persisted (but to a lesser degree) 8 weeks after symptoms had resolved. In one patient, no enhancement was seen 15 months after resolution of Bell palsy. The facial neuroma was seen as a focal nodular enhancement in the mastoid segment of the facial nerve

  15. Facial appearance affects science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Ana I; Callan, Mitchell J; Skylark, William J

    2017-06-06

    First impressions based on facial appearance predict many important social outcomes. We investigated whether such impressions also influence the communication of scientific findings to lay audiences, a process that shapes public beliefs, opinion, and policy. First, we investigated the traits that engender interest in a scientist's work, and those that create the impression of a "good scientist" who does high-quality research. Apparent competence and morality were positively related to both interest and quality judgments, whereas attractiveness boosted interest but decreased perceived quality. Next, we had members of the public choose real science news stories to read or watch and found that people were more likely to choose items that were paired with "interesting-looking" scientists, especially when selecting video-based communications. Finally, we had people read real science news items and found that the research was judged to be of higher quality when paired with researchers who look like "good scientists." Our findings offer insights into the social psychology of science, and indicate a source of bias in the dissemination of scientific findings to broader society.

  16. Outcome of a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation in patients with facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtmann, Laura C; Eckstein, Anja; Stähr, Kerstin; Xing, Minzhi; Lang, Stephan; Mattheis, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral paralysis of the facial nerve is the most frequent of all cranial nerve disorders. Despite advances in facial surgery, the functional and aesthetic reconstruction of a paralyzed face remains a challenge. Graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation is based on a modular principle. According to the patients' needs, precondition, and expectations, the following modules can be performed: temporalis muscle transposition and facelift, nasal valve suspension, endoscopic brow lift, and eyelid reconstruction. Applying a concept of a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation may help minimize surgical trauma and reduce morbidity. Twenty patients underwent a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation. A retrospective chart review was performed with a follow-up examination between 1 and 8 months after surgery. The FACEgram software was used to calculate pre- and postoperative eyelid closure, the level of brows, nasal, and philtral symmetry as well as oral commissure position at rest and oral commissure excursion with smile. As a patient-oriented outcome parameter, the Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire was applied. There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative score of eyelid closure, brow asymmetry, nasal asymmetry, philtral asymmetry as well as oral commissure symmetry at rest (p facial nerve repair or microneurovascular tissue transfer cannot be applied, graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation is a promising option to restore facial function and symmetry at rest.

  17. [Descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis in treating unilateral facial palsy after acoustic neuroma resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiantao; Li, Mingchu; Chen, Ge; Guo, Hongchuan; Zhang, Qiuhang; Bao, Yuhai

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the efficiency of the descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis for the severe facial palsy after acoustic neuroma resection. The clinical data of 14 patients (6 males, 8 females, average age 45. 6 years old) underwent descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis for treatment of unilateral facial palsy was analyzed retrospectively. All patients previously had undergone resection of a large acoustic neuroma. House-Brackmann (H-B) grading system was used to evaluate the pre-, post-operative and follow up facial nerve function status. 12 cases (85.7%) had long follow up, with an average follow-up period of 24. 6 months. 6 patients had good outcome (H-B 2 - 3 grade); 5 patients had fair outcome (H-B 3 - 4 grade) and 1 patient had poor outcome (H-B 5 grade) Only 1 patient suffered hemitongue myoparalysis owing to the operation. Descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis is effective for facial reanimation, and it has little impact on the function of chewing, swallowing and pronunciation of the patients compared with the traditional hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis.

  18. Looking with different eyes: The psychological meaning of categorisation goals moderates facial reactivity to facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dillen, L.F.; Harris, L.T.; van Dijk, W.W.; Rotteveel, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present research we examined whether the psychological meaning of people's categorisation goals affects facial muscle activity in response to facial expressions of emotion. We had participants associate eye colour (blue, brown) with either a personality trait (extraversion) or a physical

  19. Case Report: A true median facial cleft (crano-facial dysraphia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: A true median facial cleft (crano-facial dysraphia, atessier type O) in Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos. ... Patient had a multidisciplinary care by the obstetrician, Neonatologist, anesthesiologist and the plastic surgery team who scheduled a soft tissue repair of the upper lip defect, columella and ...

  20. Facial nerve conduction after sclerotherapy in children with facial lymphatic malformations: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Lin, Jan-You; Chang, Yu-Tang

    2007-04-01

    Surgical excision is thought to be the standard treatment of choice for lymphatic malformations. However, when the lesions are limited to the face only, surgical scar and facial nerve injury may impair cosmetics and facial expression. Sclerotherapy, an injection of a sclerosing agent directly through the skin into a lesion, is an alternative method. By evaluating facial nerve conduction, we observed the long-term effect of facial lymphatic malformations after intralesional injection of OK-432 and correlated the findings with anatomic outcomes. One 12-year-old boy with a lesion over the right-side preauricular area adjacent to the main trunk of facial nerve and the other 5-year-old boy with a lesion in the left-sided cheek involving the buccinator muscle were enrolled. The follow-up data of more than one year, including clinical appearance, computed tomography (CT) scan and facial nerve evaluation were collected. The facial nerve conduction study was normal in both cases. Blink reflex in both children revealed normal results as well. Complete resolution was noted on outward appearance and CT scan. The neurophysiologic data were compatible with good anatomic and functional outcomes. Our report suggests that the inflammatory reaction of OK-432 did not interfere with adjacent facial nerve conduction.

  1. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetry of Facial Muscles in Healthy Patients with Facial Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Gerd F.; Karamyan, Inna; Klingner, Carsten M.; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not yet been established systematically to detect structural muscular changes after facial nerve lesion. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate quantitative assessment of MRI muscle volume data for facial muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with facial palsy were recruited. Using manual or semiautomatic segmentation of 3T MRI, volume measurements were performed for the frontal, procerus, risorius, corrugator supercilii, orbicularis oculi, nasalis, zygomaticus major, zygomaticus minor, levator labii superioris, orbicularis oris, depressor anguli oris, depressor labii inferioris, and mentalis, as well as for the masseter and temporalis as masticatory muscles for control. Results: All muscles except the frontal (identification in 4/10 volunteers), procerus (4/10), risorius (6/10), and zygomaticus minor (8/10) were identified in all volunteers. Sex or age effects were not seen (all P > 0.05). There was no facial asymmetry with exception of the zygomaticus major (larger on the left side; P = 0.012). The exploratory examination of 5 patients revealed considerably smaller muscle volumes on the palsy side 2 months after facial injury. One patient with chronic palsy showed substantial muscle volume decrease, which also occurred in another patient with incomplete chronic palsy restricted to the involved facial area. Facial nerve reconstruction led to mixed results of decreased but also increased muscle volumes on the palsy side compared with the healthy side. Conclusions: First systematic quantitative MRI volume measures of 5 different clinical presentations of facial paralysis are provided. PMID:25289366

  2. Restorative interventions for HIV facial lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Dianne; Liew, Steven; Emery, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Facial lipoatrophy is a common and distressing manifestation of HIV lipodystrophy. The changes in facial appearance can reduce quality of life, self esteem and antiretroviral adherence. Apart from the modest benefits of thymidine-based nucleoside analog cessation, there are no proven therapies for lipoatrophy. Management of established fat loss can be challenging as restoration of lost fat mass is extremely gradual. Plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures can restore lost facial volume. Both biodegradable and permanent filling agents have been investigated for HIV facial lipoatrophy. Biodegradable products offer a good safety profile, but maintenance of aesthetic benefits necessitates reinjection over time. Although permanent products offer longevity and lower treatment costs, adverse events should they occur can be serious and of long duration. Despite the substantial increase in options for soft-tissue augmentation in recent years, well-performed clinical studies in HIV-infected adults with facial lipoatrophy are scarce, and long-term clinical safety data are lacking. This review will summarize available efficacy and safety data of the biodegradable and permanent agents utilized for soft-tissue augmentation in this population. Difficulties associated with comparing treatment efficacy data, assessment of facial lipoatrophy presence and severity, and measurement of facial fat will be discussed. Available data indicate that in HIV-infected adults, most filling agents have short-term clinically safety, and can provide aesthetic improvement and improve well-being, social functioning and quality of life. However, well-designed studies with objectively assessed endpoints are needed to elucidate optimal treatments for this distressing condition.

  3. Quality of life assessment in facial palsy: validation of the Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiss, Ingrid J; Beurskens, Carien H G; Stalmeier, Peep F M; Ingels, Koen J A O; Marres, Henri A M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at validating an existing health-related quality of life questionnaire for patients with facial palsy for implementation in the Dutch language and culture. The Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale was translated into the Dutch language using a forward-backward translation method. A pilot test with the translated questionnaire was performed in 10 patients with facial palsy and 10 normal subjects. Finally, cross-cultural adaption was accomplished at our outpatient clinic for facial palsy. Analyses for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness were performed. Ninety-three patients completed the Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale, the Dutch Facial Disability Index, and the Dutch Short Form (36) Health Survey. Cronbach's α, representing internal consistency, was 0.800. Test-retest reliability was shown by an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.737. Correlations with the House-Brackmann score, Sunnybrook score, Facial Disability Index physical function, and social/well-being function were -0.292, 0.570, 0.713, and 0.575, respectively. The SF-36 domains correlate best with the FaCE social function domain, with the strongest correlation between the both social function domains (r = 0.576). The FaCE score did statistically significantly increase in 35 patients receiving botulinum toxin type A (P = 0.042, Student t test). The domains 'facial comfort' and 'social function' improved statistically significantly as well (P = 0.022 and P = 0.046, respectively, Student t-test). The Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale shows good psychometric values and can be implemented in the management of Dutch-speaking patients with facial palsy in the Netherlands. Translation of the instrument into other languages may lead to widespread use, making evaluation and comparison possible among different providers.

  4. The MPI facial expression database--a validated database of emotional and conversational facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kaulard

    Full Text Available The ability to communicate is one of the core aspects of human life. For this, we use not only verbal but also nonverbal signals of remarkable complexity. Among the latter, facial expressions belong to the most important information channels. Despite the large variety of facial expressions we use in daily life, research on facial expressions has so far mostly focused on the emotional aspect. Consequently, most databases of facial expressions available to the research community also include only emotional expressions, neglecting the largely unexplored aspect of conversational expressions. To fill this gap, we present the MPI facial expression database, which contains a large variety of natural emotional and conversational expressions. The database contains 55 different facial expressions performed by 19 German participants. Expressions were elicited with the help of a method-acting protocol, which guarantees both well-defined and natural facial expressions. The method-acting protocol was based on every-day scenarios, which are used to define the necessary context information for each expression. All facial expressions are available in three repetitions, in two intensities, as well as from three different camera angles. A detailed frame annotation is provided, from which a dynamic and a static version of the database have been created. In addition to describing the database in detail, we also present the results of an experiment with two conditions that serve to validate the context scenarios as well as the naturalness and recognizability of the video sequences. Our results provide clear evidence that conversational expressions can be recognized surprisingly well from visual information alone. The MPI facial expression database will enable researchers from different research fields (including the perceptual and cognitive sciences, but also affective computing, as well as computer vision to investigate the processing of a wider range of natural

  5. The MPI Facial Expression Database — A Validated Database of Emotional and Conversational Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulard, Kathrin; Cunningham, Douglas W.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Wallraven, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The ability to communicate is one of the core aspects of human life. For this, we use not only verbal but also nonverbal signals of remarkable complexity. Among the latter, facial expressions belong to the most important information channels. Despite the large variety of facial expressions we use in daily life, research on facial expressions has so far mostly focused on the emotional aspect. Consequently, most databases of facial expressions available to the research community also include only emotional expressions, neglecting the largely unexplored aspect of conversational expressions. To fill this gap, we present the MPI facial expression database, which contains a large variety of natural emotional and conversational expressions. The database contains 55 different facial expressions performed by 19 German participants. Expressions were elicited with the help of a method-acting protocol, which guarantees both well-defined and natural facial expressions. The method-acting protocol was based on every-day scenarios, which are used to define the necessary context information for each expression. All facial expressions are available in three repetitions, in two intensities, as well as from three different camera angles. A detailed frame annotation is provided, from which a dynamic and a static version of the database have been created. In addition to describing the database in detail, we also present the results of an experiment with two conditions that serve to validate the context scenarios as well as the naturalness and recognizability of the video sequences. Our results provide clear evidence that conversational expressions can be recognized surprisingly well from visual information alone. The MPI facial expression database will enable researchers from different research fields (including the perceptual and cognitive sciences, but also affective computing, as well as computer vision) to investigate the processing of a wider range of natural facial expressions

  6. Investigations on the formation of frost on lamella heat-exchangers used in heat pumps; LOREF: Luftkuehler-Optimierung mit Reduktion von Eis- und Frostbildung. Untersuchung der Frostbildung fuer Lamellenluftkuehler von Waermepumpen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahinagic, R.; Imholz, M.; Berlinger, L.; Huber, H.; Hilfiker, K. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Architektur (HTA) Lucerne, Institut fuer Produktentwicklung, Thermische Verfahren und Anlagen (TVA), Horw (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive final report presents the results of the LOREF project carried out at the University of Applied Science in Horw, Switzerland, on the formation of frost on lamella air-coolers used in heat pumps. The report presents the results of extensive tests on the formation of frost on the lamella of the heat exchangers used in air-water heat pumps. The mathematical relationships and the theory behind the formation of frost on cooled surfaces are discussed in detail. The results of numerical simulations and practical tests are presented. The practical tests involved the observation of ice and frost formation on various surface forms. The results of the physical tests and observations are quoted in detail. The mathematical modelling method used and the associated results are discussed. The report is rounded off with an appendix containing tables, diagrams and photos.

  7. A carapace-like bony 'body tube' in an early triassic marine reptile and the onset of marine tetrapod predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-hong; Motani, Ryosuke; Cheng, Long; Jiang, Da-yong; Rieppel, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Parahupehsuchus longus is a new species of marine reptile from the Lower Triassic of Yuan'an County, Hubei Province, China. It is unique among vertebrates for having a body wall that is completely surrounded by a bony tube, about 50 cm long and 6.5 cm deep, comprising overlapping ribs and gastralia. This tube and bony ossicles on the back are best interpreted as anti-predatory features, suggesting that there was predation pressure upon marine tetrapods in the Early Triassic. There is at least one sauropterygian that is sufficiently large to feed on Parahupehsuchus in the Nanzhang-Yuan'an fauna, together with six more species of potential prey marine reptiles with various degrees of body protection. Modern predators of marine tetrapods belong to the highest trophic levels in the marine ecosystem but such predators did not always exist through geologic time. The indication of marine-tetrapod feeding in the Nanzhang-Yuan'an fauna suggests that such a trophic level emerged for the first time in the Early Triassic. The recovery from the end-Permian extinction probably proceeded faster than traditionally thought for marine predators. Parahupehsuchus has superficially turtle-like features, namely expanded ribs without intercostal space, very short transverse processes, and a dorsal outgrowth from the neural spine. However, these features are structurally different from their turtle counterparts. Phylogeny suggests that they are convergent with the condition in turtles, which has a fundamentally different body plan that involves the folding of the body wall. Expanded ribs without intercostal space evolved at least twice and probably even more among reptiles.

  8. Taxonomic composition and trophic structure of the continental bony fish assemblage from the early late cretaceous of Southeastern Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, Lionel; Boudad, Larbi; Tong, Haiyan; Läng, Emilie; Tabouelle, Jérôme; Vullo, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The mid-Cretaceous vertebrate assemblage from south-eastern Morocco is one of the most diversified continental vertebrate assemblages of this time worldwide. The bony fish component (coelacanths, lungfishes and ray-finned fishes) is represented by relatively complete specimens and, mostly, by fragmentary elements scattered along 250 kilometres of outcrops. Here we revisit the bony fish assemblage by studying both isolated remains collected during several fieldtrips and more complete material kept in public collections. The assemblage comprises several lungfish taxa, with the first mention of the occurrence of Arganodus tiguidiensis, and possibly two mawsoniid coelacanths. A large bichir cf. Bawitius, is recorded and corresponds to cranial elements initially referred to 'Stromerichthys' from coeval deposits in Egypt. The ginglymodians were diversified with a large 'Lepidotes' plus two obaichthyids and a gar. We confirm here that this gar belongs to a genus distinctive from Recent gars, contrary to what was suggested recently. Teleosteans comprise a poorly known ichthyodectiform, a notopterid, a probable osteoglossomorph and a large tselfatiiform, whose cranial anatomy is detailed. The body size and trophic level for each taxon are estimated on the basis of comparison with extant closely related taxa. We plotted the average body size versus average trophic level for the Kem Kem assemblage, together with extant marine and freshwater assemblages. The Kem Kem assemblage is characterized by taxa of proportionally large body size, and by a higher average trophic level than the trophic level of the extant compared freshwater ecosystems, but lower than for the extant marine ecosystems. These results should be regarded with caution because they rest on a reconstructed assemblage known mostly by fragmentary remains. They reinforce, however, the ecological oddities already noticed for this mid-Cretaceous vertebrate ecosystem in North Africa.

  9. A carapace-like bony 'body tube' in an early triassic marine reptile and the onset of marine tetrapod predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hong Chen

    Full Text Available Parahupehsuchus longus is a new species of marine reptile from the Lower Triassic of Yuan'an County, Hubei Province, China. It is unique among vertebrates for having a body wall that is completely surrounded by a bony tube, about 50 cm long and 6.5 cm deep, comprising overlapping ribs and gastralia. This tube and bony ossicles on the back are best interpreted as anti-predatory features, suggesting that there was predation pressure upon marine tetrapods in the Early Triassic. There is at least one sauropterygian that is sufficiently large to feed on Parahupehsuchus in the Nanzhang-Yuan'an fauna, together with six more species of potential prey marine reptiles with various degrees of body protection. Modern predators of marine tetrapods belong to the highest trophic levels in the marine ecosystem but such predators did not always exist through geologic time. The indication of marine-tetrapod feeding in the Nanzhang-Yuan'an fauna suggests that such a trophic level emerged for the first time in the Early Triassic. The recovery from the end-Permian extinction probably proceeded faster than traditionally thought for marine predators. Parahupehsuchus has superficially turtle-like features, namely expanded ribs without intercostal space, very short transverse processes, and a dorsal outgrowth from the neural spine. However, these features are structurally different from their turtle counterparts. Phylogeny suggests that they are convergent with the condition in turtles, which has a fundamentally different body plan that involves the folding of the body wall. Expanded ribs without intercostal space evolved at least twice and probably even more among reptiles.

  10. Immunolocalization of keratin-associated beta-proteins (beta-keratins) in pad lamellae of geckos suggest that glycine-cysteine-rich proteins contribute to their flexibility and adhesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    The epidermis of digital pads in geckos comprises superficial microornamentation from the oberhautchen layer that form long setae allowing these lizards to climb vertical surfaces. The beta-layer is reduced in pad lamellae but persists up to the apical free margin. Setae are made of different proteins including keratin-associated beta-proteins, formerly indicated as beta-keratins. In order to identify specific setal proteins the present ultrastructural study on geckos pad lamellae analyzes the immunolocalization of three beta-proteins previously found in the epidermis and adhesive setae of the green anolis. A protein rich in glycine but poor in cysteine (HgG5-like) is absent or masked in gecko pad lamellae. Another protein rich in glycine and cysteine (HgGC3-like) is weakly present in setae, oberhautchen and beta-layer. A glycine and cysteine medium rich beta-protein (HgGC10-like) is present in the lower part of the beta-layer but is absent in the oberhautchen, setae, and mesos layer. The latter two proteins may form intermolecular bonds that contribute to the flexibility of the corneous material sustaining the setae. The pliable alpha-layer present beneath the thin beta-layer and in the hinge region of the pad lamellae also contains HgGC10-like proteins. Based on the possibility that some HgGC3-like or other cys-rich beta-proteins are charged in the setae it is suggested that their charges influence the mechanism of adhesion increasing the induction of dipoles on the substrate and enhancing attractive van der Waals forces. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Photometric analysis applied in determining facial type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Flaquer Martins

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In orthodontics, determining the facial type is a key element in the prescription of a correct diagnosis. In the early days of our specialty, observation and measurement of craniofacial structures were done directly on the face, in photographs or plaster casts. With the development of radiographic methods, cephalometric analysis replaced the direct facial analysis. Seeking to validate the analysis of facial soft tissues, this work compares two different methods used to determining the facial types, the anthropometric and the cephalometric methods. METHODS: The sample consisted of sixty-four Brazilian individuals, adults, Caucasian, of both genders, who agreed to participate in this research. All individuals had lateral cephalograms and facial frontal photographs. The facial types were determined by the Vert Index (cephalometric and the Facial Index (photographs. RESULTS: The agreement analysis (Kappa, made for both types of analysis, found an agreement of 76.5%. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the Facial Index can be used as an adjunct to orthodontic diagnosis, or as an alternative method for pre-selection of a sample, avoiding that research subjects have to undergo unnecessary tests.INTRODUÇÃO: em Ortodontia, a determinação do tipo facial é um elemento-chave na prescrição de um diagnóstico correto. Nos primórdios de nossa especialidade, a observação e a medição das estruturas craniofaciais eram feitas diretamente na face, em fotografias ou em modelos de gesso. Com o desenvolvimento dos métodos radiográficos, a análise cefalométrica foi substituindo a análise facial direta. Visando legitimar o estudo dos tecidos moles faciais, esse trabalho comparou a determinação do tipo facial pelos métodos antropométrico e cefalométrico. MÉTODOS: a amostra constou de sessenta e quatro indivíduos brasileiros, adultos, leucodermas, de ambos os sexos, que aceitaram participar da pesquisa. De todos os indivíduos da amostra

  12. Should physicians have facial piercings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Alison W; Wright, Seth W; Wrenn, Keith D; Bernard, Aline

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of patrons and medical school faculty about physicians with nontraditional facial piercings. We also examined whether a piercing affected the perceived competency and trustworthiness of physicians. Survey. Teaching hospital in the southeastern United States. Emergency department patrons and medical school faculty physicians. First, patrons were shown photographs of models with a nontraditional piercing and asked about the appropriateness for a physician or medical student. In the second phase, patrons blinded to the purpose of the study were shown identical photographs of physician models with or without piercings and asked about competency and trustworthiness. The third phase was an assessment of attitudes of faculty regarding piercings. Nose and lip piercings were felt to be appropriate for a physician by 24% and 22% of patrons, respectively. Perceived competency and trustworthiness of models with these types of piercings were also negatively affected. An earring in a male was felt to be appropriate by 35% of patrons, but an earring on male models did not negatively affect perceived competency or trustworthiness. Nose and eyebrow piercings were felt to be appropriate by only 7% and 5% of faculty physicians and working with a physician or student with a nose or eyebrow piercing would bother 58% and 59% of faculty, respectively. An ear piercing in a male was felt to be appropriate by 20% of faculty, and 25% stated it would bother them to work with a male physician or student with an ear piercing. Many patrons and physicians feel that some types of nontraditional piercings are inappropriate attire for physicians, and some piercings negatively affect perceived competency and trustworthiness. Health care providers should understand that attire may affect a patient's opinion about their abilities and possibly erode confidence in them as a clinician.

  13. Fusiform Correlates of Facial Memory in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lange

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies have shown that performance on standardized measures of memory in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD is substantially reduced in comparison to matched typically developing controls (TDC. Given reported deficits in face processing in autism, the current study compared performance on an immediate and delayed facial memory task for individuals with ASD and TDC. In addition, we examined volumetric differences in classic facial memory regions of interest (ROI between the two groups, including the fusiform, amygdala, and hippocampus. We then explored the relationship between ROI volume and facial memory performance. We found larger volumes in the autism group in the left amygdala and left hippocampus compared to TDC. In contrast, TDC had larger left fusiform gyrus volumes when compared with ASD. Interestingly, we also found significant negative correlations between delayed facial memory performance and volume of the left and right fusiform and the left hippocampus for the ASD group but not for TDC. The possibility of larger fusiform volume as a marker of abnormal connectivity and decreased facial memory is discussed.

  14. Temporal distribution of alcohol related facial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai H; Qiu, Michael; Sun, Jiandong

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to address 2 important aspects of temporal pattern in alcohol-related facial fractures: (1) comparison of temporal pattern of alcohol-related facial fracture (alcohol group) presentation with non-alcohol-related fracture (non-alcohol group) presentation; (2) temporal pattern of patient demographic characteristics, injury characteristics, and surgical management in the alcohol group presentation. This study retrospectively examined the Victorian admitted episodes data set (VAED) for the years 2010 to 2013. VAED is a standardized set of data collected during all hospital presentations in Victoria. The study found higher incidence of alcohol-related facial fracture presentations during weekends and during the summer and spring months compared with non-alcohol-related fractures (statistically significant). Alcohol-related facial fractures are more likely to involve male patients in the 20- to 29-year age group, occur as a result of interpersonal violence, and require shorter hospital stays during weekend admissions (statistically significant). No statistically significant relationship has been observed in seasonal variation across all variables. This study found distinct characteristics in temporal distribution of alcohol-related facial fractures. These characteristics are, in particular, significant in weekend trauma admissions. Such information is important in workforce planning, resource distribution, and implementation of injury prevention programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Unsupervised learning of facial emotion decoding skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Oliver Huelle

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on the mechanisms underlying human facial emotion recognition has long focussed on genetically determined neural algorithms and often neglected the question of how these algorithms might be tuned by social learning. Here we show that facial emotion decoding skills can be significantly and sustainably improved by practise without an external teaching signal. Participants saw video clips of dynamic facial expressions of five different women and were asked to decide which of four possible emotions (anger, disgust, fear and sadness was shown in each clip. Although no external information about the correctness of the participant’s response or the sender’s true affective state was provided, participants showed a significant increase of facial emotion recognition accuracy both within and across two training sessions two days to several weeks apart. We discuss several similarities and differences between the unsupervised improvement of facial decoding skills observed in the current study, unsupervised perceptual learning of simple stimuli described in previous studies and practise effects often observed in cognitive tasks.

  16. Unsupervised learning of facial emotion decoding skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelle, Jan O; Sack, Benjamin; Broer, Katja; Komlewa, Irina; Anders, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Research on the mechanisms underlying human facial emotion recognition has long focussed on genetically determined neural algorithms and often neglected the question of how these algorithms might be tuned by social learning. Here we show that facial emotion decoding skills can be significantly and sustainably improved by practice without an external teaching signal. Participants saw video clips of dynamic facial expressions of five different women and were asked to decide which of four possible emotions (anger, disgust, fear, and sadness) was shown in each clip. Although no external information about the correctness of the participant's response or the sender's true affective state was provided, participants showed a significant increase of facial emotion recognition accuracy both within and across two training sessions two days to several weeks apart. We discuss several similarities and differences between the unsupervised improvement of facial decoding skills observed in the current study, unsupervised perceptual learning of simple stimuli described in previous studies and practice effects often observed in cognitive tasks.

  17. Clinical outcomes of facial transplantation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugarajah, Kumaran; Hettiaratchy, Shehan; Clarke, Alex; Butler, Peter E M

    2011-01-01

    A total of 18 composite tissue allotransplants of the face have currently been reported. Prior to the start of the face transplant programme, there had been intense debate over the risks and benefits of performing this experimental surgery. This review examines the surgical, functional and aesthetic, immunological and psychological outcomes of facial transplantation thus far, based on the predicted risks outlined in early publications from teams around the world. The initial experience has demonstrated that facial transplantation is surgically feasible. Functional and aesthetic outcomes have been very encouraging with good motor and sensory recovery and improvements to important facial functions observed. Episodes of acute rejection have been common, as predicted, but easily controlled with increases in systemic immunosuppression. Psychological improvements have been remarkable and have resulted in the reintegration of patients into the outside world, social networks and even the workplace. Complications of immunosuppression and patient mortality have been observed in the initial series. These have highlighted rigorous patient selection as the key predictor of success. The overall early outcomes of the face transplant programme have been generally more positive than many predicted. This initial success is testament to the robust approach of teams. Dissemination of outcomes and ongoing refinement of the process may allow facial transplantation to eventually become a first-line reconstructive option for those with extensive facial disfigurements. Copyright © 2011 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sad Facial Expressions Increase Choice Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have discovered a fascinating phenomenon known as choice blindness—individuals fail to detect mismatches between the face they choose and the face replaced by the experimenter. Although previous studies have reported a couple of factors that can modulate the magnitude of choice blindness, the potential effect of facial expression on choice blindness has not yet been explored. Using faces with sad and neutral expressions (Experiment 1 and faces with happy and neutral expressions (Experiment 2 in the classic choice blindness paradigm, the present study investigated the effects of facial expressions on choice blindness. The results showed that the detection rate was significantly lower on sad faces than neutral faces, whereas no significant difference was observed between happy faces and neutral faces. The exploratory analysis of verbal reports found that participants who reported less facial features for sad (as compared to neutral expressions also tended to show a lower detection rate of sad (as compared to neutral faces. These findings indicated that sad facial expressions increased choice blindness, which might have resulted from inhibition of further processing of the detailed facial features by the less attractive sad expressions (as compared to neutral expressions.

  19. Sad Facial Expressions Increase Choice Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Zhao, Song; Zhang, Zhijie; Feng, Wenfeng

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have discovered a fascinating phenomenon known as choice blindness-individuals fail to detect mismatches between the face they choose and the face replaced by the experimenter. Although previous studies have reported a couple of factors that can modulate the magnitude of choice blindness, the potential effect of facial expression on choice blindness has not yet been explored. Using faces with sad and neutral expressions (Experiment 1) and faces with happy and neutral expressions (Experiment 2) in the classic choice blindness paradigm, the present study investigated the effects of facial expressions on choice blindness. The results showed that the detection rate was significantly lower on sad faces than neutral faces, whereas no significant difference was observed between happy faces and neutral faces. The exploratory analysis of verbal reports found that participants who reported less facial features for sad (as compared to neutral) expressions also tended to show a lower detection rate of sad (as compared to neutral) faces. These findings indicated that sad facial expressions increased choice blindness, which might have resulted from inhibition of further processing of the detailed facial features by the less attractive sad expressions (as compared to neutral expressions).

  20. Stability of Facial Affective Expressions in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fatouros-Bergman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-two videorecorded interviews were conducted by two interviewers with eight patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Each patient was interviewed four times: three weekly interviews by the first interviewer and one additional interview by the second interviewer. 64 selected sequences where the patients were speaking about psychotic experiences were scored for facial affective behaviour with Emotion Facial Action Coding System (EMFACS. In accordance with previous research, the results show that patients diagnosed with schizophrenia express negative facial affectivity. Facial affective behaviour seems not to be dependent on temporality, since within-subjects ANOVA revealed no substantial changes in the amount of affects displayed across the weekly interview occasions. Whereas previous findings found contempt to be the most frequent affect in patients, in the present material disgust was as common, but depended on the interviewer. The results suggest that facial affectivity in these patients is primarily dominated by the negative emotions of disgust and, to a lesser extent, contempt and implies that this seems to be a fairly stable feature.

  1. Mothers' pupillary responses to infant facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrttiaho, Santeri; Niehaus, Dana; Thomas, Eileen; Leppänen, Jukka M

    2017-02-06

    Human parental care relies heavily on the ability to monitor and respond to a child's affective states. The current study examined pupil diameter as a potential physiological index of mothers' affective response to infant facial expressions. Pupillary time-series were measured from 86 mothers of young infants in response to an array of photographic infant faces falling into four emotive categories based on valence (positive vs. negative) and arousal (mild vs. strong). Pupil dilation was highly sensitive to the valence of facial expressions, being larger for negative vs. positive facial expressions. A separate control experiment with luminance-matched non-face stimuli indicated that the valence effect was specific to facial expressions and cannot be explained by luminance confounds. Pupil response was not sensitive to the arousal level of facial expressions. The results show the feasibility of using pupil diameter as a marker of mothers' affective responses to ecologically valid infant stimuli and point to a particularly prompt maternal response to infant distress cues.

  2. Analysis of Age-Related Changes in Asian Facial Skeletons Using 3D Vector Mathematics on Picture Archiving and Communication System Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, So Jung; Park, Jee Soo; Byun, Sung Wan; Bae, Jung Ho

    2015-09-01

    There are marked differences in facial skeletal characteristics between Asian and Caucasian. However, ethnic differences in age-related facial skeletal changes have not yet been fully established. The aims of this study were to evaluate age-related changes in Asian midfacial skeletons and to explore ethnic differences in facial skeletal structures with aging between Caucasian and Asian. The study included 108 men (aged 20-79 years) and 115 women (aged 20-81 years). Axial CT images with a gantry tilt angle of 0 were analyzed. We measured three-dimensional (3D) coordinates at each point with a pixel lens cursor in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS), and angles and widths between the points were calculated using 3D vector mathematics. We analyzed angular changes in 4 bony regions, including the glabellar, orbital, maxillary, and pyriform aperture regions, and changes in the orbital aperture width (distance from the posterior lacrimal crest to the frontozygomatic suture) and the pyriform width (between both upper margins of the pyriform aperture). All 4 midfacial angles in females and glabellar and maxillary angles in males showed statistically significant decreases with aging. On the other hand, the orbital and pyriform widths did not show statistically significant changes with aging. The results of this study suggest that Asian midfacial skeletons may change continuously throughout life, and that there may be significant differences in the midfacial skeleton between both sexes and between ethnic groups.

  3. An analysis of facial nerve function in irradiated and unirradiated facial nerve grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul D.; Eshleman, Jeffrey S.; Foote, Robert L.; Strome, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of high-dose radiation therapy on facial nerve grafts is controversial. Some authors believe radiotherapy is so detrimental to the outcome of facial nerve graft function that dynamic or static slings should be performed instead of facial nerve grafts in all patients who are to receive postoperative radiation therapy. Unfortunately, the facial function achieved with dynamic and static slings is almost always inferior to that after facial nerve grafts. In this retrospective study, we compared facial nerve function in irradiated and unirradiated nerve grafts. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 818 patients with neoplasms involving the parotid gland who received treatment between 1974 and 1997 were reviewed, of whom 66 underwent facial nerve grafting. Fourteen patients who died or had a recurrence less than a year after their facial nerve graft were excluded. The median follow-up for the remaining 52 patients was 10.6 years. Cable nerve grafts were performed in 50 patients and direct anastomoses of the facial nerve in two. Facial nerve function was scored by means of the House-Brackmann (H-B) facial grading system. Twenty-eight of the 52 patients received postoperative radiotherapy. The median time from nerve grafting to start of radiotherapy was 5.1 weeks. The median and mean doses of radiation were 6000 and 6033 cGy, respectively, for the irradiated grafts. One patient received preoperative radiotherapy to a total dose of 5000 cGy in 25 fractions and underwent surgery 1 month after the completion of radiotherapy. This patient was placed, by convention, in the irradiated facial nerve graft cohort. Results: Potential prognostic factors for facial nerve function such as age, gender, extent of surgery at the time of nerve grafting, preoperative facial nerve palsy, duration of preoperative palsy if present, or number of previous operations in the parotid bed were relatively well balanced between irradiated and unirradiated patients. However

  4. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The face is not an empty canvas: how facial expressions interact with facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ursula; Adams, Reginald B; Kleck, Robert E

    2009-12-12

    Faces are not simply blank canvases upon which facial expressions write their emotional messages. In fact, facial appearance and facial movement are both important social signalling systems in their own right. We here provide multiple lines of evidence for the notion that the social signals derived from facial appearance on the one hand and facial movement on the other interact in a complex manner, sometimes reinforcing and sometimes contradicting one another. Faces provide information on who a person is. Sex, age, ethnicity, personality and other characteristics that can define a person and the social group the person belongs to can all be derived from the face alone. The present article argues that faces interact with the perception of emotion expressions because this information informs a decoder's expectations regarding an expresser's probable emotional reactions. Facial appearance also interacts more directly with the interpretation of facial movement because some of the features that are used to derive personality or sex information are also features that closely resemble certain emotional expressions, thereby enhancing or diluting the perceived strength of particular expressions.

  6. Facial duplication: case, review, and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, M

    1982-04-01

    The craniofacial anatomy of an infant with facial duplication is described. There were four eyes, two noses, two maxillae, and one mandible. Anterior to the single pituitary the brain was duplicated and there was bilateral arhinencephaly. Portions of the brain were extruded into a large frontal encephalocele. Cases of symmetrical facial duplication reported in the literature range from two complete faces on a single head (diprosopus) to simple nasal duplication. The variety of patterns of duplication suggests that the doubling of facial components arises in several different ways: Forking of the notochord, duplication of the prosencephalon, duplication of the olfactory placodes, and duplication of maxillary and/or mandibular growth centers around the margins of the stomatodeal plate. Among reported cases, the female:male ratio is 2:1.

  7. The history of facial palsy and spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M.; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Although Sir Charles Bell was the first to provide the anatomic basis for the condition that bears his name, in recent years researchers have shown that other European physicians provided earlier clinical descriptions of peripheral cranial nerve 7 palsy. In this article, we describe the history of facial distortion by Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians, culminating in Razi's detailed description in al-Hawi. Razi distinguished facial muscle spasm from paralysis, distinguished central from peripheral lesions, gave the earliest description of loss of forehead wrinkling, and gave the earliest known description of bilateral facial palsy. In doing so, he accurately described the clinical hallmarks of a condition that we recognize as Bell palsy. PMID:21747074

  8. The history of injectable facial fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontis, Theda C; Rivkin, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    In an attempt to maintain a youthful appearance or to reconstruct facial deformities, physicians have greeted new technologies with excitement. In the late 1800 s, shortly after the invention of the syringe, chemical agents were used for facial augmentation. Unfortunately, history has taught us that new technologies must be used with care, because complications can occur, sometimes many years after initial treatment. The first injectable filling agent was paraffin, whose use was abandoned after complications of migration, embolization, and granuloma formation were described. More recently, silicone use was banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because of similar complications. In 1981, bovine collagen was the first agent to be approved by the FDA for cosmetic injection. Since its approval, dozens of injectable filling agents have been developed, and many are already FDA approved for cosmetic use. This article will review the highlights of the evolution of facial filling agents.

  9. Granuloma Faciale Treatment: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lindhaus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Granuloma faciale is an uncommon benign chronic dermatosis characterized by reddish-brown to violaceous asymptomatic plaques appearing predominantly on the face. The pathogenesis of granuloma faciale remains unclear, and it is frequently unresponsive to therapy. This systematic review aims to summarize all recent publications on the management of granuloma faciale. The publications are mainly individual case reports, small case series and a few retrospective studies. Treatment options included topical, intralesional and systemic corticosteroids, topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, topical and systemic dapsone, systemic hydroxychloroquine, clofazimine, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. More invasive therapies using lasers as well as cryosurgery and surgery were also reported. Topical glucocorticosteroids and tacrolimus remain treatments of first choice, possibly supplemented by topical dapsone.

  10. Unilateral facial pain and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Stevens, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Facial pain in lung cancer patients may be secondary to metastatic disease to the brain or skull base. Since 1983 there have been 19 published reports of hemi-facial pain as a non-metastatic complication of lung carcinoma. This report describes an additional case in whom unilateral face pain preceded the diagnosis of lung cancer by 9 months. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made after a normal brain CT scan. Later on the patient complained of global lethargy, weight loss and haemoptysis. A chest X-ray disclosed a 6 cm right hilar mass that was further defined with a whole body CT scan. The neural mechanism of the unilateral facial pain is discussed and the literature reviewed. 14 refs., 1 tab

  11. Unilateral facial pain and lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Stevens, M.J. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia)

    1996-02-01

    Facial pain in lung cancer patients may be secondary to metastatic disease to the brain or skull base. Since 1983 there have been 19 published reports of hemi-facial pain as a non-metastatic complication of lung carcinoma. This report describes an additional case in whom unilateral face pain preceded the diagnosis of lung cancer by 9 months. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made after a normal brain CT scan. Later on the patient complained of global lethargy, weight loss and haemoptysis. A chest X-ray disclosed a 6 cm right hilar mass that was further defined with a whole body CT scan. The neural mechanism of the unilateral facial pain is discussed and the literature reviewed. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: oral-facial-digital syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related conditions that affect the development of the oral cavity (the mouth and teeth), facial features, and digits ( ... this disorder involve problems with development of the oral cavity , facial features, and digits. Most forms are also ...

  13. Environmental exogenous factors and facial dermatitis: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hui Wang

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Contact factors play an important role in facial dermatitis. Aggravation by sunlight exposure, ingestion of spicy food, or alcohol are more reported in facial dermatitis compared with nonfacial dermatitis.

  14. Exacerbation of Facial Motoneuron Loss after Facial Nerve Axotomy in CCR3-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3–/– mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2 –/– (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3–/– mice, but not in CCR3–/– mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  15. Trisomy 21 and facial developmental instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Cole, Theodore M; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2013-05-01

    The most common live-born human aneuploidy is trisomy 21, which causes Down syndrome (DS). Dosage imbalance of genes on chromosome 21 (Hsa21) affects complex gene-regulatory interactions and alters development to produce a wide range of phenotypes, including characteristic facial dysmorphology. Little is known about how trisomy 21 alters craniofacial morphogenesis to create this characteristic appearance. Proponents of the "amplified developmental instability" hypothesis argue that trisomy 21 causes a generalized genetic imbalance that disrupts evolutionarily conserved developmental pathways by decreasing developmental homeostasis and precision throughout development. Based on this model, we test the hypothesis that DS faces exhibit increased developmental instability relative to euploid individuals. Developmental instability was assessed by a statistical analysis of fluctuating asymmetry. We compared the magnitude and patterns of fluctuating asymmetry among siblings using three-dimensional coordinate locations of 20 anatomic landmarks collected from facial surface reconstructions in four age-matched samples ranging from 4 to 12 years: (1) DS individuals (n = 55); (2) biological siblings of DS individuals (n = 55); 3) and 4) two samples of typically developing individuals (n = 55 for each sample), who are euploid siblings and age-matched to the DS individuals and their euploid siblings (samples 1 and 2). Identification in the DS sample of facial prominences exhibiting increased fluctuating asymmetry during facial morphogenesis provides evidence for increased developmental instability in DS faces. We found the highest developmental instability in facial structures derived from the mandibular prominence and lowest in facial regions derived from the frontal prominence. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Anomalous facial nerve canal with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, L V; Curtin, H D

    2001-05-01

    Anteromedial "migration" of the first segment of the facial nerve canal has been previously identified in a patient with a non-Mondini-type cochlear malformation. In this study, several patients with the same facial nerve canal anomaly were reviewed to assess for the association and type of cochlear malformation. CT scans of the temporal bone of 15 patients with anteromedial migration of the first segment of the facial nerve canal were collected from routine departmental examinations. In seven patients, the anomalous course was bilateral, for a total of 22 cases. The migration was graded relative to normal as either mild/moderate or pronounced. The cochlea in each of these cases was examined for the presence and size of the basilar, second, and apical turns. The turns were either absent, small, normal, or enlarged. The CT scans of five patients with eight Mondini malformations were examined for comparison. The degree of the facial nerve migration was pronounced in nine cases and mild/moderate in 13. All 22 of these cases had associated cochlear abnormalities of the non-Mondini variety. These included common cavity anomalies with lack of definition between the cochlea and vestibule (five cases), cochleae with enlarged basilar turns and absent second or third turns (five cases), and cochleae with small or normal basilar turns with small or absent second or third turns (12 cases). None of the patients with Mondini-type cochlear malformations had anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal. Anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal occurs in association with some cochlear malformations. It did not occur in association with the Mondini malformations. A cochlea with a Mondini malformation, being similar in size to a normal cochlea, may physically prohibit such a deviation in course.

  17. Facial Nerve Trauma: Evaluation and Considerations in Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gordin, Eli; Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Arnaoutakis, Demetri

    2014-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis continues to evolve. Understanding the facial nerve anatomy and the different methods of evaluating the degree of facial nerve injury are crucial for successful management. When the facial nerve is transected, direct coaptation leads to the best outcome, followed by interpositional nerve grafting. In cases where motor end plates are still intact but a primary repair or graft is not feasible, a nerve transfer should be employed. When complete muscle atrophy h...

  18. Automatic Generation of Facial Expression Using Triangular Geometric Deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Shing Sheu; Tsu-Shien Hsieh; Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an image deformation algorithm and constructs an automatic facial expression generation system to generate new facial expressions in neutral state. After the users input the face image in a neutral state into the system, the system separates the possible facial areas and the image background by skin color segmentation. It then uses the morphological operation to remove noise and to capture the organs of facial expression, such as the eyes, mouth, eyebrow, and nose. The fea...

  19. Estimador de calidad en sistemas de reconocimiento facial

    OpenAIRE

    Espejo Caballero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    El fin de este proyecto es conseguir obtener una estimación de la calidad de una imagen facial, a partir del estudio y extracción de características obtenidas, a partir de las imágenes faciales. The goal of this project is get a quality estimation of a facial image, using the extraction and learning of the differents features that we can extract from a facial image.

  20. Advances in face detection and facial image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Celebi, M; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in face detection and analysis. It outlines new research directions, including in particular psychology-based facial dynamics recognition, aimed at various applications such as behavior analysis, deception detection, and diagnosis of various psychological disorders. Topics of interest include face and facial landmark detection, face recognition, facial expression and emotion analysis, facial dynamics analysis, face classification, identification, and clustering, and gaze direction and head pose estimation, as well as applications of face analysis.

  1. Posterior fossa gangliocytoma with facial nerve invasion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koerbel Andrei

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5 year-old boy with a cerebellar gangliocytoma with a peripheral right facial paresis and ataxia is presented. His MRI showed a heterogenous, diffuse lesion, isointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2-weigthed sequences, involving the right cerebellar hemisphere with direct extension into the right facial nerve. The present case is the first description of a gangliocytoma with direct facial nerve invasion, as demonstrated for the facial nerve paresis and supported by MRI and surgical inspection.

  2. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of the Cerebellopontine Angle: A Diagnostic Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Lassaletta, Luis; Roda, José María; Frutos, Remedios; Patrón, Mercedes; Gavilán, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas are rare lesions that may involve any segment of the facial nerve. Because of their rarity and the lack of a consistent clinical and radiological pattern, facial nerve schwannomas located at the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. In this report, a case of a CPA/IAC facial nerve schwannoma is presented. Contemporary diagnosis and management of this rare lesion are analyzed.

  3. Idiopathic facial pain related with dental implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Geon Kwon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain after dental implantation is rare but difficult issue for the implant practitioner. Patients with chronic pain who had been performed previous implant surgery or related surgical intervention sometimes accompany with psychological problem and difficult to adequately manage. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD 3rd eds, Cepalagia 2013, painful neuropathies and other facial pains are subdivided into the 12 subcategories; 13.1. Trigeminal neuralgia; 13.2 Glossopharyngeal neuralgia; 13.3 Nervus intermedius (facial nerve neuralgia; 13.4 Occipital neuralgia; 13.5 Optic neuritis; 13.6 Headache attributed to ischaemic ocular motor nerve palsy; 13.7 Tolosa-Hunt syndrome; 13.8 Paratrigeminal oculo-sympathetic (Raeder’s syndrome; 13.9 Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; 13.10 Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS; 13.11 Persistent Idiopathic Facial Pain (PIFP; 13.12 Central neuropathic pain. Chronic orofacial pain after dental implant surgery can be largely into the two main categories that can be frequently encountered in clinical basis ; 1 Neuropathic pain, 2 Idiopathic pain. If there is no direct evidence of the nerve injury related with the implant surgery, the clinician need to consider the central cause of pain instead of the peripheral cause of the pain. There might be several possibilities; 1 Anaesthesia dolorosa, 2 Central post-stroke pain, 3 Facial pain attributed to multiple sclerosis, 4 Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP, 5 Burning mouth syndrome. In this presentation, Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP, the disease entity that can be frequently encountered in the clinic would be discussed. Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP can be defined as “persistent facial and/or oral pain, with varying presentations but recurring daily for more than 2 hours per day over more than 3 months, in the absence of clinical neurological deficit”. ‘Atypical’ pain is a diagnosis of

  4. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  5. Violent Media Consumption and the Recognition of Dynamic Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsh, Steven J.; Mounts, Jeffrey R. W.; Olczak, Paul V.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the speed of recognition of facial emotional expressions (happy and angry) as a function of violent media consumption. Color photos of calm facial expressions morphed to either an angry or a happy facial expression. Participants were asked to make a speeded identification of the emotion (happiness or anger) during the morph.…

  6. Intratemporal Facial Nerve Paralysis- A Three Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Ghosh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study on intratemporal facial paralysis is an attempt to understand the aetiology of facial nerve paralysis, effect of different management protocols and the outcome after long-term follow-up. Materials and Methods A prospective longitudinal study was conducted from September 2005 to August 2008 at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of a medical college in Kolkata comprising 50 patients of intratemporal facial palsy. All cases were periodically followed up for at least 6 months and their prognostic outcome along with different treatment options were analyzed. Result Among different causes of facial palsy, Bell’s palsy is the commonest cause; whereas cholesteatoma and granulation were common findings in otogenic facial palsy. Traumatic facial palsies were exclusively due to longitudinal fracture of temporal bone running through geniculate ganglion. Herpes zoster oticus and neoplasia related facial palsies had significantly poorer outcome. Discussion Otogenic facial palsy showed excellent outcome after mastoid exploration and facial decompression. Transcanal decompression was performed in traumatic facial palsies showing inadequate recovery. Complete removal of cholesteatoma over dehiscent facial nerve gave better postoperative recovery. Conclusion The stapedial reflex test is the most objective and reproducible of all topodiagnostic tests. Return of the stapedial reflex within 3 weeks of injury indicates good prognosis. Bell’s palsy responded well to conservative measures. All traumatic facial palsies were due to longitudinal fracture and 2/3rd of these patients showed favourable outcome with medical therapy.

  7. Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Basir Hashemi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra parotid facial nerve schowannoma is a rare tumor. Case report: In this article we presented two cases of intra parotid facial nerve schowannoma. In two cases tumor presented with asymptomatic parotid mass that mimic pleomorphic adenoma. No preoperative facial nerve dysfunction in cases is detected. Diagnostic result and surgical management are discussed in this paper.  

  8. Contralateral reinnervation of midline muscles in nonidiopathic facial palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Beurskens, C.H.G.; Vries, J. de; Marres, H.A.M.; Hartman, E.H.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze contralateral reinnervation of the facial nerve in eight patients with complete facial palsy after surgery or trauma and seven healthy volunteers. All patients had contralateral reinnervation of facial muscles as demonstrated by electrical nerve stimulation

  9. A small-world network model of facial emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Takuma; Ochiai, Fumio; Suzuki, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Various models have been proposed to increase understanding of the cognitive basis of facial emotions. Despite those efforts, interactions between facial emotions have received minimal attention. If collective behaviours relating to each facial emotion in the comprehensive cognitive system could be assumed, specific facial emotion relationship patterns might emerge. In this study, we demonstrate that the frameworks of complex networks can effectively capture those patterns. We generate 81 facial emotion images (6 prototypes and 75 morphs) and then ask participants to rate degrees of similarity in 3240 facial emotion pairs in a paired comparison task. A facial emotion network constructed on the basis of similarity clearly forms a small-world network, which features an extremely short average network distance and close connectivity. Further, even if two facial emotions have opposing valences, they are connected within only two steps. In addition, we show that intermediary morphs are crucial for maintaining full network integration, whereas prototypes are not at all important. These results suggest the existence of collective behaviours in the cognitive systems of facial emotions and also describe why people can efficiently recognize facial emotions in terms of information transmission and propagation. For comparison, we construct three simulated networks--one based on the categorical model, one based on the dimensional model, and one random network. The results reveal that small-world connectivity in facial emotion networks is apparently different from those networks, suggesting that a small-world network is the most suitable model for capturing the cognitive basis of facial emotions.

  10. Facial soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment | Aksakalli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To successfully meet expectations on facial esthetics, it is important to understand normal craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment thereon. To date, there have been few studies documenting changes in facial esthetics through photography. The objective of this study was to compare facial soft ...

  11. A neuroendocrine account of facial mimicry and its dynamic modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenvanger, Eline J.; Hofman, Dennis; Bos, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are considered central in conveying information about one's emotional state. During social encounters, facial expressions of another individual are often automatically imitated by the observer, a process referred to as ‘facial mimicry’. This process is assumed to facilitate

  12. Fully Automatic Recognition of the Temporal Phases of Facial Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valstar, M.F.; Pantic, Maja

    Past work on automatic analysis of facial expressions has focused mostly on detecting prototypic expressions of basic emotions like happiness and anger. The method proposed here enables the detection of a much larger range of facial behavior by recognizing facial muscle actions [action units (AUs)

  13. Decoding Facial Expressions: A New Test with Decoding Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Dale G.; Emigh, Ted H.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the development and testing of a new facial meaning sensitivity test designed to determine how specialized are the meanings that can be decoded from facial expressions. Demonstrates the use of the test to measure a receiver's current level of skill in decoding facial expressions. (JMF)

  14. Meta-Analysis of the First Facial Expression Recognition Challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valstar, M.F.; Mehu, M.; Jiang, Bihan; Pantic, Maja; Scherer, K.

    Automatic facial expression recognition has been an active topic in computer science for over two decades, in particular facial action coding system action unit (AU) detection and classification of a number of discrete emotion states from facial expressive imagery. Standardization and comparability

  15. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications, Prognosis and management. ... It should be possible to set a definite prognosis within 2 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis, and in many cases even sooner. In the prognosis of facial paralysis the aetiological and time factors involved, the completeness of ...

  16. A statistical method for 2D facial landmarking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibeklioğlu, H.; Salah, A.A.; Gevers, T.

    2012-01-01

    Many facial-analysis approaches rely on robust and accurate automatic facial landmarking to correctly function. In this paper, we describe a statistical method for automatic facial-landmark localization. Our landmarking relies on a parsimonious mixture model of Gabor wavelet features, computed in

  17. Doubly Sparse Relevance Vector Machine for Continuous Facial Behavior Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaltwang, Sebastian; Todorovic, Sinisa; Pantic, Maja

    Certain inner feelings and physiological states like pain are subjective states that cannot be directly measured, but can be estimated from spontaneous facial expressions. Since they are typically characterized by subtle movements of facial parts, analysis of the facial details is required. To this

  18. Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated categorical perception (CP) effects for affective facial expressions and linguistic facial expressions from American Sign Language (ASL) for Deaf native signers and hearing non-signers. Facial expressions were presented in isolation (Experiment 1) or in an ASL verb context (Experiment 2). Participants performed ABX…

  19. On-line image guidance for frameless stereotactic radiotherapy of lung malignancies by cone beam CT: Comparison between target localization and alignment on bony anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masi, Laura; Casamassima, Franco; Menichelli, Claudia; Pasciuti, Katia; Doro, Raffaela; Polli, Caterina; D'imporzano, Elena; Bonucci, Ivano

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Free-breathing stereotactic radiotherapy for lung malignancies requires reliable prediction of respiratory motion and accurate target localization. A protocol was adopted for reproducibility and reduction of respiratory motion and for target localization by CBCT image guidance. Tumor respiratory displacements and tumor positioning errors relative to bony anatomy alignment are analyzed. Materials and method. Image guided SRT was performed for 99 lung malignancies. Two groups of patients were considered: group A did not perform any breathing control; group B controlled visually their respiratory cycle and volumes on an Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) monitor during the acquisition of simulation CT and CBCT, and treatment delivery. GTV on end inhale and exhale CT data sets were fused in an ITV and the extent of tumor motion evaluated between these 2 phases. A pre-treatment CBCT was acquired and aligned to the reference CT using bony anatomy; for tumor positioning the ITV contour on the reference CT was matched to the visible tumor on CBCT. Interobserver variability of tumor positioning was evaluated. ITV and CBCT tumor dimensions were compared. Results. 3D tumor breathing displacement (mean±SD) was significantly higher for group A (14.7±9.9 mm) than for group B (4.7±3.1 mm). The detected differences between tumor and bony structure alignment below 3 mm were 68% for group B and 45% for group A, reaching statistical significance. Interobserver variability was 1.7±1.1 mm (mean±SD). Dimensions of tumor image on CBCT were consistent with ITV dimensions for group B (max difference 14%). Conclusions. The adopted protocol seems effective in reducing respiratory internal movements and margin. Tumor positioning errors relative to bony anatomy are also reduced. However bony anatomy as a surrogate of the target may still lead to some relevant positioning errors. Target visualization on CBCT is essential for an accurate localization in lung SRT

  20. Allergy to fish collagen: Thermostability of collagen and IgE reactivity of patients' sera with extracts of 11 species of bony and cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Kuriyama, Takuma; Nakagawara, Ryoko; Aihara, Michiko; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    Parvalbumin was identified as a major fish allergen, and has been well investigated. Collagen was identified as a second allergen; however, its allergenic properties remain uncharacterized. Although fish is an important staple in coastal countries, its thermostability is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to determine the thermostability of fish collagen as an allergen. Meat of seven bony and four cartilaginous fishes was heated at various temperatures and times, and extracts were analyzed using SDS-PAGE, IgE-ELISA, and SPTs. Collagen was dissolved from heated meat of Pacific mackerel into a crude extract. Collagen in the extracts was degraded at a high heating load-140 °C (10 min) or 100 °C (320 min). However, ELISA revealed the IgE reactivities of patients' sera with the extracts were unchanged even after heating the samples. Patients strongly reacted to extract proteins of other bony fish, which were detected by patients' IgE even after heating at 100 °C (320 min). In contrast, reactivities of the extracts of cartilaginous fish were lower than those of bony fish. SPTs in one patient revealed that all bony and cartilaginous fish extracts prepared from heated meat elicited allergic reactions. The IgE reactivity of patients' sera to fish collagen in extracts was retained even when fish meat was treated by a high heating load. As for the fish collagen, the IgE reactivities to cartilaginous fish were lower than that to bony fish. Reducing IgE reactivity to fish meat using heat is difficult, and other modalities will be required to produce hypoallergenic fish meat. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Facial Muscle Coordination in Monkeys During Rhythmic Facial Expressions and Ingestive Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Stephen V.; Lanzilotto, Marco; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses regarding the origins of communication signals generally, and primate orofacial communication signals in particular, suggest that these signals derive by ritualization of noncommunicative behaviors, notably including ingestive behaviors such as chewing and nursing. These theories are appealing in part because of the prominent periodicities in both types of behavior. Despite their intuitive appeal, however, there are little or no data with which to evaluate these theories because the coordination of muscles innervated by the facial nucleus has not been carefully compared between communicative and ingestive movements. Such data are especially crucial for reconciling neurophysiological assumptions regarding facial motor control in communication and ingestion. We here address this gap by contrasting the coordination of facial muscles during different types of rhythmic orofacial behavior in macaque monkeys, finding that the perioral muscles innervated by the facial nucleus are rhythmically coordinated during lipsmacks and that this coordination appears distinct from that observed during ingestion. PMID:22553017

  2. Diagnosis and surgical outcomes of intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma showing normal facial nerve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D W; Byeon, H K; Chung, H P; Choi, E C; Kim, S-H; Park, Y M

    2013-07-01

    The findings of intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma (FNS) using preoperative diagnostic tools, including ultrasonography (US)-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, computed tomography (CT) scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were analyzed to determine if there are any useful findings that might suggest the presence of a lesion. Treatment guidelines are suggested. The medical records of 15 patients who were diagnosed with an intraparotid FNS were retrospectively analyzed. US and CT scans provide clinicians with only limited information; gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted images from MRI provide more specific findings. Tumors could be removed successfully with surgical exploration, preserving facial nerve function at the same time. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed more characteristic findings for the diagnosis of intraparotid FNS. Intraparotid FNS without facial palsy can be diagnosed with MRI preoperatively, and surgical exploration is a suitable treatment modality which can remove the tumor and preserve facial nerve function. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Face Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Independent or Interactive Processing of Facial Identity and Facial Expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Julia F.; Biswas, Ajanta; Pascalis, Olivier; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmuth; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated if deficits in processing emotional expression affect facial identity processing and vice versa in children with autism spectrum disorder. Children with autism and IQ and age matched typically developing children classified faces either by emotional expression, thereby ignoring facial identity or by facial identity…

  4. Annotation: Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), the most frequent known interstitial deletion identified in man, is associated with chromosomal microdeletions in the q11 band of chromosome 22. Individuals with VCFS are reported to have a characteristic behavioural phenotype with high rates of behavioural, psychiatric, neuropsychological and…

  5. Modern approach to facial skin defects reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Kister

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of a facial defect is usually a challenging endeavor. The article aims to describe different types of flaps that might be used to restore such deformities- including their characteristics, indications and guidelines that should be followed in the reconstructive procedures.

  6. Minimally invasive brow suspension for facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Peter D; Hiltzik, David H; Moche, Jason; Preminger, Aviva

    2003-01-01

    To report a new technique for unilateral brow suspension for facial paralysis that is minimally invasive, limits supraciliary scar formation, does not require specialized endoscopic equipment or expertise, and has proved to be equal to direct brow suspension in durability and symmetry. Retrospective survey of a case series of 23 patients between January 1997 and December 2000. Metropolitan tertiary care center. Patients with head and neck tumors and brow ptosis caused by facial nerve paralysis. The results of the procedure were determined using the following 3-tier rating system: outstanding (excellent elevation and symmetry); acceptable (good elevation and fair symmetry); and unacceptable (loss of elevation). The results were considered outstanding in 12 patients, acceptable in 9 patients, and unacceptable in only 1 patient. One patient developed a hematoma, and 1 patient required a secondary adjustment. The technique has proved to be superior to standard brow suspension procedures with regard to scar formation and equal with respect to facial symmetry and suspension. These results have caused us to abandon direct brow suspension and to use this minimally invasive method in all cases of brow ptosis due to facial paralysis.

  7. Exporting vector muscles for facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, T.D.; Butz, Andreas; Kruger, Antonio; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Olivier, Patrick; Nijholt, Antinus; Poel, Mannes

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a method of exporting vector muscles from one 3D face to another for facial animation. Starting from a 3D face with an extended version of Waters’ linear muscle system, we transfer the linear muscles to a target 3D face.We also transfer the region division, which is used

  8. Searching for Prototypical Facial Feedback Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Bevacqua, E.; Tellier, M.; Pelachaud, C.; Pelachaud, C.; Martin, J-C.; André, E.; Chollet, G.; Pelé, D.

    2007-01-01

    Embodied conversational agents should be able to provide feedback on what a human interlocutor is saying. We are compiling a list of facial feedback expressions that signal attention and interest, grounding and attitude. As expressions need to serve many functions at the same time and most of the

  9. Judgment of facial expressions and depression persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, WW

    1998-01-01

    In research it has been demonstrated that cognitive and interpersonal processes play significant roles in depression development and persistence. The judgment of emotions displayed in facial expressions by depressed patients allows for a better understanding of these processes. In this study, 48

  10. Biased Facial Expression Interpretation in Shy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokin, Jessica; Younger, Alastair; Gosselin, Pierre; Vaillancourt, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between shyness and the interpretations of the facial expressions of others was examined in a sample of 123 children aged 12 to 14?years. Participants viewed faces displaying happiness, fear, anger, disgust, sadness, surprise, as well as a neutral expression, presented on a computer screen. The children identified each expression…

  11. A Facial Control Method Using Emotional Parameters in Sensibility Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroshi; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Kato, Shohei; Kunitachi, Tsutomu; Itoh, Hidenori

    The “Ifbot” robot communicates with people by considering its own “emotions”. Ifbot has many facial expressions to communicate enjoyment. These are used to express its internal emotions, purposes, reactions caused by external stimulus, and entertainment such as singing songs. All these facial expressions are developed by designers manually. Using this approach, we must design all facial motions, if we want Ifbot to express them. It, however, is not realistic. We have therefore developed a system which convert Ifbot's emotions to its facial expressions automatically. In this paper, we propose a method for creating Ifbot's facial expressions from parameters, emotional parameters, which handle its internal emotions computationally.

  12. Facial identity and facial expression are initially integrated at visual perceptual stages of face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Katie; Towler, John; Eimer, Martin

    2016-01-08

    It is frequently assumed that facial identity and facial expression are analysed in functionally and anatomically distinct streams within the core visual face processing system. To investigate whether expression and identity interact during the visual processing of faces, we employed a sequential matching procedure where participants compared either the identity or the expression of two successively presented faces, and ignored the other irrelevant dimension. Repetitions versus changes of facial identity and expression were varied independently across trials, and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during task performance. Irrelevant facial identity and irrelevant expression both interfered with performance in the expression and identity matching tasks. These symmetrical interference effects show that neither identity nor expression can be selectively ignored during face matching, and suggest that they are not processed independently. N250r components to identity repetitions that reflect identity matching mechanisms in face-selective visual cortex were delayed and attenuated when there was an expression change, demonstrating that facial expression interferes with visual identity matching. These findings provide new evidence for interactions between facial identity and expression within the core visual processing system, and question the hypothesis that these two attributes are processed independently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accurate landmarking of three-dimensional facial data in the presence of facial expressions and occlusions using a three-dimensional statistical facial feature model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Dellandréa, Emmanuel; Chen, Liming; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional face landmarking aims at automatically localizing facial landmarks and has a wide range of applications (e.g., face recognition, face tracking, and facial expression analysis). Existing methods assume neutral facial expressions and unoccluded faces. In this paper, we propose a general learning-based framework for reliable landmark localization on 3-D facial data under challenging conditions (i.e., facial expressions and occlusions). Our approach relies on a statistical model, called 3-D statistical facial feature model, which learns both the global variations in configurational relationships between landmarks and the local variations of texture and geometry around each landmark. Based on this model, we further propose an occlusion classifier and a fitting algorithm. Results from experiments on three publicly available 3-D face databases (FRGC, BU-3-DFE, and Bosphorus) demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, in terms of landmarking accuracy and robustness, in the presence of expressions and occlusions.

  14. A clinical study on the efficacy of hydroxyapatite - Bioactive glass composite granules in the management of periodontal bony defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirthankar Debnath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In periodontal regeneration, several alloplastic materials are being used with a goal to reconstruct new osseous tissue in the infrabony defect sites. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of hydroxyapatite-bioactive glass (HA:BG composite granules in the management of periodontal bony defects. Materials and Methods: A randomized control study was conducted. Subjects with infrabony defects were divided into three groups. Test Group 1 (n = 10: Defect site was treated with HA:BG, with a biodegradable membrane. Test Group 2 (n = 10: Defect site was treated with HAP, with a biodegradable membrane. Control group (n = 10: Defect site was treated with open flap debridement with a biodegradable membrane Results: The healing of defects was uneventful and free of any biological complications. The gain in clinical attachment level, reduction of probing pocket depth, and defect fill were statistically significant in all three groups. TG1 sites showed significant defect fill than TG2 and CG sites. Conclusion: The performance of HA:BG was better compared to HAP and open flap debridement for the reconstruction of infrabony defects.

  15. Performance-driven facial animation: basic research on human judgments of emotional state in facial avatars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, A A; Neumann, U; Enciso, R; Fidaleo, D; Noh, J Y

    2001-08-01

    Virtual reality is rapidly evolving into a pragmatically usable technology for mental health (MH) applications. As the underlying enabling technologies continue to evolve and allow us to design more useful and usable structural virtual environments (VEs), the next important challenge will involve populating these environments with virtual representations of humans (avatars). This will be vital to create mental health VEs that leverage the use of avatars for applications that require human-human interaction and communication. As Alessi et al.1 pointed out at the 8th Annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference (MMVR8), virtual humans have mainly appeared in MH applications to "serve the role of props, rather than humans." More believable avatars inhabiting VEs would open up possibilities for MH applications that address social interaction, communication, instruction, assessment, and rehabilitation issues. They could also serve to enhance realism that might in turn promote the experience of presence in VR. Additionally, it will soon be possible to use computer-generated avatars that serve to provide believable dynamic facial and bodily representations of individuals communicating from a distance in real time. This could support the delivery, in shared virtual environments, of more natural human interaction styles, similar to what is used in real life between people. These techniques could enhance communication and interaction by leveraging our natural sensing and perceiving capabilities and offer the potential to model human-computer-human interaction after human-human interaction. To enhance the authenticity of virtual human representations, advances in the rendering of facial and gestural behaviors that support implicit communication will be needed. In this regard, the current paper presents data from a study that compared human raters' judgments of emotional expression between actual video clips of facial expressions and identical expressions rendered on a

  16. Incongruence Between Observers’ and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja S. H. Wingenbach

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others’ facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others’ facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition, (b pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition, and (c passive viewing (control condition. It was hypothesised that (1 experimental condition (a and (b result in greater facial muscle activity than (c, (2 experimental condition (a increases emotion recognition accuracy from others’ faces compared to (c, (3 experimental condition (b lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c. Participants (42 males, 42 females underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV while electromyography (EMG was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions’ order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed.

  17. Incongruence Between Observers' and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenbach, Tanja S H; Brosnan, Mark; Pfaltz, Monique C; Plichta, Michael M; Ashwin, Chris

    2018-01-01

    According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others' facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others' facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a) explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition), (b) pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition), and (c) passive viewing (control condition). It was hypothesised that (1) experimental condition (a) and (b) result in greater facial muscle activity than (c), (2) experimental condition (a) increases emotion recognition accuracy from others' faces compared to (c), (3) experimental condition (b) lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c). Participants (42 males, 42 females) underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV) while electromyography (EMG) was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions' order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed.

  18. Incongruence Between Observers’ and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenbach, Tanja S. H.; Brosnan, Mark; Pfaltz, Monique C.; Plichta, Michael M.; Ashwin, Chris

    2018-01-01

    According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others’ facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others’ facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a) explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition), (b) pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition), and (c) passive viewing (control condition). It was hypothesised that (1) experimental condition (a) and (b) result in greater facial muscle activity than (c), (2) experimental condition (a) increases emotion recognition accuracy from others’ faces compared to (c), (3) experimental condition (b) lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c). Participants (42 males, 42 females) underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV) while electromyography (EMG) was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions’ order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed. PMID:29928240

  19. Pattern of facial palsy in a typical Nigerian specialist hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamina, S; Hanif, S

    2012-12-01

    Data on incidence of facial palsy is generally lacking in Nigeria. To assess six years' incidence of facial palsy in Murtala Muhammed Specialist Hospital (MMSH), Kano, Nigeria. The records of patients diagnosed as facial problems between January 2000 and December 2005 were scrutinized. Data on diagnosis, age, sex, side affected, occupation and causes were obtained. A total number of 698 patients with facial problems were recorded. Five hundred and ninety four (85%) were diagnosed as facial palsy. Out of the diagnosed facial palsy, males (56.2%) had a higher incidence than females; 20-34 years age group (40.3%) had a greater prevalence; the commonest cause of facial palsy was found out to be Idiopathic (39.1%) and was most common among business men (31.6%). Right sided facial palsy (52.2%) was predominant. Incidence of facial palsy was highest in 2003 (25.3%) and decreased from 2004. It was concluded that the incidence of facial palsy was high and Bell's palsy remains the most common causes of facial (nerve) paralysis.

  20. Idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia: two topographic facial pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado, María L; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gili, Pablo; Caminero, Ana B; Cebrián, José L

    2010-09-01

    To describe 2 topographic facial pain conditions with the pain clearly localized in the eye (idiopathic ophthalmodynia) or in the nose (idiopathic rhinalgia), and to propose their distinction from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Persistent idiopathic facial pain, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia, and facial arthromyalgia are idiopathic facial pain syndromes that have been separated according to topographical criteria. Still, some other facial pain syndromes might have been veiled under the broad term of persistent idiopathic facial pain. Through a 10-year period we have studied all patients referred to our neurological clinic because of facial pain of unknown etiology that might deviate from all well-characterized facial pain syndromes. In a group of patients we have identified 2 consistent clinical pictures with pain precisely located either in the eye (n=11) or in the nose (n=7). Clinical features resembled those of other localized idiopathic facial syndromes, the key differences relying on the topographic distribution of the pain. Both idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia seem specific pain syndromes with a distinctive location, and may deserve a nosologic status just as other focal pain syndromes of the face. Whether all such focal syndromes are topographic variants of persistent idiopathic facial pain or independent disorders remains a controversial issue.

  1. Perceptually Valid Facial Expressions for Character-Based Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Arya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of creating facial expression of mixed emotions in a perceptually valid way. The research has been done in the context of a “game-like” health and education applications aimed at studying social competency and facial expression awareness in autistic children as well as native language learning, but the results can be applied to many other applications such as games with need for dynamic facial expressions or tools for automating the creation of facial animations. Most existing methods for creating facial expressions of mixed emotions use operations like averaging to create the combined effect of two universal emotions. Such methods may be mathematically justifiable but are not necessarily valid from a perceptual point of view. The research reported here starts by user experiments aiming at understanding how people combine facial actions to express mixed emotions, and how the viewers perceive a set of facial actions in terms of underlying emotions. Using the results of these experiments and a three-dimensional emotion model, we associate facial actions to dimensions and regions in the emotion space, and create a facial expression based on the location of the mixed emotion in the three-dimensional space. We call these regionalized facial actions “facial expression units.”

  2. Hypoglossal-facial-jump-anastomosis without an interposition nerve graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutner, Dirk; Luers, Jan C; Grosheva, Maria

    2013-10-01

    The hypoglossal-facial-anastomosis is the most often applied procedure for the reanimation of a long lasting peripheral facial nerve paralysis. The use of an interposition graft and its end-to-side anastomosis to the hypoglossal nerve allows the preservation of the tongue function and also requires two anastomosis sites and a free second donor nerve. We describe the modified technique of the hypoglossal-facial-jump-anastomosis without an interposition and present the first results. Retrospective case study. We performed the facial nerve reconstruction in five patients. The indication for the surgery was a long-standing facial paralysis with preserved portion distal to geniculate ganglion, absent voluntary activity in the needle facial electromyography, and an intact bilateral hypoglossal nerve. Following mastoidectomy, the facial nerve was mobilized in the fallopian canal down to its bifurcation in the parotid gland and cut in its tympanic portion distal to the lesion. Then, a tensionless end-to-side suture to the hypoglossal nerve was performed. The facial function was monitored up to 16 months postoperatively. The reconstruction technique succeeded in all patients: The facial function improved within the average time period of 10 months to the House-Brackmann score 3. This modified technique of the hypoglossal-facial reanimation is a valid method with good clinical results, especially in cases of a preserved intramastoidal facial nerve. Level 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Marker optimization for facial motion acquisition and deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Binh H; Zhu, Mingyang; Deng, Zhigang

    2013-11-01

    A long-standing problem in marker-based facial motion capture is what are the optimal facial mocap marker layouts. Despite its wide range of potential applications, this problem has not yet been systematically explored to date. This paper describes an approach to compute optimized marker layouts for facial motion acquisition as optimization of characteristic control points from a set of high-resolution, ground-truth facial mesh sequences. Specifically, the thin-shell linear deformation model is imposed onto the example pose reconstruction process via optional hard constraints such as symmetry and multiresolution constraints. Through our experiments and comparisons, we validate the effectiveness, robustness, and accuracy of our approach. Besides guiding minimal yet effective placement of facial mocap markers, we also describe and demonstrate its two selected applications: marker-based facial mesh skinning and multiresolution facial performance capture.

  4. Effects of Face and Background Color on Facial Expression Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuto Minami

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Detecting others’ emotional states from their faces is an essential component of successful social interaction. However, the ability to perceive emotional expressions is reported to be modulated by a number of factors. We have previously found that facial color modulates the judgment of facial expression, while another study has shown that background color plays a modulatory role. Therefore, in this study, we directly compared the effects of face and background color on facial expression judgment within a single experiment. Fear-to-anger morphed faces were presented in face and background color conditions. Our results showed that judgments of facial expressions was influenced by both face and background color. However, facial color effects were significantly greater than background color effects, although the color saturation of faces was lower compared to background colors. These results suggest that facial color is intimately related to the judgment of facial expression, over and above the influence of simple color.

  5. Perception of global facial geometry is modulated through experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Ramon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of personally familiar faces is highly efficient across various viewing conditions. While the presence of robust facial representations stored in memory is considered to aid this process, the mechanisms underlying invariant identification remain unclear. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that facial representations stored in memory are associated with differential perceptual processing of the overall facial geometry. Subjects who were personally familiar or unfamiliar with the identities presented discriminated between stimuli whose overall facial geometry had been manipulated to maintain or alter the original facial configuration (see Barton, Zhao & Keenan, 2003. The results demonstrate that familiarity gives rise to more efficient processing of global facial geometry, and are interpreted in terms of increased holistic processing of facial information that is maintained across viewing distances.

  6. The influence of context on distinct facial expressions of disgust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Peter J; Walle, Eric A; Knothe, Jennifer M; Lopez, Lukas D

    2018-06-11

    Face perception is susceptible to contextual influence and perceived physical similarities between emotion cues. However, studies often use structurally homogeneous facial expressions, making it difficult to explore how within-emotion variability in facial configuration affects emotion perception. This study examined the influence of context on the emotional perception of categorically identical, yet physically distinct, facial expressions of disgust. Participants categorized two perceptually distinct disgust facial expressions, "closed" (i.e., scrunched nose, closed mouth) and "open" (i.e., scrunched nose, open mouth, protruding tongue), that were embedded in contexts comprising emotion postures and scenes. Results demonstrated that the effect of nonfacial elements was significantly stronger for "open" disgust facial expressions than "closed" disgust facial expressions. These findings provide support that physical similarity within discrete categories of facial expressions is mutable and plays an important role in affective face perception. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Dynamic facial expression recognition based on geometric and texture features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Wang, Zengfu

    2018-04-01

    Recently, dynamic facial expression recognition in videos has attracted growing attention. In this paper, we propose a novel dynamic facial expression recognition method by using geometric and texture features. In our system, the facial landmark movements and texture variations upon pairwise images are used to perform the dynamic facial expression recognition tasks. For one facial expression sequence, pairwise images are created between the first frame and each of its subsequent frames. Integration of both geometric and texture features further enhances the representation of the facial expressions. Finally, Support Vector Machine is used for facial expression recognition. Experiments conducted on the extended Cohn-Kanade database show that our proposed method can achieve a competitive performance with other methods.

  8. The enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal: a new CT finding of facial nerve canal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Ruozhen; Li Yuhua; Gong Wuxian; Wu Lebin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the value of enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal in the diagnosis of facial nerve canal fracture. Methods: Thirty patients with facial nerve canal fracture underwent axial and coronal CT scan. The correlation between the fracture and the enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was analyzed. The ability of showing the fracture and enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal in axial and coronal imaging were compared. Results: Fracture of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was found in the operation in 30 patients, while the fracture was detected in CT in 18 patients. Enlargement of geniculate ganglion of facial nerve was detected in 30 patients in the operation, while the enlargement of fossa was found in CT in 28 cases. Enlargement and fracture of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal were both detected in CT images in 18 patients. Only the enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was shown in 12 patients in CT. Conclusion: Enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was a useful finding in the diagnosis of fracture of geniculate fossa in patients with facial paralysis, even no fracture line was shown on CT images. (authors)

  9. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people’s emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such. PMID:27467393

  10. Parotidectomía y vena facial Parotidectomy and facial vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hernández Altemir

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La cirugía de los tumores benignos de la parótida, es una cirugía de relaciones con estructuras fundamentalmente nerviosas cuyo daño, representa un gravísimo problema psicosomático por definirlo de una manera genérica. Para ayudar al manejo quirúrgico del nervio facial periférico, es por lo que en el presente artículo tratamos de enfatizar la importancia de la vena facial en la disección y conservación del nervio, precisamente donde su disección suele ser más comprometida, esto es en las ramas más caudales. El trabajo que vamos a desarrollar hay que verlo pues, como un ensalzamiento de las estructuras venosas en el seguimiento y control del nervio facial periférico y de porqué no, el nervio auricular mayor no siempre suficientemente valorado en la cirugía de la parótida al perder protagonismo con el facial.Benign parotid tumor surgery is related to fundamental nervous structures, defined simply: that when damaged cause great psychosomatic problems. In order to make peripheral facial nerve surgery easy to handle for the surgeon this article emphasizes the importance of the facial vein in the dissection and conservation of the nerve. Its dissection can be compromised if the caudal branches are damaged. The study that we develop should be seen as praise for the vein structures in the follow up and control of the peripheral facial nerve, and the main auricular nerve that is often undervalued when it is no longer the protagonist in the face.

  11. Satisfaction with facial appearance and its determinants in adults with severe congenital facial disfigurement: a case-referent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnel, S L; Duivenvoorden, H J; Passchier, J; Mathijssen, I M J

    2010-10-01

    Patients with severe congenital facial disfigurement have a long track record of operations and hospital visits by the time they are 18 years old. The fact that their facial deformity is congenital may have an impact on how satisfied these patients are with their appearance. This study evaluated the level of satisfaction with facial appearance of congenital and of acquired facially disfigured adults, and explored demographic, physical and psychological determinants of this satisfaction. Differences compared with non-disfigured adults were examined. Fifty-nine adults with a rare facial cleft, 59 adults with a facial deformity traumatically acquired in adulthood, and a reference group of 201 non-disfigured adults completed standardised demographic, physical and psychological questionnaires. The congenital and acquired groups did not differ significantly in the level of satisfaction with facial appearance, but both were significantly less satisfied than the reference group. In facially disfigured adults, level of education, number of affected facial parts and facial function were determinants of the level of satisfaction. High fear of negative appearance evaluation by others (FNAE) and low self-esteem (SE) were strong psychological determinants. Although FNAE was higher in both patient groups, SE was similar in all three groups. Satisfaction with facial appearance of individuals with a congenital or acquired facial deformity is similar and will seldom reach the level of satisfaction of non-disfigured persons. A combination of surgical correction (with attention for facial profile and restoring facial functions) and psychological help (to increase SE and lower FNAE) may improve patient satisfaction. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MR findings of facial nerve on oblique sagittal MRI using TMJ surface coil: normal vs peripheral facial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Ok; Lee, Myeong Jun; Lee, Chang Joon; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the findings of normal facial nerve, as seen on oblique sagittal MRI using a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) surface coil, and then to evaluate abnormal findings of peripheral facial nerve palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy and 50 normal facial nerves of 36 patients without facial palsy. All underwent oblique sagittal MRI using a T MJ surface coil. We analyzed the course, signal intensity, thickness, location, and degree of enhancement of the facial nerve. According to the angle made by the proximal parotid segment on the axis of the mastoid segment, course was classified as anterior angulation (obtuse and acute, or buckling), straight and posterior angulation. Among 50 normal facial nerves, 24 (48%) were straight, and 23 (46%) demonstrated anterior angulation; 34 (68%) showed iso signal intensity on T1W1. In the group of patients, course on the affected side was either straight (40%) or showed anterior angulation (55%), and signal intensity in 80% of cases was isointense. These findings were similar to those in the normal group, but in patients with post-traumatic or post-operative facial palsy, buckling, of course, appeared. In 12 of 18 facial palsy cases (66.6%) in which contrast materials were administered, a normal facial nerve of the opposite facial canal showed mild enhancement on more than one segment, but on the affected side the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement in all 14 patients with acute facial palsy. Eleven of these (79%) showed fair or marked enhancement on more than one segment, and in 12 (86%), mild enhancement of the proximal parotid segment was noted. Four of six chronic facial palsy cases (66.6%) showed atrophy of the facial nerve. When oblique sagittal MR images are obtained using a TMJ surface coil, enhancement of the proximal parotid segment of the facial nerve and fair or marked enhancement of at least one segment within the facial canal always suggests pathology of

  13. Bony landmark between the attachment of the medial meniscus posterior root and the posterior cruciate ligament: CT and MR imaging assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    (1) To reveal the prevalence of the bony recess (posterior dimple) and (2) to determine the position of the posterior dimple on the tibial plateau using three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In this study, a retrospective review of 112 patients was performed to identify the posterior dimple and to evaluate its position on 3DCT. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also used to determine the positional relationship among the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus posterior insertion (MMPI), and posterior dimple. The posterior dimple was observed in 100 of 112 knees (89.3%) on 3DCT. The center of the posterior dimple was 13.6 ± 0.8 mm from the medial tibial eminence apex. MRI showed that the posterior dimple separated the tibial attachment of the PCL and MMPI. This is the first study to discuss the prevalence and position of the bony recess in the posterior intercondylar fossa. (orig.)

  14. X-ray and neutron tomography on the bony inner ear of baleen whales; Roentgen- und Neutronentomographie am knoechernen Innenohr der Bartenwale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlt, Tobias [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany); Wieder, Frank [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung BAM, Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe 8.3 ' ' Radiologische Verfahren' ' ; Hilger, Andre; Kardjilov, Nikolay [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin HZB, Berlin (Germany); Hampe, Oliver [Museum fuer Naturkunde, Berlin (Germany); Manke, Ingo [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) fuer Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe ' ' Bildgebende Verfahren' ' ; Ritsche, Indira; Fahlke, Julia M.

    2018-04-01

    During their evolution whales and dolphins developed a highly specialized hearing organ for orientation in their deep sea territory covering a broad acoustic spectrum. The internal anatomy of the periotic bone, especially the morphology of the cochlea, has a significant influence on the hearing capability of mammals. The bony and fossilized cochleae of several fossil representatives of extinct baleen whales (e.g., Cetotheriidae) and modern rorquals (Balaenopteridae) and right whales, as well as cochleae of an archaeocete and some land mammals are investigated by X-ray and neutron tomography in order to record morphological changes that may be responsible for the development of low frequency hearing. Differences in the cochlear morphology have been determined by means of morphometric parameters, such as the number of turns, the length of the cochlea, and the curvature of the cochlear canal. In particular, X-ray tomography enables a high resolution display of the bony inner ear.

  15. Bony landmark between the attachment of the medial meniscus posterior root and the posterior cruciate ligament: CT and MR imaging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    (1) To reveal the prevalence of the bony recess (posterior dimple) and (2) to determine the position of the posterior dimple on the tibial plateau using three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In this study, a retrospective review of 112 patients was performed to identify the posterior dimple and to evaluate its position on 3DCT. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also used to determine the positional relationship among the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus posterior insertion (MMPI), and posterior dimple. The posterior dimple was observed in 100 of 112 knees (89.3%) on 3DCT. The center of the posterior dimple was 13.6 ± 0.8 mm from the medial tibial eminence apex. MRI showed that the posterior dimple separated the tibial attachment of the PCL and MMPI. This is the first study to discuss the prevalence and position of the bony recess in the posterior intercondylar fossa. (orig.)

  16. Facial Palsy Following Embolization of a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Kareem O; Harmon, Jeffrey J; Walters, Zoe; Samy, Ravi; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Stevens, Shawn M; Abruzzo, Todd

    2018-05-01

    To describe a case of the rare complication of facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). To illustrate the vascular supply to the facial nerve and as a result, highlight the etiology of the facial nerve palsy. The angiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of a case of facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a JNA is reviewed. A 13-year-old male developed left-sided facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a left-sided JNA. Evaluation of MR imaging studies and retrospective review of the angiographic data suggested errant embolization of particles into the petrosquamosal branch of the middle meningeal artery (MMA), a branch of the internal maxillary artery (IMA), through collateral vasculature. The petrosquamosal branch of the MMA is the predominant blood supply to the facial nerve in the facial canal. The facial palsy resolved since complete infarction of the nerve was likely prevented by collateral blood supply from the stylomastoid artery. Facial palsy is a potential complication of embolization of the IMA, a branch of the external carotid artery (ECA). This is secondary to ischemia of the facial nerve due to embolization of its vascular supply. Clinicians should be aware of this potential complication and counsel patients accordingly prior to embolization for JNA.

  17. Factors contributing to the adaptation aftereffects of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrea; Oruc, Ipek; Fox, Christopher J; Barton, Jason J S

    2008-01-29

    Previous studies have demonstrated the existence of adaptation aftereffects for facial expressions. Here we investigated which aspects of facial stimuli contribute to these aftereffects. In Experiment 1, we examined the role of local adaptation to image elements such as curvature, shape and orientation, independent of expression, by using hybrid faces constructed from either the same or opposing expressions. While hybrid faces made with consistent expressions generated aftereffects as large as those with normal faces, there were no aftereffects from hybrid faces made from different expressions, despite the fact that these contained the same local image elements. In Experiment 2, we examined the role of facial features independent of the normal face configuration by contrasting adaptation with whole faces to adaptation with scrambled faces. We found that scrambled faces also generated significant aftereffects, indicating that expressive features without a normal facial configuration could generate expression aftereffects. In Experiment 3, we examined the role of facial configuration by using schematic faces made from line elements that in isolation do not carry expression-related information (e.g. curved segments and straight lines) but that convey an expression when arranged in a normal facial configuration. We obtained a significant aftereffect for facial configurations but not scrambled configurations of these line elements. We conclude that facial expression aftereffects are not due to local adaptation to image elements but due to high-level adaptation of neural representations that involve both facial features and facial configuration.

  18. Evolution of facial color pattern complexity in lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonirina, Hanitriniaina; Kappeler, Peter M; Fichtel, Claudia

    2017-11-09

    Interspecific variation in facial color patterns across New and Old World primates has been linked to species recognition and group size. Because group size has opposite effects on interspecific variation in facial color patterns in these two radiations, a study of the third large primate radiation may shed light on convergences and divergences in this context. We therefore compiled published social and ecological data and analyzed facial photographs of 65 lemur species to categorize variation in hair length, hair and skin coloration as well as color brightness. Phylogenetically controlled analyses revealed that group size and the number of sympatric species did not influence the evolution of facial color complexity in lemurs. Climatic factors, however, influenced facial color complexity, pigmentation and hair length in a few facial regions. Hair length in two facial regions was also correlated with group size and may facilitate individual recognition. Since phylogenetic signals were moderate to high for most models, genetic drift may have also played a role in the evolution of facial color patterns of lemurs. In conclusion, social factors seem to have played only a subordinate role in the evolution of facial color complexity in lemurs, and, more generally, group size appears to have no systematic functional effect on facial color complexity across all primates.

  19. Allergy to fish collagen: Thermostability of collagen and IgE reactivity of patients' sera with extracts of 11 species of bony and cartilaginous fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Kobayashi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The IgE reactivity of patients' sera to fish collagen in extracts was retained even when fish meat was treated by a high heating load. As for the fish collagen, the IgE reactivities to cartilaginous fish were lower than that to bony fish. Reducing IgE reactivity to fish meat using heat is difficult, and other modalities will be required to produce hypoallergenic fish meat.

  20. Long-term Results of Troublesome CWD Cavity Reconstruction by Mastoid and Epitympanic Bony Obliteration (CWR-BOT) in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; van Dinther, Joost J S; De Foer, Bert; Casselman, Jan; Somers, Thomas; Zarowski, Andrzej; Cremers, Cor C; Offeciers, Erwin

    2016-07-01

    To present the long-term surgical outcome of the bony mastoid and epitympanic obliteration technique with canal wall reconstruction (CWR-BOT) in adults with an unstable cavity after previous canal wall-down surgery for extensive cholesteatoma. Retrospective study. Therapeutic. Tertiary referral center. Fifty consecutive adult patients undergoing a CWR-BOT between 1998 and 2009. (A) Recurrence and residual rates of cholesteatoma, (B) postoperative hygienic status of the ear, including postoperative aspect of the tympanic membrane and external ear canal integrity (EAC), (C) functional outcome, and (D) long-term safety issues. (A) The percentage of ears remaining safe without recurrent or residual disease after CWR-BOT was 96% after a mean follow-up time of 101.8 months. Recurrent cholesteatoma occurred in 2% (n = 1) and a residual cholesteatoma was detected in 2% (n = 1) of the patients. (B) A safe dry, and trouble-free graft and selfcleaning EAC was achieved in 94%. (C) The postoperative hearing results showed a gain of 1.7 dB on pure-tone average air-conduction. (D) Nonecho planar diffusion-weighted imaging (non-EP DW magnetic resonance imaging) documented the residual (n = 1) and recurrent cholesteatoma (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year imaging follow-up revealed no other recurrent or residual disease. The CWR-BOT is a safe and very effective option for treatment of problematic unstable canal wall-down mastoid cavities, resulting in dry trouble-free ears.

  1. Perioperative management of facial bipartition surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruselli M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marco Caruselli,1 Michael Tsapis,1,2 Fabrice Ughetto,1 Gregoire Pech-Gourg,3 Dario Galante,4 Olivier Paut1 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, 2Pediatric Transport Team, SAMU 13, La Timone Hospital, 3Pediatric Neurosurgery Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Ospedali Riuniti of Foggia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Severe craniofacial malformations, such as Crouzon, Apert, Saethre-Chotzen, and Pfeiffer syndromes, are very rare conditions (one in 50,000/100,000 live births that often require corrective surgery. Facial bipartition is the more radical corrective surgery. It is a high-risk intervention and needs complex perioperative management and a multidisciplinary approach. Keywords: craniofacial surgery, facial bipartition surgery, craniofacial malformations, pediatric anesthesia

  2. Comparison of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve transposition with a cross-facial nerve graft and muscle transplant for the rehabilitation of facial paralysis using the facial clima method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Vila, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    To compare quantitatively the results obtained after hemihypoglossal nerve transposition and microvascular gracilis transfer associated with a cross facial nerve graft (CFNG) for reanimation of a paralysed face, 66 patients underwent hemihypoglossal transposition (n = 25) or microvascular gracilis transfer and CFNG (n = 41). The commissural displacement (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) in the two groups were compared using the system known as Facial clima. There was no inter-group variability between the groups (p > 0.10) in either variable. However, intra-group variability was detected between the affected and healthy side in the transposition group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively). The transfer group had greater symmetry in displacement of the commissure (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) than the transposition group and patients were more satisfied. However, the transposition group had correct symmetry at rest but more asymmetry of CCV and CD when smiling.

  3. Medical makeup for concealing facial scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Donna; Wong, Brian J F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical, laser, and pharmacological therapies are all used to correct scars and surgical incisions, though have limits with respect to how well facial skin can be restored or enhanced. The use of cosmetics has long been a relevant adjunct to all scar treatment modalities. In recent years, technical advancements in the chemistry and composition of cosmetic products have provided the patient with a broader range of products to employ for concealing scars. This review will provide an overview of contemporary methods for concealing facial scars, birthmarks, and pigmentary changes without the use of traditional/dated, heavy appearing camouflage products. Additionally, general guidelines and information will be provided with respect to identifying competent makeup artists for care of the medical patient. The article by no means is meant to be a tutorial, but rather serves as a starting point in this allied field of medicine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Automatic recognition of emotions from facial expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Henry; Gertner, Izidor

    2014-06-01

    In the human-computer interaction (HCI) process it is desirable to have an artificial intelligent (AI) system that can identify and categorize human emotions from facial expressions. Such systems can be used in security, in entertainment industries, and also to study visual perception, social interactions and disorders (e.g. schizophrenia and autism). In this work we survey and compare the performance of different feature extraction algorithms and classification schemes. We introduce a faster feature extraction method that resizes and applies a set of filters to the data images without sacrificing the accuracy. In addition, we have enhanced SVM to multiple dimensions while retaining the high accuracy rate of SVM. The algorithms were tested using the Japanese Female Facial Expression (JAFFE) Database and the Database of Faces (AT&T Faces).

  5. Clinic-Radiological Study of facial paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olier, J.; Bacaicoa, M.C.; Guridi, J.; Gil, J.L.; Elcarte, F.; Delgado, G.

    1992-01-01

    We have gathered 159 cases of facial paralysis from recent records in our hospital, including paralyses of central as well as peripheral origin, and presenting as the only symptom or as one of several major symptoms of the discomfort of each patient. Sixty-four percent of them were studied by CT scan and/or MR, confirming the existence of alterations in the pathway of nerve pair VII in 50% of the patients who underwent radiological study. Idiopathic facial paralysis was the most common type (42% of the total); while tumors and post-traumatic findings were the most constant radiological findings. From the analysis of the data, the importance of the clinical criteria for selection of the patients in the study and the protocol for radiological diagnosis employed can be deduced. (author)

  6. Do Dynamic Compared to Static Facial Expressions of Happiness and Anger Reveal Enhanced Facial Mimicry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Rymarczyk

    Full Text Available Facial mimicry is the spontaneous response to others' facial expressions by mirroring or matching the interaction partner. Recent evidence suggested that mimicry may not be only an automatic reaction but could be dependent on many factors, including social context, type of task in which the participant is engaged, or stimulus properties (dynamic vs static presentation. In the present study, we investigated the impact of dynamic facial expression and sex differences on facial mimicry and judgment of emotional intensity. Electromyography recordings were recorded from the corrugator supercilii, zygomaticus major, and orbicularis oculi muscles during passive observation of static and dynamic images of happiness and anger. The ratings of the emotional intensity of facial expressions were also analysed. As predicted, dynamic expressions were rated as more intense than static ones. Compared to static images, dynamic displays of happiness also evoked stronger activity in the zygomaticus major and orbicularis oculi, suggesting that subjects experienced positive emotion. No muscles showed mimicry activity in response to angry faces. Moreover, we found that women exhibited greater zygomaticus major muscle activity in response to dynamic happiness stimuli than static stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that people mimic positive emotions and confirm the importance of dynamic stimuli in some emotional processing.

  7. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell?s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the...

  8. Contemporary Koreans’ Perceptions of Facial Beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Chul Rhee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background This article aims to investigate current perceptions of beauty of the general public and physicians without a specialization in plastic surgery performing aesthetic procedures. Methods A cross-sectional and interviewing questionnaire was administered to 290 people in Seoul, South Korea in September 2015. The questionnaire addressed three issues: general attitudes about plastic surgery (Q1, perception of and preferences regarding Korean female celebrities’ facial attractiveness (Q2, and the relative influence of each facial aesthetic subunit on overall facial attractiveness. The survey’s results were gathered by a professional research agency and classified according to a respondent’s gender, age, and job type (95%±5.75% confidence interval. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS ver. 10.1, calculating one-way analysis of variance with post hoc analysis and Tukey’s t-test. Results Among the respondents, 38.3% were in favor of aesthetic plastic surgery. The most common source of plastic surgery information was the internet (50.0%. The most powerful factor influencing hospital or clinic selection was the postoperative surgical results of acquaintances (74.9%. We created a composite face of an attractive Korean female, representing the current facial configuration considered appealing to the Koreans. Beauty perceptions differed to some degree based on gender and generational differences. We found that there were certain differences in beauty perceptions between general physicians who perform aesthetic procedures and the general public. Conclusions Our study results provide aesthetic plastic surgeons with detailed information about contemporary Korean people’s attitudes toward and perceptions of plastic surgery and the specific characteristics of female Korean faces currently considered attractive, plus trends in these perceptions, which should inform plastic surgeons within their specialized fields.

  9. Dentigerous cyst presenting as facial pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzoor, T.; Raza, S.N.; Qayyum, A.; Azam, K.

    2006-01-01

    A rare case is presented in which a maxillary dentigerous cyst had eroded the posterior wall of the right maxillary sinus into the pterygo-palatine fossa causing facial pain due to pressure on the nerves. It had also eroded the lateral wall of sinus and into the oral cavity and got infected resulting in foul smelling oral discharge. The case was dealt with complete removal of cyst using Caldwell Luc's approach. (author)

  10. Topical therapy for facial allergic dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Kondratyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to assess clinical dynamics and morphofunctional skin parameters of patients with facial allergic dermatoses on the background of combined topical therapy. Materials and methods. 45 patients with various facial allergic dermatoses in dry and sensitive skin took part in the research. The methods included anamnesis taking, poll, objective examination and assessment of morphofunctional parameters of skin, as well as estimation of life quality dynamic index (LQDI. Main results. After a course of treatment with 0,05% solution of alclometasone dipropionate inflammation of dermatosis ceased in 45 (100% patients, itching and pains in 39 (86,7% patients, but complaints about dryness and peeling of facial skin remained in 41 (91,1% and 40 (88,8% patients respectively. On the background of therapy including emollient Aflocream the above mentioned symptoms did not appear in 43 (95,6% patients, wherein maximum effect was achieved in patients with allergic contact dermatitis - 14 (93,3%. After a course of topical therapy all patients showed statistically significant increase of epidermal moisture level, alongside with reduction of skin relief and degree of keratinization. During the assessment of LQDI a tendency to reduction of proportion of patients on whom the disease has a strong and extremely strong impact was noted in 10 patients (i.e. 22,2%, moderate influence - in 5 of them (11,45%, insignificant influence or its absence - in 30 (66,7% people. Conclusion. Combined therapy including the use of a topical corticosteroid Afloderm and an emollient Aflocream showed good clinical efficiency in patients with facial allergic dermatoses. The efficiency is also confirmed with improvements in morphofunctional characteristics of patients’ skin on the background of therapy.

  11. Calcification mechanism and bony bonding studies of calcium carbonate and composite aluminosilicate/calcium phosphate applied as biomaterials by using radioactivation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudadesse, H.; Derrien, A.C.; Lucas-Girot, A.; Martin, S.; Cathelieau, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bony grafts are used as a filling biomaterial for defective bone. The introduction of new range of synthetic materials offers to surgeons additional possibilities to avoid virus transmission risks by using natural grafts in bony surgery. In this work, two materials, synthetic calcium carbonate and composite aluminosilicate/calcium phosphate were synthesized by an original method and experimented 'in vivo' as biomaterials for bony filling. Extracted biopsies were studied by several physico chemical and biological methods. The aim was to evaluate the kinetic resorption and bioconsolidation of these materials. We focused on the bioconsolidation between implant and bone by realising cartographies from the implant to the bone and on the calcification mechanism by determination of the origin of Ca and Sr responsible of the neo-formed bone. Neutron activation analysis (NAA), radiotracers 45 Ca* and 85 Sr* and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) were used. Concerning the synthetic calcium carbonate, results show that twelve months after implantation, the mineral composition of implant becomes similar to that of the mature bone. The neoformed bone is composed with Ca and Sr coming from the organism when the Ca and Sr of the implant were progressively eliminated. Concerning the composite geopolymer/calcium phosphate, PIXE and histological studies reveal the intimate links between the bone and the implant starting with the first month after implantation. (author)

  12. Nonablative laser treatment of facial rhytides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lask, Gary P.; Lee, Patrick K.; Seyfzadeh, Manouchehr; Nelson, J. Stuart; Milner, Thomas E.; Anvari, Bahman; Dave, Digant P.; Geronemus, Roy G.; Bernstein, Leonard J.; Mittelman, Harry; Ridener, Laurie A.; Coulson, Walter F.; Sand, Bruce; Baumgarder, Jon; Hennings, David R.; Menefee, Richard F.; Berry, Michael J.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the New Star Model 130 neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser system for nonablative laser treatment of facial rhytides (e.g., periorbital wrinkles). Facial rhytides are treated with 1.32 micrometer wavelength laser light delivered through a fiberoptic handpiece into a 5 mm diameter spot using three 300 microsecond duration pulses at 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency and pulse radiant exposures extending up to 12 J/cm2. Dynamic cooling is used to cool the epidermis selectively prior to laser treatment; animal histology experiments confirm that dynamic cooling combined with nonablative laser heating protects the epidermis and selectively injures the dermis. In the human clinical study, immediately post-treatment, treated sites exhibit mild erythema and, in a few cases, edema or small blisters. There are no long-term complications such as marked dyspigmentation and persistent erythema that are commonly observed following ablative laser skin resurfacing. Preliminary results indicate that the severity of facial rhytides has been reduced, but long-term follow-up examinations are needed to quantify the reduction. The mechanism of action of this nonablative laser treatment modality may involve dermal wound healing that leads to long- term synthesis of new collagen and extracellular matrix material.

  13. Massive Cerebral Infarction Following Facial Fat Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Qi; Zhang, Hengshu

    2016-10-01

    Autologous facial fat injection is becoming popular around the world. Semiliquid fat grafts are used for correction of deformities or aesthetic purposes. Fat transfer is a mini-invasive surgical procedure, but causes severe complications occasionally. A 30-year-old female patient presented to our hospital with sudden unconsciousness and left limb weakness 8 h after facial fat injection. Brain arteriography (CTA) and venography were performed immediately after her admission. Frontal temporoparietal decompressive craniectomy plus multiple treatments was scheduled for the patient. The patient was diagnosed with extensive cerebral infarction of the right hemisphere. CTA showed that both external and internal carotid arteries were obstructed. A sectional filling defect could be seen at the telecentric segment of the right carotid artery. No development was observed during the full course of the treatment at the carotid bifurcation, external carotid artery, or internal carotid artery. Routine cosmetic procedures of facial fat injections could cause devastating and even fatal complications to patients. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the A5 online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  14. Professional assessment of facial profile attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Jen; Chew, Ming Tak; Wong, Hwee Bee

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the assessments of Chinese facial profile attractiveness by orthodontists and oral surgeons. The sample comprised 31 dental professionals (20 orthodontists, 11 oral surgeons) in an Asian community. Facial profile photographs and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 2 Chinese adults (1 man, 1 woman) with normal profiles, Class I incisor relationships, and Class I skeletal patterns were digitized. The digital images were modified by altering cephalometric skeletal and dental hard tissue Chinese normative values in increments of 2 standard deviations in the anteroposterior plane to obtain 7 facial profiles for each sex. The images were bimaxillary protrusion, protrusive mandible, retrusive mandible, normal profile (Class I incisor with Class I skeletal pattern), retrusive maxilla, protrusive maxilla, and bimaxillary retrusion. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine professional differences in assessment. Multiple regression analysis was performed with age, professional status, sex, and number of years in practice as independent variables. A strong correlation was found in the profile assessment between orthodontists and oral surgeons. Normal and bimaxillary retrusive Chinese male and female profiles were judged to be highly attractive by orthodontists and oral surgeons. Chinese male and female profiles with protrusive mandibles were judged the least attractive. There was a difference in professional opinion about the most attractive male profile (P profile and oral surgeons preferring a fuller normal Chinese profile. Sex of dental professionals and number of years in clinical practice were found to affect profile rankings.

  15. A Robot with Complex Facial Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Takeno

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors believe that the consciousness of humans basically originates from languages and their association-like flow of consciousness, and that feelings are generated accompanying respective languages. We incorporated artificial consciousness into a robot; achieved an association flow of language like flow of consciousness; and developed a robot called Kansei that expresses its feelings according to the associations occurring in the robot. To be able to fully communicate with humans, robots must be able to display complex expressions, such as a sense of being thrilled. We therefore added to the Kansei robot a device to express complex feelings through its facial expressions. The Kansei robot is actually an artificial skull made of aluminum, with servomotors built into it. The face is made of relatively soft polyethylene, which is formed to appear like a human face. Facial expressions are generated using 19 servomotors built into the skull, which pull metal wires attached to the facial “skin” to create expressions. The robot at present is capable of making six basic expressions as well as complex expressions, such as happiness and fear combined.

  16. Facial motion engages predictive visual mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordy Kaufman

    Full Text Available We employed a novel cuing paradigm to assess whether dynamically versus statically presented facial expressions differentially engaged predictive visual mechanisms. Participants were presented with a cueing stimulus that was either the static depiction of a low intensity expressed emotion; or a dynamic sequence evolving from a neutral expression to the low intensity expressed emotion. Following this cue and a backwards mask, participants were presented with a probe face that displayed either the same emotion (congruent or a different emotion (incongruent with respect to that displayed by the cue although expressed at a high intensity. The probe face had either the same or different identity from the cued face. The participants' task was to indicate whether or not the probe face showed the same emotion as the cue. Dynamic cues and same identity cues both led to a greater tendency towards congruent responding, although these factors did not interact. Facial motion also led to faster responding when the probe face was emotionally congruent to the cue. We interpret these results as indicating that dynamic facial displays preferentially invoke predictive visual mechanisms, and suggest that motoric simulation may provide an important basis for the generation of predictions in the visual system.

  17. Hemispheric and facial asymmetry: faces of academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W M

    1998-11-01

    Facial asymmetry (facedness) of selected academic faculty members was studied in relation to brain asymmetry and cognitive specialization. Comparisons of facedness were made among humanities faculty (H), faculty members of mathematics and physics (M-P), psychologists (P), and a group of randomly selected individuals (R). Facedness was defined in terms of the relative sizes (in square centimeters) of the two hemifaces. It was predicted that the four groups would show differences in facedness, namely, H, right face bias; M-P, left face bias; P, no bias; and R, no bias. The predictions were confirmed, and the results interpreted in terms of known differences in hemispheric specialization of cognitive functions as they relate to the dominant cognitive activity of each of the different groups. In view of the contralateral control of the two hemifaces (below the eyes) by the two hemispheres of the brain, the two sides of the face undergo differential muscular development, thus creating facial asymmetry. Other factors, such as gender, also may affect facial asymmetry. Suggestions for further research on facedness are discussed.

  18. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Facial Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Papoian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBariatric surgeries performed in the USA has increased twelve-fold in the past two decades. The effects of rapid weight loss on facial features has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery will mimic the effects of aging thus giving the patient an older and less attractive appearance.MethodsConsecutive patients were enrolled from the bariatric surgical clinic at our institution. Pre and post weight loss photographs were taken and used to generate two surveys. The surveys were distributed through social media to assess the difference between the preoperative and postoperative facial photos, in terms of patients' perceived age and overall attractiveness. 102 respondents completed the first survey and 95 respondents completed the second survey.ResultsOf the 14 patients, five showed statistically significant change in perceived age (three more likely to be perceived older and two less likely to be perceived older. The patients were assessed to be more attractive postoperatively, which showed statistical significance.ConclusionsWeight loss does affect facial aesthetics. Mild weight loss is perceived by survey respondents to give the appearance of a younger but less attractive patient, while substantial weight loss is perceived to give the appearance of an older but more attractive patient.

  19. Patterns of orofacial clefting in the facial morphology of bats: a possible naturally occurring model of cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, David J A; Teeling, Emma C; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Finarelli, John A

    2016-11-01

    A normal feature of the facial anatomy of many species of bat is the presence of bony discontinuities or clefts, which bear a remarkable similarity to orofacial clefts that occur in humans as a congenital pathology. These clefts occur in two forms: a midline cleft between the two premaxillae (analogous to the rare midline craniofacial clefts in humans) and bilateral paramedian clefts between the premaxilla and the maxillae (analogous to the typical cleft lip and palate in humans). Here, we describe the distribution of orofacial clefting across major bat clades, exploring the relationship of the different patterns of clefting to feeding mode, development of the vomeronasal organ, development of the nasolacrimal duct and mode of emission of the echolocation call in different bat groups. We also present the results of detailed radiographic and soft tissue dissections of representative examples of the two types of cleft. The midline cleft has arisen independently multiple times in bat phylogeny, whereas the paramedian cleft has arisen once and is a synapomorphy uniting the Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae. In all cases examined, the bony cleft is filled in by a robust fibrous membrane, continuous with the periosteum of the margins of the cleft. In the paramedian clefts, this membrane splits to enclose the premaxilla but forms a loose fold laterally between the premaxilla and maxilla, allowing the premaxilla and nose-leaf to pivot dorsoventrally in the sagittal plane under the action of facial muscles attached to the nasal cartilages. It is possible that this is a specific adaptation for echolocation and/or aerial insectivory. Given the shared embryological location of orofacial clefts in bats and humans, it is likely that aspects of the developmental control networks that produce cleft lip and palate in humans may also be implicated in the formation of these clefts as a normal feature in some bats. A better understanding of craniofacial development in bats with and

  20. Measurement of facial movements with Photoshop software during treatment of facial nerve palsy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmomeny, Abbas Ali; Zadmehr, Hassan; Hossaini, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluating the function of facial nerve is essential in order to determine the influences of various treatment methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate and assess the agreement of Photoshop scaling system versus the facial grading system (FGS). METHODS: In this semi-experimental study, thirty subjects with facial nerve paralysis were recruited. The evaluation of all patients before and after the treatment was performed by FGS and Photoshop measurements. RESULTS: The mean values of FGS before and after the treatment were 35 ± 25 and 67 ± 24, respectively (p Photoshop assessment, mean changes of face expressions in the impaired side relative to the normal side in rest position and three main movements of the face were 3.4 ± 0.55 and 4.04 ± 0.49 millimeter before and after the treatment, respectively (p Photoshop was more objective than using FGS. Therefore, it may be recommended to use this method instead. PMID:22973325