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Sample records for facet joint osteoarthritis

  1. Correlation of the Features of the Lumbar Multifidus Muscle With Facet Joint Osteoarthritis.

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    Yu, Bo; Jiang, Kaibiao; Li, Xinfeng; Zhang, Jidong; Liu, Zude

    2017-09-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis is considered a consequence of the aging process; however, there is evidence that it may be associated with degenerative changes of other structures. The goal of this study was to investigate the correlation between lumbar multifidus muscle features and facet joint osteoarthritis. This retrospective study included 160 patients who had acute or chronic low back pain and were diagnosed with facet joint osteoarthritis on computed tomography scan. Morphometric parameters, including cross-sectional area, muscle-fat index, and percentage of bilateral multifidus asymmetry at L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1, were evaluated with T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with facet joint osteoarthritis had a smaller cross-sectional area and a higher muscle-fat index than those without facet joint osteoarthritis (Posteoarthritis at all 3 spinal levels (Posteoarthritis only at L4-L5 (P=.005). Asymmetry of the bilateral multifidus cross-sectional area was independently associated with facet joint osteoarthritis at L5-S1 (P=.009), but did not seem to be responsible for asymmetric degeneration of the bilateral facet joints. A higher multifidus muscle-fat index was independently associated with facet joint osteoarthritis, and bilateral multifidus size asymmetry was associated with the development of facet joint osteoarthritis at L5-S1. It seems more accurate to consider facet joint osteoarthritis a failure of the whole joint structure, including the paraspinal musculature, rather than simply a failure of the facet joint cartilage. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(5):e793-e800.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Association between facet joint osteoarthritis and the Oswestry Disability Index.

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    Maataoui, Adel; Vogl, Thomas J; Middendorp, Marcus; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos; Khan, M Fawad

    2014-11-28

    To investigate the correlation of facet joint osteoarthritis (FJOA) at lumbar levels L4/L5 and L5/S1 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The study involved lumbar MRIs of 591 patients with a mean age of 47.3 years. The MRIs of the lumbar spine were performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner (Magnetom(®) Avanto, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) using a dedicated receive only spine coil. After initial blinding, each dataset was evaluated by 2 board certified radiologist with more than 5 years experience in musculoskeletal imaging. In total 2364 facet joints were graded. Degenerative changes of the facet joints were evaluated according to the 4-point scale as proposed by Weishaupt et al Functional status was assessed using the ODI. The index is scored from 0 to 100 and interpreted as follows: 0%-20%, minimal disability; 20%-40%, moderate disability; 40%-60%, severe disability; 60%-80%, crippled; 80%-100%, patients are bedbound. Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation was used for statistical analysis, with significance set at P disability had a minimum of 0% and a maximum of 91.11% with an arithmetic mean of 32.77% ± 17.02%. The majority of patients (48.39%) had moderate functional disability (21%-40%). There was no significant correlation between FJOA and ODI on both sides of lumbar level L4/5 and on the left side of lumbar level L5/S1. A weak positive correlation was evaluated between ODI and FJOA on the right side of lumbar level L5/S1. The missing correlation of FJOA and ODI confirms our clinical experience that imaging alone is an insufficient approach explaining low back pain. Clinical correlation is imperative for an adequate diagnostic advance in patients with low back pain.

  3. MR imaging and CT in osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, D.; Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Boos, N.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To test the agreement between MR imaging and CT in the assessment of osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joints, and thus to provide data about the need for an additional CT scan in the presence of an MR examination. Design and patients. Using a four-point scale, two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded the severity of osteoarthritis of 308 lumbar facet joints on axial T2-weighted and on sagittal T1- and T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo images and separately on the corresponding axial CT scans. Kappa statistics and percentage agreement were calculated. Results. The weighted kappa coefficients for MR imaging versus CT were 0.61 and 0.49 for readers 1 and 2, respectively. The weighted kappa coefficients for interobserver agreement were 0.41 for MR imaging and 0.60 for CT, respectively. There was agreement within one grade between MR and CT images in 95% of cases for reader 1, and in 97% of cases for reader 2. Conclusion. With regard to osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joints there is moderate to good agreement between MR imaging and CT. When differences of one grade are disregarded agreement is even excellent. Therefore, in the presence of an MR examination CT is not required for the assessment of facet joint degeneration. (orig.)

  4. Lumbar disc degeneration was not related to spine and hip bone mineral densities in Chinese: facet joint osteoarthritis may confound the association.

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    Pan, Jianjiang; Lu, Xuan; Yang, Ge; Han, Yongmei; Tong, Xiang; Wang, Yue

    2017-12-01

    A sample of 512 Chinese was studied and we observed that greater disc degeneration on MRI was associated with greater spine DXA BMD. Yet, this association may be confounded by facet joint osteoarthritis. BMD may not be a risk factor for lumbar disc degeneration in Chinese. Evidence suggested that lumbar vertebral bone and intervertebral disc interact with each other in multiple ways. The current paper aims to determine the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and lumbar disc degeneration using a sample of Chinese. We studied 165 patients with back disorders and 347 general subjects from China. All subjects had lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and dual- energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) spine BMD studies, and a subset of general subjects had additional hip BMD measurements. On T2-weighted MR images, Pfirrmann score was used to evaluate the degree of lumbar disc degeneration and facet joint osteoarthritis was assessed as none, slight-moderate, and severe. Regression analyses were used to examine the associations between lumbar and hip BMD and disc degeneration, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), lumbar region, and facet joint osteoarthritis. Greater facet joint osteoarthritis was associated with greater spine BMD (P osteoarthritis entered the regression model, however, greater spine BMD was associated with greater facet joint osteoarthritis (P  0.05). No statistical association was observed between spine BMD and lumbar disc degeneration in patients with back disorders (P > 0.05), and between hip BMD and disc degeneration in general subjects (P > 0.05). BMD may not be a risk factor for lumbar disc degeneration in Chinese. Facet joint osteoarthritis inflates DXA spine BMD measurements and therefore, may confound the association between spine BMD and disc degeneration.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Bone Structural Parameters Reveals Subchondral Cortical Plate Resorption and Increased Trabecular Bone Remodeling in Human Facet Joint Osteoarthritis

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    Cordula Netzer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Facet joint osteoarthritis is a prominent feature of degenerative spine disorders, highly prevalent in ageing populations, and considered a major cause for chronic lower back pain. Since there is no targeted pharmacological therapy, clinical management of disease includes analgesic or surgical treatment. The specific cellular, molecular, and structural changes underpinning facet joint osteoarthritis remain largely elusive. The aim of this study was to determine osteoarthritis-related structural alterations in cortical and trabecular subchondral bone compartments. To this end, we conducted comparative micro computed tomography analysis in healthy (n = 15 and osteoarthritic (n = 22 lumbar facet joints. In osteoarthritic joints, subchondral cortical plate thickness and porosity were significantly reduced. The trabecular compartment displayed a 42 percent increase in bone volume fraction due to an increase in trabecular number, but not trabecular thickness. Bone structural alterations were associated with radiological osteoarthritis severity, mildly age-dependent but not gender-dependent. There was a lack of association between structural parameters of cortical and trabecular compartments in healthy and osteoarthritic specimens. The specific structural alterations suggest elevated subchondral bone resorption and turnover as a potential treatment target in facet joint osteoarthritis.

  6. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

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    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  7. Facet joint syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigrai, M.; Zakovic, J.; Brezinova, M.; Pavlovicova, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is the purpose of the study to demonstrate the clinical relevance of degenerative changes in the facet joint of patients with low back pain irradiating to the lower extremities, and discuss some problems relating to diagnosis and different diagnosis. 119 patients presenting the listed bellow syndromes are covered by the study: scoliosis, polytopic pain vertebral syndrome, paresis and history of trauma. all patients undergo comprehensive neurological examination with special attention focused on the spine: CT and plain x-rays are taken of the lumbosacral segment to assess the condition of the facet joints. The neurological examination demonstrates in all cases pain syndrome in the lumbar spine referred to one or both lower extremities. In 56% it is a matter of persisting pain, and in 44% - recurrent. More than half of the patients complain of sacroiliac (SI) dislocation and palpatory pain. Unilateral or bilateral degenerative changes are documented by imaging studies in all patients, including: subchondral thickening, osteopathy narrowing the lateral or central part of the spinal canal with ensuing nerve root compression. The lumbosacral zygoapophyseal joints are source of pseudoradicular pain. A correlation between clinical picture and GT changes is noted in all patients with facet joint syndrome. CT is an indispensable method in diagnosing facet joint syndrome. (authors)

  8. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

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    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W. [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gedroyc, Wladyslaw [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  9. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W.; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  10. Arthrography of the lumber facet joint and facet block

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    Cho, Hee Kyung; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Park, Hyung Chun; Moon, Jae Ho; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    In spite of numerous clinical and patho-anatomical studied made in the past, there are still different opinions concerning the mechanism of low back pain. We have focused attention on the posterior structures as an alternative source of low back pain with sciatica. So we have studied and analyzed the finding of arthrography of facet joint and effect of the injection of methyprednisolone acetate suspension (Depomedrol) 20mg into the each facet joint. Our results are as follows: 1. Abnormal findings of facet joint arthrogram were degenerative osteoarthritis of facet joint (70.5%), synovial cyst (11.8%), accessory bone (11.8%), and spondylolysis (5.9%). 2. The mean facet angulations of patients of facet syndrome were abnormal on lower lumbar facet joint in 9 of 13 cases (69.2%). 3. On initial assessment, 11 of 17 cases (64.7%) showed complete relief and one month later, 6 of 11 cases (35.3%) showed continuous relief, after steroid injection.

  11. Arthrography of the lumber facet joint and facet block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Park, Hyung Chun; Moon, Jae Ho; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik

    1988-01-01

    In spite of numerous clinical and patho-anatomical studied made in the past, there are still different opinions concerning the mechanism of low back pain. We have focused attention on the posterior structures as an alternative source of low back pain with sciatica. So we have studied and analyzed the finding of arthrography of facet joint and effect of the injection of methyprednisolone acetate suspension (Depomedrol) 20mg into the each facet joint. Our results are as follows: 1. Abnormal findings of facet joint arthrogram were degenerative osteoarthritis of facet joint (70.5%), synovial cyst (11.8%), accessory bone (11.8%), and spondylolysis (5.9%). 2. The mean facet angulations of patients of facet syndrome were abnormal on lower lumbar facet joint in 9 of 13 cases (69.2%). 3. On initial assessment, 11 of 17 cases (64.7%) showed complete relief and one month later, 6 of 11 cases (35.3%) showed continuous relief, after steroid injection.

  12. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

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    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  13. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

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    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  14. Computed Tomography of the lumbar facet joints

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    Choi, Mi Ryoung; Kim, Yung Soon; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Jeon, Hae Sang; Kim, Dae Yung [Kang Nam General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    The lumbar facet disease is a frequently overlooked cause of sciatic pain, but the lumbar facet joints are well-recognized source of low back pain and radiating leg pain which can be confused with sciatica due to herniated disc. We measured the angulation of the facet joints on axial spine CT films in 149 cases which contains 41 normal group and 108 abnormal group and studied the relationship between the angulation and degeneration of the facets, the asymmetry of each sided facets and facet degeneration, the asymmetry and disc protrusion, and the asymmetry and annular bulging of the disc. The results were as follows: 1. Facet angulation in abnormal group were more sagittally oriented than the normal group. 2. The angulation of right facet was more sagittally oriented than the left in L4-5 level of abnormal group. 3. Degeneration of facet joints occur asymmetrically, and the more facet joint degenerates, the more it orients sagittally, particularly in L4-5. 4. Asymmetry in facet joint degeneration and unilateral disc protrusion of L5-SI level is greater than the normal gro0008.

  15. Computed Tomography of the lumbar facet joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; Kim, Yung Soon; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Jeon, Hae Sang; Kim, Dae Yung

    1989-01-01

    The lumbar facet disease is a frequently overlooked cause of sciatic pain, but the lumbar facet joints are well-recognized source of low back pain and radiating leg pain which can be confused with sciatica due to herniated disc. We measured the angulation of the facet joints on axial spine CT films in 149 cases which contains 41 normal group and 108 abnormal group and studied the relationship between the angulation and degeneration of the facets, the asymmetry of each sided facets and facet degeneration, the asymmetry and disc protrusion, and the asymmetry and annular bulging of the disc. The results were as follows: 1. Facet angulation in abnormal group were more sagittally oriented than the normal group. 2. The angulation of right facet was more sagittally oriented than the left in L4-5 level of abnormal group. 3. Degeneration of facet joints occur asymmetrically, and the more facet joint degenerates, the more it orients sagittally, particularly in L4-5. 4. Asymmetry in facet joint degeneration and unilateral disc protrusion of L5-SI level is greater than the normal group

  16. In vivo facet joint loading of the canine lumbar spine.

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    Buttermann, G R; Schendel, M J; Kahmann, R D; Lewis, J L; Bradford, D S

    1992-01-01

    This study describes a technique to measure in vivo loads and the resultant load-contact locations in the facet joint of the canine lumbar spine. The technique is a modification of a previously described in vitro method that used calibrated surface strains of the lateral aspect of the right L3 cranial articular process. In the present study, strains were measured during various in vivo static and dynamic activities 3 days after strain gage implantation. The in vivo recording technique and its errors, which depend on the location of the applied facet loads, is described. The results of applying the technique to five dogs gave the following results. Relative resultant contact load locations on the facet tended to be in the central and caudal portion of the facet in extension activities, central and cranial in standing, and cranial and ventral in flexion or right-turning activities. Right-turning contact locations were ventral and cranial to left-turning locations. Resultant load locations at peak loading during walking were in the central region of the facet, whereas resultant load locations at minimum loading during walking were relatively craniad. This resultant load-contact location during a walk gait cycle typically migrated in an arc with a displacement of 4 mm from minimum to maximum loading. Static tests resulted in a range of facet loads of 0 N in flexion and lying to 185 N for two-legged standing erect, and stand resulted in facet loads of 26 +/- 15 N (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]). Dynamic tests resulted in peak facet loads ranging from 55 N while walking erect to 170 N for climbing up stairs. Maximum walk facet loads were 107 +/- 27 N. The technique is applicable to in vivo studies of a canine facet joint osteoarthritis model and may be useful for establishing an understanding of the biomechanics of low-back pain.

  17. Cervical facet joint dysfunction: a review.

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    Kirpalani, Dhiruj; Mitra, Raj

    2008-04-01

    To review the relevant literature on cervical facet joint dysfunction and determine findings regarding its anatomy, etiology, prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. A computer-aided search of several databases was performed, including Medline (1966 to present), Ovid (1966 to present), and the Cochrane database (1993 to present). Selected articles had the following criteria: (1) all articles analyzed cervical facet joint pain-anatomy, prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, treatment; (2) only full, published articles were studied, not abstracts; and (3) all articles were published in English. All articles were critically evaluated and included the following categories: randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, uncontrolled clinical trials, uncontrolled comparison studies, nonquantitative systematic reviews, and literature-based reviews. We examined 45 references that consisted of 44 journal articles and relevant sections from 1 textbook. Cervical facet joints have been well established in the literature as a common nociceptive pain generator, with an estimated prevalence that ranges from 25% to 66% of chronic axial neck pain. No studies have reported clinical examination findings that are diagnostic for cervical facet mediated pain. Overall the literature provides very limited information regarding the treatment of this condition, with only radiofrequency neurotomy showing evidence of effectively reducing pain from cervical facet joint dysfunction.

  18. Relationship between facet tropism and facet joint degeneration in the sub-axial cervical spine

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    Xin Rong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facet tropism is the angular asymmetry between the left and right facet joint orientation. Although debatable, facet tropism was suggested to be associated with disc degeneration, facet degeneration and degenerative spondylolisthesis in the lumbar spine. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between facet tropism and facet degeneration in the sub-axial cervical spine. Methods A total of 200 patients with cervical spondylosis were retrospectively analyzed. Facet degeneration was categorized into 4 grade: grade I, normal; grade II, degenerative changes including joint space narrowing, cyst formation, small osteophytes (3 mm without fusion of the joint; grade IV, bony fusion of the facet joints. Facet orientations and facet tropisms with respect to the transverse, sagittal and coronal plane were calculated from the reconstructed cervical spine, which was based on the axial CT scan images. The paired facet joints were then categorized into three types: symmetric, moderated tropism and severe tropism. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the relationship between any demographic and anatomical factor and facet degeneration. Results The mean age of enrolled patients was 46.23 years old (ranging from 30 to 64 years old. There were 114 males and 86 females. The degrees of facet degeneration varied according to cervical levels and ages. Degenerated facet joints were most common at C2-C3 level and more common in patients above 50 years old. The facet orientations were also different from level to level. By univariate analysis, genders, ages, cervical levels, facet orientations and facet tropisms were all significantly different between the normal facets and degenerated facets. However, results from multivariate logistic regression suggested only age and facet tropism with respect to the sagittal plane were related to facet degeneration. Conclusion Facet degeneration were more common at

  19. Imaging findings predicting the outcome of cervical facet joint blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechelhammer, Lukas; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Zanetti, Marco; Hodler, Juerg; Schmid, Marius R.; Boos, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    To determine which cross-sectional imaging findings predict the short-term outcome of cervical facet joint blocks (FJB) and to evaluate the effect of combined intra-/periarticular versus periarticular injection on pain. Fifty facet joints in 37 patients were included in the study. Single, unilateral FJBs in 24 patients, and bilateral single level FJBs in 13 patients were performed, respectively. In all patients, pain relief was assessed using a visual analogue scale. All computed tomography (CT) examinations were blindly reviewed by two radiologists. Osteoarthritis was rated using the Kellgren classification. The presence of combined intra-/periarticular vs. sole periarticular injection of contrast was evaluated. Kellgren Grades 0 (n=23), 1 (n=5), 2 (n=3), 3 (n=9), and 4 (n=10) were found. Mean pain relief after injection was 35% (range: 0-100%). 40% of all injections were combined intra-/periarticular. There was neither a statistically significant difference between pain relief and combined intra-/periarticular versus sole periarticular injection (p=0.64) nor the grade of osteoarthritis (p=0.49). Pain relief after cervical FJBs does not correlate with morphologic alterations seen on CT. Periarticular FJBs are not less successful than combined intra-/periarticular FJBs. (orig.)

  20. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

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    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose versus ultra-low-dose CT for lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis in patients with low back pain with MRI correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Yun, Seong Jong; Jo, Hyeon Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyeon; Song, Jae Gwang; Park, Yong Sung

    2018-01-01

    To compare the image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic performance between low-dose (LD) and ultra-low-dose (ULD) lumbar-spine (L-spine) CT with iterative reconstruction (IR) for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 260 patients with chronic LBP who underwent L-spine CT between November 2015 and September 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Of these, 143 underwent LD-CT with IR and 117 underwent ULD-CT with IR. The patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) into BMI1 (<22.9 kg/m 2 ), BMI2 (23.0-24.9 kg/m 2 ), and BMI3 (≥25 kg/m 2 ) groups. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), qualitative image quality, and final diagnoses (lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis). L-spine MRIs interpreted by consensus were used as the reference standard. All data were statistically analyzed. ULD protocol showed significantly lower SNR for all patients (p < 0.001) except the vertebral bodies and lower qualitative image quality for BMI3 patients (p ≤ 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference between ULD (sensitivity, 95.1-98.1%; specificity, 92.5-98.7%; accuracy, 94.6-98.0%) and LD protocols (sensitivity, 95.6-100%; specificity, 95.5-98.9%; accuracy, 97.4-98.1%), (all p≥0.1) in the BMI1 and BMI2; while dose was 60-68% lower with the ULD protocol. Interobserver agreements were excellent or good with regard to image quality and final diagnoses. For the BM1 and BMI2 groups, ULD-CT provided an acceptable image quality and exhibited a diagnostic accuracy similar to that of LD-CT. These findings suggest that it is a useful diagnostic tool for patients with chronic LBP who exhibit a BMI of <25 kg/m 2 . (orig.)

  2. CHECKing radiographic joint damage in early osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinds, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease, characterized by pain and functional disability. OA commonly involves the larger joints, with symptomatic knee and hip OA affecting 6% and 3% of the adult population (age 30 years and over), respectively. The prevalence and disease

  3. Vitamin K, osteoarthritis, and joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of joint pain and lower extremity disability in older adults and there is no known cure. Vitamin K has been implicated on osteoarthritis because vitamin K dependent proteins are present in joint tissues, such as cartilage and bone. In order to function, vitamin K ...

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose versus ultra-low-dose CT for lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis in patients with low back pain with MRI correlation

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    Lee, Sun Hwa [Inje University College of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Nowon-gu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Seong Jong; Jo, Hyeon Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyeon [Republic of Korea Air Force, Department of Radiology, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Gwang [Republic of Korea Air Force, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Sung [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-04-15

    To compare the image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic performance between low-dose (LD) and ultra-low-dose (ULD) lumbar-spine (L-spine) CT with iterative reconstruction (IR) for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 260 patients with chronic LBP who underwent L-spine CT between November 2015 and September 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Of these, 143 underwent LD-CT with IR and 117 underwent ULD-CT with IR. The patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) into BMI1 (<22.9 kg/m{sup 2}), BMI2 (23.0-24.9 kg/m{sup 2}), and BMI3 (≥25 kg/m{sup 2}) groups. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), qualitative image quality, and final diagnoses (lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis). L-spine MRIs interpreted by consensus were used as the reference standard. All data were statistically analyzed. ULD protocol showed significantly lower SNR for all patients (p < 0.001) except the vertebral bodies and lower qualitative image quality for BMI3 patients (p ≤ 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference between ULD (sensitivity, 95.1-98.1%; specificity, 92.5-98.7%; accuracy, 94.6-98.0%) and LD protocols (sensitivity, 95.6-100%; specificity, 95.5-98.9%; accuracy, 97.4-98.1%), (all p≥0.1) in the BMI1 and BMI2; while dose was 60-68% lower with the ULD protocol. Interobserver agreements were excellent or good with regard to image quality and final diagnoses. For the BM1 and BMI2 groups, ULD-CT provided an acceptable image quality and exhibited a diagnostic accuracy similar to that of LD-CT. These findings suggest that it is a useful diagnostic tool for patients with chronic LBP who exhibit a BMI of <25 kg/m{sup 2}. (orig.)

  5. Histological Osteoarthritic Changes in the Human Cervical Spine Facet Joints Related to Age and Gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Charles, Annie Vesterby; Gregersen, Markil

    2018-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional autopsy study. OBJECTIVE: Quantify histological changes in the lower cervical spine facet joints with regard to age and gender using systematic random sampling of entire joints. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Neck pain is a common debilitating musculoskeletal condition...... and one of the highest ranked causes of years lived with disability. The cause of neck pain is multifactorial and osteoarthritis is one potential cause. The cervical spine facet joints have been implicated in the aetiology of chronic neck pain. Hence, a detailed description of their anatomy and age......- and gender related changes is needed. METHODS: The lower four cervical spine segments (C4-C7 included) were obtained from 72 subjects during autopsy; 29 females (median age 53 years [22-77]) and 43 males (median age 38 years [20-78]). A total of 1132 articular facets were embedded in toto in hard plastic...

  6. Biochemical and biomechanical characterisation of equine cervical facet joint cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, S A; White, J L; Hu, J C; Athanasiou, K A

    2018-04-15

    The equine cervical facet joint is a site of significant pathology. Located bilaterally on the dorsal spine, these diarthrodial joints work in conjunction with the intervertebral disc to facilitate appropriate spinal motion. Despite the high prevalence of pathology in this joint, the facet joint is understudied and thus lacking in viable treatment options. The goal of this study was to characterise equine facet joint cartilage and provide a comprehensive database describing the morphological, histological, biochemical and biomechanical properties of this tissue. Descriptive cadaver studies. A total of 132 facet joint surfaces were harvested from the cervical spines of six skeletally mature horses (11 surfaces per animal) for compiling biomechanical and biochemical properties of hyaline cartilage of the equine cervical facet joints. Gross morphometric measurements and histological staining were performed on facet joint cartilage. Creep indentation and uniaxial strain-to-failure testing were used to determine the biomechanical compressive and tensile properties. Biochemical assays included quantification of total collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan and DNA content. The facet joint surfaces were ovoid in shape with a flat articular surface. Histological analyses highlighted structures akin to articular cartilage of other synovial joints. In general, biomechanical and biochemical properties did not differ significantly between the inferior and superior joint surfaces as well as among spinal levels. Interestingly, compressive and tensile properties of cervical facet articular cartilage were lower than those of articular cartilage from other previously characterised equine joints. Removal of the superficial zone reduced the tissue's tensile strength, suggesting that this zone is important for the tensile integrity of the tissue. Facet surfaces were sampled at a single, central location and do not capture the potential topographic variation in cartilage properties. This

  7. Radiosynoviorthesis in osteoarthritis of finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, G.

    2006-01-01

    This is an overview about osteoarthritis of the finger joints. The scientific publications according to the therapy of this disease by means of radiosynoviorthesis are presented, comparing the results in rheumatoid arthritis. Additionally own experience and results are reported. (orig.)

  8. Hypertrophic Synovitis of the Facet Joint Causing Root Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Iwatsuki M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritic changes in the facet joints are common in the presence of degenerative disc disease. Changes in the joint capsule accompany changes in the articular surfaces. Intraspinal synovial cysts that cause radicular pain, cauda equina syndrome, and myelopathy have been reported; however, there have been few reports in orthopedic or neurosurgical literature regarding hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint presenting as an incidental para-articular mass. Here, we report a case of hypertrophic synovitis causing root pain. We describe the case of a 65-year-old man suffering from right sciatica and right leg pain in the L5 nerve-root dermatome for 1 year; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an enhanced mass around the L4–5 facet joint. We investigated this mass pathologically. After right medial facetectomy, the symptoms resolved. Pathological investigation revealed this mass was hypertrophic synovitis. Hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint might cause root pain.

  9. Unilateral spondylolysis and the presence of facet joint tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankine, James J; Dickson, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Retrospective review of the CT scans performed in a group of patients examined for a possible spondylolysis. To investigate whether there is an association between unilateral spondylolysis and facet joint tropism. Spondylolysis is a fatigue fracture of the pars interarticularis of great importance in sports injury. The demonstration of a unilateral spondylolysis is important because there is a potential for full healing if the athletic activity is modified, whereas bilateral spondylolysis frequently leads to established nonunion. Coronally orientated facet joints are known to predispose to spondylolysis by increasing the point loading of the pars interarticularis. The importance of this finding has not been investigated in unilateral spondylolysis. A review of patients with low back pain and a possible diagnosis of spondylolysis who were investigated with multislice CT was performed. The coronal orientation of the facet joints at L4/5 and L5/S1 was measured and comparison was done between those with and without a spondylolysis. The coronal angle of 140 facet joints in 35 patients was recorded. Of 35 patients, 23 had a spondylolysis which was unilateral in 12 patients. The facet joint angle was significantly more coronally orientated in the presence of a spondylolysis when compared with an intact pars (means, 53° and 43°, respectively; P spondylolysis, the facet joint was significantly more coronally orientated on the side of the spondylolysis (means, 52° and 45°, respectively; P spondylolysis. Asymmetric facet joints do increase the force through one side of the spine, with a unilateral spondylolysis occurring on the side of the more coronally orientated facet joint.

  10. Uncovertebral joint injury in cervical facet dislocation: the headphones sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, Francesco; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N.; Dell' Atti, Claudia; Lalam, Radhesh K.; Tins, Bernhard J.; Tyrrell, Prudencia N.M.; McCall, Iain W. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the uncovertebral mal-alignment as a reliable indirect sign of cervical facet joint dislocation. We examined the uncovertebral axial plane alignment of 12 patients with unilateral and bilateral cervical facet joint dislocation (UCFJD and BCFJD, respectively), comparing its frequency to the reverse hamburger bun sign on CT and MR axial images. Of the seven cases with BCFJD, five clearly demonstrated the diagnostic reverse facet joint hamburger bun sign on CT and MR images, but in two cases this sign was not detectable. In the five cases with UCFJD, four demonstrated the reverse hamburger bun sign on both CT and MRI. In one case the reverse hamburger bun sign was not seen adequately with either image modality, but the facet dislocation was identified on sagittal imaging. The uncovertebral mal-alignment was detected in all 12 cases. Normally, the two components of the uncovertebral joint enjoy a concentric relationship that in the axial plane is reminiscent of the relationship of headphones with the wearer's head. We name this appearance the 'headphones' sign. Radiologists should be aware of the headphones sign as a reliable indicator of facet joint dislocation on axial imaging used in the assessment of cervical spine injuries. (orig.)

  11. Augmented Reality-Guided Lumbar Facet Joint Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Dennler, Cyrill; Rosskopf, Andrea B; Jaberg, Laurenz; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Farshad, Mazda

    2018-05-08

    The aim of this study was to assess feasibility and accuracy of augmented reality-guided lumbar facet joint injections. A spine phantom completely embedded in hardened opaque agar with 3 ring markers was built. A 3-dimensional model of the phantom was uploaded to an augmented reality headset (Microsoft HoloLens). Two radiologists independently performed 20 augmented reality-guided and 20 computed tomography (CT)-guided facet joint injections each: for each augmented reality-guided injection, the hologram was manually aligned with the phantom container using the ring markers. The radiologists targeted the virtual facet joint and tried to place the needle tip in the holographic joint space. Computed tomography was performed after each needle placement to document final needle tip position. Time needed from grabbing the needle to final needle placement was measured for each simulated injection. An independent radiologist rated images of all needle placements in a randomized order blinded to modality (augmented reality vs CT) and performer as perfect, acceptable, incorrect, or unsafe. Accuracy and time to place needles were compared between augmented reality-guided and CT-guided facet joint injections. In total, 39/40 (97.5%) of augmented reality-guided needle placements were either perfect or acceptable compared with 40/40 (100%) CT-guided needle placements (P = 0.5). One augmented reality-guided injection missed the facet joint space by 2 mm. No unsafe needle placements occurred. Time to final needle placement was substantially faster with augmented reality guidance (mean 14 ± 6 seconds vs 39 ± 15 seconds, P Augmented reality-guided facet joint injections are feasible and accurate without potentially harmful needle placement in an experimental setting.

  12. A STUDY ON OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyappan Nair

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It is a degenerative disease where, load bearing synovial joints like hip and knee are affected. Usually bilateral, highest incidence is seen after 6th decade of life. It is also common in women post - menopausal age. Osteoarthritis of knee is more common in Asian population because of lifestyle habits like squatting and sitting cross legged. The aetiology of the disease can be multifactorial but usually it is an age associated disease due to wear and tear. The two types of osteoarthritis are, Primary osteoarthritis: It is more common. This occurs in old age due to wear and tear of the joints and Secondary osteoarthritis: In this there is an underlying primary joint disease which leads to degeneration. Any age group can be affected. Predisposing factors are, congenital malformation of joint, trauma, disease involving joints, malalignment, internal derangement and obesity. A sincere effort has been put in this study to understand the Osteoarthritis complications in the elderly population. This study is intended to help the practicing fellow orthopaedicians to understand and thus treat the patient more effectively. METHODS  The study was done in the Department of Orthopaedics, Travancore Medical College at Kollam.  The study was done from June 2014 to June 2016.  Three Hundred Twenty cases who attended in the Department of Orthopaedics were taken for the study.  Detailed History and Clinical Examination was conducted.  All the statistical analysis was done using the latest SPSS software 2015 (California. RESULTS In the present study, the mean age of the population was 62.67 years with a standard deviation of 11.739 years. Crepitus was present in eighty three cases; pain was the chief complaint and was present in two hundred and thirty eight cases. Stiffness was complained in two hundred and fourteen cases and in seventy one cases the patient complained of swelling. On

  13. Lumbar facet syndrome - Lumbar facet joint injection and low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Jimenez Hakim, Enrique; Rodriguez, Jose Maria; Hakim Daccach, Fernando; Quinonez, German; Rodriguez Munera, Andres

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective study lo evaluate the effectiveness of injection therapy in the lumbar zygapophysial joints with anesthetics and steroids in patients with persisting low back pain and lumbar facer syndrome. Thirty-seven patients with low back pain who reported immediate relief of their pain after controlled blocks into the facet joints between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae and the fifth lumbar and first sacral vertebrae were evaluated. Outcome was evaluated using the visual analog pain scales. All outcome measures were repeated at eight days and six weeks alter controlled injection. At six-week follow-up examination 83,7% of thirty-seven patients experienced a good response to controlled blocks of the lumbar zygaphyseal (facet) joints. Good result is the pain relief of 50% or more. Fifteen patients experienced a good response with pain relief of eight points or more in the VAS

  14. Ageing and Incidence of Osteoarthritis of the Knee Joint, Lumbar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant difference in the distribution of osteoarthritis between gender and within the age groups (P=0.000). Osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine was the highest in males within the age groups of 61-65, followed by 45- 50, 56 - 60, and 51 - 55; whereas in the females, osteoarthritis of the knee joint was the ...

  15. Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  16. Early osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Elizabeth A; Berruto, Massimo; Filardo, Giuseppe; Ronga, Mario; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Farr, Jack; Ferrua, Paolo; Grassi, Alberto; Condello, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    Patellofemoral joint cartilage lesions are associated with a variety of clinical situations including blunt trauma, lateral patella dislocations, or as a secondary development in the setting of abnormal joint loading. There is a need for more clarity on how to best address these lesions. Most specifically, when is it necessary to surgically treat these lesions of the patella and trochlea and which technique to use? This review will focus on the spectrum of patellofemoral disease/injury and their treatment strategies, with special emphasis on cartilage damage and early osteoarthritis. Chapter sections will review the most common scenarios of cartilage damage in the patellofemoral joint, with an attempt to summarize current treatment, their outcomes, remaining challenges and unanswered questions.

  17. [Feasibility and accuracy of ultrasound-guided methodology in the examination of lumbar spine facet joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chuan-Bing; Li, Yong-Zhong; Tang, Qin-Qin; Sun, Lin; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Bang-Xiang; Song, Li; Liu, Hui

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility, accuracy of B ultrasound in the examination of joint space of lumbar spine facet joints compared with CT scan. Ten healthy adult volunteers were enrolled. The joint space of lumbar facet joints was measured by ultrasound. To identify the spinal levels, the posterior parasagittal sonograms were obtained at levels L1 to S1. The lumbar facet joints were delineated with the help of transverse sonograms at each level. Meanwhile, the lumbar facet joints were evaluated by spiral CT on the same plane, reformatted to 1-mm axial slices. A total of 88 lumbar facet joints from L1 to S1 were clearly visualized in the 10 volunteers. Both ultrasound and CT measurements showed the same average depth and lateral distance of lumbar facet joint space (P > 0.05). The lumbar facet joint space can be accurately demonstrated by ultrasound.

  18. Intra-articular nerve growth factor regulates development, but not maintenance, of injury-induced facet joint pain & spinal neuronal hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, J V; Kartha, S; Winkelstein, B A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the current study is to define whether intra-articular nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to osteoarthritic pain, is necessary and sufficient for the development or maintenance of injury-induced facet joint pain and its concomitant spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. Male Holtzman rats underwent painful cervical facet joint distraction (FJD) or sham procedures. Mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed in the forepaws, and NGF expression was quantified in the C6/C7 facet joint. An anti-NGF antibody was administered intra-articularly in additional rats immediately or 1 day following facet distraction or sham procedures to block intra-articular NGF and test its contribution to initiation and/or maintenance of facet joint pain and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. NGF was injected into the bilateral C6/C7 facet joints in separate rats to determine if NGF alone is sufficient to induce these behavioral and neuronal responses. NGF expression increases in the cervical facet joint in association with behavioral sensitivity after that joint's mechanical injury. Intra-articular application of anti-NGF immediately after a joint distraction prevents the development of both injury-induced pain and hyperexcitability of spinal neurons. Yet, intra-articular anti-NGF applied after pain has developed does not attenuate either behavioral or neuronal hyperexcitability. Intra-articular NGF administered to the facet in naïve rats also induces behavioral hypersensitivity and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. Findings demonstrate that NGF in the facet joint contributes to the development of injury-induced joint pain. Localized blocking of NGF signaling in the joint may provide potential treatment for joint pain. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolated Facet Joint Fracture as a Cause of Chronic Low Back Pain and Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Teasell

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of facet joint fracture following a rear-end motor vehicle accident who presented with chronic low back pain and sciatica is outlined. Diagnosis was made with 99Tc nuclear bone scan and was confirmed on computed tomographic scan after diagnosis with regular radiographs had failed. Facetectomy relieved pain but led to symptoms related to asymmetric load on the opposite facet joint. Symptoms were substantially relieved with a facet joint deinnervation procedure. Facet joint fracture was felt to occur as a consequence of compression forces on the facet joint at the time of impact.

  20. Utilization of Facet Joint and Sacroiliac Joint Interventions in Medicare Population from 2000 to 2014: Explosive Growth Continues!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-10-01

    Increasing utilization of interventional techniques in managing chronic spinal pain, specifically facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections, is a major concern of healthcare policy makers. We analyzed the patterns of utilization of facet and sacroiliac joint interventions in managing chronic spinal pain. The results showed significant increase of facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections from 2000 to 2014 in Medicare FFS service beneficiaries. Overall, the Medicare population increased 35 %, whereas facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions increased 313.3 % per 100,000 Medicare population with an annual increase of 10.7 %. While the increases were uniform from 2000 to 2014, there were some decreases noted for facet joint interventions in 2007, 2010, and 2013, whereas for sacroiliac joint injections, the decreases were noted in 2007 and 2013. The increases were for cervical and thoracic facet neurolysis at 911.5 % compared to lumbosacral facet neurolysis of 567.8 %, 362.9 % of cervical and thoracic facet joint blocks, 316.9 % of sacroiliac joints injections, and finally 227.3 % of lumbosacral facet joint blocks.

  1. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Gallo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.gallo83@gmail.com; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: asbertrand3@hotmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice (France); Bard, Robert L., E-mail: rbard@cancerscan.com [New York Medical College (United States); Kelekis, Alexis, E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital “ATTIKON” (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4–L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst.

  2. Clinical features of symptomatic patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (OA) is common and leads to pain and disability. However, current classification criteria do not distinguish between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint OA. The objective of this study was to provide empirical evidence of the clinical features of patellofemoral joint OA (PFJOA) and to explore the potential for making a confident clinical diagnosis in the community setting. Methods This was a population-based cross-sectional study of 745 adults aged ≥50 years with knee pain. Information on risk factors and clinical signs and symptoms was gathered by a self-complete questionnaire, and standardised clinical interview and examination. Three radiographic views of the knee were obtained (weight-bearing semi-flexed posteroanterior, supine skyline and lateral) and individuals were classified into four subsets (no radiographic OA, isolated PFJOA, isolated tibiofemoral joint OA, combined patellofemoral/tibiofemoral joint OA) according to two different cut-offs: 'any OA' and 'moderate to severe OA'. A series of binary logistic and multinomial regression functions were performed to compare the clinical features of each subset and their ability in combination to discriminate PFJOA from other subsets. Results Distinctive clinical features of moderate to severe isolated PFJOA included a history of dramatic swelling, valgus deformity, markedly reduced quadriceps strength, and pain on patellofemoral joint compression. Mild isolated PFJOA was barely distinguished from no radiographic OA (AUC 0.71, 95% CI 0.66, 0.76) with only difficulty descending stairs and coarse crepitus marginally informative over age, sex and body mass index. Other cardinal signs of knee OA - the presence of effusion, bony enlargement, reduced flexion range of movement, mediolateral instability and varus deformity - were indicators of tibiofemoral joint OA. Conclusions Early isolated PFJOA is clinically manifest in symptoms and self-reported functional

  3. Factors affecting results of fluoroscopy-guided facet joint injection: Probable differences in the outcome of treatment between pure facet joint hypertrophy and concomitant diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akif Albayrak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Retrospective cohort study. Purpose: Facet joints are considered a common source of chronic low-back pain. To determine whether pathogens related to the facet joint arthritis have any effect on treatment failure. Materials and Methods: Facet joint injection was applied to 94 patients treated at our hospital between 2011 and 2012 (mean age 59.5 years; 80 women and 14 men. For the purpose of analysis, the patients were divided into two groups. Patients who only had facet hypertrophy were placed in group A (47 patients, 41 women and 6 men, mean age 55.3 years and patients who had any additional major pathology to facet hypertrophy were placed in group B (47 patients, 39 women and 8 men, mean age 58.9 years. Injections were applied around the facet joint under surgical conditions utilizing fluoroscopy device guidance. A mixture of methylprednisolone and lidocaine was used as the injection ingredient. Results: In terms of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and visual analog scale (VAS scores, no significant difference was found between preinjection and immediate postinjection values in both groups, and the scores of group A patients were significantly lower (P < 0.005 compared with that of group B patients at the end of the third, sixth, and twelfth month. Conclusion: For low-back pain caused by facet hypertrophy, steroid injection around the facet joint is an effective treatment, but if there is an existing major pathology, it is not as effective.

  4. Treatment of lumbar facet joint syndrome by CT-guided intraarticular infiltration of fact joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleifer, J.; Fenzl, G.; Wolf, A.; Diehl, K.

    1994-01-01

    In 62 patients with facet syndrome a total of 205 joints were infiltrated, CT monitoring being used in all cases. Each facet joint was infiltrated with 0.3 ml bupivacaine and 0.8 ml methylprednisolone. The patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 24 persons who had undergone lumbar disc surgery, group 2 of 23 patients with spondylarthrosis of the facet joints, and group 3 of 15 patients who had undergone lumbar disc surgery but hat additional spondylarthrosis. Very good results were defined as pain relief for longer than 4 weeks, good results as pain relief for up to 4 weeks and poor results as brief pain relief or none at all. In 27 patients facet infiltration was performed for the purpose of diagnosis. Results were significantly in group 2 than in group 1. In group 3 results were better than in group 1, but worse than in group 2. These differences were not statistical by significant. Seven patients in the diagnostic group had no pain relief, and facet syndrome was excluded. (orig.) [de

  5. Congenital absence of the lumbar facet joint associated with bilateral spondylolysis of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with a rare case of congenital absence of lumbar facet joint manifesting as low back pain. Physical examination showed no neurological or hematologic abnormalities. Radiography revealed absence of a facet joint on the right side of L4-5. Computed tomography and three-dimensional computed tomography revealed absence of the facet joint on the right side of L4-5 and spondylolysis on both sides of L5. Pain subsided after conservative treatment. This is an extremely rare case of congenital absence of lumbar facet joint associated with bilateral spondylolysis.

  6. Who should have knee joint replacement surgery for osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieppe, Paul; Lim, Keith; Lohmander, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10-20% of peo......Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10...

  7. Biomarkers for equine joint injury and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwraith, C Wayne; Kawcak, Christopher E; Frisbie, David D; Little, Christopher B; Clegg, Peter D; Peffers, Mandy J; Karsdal, Morten A; Ekman, Stina; Laverty, Sheila; Slayden, Richard A; Sandell, Linda J; Lohmander, L S; Kraus, Virginia B

    2018-03-01

    We report the results of a symposium aimed at identifying validated biomarkers that can be used to complement clinical observations for diagnosis and prognosis of joint injury leading to equine osteoarthritis (OA). Biomarkers might also predict pre-fracture change that could lead to catastrophic bone failure in equine athletes. The workshop was attended by leading scientists in the fields of equine and human musculoskeletal biomarkers to enable cross-disciplinary exchange and improve knowledge in both. Detailed proceedings with strategic planning was written, added to, edited and referenced to develop this manuscript. The most recent information from work in equine and human osteoarthritic biomarkers was accumulated, including the use of personalized healthcare to stratify OA phenotypes, transcriptome analysis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal injuries in the human knee. The spectrum of "wet" biomarker assays that are antibody based that have achieved usefulness in both humans and horses, imaging biomarkers and the role they can play in equine and human OA was discussed. Prediction of musculoskeletal injury in the horse remains a challenge, and the potential usefulness of spectroscopy, metabolomics, proteomics, and development of biobanks to classify biomarkers in different stages of equine and human OA were reviewed. The participants concluded that new information and studies in equine musculoskeletal biomarkers have potential translational value for humans and vice versa. OA is equally important in humans and horses, and the welfare issues associated with catastrophic musculoskeletal injury in horses add further emphasis to the need for good validated biomarkers in the horse. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:823-831, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Facet joint injuries in acute cervical spine trauma : evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jeon Ju; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Lee, Keon; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Yun, Seong Mun [Dongkang General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate injury patterns of facet joints and associated soft tissue injuries in patients with acute traumatic cervical facet joint injuries. From among patients with cervical spine trauma, 27 with facet joint injuries, as seen on CT and MRI, were chosen for this study. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the location of facet joint injury, the presence or absence of facet dislocation or fracture, and other associated fractures. MR images were analyzed with regard to ligament injury, intervertebral disc injury, intervertebral disc herniation, and spinal cord injury. The most common location of facet joint injury was C6-7 level(n=10), followed by C5-6(n=8). Among these 27 patients with facet joint injuries, 12(44%) had bilateral injuries and 15(56%) unilateral injuries. Facet fractures were present in 17 cases(63%) and the fracture of inferior facet was more frequent than superior. Patterns of fracture were vertical, transverse, or comminuted, but vertical fracture was the most common. Various degrees of dislocation were observed in patients with facet fractures. Fractures other than facet included pillar(n=11), lamina(n=6), transverse process(n=14), body(n=13), and spinous process(n=3). On MR images, anterior longitudinal ligament injury was found in 8 patients(30%), posterior longitudinal ligament injury in 4(15%), and interspinous ligament injury in 20(74%). Twelve patients(44%) had spinal cord injuries including edema(n=8) and hemorrhage(n=4). Among patients with disc abnormalities, 11(41%) had intervertebral disc injuries, and traumatic disc herniations were found in nine. Traumatic cervical facet joint injuries were manifested as various patterns and frequently associated with other fractures or soft tissue injuries. Analysis of CT and MR findings of these injury patterns helped formulate a therapeutic plan and determine of prognosis.

  9. Image-guided lumbar facet joint infiltration in nonradicular low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, Arti; Chaturvedi, Sunil; Sivasankar, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of facet joint infiltrations for pain relief in 44 selected patients with chronic nonradicular low back pain (LBP). Forty-four patients with chronic LBP of more than 3 months' duration were selected for facet joint infiltration. The majority (n = 24) had facetal pain with no evidence of significant facetal arthropathy on imaging. Fifteen patients had radiological evidence of facetal arthropathy, one had a facet joint synovial cyst, three were post–lumbar surgery patients, and two patients had spondylolysis. Facet joint injections were carried out under fluoroscopic guidance in 39 patients and under CT guidance in 5 cases. Pain relief was assessed using the visual analog scale at 1 h post-procedure and, thereafter, at 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks. A total of 141 facet joints were infiltrated in 44 patients over a 2-year period. There was significant pain relief in 81.8% patients 1 h after the procedure, in 86.3% after 1 week, in 93.3% after 4 weeks, in 85.7% after 12 weeks, and in 62.5% after 24 weeks. No major complications were encountered. Facet nerve block was found to be a simple, minimally invasive, and safe procedure. With meticulous patient selection, we achieved long-term success rates of over 60%. We conclude that this method represents an important alternative treatment for nonradicular back pain

  10. FACET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.W.; Banszky, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    The merits of using commercially available software packages versus in-house software and databases are frequently assessed by cost engineers in consulting, contracting and operating companies alike. There is no consensus on which approach is better as each company has individual requirements that are better provided for by one or the other alternative. This paper describes Mobil Oil Canada's FACET (Facilities Cost Estimating Techniques) programs and provides a framework for building any successful in-house PC-based cost estimating and control system. The FACET series of programs enables detailed cost estimates to be quickly developed from relatively conceptual cost data and allows project cost estimates to be compared with actual costs as the project proceeds

  11. Inter-rater reliability of diagnostic criteria for sacroiliac joint-, disc- and facet joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Cornelis W J; Groeneweg, Johannes G; Stronks, Dirk L; Huygen, Frank J P M

    2017-01-01

    Several diagnostic criteria sets are described in the literature to identify low back pain subtypes, but very little is known about the inter-rater reliability of these criteria. We conducted a study to determine the reliability of diagnostic tests that point towards SI joint-, disc- or facet joint pain. Inter-rater reliability study alongside three randomized clinical trials. Multidisciplinary pain center of general hospital. Patients aged 18 or more with medical history and physical examination suggestive of sacroiliac joint-, disc- and facet joint pain on lumbar level. Making use of nowadays most common used diagnostic criteria, a physical examination is taken independently by three physicians (two pain physicians and one orthopedic surgeon). Inter-rater reliability (Kappa (κ) measure of agreement) and significance (p) between raters are presented. Strengths of agreement, indicated with κ values above 0,20, are presented in order of agreement. One hundred patients were included. None of the parameters from the physical investigation had κ values of more than 0.21 (fair) in all pairs of raters. Between two raters (C and D), there was an almost perfect agreement on three parameters, more specifically ``Abnormal sensory and motor examination, hyperactive or diminished reflexes'', ``Sitting exam shows no reflex, motor or sensory signs in the legs'' and ``Straight leg raising (Laségue) negative between 30 and 70 degrees of flexion''. The ``Drop test positive'' parameters had moderate strength of agreement between raters A and D and fair strength between raters A and B. The ``Digital interspinous pressure test positive'' had moderate strength of agreement between raters C and D and fair strength of agreement between raters A and B as well as raters B and C. Three other parameters had a fair strength of agreement between two raters, all other parameters had a slight or poor strength of agreement. Inter-rater reliability, confidence intervals and significance of

  12. Detailed examination of the lower cervical spine facet joints in a road traffic crash fatality - a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Nielsen, Edith; Vesterby, Annie

    2005-01-01

    The lower cervical spine facet joints of a road traffic crash fatality were examined using diagnostic imaging and histological techniques. No injuries to the cervical spine facet joints could be identified with diagnostic imaging including conventional radiology, CT and MRI. Examination of stained...... histological sections visualised the morphology and integrity of the facet joints in detail. Occult injuries to and in close proximity of the cervical spine facet joints were identified only on histological examination....

  13. Joint Space Narrowing in Patients With Pisotriquetral Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Berg, Paul W L; Heeg, Erik; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2017-09-01

    Patients with suspected pisotriquetral osteoarthritis may show joint space narrowing. However, the extent of joint space narrowing and its deviation from the joint space width (JSW) in normal anatomy is unknown. In this pathoanatomic study, we therefore compared the JSW in the pisotriquetral joint between osteoarthritic patient wrists and healthy wrists. We reviewed preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 wrists of patients with ulnar-sided wrist pain who underwent a pisiformectomy with confirmed pisotriquetral osteoarthritis at surgery. We also reviewed CT scans of 20 normal wrists from healthy volunteers serving as control group. Three-dimensional CT models of the pisiform and triquetrum were obtained from both affected and normal wrists, after which the minimum JSW was calculated in an automated fashion. In the patient group, the median (interquartile range) of the minimum JSW was 0.1 mm (0.0-0.2), and in the control group, 0.8 mm (0.3-0.9) ( P = .007). We showed that the pisotriquetral joint space in osteoarthritic patient wrists was significantly narrowed compared with healthy wrists. These results suggest that JSW evaluation has a potential diagnostic value in the work-up of patients with suspected pisotriquetral osteoarthritis. This is an interesting area for future clinical research, especially because no gold standard for diagnosing pisotriquetral osteoarthritis has been established yet.

  14. Clinical efficacy of radiation synovectomy in digital joint osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampen, Willm Uwe; Hellweg, Leif; Massoudi-Nickel, Schirin; Czech, Norbert; Henze, Eberhard; Brenner, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy was developed for local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the long-term efficacy of radiation synovectomy was retrospectively evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (activated arthrosis) of the digital joints using an algofunctional score. Fifty-three digital joints in 29 patients (mean age 64.8 years) were treated by intra-articular injection of 169 Er citrate. All joints were painful despite pharmacotherapy and showed an elevated blood pool pattern in a pretherapeutic three-phase bone scan, indicative for local synovitis. The patients were asked to classify their complaints with respect to different daily manual activities on a ten-step pain scale from 1 (total disability) to 10 (lack of any impairment) prior to and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 41 months. Local signs of osteoarthritis such as joint swelling or pain were additionally evaluated and were scored from progression of complaints to excellent improvement based on patient self-evaluation. All patients reported a pronounced improvement in their manual activities. The mean total score of 4.73±0.58 for all activities prior to treatment increased significantly to 6.79±0.47 after radiation synovectomy (p<0.05). The best results were obtained in the thumb base joints, whereas distal interphalangeal joints were frequently resistant to therapy. Radiation synovectomy is highly effective in digital joint osteoarthritis with concomitant local synovitis. (orig.)

  15. Clinical efficacy of radiation synovectomy in digital joint osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampen, Willm Uwe; Hellweg, Leif; Massoudi-Nickel, Schirin; Czech, Norbert; Henze, Eberhard [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Kiel (Germany); Brenner, Winfried [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Radiation synovectomy was developed for local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the long-term efficacy of radiation synovectomy was retrospectively evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (activated arthrosis) of the digital joints using an algofunctional score. Fifty-three digital joints in 29 patients (mean age 64.8 years) were treated by intra-articular injection of{sup 169}Er citrate. All joints were painful despite pharmacotherapy and showed an elevated blood pool pattern in a pretherapeutic three-phase bone scan, indicative for local synovitis. The patients were asked to classify their complaints with respect to different daily manual activities on a ten-step pain scale from 1 (total disability) to 10 (lack of any impairment) prior to and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 41 months. Local signs of osteoarthritis such as joint swelling or pain were additionally evaluated and were scored from progression of complaints to excellent improvement based on patient self-evaluation. All patients reported a pronounced improvement in their manual activities. The mean total score of 4.73{+-}0.58 for all activities prior to treatment increased significantly to 6.79{+-}0.47 after radiation synovectomy (p<0.05). The best results were obtained in the thumb base joints, whereas distal interphalangeal joints were frequently resistant to therapy. Radiation synovectomy is highly effective in digital joint osteoarthritis with concomitant local synovitis. (orig.)

  16. Facet joint orientation and tropism in lumbar degenerative disc disease and spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichaisak, Witchate; Chotiyarnwong, Chayaporn; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong

    2015-04-01

    Although degenerative disc disease (DDD) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) are two common causes of back pain in elderly, the association between the lumbarfacet joint angle and tropism in these conditions are still unclear. To evaluate the difference in facet joint angles between normal population and lumbar degenerative disc disease and spondylolisthesis patient. The angle of lumbar facet joints were retrospectively measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine whether there was a difference between degenerative diseases. MRI of patients with DDD, DS, and control group at facet joint between L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S1 level were measured in axial view (60 subjects in each group). There was no difference infacetjoint angle in DDD (44.1 ± 11.9) and control (45.6 ± 8.9), but differed in DS (40.1 ± 10. 7) and control group (p = 0.010) at L4-5 level. Facet tropism showed difference between degenerative groups and control group at L4-5 level. DS group showed difference in facet joints angle and tropism when compared with control population, while DDD showed difference only in facet tropism. In addition, longitudinal studies are needed to understand the clinical significant between facet joint angle and tropism in spinal degenerative diseases.

  17. Subdural empyema following lumbar facet joint injection: An exceeding rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayeye, Oluwafikayo; Silva, Adikarige Haritha Dulanka; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Furtado, Navin Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is extremely common with a life time prevalence estimated at greater than 70%. Facet joint arthrosis is thought to be the causative aetiological substrate in approximately 25% of chronic low back pain cases. Facet joint injection is a routine intervention in the armamentarium for both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic low back pain. In fact, a study by Carrino et al. reported in excess of 94,000 facet joint injection procedures were carried out in the US in 1999. Although generally considered safe, the procedure is not entirely without risk. Complications including bleeding, infection, exacerbation of pain, dural puncture headache, and pneumothorax have been described. We report a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who developed a left L4/5 facet septic arthrosis with an associated subdural empyema and meningitis following facet joint injection. This case is unique, as to the best of our knowledge no other case of subdural empyema following facet joint injection has been reported in the literature. Furthermore this case serves to highlight the potential serious adverse sequelae of a routine and apparently innocuous intervention. The need for medical practitioners to be alert to and respond rapidly to the infective complications of facet joint injection cannot be understated. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Facet Joints and Interspinous Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Baldur; Limthongkul, Worawat; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Thantiworasit, Pattarawat; Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-01-01

    A descriptive in vitro study on isolation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the facet joints and interspinous ligaments. To isolate cells from the facet joints and interspinous ligaments and investigate their surface marker profile and differentiation potentials. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament are progressive conditions characterized by the hypertrophy and ossification of ligaments and joints within the spinal canal. MSCs are believed to play a role in the advancement of these diseases and the existence of MSCs has been demonstrated within the ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these cells could also be found within facet joints and interspinous ligaments. Samples were harvested from 10 patients undergoing spinal surgery. The MSCs from facet joints and interspinous ligaments were isolated using direct tissue explant technique. Cell surface antigen profilings were performed via flow cytometry. Their lineage differentiation potentials were analyzed. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs have the tri-lineage potential to be differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cells under appropriate inductions. Flow cytometry analysis revealed both cell lines expressed MSCs markers. Both facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs expressed marker genes for osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments may provide alternative sources of MSCs for tissue engineering applications. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs are part of the microenvironment of the human ligaments of the spinal column and might play a crucial role in the development and progression of degenerative spine conditions.

  19. Desmoid type fibromatosis in the facet joint of lumbar spine: Case report and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Jung; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Hae Youn [CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Desmoid type fibromatosis is a benign fibroblastic tumor arising from the fascia or musculoaponeurosis. It may occur in various locations, but most commonly in the shoulder girdle and neck; to our knowledge, there has been no reported case originating from a facet joint of the spine. We report CT and MR imaging findings of a desmoid type fibromatosis, involving the facet joint of the L3-4 spine with bone involvement.

  20. Lumbar Facet Joint Arthritis Is Associated with More Coronal Orientation of the Facet Joints at the Upper Lumbar Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentzsch, Th.; Geiger, J.; Zimmermann, S.M.; Slankamenac, K.; Werner, C.M.L.; Nguyen-Kim, Th.D.L.

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 620 individuals, who presented to our traumatology department between 2008 and 2010. Facet joint (FJ) arthritis was present in 308 (49.7%) individuals with a mean grade of 1. It was seen in 27% of individuals ≤40 years and in 75% of individuals ≥41 years ( Ρ <0.0001) as well as in 52% of females and 49% of males ( Ρ=0.61). Mean FJ orientation was 30.4° at L2/3, 38.7° at L3/4, 47° at L4/5, and 47.3° at L5/S1. FJ arthritis was significantly associated with more coronal (increased degree) FJ orientation at L2/3 (Ρ=0.03) with a cutoff point at ≥32°. FJs were more coronally oriented (48.8°) in individuals ≤40 years and more sagittally oriented (45.6°) in individuals ≥41 years at L5/S1 (Ρ=0.01). Mean FJ asymmetry was 4.89° at L2/3, 6.01° at L3/4, 6.67° at L4/5, and 7.27° at L5/S1, without a significant difference for FJ arthritis. FJ arthritis is common, increases with age, and affects both genders equally. More coronally oriented FJs (≥32°) in the upper lumbar spine may be an individual risk factor for development of FJ arthritis.

  1. Intraarticular Pulsed Radiofrequency to Treat Refractory Lumbar Facet Joint Pain in Patients with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Min Cheol; Cho, Yun-Woo; Ahn, Da Hyun; Do, Kyung Hee

    2018-04-01

    Many treatment techniques have been used for refractory lumbar facet joint pain; however, their efficacy has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of refractory lumbar facet joint pain in patients with low back pain. Twenty patients with refractory lumbar facet joint pain were recruited, and each patient was treated via intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency. The treatment effects were measured with a numerical rating scale, and the technical accuracy of intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency treatment was evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Any adverse events or complications also were checked. We performed intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency treatment at 48 levels of the lumbar facet joints in 20 patients (5 men and 15 women; mean age, 64.50 ± 10.65 years) with refractory lumbar facet joint pain. Pain scores were significantly reduced at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment (P radiofrequency results in all 20 patients, without any serious adverse effects. Treatment using intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency is an alternative to other techniques in patients with refractory lumbar facet joint pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lumbar Facet Joint Compressive Injury Induces Lasting Changes in Local Structure, Nociceptive Scores, and Inflammatory Mediators in a Novel Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a novel animal model of persisting lumbar facet joint pain. Methods. Sprague Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the right lumbar (L5/L6 facet joint was exposed and compressed to ~1 mm with modified clamps applied for three minutes; sham-operated and naïve animals were used as control groups. After five days, animals were tested for hind-paw sensitivity using von Frey filaments and axial deep tissue sensitivity by algometer on assigned days up to 28 days. Animals were sacrificed at selected times for histological and biochemical analysis. Results. Histological sections revealed site-specific loss of cartilage in model animals only. Tactile hypersensitivity was observed for the ipsi- and contralateral paws lasting 28 days. The threshold at which deep tissue pressure just elicited vocalization was obtained at three lumbar levels; sensitivity at L1>L3/4>L6. Biochemical analyses revealed increases in proinflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β. Conclusions. These data suggest that compression of a facet joint induces a novel model of local cartilage loss accompanied by increased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli and by increases in inflammatory mediators. This new model may be useful for studies on mechanisms and treatment of lumbar facet joint pain and osteoarthritis.

  3. the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anetta Zioła-Frankowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers, alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol, and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men. The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity.

  4. Interventions for treating osteoarthritis of the big toe joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Gerard V; Menz, Hylton B; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B; Gilheany, Mark F

    2010-09-08

    Osteoarthritis affecting of the big toe joint of the foot (hallux limitus or rigidus) is a common and painful condition. Although several treatments have been proposed, few have been adequately evaluated. To identify controlled trials evaluating interventions for osteoarthritis of the big toe joint and to determine the optimum intervention(s). Literature searches were conducted across the following electronic databases: CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; and PEDro (to 14th January 2010). No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised trials, or controlled clinical trials that assessed treatment outcomes for osteoarthritis of the big toe joint. Participants of any age or gender with osteoarthritis of the big toe joint (defined either radiographically or clinically) were included. Two authors examined the list of titles and abstracts identified by the literature searches. One content area expert and one methodologist independently applied the pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text of identified trials. To minimise error and reduce potential bias, data were extracted independently by two content experts. Only one trial satisfactorily fulfilled the inclusion criteria and was included in this review. This trial evaluated the effectiveness of two physical therapy programs in 20 individuals with osteoarthritis of the big toe joint. Assessment outcomes included pain levels, big toe joint range of motion and plantar flexion strength of the hallux. Mean differences at four weeks follow up were 3.80 points (95% CI 2.74 to 4.86) for self reported pain, 28.30 degrees (95% CI 21.37 to 35.23) for big toe joint range of motion, and 2.80 kg (95% CI 2.13 to 3.47) for muscle strength. Although differences in outcomes between treatment and control groups were reported, the risk of bias was high. The trial failed to employ appropriate randomisation or adequate allocation concealment, used a relatively small sample and

  5. Degenerative Changes of the Facet Joints in Adults With Lumbar Spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Yuichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Harada, Taihei; Takao, Shoichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Harada, Masafumi; Sairyo, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Radiologic analysis using computed tomography. To analyze the degenerative changes of the facet joints in patients with spondylolysis in comparison with control subjects. Defects of the pars interarticularis are thought to result in a reduction of biomechanical stress on adjacent facet joints. Therefore, degenerative changes of the facet joints in patients with spondylolysis are expected to be less than those in patients without spondylolysis. Abdominal and pelvic multidetector computed tomography scans of 2000 subjects, performed for conditions unrelated to low back pain, were reviewed. A total of 107 patients (37 women and 70 men) with L5 spondylolysis were identified [spondylolysis (+) group]. Sex-matched and age-matched controls without spondylolysis were chosen randomly [spondylolysis (-) group]. Subjects in the spondylolysis group were subdivided into either bilateral spondylolysis or unilateral spondylolysis groups for comparison with the control group. Four radiologic findings (narrowing, sclerosis, osteophyte, and bone cyst) indicative of degenerative change of the facet joints adjacent to the L5 pars defects were evaluated and the degree of degenerative change was graded by summing the number of degenerative changes (score range, 0-4). The χ test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis. Significantly more degenerative changes in both L4/L5 and L5/S facet joints were found in the spondylolysis (+) group than in the spondylolysis (-) group (χ test, P spondylolysis (+) group than in the spondylolysis (-) group. Degenerative changes of the facet joints at both L4/L5 and L5/S were more severe in the unilateral spondylolysis (+) group than in the spondylolysis (-) group. Degenerative changes of the facet joints in patients with lumbar spondylolysis were more severe than those without spondylolysis.

  6. Evaluation of the relationship between age, gender, and body mass index, and lumbar facet joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Taheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar facet joint pain accounts for 5-15% of the cases of chronic, axial low back pain. Most commonly, facetogenic pain is the result of repetitive stress and/or cumulative low level trauma, leading to inflammation and stretching of the joint capsule. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive study 76 patients who were diagnosed, after a diagnostic block, as having lumbar facet joint pain were evaluated by their age, sex, and body mass index (BMI. Data were collected according to a checklist and entered to SPSS version 16. Results: The mean age of the participants was 48.53 years; the participants included 44 women and 32 men. Lumbar facet joint pain was more frequent in the age range of 40-55 years. With respect to BMI, lumbar facet joint pain was most frequently seen in patients with BMI of 24.5-29.5 kg/m 2 (40.8%. Conclusion: Based on our findings, the chances of developing lumbar facet joint pain is more in women who are between 40 years and 55 years of age and whose BMI is 24.5-29.5 kg/m 2 .

  7. Neuromuscular prehabilitation to prevent osteoarthritis after a traumatic joint injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Shull, Pete B; Fredericson, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is a process resulting from direct forces applied to a joint that cause injury and degenerative changes. An estimated 12% of all symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip, knee, and ankle can be attributed to a post-traumatic cause. Neuromuscular prehabilitation is the process of improving neuromuscular function to prevent development of PTOA after an initial traumatic joint injury. Prehabilitation strategies include restoration of normative movement patterns that have been altered as the result of traumatic injury, along with neuromuscular exercises and gait retraining to prevent the development of OA after an injury occurs. A review of the current literature shows that no studies have been performed to evaluate methods of neuromuscular prehabilitation to prevent PTOA after a joint injury. Instead, current research has focused on management strategies after knee injuries, the value of exercise in the management of OA, and neuromuscular exercises after total knee arthroplasty. Recent work in gait retraining that alters knee joint loading holds promise for preventing the development of PTOA after joint trauma. Future research should evaluate methods of neuromuscular prehabilitation strategies in relationship to the outcome of PTOA after joint injury. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of facet joint activity on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT with facet joint signal change on MRI with fat suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Vance T; Murphy, Robert C; Schenck, Louis A; Carter, Rickey E; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Kotsenas, Amy L; Morris, Jonathan M; Nathan, Mark A; Wald, John T; Maus, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    We compared signal change on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with fat suppression and bone scan activity of lumbar facet joints to determine if these two imaging findings are correlated. We retrospectively identified all patients who underwent imaging of the lumbar spine for pain evaluation using both technetium-99m methylene disphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT) and MRI with at least one fat-suppressed T2- or T1-weighted sequence with gadolinium enhancement within a 180-day interval, at our institution between 1 January 2008 and 19 February 2013. Facet joint activity on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and peri-facet signal change on MRI were rated as normal or increased. Agreement between the two examination types were determined with the κ and prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted κ (PABAK) statistics. This study included 60 patients (28 male, 47%), with a mean age of 49±19.7 years (range, 12-93 years). The κ value indicated no agreement between 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI (κ=-0.026; 95% confidence interval: -0.051, 0.000). The PABAK values were fair to high at each spinal level, which suggests that relatively low disease prevalence lowered the κ values. Together, the κ and PABAK values indicate that there is some degree of intermodality agreement, but that it is not consistent. Overall, facet joint signal change on fat-suppressed MRI did not always correlate with increased 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT activity. MRI and 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT for facet joint evaluation should not be considered interchangeable examinations in clinical practice or research.

  9. Is early osteoarthritis associated with differences in joint congruence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conconi, Michele; Halilaj, Eni; Parenti Castelli, Vincenzo; Crisco, Joseph J

    2014-12-18

    Previous studies suggest that osteoarthritis (OA) is related to abnormal or excessive articular contact stress. The peak pressure resulting from an applied load is determined by many factors, among which is shape and relative position and orientation of the articulating surfaces or, referring to a more common nomenclature, joint congruence. It has been hypothesized that anatomical differences may be among the causes of OA. Individuals with less congruent joints would likely develop higher peak pressure and thus would be more exposed to the risk of OA onset. The aim of this work was to determine if the congruence of the first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint differs with the early onset of OA or with sex, as the female population has a higher incidence of OA. 59 without and 38 with early OA were CT-scanned with their dominant or arthritic hand in a neutral configuration. The proposed measure of joint congruence is both shape and size dependent. The correlation of joint congruence with pathology and sex was analyzed both before and after normalization for joint size. We found a significant correlation between joint congruence and sex due to the sex-related differences in size. The observed correlation disappeared after normalization. Although joint congruence increased with size, it did not correlate significantly with the onset of early OA. Differences in joint congruence in this population may not be a primary cause of OA onset or predisposition, at least for the CMC joint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radionuclide joint imaging in osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jingjing

    1988-01-01

    31 knee joints of 17 patients were studied with radinuclide joint imaging (RJI). The knees were afficted with primary osteoarthritis associated with various deformity. In comparison with the normal group, RJI of the group of osteoarthritiis showed increased radioactivity in medial compartment of the femorotibial articulation. The ratio of medial to lateral condyle activity was increased. The difference between the two groups was singificant (P < 0.01). In the 'hot patella' groups, the ratio of the activity of the patella to that of the femoral condyle was also increased. The difference between the group and the normals was significant (P < 0.01). Clinical evaluation of RJI was discussed

  11. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.L.; Kaplan, P.A.; Dussault, R.G.; Anderson, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without spondylolysis were reviewed for marrow signal intensity changes in pedicles and vertebral bodies as well as for facet degenerative joint disease.Results. Five percent (46/890) of lumbar pedicles in 23 patients had marrow signal intensity changes. Ninety-one percent (42/46) of the abnormal pedicles had adjacent degenerative joint disease of the facets, while only 21% (189/890) of normal pedicles had adjacent facet degenerative joint disease (p<0.001). Eighty-nine percent (41/46) of the pedicles with marrow signal intensity changes had adjacent degenerative disc disease.Conclusions. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are not a specific sign of spondylolysis; they are commonly seen with adjacent facet degenerative joint disease in the absence of spondylolysis. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are probably a response to abnormal stresses related to abnormal motion or loading caused by the degenerative changes in the spinal segment. (orig.)

  12. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J.L.; Kaplan, P.A.; Dussault, R.G.; Anderson, M.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without spondylolysis were reviewed for marrow signal intensity changes in pedicles and vertebral bodies as well as for facet degenerative joint disease.Results. Five percent (46/890) of lumbar pedicles in 23 patients had marrow signal intensity changes. Ninety-one percent (42/46) of the abnormal pedicles had adjacent degenerative joint disease of the facets, while only 21% (189/890) of normal pedicles had adjacent facet degenerative joint disease (p<0.001). Eighty-nine percent (41/46) of the pedicles with marrow signal intensity changes had adjacent degenerative disc disease.Conclusions. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are not a specific sign of spondylolysis; they are commonly seen with adjacent facet degenerative joint disease in the absence of spondylolysis. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are probably a response to abnormal stresses related to abnormal motion or loading caused by the degenerative changes in the spinal segment. (orig.)

  13. Structural joint changes, malalignment, and laxity in osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.; Wieringa, H.; Dinant, H.; Dekker, J.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the relationship between (i) structural joint changes (i.e. joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation) and laxity and (ii) joint malalignment and laxity in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 35 outpatients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  14. Contribution of facet joints, axial compression, and composition to human lumbar disc torsion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezci, Semih E; Eleswarapu, Ananth; Klineberg, Eric O; O'Connell, Grace D

    2018-02-12

    Stresses applied to the spinal column are distributed between the intervertebral disc and facet joints. Structural and compositional changes alter stress distributions within the disc and between the disc and facet joints. These changes influence the mechanical properties of the disc joint, including its stiffness, range of motion, and energy absorption under quasi-static and dynamic loads. There have been few studies evaluating the role of facet joints in torsion. Furthermore, the relationship between biochemical composition and torsion mechanics is not well understood. Therefore, the first objective of this study was to investigate the role of facet joints in torsion mechanics of healthy and degenerated human lumbar discs under a wide range of compressive preloads. To achieve this, each disc was tested under four different compressive preloads (300-1200 N) with and without facet joints. The second objective was to develop a quantitative structure-function relationship between tissue composition and torsion mechanics. Facet joints have a significant contribution to disc torsional stiffness (∼60%) and viscoelasticity, regardless of the magnitude of axial compression. The findings from this study demonstrate that annulus fibrosus GAG content plays an important role in disc torsion mechanics. A decrease in GAG content with degeneration reduced torsion mechanics by more than an order of magnitude, while collagen content did not significantly influence disc torsion mechanics. The biochemical-mechanical and compression-torsion relationships reported in this study allow for better comparison between studies that use discs of varying levels of degeneration or testing protocols and provide important design criteria for biological repair strategies. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint: a study of radiology and clinical epidemiology:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Holm, Stig; Jacobsen, J

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis of the knee and hand with increased body mass index [BMI]. Osteoarthritis of the hip joint is not related to BMI. The connection between obesity and osteoarthritis cannot exclusively be explained by genetic factors or by the a...

  16. Knee joint anterior malalignment and patellofemoral osteoarthritis: an MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Katonis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate patellofemoral congruency measurements on MRI and correlate the findings with severity of ipsilateral osteoarthritis. We retrospectively reviewed 650 consecutive knee MRI examinations from 622 patients divided into two age groups: ≤50 and >50 year-old. The femoral sulcus angle (SA) and depth (SD), lateral patellar displacement (LPD), lateral patellofemoral angle (LPFA), tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance and Insall-Salvati index as well as the grade of focal cartilage defects (ranging from I to IV) in the patellofemoral region were assessed in each subject on axial and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w MR images. A significant difference exists between normal and knees with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis regarding SA (p = 0.0002 and 50 respectively). Significant correlation was found between grading of cartilage defects and SA (rho = 0.21, p = 0.0001 and 0.443, <0.0001), SD (rho = -0.198, p = 0.0003 and -0.418, <0.0001), LPD (rho = 0.176, p = 0.0013 and 0.251, 0.0002) and LPFA (rho = -0.204, p = 0.0002 and -0.239, 0.0005) in both age groups. Knee joint anterior malalignment is multivariably associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. circle MRI is an excellent method to evaluate knee alignment and articular cartilage damage. (orig.)

  17. The prevalence of lumbar facet joint edema in patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Klaus M.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried; Nemec, Stefan; Peloschek, Philipp; Weber, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to assess the prevalence of lumbar facet joint edema in patients with low back pain. Lumbar spine MR examinations (1.5 T) of 145 consecutive patients (87 women, 58 men; mean age 52.8, range 17-94 years) were retrospectively evaluated with regard to the presence of facet joint edema. The MR protocol included sagittal short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), T1- and T2-weighted as well as transverse T2-weighted images. In 9 patients follow-up MR examinations were performed and results were compared with pain. The agreement between the change in intensity of facet joint edema and the change in intensity of pain was assessed using kappa statistics and Kendall's tau coefficient. In 21 of the 145 patients (14%) edema was found at the facet joints: in 52.4% at L4/5, in 19.0% at L5/S1, in 14.3% at L4/5 and L5/S1, in 9.5% at L3/4 and L4/5, and in 4.8% at L3/4. The agreement between the change in pain score and intensity of edema within the follow-up group was ''almost perfect'' (kappa = 0.81). Kendall's tau coefficient was 0.91, indicating high agreement. Sagittal STIR images detect facet joint edema in 14% of patients with low back pain. This fact may be useful for planning treatment including facet joint injections. (orig.)

  18. Experimental osteoarthritis in the rabbit knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, H.

    1976-01-01

    development of arthrotic-like changes following resection of the of the cruciate ligaments in the knee joint of rabbits has been studied at intervals from 2 weeks to 10 months in 35 animals. Signs of cartilage degeneration were followed by changes in the subchondral bone, where formation of osteophytes and condensation to took place. An increased vascular supply was demonstrated by microangiographic and scintigraphic investigations. The uptake of 18 F and 99 mTc-polyphosphate reached a maximal value about 2 months after the operation and then diminished despite further development of arthrotic changes. (author)

  19. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, T

    2006-01-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis....... Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes....

  20. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Velickovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of degeneration of cervical intervertebral discs and facet joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraevens, Joris; Liu, Baoge; Meersschaert, Joke; Demaerel, Philippe; Delye, Hans; Depreitere, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos; Goffin, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs and facet joints is one of the most frequently encountered spinal disorders. In order to describe and quantify degeneration and evaluate a possible relationship between degeneration and biomechanical parameters, e.g., the intervertebral range of motion and intradiscal pressure, a scoring system for degeneration is mandatory. However, few scoring systems for the assessment of degeneration of the cervical spine exist. Therefore, two separate objective scoring systems to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the degree of cervical intervertebral disc and facet joint degeneration were developed and validated. The scoring system for cervical disc degeneration consists of three variables which are individually scored on neutral lateral radiographs: "height loss" (0-4 points), "anterior osteophytes" (0-3 points) and "endplate sclerosis" (0-2 points). The scoring system for facet joint degeneration consists of four variables which are individually scored on neutral computed tomography scans: "hypertrophy" (0-2 points), "osteophytes" (0-1 point), "irregularity" on the articular surface (0-1 point) and "joint space narrowing" (0-1 point). Each variable contributes with varying importance to the overall degeneration score (max 9 points for the scoring system of cervical disc degeneration and max 5 points for facet joint degeneration). Degeneration of 20 discs and facet joints of 20 patients was blindly assessed by four raters: two neurosurgeons (one senior and one junior) and two radiologists (one senior and one junior), firstly based on first subjective impression and secondly using the scoring systems. Measurement errors and inter- and intra-rater agreement were determined. The measurement error of the scoring system for cervical disc degeneration was 11.1 versus 17.9% of the subjective impression results. This scoring system showed excellent intra-rater agreement (ICC = 0.86, 0.75-0.93) and excellent inter-rater agreement (ICC = 0

  2. Rapidly destructive osteoarthritis of the hip joint: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMurtrie A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip is a rare and incompletely understood disorder with scarce literature about variations in natural history within a population. Methods A series of cases from North Wales with rapid progressive joint destruction and extensive subchondral bone loss in the femoral head and acetabulum are presented. Radiographic findings mimicked those of other disorders such as septic arthritis, rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis, primary osteonecrosis with secondary osteoarthritis, or neuropathic osteoarthropathy, but none of the patients had clinical, pathologic, or laboratory evidence of these entities. Results Rapid progression of hip pain and disability was a consistent clinical feature. The average duration of symptoms was 1.4 years. Radiographs obtained at various intervals before surgery (average 14 months in 18 patients documented rapid hip destruction, involvement being unilateral in 13 cases. All patients underwent total hip arthroplasty, and osteoarthritis was confirmed at pathologic examination. Conclusion The authors postulate that these cases represent an uncommon subset of osteoarthritis and regular review, both clinically and radiologically, are required to assess speed of progression and prevent rapid loss of bone stock without the surgeon being aware. These cases are unsuitable for being placed on long waiting list due to technical difficulties in delayed surgery and compromised outcome following surgery.

  3. Multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcot, Katia; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suvà, Domizio; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated balance impairment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although it is currently accepted that postural control depends on multi-joint coordination, no study has previously considered this postural strategy in patients suffering from knee OA. The objectives of this study were to investigate the multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee OA and to evaluate the association with clinical outcomes. Eighty-seven patients with knee OA and twenty-five healthy elderly were recruited to the study. A motion analysis system and two force plates were used to investigate the joint kinematics (trunk and lower body segments), the lower body joint moments, the vertical ground reaction force ratio and the center of pressure (COP) during a quiet standing task. Pain, functional capacity and quality of life status were also recorded. Patients with symptomatic and severe knee OA adopt a more flexed posture at all joint levels in comparison with the control group. A significant difference in the mean ratio was found between groups, showing an asymmetric weight distribution in patients with knee OA. A significant decrease in the COP range in the anterior-posterior direction was also observed in the group of patients. Only small associations were observed between postural impairments and clinical outcomes. This study brings new insights regarding the postural behavior of patients with severe knee OA during a quiet standing task. The results confirm the multi-joint asymmetric posture adopted by this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative in vivo MRI evaluation of lumbar facet joints and intervertebral discs using axial T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzeneder, David; Messner, Alina; Vlychou, Marianna; Welsch, Goetz H; Scheurecker, Georg; Goed, Sabine; Pieber, Karin; Pflueger, Verena; Friedrich, Klaus M; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2011-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of T2 mapping of lumbar facet joints and intervertebral discs in a single imaging slab and to compare the findings with morphological grading. Sixty lumbar spine segments from 10 low back pain patients and 5 healthy volunteers were examined by axial T2 mapping and morphological MRI at 3.0 Tesla. Regions of interest were drawn on a single slice for the facet joints and the intervertebral discs (nucleus pulposus, anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus). The Weishaupt grading was used for facet joints and the Pfirrmann score was used for morphological disc grading ("normal" vs. "abnormal" discs). The inter-rater agreement was excellent for the facet joint T2 evaluation (r = 0.85), but poor for the morphological Weishaupt grading (kappa = 0.15). The preliminary results show similar facet joint T2 values in segments with normal and abnormal Pfirrmann scores. There was no difference in mean T2 values between facet joints in different Weishaupt grading groups. Facet joint T2 values showed a weak correlation with T2 values of the posterior annulus (r = 0.32) This study demonstrates the feasibility of a combined T2 mapping approach for the facet joints and intervertebral discs using a single axial slab.

  6. Quantitative in vivo MRI evaluation of lumbar facet joints and intervertebral discs using axial T2 mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzeneder, David; Messner, Alina; Scheurecker, Georg; Goed, Sabine; Friedrich, Klaus M.; Trattnig, Siegfried; Vlychou, Marianna; Welsch, Goetz H.; Pieber, Karin; Pflueger, Verena

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of T2 mapping of lumbar facet joints and intervertebral discs in a single imaging slab and to compare the findings with morphological grading. Sixty lumbar spine segments from 10 low back pain patients and 5 healthy volunteers were examined by axial T2 mapping and morphological MRI at 3.0 Tesla. Regions of interest were drawn on a single slice for the facet joints and the intervertebral discs (nucleus pulposus, anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus). The Weishaupt grading was used for facet joints and the Pfirrmann score was used for morphological disc grading (''normal'' vs. ''abnormal'' discs). The inter-rater agreement was excellent for the facet joint T2 evaluation (r = 0.85), but poor for the morphological Weishaupt grading (kappa = 0.15). The preliminary results show similar facet joint T2 values in segments with normal and abnormal Pfirrmann scores. There was no difference in mean T2 values between facet joints in different Weishaupt grading groups. Facet joint T2 values showed a weak correlation with T2 values of the posterior annulus (r = 0.32) This study demonstrates the feasibility of a combined T2 mapping approach for the facet joints and intervertebral discs using a single axial slab. (orig.)

  7. The alignment of the knee joint in relationship to age and osteoarthritis: the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in the axis of the knee joint in both radiologically osteoarthritic and non-osteoarthritic knees, on the basis of angles measurable in standardized clinical short knee radiographs, in a cross sectional study of an epidemiological cohort. From the third inclusion of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 4,151 subjects were selected for standardized radiography of the knees. After censuring the inclusion, the resulting cohort was comprised of 3,488 individuals. Images were analyzed for radiological knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) and the anatomical femorotibial axis of the knee joint was measured. The prevalence of knee joint OA in males was 27.9% and 27.5%, for the left and right knees respectively. In females this was 32.8% and 36.4%. The mean knee joint angles were 4.11° in males; and 5.45° in females. A difference of 1.3° was found between the genders. In non-osteoarthritic knees the increase in valgus orientation in relationship to increasing age was found to be 0.03° and 0.04° per year, respectively, for males and females. Likewise, Kellgren and Lawrence found that OA was seen to influence a shift towards varus of 0.55°-0.76° per level of OA. Stratification in accordance with morphological severity of OA documented a clear tendency for the axis of the diseased knees to depart from the mean, primarily in the direction of varus. In knees exhibiting no signs of radiographic osteoarthritis we found a significant relationship between increasing age and a shift in the anatomical axis in the direction of valgus.

  8. Comparison between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis on knee joint MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; Meng Xianghong, Suo Yongmei; Wan Yeda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the MRI characteristics between the late stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee joints. Materials and Methods: We collected knee joints MR data using 0.35 T MR from 40 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 60 cases with osteoarthritis between July, 2010 and August, 2012. We compared the differences in the menisci, the articular cartilage, the subchondral bone, and synovial lesions between the two groups. We calculated the morbidity and analyzed the severity in each part in both groups, and compared the differences between the two groups. If P<0.05, the results had statistical significance. Results: The injury of all parts in the medial and lateral menisci in the RA group was more severe than in the OA group (P<0.05). The articular cartilage of lateral tibiofemoral joints in the RA group was more severe than in the OA group (Z values of the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial plateau were 5.702 vs. 7.534, P<0.05). However, the injury did not significantly differ at the articular cartilage in the patellofemoral joints and in the medial tibiofemoral joints (P>0.05). The subchondral bone marrow lesions of both medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints in the RA group were more severe than in the OA group (the χ 2 values of the medial and lateral femoral condyle were 6.730 and 23.938, respectively; the χ 2 values of the medial and lateral tibial plateau were 12.033 and 41.017, respectively; P<0.05). However, there was no statistical significance in the subchondral bone marrow lesions in the patellofemoral joints (P>0.05). In the RA group, there were 97.5% (39/40) cases having diffuse synovial thickening, including 20 cases with bone destruction in the bare area. In the OA group, there were 21.7% (13/60) cases having synovial thickening with less extend compared to RA group, none of them had bone destruction in the bare area. Conclusions: There are diffuse synovial thickening, bare area destruction, diffuse

  9. Knee joint anterior malalignment and patellofemoral osteoarthritis: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University Hospital, University of Crete, Department of Medical Imaging, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katonis, Pavlos [University Hospital, University of Crete, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate patellofemoral congruency measurements on MRI and correlate the findings with severity of ipsilateral osteoarthritis. We retrospectively reviewed 650 consecutive knee MRI examinations from 622 patients divided into two age groups: {<=}50 and >50 year-old. The femoral sulcus angle (SA) and depth (SD), lateral patellar displacement (LPD), lateral patellofemoral angle (LPFA), tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance and Insall-Salvati index as well as the grade of focal cartilage defects (ranging from I to IV) in the patellofemoral region were assessed in each subject on axial and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w MR images. A significant difference exists between normal and knees with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis regarding SA (p = 0.0002 and <0.0001), SD (p = 0.0004 and <0.0001), LPD (p = 0.0014 and 0.0009) and LPFA (p = 0.0002 and 0.0003) in both age groups ({<=}50 and >50 respectively). Significant correlation was found between grading of cartilage defects and SA (rho = 0.21, p = 0.0001 and 0.443, <0.0001), SD (rho = -0.198, p = 0.0003 and -0.418, <0.0001), LPD (rho = 0.176, p = 0.0013 and 0.251, 0.0002) and LPFA (rho = -0.204, p = 0.0002 and -0.239, 0.0005) in both age groups. Knee joint anterior malalignment is multivariably associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. circle MRI is an excellent method to evaluate knee alignment and articular cartilage damage. (orig.)

  10. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  11. Relationship between the utilisation profile of individual joints and their susceptibility to primary osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two subjects were studied for 1 to 3 weeks during the course of their normal domestic activities. Utilisation profiles were derived for ten joints, using a systematic time-series sampling technique adapted from behavioural biology. At each joint the proportion of the available range utilised was noted. The results were compared with the known regional prevalence of primary osteoarthritis. There was a correlation between the degree to which a joint was incompletely utilised, and its susceptibility to osteoarthritis. The hypothesis is advanced that primary osteoarthritis may be due to incomplete joint utilisation. (orig.)

  12. Induction of osteoarthritis by injecting monosodium iodoacetate into the patellofemoral joint of an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ikufumi; Matsuzaki, Taro; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Hoso, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the histopathological changes in the patellofemoral joint using a rat model of osteoarthritis that was induced using monosodium iodoacetate, and to establish a novel model of patellofemoral osteoarthritis in a rat model using histopathological analysis. Sixty male rats were used. Osteoarthritis was induced through a single intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate in both knee joints. Animals were equally divided into two experimental groups based on the monosodium iodoacetate dose: 0.2 mg and 1.0 mg. Histopathological changes in the articular cartilage of the patellofemoral joint and the infrapatellar fat pad were examined at 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after the monosodium iodoacetate injection. In the 1.0-mg group, the representative histopathological findings of osteoarthritis were observed in the articular cartilage of the patellofemoral joint over time. Additionally, the Osteoarthritis Research Society International scores of the patellofemoral joint increased over time. The synovitis scores of the infrapatellar fat pad in both groups were highest at 3 days, and then the values decreased over time. The fibrosis score of the infrapatellar fat pad in the 1.0-mg group increased with time, whereas the fibrosis score in the 0.2-mg group remained low. Representative histopathological findings of osteoarthritis were observed in the articular cartilage of the patellofemoral joint in a rat model of osteoarthritis induced using monosodium iodoacetate. With appropriate selection, this model may be regarded as an ideal patellofemoral osteoarthritis model.

  13. Lumbar facet joint fat pads: Their normal anatomy and their appearance when enlarged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.; McCormick, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    The polar recesses, superior and inferior to lumbar facet joints, are filled by fat pads from which fat-filled synovial folds project between the articular surfaces for a distance of two to four millimetres. The intracapsular superior recess lies between the ligamentum flavum and the lamina above. The extracapsular inferior recess lies on the back of the lamina below and communicates with the joint through a hole in the inferior capsule. The intracapsular folds move freely in and out of the joint during movements. These features are demonstrated in anatomic studies using transverse sections and radiologic studies using computed tomography. In about 4% of lumbar spines examined, the intraarticular fat pads are enlarged and extend from the joint recess(es) into the middle third of one or more facet joints. The fat pads can be identified in CT scans by their radiolucency and distinguished from vacuum phenomenon by measuring their attenuation values. The cause of the intra-articular enlargement of the fat pads is unknown, but it is suggested that their extension into the middle third of the joint may be secondary to degenerative change in the motion segment with capsular laxity in the affected joint. (orig.)

  14. Optimized cervical spine bone SPET for detection of facet joint injury after whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardaci, G T; Bower, G D; Taylor, J [Perth and Perth Pain Management, South Perth, WA (Australia). Mount Medical Centre, Isotope Imaging

    1999-04-01

    Full text: The most frequent origin for chronic cervical pain in patients with a remote history of whiplash injury is the cervical facet joints. Exact localization of facet joint injury is difficult and currently advocated methods include multiple invasive diagnostic injections. Optimization of {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-HDP cervical SPET (CSPET) to accurately localize facet joint pathology was attempted and the results correlated with clinical localization relying on focal joint tenderness and passive movement methods. Imaging was performed on a dual-headed gamma camera system using an elliptical orbit over 360 deg. The patient's neck was flexed to eliminate the cervical lordosis. Reconstructed CSPET images were reorientated into the long axis of the vertebral bodies. CSPET studies were independently scored by two observers blinded to the clinical and other imaging information and correlated with clinical localization and response to radiofrequency ablation. 54 patients have been studied using this technique in a prospective study. Early patient follow-up data will be presented. CSPET was felt to be clinically useful by pain therapists in targeting treatment.

  15. Optimized cervical spine bone SPET for detection of facet joint injury after whiplash injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardaci, G.T.; Bower, G.D.; Taylor, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The most frequent origin for chronic cervical pain in patients with a remote history of whiplash injury is the cervical facet joints. Exact localization of facet joint injury is difficult and currently advocated methods include multiple invasive diagnostic injections. Optimization of 99 Tc m -HDP cervical SPET (CSPET) to accurately localize facet joint pathology was attempted and the results correlated with clinical localization relying on focal joint tenderness and passive movement methods. Imaging was performed on a dual-headed gamma camera system using an elliptical orbit over 360 deg. The patient's neck was flexed to eliminate the cervical lordosis. Reconstructed CSPET images were reorientated into the long axis of the vertebral bodies. CSPET studies were independently scored by two observers blinded to the clinical and other imaging information and correlated with clinical localization and response to radiofrequency ablation. 54 patients have been studied using this technique in a prospective study. Early patient follow-up data will be presented. CSPET was felt to be clinically useful by pain therapists in targeting treatment

  16. Radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging of the stifle joint in experimental osteoarthritis of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmer, W.R.; Buckwalter, K.A.; Braunstein, E.M.; Hill, M.A.; O'Connor, B.L.; Visco, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate osteoarthritis at 2, 6, and 12 weeks following transection of the cranial cruciate ligament of the stifle (femorotibial) joint of 6 dogs. A quantitative radiographic scoring system was used to assess the progression of hard and soft tissue changes of osteoarthritis. Mediolateral (flexed joint) and oblique (extended joint) radiographic projections enabled identification of small osteophytes on the femoral trochlear ridges, which were detected at an earlier stage of development than was previously reported. Magnetic resonance imaging was useful in detecting changes in cartilage thickness, osteophytosis and intraarticular loose bodies. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging were complementary in the assessment of pathologic changes of osteoarthritis

  17. Evaluation of Facet Joint Arthrosis in Stenotic and Normal Lumbar Spines with MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Ozan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To reveal the prevalence of lumbar facet joint arthrosis in normal and stenotic lumbar spines with magnetic resonance imaging. Material and Method: Study group consisted of 30 patients with complaints and findings of lower back pain, neurologic claudicatio and lumbar spinal stenosis detected at L3-4, L4-5 and/or L5-S1 with magnetic resonance imaging (cross section area of the dural sac

  18. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  19. Osseous associated cervical spondylomyelopathy at the C2-C3 articular facet joint in 11 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C; Gutierrez-Quintana, R; Penderis, J; Gonçalves, R

    2015-11-21

    In dogs, vertebral canal stenosis at C2-C3 due to articular facet joint degeneration is only sporadically identified. The authors' aims were to review the clinical presentation, MRI characteristics, treatment and outcome of dogs presenting with this condition. Eleven cases were eligible for inclusion. Neurological examination revealed tetraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia in all 4 limbs in 3/11, proprioceptive tetra-ataxia only in 4/11, pelvic limb proprioceptive ataxia in 2/11 and no gait abnormalities in 2/11 dogs. Cervical hyperaesthesia was present in 7/11 dogs. MRI revealed bilateral articular facet joint degeneration in 10/11 cases and unilateral degeneration in one. Surgery was performed in six cases and medical management elected in five. Long-term follow-up information was available for 11 animals. Four of the surgical cases are alive and have no neurological deficits, one was euthanased for an unrelated condition and one lost to follow-up. Of the cases managed medically, three are alive showing no neurological deficits, one is alive still displaying neurological deficits and one euthanased for an unrelated condition whilst still ataxic. This study shows that both medical and surgical management can result in good outcomes in dogs with vertebral canal stenosis resulting from articular facet joint degeneration at the level of C2-C3. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Lumbar facet joint septic arthritis presenting atypically as acute abdomen – A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysha Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The atypical presentation of facet joint septic arthritis is one of the reasons why early diagnosis is elusive. Definitive diagnoses with MRI and bacterial culture as well as prolonged antibiotic therapy are recommended in this condition.

  1. The Clinical Study on Bee Venom Acupuncture Treatment on Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Jeong a

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study is performed for the purpose of examining into the efficacy of the Bee Venom Acupuncture Treatment for Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint Methods : We investitigated 25 cases of patients with Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint from 1st June 2005 to 13th July 2005. The 25 patients were taken Bee Venom Acupuncture over three times irregularly. Treatment efficiency was monitored through VAS (Visual Analog Scale and improvement degree of the grade of clinical symptoms Conclusion : We brought to the conclusion that the Bee Venom Acupuncture has possibility to be efficient to cure the Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint patients. So we suggest the possibility to use this new remedy for the Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint

  2. Joint distraction in treatment of osteoarthritis (II): effects on cartilage in a canine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valburg, A. A.; van Roermund, P. M.; Marijnissen, A. C.; Wenting, M. J.; Verbout, A. J.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    From a clinical point of view, joint distraction as a treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and ankle has been demonstrated to be very promising. Pain, joint mobility and functional ability, the most important factors for a patient with severe OA, all improved. Although radiographic joint space

  3. A new technique to treat facet joint pain with pulsed radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schianchi, Pietro Martino

    2015-02-01

    Facet joint pain affects 5% to 15% of the population with low back pain and the prevalence increases with age due to progression of arthritis. While conservative treatments are often unsuccessful, the scientific evidence on minimally invasive therapies such as intra-articular steroid infiltration and continuous and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the medial branches is contradictory. Since PRF has recently been reported to successfully treat joint pain, a new application of this method is proposed for facetogenic lumbar pain via an intra-articular subcapsular approach. Here we reported two cases with successful treatment. A 71-year-old patient presented because of persisting pain in the left gluteal region radiating to the lateral thigh and calf when standing. Anti-inflammatory drugs produced only short-lasting insufficient relief. A 52-year-old employee was admitted in June 2012 because of axial lower lumbar pain with intermittent diffuse radiation to the right lower extremity that worsened during walking and lying down despite receiving analgesics and physiotherapy. A new approach to treat lumbar facet joint pain with PRF is simple to perform and without serious complications. In view of the good long-lasting results obtained with the two reported cases, randomized control trials are necessary to validate this new approach.

  4. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L.

    1989-01-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements

  5. Pseudomeningocele in communication with the facet joint: demonstration by computerized tomography-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiyusufoglu, Kursat; Ozturk, Cagatay; Sirvanci, Mustafa; Aksu, Neslihan; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomeningocele is an uncommon but well-known complication of lumbar spine operations. Although it is mostly asymptomatic and managed conservatively in most cases, it is claimed as a causative factor of failed back surgery syndrome and requires surgery in some cases. Usually, its diagnosis is confidently done with imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and myelography. In this report, we describe a case of pseudomeningocele that communicated with a facet joint. The diagnostic approach for this unusual lesion and its probable causes are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Pseudomeningocele in communication with the facet joint: demonstration by computerized tomography-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganiyusufoglu, Kursat; Ozturk, Cagatay; Sirvanci, Mustafa; Aksu, Neslihan; Hamzaoglu, Azmi [Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul Spine Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-08-15

    Pseudomeningocele is an uncommon but well-known complication of lumbar spine operations. Although it is mostly asymptomatic and managed conservatively in most cases, it is claimed as a causative factor of failed back surgery syndrome and requires surgery in some cases. Usually, its diagnosis is confidently done with imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and myelography. In this report, we describe a case of pseudomeningocele that communicated with a facet joint. The diagnostic approach for this unusual lesion and its probable causes are discussed. (orig.)

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN JOINT MOBILIZATION AND CONVENTIONAL PHYSIOTHERAPY IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (O.A. is an active disease process involving articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone thickening and new bone formation. Worldwide osteoarthritis is estimated to be the fourth leading cause of disability, in which 10% are males and 13% are females. Studies from china, Bangladesh and Pakistan have shown high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. Pharmacological interventions, surgical procedures and Physiotherapy management play important role in knee Osteoarthritis. In Physiotherapy management of osteoarthritis, manual therapy along with thermotherapy and/or electrotherapy is used. Current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of joint mobilization in knee osteo-arthritis. Methods: Comparative study was undertaken on 50 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who were randomly assigned to one of two groups that received Joint mobilization alone (n = 25; mean age, 53 years or Conventional Physiotherapy (n = 25; mean age, 50 years.Both groups were received their programs for 8 weeks; two sessions per week. Analysis of data within group and between groups of the pre and post treatment values of the function and pain was done using pair t test and independent t test. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement in ISOA score and VAS. There was statistical significant difference between the two groups (Group A and B i.e. p < 0.005. Conclusion: Manual joint mobilization improves the effectiveness of the treatment program in treating symptoms of knee OA and improves function in elderly people with knee OA.

  8. Modern radiological imaging of osteoarthritis of the hip joint with consideration of predisposing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Rehnitz, C.; Merle, C.; Gotterbarm, T.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common disease of the hip joint in adults and has a high socioeconomic impact. This review article discusses the value of three imaging modalities in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the hip joint: projection radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Besides established imaging diagnostics of osteoarthritis, this review also outlines new MRI techniques that enable the biochemical analysis of hip joint cartilage and discusses predisposing deformities of the hip joint including femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with labral pathologies, hip joint dysplasia, malrotation, and, finally, femoral head necrosis, for which early detection and an exact description of the extent and localization of the necrotic area are extremely important. Conventional X-rays remain indispensable for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, while MRI is able to depict additional early symptoms and signs of activity of the disease. With the increasing number of joint-preserving interventions such as surgical hip luxation and hip joint arthroscopy for treating FAI, high-resolution imaging is gaining further importance for both pre- and postoperative diagnostics because it can accurately recognize early stages of joint damage. With high-resolution MR sequences and MR arthrography, the detailed depiction of the thin cartilaginous coating of the hip joint has become quite possible.

  9. OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE JOINT AND ITS RISK FACTOR IN POPULATION OF BIHAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In study of Orthopaedic diseases, Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most prevalent condition resulting to disability particularly in population of old age people and is a leading cause of chronic disability. The knee is the commonest of the large joints in the body to be affected by Osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a very chronic joint disorder in which there is progressive softening and disintegration of articular cartilage accompanied by new growth of cartilage and bone at the joint margins (Osteophytes and the capsular fibrosis. METHODS A total of 100 cases and 100 controls were taken in the Bihari Population. For each case, an age matched control of same sex was taken, who had no complaints pertaining to knee. RESULTS In this study, old age, female sex, obesity, hypertension, family history of knee pain, Indian toilet habits, history of knee trauma/disease, sitting cross-legged for longer period, sitting before Computer for long hours, using cell phone with improper body posture and increased frequency of knee bending were found to be predisposing factors for knee Osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION Keeping weight under control, modifying daily habits such as sitting cross-legged and squatting along with using western toilet can significantly reduce the toll of knee osteoarthritis. Any trauma to knee should be dealt with utmost care, so as to maintain joint congruity and to prevent its progression to osteoarthritis in future is also strongly recommended.

  10. [Case-control study on needle-knife to cut off the medial branch of the lumbar posterior ramus under C-arm guiding for the treatment of low back pain caused by lumbar facet osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Di; Xu, Wei-xing; Ding, Wei-Guo; Guo, Qiao-Feng; Ma, Gou-ping; Zhu, Wei-min

    2013-03-01

    To study the clinical efficacy of needle-knife to cut off the medial branch of the lumbar posterior ramus under C-arm guiding to treat low back pain caused by lumbar facet osteoarthritis. From July 2009 to June 2011, 60 patients with low back pain caused by lumbar facet osteoarthritis were reviewed,including 34 males and 26 females, ranging in age from 39 to 73 years old,averaged 61.9 years old; the duration of the disease ranged from 6 to 120 months, with a mean of 18.9 months. All the patients were divided into two groups, 30 patients (18 males and 12 females, ranging in age from 39 to 71 years old, needle-knife group) were treated with needle-knife to cut off medial branch of the lumbar posterior ramus under C -arm guiding and the other 30 patients(16 males and 14 females, ranging in age from 41 to 73 years old, hormone injection group) were treated with hormone injection in lumbar facet joint under C-arm guiding. The preoperative JOA scores and the scores at the 1st, 12th and 26th weeks after treatment were analyzed. Before treatment,the JOA scores between the two groups had no significant difference (P= 0.479); after 1 week of treatment, the JOA scores between the two groups had significant difference (P= 0.040), the improvement rate of hormone injection group was superior than that of the needle-knife group,which were (58.73+/-18.20)% in needle-knife group and (71.10+/-22.19)% in hormone injection group; after 12 weeks of treatment, the JOA scores between the two groups had no significant difference(P=0.569), and the improvement rate between the two groups had no significant difference,which were (50.09+/-19.33)% in the needle-knife group and (48.70+/-18.36)%) in the hormone injection group; after 26 weeks of treatment,the JOA scores between the two groups had significant difference (P=0.000), the improvement rate of hormone injection group was superior than that of the needle-knife group,which were (48.56+/-28.24)% in needle-knife group and (15

  11. Clinical benefit of joint distraction in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis of the ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, ACA; van Roermund, PM; van Melkebeek, J; Schenk, W; Verbout, AJ; Bijlsma, JWJ; Lafeber, FPJG

    Objective. Osteoarthritis, (OA) is a degenerative, disabling joint disease that affects >10% of the adult population. No effective disease-modifying treatment is available. In the present study, we used joint distraction, a relatively new treatment in Which mechanical contact between the articular

  12. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve the...

  13. Alteration of Cartilage Degeneration and Inflammation Markers in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Occurs Proportionally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Lukas M.; Kuijer, Roel; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing interest in markers for cartilage degradation in synovial joints because of their potential diagnostic and prognostic value. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify valuable degradation markers for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) by comparing

  14. Autologous Fat Transfer for Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christian; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Groddeck, Robert; Allert, Sixtus

    2017-08-01

    Most operations for carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb irreversibly alter or destroy the anatomy. There is a high demand for minimally invasive alternatives. The authors report the results of autologous fat transfer for treatment of thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. In a prospective study, 50 patients with thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis were observed for 1 year after autologous fat transfer. Manual liposuction and centrifugation were performed. Pain rating according to visual analogue pain scale; objective force of pinch grip and fist closure; and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores before and after treatment were analyzed. The average pain in stage 2 patients preoperatively was 7.7 ± 1.3; it was 1.8 ± 1.9 after 6 months and 2.4 ± 3.1 after 12 months. Patients with stage 2 osteoarthritis demonstrated a superior benefit from this treatment compared with patients with either stage 3 or stage 4 thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. There were similar improvements for the parameters strength and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire score. No serious adverse events were observed. Autologous fat transplantation is an appealing alternative, especially in early-stage basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb. The low invasiveness of the procedure and early recovery of patients compared with classical procedures such as trapeziectomy, and the superior long-term results compared with classical injection therapy, make this approach feasible as a first-line therapy in early-stage basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb. Therapeutic, IV.

  15. An in Silico Analysis of Ankle Joint Loads in Secondary Ankle Osteoarthritis. Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Mrzygłód, Mirosław W; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Secondary, post-traumatic, degenerative lesions of the ankle joint remain a serious clinical challenge. This paper presents the case of a 66-year-old patient with secondary, post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis and subchondral cysts. The use of rapid computer modelling FEM 2D enabled optimization of surgical treatment. A FEM 2D model of biomechanical changes in bones may help in streamlining treatment as well as improve our understanding of the pathomechanism of osteoarthritis.

  16. Hyaluronic acid for the treatment of osteoarthritis in all joints except the knee: what is the current evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Sascha; Haverkamp, Daniel; Mulier, Michiel; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2012-04-01

    The use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) is a well known treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). In other joints, less evidence is available about the efficacy of treatment with intra-articular HA. HA is also used intra-articularly in the metatarsophalangeal-1 joint, the ankle, the hip, the sacroiliac joint, the facet joints, the carpometacarpal-1 joint, the shoulder and the temporo-mandibular joint. In this systematic review we include all prospective studies about the effects of intra-articular HA in the above-mentioned joints. Its use in the knee joint, however, will be discussed in a separate article in this journal. A systematic review was conducted using databases including MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Clinical Trial Register, and EMBASE. After performing a solid systematic review using a rigid methodology and trying to pool the outcomes of different studies, we noticed that, compared with baseline, there is statistical evidence for a positive effect of intra-articular HA. However, there is limited evidence HA is superior to placebo and no evidence that intra-articular HA is better than corticosteroids or other conservative therapies. Our recommendation for future research is that one should focus on adequately powered randomized trials comparing HA treatment with other types of intra-articular or conservative treatment. We think it is useless to further perform and publish (large) non-comparative prospective studies about the use of HA in the treatment of problems caused by OA. It is well perceived that HA exerts positive effects in the treatment of OA, but up to now there is no (strong) evidence available that HA is superior to other treatments of OA such as corticosteroids, physiotherapy or other conservative measures.

  17. The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, E.J.; Schaap, L.A.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Dennison, E.M.; Maggi, S.; Pedersen, N.L.; Castell, M.V; Denkinger, M.D.; Edwards, M.H.; Limongi, F.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Siviero, P.; Queipo, R.; Peter, R.; van der Pas, S.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study examined whether daily weather conditions, 3-day average weather conditions, and changes in weather conditions influence joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis (OA) in 6 European countries. Methods. Data from the population-based European Project on OSteoArthritis were

  18. Unusual case of paediatric septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joints due to Kingella kingae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hanneur, M; Vidal, C; Mallet, C; Mazda, K; Ilharreborde, B

    2016-11-01

    A 32-month-old boy presented with febrile limping that had developed over 6days, associated with right lumbosacral inflammatory swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed joint effusion of the right L5-S1 zygapophyseal joint, complicated by destructive osteomyelitis of the L5 articular process and paraspinal abscess. Surgery was decided to evacuate the fluid accumulation and rule out differential diagnoses. The diagnosis of septic arthritis of the facet joint was confirmed intraoperatively; real-time quantitative PCR analysis identified Kingella kingae. This is the first substantiated paediatric case of zygapophyseal joint septic arthritis due to K. kingae. K. kingae is the most common pathogen responsible for invasive osteoarticular infection in children under 4years of age. Since empiric antibiotics are effective in early stages, physicians should consider the possibility of spinal infections due to K. kingae when a limping child under 4years of age presents with a fever. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of joint traction on functional improvement and quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Sadat Naeimee; Abbas Rahimi; Mehdi Rezaee; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Khosro Khademi Kalantari; ُSomayeh Mahmoudi Aghdam

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disease in adults around the world and its incidence rises with age. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis often complain of pain and severe functional disability. Most of conservative treatments used in this group of patients induce poor improvements. This study evaluated the effect of joint traction on quality of life of patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, forty f...

  20. Effects of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loading in obese adults with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, J; Bliddal, H; Messier, S P

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).......To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  1. Altered Tibiofemoral Joint Contact Mechanics and Kinematics in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Episodic Complaints of Joint Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Klatt, Brian A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Tashman, Scott; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. Methods Forty-three subjects, 11 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), 7 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), and 25 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a downhill gait task on a treadmill. Findings The medial compartment contact point excursions were longer in the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.046) and the control groups (p=0.016). The peak medial compartment contact point velocity was also greater for the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.047) and control groups (p=0.022). Additionally, the unstable group demonstrated a coupled movement pattern of knee extension and external rotation after heel contact which was different than the coupled motion of knee flexion and internal rotation demonstrated by stable and control groups. Interpretation Our findings suggest that knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics are altered during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. The observed longer medial compartment contact point excursions and higher velocities represent objective signs of mechanical instability that may place the arthritic knee joint at increased risk for disease progression. Further research is indicated to explore the clinical relevance of altered contact mechanics and kinematics during other common daily activities and to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation programs to improve altered joint biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. PMID:24856791

  2. Facet orientation and tropism: associations with spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Guermazi, Ali; Li, Ling; Hunter, David J; Suri, Pradeep

    2010-04-01

    Cross-sectional study. To evaluate the association between lumbar spine facet joint orientation, facet joint tropism, and spondylolysis identified by multidetector computed tomography (CT) in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. The association between lumbar spondylolysis and facet orientation and tropism remains unclear. This study was an ancillary project to the Framingham Heart Study. Three thousand five hundred twenty-nine participants of the Framingham Heart Study aged 40 to 80 years underwent multidetector CT imaging to assess aortic calcification. One hundred ninety-one subjects were included in this ancillary study. Facet joint features and spondylolysis were evaluated on CT scans. The final analyzed sample included 104 men with mean age 51.90+/-11.25 years and 84 women with mean age 53.61+/-10.20 years. The association between spondylolysis and facet orientation and tropism was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Spondylolysis was prevalent in 11.5% of the total population. chi2 test demonstrated a significant sex difference in prevalence of spondylolysis (P=0.0154), with almost 3 times higher prevalence among men. There was no statistically significant difference in facet orientation and continuous facet tropism between individuals with and without spondylolysis at the L5 level (P=0.49 to 0.91). After adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, no significant association between the occurrence of spondylolysis and facet orientation and tropism was found. In the studied sample the prevalence of facet joint osteoarthritis was significantly higher in individuals with spondylolysis than in those without spondylolysis at both sides of L4-L5 spinal level (P=0.044 at the right side and P=0.003 at the left side) and at left side of L5-S1 level (P=0.038). We did not find an association between facet orientation, facet tropism, and spondylolysis. One of the possible explanations for this is that the high prevalence of facet joint

  3. The possibility of the radiological and ultrasonographic examination of the facet joints of the equine thoracic and lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, R.

    2003-03-01

    The facet joints of the equine thoracic and lumbar spine were examined by radiology and ultrasonography in 31 and 20 standing horses, respectively. The employed methods were evaluated. The left and right joints of 15/31 standing horses were comparatively x-rayed with both 20 o ventral oblique and 30 o dorsal oblique techniques. The independent evaluation of the ensuing films by four experienced veterinary surgeons yielded a significantly better assessment of the tested parameters in the 20 o ventral oblique technique. It was possible to depict the facet joints of the right and left sides between the caudal margin of the scapula and the diaphragm with the pulmonary field as background rich in contrast. In 20 horses, the facet joints were examined from Th10 to L6 in longitudinal and sagittal planes. A linear-array ultrasound probe with a frequency of 7,5 MHz and a convex ultrasound probe with a frequency of 3,5 MHz were used. Depending on the nutritional state, the soft tissue structures could be evaluated. The evaluation of the facet joints themselves was very limited. (author)

  4. The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on joint position sense in patients with knee joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Zahra Rojhani; Shafaee, Razieh; Abbasi, Leila

    2014-10-01

    To study the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on joint position sense (JPS) in knee osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Thirty subjects with knee OA (40-60 years old) using non-random sampling participated in this study. In order to evaluate the absolute error of repositioning of the knee joint, Qualysis Track Manager system was used and sensory electrical stimulation was applied through the TENS device. The mean errors in repositioning of the joint, in two position of the knee joint with 20 and 60 degree angle, after applying the TENS was significantly decreased (p knee OA could improve JPS in these subjects.

  5. Management of low back pain with facet joint injections and nerve root blocks under computed tomography guidance. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia; Wojcik, Andrew; Shaju, Antony

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the performance of facet joint and nerve root infiltrations under computed tomography guidance for the management of low back pain and to investigate the complications and patient tolerance. The study was board-certified and informed consent was obtained from all patients. In 1 year, 86 consecutive patients (47 male, 39 female, age range 47-87 years, mean age 63) with low back pain for more than 2 years were included. All patients were clinically examined and had cross-sectional imaging performed before the procedure. Fifty-five facet joint infiltrations and 31 nerve blocks were performed under computed tomography guidance. All patients completed two valid pain questionnaires before and 3 months after the procedures. At the same time, they were clinically examined by the referring Orthopaedic Surgeon. The pain response was assessed by comparing the scores of the questionnaires. The improvement in clinical examination findings was assessed as well. In patients who underwent facet joint infiltrations, long-term pain improvement was achieved in 79% and in those with nerve blocks in 85%. Immediate pain relief was demonstrated in 83% of patients with nerve infiltrations. No complications were observed. All procedures were very well tolerated by patients. Facet joint and nerve infiltrations under computed tomography guidance constitute an accurate and safe method that could be used to relieve low back pain and minimize the risk of disability. (orig.)

  6. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS: from joint injury to osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Ewa M

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS was developed as an extension of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index with the purpose of evaluating short-term and long-term symptoms and function in subjects with knee injury and osteoarthritis. The KOOS holds five separately scored subscales: Pain, other Symptoms, Function in daily living (ADL, Function in Sport and Recreation (Sport/Rec, and knee-related Quality of Life (QOL. The KOOS has been validated for several orthopaedic interventions such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, meniscectomy and total knee replacement. In addition the instrument has been used to evaluate physical therapy, nutritional supplementation and glucosamine supplementation. The effect size is generally largest for the subscale QOL followed by the subscale Pain. The KOOS is a valid, reliable and responsive self-administered instrument that can be used for short-term and long-term follow-up of several types of knee injury including osteoarthritis. The measure is relatively new and further use of the instrument will add knowledge and suggest areas that need to be further explored and improved.

  7. Glenohumeral Joint Preservation: A Review of Management Options for Young, Active Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier A. van der Meijden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of osteoarthritis of the shoulder in young, active patients is a challenge, and the optimal treatment has yet to be completely established. Many of these patients wish to maintain a high level of activity, and arthroplasty may not be a practical treatment option. It is these patients who may be excellent candidates for joint-preservation procedures in an effort to avoid or delay joint replacement. Several palliative and restorative techniques are currently optional. Joint debridement has shown good results and a combination of arthroscopic debridement with a capsular release, humeral osteoplasty, and transcapsular axillary nerve decompression seems promising when humeral osteophytes are present. Currently, microfracture seems the most studied reparative treatment modality available. Other techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral transfers, have reportedly shown potential but are currently mainly still investigational procedures. This paper gives an overview of the currently available joint preserving surgical techniques for glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

  8. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint organ and its relationship to disc displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, B

    2001-01-01

    To overcome disagreements with regard to the relationship between disc displacement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the evidence for suggested disease mechanisms and clinical course of these disorders is reviewed. The TMJ behaves as a complex organ in which biochemical and

  9. Systematic review of patient history and physical examination to diagnose chronic low back pain originating from the facet joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, E T; Juch, J N S; Ostelo, R W J G; Groeneweg, J G; Kallewaard, J W; Koes, B W; Verhagen, A P; Huygen, F J P M; van Tulder, M W

    2017-03-01

    Patient history and physical examination are frequently used procedures to diagnose chronic low back pain (CLBP) originating from the facet joints, although the diagnostic accuracy is controversial. The aim of this systematic review is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of patient history and/or physical examination to identify CLBP originating from the facet joints using diagnostic blocks as reference standard. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and the Cochrane Collaboration database from inception until June 2016. Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We calculated sensitivity and specificity values, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Twelve studies were included, in which 129 combinations of index tests and reference standards were presented. Most of these index tests have only been evaluated in single studies with a high risk of bias. Four studies evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the Revel's criteria combination. Because of the clinical heterogeneity, results were not pooled. The published sensitivities ranged from 0.11 (95% CI 0.02-0.29) to 1.00 (95% CI 0.75-1.00), and the specificities ranged from 0.66 (95% CI 0.46-0.82) to 0.91 (95% CI 0.83-0.96). Due to clinical heterogeneity, the evidence for the diagnostic accuracy of patient history and/or physical examination to identify facet joint pain is inconclusive. Patient history and physical examination cannot be used to limit the need of a diagnostic block. The validity of the diagnostic facet joint block should be studied, and high quality studies are required to confirm the results of single studies. Patient history and physical examination cannot be used to limit the need of a diagnostic block. The validity of the diagnostic facet joint block should be studied, and high quality studies are required to confirm the results of single studies. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  10. MR-guided facet joint injection therapy using an open 1.0-T MRI system: an outcome study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian; Hartwig, Tony; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided facet joint injection therapy using a 1.0-T open MRI. One hundred and sixty-six facet joint blocks in 45 patients with lower back pain were performed under MR fluoroscopic guidance using a proton-density-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence. An in-room monitor, wireless MR-mouse for operator-controlled multiplanar navigation, a flexible surface coil and MR-compatible 20-G needle were used. Clinical outcome was evaluated by questionnaire before intervention and after 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months using a numerical visual analogue scale (VAS). All facet joint blocks were considered technically successful with distribution of the injectant within and/or around the targeted facet joint. No major complications occurred. The final outcome analysis included 38 patients. An immediate effect was reported by 63 % of the patients. A positive mid-/long-term effect was seen in 13 patients (34 %) after 6 months and in 9 patients (24 %) after 12 months. Mean VAS was reduced from 7.1 ± 1.7 (baseline) to 3.5 ± 2.2, 4.1 ± 3.0, 3.8 ± 2.9 and 4.6 ± 2.9 at 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01). MR-guided facet joint injection therapy of the lumbosacral spine is accurate, safe and efficient in the symptomatic treatment of lower back pain. (orig.)

  11. Diagnostic value of lumbar facet joint injection: a prospective triple cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Schütz

    Full Text Available The diagnosis "lumbar facet syndrome" is common and often indicates severe lumbar spine surgery procedures. It is doubtful whether a painful facet joint (FJ can be identified by a single FJ block. The aim of this study was to clarify the validity of a single and placebo controlled bilateral FJ blocks using local anesthetics. A prospective single blinded triple cross-over study was performed. 60 patients (31 f, 29 m, mean age 53.2 yrs (22-73 with chronic low back pain (mean pain persistance 31 months, 6 months of conservative treatment without success admitted to a local orthopaedic department for surgical or conservative therapy of chronic LBP, were included in the study. Effect on pain reduction (10 point rating scale was measured. The 60 subjects were divided into six groups with three defined sequences of fluoroscopically guided bilateral monosegmental lumbar FJ test injections in "oblique needle" technique: verum-(local anaesthetic-, placebo-(sodium chloride- and sham-injection. Carry-over and periodic effects were evaluated and a descriptive and statistical analysis regarding the effectiveness, difference and equality of the FJ injections and the different responses was performed. The results show a high rate of non-response, which documents the lack of reliable and valid predictors for a positive response towards FJ blocks. There was a high rate of placebo reactions noted, including subjects who previously or later reacted positively to verum injections. Equivalence was shown among verum vs. placebo and partly vs. sham also. With regard to test validity criteria, a single intraarticular FJ block with local anesthetics is not useful to detect the pain-responsible FJ and therefore is no valid and reliable diagostic tool to specify indication of lumbar spine surgery. Comparative FJ blocks with local anesthetics and placebo-controls have to be interpretated carefully also, because they solely give no proper diagnosis on FJ being main pain

  12. Global Gene Expression Differences in Joints of Mice with Divergent Post Traumatic Osteoarthritis Phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibui, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating joint disease characterized by cartilage degradation which prompts pain, stiffness and swelling. Contributing factors include age, genetics, obesity, injury and overuse of joints. OA is defined by an acute phase and a chronic phase whereby inflammation and degeneration of articular cartilage and other tissues is followed by joint pain and limited mobility. Patients remain asymptomatic until substantial joint damage has occurred and therefore rely on long term surgical joint replacement and pain management as their sole treatment options. For this reason, there is an increasing need to identify early stage osteoarthritis biomarkers. Our study aimed to identify and characterize gene expression variances in 3 different mouse strains (STR/ort, C57BL/6 and MRL/MpJ) with different susceptibility to post traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Through RNA sequence analysis of whole knee joint RNA, we identified differentially expressed genes associated with the initial stages of PTOA in relation to mice with divergent phenotypes. These results will help elucidate potential mechanisms responsible for PTOA outcomes.

  13. Self-reported knee joint instability is related to passive mechanical stiffness in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaby, Mark W; Wrigley, Tim V; Lim, Boon-Whatt; Hinman, Rana S; Bryant, Adam L; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-11-20

    Self-reported knee joint instability compromises function in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis and may be related to impaired joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported instability and the passive varus-valgus mechanical behaviour of the medial osteoarthritis knee. Passive varus-valgus angular laxity and stiffness were assessed using a modified isokinetic dynamometer in 73 participants with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. All participants self-reported the absence or presence of knee instability symptoms and the degree to which instability affected daily activity on a 6-point likert scale. Forward linear regression modelling identified a significant inverse relationship between passive mid-range knee stiffness and symptoms of knee instability (r = 0.27; P 0.05). Conceivably, a stiffer passive system may contribute toward greater joint stability during functional activities. Importantly however, net joint stiffness is influenced by both active and passive stiffness, and thus the active neuromuscular system may compensate for reduced passive stiffness in order to maintain joint stability. Future work is merited to examine the role of active stiffness in symptomatic joint stability.

  14. Correlation between radiographic findings of osteoarthritis and arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Blankenbaker, Donna; Stanton, Paul; De Smet, Arthur; Fine, Jason

    2006-01-01

    To correlate radiographic findings of osteoarthritis on axial knee radiographs with arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint in patients with chronic knee pain. The study group consisted of 104 patients with osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint and 30 patients of similar age with no osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint. All patients in the study group had an axial radiograph of the knee performed prior to arthroscopic knee surgery. At the time of arthroscopy, each articular surface of the patellofemoral joint was graded using the Noyes classification system. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the knee radiographs to determine the presence of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts. The sensitivity and specificity of the various radiographic features of osteoarthritis for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint were determined. The sensitivity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 73%, 37%, 4%, and 0% respectively. The specificity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 67%, 90%, 100%, and 100% respectively. Marginal osteophytes were the most sensitive radiographic feature for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint. Joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts were insensitive radiographic features of osteoarthritis, and rarely occurred in the absence of associated osteophyte formation. (orig.)

  15. Correlation between radiographic findings of osteoarthritis and arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Blankenbaker, Donna; Stanton, Paul; De Smet, Arthur [University of Wisconsin Hospital Clinical Science Center-E3/311, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Fine, Jason [University of Wisconsin Clinical Science Center-K6/4675, Department of Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-12-15

    To correlate radiographic findings of osteoarthritis on axial knee radiographs with arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint in patients with chronic knee pain. The study group consisted of 104 patients with osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint and 30 patients of similar age with no osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint. All patients in the study group had an axial radiograph of the knee performed prior to arthroscopic knee surgery. At the time of arthroscopy, each articular surface of the patellofemoral joint was graded using the Noyes classification system. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the knee radiographs to determine the presence of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts. The sensitivity and specificity of the various radiographic features of osteoarthritis for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint were determined. The sensitivity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 73%, 37%, 4%, and 0% respectively. The specificity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 67%, 90%, 100%, and 100% respectively. Marginal osteophytes were the most sensitive radiographic feature for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint. Joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts were insensitive radiographic features of osteoarthritis, and rarely occurred in the absence of associated osteophyte formation. (orig.)

  16. Correlation between radiographic findings of osteoarthritis and arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijowski, Richard; Blankenbaker, Donna; Stanton, Paul; Fine, Jason; De Smet, Arthur

    2006-12-01

    To correlate radiographic findings of osteoarthritis on axial knee radiographs with arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint in patients with chronic knee pain. The study group consisted of 104 patients with osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint and 30 patients of similar age with no osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint. All patients in the study group had an axial radiograph of the knee performed prior to arthroscopic knee surgery. At the time of arthroscopy, each articular surface of the patellofemoral joint was graded using the Noyes classification system. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the knee radiographs to determine the presence of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts. The sensitivity and specificity of the various radiographic features of osteoarthritis for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint were determined. The sensitivity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 73%, 37%, 4%, and 0% respectively. The specificity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 67%, 90%, 100%, and 100% respectively. Marginal osteophytes were the most sensitive radiographic feature for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint. Joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts were insensitive radiographic features of osteoarthritis, and rarely occurred in the absence of associated osteophyte formation.

  17. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, E.J.; van der Pas, S.; Schaap, L.A.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Zambon, S.; Peter, R.; Pedersen, N.L.; Dennison, E.M.; Denkinger, M.; Castell, M.V; Siviero, P.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Edwards, M.H.; Otero, A.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six

  18. Flexibility of Knee Joint Muscles in Women with Knee Osteoarthritis and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Abolahrari Shirazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases in synovial joints. Due to high loading forces during weight-bearing activities, the knee joint is prone to degenerative processes. This study aimed to compare the flexibility of muscles around the knee joint in patients with knee osteoarthritis with those of healthy individuals. Methods: Twenty-three women with bilateral knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy women matched with the patient group for age, height and weight participated in this study. Flexibility of the quadriceps, hamstring, iliotibial band, adductor and gastrocnemius muscles was evaluated with a goniometric device. Pain intensity was assessed with a visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed with independent t-tests to compare the two groups, and Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate muscle flexibility and pain intensity. Results: significant lower flexibility of the bilateral quadriceps muscles was found in patients compared to healthy women (P<0.05. No significant differences were detected between groups regarding other muscles. Quadriceps flexibility correlated significantly with pain intensity in patients (P<0.001. Conclusion: In patients with osteoarthritis, quadriceps flexibility may be decreased although other muscles may remain unaffected. Quadriceps stretching is thus a potentially important component of treatment, which may influence pain reduction in these patients.

  19. A cadaveric investigation into the demographic and bony alignment properties associated with osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Douglas S; Tucker, Braden J; Drain, Joseph P; Wang, David M; Gilmore, Allison; Liu, Raymond W

    2016-06-01

    Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is common, although circumstances dictating its evolution and pathogenesis remain unclear. Advances in surgical technique have improved the ability to modify long-bone alignment in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. However, to our knowledge, there is no significant long-term data available in regard to the relationship between anatomic alignment parameters most amenable to surgical modification and patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Five-hundred and seventy-one cadaveric skeletons were obtained from the Hamann-Todd osteological collection. Mechanical lateral distal femoral angle, medial proximal tibial angle, tibial slope, femoral version, tibial torsion, the position of the tibial tubercle relative to the width of the tibial plateau, trochlear depth, and patellar size were measured using validated techniques. A previously published grading system for patellofemoral joint arthritis was used to quantify macroscopic signs of degenerative joint disease. Increasing age (standardized beta 0.532, ppatellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. A relatively more laterally positioned tibial tubercle trended towards predicting patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (standardized beta 0.080, p=0.089). These findings confirm that patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is strongly associated with increasing age and female gender. Valgus alignment of the distal femur, a relatively more lateral location of the tibial tubercle, and a shallower trochlear grove appear to have modest effects on the development of patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Audit of conservative management of chronic low back pain in a secondary care setting--part I: facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Robin; Dias, Richard

    2004-12-01

    The work of a chronic back pain service in secondary care in the West Midlands is reported. The service offers acupuncture, spinal injection procedures, osteopathy and a range of other interventions for patients whose back pain has not responded to conservative management. This section of the report focuses on injection procedures for lumbar facet joint and sacroiliac joint pain, which have been shown to be the cause of chronic low back pain in 16-40% and 13-19% of patients respectively. Diagnosis relies on the use of intra-articular or sensory nerve block injections with local anaesthetic. Possible treatments following diagnosis include intra-articular corticosteroid, radiofrequency denervation (for facet joint pain) or ligament prolotherapy injections (for sacroiliac joint pain). The results of several hospital audits are reported. At six month follow up, 50% of 38 patients undergoing radiofrequency denervation following diagnostic blocks for facet joint pain had improved by more than 50%, compared to 29% of 34 patients treated with intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Sixty three per cent of 19 patients undergoing prolotherapy following diagnostic block injection for sacroiliac joint pain had improved at six months, compared to 33% of 33 who had intra-articular corticosteroid. Both radiofrequency denervation and sacroiliac prolotherapy showed good long-term outcomes at one year.

  1. Arthropathy in long-term cured acromegaly is characterised by osteophytes without joint space narrowing: a comparison with generalised osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, M. J. E.; Biermasz, N. R.; Bijsterbosch, J.; Pereira, A. M.; Meulenbelt, I.; Smit, J. W. A.; Roelfsema, F.; Kroon, H. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2011-01-01

    To compare the distribution of osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) between patients with acromegaly and primary generalised osteoarthritis to gain insight into the pathophysiological process of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I)-mediated osteoarthritis. We

  2. Effects of Facet Joint Injection Reducing the Need for Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Vertebral Compression Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Tae Seong; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kang, Yusuhn; Ahn, Joong Mo, E-mail: joongmoahn@gmail.com; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the effects of facet joint injection (FJI) reducing the need for percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in cases of vertebral compression fracture (VCF).Materials and MethodsA total of 169 patients who were referred to the radiology department of our institution for PVP between January 2011 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. The effectiveness of FJI was evaluated by the proportion of patients who cancelled PVP and who experienced reduced pain. In addition, by means of medical chart and MRI review, those clinical factors (age, sex, history of trauma, amount of injected steroids and interval days elapsed between VCF and FJI) and MR image factors (kyphosis angle, height loss, single or multiple level of VCF, burst fracture, central canal compromise, posterior element injury) that were believed to be significant for the effectiveness of FJI were statistically analysed.ResultsIn the 26 patients with FJI prior to PVP, six (23 %) patients cancelled PVP with considerable improvement in reported pain. In the 20 patients with PVP after FJI, improvement in pain after FJI was reported by six patients, resulting in a total of 12 patients (46 %) who experienced reduced pain after FJI. Clinical factors and MR image factors did not show any statistically significant difference between those groups, divided by PVP cancellation and by improvement of pain.ConclusionAfter FJI prior to PVP, about one quarter of patients cancelled PVP due to reduced pain and overall about half of the patients experienced reduced pain.

  3. Gradient-echo imaging of intervertebral disk degeneration and facet joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, D.H.; Kormos, D.; Modic, M.T.; Carter, J.; Masaryk, T.J.; Ross, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of gradient-echo, partial-flip angle images in the evaluation of components of degenerative spine disease. First, cadaveric spines were studied with plain radiographs, high-resolution CT, T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) MR images (repetition time msec/echo time msec=500/17). T2-weighted SE images (2,000/30-90), and fast low-angle shot (FLASH) images (200/10.50 0 ) before and after intradiskal injection of air (0.1-1cc). Second, lumbar spine MR images were retrospectively evaluated to compare gradient-echo and SE sequences. Results indicate that the signal intensity changes of the intervertebral disk related to degeneration were best appreciated on T2-weighted SE studies in both groups. Vacuum phenomenon and calcification were most accurately assessed with FLASH imaging (based on susceptibility changes) and CT images. SE images appeared more sensitive to adjacent marrow change. In the facet joints, CT was more accurate for changes in the subarticular bone, but FLASH images were more sensitive to change in the articular cartilage

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of the impact of various facet joint lesions on the primary stability of anterior plate fixation in cervical dislocation injuries: a cadaver study: Laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkircher, Ludwig; Born, Sebastian; Struewer, Johannes; Bliemel, Christopher; Buecking, Benjamin; Wack, Christina; Bergmann, Martin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Krüger, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Injuries of the subaxial cervical spine including facet joints and posterior ligaments are common. Potential surgical treatments consist of anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior fixation. Because each approach has its advantages and disadvantages, the best treatment is debated. This biomechanical cadaver study compared the effect of different facet joint injuries on primary stability following anterior plate fixation. Fractures and plate fixation were performed on 15 fresh-frozen intact cervical spines (C3-T1). To simulate a translation-rotation injury in all groups, complete ligament rupture and facet dislocation were simulated by dissecting the entire posterior and anterior ligament complex between C-4 and C-5. In the first group, the facet joints were left intact. In the second group, one facet joint between C-4 and C-5 was removed and the other side was left intact. In the third group, both facet joints between C-4 and C-5 were removed. The authors next performed single-level anterior discectomy and interbody grafting using bone material from the respective thoracic vertebral bodies. An anterior cervical locking plate was used for fixation. Continuous loading was performed using a servohydraulic test bench at 2 N/sec. The mean load failure was measured when the implant failed. In the group in which both facet joints were intact, the mean load failure was 174.6 ± 46.93 N. The mean load failure in the second group where only one facet joint was removed was 127.8 ± 22.83 N. In the group in which both facet joints were removed, the mean load failure was 73.42 ± 32.51 N. There was a significant difference between the first group (both facet joints intact) and the third group (both facet joints removed) (p cadaver study, primary stability of anterior plate fixation for dislocation injuries of the subaxial cervical spine was dependent on the presence of the facet joints. If the bone in one or both facet joints is damaged in the clinical setting, anterior plate

  5. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  6. Evaluation of Water Content in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs and Facet Joints Before and After Physiological Loading Using T2 Mapping MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Daisuke; Murakami, Hideki; Chokan, Kou; Endo, Hirooki; Oikawa, Ryosuke; Sawamura, Shoitsu; Doita, Minoru

    2017-12-15

    T2 mapping was used to quantify the water content of lumbar spine intervertebral discs (IVDs) and facet joints before and after physiological loading. The aim of this study was to clarify the interaction between lumbar spine IVD and facet joints as load-bearing structures by measuring the water content of their matrix after physiological loading using T2 mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To date, few reports have functionally evaluated lumbar spine IVD and facet joints, and their interaction in vivo. T2 mapping may help detect changes in the water content of IVD and articular cartilage of facet joints before and after physiological loading, thereby enabling the evaluation of changes in interacted water retention between IVD and facet joints. Twenty asymptomatic volunteers (10 female and 10 male volunteers; mean age, 19.3 years; age range, 19-20 years) underwent MRI before and after physiological loading such as lumbar flexion, extension, and rotation. Each IVD from L1/2 to L5/S1 was sliced at center of the disc space, and the T2 value was measured at the nucleus pulposus (NP), anterior annulus fibrosus (AF), posterior AF, and bilateral facet joints. In the NP, T2 values significantly decreased after exercise at every lumbar spinal level. In the anterior AF, there were no significant differences in T2 values at any level. In the posterior AF, T2 values significantly increased only at L4/5. In the bilateral facet joints, T2 values significantly decreased after exercise at every level. There was a significant decrease in the water content of facet joints and the NP at every lumbar spinal level after dynamic loading by physical lumbar exercise. These changes appear to play an important and interactional role in the maintenance of the interstitial matrix in the IVD NP and cartilage in the facet joint. 3.

  7. Interlimb symmetry of dynamic knee joint stiffness and co-contraction is maintained in early stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A T; Richardson, R T; Higginson, J S

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with knee OA often exhibit greater co-contraction of antagonistic muscle groups surrounding the affected joint which may lead to increases in dynamic joint stiffness. These detrimental changes in the symptomatic limb may also exist in the contralateral limb, thus contributing to its risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interlimb symmetry of dynamic knee joint stiffness and muscular co-contraction in knee osteoarthritis. Muscular co-contraction and dynamic knee joint stiffness were assessed in 17 subjects with mild to moderate unilateral medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and 17 healthy control subjects while walking at a controlled speed (1.0m/s). Paired and independent t-tests determined whether significant differences exist between groups (pknees compared to the healthy group (p=0.051). Subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis maintain symmetric control strategies during gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging and histological features of central subchondral osteophytes in racehorses with metacarpophalangeal joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J; D'Anjou, M A; Girard, C; Laverty, S; Theoret, C L

    2009-12-01

    Marginal osteophytes represent a well known component of osteoarthritis in man and animals. Conversely, central subchondral osteophytes (COs), which are commonly present in human knees with osteoarthritis, have not been reported in horses. To describe and compare computed radiography (CR), single-slice computed tomography (CT), 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological features of COs in equine metacarpophalangeal joints with macroscopic evidence of naturally-occurring osteoarthritis. MRI sequences (sagittal spoiled gradient recalled echo [SPGR] with fat saturation, sagittal T2-weighted fast spin echo with fat saturation [T2-FS], dorsal and transverse T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo [GRE], and sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo with fast imaging employing steady state acquisition [FIESTA]), as well as transverse and reformatted sagittal CTI and 4 computed radiographic (CR) views of 20 paired metacarpophalangeal joints were acquired ex vivo. Following macroscopic evaluation, samples were harvested in predetermined sites of the metacarpal condyle for subsequent histology. The prevalence and detection level of COs was determined for each imaging modality. Abnormalities consistent with COs were clearly depicted on MRI, using the SPGR sequence, in 7/20 (35%) joints. They were identified as a focal hypointense protuberance from the subchondral plate into the cartilage, at the palmarodistal aspect (n=7) and/or at the very dorsal aspect (n=2) of the metacarpal condyle. COs were visible but less obvious in 5 of the 7 joints using FIESTA and reformatted sagittal CT, and were not identifiable on T2-FS, T1-GRE or CR. Microscopically, they consisted of dense bone protruding into the calcified cartilage and disrupting the tidemarks, and they were consistently associated with overlying cartilage defects. Subchondral osteophytes are a feature of osteoarthritis of equine metacarpophalangeal joints and they may be diagnosed using 1.5 Tesla MRI and CT. Central

  9. MRI of articular cartilaginous lesions. MRI findings in osteoarthritis of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Takezawa, Yuuichi; Suguro, Tohru; Igata, Atsuomi; Kudo, Yukihiko; Motegi, Mitsuo.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging for imaging of the knee joint, especially for detecting articular cartilaginous lesions associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 141 patients with osteoarthritis were examined (23 males, 118 females). Their age range was 40-93 (mean age 66.2). Using radiotherapy examinations, patients were classified according to Hokkaido University Classification Criteria; 22, 49, 46, 16, and 8 patients were classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Articular cartilage defects were examined using MRI, and the number of such defects increased as the X-ray stage progressed. The appearance of a low signal intensity area in the bone marrow was examined using MRI, and the number of patients observed to have such areas increased as the x-ray stages progressed. JOA OA scores were significantly low for patients with meniscal tears. Patients were classified and results reviewed using MRI examinations. Classification by MRI of articular cartilage lesions correlated with the JOA OA scores. Low signal intensity areas in the bone marrow were frequently observed in advanced osteoarthritis cases, and there was correlation between FTA and MRI classifications of these areas. MRI is extremely valuable in detecting articular cartilage lesions in the knee joint, showing those lesions which cannot be detected by conventional radiography examinations. Thus, MRI is judged to be a clinically useful method for diagnosis of osteoarthritis. (author)

  10. Increased expression of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in osteoarthritis of human knee joint compared to hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, John H; Rai, Vikrant; Dilisio, Matthew F; Sekundiak, Todd D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by the destruction of cartilage. The greatest risk factors for the development of OA include age and obesity. Recent studies suggest the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of OA. The two most common locations for OA to occur are in the knee and hip joints. The knee joint experiences more mechanical stress, cartilage degeneration, and inflammation than the hip joint. This could contribute to the increased incidence of OA in the knee joint. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high-mobility group box-1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, and alarmins (S100A8 and S100A9), are released in the joint in response to stress-mediated chondrocyte and cartilage damage. This facilitates increased cartilage degradation and inflammation in the joint. Studies have documented the role of DAMPs in the pathogenesis of OA; however, the comparison of DAMPs and its influence on OA has not been discussed. In this study, we compared the DAMPs between OA knee and hip joints and found a significant difference in the levels of DAMPs expressed in the knee joint compared to the hip joint. The increased levels of DAMPs suggest a difference in the underlying pathogenesis of OA in the knee and the hip and highlights DAMPs as potential therapeutic targets for OA in the future.

  11. Significance of interfacet distance, facet joint orientation, and lumbar lordosis in spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Bong; Lee, Sungjoon; Kim, Hoon; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the association between lumbar spondylolysis and several radiologic parameters, which had been suggested to be significant. The authors examine interfacet distance (IFD), facet joint orientation (FJO), and lumbar segmental lordosis (LSL) all together on the basis of lumbar computed tomography (CT) scan of 35 patients with L5 spondylolysis and 36 unaffected control groups. Thirty-five Korean military recruits, aged 19-23 (mean 20.9 years), were diagnosed as L5 spondylolysis by lumber CT scans. As a control group, 36 male Korean military recruits, aged 18-25 (mean 21.3 years), were reconfirmed as not affected by lumbar spondylolysis by CT scan when they visited our hospital complaining of back pain. This study compares IFD, FJO, and LSL for each lumbar segment between the spondylolytic and unaffected groups. We also propose the use of normal mean data of IFD, FJO, and LSL of lumbar vertebrae from 36 Korean young military recruits because each measurement has power as an absolute value, like data from an osteologic collection in other studies. Comparison of IFD between spondylolytic and unaffected individuals reveals significant differences at the L3, L4, and L5 level (P = 0.0384, P = 0.0219, and P spondylolysis, the increase of IFD from L4 to S1 was less pronounced (P spondylolysis and individuals without pars defect on L5. In the spondylolysis group, and the increase of IFD from L4 to S1 was less pronounced and the LSL at L5-S1 was more lordotic. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Intra-articular pressures and joint mechanics: should we pay attention to effusion in knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Derek James

    2014-09-01

    What factors play a role to ensure a knee joint does what it should given the demands of moving through the physical environment? This paper aims to probe the hypothesis that intra-articular joint pressures, once a topic of interest, have been left aside in contemporary frameworks in which we now view knee joint function. The focus on ligamentous deficiencies and the chondrocentric view of osteoarthritis, while important, have left little attention to the consideration of other factors that can impair joint function across the lifespan. Dynamic knee stability is required during every step we take. While there is much known about the role that passive structures and muscular activation play in maintaining a healthy knee joint, this framework does not account for the role that intra-articular joint pressures may have in providing joint stability during motion and how these factors interact. Joint injuries invariably result in some form of intra-articular fluid accumulation. Ultimately, it may be how the knee mechanically responds to this fluid, of which pressure plays a significant role that provides the mechanisms for continued function. Do joint pressures provide an important foundation for maintaining knee function? This hypothesis is unique and argues that we are missing an important piece of the puzzle when attempting to understand implications that joint injury and disease have for joint function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute Injury of Synovial Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    submitted and accepted to the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society, North America Conference (December 2016): Raleigh AR...bone, ligament , or meniscus) increases the likelihood of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) [1]. PTOA may be due, in part, to a decrease in...Mechanisms of joint degradation may be elucidated in animal models of PTOA, such as with anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). Following

  14. Knee joint pain potentially due to bone alterations in a knee osteoarthritis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown. We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA. Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient's knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations.

  15. Clinical efficacy and safety of Gubitong Recipe () in treating osteoarthritis of knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qing-wen; Xu, Yuan; Jin, Di-er; Yan, Xiao-ping

    2009-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic efficacy and safety of Gubitong Recipe (, GBT) in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee joint. Ninety patients with knee osteoarthritis were equally assigned, according to a randomizing digital table, to the treatment group and the control group. The treatment group was treated with GBT Decoction one dose every day and the control group with glucosamine sulfate 500 mg thrice a day, respectively, for eight successive weeks. Besides, diclofenac sodium could be given as supplementary dugs with the dosage used recorded if necessary. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, an index reflecting the degree of joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction) in patients was assessed before and after treatment, and the patients' symptoms were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) as well. Moreover, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), blood C-reactive protein (CRP), blood and urinary routine tests, liver and kidney function examination, and the adverse reaction that occurred during the treatment period were observed. WOMAC index and integral VAS value were lowered in both groups after treatment, showing significant statistical difference as compared with before treatment (P<0.05), but the decrement of WOMAC index in the treatment group was more significant than that in the control group (P<0.05). ESR and CRP levels remained unchanged in all patients, and the proportion and mean dosage of diclofenac sodium used were similar in the two groups. No evident adverse reaction occurred during the treatment period. GBT is an effective and safe recipe for the treatment of osteoarthritis of knee joint, which could alleviate the joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction.

  16. Effects of non-surgical joint distraction in the treatment of severe knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi-Kalantari, Khosro; Mahmoodi Aghdam, Somayeh; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Rezayi, Mehdi; Rahimi, Abbas; Naimee, Sedighesadat

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of non surgical knee distraction in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. forty female patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided in two groups. A standard physiotherapy treatment was applied to both groups and in one group it was accompanied with 20 min knee joint distraction. The patients were treated for 10 sessions. Clinical examination consisted of functional examination, completion of a quality of life questionnaire, pain scale, and assessment of joint mobility and joint edema. The standard physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction resulted in significantly higher improvement in pain (P = 0.004), functional ability (P = 0.02), quality of life (P = 0.002) and knee flexion range of motion (p = 0.02) compared to the standard physiotherapy treatment alone post treatment and after 1 month follow up. Adding knee distraction to standard physiotherapy treatment can result in further improvement in pain relief, increased functional ability and better quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Kelli D.; Choong, Peter F.; Davis, Aileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. Despite the existence of evidence-based treatments and guidelines, substantial gaps remain in the quality of OA management. There is underutilization of behavioral and rehabilitative strategies to prevent and treat OA as well...

  18. Treatment of lumbar facet joint syndrome by CT-guided intraarticular infiltration of fact joints; Behandlung des lumbalen Facettensyndroms durch CT-gesteuerte Infiltration der Zwischenwirbelgelenke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleifer, J. [Knappschaftsklinik Puettlingen/Saar (Germany). Orthopaedische Abteilung; Fenzl, G. [Knappschaftsklinik Puettlingen/Saar (Germany). Orthopaedische Abteilung; Wolf, A. [Knappschaftsklinik Puettlingen/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Abteilung; Diehl, K. [Knappschaftsklinik Puettlingen/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Abteilung

    1994-11-01

    In 62 patients with facet syndrome a total of 205 joints were infiltrated, CT monitoring being used in all cases. Each facet joint was infiltrated with 0.3 ml bupivacaine and 0.8 ml methylprednisolone. The patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 24 persons who had undergone lumbar disc surgery, group 2 of 23 patients with spondylarthrosis of the facet joints, and group 3 of 15 patients who had undergone lumbar disc surgery but hat additional spondylarthrosis. Very good results were defined as pain relief for longer than 4 weeks, good results as pain relief for up to 4 weeks and poor results as brief pain relief or none at all. In 27 patients facet infiltration was performed for the purpose of diagnosis. Results were significantly in group 2 than in group 1. In group 3 results were better than in group 1, but worse than in group 2. These differences were not statistical by significant. Seven patients in the diagnostic group had no pain relief, and facet syndrome was excluded. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei 62 Patienten mit lumbalem Facettensyndrom wurden insgesamt 205 Zwischenwirbelgelenke (Facettengelenke) perkutan CT-gesteuert infiltriert. Je Gelenk wurden 0,3 ml Bupivacain und 0,8 ml Methylprednisolon intraartikulaer infiziert. Die Patienten wurden in 3 Gruppen unterteilt. Die 1. Gruppe umfasste 24 Patienten mit Postnukleotomiesyndrom, die 2. Gruppe 23 Patienten mit spondylarthrotischen Veraenderungen, die 3. Gruppe 15 bandscheibenoperierte Patienten mit zusaetzlicher Spondylarthrose. In Gruppe 2 fanden sich signifikant bessere Ergebnisse als in Gruppe 1. Gute Resultate ergab auch die dritte Gruppe, sie waren jedoch nicht signifikant besser als die der Gruppe 1. Die sorgfaeltige Auswahl der Patienten ist fuer den Erfolg der Behandlung entscheidend. Die Infiltrationsbehandlung der Zwischenwirbelgelenke hat nahezu keine Nebenwirkungen. Ausser zur Therapie wird das Verfahren diagnostisch zum Ausschluss eines Facettensyndromes im Rahmen der Abklaerung

  19. DINAMICS OF KNEE JOINT SPACE ASYMMETRY ON X-RAY AS A MARKER OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS REHABILITATION EFFICACY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheveleva, N; Minbayeva, L; Belyayeva, Y

    2017-03-01

    Reducing of articular cartilage functional volume in knee joint osteoarthritis occurs unevenly and accompanied with pathological changes of lower limb axis as a result of connective tissue and muscle structures dysfunction. Evaluation of X-ray knee joint space asymmetry seems to be informative to analyze the dynamics of lower extremities biomechanical imbalances characteristic for knee joint osteoarthritis. However, standardized method of X-ray joint space determining does not include its symmetry calculation. The purpose of the study was optimization of knee joint radiological examination by developing of X-ray knee joint space asymmetry index calculation method. The proposed method was used for comparative analysis of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy efficacy in 30 patients with knee joint osteoarthritis of 2-3 degrees (Kellgren-Lawrence, 1957). As a result of the conducted treatment statistically significant decrease of the X-ray knee joint space asymmetry index was observed (Me(Q1;Q3): Z=5.20, pknee joint space asymmetry index, calculated according to the proposed method, allows to evaluate dynamics of articular surfaces congruency changes and provide differentiated approach to the treatment of knee joint osteoarthritis.

  20. Hip joint biomechanics in those with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, E; Zeni, J A; Axe, M J; Snyder-Mackler, L

    2017-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury results in altered kinematics and kinetics in the knee and hip joints that persist despite surgical reconstruction and rehabilitation. Abnormal movement patterns and a history of osteoarthritis are risk factors for articular cartilage degeneration in additional joints. The purpose of this study was to determine if hip joint biomechanics early after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction differ between patients with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis 5years after reconstruction. The study's rationale was that individuals who develop knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury may also demonstrate large alterations in hip joint biomechanics. Nineteen athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury completed standard gait analysis before (baseline) and after (post-training) extended pre-operative rehabilitation and at 6months, 1year, and 2years after reconstruction. Weightbearing knee radiographs were completed 5years after reconstruction to identify medial compartment osteoarthritis. Five of 19 patients had knee osteoarthritis at 5years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Patients with knee osteoarthritis at 5years walked with smaller sagittal plane hip angles (P: 0.043) and lower sagittal (P: 0.021) and frontal plane (P: 0.042) external hip moments in the injured limb before and after reconstruction compared to those without knee osteoarthritis. The current findings suggest hip joint biomechanics may be altered in patients who develop post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. Further study is needed to confirm whether the risk of non-traumatic hip pathology is increased after anterior cruciate ligament injury and if hip joint biomechanics influence its development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Are the Kinematics of the Knee Joint Altered during the Loading Response Phase of Gait in Individuals with Concurrent Knee Osteoarthritis and Complaints of Joint Instability? A Dynamic Stereo X-ray Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B.; Klatt, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Background Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional declines in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Methods Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Findings Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (P knee joint at initial contact was significantly different (P knee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. Interpretations The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics. PMID:22071429

  2. Are the kinematics of the knee joint altered during the loading response phase of gait in individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability? A dynamic stereo X-ray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B; Klatt, Brian A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2012-05-01

    Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional decline in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (Pknee joint at initial contact was significantly different (Pknee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluoroscopy-guided intrA-articular facet joint steroid injection for the management of low back pain: Therapeutic effectiveness and arthrographic pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Guen Young; You, Ja Yeon; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jae Won [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Mo [Dept. of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular facet joint steroid injection for the management of low back pain, and to document the incidence of epidural leakage. In total, 320 facet joint injections of 244 consecutive patients were included in this study. All patients had undergone an intra-articular facet joint steroid injection in 2007 and had follow-up post-treatment medical records. The response to treatment was analyzed on the basis of chart documentation (aggravated, no change, slightly improved, much improved, no pain). Fluoroscopic arthrograms of the injections were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists. Of the 244 patients, 85.2% (n = 208) showed improvement after an initial intra-articular facet joint steroid injection. A total of 77.9% (n = 162) of the patients showed symptom recurrence, with a median of a 69 day symptom-free interval, while 30.3% (n = 74) of the patients showed symptom-free intervals of more than six months. Overall, 74 (33.3%) of the 222 cases of intra-articular facet joint steroid injections without concomitant epidural steroid injection showed epidural leakage in fluoroscopic arthrograms. Fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular facet joint injection is a reliable technique for the management of low back pain, with excellent immediate effectiveness and good prolonged (> 2 months) pain relief. Epidural leakage during injection was detected in one-third of the cases.

  4. Fluoroscopy-guided intrA-articular facet joint steroid injection for the management of low back pain: Therapeutic effectiveness and arthrographic pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Guen Young; You, Ja Yeon; Kang, Heung Sik; Chai, Jae Won; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular facet joint steroid injection for the management of low back pain, and to document the incidence of epidural leakage. In total, 320 facet joint injections of 244 consecutive patients were included in this study. All patients had undergone an intra-articular facet joint steroid injection in 2007 and had follow-up post-treatment medical records. The response to treatment was analyzed on the basis of chart documentation (aggravated, no change, slightly improved, much improved, no pain). Fluoroscopic arthrograms of the injections were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists. Of the 244 patients, 85.2% (n = 208) showed improvement after an initial intra-articular facet joint steroid injection. A total of 77.9% (n = 162) of the patients showed symptom recurrence, with a median of a 69 day symptom-free interval, while 30.3% (n = 74) of the patients showed symptom-free intervals of more than six months. Overall, 74 (33.3%) of the 222 cases of intra-articular facet joint steroid injections without concomitant epidural steroid injection showed epidural leakage in fluoroscopic arthrograms. Fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular facet joint injection is a reliable technique for the management of low back pain, with excellent immediate effectiveness and good prolonged (> 2 months) pain relief. Epidural leakage during injection was detected in one-third of the cases

  5. Preoperative Pain Neuroscience Education Combined With Knee Joint Mobilization for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Enrique; Dueñas, Lirios; Falla, Deborah; Baert, Isabel; Meeus, Mira; Sánchez-Frutos, José; Nijs, Jo

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to first compare the effects of a preoperative treatment combining pain neuroscience education (PNE) with knee joint mobilization versus biomedical education with knee joint mobilization on central sensitization (CS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis, both before and after surgery. Second, we wanted to compare the effects of both interventions on knee pain, disability, and psychosocial variables. Forty-four patients with knee osteoarthritis were allocated to receive 4 sessions of either PNE combined with knee joint mobilization or biomedical education with knee joint mobilization before surgery. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires and quantitative sensory testing was performed at baseline, after treatment and at a 1 month follow-up (all before surgery), and at 3 months after surgery. Significant and clinically relevant differences before and after surgery were found after treatments for both knee pain and disability, and some measures of CS (ie, widespread hyperalgesia, CS inventory), with no significant between-group differences. Other indicators of CS (ie, conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) did not change over time following either treatment, and in some occasions the observed changes were not in the expected direction. Patients receiving PNE with knee joint mobilization achieved greater improvements in psychosocial variables (pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia) both before and after surgery. Preoperative PNE combined with knee joint mobilization did not produce any additional benefits over time for knee pain and disability, and CS measures compared with biomedical education with knee joint mobilization. Superior effects in the PNE with knee joint mobilization group were only observed for psychosocial variables related to pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia.

  6. The associations between quadriceps muscle strength, power, and knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Armstrong, Charles W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Tevald, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal knee joint mechanics have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Deficits in muscle function (i.e., strength and power) may contribute to abnormal knee joint loading. The associations between quadriceps strength, power and knee joint mechanics remain unclear in knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to collect peak knee joint angles and moments during the first 50% of stance phase of gait in 33 participants with knee osteoarthritis. Quadriceps strength and power were assessed using a knee extension machine. Strength was quantified as the one repetition maximum. Power was quantified as the peak power produced at 40-90% of the one repetition maximum. Quadriceps strength accounted for 15% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P=0.016). Quadriceps power accounted for 20-29% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (Pknee adduction moment (P=0.05). These data suggest that quadriceps power explains more variance in knee flexion angle and knee adduction moment during gait in knee osteoarthritis than quadriceps strength. Additionally, quadriceps power at multiple loads is associated with knee joint mechanics and therefore should be assessed at a variety of loads. Taken together, these results indicate that quadriceps power may be a potential target for interventions aimed at changing knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of bone marrow edema with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis and internal derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaj, Aiyesha; Hafeez, Kashif; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the dental literature in order to determine the association of bone marrow edema with osteoarthritis and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement disorders. A literature search was performed using electronic databases PubMed/Medline (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) and Cochrane for articles published during the last 15 years (January 2000-December 2014). A predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were used for filtering the scientific papers. Research articles fulfilling the basic inclusion criteria were included in the review. The reviewed studies showed that bone marrow edema is found in painful joints with osteoarthritis in a majority of cases. A few cases with no pain or significant degenerative changes are reported to have a bone marrow edema pattern as well. Bone marrow edema, increased fluid level, and pain are associated with osteoarthritis in the majority of patients reporting TMJ arthritis. Degenerative and disc displacement conditions are multifactorial and require further investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging can be employed to detect bone marrow edema even in the absence of pain and clinical symptoms in the patients of internal derangements.

  8. A Best-Evidence Systematic Appraisal of the Diagnostic Accuracy and Utility of Facet (Zygapophysial) Joint Injections in Chronic Spinal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Mark V; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Bakshi, Sanjay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Gupta, Sanjeeva; Jha, Sachin Sunny; Nampiaparampil, Devi E; Simopoulos, Thomas T; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Spinal zygapophysial, or facet, joints are a source of axial spinal pain and referred pain in the extremities. Conventional clinical features and other noninvasive diagnostic modalities are unreliable in diagnosing zygapophysial joint pain. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of spinal facet joint nerve blocks. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of spinal facet joint nerve blocks in chronic spinal pain. A methodological quality assessment of included studies was performed using Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies (QAREL). Only diagnostic accuracy studies meeting at least 50% of the designated inclusion criteria were utilized for analysis. The level of evidence was classified as Level I to V based on the grading of evidence utilizing best evidence synthesis. Data sources included relevant literature identified through searches of PubMed and other electronic searches published from 1966 through March 2015, Cochrane reviews, and manual searches of the bibliographies of known primary and review articles. Studies must have been performed utilizing controlled local anesthetic blocks. The criterion standard must have been at least 50% pain relief from baseline scores and the ability to perform previously painful movements. The available evidence is Level I for lumbar facet joint nerve blocks with the inclusion of a total of 17 studies with dual diagnostic blocks, with at least 75% pain relief with an average prevalence of 16% to 41% and false-positive rates of 25% to 44%. The evidence for diagnosis of cervical facet joint pain with cervical facet joint nerve blocks is Level II based on a total of 11 controlled diagnostic accuracy studies, with significant variability among the prevalence in a heterogenous population with internal inconsistency. The prevalence rates ranged from 36% to 67% with at least 80% pain relief as the criterion standard and a false-positive rate of 27% to 63%. The level of evidence for the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic facet

  9. Body mass index affects knee joint mechanics during gait differently with and without moderate knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Graeme T; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Dunbar, Michael J; Stanish, William D; Astephen Wilson, Janie L

    2012-11-01

    Obesity is a highly cited risk factor for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but its role in knee OA pathogenesis and progression is not as clear. Excess weight may contribute to an increased mechanical burden and altered dynamic movement and loading patterns at the knee. The objective of this study was to examine the interacting role of moderate knee OA disease presence and obesity on knee joint mechanics during gait. Gait analysis was performed on 104 asymptomatic and 140 individuals with moderate knee OA. Each subject group was divided into three body mass categories based on body mass index (BMI): healthy weight (BMI30). Three-dimensional knee joint angles and net external knee joint moments were calculated and waveform principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract major patterns of variability from each. PC scores for major patterns were compared between groups using a two-factor ANOVA. Significant BMI main effects were found in the pattern of the knee adduction moment, the knee flexion moment, and the knee rotation moment during gait. Two interaction effects between moderate OA disease presence and BMI were also found that described different changes in the knee flexion moment and the knee flexion angle with increased BMI with and without knee OA. Our results suggest that increased BMI is associated with different changes in biomechanical patterns of the knee joint during gait depending on the presence of moderate knee OA. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  11. ASCOT: Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Use for Osteoarthritis of the Thumb—First Carpometacarpal Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christina; Sugrue, Conor; Carr, Emma; O’Reilly, Aine; O’Neill, Shane; Carroll, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The first carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) in the hand is a commonly affected joint by osteoarthritis. It causes significant thumb base pain, limiting functional capacity. Microfracturing and application of autologous stem cells has been performed on large joints such as the knee but has never been evaluated for use in the smaller joints in the hand. Our aim was to determine the potential benefit of microfracturing and autologous bone marrow stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis of the first CMCJ in the hand. Methods: All inclusion criteria were satisfied. Preoperative assessment by the surgeon, physiotherapist, and occupational therapist was performed. The first CMCJ was microfractured and the Bone Marrow Stem Cells were applied directly. Postoperatively, the patients were followed up for 1 year. Results: Fifteen patients met inclusion criteria; however, 2 patients were excluded due to postoperative cellulitis and diagnosis of De Quervain's tenosynovitis. The mean scores of the 13-patient preoperative and 1 year follow-up assessments are visual analog score at rest of 3.23–1.69 (P = 0.0292), visual analog score on activity of 7.92–4.23 (P = 0.0019), range of motion 45.77o–55.15o (P = 0.0195), thumb opposition score 7.62–9.23 (P = 0.0154), Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 51.67–23.08 (P = 0.0065). Strength improved insignificantly from 4.7 kg preoperatively to 5.53 kg at 12 months (P = 0.1257). All patients had a positive Grind test preoperatively and a negative test after 12 months. Conclusions: This innovative pilot study is a new approach to osteoarthritis of the thumb. PMID:29062653

  12. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsin Kao

    Full Text Available Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes.An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT with medial meniscectomy (MMx was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI scoring system.This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration.SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints.

  13. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jen-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints.

  14. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  15. Knee joint stabilization therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Dekker, J; van der Leeden, M; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Gerritsen, M; Voorneman, R E; Peter, W F; de Rooij, M; Romviel, S; Lems, W F; Roorda, L D; Steultjens, M P M

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether an exercise program, initially focusing on knee stabilization and subsequently on muscle strength and performance of daily activities is more effective than an exercise program focusing on muscle strength and performance of daily activities only, in reducing activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and instability of the knee joint. A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 159 knee OA patients with self-reported and/or biomechanically assessed knee instability, randomly assigned to two treatment groups. Both groups received a supervised exercise program for 12 weeks, consisting of muscle strengthening exercises and training of daily activities, but only in the experimental group specific knee joint stabilization training was provided. Outcome measures included activity limitations (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index - WOMAC physical function, primary outcome), pain, global perceived effect and knee stability. Both treatment groups demonstrated large (∼20-40%) and clinically relevant reductions in activity limitations, pain and knee instability, which were sustained 6 months post-treatment. No differences in effectiveness between experimental and control treatment were found on WOMAC physical function (B (95% confidence interval - CI) = -0.01 (-2.58 to 2.57)) or secondary outcome measures, except for a higher global perceived effect in the experimental group (P = 0.04). Both exercise programs were highly effective in reducing activity limitations and pain and restoring knee stability in knee OA patients with instability of the knee. In knee OA patients suffering from knee instability, specific knee joint stabilization training, in addition to muscle strengthening and functional exercises, does not seem to have any additional value. Dutch Trial Register (NTR) registration number: NTR1475. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier

  16. Technical feasibility of personalized articulating knee joint distraction for treatment of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struik, T; Jaspers, J E N; Besselink, N J; van Roermund, P M; Plomp, S; Rudert, M J; Lafeber, F P J G; Mastbergen, S C

    2017-11-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent degenerative joint disorder characterized by joint tissue damage and pain. Knee joint distraction has been introduced as a joint preserving surgical procedure to postpone knee arthroplasty. An often used standard externally fixation device for distraction poses a burden to patients due to the absence of joint flexion during the 6weeks treatment. Therefore, a personalized articulating distraction device was developed. The aim of this study was to test technical feasibility of this device. Based on an often applied rigid device, using equal bone pin positions and connectors, a hinge mechanism was developed consisting of a cam-following system for reproducing the complex joint-specific knee kinematics. In support, a device was developed for capturing the joint-specific sagittal plane articulation. The obtained kinematic data were translated into joint-specific cam shapes that were installed bilaterally in the hinge mechanism of the distraction device, as such providing personalized knee motion. Distraction of 5mm was performed within a range of motion of 30deg. joint flexion. Pre-clinical evaluation of the working principle was performed on human cadaveric legs and system stiffness characteristics were biomechanically evaluated. The desired range of motion was obtained and distraction was maintained under physiologically representative loading. Moreover, the joint-specific approach demonstrated tolerance of deviations from anatomical and alignment origin during initial placement of the developed distraction device. Articulation during knee distraction is considered technically feasible and has potential to decrease burden and improve acceptance of distraction therapy. Testing of clinical feasibility is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fixed-flexion radiography of the knee provides reproducible joint space width measurements in osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothari, Manish; Sieffert, Martine; Block, Jon E.; Peterfy, Charles G.; Guermazi, Ali; Ingersleben, Gabriele von; Miaux, Yves; Stevens, Randall

    2004-01-01

    The validity of a non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion radiographic acquisition and analysis protocol for measurement of joint space width (JSW) in knee osteoarthritis is determined. A cross-sectional study of 165 patients with documented knee osteoarthritis participating in a multicenter, prospective study of chondroprotective agents was performed. All patients had posteroanterior, weight-bearing, fixed-flexion radiography with 10 caudal beam angulation. A specially designed frame (SynaFlexer) was used to standardize the positioning. Minimum medial and lateral JSW were measured manually and twice by an automated analysis system to determine inter-technique and intra-reader concordance and reliability. A random subsample of 30 patients had repeat knee radiographs 2 weeks apart to estimate short-term reproducibility using automated analysis. Concordance between manual and automated medial JSW measurements was high (ICC=0.90); lateral compartment measurements showed somewhat less concordance (ICC=0.72). There was excellent concordance between repeated automated JSW measurements performed 6 months apart for the medial (ICC=0.94) and lateral (ICC=0.86) compartments. Short-term reproducibility for the subsample of 30 cases with repeat acquisitions demonstrated an average SD of 0.14 mm for medial JSW (CV=4.3%) and 0.23 mm for lateral JSW (CV=4.0%). Fixed-flexion radiography of the knee using a positioning device provides consistent, reliable and reproducible measurement of minimum JSW in knee osteoarthritis without the need for concurrent fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.)

  18. Biomechanical analysis of press-extension technique on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and staggered facet joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-gen Du

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of a new Chinese massage technique named “press-extension” on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation, and provides a biomechanical explanation of this massage technique. Self-developed biomechanical software was used to establish a normal L1–S1 lumbar 3D FE model, which integrated the spine CT and MRI data-based anatomical structure. Then graphic technique is utilized to build a degenerative lumbar FE model with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation. According to the actual press-extension experiments, mechanic parameters are collected to set boundary condition for FE analysis. The result demonstrated that press-extension techniques bring the annuli fibrosi obvious induction effect, making the central nucleus pulposus forward close, increasing the pressure in front part. Study concludes that finite element modelling for lumbar spine is suitable for the analysis of press-extension technique impact on lumbar intervertebral disc biomechanics, to provide the basis for the disease mechanism of intervertebral disc herniation using press-extension technique.

  19. Assessment of trunk muscle density using CT and its association with degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebro, Ronnie; O'Brien, Liam; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the association of trunk muscle density assessed by computed tomography (CT) with age, gender, and BMI and (2) to evaluate the association between trunk muscle CT density and degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine. The study was IRB approved and HIPAA compliant. The study group comprised 100 subjects (mean age 44.4 ± 22.2 years, 51 % male) who underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis without intravenous contrast. Exclusion criteria included prior abdominal or spine surgery, active malignancy and scoliosis. CTs were reviewed and the attenuation of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, internal and external obliques, psoas, multifidus, longissimus and gluteus maximus were measured bilaterally at consistent levels. Degenerative disc and bilateral facet joint disease were scored using established methods. Univariate analyses were performed using linear regression. Multivariate linear regression was performed to adjust for age, gender and BMI. CT density of each trunk muscle correlated inversely with age (p degenerative disc and facet joint disease in the univariate analyses (p degenerative disc and facet joint disease respectively in the multivariate analysis. Fatty infiltration of trunk musculature increases with age and BMI. Fatty infiltration of the gluteus maximus and transverse abdominis are associated with degenerative disc and facet joint disease, independent of age, gender and BMI.

  20. Role of hormones in cartilage and joint metabolism: understanding an unhealthy metabolic phenotype in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Slagboom, Eline; Chen-An, Pingping; Alexandersen, Peter; Qvist, Per; Christiansen, Claus; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Karsdal, Morten A

    2013-05-01

    Joint health is affected by local and systemic hormones. It is well accepted that systemic factors regulate the metabolism of joint tissues, and that substantial cross-talk between tissues actively contributes to homeostasis. In the current review, we try to define a subtype of osteoarthritis (OA), metabolic OA, which is dependent on an unhealthy phenotype. Peer-reviewed research articles and reviews were reviewed and summarized. Only literature readily available online, either by download or by purchase order, was included. OA is the most common joint disease and is more common in women after menopause. OA is a disease that affects the whole joint, including cartilage, subchondral bone, synovium, tendons, and muscles. The clinical endpoints of OA are pain and joint space narrowing, which is characterized by cartilage erosion and subchondral sclerosis, suggesting that cartilage is a central tissue of joint health. Thus, the joint, more specifically the cartilage, may be considered a target of endocrine function in addition to the well-described traditional risk factors of disease initiation and progression such as long-term loading of the joint due to obesity. Metabolic syndrome affects a range of tissues and may in part be molecularly described as a dysregulation of cytokines, adipokines, and hormones (e.g., estrogen and thyroid hormone). Consequently, metabolic imbalance may both directly and indirectly influence joint health and cartilage turnover, altering the progression of diseases such as OA. There is substantial evidence for a connection between metabolic health and development of OA. We propose that more focus be directed to understanding this connection to improve the management of menopausal health and associated comorbidities.

  1. Up-regulation of p55 TNF alpha-receptor in dorsal root ganglia neurons following lumbar facet joint injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Ohtori, Seiji; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Tetsu; Inoue, Gen; Doya, Hideo; Koshi, Takana; Ito, Toshinori; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Moriya, Hideshige; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2007-08-01

    The rat L5/6 facet joint is multisegmentally innervated from the L1 to L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a known mediator of inflammation. It has been reported that satellite cells are activated, produce TNF and surround DRG neurons innervating L5/6 facet joints after facet injury. In the current study, changes in TNF receptor (p55) expression in DRG neurons innervating the L5/6 facet joint following facet joint injury were investigated in rats using a retrograde neurotransport method followed by immunohistochemistry. Twenty rats were used for this study. Two crystals of Fluorogold (FG; neurotracer) were applied into the L5/6 facet joint. Seven days after surgery, the dorsal portion of the capsule was cut in the injured group (injured group n = 10). No injury was performed in the non-injured group (n = 10). Fourteen days after the first application of FG, bilateral DRGs from T13 to L6 levels were resected and sectioned. They were subsequently processed for p55 immunohistochemistry. The number of FG labeled neurons and number of FG labeled p55-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were counted. FG labeled DRG neurons innervating the L5/6 facet joint were distributed from ipsilateral L1 to L6 levels. Of FG labeled neurons, the ratio of DRG neurons immunoreactive for p55 in the injured group (50%) was significantly higher than that in the non-injured group (13%). The ratio of p55-IR neurons of FG labeled DRG neurons was significantly higher in total L1 and L2 DRGs than that in total L3, 4, 5 and 6 DRGs in the injured group (L1 and 2 DRG, 67%; L3, 4, 5 and 6 DRG, 37%, percentages of the total number of p55-IR neurons at L1 and L2 level or L3-6 level/the total number of FG-labeled neurons at L1 and L2 level or L3-6 level). These data suggest that up-regulation of p55 in DRG neurons may be involved in the sensory transmission from facet joint injury. Regulation of p55 in DRG neurons innervating the facet joint was different between upper DRG innervated

  2. CT-guided intradiscal ozone injection combined with intervertebral facet joint steroid injection for lumbar disk herniation accompanied with intervertebral arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Chen Zhaohui; Sun Xijun; Liu Jianping; Li Jiakai

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effectiveness of ozone (O 3 ) nucleus pulposus ablation only with that of O 3 nucleus pulposus ablation combined with intervertebral facet joint injection of compound Betamethasome in treating lumbar disk herniation accompanied with intervertebral facet arthritis. Methods: Eighty patients with lumbar disk herniation and intervertebral facet arthritis were equally and randomly divided into two groups. Under CT guidance, O 3 nucleus pulposus ablation was performed in patients of group A(n=40), while O 3 nucleus pulposus ablation combined with intervertebral facet joint injection of compound Betamethasome (0.5-1 ml) was carried out in patients of group B(n=40). Using double blind method the therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated before and 1 week,3,6-months after the procedure by an Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire. Results: One week after the procedure the effective rate of group A and group B was 65% and 82.5% respectively. Three and six months after the treatment, the effective rate was 75% and 70% respectively for group A, while it was 90% and 92.5% respectively for group B. The difference between two groups was significant (P 3 combined with intervertebral facet joint injection of compound Betamethasome is an effective and safe treatment for lumbar disk herniation accompanied with intervertebral facet arthritis.It is worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  3. Painkilling effect of ozone-oxygen injection on spine and joint osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaziri, Ahmed A.; Mahmoodi, Seyed M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to analyze the painkilling effect of ozone-oxygen injection on joint and spine osteoarthritis. This prospective study was completed at the Ozone Clinic, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates on 220 mainly local patients (12 women, mean age 47.05 years; 98 men, mean age 52.8 years) with radiographic documented spine or extremities osteoarthritis. The patients were treated over 3 years (September 2002 to August 2005) by ozone-oxygen injection twice a week for at least 12 sessions. Using the 6 faces pain scale; the patient's pain was recorded at the beginning and at the 4th, 8th and 12th sessions. They were followed for a mean of 8.48 months and their pain scale was recorded at that time too. Comparison of the patient's 1st day pains with their 4th, 8th and 12th sessions pain showed a significant decrease (1st day to 4th session p=0.005, 1st day to 8th week p=0.005, 1st day to 12th session p=0.0043). Comparison of the 1st day pain with the final follow-up pain, which was around 10 months from the first treatment, showed a meaningful decrease of pain (p=0.0048). This study validates the painkilling effect of ozone-oxygen injection on osteoarthritis of the joints and spine. Its long term effect on pain advocates the likelihood of some histological changes as mechanism of its action. (author)

  4. The role of adipocytokines in the pathogenesis of knee joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Magdalena; Trzeciak, Tomasz; Owecki, Maciej; Pucher, Andrzej; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal disability in the world. Traditionally, it has been thought that obesity contributes to the development and progression of OA by increased mechanical load of the joint structures. Nevertheless, studies have shown that adipose tissue-derived cytokines (adipocytokines) are a possible link between obesity and OA. Furthermore, according to recent findings, not only articular cartilage may be the main target of these cytokines but also the synovial membrane, subchondral bone and infrapatellar fat pad may be encompassed in the process of degradation. This review presents the most recent reports on the contribution of adipocytokines to the knee joint cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, infrapatellar fat pad alterations and synovitis.

  5. Histomorphometric analysis of osteopenia associated with endemic osteoarthritis (Mseleni joint disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, C M; Pieczkowski, W M; Fredlund, V; Mesquita, J M; Sweet, M B; Smit, A E

    1988-01-01

    Mseleni Joint Disease (MJD), a polyarticular osteoarthritis of uncertain etiology is endemic among the Tonga-Zulu tribe. The traditional diet is deficient in calcium, and palm wine (2-4% alcohol) is drunk widely. Patients with MJD are reported to be more osteopenic than those without. Iliac bone biopsies of 19 arthritic patients were examined by routine histomorphometry and revealed decreased trabecular bone volume (p less than 0.0005), increased resorption surfaces (p less than 0.01), decreased bone formation rate at the BMU (p less than 0.01) level and increased mineralization lag time (p less than 0.01). Six of the 19 patients (31.6%) had features of osteomalacia and six (31.6%) signs of osteoblast failure. The most likely cause of the bone disorder is calcium deficiency, but inanition, inactivity and alcohol abuse may have contributed. Although the joint disorder may have contributed to the bone disorder, the converse is unlikely the case.

  6. Rotatory Subluxation and Facet Deformity in the Atlanto-occipital Joint in Patients with Chronic Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashii, Masafumi; Masuhara, Kenta; Kaito, Takashi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between the morphometry of atlantoaxial joint and chronic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) is well known, but disorders in the atlanto-occipital joint in chronic AARF are not fully elucidated. The authors report two rare cases of secondary deformities in the atlanto-occipital joint in chronic AARF. Two patients with chronic AARF were treated with closed manipulation, skull traction and halo-vest immobilization. Clinical outcomes and radiographs were reviewed retrospectively, focusing on pathological changes in the atlanto-occipital joint using multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography and three-dimensional computed tomography images. Case 1 (12-year-old girl) had rotatory subluxation with a superior facet deformity of the atlas in the atlanto-occipital joint before the initiation of treatment. After a series of conservative treatments, both atlantoaxial and atlanto-occipital rotatory fixation could not be reduced, and both the superior facet deformity of the atlas and osteoarthritic changes in the atlanto-occipital developed. She was monitored without surgery because the disorder progressed to the spontaneous fusion of the occipital bone to the axis. Case 2 (13-year-old boy) had rotatory subluxation without facet deformity of the atlas in the atlanto-occipital joint before the initiation of treatment. However, both the superior facet deformity of the atlas and osteoarthritic changes in the atlanto-occipital developed over time, and both atlantoaxial and atlanto-occipital rotatory fixation could not be reduced after a series of conservative treatments. He still had severe neck pain and severely restricted neck mobility and underwent spinal fusion. Atlanto-occipital rotatory subluxation and facet deformity in the atlanto-occipital joint may occur after prolonged AARF. It is necessary to pay attention to pathological changes not only in the atlantoaxial joint but also in the atlanto-occipital joint, when orthopedic surgeons treat patients

  7. [Correlations Between Joint Proprioception, Muscle Strength, and Functional Ability in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yoa; Yu, Yong; He, Cheng-qi

    2015-11-01

    To establish correlations between joint proprioception, muscle flexion and extension peak torque, and functional ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty-six patients with symptomatic knee OA were recruited in this study. Both proprioceptive acuity and muscle strength were measured using the isomed-2000 isokinetic dynamometer. Proprioceptive acuity was evaluated by establishing the joint motion detection threshold (JMDT). Muscle strength was evaluated by Max torque (Nm) and Max torque/weight (Nm/ kg). Functional ability was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function (WOMAC-PF) questionnaire. Correlational analyses were performed between proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability. A multiple stepwise regression model was established, with WOMAC-PF as dependent variable and patient age, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale (VAS)-score, mean grade for Kellgren-Lawrance of both knees, mean strength for quadriceps and hamstring muscles of both knees, and mean JMDT of both knees as independent variables. Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was negatively correlated with muscle strength (Pcoefficient (B) = 0.385, P<0.50 and high VAS-scale score (B=0.347, P<0.05) were significant predictors of WOMAC-PF score. Patients with poor proprioception is associated with poor muscle strength and limitation in functional ability. Patients with symptomatic OA of knees commonly endure with moderate to considerable dysfunction, which is associated with poor proprioception (high JMDT) and high VAS-scale score.

  8. The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Erik J; Schaap, Laura A; Herbolsheimer, Florian; Dennison, Elaine M; Maggi, Stefania; Pedersen, Nancy L; Castell, Maria Victoria; Denkinger, Michael D; Edwards, Mark H; Limongi, Federica; Sánchez-Martínez, Mercedes; Siviero, Paola; Queipo, Rocio; Peter, Richard; van der Pas, Suzan; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether daily weather conditions, 3-day average weather conditions, and changes in weather conditions influence joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis (OA) in 6 European countries. Data from the population-based European Project on OSteoArthritis were used. The American College of Rheumatology classification criteria were used to diagnose OA in older people (65-85 yrs). After the baseline interview, at 6 months, and after the 12-18 months followup interview, joint pain was assessed using 2-week pain calendars. Daily values for temperature, precipitation, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, and wind speed were obtained from local weather stations. Multilevel regression modelling was used to examine the pain-weather associations, adjusted for several confounders. The study included 810 participants with OA in the knee, hand, and/or hip. After adjustment, there were significant associations of joint pain with daily average humidity (B = 0.004, p weather conditions. Changes in weather variables between 2 consecutive days were not significantly associated with reported joint pain. The associations between pain and daily average weather conditions suggest that a causal relationship exist between joint pain and weather variables, but the associations between day-to-day weather changes and pain do not confirm causation. Knowledge about the relationship between joint pain in OA and weather may help individuals with OA, physicians, and therapists to better understand and manage fluctuations in pain.

  9. Facet orientation and tropism: Associations with asymmetric lumbar paraspinal and psoas muscle parameters in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W B; Chen, S; Fan, S W; Zhao, F D; Yu, X J; Hu, Z J

    2016-08-10

    Many studies have explored the relationship between facet tropism and facet joint osteoarthritis, disc degeneration and degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, the associations between facet orientation and tropism, and paraspinal muscles have not been studied. To analyze the associations between facet orientation and tropism, and parameters of paraspinal muscles in patients with chronic low back pain. Ninety-five patients with chronic low back pain were consecutively enrolled. Their facet joint angles were measured on computed tomography (CT) while gross cross-sectional area (GCSA), functional cross-sectional area (FCSA) and T2 signal intensity of lumbar paraspinal and psoas muscle were evaluated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The GCSA and FCSA were significantly smaller for multifidus muscle (Plow back pain. Longitudinal studies are needed to understand the causal relationship between facet orientation and tropism and muscular asymmetry in future.

  10. Is increased joint loading detrimental to obese patients with knee osteoarthritis? A secondary data analysis from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, M; Hunter, D J; Dam, E B; Messier, S P; Andriacchi, T P; Lohmander, L S; Aaboe, J; Boesen, M; Gudbergsen, H; Bliddal, H; Christensen, R

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether increased knee joint loading due to improved ambulatory function and walking speed following weight loss achieved over 16 weeks accelerates symptomatic and structural disease progression over a subsequent 1 year weight maintenance period in an obese population with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Data from a prospective study of weight loss in obese patients with knee OA (the CARtilage in obese knee OsteoarThritis (CAROT) study) were used to determine changes in knee joint compressive loadings (model estimated) during walking after a successful 16 week weight loss intervention. The participants were divided into 'Unloaders' (participants that reduced joint loads) and 'Loaders' (participants that increased joint loads). The primary symptomatic outcome was changes in knee symptoms, measured with the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire, during a subsequent 52 weeks weight maintenance period. The primary structural outcome was changes in tibiofemoral cartilage loss assessed semi-quantitatively (Boston Leeds Knee Osteoarthritis Score (BLOKS) from MRI after the 52 weight maintenance period. 157 participants (82% of the CAROT cohort) with medial and/or lateral knee OA were classified as Unloaders (n = 100) or Loaders (n = 57). The groups showed similar significant changes in symptoms (group difference: -2.4 KOOS points [95% CI -6.8:1.9]) and cartilage loss (group difference: -0.06 BLOKS points [95% CI -0.22:0.11) after 1 year, with no statistically significant differences between Loaders and Unloaders. For obese patients undergoing a significant weight loss, increased knee joint loading for 1 year was not associated with accelerated symptomatic and structural disease progression compared to a similar weight loss group that had reduced ambulatory compressive knee joint loads. NCT00655941. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of Foot Orthoses Versus Rocker-Sole Footwear for First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Osteoarthritis: Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Tan, Jade M; Levinger, Pazit; Roddy, Edward; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effectiveness of prefabricated foot orthoses to rocker-sole footwear in reducing foot pain in people with first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Participants (n = 102) with first MTP joint OA were randomly allocated to receive individualized, prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker-sole footwear. The primary outcome measure was the pain subscale on the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included the function, footwear, and general foot health subscales of the FHSQ; the Foot Function Index; severity of pain and stiffness at the first MTP joint; perception of global improvement; general health status; use of rescue medication and co-interventions to relieve pain; physical activity; and the frequency of self-reported adverse events. The FHSQ pain subscale scores improved in both groups, but no statistically significant difference between the groups was observed (adjusted mean difference 2.05 points, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -3.61, 7.71; P = 0.477). However, the footwear group exhibited lower adherence (mean ± SD total hours worn 287 ± 193 versus 448 ± 234; P footwear are similarly effective at reducing foot pain in people with first MTP joint OA. However, prefabricated foot orthoses may be the intervention of choice due to greater adherence and fewer associated adverse events. © 2016 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. OMERACT/OARSI initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Hawker, Gillian; Davis, Aileen M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Time to theoretical indication of joint replacement surgery has been proposed as a primary outcome for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this OMERACT/OARSI Working Group were to identify pain, physical function, and structure states ...

  13. A New Technique for the Treatment of Lumbar Facet Joint Syndrome Using Intra-articular Injection with Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiuping; Du, Zhenwu; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Ruiqiang; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Guizhen; Liu, Qinyi

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar facet joint syndrome is currently suggested to be a main source of axial low back pain, and a large portion of axial low back pain is caused by disorders in lumbar facet joints. Intra-articular injection is one of the most common treatment methods in the early clinical application. Therefore, we attempt to seek a new injectable material, autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP), to treat lumbar facet syndrome, as well as to assess its therapeutic effectiveness and safety. A prospective clinic evaluation. The outpatient clinic of a single academic medical center. Total 19 patients with lumbar facet joint syndrome (8 men, 11 women; mean ages: 52.53 ± 6.79 years, range: 38 - 62 years) were enrolled to receive lumbar facet joint injection with autologous PRP under x-ray fluoroscopic control. Patients were followed up immediately, at one week, one month, 2 months, and 3 months following treatment, and the elements of this analysis included low back pain visual analogue scale (VAS) at rest and during flexion, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and modified MacNab criteria for the pain relief. All the 19 patients completed the intra-articular injections with autologous PRP successfully. At one week after treatment, low back pain reduced significantly compared with prior to treatment both at rest and during flexion. The outcomes were assessed as "good" or "excellent" for 9 patients (47.37%) immediately after treatment, 14 patients (73.68%) at one week, 15 patients (78.95%) at one month, 15 patients (78.95%) at 2 months, and 15 patients (78.95%) at 3 months. Statistically significant differences were observed based on RMQ and a more than 10% improvement in lumbar functional capacity was observed based on ODI between pre-treatment and post-treatment. In addition, there were no severe relevant complications during the whole process of injection and follow-up period. A control group and the curative effect observations with

  14. Effect of low-level laser on healing of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Peimani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders (TMD are clinical conditions characterized by pain and sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. This study was designed to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT on healing of osteoarthritis in rats with TMD.Thirty-two male Wistar rats (250-200 g were housed in standard plastic cages. After injection of Complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ, rats were randomly divided into two groups of 16 (case and control and anesthetized; then osteoarthritis was induced via intraarticular injection of 50 µl of Complete Freund's adjuvant; into the bilateral TMJs. In the case group, LLLT was done transcutaneously for 10 minutes daily, starting the day after the confirmation of osteoarthritis. Exposure was performed for 10 minutes at the right side of the TMJ with 880 nm low-level laser with 100 mW power and a probe diameter of 0.8 mm. Control rats were not treated with laser.After three days of treatment the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, angiogenesis, number of cell layers and arthritis in rats in the case group were not significantly different compared with controls (P>0.05. After seven days, the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, number of cell layers, and arthritis in the case group improved compared to controls (P<0.05; angiogenesis in both groups was similar.Treatment of TMD with LLLT after 7 days of irradiation with a wavelength of 880 nm was associated with a greater improvement compared to the control group.

  15. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Soo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42-70 years. The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4-8 years 10 months. The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly ( P < 0.001. There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor.

  16. Effect of joint traction on functional improvement and quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sadat Naeimee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most prevalent joint disease in adults around the world and its incidence rises with age. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis often complain of pain and severe functional disability. Most of conservative treatments used in this group of patients induce poor improvements. This study evaluated the effect of joint traction on quality of life of patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, forty female patients with severe knee OA were randomly assigned to two following groups; common physiotherapy treatment and common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction. Quality of life was evaluated pre- and post-treatment and also one month follow-up using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS questionnaire.Results: Common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction resulted in significantly better quality of life post-treatment and at 1month follow-up, compared to common physiotherapy treatment alone (P<0.01.Conclusion: Common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction induces significant improvement in quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis compared to common physiotherapy treatment alone.

  17. Kartogenin treatment prevented joint degeneration in a rodent model of osteoarthritis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Geetha; Magnitsky, Sergey; Melkus, Gerd; Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Kazakia, Galateia; Burghardt, Andrew J; Dang, Alexis; Lane, Nancy E; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive loss of articular cartilage, synovitis, subchondral bone changes, and osteophyte formation. Currently there is no treatment for OA except temporary pain relief and end-stage joint replacement surgery. We performed a pilot study to determine the effect of kartogenin (KGN, a small molecule) on both cartilage and subchondral bone in a rat model of OA using multimodal imaging techniques. OA was induced in rats (OA and KGN treatment group) by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) surgery in the right knee joint. Sham surgery was performed on the right knee joint of control group rats. KGN group rats received weekly intra-articular injection of 125 μM KGN 1 week after surgery until week 12. All rats underwent in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Quantitative MR relaxation measures (T 1ρ and T 2 ) were determined to evaluate changes in articular cartilage. Cartilage and bone turnover markers (COMP and CTX-I) were determined at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Animals were sacrificed at week 12 and the knee joints were removed for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histology. KGN treatment significantly lowered the T 1ρ and T 2 relaxation times indicating decreased cartilage degradation. KGN treatment significantly decreased COMP and CTX-I levels indicating decreased cartilage and bone turnover rate. KGN treatment also prevented subchondral bone changes in the ACLT rat model of OA. Thus, kartogenin is a potential drug to prevent joint deterioration in post-traumatic OA. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1780-1789, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A critical evaluation of subtalar joint arthrosis associated with middle facet talocalcaneal coalition in 21 surgically managed patients: a retrospective computed tomography review. Investigations involving middle facet coalitions-part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernbach, Klaus J; Barkan, Howard; Blitz, Neal M

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition is frequently associated with rearfoot arthrosis that is often managed surgically with rearfoot fusion. However, no objective method for classifying the extent of subtalar joint arthrosis exists. No study has clearly identified the extent of posterior facet arthrosis present in a large cohort treated surgically for talocalcaneal coalition through preoperative computerized axial tomography. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 21 patients (35 feet) with coalition who were surgically treated over a 12-year period for coalition on at least 1 foot. Using a predefined original staging system, the extent of the arthrosis was categorized into normal or mild (Stage I), moderate (Stage II), and severe (Stage III) arthrosis. The association of stage and age is statistically significant. All of the feet with Stage III arthrosis had fibrous coalitions. No foot with osseous coalition had Stage III arthrosis. The distribution of arthrosis staging differs between fibrous and osseous coalitions. Only fibrous coalitions had the most advanced arthrosis (Stage III), whereas osseous coalitions did not. This suggests that osseous coalitions may have a protective effect in the prevention of severe degeneration of the subtalar joint. Concomitant subtalar joint arthrosis severity progresses with age; surgeons may want to consider earlier surgical intervention to prevent arthrosis progression in patients with symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition.

  19. Interphalangeal Osteoarthritis Radiographic Simplified (iOARS) score: a radiographic method to detect osteoarthritis of the interphalangeal finger joints based on its histopathological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Amoyo-Minar, Love; Stamm, Tanja; Haider, Stefanie; Niederreiter, Birgit; Supp, Gabriela; Soleiman, Afschin; Kainberger, Franz; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    To develop a radiographic score for assessment of hand osteoarthritis (OA) that is based on histopathological alterations of the distal (DIP) and proximal (PIP) interphalangeal joints. DIP and PIP joints were obtained from corpses (n=40). Plain radiographies of these joints were taken. Joint samples were prepared for histological analysis; cartilage damage was graded according to the Mankin scoring system. A 2×2 Fisher's exact test was applied to define those radiographic features most likely to be associated with histological alterations. Receiver operating characteristic curves were analysed to determine radiographic thresholds. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated intra- and inter-reader variability. Spearman's correlation was applied to examine the relationship between our score and histopathological changes. Differences between groups were determined by a Student's t test. The Interphalangeal Osteoarthritis Radiographic Simplified (iOARS) score is presented. The score is based on histopathological changes of DIP and PIP joints and follows a simple dichotomy whether OA is present or not. The iOARS score relies on three equally ranked radiographic features (osteophytes, joint space narrowing and subchondral sclerosis). For both DIP and PIP joints, the presence of one x-ray features reflects interphalangeal OA. Sensitivity and specificity for DIP joints were 92.3% and 90.9%, respectively, and 75% and 100% for PIP joints. All readers were able to reproduce their own readings in DIP and PIP joints after 4 weeks. The overall agreement between the three readers was good; ICCs ranged from 0.945 to 0.586. Additionally, outcomes of the iOARS score in a hand OA cohort revealed a higher prevalence of interphalangeal joint OA compared with the Kellgren and Lawrence score. The iOARS score is uniquely based on histopathological alterations of the interphalangeal joints in order to reliably determine OA of the DIP and PIP joints radiographically. Its high

  20. The role of meniscal tissue in joint protection in early osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Rene; Madry, Henning; Shabshin, Nogah; Dirisamer, Florian; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Pujol, Nicolas; Spalding, Tim; Verdonk, Peter; Seil, Romain; Condello, Vincenzo; Di Matteo, Berardo; Zellner, Johannes; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that partial meniscectomy leads to early onset of osteoarthritis (OA). A strong correlation exists between the amount and location of the resected meniscus and the development of degenerative changes in the knee. On the other hand, osteoarthritic changes of the joint alter the structural and functional integrity of meniscal tissue. These alterations might additionally compromise the limited healing capacity of the meniscus. In young, active patients without cartilage damage, meniscus therapy including partial meniscectomy, meniscus suture, and meniscus replacement has proven beneficial effects in long-term studies. Even in an early osteoarthritic milieu, there is a relevant regenerative potential of the meniscus and the surrounding cartilage. This potential should be taken into account, and meniscal surgery can be performed with the correct timing and the proper indication even in the presence of early OA.

  1. Muscle area and muscle density of osteoarthritis of the knee joint studied by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Onosawa, Toshihiro; Shibata, Minoru; Yamashita, Izumi; Yoshimura, Shinichiro; Muraoka, Shunichi; Asano, Akira

    1985-01-01

    In order to investigate the etiology and pathology of osteoarthritis of the knee joints (OA), the areas and density of the muscle 10 cm above the knee were compared using computerized tomography (CT) in 26 knees from 19 normal persons, 30 knees from 17 patients with OA, and 14 knees from 7 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The areas of the quadriceps musculi of thigh were remarkably decreased and the areas of the flexor musculi were comparatively maintained in the patients with OA. Muscle density was markedly lowered in the musculi semimembranosus and biceps femoris long head. Fatty tissues were seen in the whole area of the venter on CT in some of the patients with OA. These findings are considered to be of major importance when studying the etiology of OA. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Altered joint tribology in osteoarthritis: Reduced lubricin synthesis due to the inflammatory process. New horizons for therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychlinska, M A; Leonardi, R; Al-Qahtani, M; Mobasheri, A; Musumeci, G

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. This review aimed to consolidate the current evidence that implicates the inflammatory process in the attenuation of synovial lubrication and joint tissue homeostasis in OA. Moreover, with these findings, we propose some evidence for novel therapeutic strategies for preventing and/or treating this complex disorder. The studies reviewed support that inflammatory mediators participate in the onset and progression of OA after joint injury. The flow of pro-inflammatory cytokines following an acute injury seems to be directly associated with altered lubricating ability in the joint tissue. The latter is associated with reduced level of lubricin, one of the major joint lubricants. Future research should focus on the development of new therapies that attenuate the inflammatory process and restore lubricin synthesis and function. This approach could support joint tribology and synovial lubrication leading to improved joint function and pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Synovial deposition of wild-type transthyretin-derived amyloid in knee joint osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masayuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Yamazaki, Hideshi; Nawata, Masashi; Katagiri, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2013-09-01

    To investigate histological features of deposited amyloid in the synovial tissue and its clinical significance in knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We prospectively enrolled 232 consecutive patients who underwent arthroplasty or total replacement of the knee joint for treatment of OA. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry were performed in the synovial tissue obtained at surgery. When transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid was positive, we analyzed all 4 exons of the TTR gene using the direct DNA sequencing method in order to detect mutations. We analyzed 322 specimens in this study. Twenty-six specimens (8.1%) obtained from 21 patients (5 men and 16 women; mean, 79.0 ± 4.6 years) showed deposition of amyloid, which was positively stained with the anti-TTR antibody. Eighteen patients showed inhomogeneous accumulations of amyloid in the loose connective tissue under the synovial epithelia sometimes with nodule formation, while in the remaining three, small vessels in the adipose tissue were involved. Medical records of these patients revealed nothing remarkable in the clinical course, laboratory data or macroscopic intraarticular findings at surgery. No mutations were detectable in the TTR gene analysis. Wild-type TTR-derived amyloid may affect the synovial tissue as a result of long-term mechanical stress or as a part of senile systemic amyloidosis in approximately 8% of knee joint OA patients. No obvious clinical significance was found in synovial deposition of amyloid.

  4. Knee joint stiffness in individuals with and without knee osteoarthritis: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatis, Carol A; Wolff, Edward F; Lennon, Sandra K

    2006-12-01

    Descriptive, case-matched comparison. To compare the knee joint stiffness and damping coefficients of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) to those of age- and gender-matched individuals without KOA. A secondary purpose was to investigate relationships between these coefficients and complaints of stiffness in individuals with KOA. KOA is a leading cause of disability, and stiffness is a common complaint in individuals with KOA. Yet the most common method of assessing knee joint stiffness is through a self-report questionnaire. Stiffness and damping coefficients at the knee were calculated in 10 volunteers (mean age +/- SD, 64.1+/-15.5 years) with KOA and compared to coefficients from age-and gender-matched individuals without KOA, collected in a previous study (mean age +/- SD, 62.1+/-13.9 years). Stiffness and damping coefficients were calculated from the angular motion of the knee during a relaxed oscillation. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between stiffness and damping coefficients and WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) scores for subjects with KOA. Independent 2-tailed t tests revealed significantly larger damping coefficients (P = .035) among those with KOA (95% CI, 0.10-2.32 Nm s/rad). Spearman rank correlations revealed a significant positive relationship (r = .85, P = .003) between the damping coefficient and the stiffness subscore of the WOMAC. This study offers preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of measuring stiffness and damping coefficients in individuals with KOA. Additionally, the damping coefficient is increased in people with KOA when compared to age- and gender-matched individuals without KOA. The damping coefficient appears to be associated with the complaints of stiffness reported by the WOMAC.

  5. Etoricoxib improves osteoarthritis pain relief, joint function, and quality of life in the extreme elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Nan Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Etoricoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, with a lower risk of gastrointestinal toxicity compared to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. We evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of etoricoxib in extremely elderly patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis (OA. A prospective, single-center, single-arm study was conducted, enrolling 19 extremely elderly men with OA (mean age 85.9, range 79-96 years, who responded inadequately to NSAIDs or other analgesics. Patients were switched to etoricoxib, 60 mg once daily for 4 weeks, without prior medication washout. Data were recorded before and after etoricoxib treatment. The primary endpoint was improvement in pain, assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC after the 4-week treatment. Other endpoints included the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF, Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM, Short Form 36 (SF36, and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D. Safety and tolerability were assessed by collecting adverse events data. Pain and disability scores measured by WOMAC index were lower after treatment (pain, p ≤ 0.001; disability, p = 0.020. BPI-SF showed a significant improvement in joint function when walking and performing normal work (walking, p = 0.021; normal work, p = 0.030. SF36 scores improved for 7 out of 11 items after etoricoxib treatment (#1, p = 0.032; #4, p = 0.026; #5, p = 0.017; #6, p = 0.008; #7, p = 0.009; #8, p = 0.013; and #10, p = 0.038. EQ-5D showed a significant improvement in visual analogue scale scores (p = 0.036. TSQM results demonstrated a higher patient perception of overall satisfaction. No adverse events were reported. Pain relief, joint function, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction improved significantly in elderly patients with OA after etoricoxib administration.

  6. Joint proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Steultjens, M; Harlaar, J; Knol, D; Lems, W; Dekker, J

    2007-06-15

    To test the hypotheses that poor knee joint proprioception is related to limitations in functional ability, and poor proprioception aggravates the impact of muscle weakness on limitations in functional ability in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Sixty-three patients with symptomatic OA of the knee were tested. Proprioceptive acuity was assessed by establishing the joint motion detection threshold (JMDT) in the anteroposterior direction. Muscle strength was measured using a computer-driven isokinetic dynamometer. Functional ability was assessed by the 100-meter walking test, the Get Up and Go (GUG) test, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function (WOMAC-PF) questionnaire. Correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationship between proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability. Regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of proprioception on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability. Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was related to more limitation in functional ability (walking time r = 0.30, P < 0.05; GUG time r = 0.30, P < 0.05; WOMAC-PF r = 0.26, P <0.05). In regression analyses, the interaction between proprioception and muscle strength was significantly related to functional ability (walking time, P < 0.001 and GUG time, P < 0.001) but not to WOMAC-PF score (P = 0.625). In patients with poor proprioception, reduction of muscle strength was associated with more severe deterioration of functional ability than in patients with accurate proprioception. Patients with poor proprioception show more limitation in functional ability, but this relationship is rather weak. In patients with poor proprioception, muscle weakness has a stronger impact on limitations in functional ability than in patients with accurate proprioception.

  7. Effect of Footwear on Joint Pain and Function in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy; Luna, Sarah

    Lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition among older adults; given the risks of surgical and pharmaceutical interventions, conservative, lower-cost management options such as footwear warrant further investigation. This systematic review investigated the effects of footwear, including shoe inserts, in reducing lower extremity joint pain and improving gait, mobility, and quality of life in older adults with OA. The CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, RECAL, and Web of Knowledge databases were searched for publications from January 1990 to September 2014, using the terms "footwear," "shoes," "gait," "pain," and "older adult." Participants who were 50 years or older and those who had OA in at least one lower extremity joint narrowed the results. Outcomes of interest included measures of pain, comfort, function, gait, or quality of life. Exclusion criteria applied to participants with rheumatoid arthritis, amputation, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, use of modified footwear or custom orthotics, purely biomechanical studies, and outcomes of balance or falls only. Single-case studies, qualitative narrative descriptions, and expert opinions were also excluded. The initial search resulted in a total of 417 citations. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria. Two randomized controlled trials and 3 quasiexperimental studies reported lateral wedge insoles may have at least some pain-relieving effects and improved functional mobility in older adults at 4 weeks to 2 years' follow-up, particularly when used with subtalar and ankle strapping. Three randomized controlled trials with large sample sizes reported that lateral wedges provided no knee pain relief compared with flat insoles. Hardness of shoe soles did not significantly affect joint comfort in the foot in a quasiexperimental study. A quasiexperimental designed study investigating shock-absorbing insoles showed reduction in knee joint pain with 1 month of wear. Finally, a cross-sectional prognostic study indicated

  8. Assessment of trunk muscle density using CT and its association with degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebro, Ronnie; O'Brien, Liam; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the association of trunk muscle density assessed by computed tomography (CT) with age, gender, and BMI and (2) to evaluate the association between trunk muscle CT density and degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine. The study was IRB approved and HIPAA compliant. The study group comprised 100 subjects (mean age 44.4 ± 22.2 years, 51 % male) who underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis without intravenous contrast. Exclusion criteria included prior abdominal or spine surgery, active malignancy and scoliosis. CTs were reviewed and the attenuation of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, internal and external obliques, psoas, multifidus, longissimus and gluteus maximus were measured bilaterally at consistent levels. Degenerative disc and bilateral facet joint disease were scored using established methods. Univariate analyses were performed using linear regression. Multivariate linear regression was performed to adjust for age, gender and BMI. CT density of each trunk muscle correlated inversely with age (p < 0.001) and BMI (p < 0.001). CT density of each trunk muscle correlated inversely with degenerative disc and facet joint disease in the univariate analyses (p < 0.001); however, only the gluteus maximus and the transverse abdominis remained significant predictors of degenerative disc and facet joint disease respectively in the multivariate analysis. Fatty infiltration of trunk musculature increases with age and BMI. Fatty infiltration of the gluteus maximus and transverse abdominis are associated with degenerative disc and facet joint disease, independent of age, gender and BMI. (orig.)

  9. Environmental Disruption of Circadian Rhythm Predisposes Mice to Osteoarthritis-Like Changes in Knee Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Robin M; Ellman, Michael B; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Keshavarizian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Chen, Di; Forsyth, Christopher B; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm dysfunction is linked to many diseases, yet pathophysiological roles in articular cartilage homeostasis and degenerative joint disease including osteoarthritis (OA) remains to be investigated in vivo. Here, we tested whether environmental or genetic disruption of circadian homeostasis predisposes to OA-like pathological changes. Male mice were examined for circadian locomotor activity upon changes in the light:dark (LD) cycle or genetic disruption of circadian rhythms. Wild-type (WT) mice were maintained on a constant 12 hour:12 hour LD cycle (12:12 LD) or exposed to weekly 12 hour phase shifts. Alternatively, male circadian mutant mice (ClockΔ19 or Csnk1etau mutants) were compared with age-matched WT littermates that were maintained on a constant 12:12 LD cycle. Disruption of circadian rhythms promoted osteoarthritic changes by suppressing proteoglycan accumulation, upregulating matrix-degrading enzymes and downregulating anabolic mediators in the mouse knee joint. Mechanistically, these effects involved activation of the PKCδ-ERK-RUNX2/NFκB and β-catenin signaling pathways, stimulation of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5, as well as suppression of the anabolic mediators SOX9 and TIMP-3 in articular chondrocytes of phase-shifted mice. Genetic disruption of circadian homeostasis does not predispose to OA-like pathological changes in joints. Our results, for the first time, provide compelling in vivo evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is a risk factor for the development of OA-like pathological changes in the mouse knee joint. PMID:25655021

  10. Cervical Facet Joint Infection and Associated Epidural Abscess with Streptococcus intermedius from a Dental Infection Origin A Case Report and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Ian David; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S

    2016-09-01

    Pyogenic cervical facet joint infections are rare and such infections from a dental origin are even less common. Of these few cases, none have described infection with Streptococcus intermedius as the pathogen. A 65-year-old orthopaedic surgeon complained of fevers, right-sided radiating neck pain, stiffness, swelling, erythema, and right upper extremity weakness one month after he had broken a crown over his right mandibular premolar, a continued source of pain. Imaging of the cervical spine showed a right C4-C5 facet inflammatory arthropathy and a small epidural abscess that was cultured and initially treated with intravenous antibiotics. The oral maxillofacial surgery team performed an extraction of the infected, symptomatic tooth. For continued right upper extremity weakness, the patient underwent C4-C5 laminoforaminotomy and irrigation and debridement of the right C4-C5 facet joint. After 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, the patient's infectious and inflammatory markers had normalized. By 4 months, he had regained full strength at his upper extremity and a painless and full range of motion of his cervical spine.Pyogenic cervical facet joint infection is very rare and potentially dangerous. A high clinical suspicion and appropriate imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, are important for correct diagnosis. Prompt medical and surgical treatment may avert complications, and although the patient presented made a complete recovery, patients may be left with neurological compromise.

  11. OARSI/OMERACT initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis. An OMERACT 10 Special Interest Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Paternotte, Simon; Bingham, Clifton O

    2011-01-01

    To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of "need for joint replacement surgery," for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA)....

  12. Proximal fibular osteotomy: a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohu; Wei, Lei; Lv, Zhi; Zhao, Bin; Duan, Zhiqing; Wu, Wenjin; Zhang, Bin; Wei, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    Objective To explore the effects of proximal fibular osteotomy as a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of medial joint space and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods From January 2015 to May 2015, 47 patients who underwent proximal fibular osteotomy for medial compartment osteoarthritis were retrospectively followed up. Preoperative and postoperative weight-bearing and whole lower extremity radiographs were obtained to analyse the alignment of the lower extremity and ratio of the knee joint space (medial/lateral compartment). Knee pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale, and knee ambulation activities were evaluated using the American Knee Society score preoperatively and postoperatively. Results Medial pain relief was observed in almost all patients after proximal fibular osteotomy. Most patients exhibited improved walking postoperatively. Weight-bearing lower extremity radiographs showed an average increase in the postoperative medial knee joint space. Additionally, obvious correction of alignment was observed in the whole lower extremity radiographs in 8 of 47 patients. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that proximal fibular osteotomy effectively relieves pain and improves joint function in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis at a mean of 13.38 months postoperatively.

  13. Joint laxity and the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Steultjens, M; Knol, D L; Dinant, H; Dekker, J

    2006-12-15

    To establish the impact of knee joint laxity on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A cross-sectional study of 86 patients with OA of the knee was conducted. Tests were performed to determine varus-valgus laxity, muscle strength, and functional ability. Laxity was assessed using a device that measures the angular deviation of the knee in the frontal plane. Muscle strength was measured using a computer-driven isokinetic dynamometer. Functional ability was assessed by observation (100-meter walking test) and self report (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC]). Regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of joint laxity on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability. In regression analyses, the interaction between muscle strength and joint laxity contributed to the variance in both walking time (P = 0.002) and WOMAC score (P = 0.080). The slope of the regression lines indicated that the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability (walking time, WOMAC) was stronger in patients with high knee joint laxity. Patients with knee OA and high knee joint laxity show a stronger relationship between muscle strength and functional ability than patients with OA and low knee joint laxity. Patients with OA, high knee joint laxity, and low muscle strength are most at risk of being disabled.

  14. Evaluation of intra-articular injection of autologous platelet lysate (PL) in horses with osteoarthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrnenopoulou, Panagiota; Diakakis, Nikolaos; Karayannopoulou, Maria; Savvas, Ioannis; Koliakos, Georgios

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine has become one of the most promising therapies of equine osteoarthritis. Platelet lysate (PL) is rich in bioactive proteins and growth factors that play a crucial role in tissue healing. To evaluate the efficacy of intra-articularly injected autologous PL in equine athletes with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Fifteen warmblood geldings aged 8-19 years with osteoarthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups; 10 horses received intra-articular injections of PL and 5 of normal saline (controls). Before treatment, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) levels in basal plasma and prepared PL were estimated. Each joint was injected twice within a three-week period. Lameness was evaluated using the American Association of Equine Practitioners grading system, before treatment and 10 days after each intra-articular injection. Horses were examined fortnightly for one year. Radiographic examination was performed six months post-treatment. The generalized estimating equation test was used for statistical analysis. Acceptable levels of PDGF were detected in PLs (mean ± SD: 258.0 ± 52.3 pg/ml). The majority of horses (9/10) responded positively to PL treatment presenting lower lameness grades (p < 0.0005) compared to controls 10 days after the second injection, and returned to normal athletic activity. Radiographs revealed no changes in osteoarthritis lesions six months after treatment. One year post-injections, however, all horses relapsed to their initial degree of lameness. Intra-articularly injected autologous PL is an efficient method for temporarily managing osteoarthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint in athletic horses.

  15. Hand osteoarthritis: Differential diagnosis with inflammatory joint diseases and treatment policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Olyunin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA usually affects certain joint groups selectively and the hand joints (HJ are one of its classical locations. Hand OA is widespread in the population. In their practice rheumatologists encounter HJ injury in OA in 38% of cases. It is conventional to identify three main types of hand OA. These are 1 interphalangeal OA that may or may not be accompanied by nodulation; 2 first carpometacarpal OA; and 3 erosive OA. At the same time, the rate of clinical forms ranges from 2.0 to 6.2%; it is 4.7 to 20.4% in the elderly. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are most commonly used to relieve pain that is the main manifestation of the disease. The risk for NSAID-related adverse gastrointestinal (GI events is substantially reduced by the drugs that exert their effects mainly on cyclooxygenase 2. These include nimesulide in particular. Undesirable GI effects may be also considerably minimized by using NSAIDs that have both their gastroprotective and antiinflammatory activities. By suppressing pain and inflammatory changes, the recently designed NSAID amtolmetin guacil simultaneously exerts a protective effect on the GI mucosa, by elevating its nitric oxide levels.

  16. Effect of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda on Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Perera, Manaram; Kumarasinghe, Nishantha

    2014-01-01

    Reported case was a 63-year-old female with end-stage osteoarthritis (OA) (Sandhigata Vata) of the left knee joint accompanied by exostoses. Radiology (X-ray) report confirmed it as a Kellgren-Lawrence grade III or less with exostoses. At the beginning, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were poor, and function score was fair. Srilankan traditional and Ayurveda medicine treatment was given in three regimens for 70 days. After 70 days, external treatment of oleation and 2 capsules of Shallaki (Boswellia serrata Triana and Planch) and two tablets of Jeewya (comprised of Emblica officinalis Gaertn., Tinospora cordifolia [Willd.] Millers. and Terminalia chebula Retz.), twice daily were continued over 5 months. Visual analogue scale for pain, knee scores in the Knee Society online rating system and a Ayurveda clinical assessment criteria was used to evaluate the effects of treatments in weekly basis. After treatment for 70 days, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were also improved up to good level and function score was improved up to excellent level. During the follow-up period, joint symptoms and signs and the knee scores were unchanged. In conclusion, this OA patient's quality of life was improved by the combined treatment of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda. PMID:26195904

  17. Osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint: Correlation of ultrasound appearances to disability and treatment response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J.K.; Farnell, R.D.; Campbell, D.A.; Robinson, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate grading of thumb carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) osteoarthritis (OA) using ultrasound, correlating findings with disability and treatment response. Materials and methods: Patients with symptomatic thumb OA attending for ultrasound-guided CMCJ steroid injection and a group of asymptomatic controls were recruited prospectively. Thumb CMCJ ultrasound was graded (osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, capsule size, and measured capsule size), and a Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was completed for each patient. Symptomatic patients then underwent injection with DASH repeated 6 weeks post-treatment. Ultrasound features were correlated with the initial DASH disability score and response as defined by change in DASH 6 weeks after treatment. Results: Thirty-one patients with symptomatic OA and 37 asymptomatic controls were recruited. With the exception of osteophytes (p = 0.017), no statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between severity of ultrasound features and patient disability. However, all features demonstrated statistically significant higher grades in the symptomatic group compared to controls. Ultrasound grading did not have statistical correlation with treatment response. Conclusion: No correlation was found between the majority of ultrasound features and the clinical severity of OA or likely response to treatment. However, these features are significantly more common in the symptomatic population

  18. Does joint alignment affect the T2 values of cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Klaus M.; Shepard, Timothy; Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Babb, James S.; Regatte, Ravinder; Schweitzer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    To assess the relationship between T2 values of femorotibial cartilage and knee alignment in patients with clinical symptoms of medial osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-four patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 62.5 ± 9.9 years) with clinical symptoms of medial knee OA, 12 with varus and 12 with valgus alignment of the femorotibial joint, were investigated on 3T MR using a 2D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) sequence for T2 mapping. Analysis of covariance, Spearman correlation coefficients, exact Mann-Whitney tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Overall the T2 values of cartilage in the medial compartment (median ± interquartile-range, 49.44 ± 6.58) were significantly higher (P = 0.0043) than those in the lateral compartment (47.15 ± 6.87). Patients with varus alignment (50.83 ± 6.30 ms) had significantly higher T2 values of cartilage (P < 0.0001) than patients with valgus alignment (46.20 ± 6.00 ms). No statistically significant association between the T2 values of cartilage (in either location) and the Kellgren Lawrence score was found in the varus or in the valgus group. T2 measurements were increased in medial knee OA patients with varus alignment, adding support to the theory of an association of OA and joint alignment. (orig.)

  19. Does joint alignment affect the T2 values of cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Klaus M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Shepard, Timothy; Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Babb, James S.; Regatte, Ravinder [New York University Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Schweitzer, Mark [Ottawa Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    To assess the relationship between T2 values of femorotibial cartilage and knee alignment in patients with clinical symptoms of medial osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-four patients (mean age {+-} standard deviation, 62.5 {+-} 9.9 years) with clinical symptoms of medial knee OA, 12 with varus and 12 with valgus alignment of the femorotibial joint, were investigated on 3T MR using a 2D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) sequence for T2 mapping. Analysis of covariance, Spearman correlation coefficients, exact Mann-Whitney tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Overall the T2 values of cartilage in the medial compartment (median {+-} interquartile-range, 49.44 {+-} 6.58) were significantly higher (P = 0.0043) than those in the lateral compartment (47.15 {+-} 6.87). Patients with varus alignment (50.83 {+-} 6.30 ms) had significantly higher T2 values of cartilage (P < 0.0001) than patients with valgus alignment (46.20 {+-} 6.00 ms). No statistically significant association between the T2 values of cartilage (in either location) and the Kellgren Lawrence score was found in the varus or in the valgus group. T2 measurements were increased in medial knee OA patients with varus alignment, adding support to the theory of an association of OA and joint alignment. (orig.)

  20. Gait adaptations with aging in healthy participants and people with knee-joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffell, Lynsey D; Jordan, Stevan J; Cobb, Justin P; McGregor, Alison H

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between age and gait characteristics in people with and without medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. We aimed to characterize this relationship and to relate biomechanical and structural parameters in a subset of OA patients. Twenty five participants with diagnosed unilateral medial knee OA and 84 healthy participants, with no known knee pathology were recruited. 3D motion capture was used to analyse sagittal and coronal plane gait parameters while participants walked at a comfortable speed. Participants were categorized according to age (18-30, 31-59 and 60+ years), and those with and without OA were compared between and within age groups. In a subset of OA patients, clinically available Computed Tomography images were used to assess joint structure. Differences in coronal plane kinematics at the hip and knee were noted in participants with OA particularly those who were older compared with our healthy controls, as well as increased knee moments. Knee adduction moment correlated with structural parameters in the subset of OA patients. Increased knee moments and altered kinematics were observed in older participants presenting with OA only, which seem to be related to morphological changes in the joint due to OA, as opposed to being related to the initial cause of medial knee OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Dubious space for Artelon joint resurfacing for basal thumb (trapeziometacarpal joint) osteoarthritis. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Francesco; Mariconda, Massimo; Balato, Giovanni; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Criscuolo, Giovanni; Maffulli, Nicola

    2018-04-06

    Trapeziometacarpal arthritis is a common and disabling condition. There is no evidence in the literature of superiority of one surgical procedure over others. Several prosthetic implants have been introduced to preserve joint mobility. We searched the on Medline (PubMed), Web of Science and Scopus databases using the combined keywords 'artelon', 'thumb', 'carpometacarpal', 'trapeziometacarpal' and 'rhizoarthrosis'; 11 studies were identified. The use of Artelon implant is not recommended because of its high revision rate and worse outcomes compared to conventional techniques. Inert materials subjected to compressive and shearing forces could produce debris and subsequent inflammatory response. There is debate in the published scientific literature regarding the role of preoperative antibiotic profilaxis and post-surgery inflammatory response. Standard techniques such as trapeziectomy alone or combined with interposition or suspensionplasty offer effective treatment for thumb basal joint arthritis. Several prosthetic implants show promising results in terms of pain relief and functional request, but there is a need of long-term randomized controlled trials to demonstrate their equivalence, and eventually superiority, compared to standard techniques.

  2. Crosslinking of fibrinogen and fibronectin by free radicals : A possible initial step in adhesion formation in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Zardeneta, G; Cordewener, FW; Liem, RSB; Schmitz, JP; de Bont, LGM; Milam, SB

    Purpose: Adhesion formation in osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) typically results in a sustained limitation of joint movement. We propose the hypothesis that free-radical-mediated crosslinking of proteins underlies this adhesion formation in affected joints. Free radicals may

  3. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Erik J; van der Pas, Suzan; Schaap, Laura A; Sánchez-Martínez, Mercedes; Zambon, Sabina; Peter, Richard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dennison, Elaine M; Denkinger, Michael; Castell, Maria Victoria; Siviero, Paola; Herbolsheimer, Florian; Edwards, Mark H; Otero, Angel; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2014-03-05

    People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six European countries with different climates and to identify characteristics of older persons with OA that are most predictive of perceived weather sensitivity. Baseline data from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used. ACR classification criteria were used to determine OA. Participants with OA were asked about their perception of weather as influencing their pain. Using a two-week follow-up pain calendar, average self-reported joint pain was assessed (range: 0 (no pain)-10 (greatest pain intensity)). Linear regression analyses, logistic regression analyses and an independent t-test were used. Analyses were adjusted for several confounders. The majority of participants with OA (67.2%) perceived the weather as affecting their pain. Weather-sensitive participants reported more pain than non-weather-sensitive participants (M = 4.1, SD = 2.4 versus M = 3.1, SD = 2.4; p weather sensitivity and joint pain remained present (B = 0.37, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analyses revealed that women and more anxious people were more likely to report weather sensitivity. Older people with OA from Southern Europe were more likely to indicate themselves as weather-sensitive persons than those from Northern Europe. Weather (in)stability may have a greater impact on joint structures and pain perception in people from Southern Europe. The results emphasize the importance of considering weather sensitivity in daily life of older people with OA and may help to identify weather-sensitive older people with OA.

  4. The lumbar facet arthrosis syndrome. Clinical presentation and articular surface changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, S M; Parry, C R

    1987-01-01

    We describe a lumbar facet syndrome in which disabling symptoms are associated with normal or near-normal plain radiographs. Local spinal fusion relieved symptoms in 12 patients; the excised facet joint surfaces showed some of the histological changes seen in chondromalacia patellae and in osteoarthritis of other large joints. The most frequent change was focal full-thickness cartilage necrosis or loss of cartilage with exposure of subchondral bone, but osteophyte formation was remarkably absent in all specimens. We suggest that there are both clinical and histological similarities between the facet arthrosis syndrome and chondromalacia patellae. Facet arthrosis may be a relatively important cause of intractable back pain in young and middle-aged adults.

  5. The evaluation of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in naturally occurring osteoarthritis of the stifle joint in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, J; Fitch, G; Evans, R B; McClure, S R; Conzemius, M

    2005-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has expanded from the original uses of human urinary calculi treatment to veterinary orthopaedic applications. This paper investigates the feasibility and efficacy of treating dogs with osteoarthritis of the stifle joint with ESWT. In this study, dogs with persistent stifle lameness despite previous surgical or medical treatment were either treated with ESWT or served as untreated controls. The more lame rear limb of each dog was determined by force platform analysis. The range of motion (ROM) of the stifle joints was assessed by goniometry. Force platform gait analysis and goniometry were performed on both groups for four visits at three-week intervals and a final examination four weeks later. Shock wave therapy was performed three times on the treated dogs, once at each of the first three examinations. A placebo treatment consisting of clipping and wetting the hair was performed on the control dogs. The vertical forces were evaluated for objective analysis of treatment response. For peak vertical force (PVF), four of seven treated dogs improved, while only one of five of control dogs improved. The PVF for the within group analysis did not show any significant change for the treated group, however, the control group has a significant decrease (p = 0.05) in PVF consistent with an increase in lameness. The range of motion (ROM) of the stifle joint improved in five of seven treated dogs and three of five controls. Dogs in the treated group had a trend toward increased ROM (p = 0.07) and a 'positive slope' when compared to dogs in the control group which did not have a significant change (p = 0.78) and had a negative slope indicating the dogs were developing a decrease in ROM. The subjective data provided by client questionnaire did not show significant difference between groups.

  6. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  7. Associations Between Knee Effusion-synovitis and Joint Structural Changes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Blizzard, Leigh; Antony, Benny; Han, Weiyu; Zhu, Zhaohua; Cicuttini, Flavia; Wluka, Anita E; Winzenberg, Tania; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2017-11-01

    To describe the associations between effusion-synovitis and joint structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 24 months. A posthoc analysis using data from a randomized controlled trial in 413 patients with symptomatic OA (aged 63 ± 7 yrs, 208 women). Knee effusion-synovitis volume and score, cartilage defects, cartilage volume, and bone marrow lesions (BML) were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed using radiograph. Least significant change criterion was used to define change in effusion-synovitis volume. Knee symptoms were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index. Multivariable linear/logistic regression and multilevel generalized mixed-effects models were used in longitudinal analyses. Total effusion-synovitis volume increased modestly from baseline (8.0 ± 8.5 ml) to followup (9.0 ± 10.5 ml). Baseline BML, cartilage defect, JSN, and osteophyte scores were positively associated with change in effusion-synovitis volume (p effusion-synovitis score (p effusion-synovitis score nor volume consistently predicted change in the above structures except cartilage volume. In the mixed-effects models, knee effusion-synovitis was positively associated with BML (volume: β = 1.19 ml/grade; score: OR = 1.75/grade) and cartilage defects (volume: β = 1.87 ml/grade; score: OR = 2.22/grade), while negatively associated with cartilage volume loss. Change in effusion-synovitis volume was positively correlated with changes in knee pain and stiffness scores (p effusion-synovitis, but effusion-synovitis did not predict knee structural changes. These findings suggest that synovial inflammation is likely the result of joint structural abnormalities in established OA. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000495022.

  8. Knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis: influence of abdominal and thigh fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P; Beavers, Daniel P; Loeser, Richard F; Carr, J Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J; Hunter, David J; Devita, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography, and total lean and fat mass were determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age, 66.3 yr; body mass index, 33.5 kg·m) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Higher total body mass was significantly associated (P ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (P knee extensor moments (P = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (P = 0.0001), shear (P knee extension moment (P = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (P = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found that both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (P ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with knee abduction (P = 0.03) and knee extension moment (P = 0.02). Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA.

  9. Predictors of response to prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker-sole footwear in individuals with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, HB; Auhl, M; Tan, JM; Levinger, P; Roddy, E; Munteanu, SE

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1st MTPJ OA) is a common and disabling condition commonly managed with footwear and orthotic interventions. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with a successful treatment response in people with 1st MTPJ OA provided with prefabricated orthoses or rocker-sole footwear as part of a randomised clinical trial. METHODS: People with 1st MTPJ OA (n = 88) who participated in a randomised trial were allocate...

  10. A web-based system for neural network based classification in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dumast, Priscille; Mirabel, Clément; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ruellas, Antonio; Yatabe, Marilia; Ioshida, Marcos; Ribera, Nina Tubau; Michoud, Loic; Gomes, Liliane; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Hongtu; Muniz, Luciana; Shoukri, Brandon; Paniagua, Beatriz; Styner, Martin; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Vimort, Jean-Baptiste; Pascal, Laura; Prieto, Juan Carlos

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the methodological innovations of a web-based system for storage, integration and computation of biomedical data, using a training imaging dataset to remotely compute a deep neural network classifier of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA). This study imaging dataset consisted of three-dimensional (3D) surface meshes of mandibular condyles constructed from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The training dataset consisted of 259 condyles, 105 from control subjects and 154 from patients with diagnosis of TMJ OA. For the image analysis classification, 34 right and left condyles from 17 patients (39.9 ± 11.7 years), who experienced signs and symptoms of the disease for less than 5 years, were included as the testing dataset. For the integrative statistical model of clinical, biological and imaging markers, the sample consisted of the same 17 test OA subjects and 17 age and sex matched control subjects (39.4 ± 15.4 years), who did not show any sign or symptom of OA. For these 34 subjects, a standardized clinical questionnaire, blood and saliva samples were also collected. The technological methodologies in this study include a deep neural network classifier of 3D condylar morphology (ShapeVariationAnalyzer, SVA), and a flexible web-based system for data storage, computation and integration (DSCI) of high dimensional imaging, clinical, and biological data. The DSCI system trained and tested the neural network, indicating 5 stages of structural degenerative changes in condylar morphology in the TMJ with 91% close agreement between the clinician consensus and the SVA classifier. The DSCI remotely ran with a novel application of a statistical analysis, the Multivariate Functional Shape Data Analysis, that computed high dimensional correlations between shape 3D coordinates, clinical pain levels and levels of biological markers, and then graphically displayed the computation results. The findings of this

  11. Multidisciplinary approaches to managing osteoarthritis in multiple joint sites: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Andrew; Healey, Emma; Jordan, Joanne L; Ryan, Sarah; Dziedzic, Krysia S

    2016-07-08

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's Osteoarthritis (OA) guidelines recommended that future research should consider the benefits of combination therapies in people with OA across multiple joint sites. However, the clinical effectiveness of such approaches to OA management is unknown. This systematic review therefore aimed to identify the clinical and cost effectiveness of multidisciplinary approaches targeting multiple joint sites for OA in primary care. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Computerised bibliographic databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, BNI, HBE, HMIC, AMED, Web of Science and Cochrane). Studies were included if they met the following criteria; a randomised controlled trial (RCT), a primary care population with OA across at least two different peripheral joint sites (multiple joint sites), and interventions undertaken by at least two different health disciplines (multidisciplinary). The Cochrane 'Risk of Bias' tool and PEDro were used for quality assessment of eligible studies. Clinical and cost effectiveness was determined by extracting and examining self-reported outcomes for pain, function, quality of life (QoL) and health care utilisation. The date range for the search was from database inception until August 2015. The search identified 1148 individual titles of which four were included in the review. A narrative review was conducted due to the heterogeneity of the included trials. Each of the four trials used either educational or exercise interventions facilitated by a range of different health disciplines. Moderate clinical benefits on pain, function and QoL were reported across the studies. The beneficial effects of exercise generally decreased over time within all studies. Two studies were able to show a reduction in healthcare utilisation due to a reduction in visits to a physiotherapist or a reduction in x-rays and orthopaedic referrals. The intervention that showed the most

  12. Osteoprotegerin reduces the development of pain behaviour and joint pathology in a model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Ashraf, Sadaf; Xu, Luting; Burston, James J; Menhinick, Matthew R; Poulter, Caroline L; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2014-08-01

    Increased subchondral bone turnover may contribute to pain in osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the analgesic potential of a modified version of osteoprotegerin (osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc)) in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) model of OA pain. Male Sprague Dawley rats (140-260 g) were treated with either OPG-Fc (3 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) between days 1 and 27 (pre-emptive treatment) or days 21 and 27 (therapeutic treatment) after an intra-articular injection of MIA (1 mg/50 µl) or saline. A separate cohort of rats received the bisphosphonate zoledronate (100 µg/kg, subcutaneously) between days 1 and 25 post-MIA injection. Incapacitance testing and von Frey (1-15 g) hind paw withdrawal thresholds were used to assess pain behaviour. At the end of the study, rats were killed and the knee joints and spinal cord removed for analysis. Immunohistochemical studies using Iba-1 and GFAP quantified levels of activation of spinal microglia and astrocytes, respectively. Joint sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or Safranin-O fast green and scored for matrix proteoglycan and overall joint morphology. The numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts were quantified. N=10 rats/group. Pre-emptive treatment with OPG-Fc significantly attenuated the development of MIA-induced changes in weightbearing, but not allodynia. OPG-Fc decreased osteoclast number, inhibited the formation of osteophytes and improved structural pathology within the joint similarly to the decrease seen after pretreatment with the bisphosphonate, zoledronate. Therapeutic treatment with OPG-Fc decreased pain behaviour, but did not improve pathology in rats with established joint damage. Our data suggest that early targeting of osteoclasts may reduce pain associated with OA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Association of Beta-Blocker Use With Less Prevalent Joint Pain and Lower Opioid Requirement in People With Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Ana M; Abhishek, Abhishek; Muir, Kenneth; Zhang, Weiya; Maciewicz, Rose A; Doherty, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Recent findings suggest that β-adrenergic blockers have antinociceptive properties. The aim of this study was to compare levels of large-joint pain between those taking adrenergic blockers and those taking other antihypertensive medications. Data from the Genetics of Osteoarthritis and Lifestyle (GOAL) study, a secondary-care cohort of osteoarthritis (OA) patients, were used. Joint pain was assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain scores in 873 individuals with symptomatic hip and/or knee OA and hypertension, who were taking ≥1 prescription antihypertensive medications. The association between adrenergic blocker prescription and at least moderate joint pain (WOMAC score anxiety, and depression. The use of β-adrenergic blockers was associated with lower WOMAC pain scores and with a lower prevalence of joint pain after adjustment for demographic variables and comorbidity (adjusted odds ratio [OR adj ] for pain 0.68 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.51, 0.92]; P blockers (OR adj for pain 0.94 [95% CI 0.55, 1.58]) or with any other class of antihypertensive medications. Prescription of beta-blockers was also associated negatively with opioid use (OR adj for opioids 0.73 [95% CI 0.54, 0.98]; P beta-blockers is associated with less joint pain and a lower use of opioids and other analgesics in individuals with symptomatic large-joint OA. This observation needs to be confirmed by other studies. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475. When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P<0.01 of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  15. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical examination, laboratory tests and choose appropriate

  17. Use of dimensionality reduction for structural mapping of hip joint osteoarthritis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoharatos, C; Fotopoulos, S; Boniatis, I; Panayiotakis, G; Panagiotopoulos, E

    2009-01-01

    A visualization-based, computer-oriented, classification scheme is proposed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA) using dimensionality reduction techniques. The introduced methodology tries to cope with the confined ability of physicians to structurally organize the entire available set of medical data into semantically similar categories and provide the capability to make visual observations among the ensemble of data using low-dimensional biplots. In this work, 18 pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA are evaluated by experienced physicians and assessed into Normal, Mild and Severe following the Kellgren and Lawrence scale. Two regions of interest corresponding to radiographic hip joint spaces are determined and representative features are extracted using a typical texture analysis technique. The structural organization of all hip OA data is accomplished using distance and topology preservation-based dimensionality reduction techniques. The resulting map is a low-dimensional biplot that reflects the intrinsic organization of the ensemble of available data and which can be directly accessed by the physician. The conceivable visualization scheme can potentially reveal critical data similarities and help the operator to visually estimate their initial diagnosis. In addition, it can be used to detect putative clustering tendencies, examine the presence of data similarities and indicate the existence of possible false alarms in the initial perceptual evaluation

  18. Clinical investigation compared with the effects of the bee-venom Acupuncture on knee joint with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wu-Hao

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is designed to find out the effects of the Bee-Venom Acupuncture on knee joint with osteoarthritis. Methods: We are investigated that outpatients suffer from knee joint pain deciphered at the division of Acupuncture in Jaseng oriental medicine hospital from the 13, July 1999 to unti111, November 2000. We make an estimated of the score from both before or after its treatment about 70 cases of diagnostic patient with the osteoarthritis of knee joints by biochemical method and X-RAY analysis, we observed in the progress of symptoms. Results: These results found that sex distinction with a disease caused much more female than male at the ratio of I to 5.36 in the proportion of males to females, jobs is mainly ranked with a housewife and approximately 82.9% of cases before our hospital have ever treated at the other clinics or hospitals. On the hand, the distribution interval of a case history is mainly followed by disease in below 6 month, interval of the period-treatment is mainly gone within 3 month and frequency of treatment is examined into II to 15 times, more than 16 times and below 10 times, respectively. We are estimated with the score of functional barrier from both before or after its treatment against osteoarthritis' patients and produced in the usefulness from the totally point of fields except the aid-device after its treatment In summary, these results demonstrated that Bee Venom, Acupuncture enhanced more than 82.9% to the improvement of treatment and p<0.05 considered to be statistically significant. Conclusion: These results suggest that Bee-venom Acupuncture may be playa role in the significant usefulness and have need of actively application for the clinical trials against osteoarthritis' patients.

  19. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  1. The association between reduced knee joint proprioception and medial meniscal abnormalities using MRI in knee osteoarthritis: results from the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Knoop, J; Hunter, D J; Klein, J-P; van der Leeden, M; Knol, D L; Reiding, D; Voorneman, R E; Gerritsen, M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; Dekker, J

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is characterized by pain and activity limitations. In knee OA, proprioceptive accuracy is reduced and might be associated with pain and activity limitations. Although causes of reduced proprioceptive accuracy are divergent, medial meniscal abnormalities, which are highly prevalent in knee OA, have been suggested to play an important role. No study has focussed on the association between proprioceptive accuracy and meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. To explore the association between reduced proprioceptive accuracy and medial meniscal abnormalities in a clinical sample of knee OA subjects. Cross-sectional study in 105 subjects with knee OA. Knee proprioceptive accuracy was assessed by determining the joint motion detection threshold in the knee extension direction. The knee was imaged with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Number of regions with medial meniscal abnormalities and the extent of abnormality in the anterior and posterior horn and body were scored according to the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) method. Multiple regression analyzes were used to examine whether reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA subjects. Mean proprioceptive accuracy was 2.9° ± 1.9°. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected medial meniscal abnormalities were found in the anterior horn (78%), body (80%) and posterior horn (90%). Reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with both the number of regions with meniscal abnormalities (P knee complaints. This is the first study showing that reduced proprioceptive accuracy is associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. The study highlights the importance of meniscal abnormalities in understanding reduced proprioceptive accuracy in persons with knee OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of malformations of the hip joint and their relationship to sex, groin pain, and risk of osteoarthritis: a population-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2010-01-01

    of Østerbro, Copenhagen, Denmark. The inclusion criteria for this study were met by 1332 men and 2288 women. On the basis of radiographic criteria, the hips were categorized as being without malformations or as having an abnormality consisting of a deep acetabular socket, a pistol grip deformity......, or a combination of a deep acetabular socket and a pistol grip deformity. Hip osteoarthritis was defined radiographically as a minimum joint-space width of 0.13). A deep acetabular socket was a significant risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (risk ratio, 2.4), as was a pistol grip deformity (risk...... was 71.0% in men with hip osteoarthritis and 36.6% in women with hip osteoarthritis. CONCLUSIONS: In our study population, a deep acetabular socket and a pistol grip deformity were common radiographic findings and were associated with an increased risk of hip osteoarthritis. The high prevalence...

  3. Epidemiology of Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abbey C; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2017-06-02

    Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability whose prevalence and incidence continue to increase. History of joint injury represents an important risk factor for posttraumatic osteoarthritis and is a significant contributor to the rapidly growing percentage of the population with osteoarthritis. This review will present the epidemiology associated with posttraumatic osteoarthritis, with particular emphasis on the knee and ankle joints. It is important to understand the effect of posttraumatic osteoarthritis on the population so that sufficient resources can be devoted to countering the disease and promoting optimal long-term health for patients after joint injury.

  4. The efficacy of conventional radiofrequency denervation in patients with chronic low back pain originating from the facet joints: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Chi Heon

    2017-11-01

    Radiofrequency denervation is commonly used for the treatment of chronic facet joint pain that has been refractory to more conservative treatments, although the evidence supporting this treatment has been controversial. We aimed to elucidate the precise effects of radiofrequency denervation in patients with low back pain originating from the facet joints relative to those obtained using control treatments, with particular attention to consistency in the denervation protocol. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was carried out. Adult patients undergoing radiofrequency denervation or control treatments (sham or epidural block) for facet joint disease of the lumbar spine comprised the patient sample. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores were measured and stratified by response of diagnostic block procedures. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials regarding radiofrequency denervation and control treatments for back pain. Changes in VAS pain scores of the radiofrequency group were compared with those of the control group as well as the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for back pain VAS. Meta-regression model was developed to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency treatment according to responses of diagnostic block while controlling for other variables. We then calculated mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random-effects models. We included data from seven trials involving 454 patients who had undergone radiofrequency denervation (231 patients) and control treatments such as sham or epidural block procedures (223 patients). The radiofrequency group exhibited significantly greater improvements in back pain score when compared with the control group for 1-year follow-up. Although the average improvement in VAS scores exceeded the MCID, the lower limit of the 95% CI encompassed the MCID. A subgroup of patients who responded very well to diagnostic block

  5. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The selective cathepsin K inhibitor MIV-711 attenuates joint pathology in experimental animal models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Erik; Rizoska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Edenius, Charlotte; Bendele, Alison M; Maul, Don; Larson, Michael; Shah, Neha; Yoder Otto, Valerie; Jerome, Chris; Grabowska, Urszula

    2018-03-09

    MIV-711 is a highly potent and selective cathepsin K inhibitor. The current article summarizes the therapeutic effects of MIV-711 on joint pathology in rabbits subjected to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT), and the prophylactic effects on joint pathology in dogs subjected to partial medial meniscectomy, two surgical models of osteoarthritis (OA). Starting 1 week after surgery, rabbits were dosed daily via oral gavage with either MIV-711 or vehicle (n = 7/group) for 7 weeks. The four treatment groups were: (1) sham + vehicle; (2) ACLT + vehicle; (3) ACLT + MIV-711, 30 µmol/kg and (4) ACLT + MIV-711, 100 µmol/kg. Subchondral bone and articular cartilage structures were assessed by µCT, histomorphometry, and scoring. Dogs subjected to partial medial meniscectomy received either MIV-711 (30 µmol/kg) or vehicle (n = 15/group) via oral gavage once daily, starting 1 day before meniscectomy, for 28 days. Cartilage degradation was assessed at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. The exposures of MIV-711 were assessed in both studies and biomarkers reflecting bone resorption (HP-1 in rabbits, CTX-I in dogs) and cartilage degradation (CTX-II) were measured. In ACLT rabbits, MIV-711 decreased HP-1 levels by up to 72% (p subchondral bone plate and reduced trabecular bone volume in the femur and tibia. These effects were reversed by MIV-711. ACLT resulted in cartilage thickening, which was attenuated by MIV-711. MIV-711 did not affect osteophyte formation or Mankin scores. In dogs, MIV-711 reduced CTX-I and CTX-II levels by 86% (p subchondral bone loss and partially attenuates cartilage pathology in two animal models of OA. These beneficial effects of MIV-711 on joint pathology are observed in conjunction with decreases in bone and cartilage biomarkers that have been shown to be clinically attainable in human. The data support the further development of MIV-711 for the treatment of OA.

  7. Decreased Temporomandibular Joint Range of Motion in a Model of Early Osteoarthritis in the Rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Tudares, Mauro A.; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Analysis of mandibular biomechanics could help with understanding the mechanisms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMJDs), such as osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA), by investigating the effects of injury or disease on TMJ movement. The objective of the present study was to determine the functional kinematic implications of mild TMJ-OA degeneration caused by altered occlusion from unilateral splints in the rabbit. Materials and Methods Altered occlusion of the TMJ was mechanically induced in rabbits by way of a unilateral molar dental splint (n = 3). TMJ motion was assessed using 3-dimensional (3D) skeletal kinematics twice, once before and once after 6 weeks of splint placement with the splints removed, after allowing 3 days of recovery. The relative motion of the condyle to the fossa and the distance between the incisors were tracked. Results An overall decrease in the range of joint movement was observed at the incisors and in the joint space between the condyle and fossa. The incisor movement decreased from 7.0 ± 0.5 mm to 6.2 ± 0.5 mm right to left, from 5.5 ± 2.2 mm to 4.6 ± 0.8 mm anterior to posterior, and from 13.3 ± 1.8 mm to 11.6 ± 1.4 mm superior to inferior (P < .05). The total magnitude of the maximum distance between the points on the condyle and fossa decreased from 3.6 ± 0.8 mm to 3.1 ± 0.6 mm for the working condyle and 2.8 ± 0.4 mm to 2.5 ± 0.4 mm for the balancing condyle (P < .05). The largest decreases were seen in the anteroposterior direction for both condyles. Conclusion Determining the changes in condylar movement might lead to a better understanding of the early predictors in the development of TMJ-OA and determining when the symptoms become a chronic, irreversible problem. PMID:25889371

  8. Composition of The Knee Index, a novel three-dimensional biomechanical index for knee joint load, in subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Andriacchi, Tom; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    Background Knee joint load is an important factor associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. To provide an overall understanding of knee joint loading, the Knee Index (KI) has been developed to include moments from all three planes (frontal, sagittal and transversal). However, before KI...... index of joint load for the knee, in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods The contribution of frontal, sagittal and transversal plane knee moments to KI was investigated in 24 subjects (13 women, age: 58 ± 7.6 years, BMI: 27.1 ± 3.0) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee...... kinematics (i.e. the knee adduction moment), and secondarily the sagittal plane kinematics (i.e. the knee flexion moment). This holds promise for using KI in clinical trials since both frontal and sagittal knee joint moments have been suggested to be associated with the knee osteoarthritis disease...

  9. Bone bruise in magnetic resonance imaging strongly correlates with the production of joint effusion and with knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Hiromi; Igarashi, Mitsuo; Sase, Hiroshi; Sase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Seizo

    2008-01-01

    The findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have not been studied systematically in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The objective here was to compare MRI findings with radiological findings in patients with knee pain and to identify factors that influence the progression of OA of the knee. Of 212 patients with knee pain and MRI of the knee joint, 161 patients were selected for the study after exclusion of cases of trauma and other arthritides. MRI was used to evaluate the presence and degree of bone bruise, hydrarthrosis, and injuries to the cruciate ligament and meniscus. Bone bruise was classified into four types, and hydrarthrosis into four grades. Radiologically, OA progression in the femorotibial and patellofemoral joints was analyzed according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. Age was divided into four groups based on distribution quartiles. Logistic regression analysis and a generalized linear model with Poisson regression were used to analyze correlations among these factors. Bone bruise was present in 87 cases, hydrarthrosis in 100, cruciate ligament injury in 20, and meniscus injury in 98. The presence of bone bruise was not related to age, cruciate ligament injury, meniscus injury, nor to OA of the patellofemoral joint, but was related to hydrarthrosis and to OA of the femorotibial joint. Femorotibial OA was much more strongly associated with bone bruise than with hydrarthrosis. Furthermore, analyzing the relation between the types of bone bruise and the degree of hydrarthrosis using a generalized linear model with Poisson regression, there was a positive correlation between the grade of bone bruise and the amount of hydrarthrosis. A factor associated with the degree of osteoarthritis of the knee is bone bruise observed on MRI. The degree of hydrarthrosis is related to the grade of bone bruise, but is not linked to the degree of osteoarthritis. (author)

  10. Managing Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effects of Body Weight Supported Physical Activity on Joint Pain, Function, and Thigh Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Jason; Christian, Mathew; Cooper, Juliette; Leiter, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effect of a 12-week lower body positive pressure (LBPP)-supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee joint pain, function, and thigh muscle strength in overweight patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community-based, multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients aged between 55 and 75 years, with a body mass index ≥25 kg/m and mild-to-moderate knee OA. Twelve-week LBPP-supported low-load treadmill walking regimen. Acute knee joint pain (visual analog scale) during full weight bearing treadmill walking, chronic knee pain, and joint function [Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire] during normal activities of daily living, and thigh muscle strength (isokinetic testing). Appropriate methods of statistical analysis were used to compare data from baseline and follow-up evaluation. Participants reported significant improvements in knee joint pain and function and demonstrated significant increases in thigh muscle strength about the degenerative knee. Participants also experienced significant reductions in acute knee pain during full weight bearing treadmill walking and required dramatically less LBPP support to walk pain free on the treadmill. Data suggest that an LBPP-supported low-load exercise regimen can be used to significantly diminish knee pain, enhance joint function, and increase thigh muscle strength, while safely promoting pain-free walking exercise in overweight patients with knee OA. These findings have important implications for the development of nonoperative treatment strategies that can be used in the management of joint symptoms associated with progressive knee OA in at-risk patient populations. This research suggests that LBPP-supported low-load walking is a safe user-friendly mode of exercise that can be successfully used in the management of day-to-day joint symptoms associated with knee OA, helping to improve the

  11. EFFECTS OF KINESIOTAPING ALONG WITH QUADRICEPS STRENGTHENING EXERCISES ON PAIN, JOINT RANGE OF MOTION AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES OF KNEE IN SUBJECTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL OSTEOARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Harshitha; K. Senthil kumar; K. Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patello femoral Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative disease in older age group, causing pain, physical disability, and decreased quality of life.As many treatment options available, kinesiotaping is an efficacious treatment for management of pain & disability in patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that kinesiotaping as well as quadriceps strengthening significantly yields functional benefits. But there is lack of evidence revealing combined ...

  12. temporomandibular joint cartilage in rabbits affected by drug-induced osteoarthritis

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    Krzysztof Kałużyński

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of this study were to assess the anti-degenerative effects of pioglitazone and to compare these effects with those of methylprednisolone and hyaluronic acid on drug-induced osteoarthritis in rabbits’ temporomandibular joint cartilage.Material and Methods: The experiment was conducted on 40 Californian white rabbits. Degenerative changes were induced by intra-articular injections of papain. Subsequently, all of the animals were randomly assigned to one of four groups:1 a control group that received no medications;2 a group treated with 4 intra-articular injections of 2 mg (0.2 ml of hyaluronic acid at weekly intervals;3 a group treated with 4 intra-articular injections of 2 mg (0.1 ml of methylprednisolone at weekly intervals;4 a group administered pioglitazone orally in daily doses of 2 mg/kg of body weight. Four weeks after the beginning of drug administration, the rabbits were sacrificed. Sagittal sections of the intra-articular cartilage (discs and mandibular condyles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin by the PAS technique and with van Gieson’s solution. Histologic examinations, as well as cartilage thickness and number of cell layers measurements, were performed.Results: Histologic assessment in cases of arthritis-associated pathologies revealed that changes occurred most frequently in the control group and least frequently in the pioglitazone group. There were no differences in the histological structures of the intra-articular discs. Cartilage thickness measurements demonstrated the thinnest cartilage in group 2 and the thickest in group 3. Analysis of cell layer numbers showed the most numerous layers in the pioglitazone group and the least in the control group.Conclusion: Pioglitazone and hyaluronic acid showed anti-degenerative properties compared to methylprednisolone in an animal model.

  13. Targeted physiotherapy for patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: A protocol for a randomised, single-blind controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Kay M; Vicenzino, Bill; Pandy, Marcus G; Schache, Anthony G; Hinman, Rana S

    2008-01-01

    Background The patellofemoral joint (PFJ) is one compartment of the knee that is frequently affected by osteoarthritis (OA) and is a potent source of OA symptoms. However, there is a dearth of evidence for compartment-specific treatments for PFJ OA. Therefore, this project aims to evaluate whether a physiotherapy treatment, targeted to the PFJ, results in greater improvements in pain and physical function than a physiotherapy education intervention in people with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA. Methods 90 people with PFJ OA (PFJ-specific history, signs and symptoms and radiographic evidence of PFJ OA) will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated into one of two treatments. A randomised controlled trial adhering to CONSORT guidelines will evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks, as well as a home exercise program 4 times/week) compared to a physiotherapist-delivered OA education control treatment (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks). Physiotherapy treatment will consist of (i) quadriceps muscle retraining; (ii) quadriceps and hip muscle strengthening; (iii) patellar taping; (iv) manual PFJ and soft tissue mobilisation; and (v) OA education. Resistance and dosage of exercises will be tailored to the participant's functional level and clinical state. Primary outcomes will be evaluated by a blinded examiner at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months using validated and reliable pain, physical function and perceived global effect scales. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis using linear mixed regression models, including respective baseline scores as a covariate, subjects as a random effect, treatment condition as a fixed factor and the covariate by treatment interaction. Conclusion This RCT is targeting PFJ OA, an important sub-group of knee OA patients, with a specifically designed conservative intervention. The project's outcome will influence PFJ OA rehabilitation, with the potential to reduce

  14. Evaluation of chondrocalcinosis and associated knee joint degeneration using MR imaging: Data from the osteoarthritis initiative

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    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Heilmeier, Ursula; Joseph, Gabby B.; Facchetti, Luca; Kretzschmar, Martin; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lynch, John A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Nevitt, Michael C. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the ability of different MRI sequences to detect chondrocalcinosis within knee cartilage and menisci, and to analyze the association with joint degeneration. Subjects with radiographic knee chondrocalcinosis (n = 90, age 67.7 ± 7.3 years, 50 women) were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative and matched to controls without radiographic chondrocalcinosis (n = 90). Visualization of calcium-containing crystals (CaC) was compared between 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (T1GE), 3D dual echo steady-state (DESS), 2D intermediate-weighted (IW), and proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences obtained with 3T MRI and correlated with a semiquantitative CaC score obtained from radiographs. Structural abnormalities were assessed using Whole-Organ MRI Score (WORMS) and logistic regression models were used to compare cartilage compartments with and without CaC. Correlations between CaC counts of MRI sequences and degree of radiographic calcifications were highest for GE (r{sub T1GE} = 0.73, P < 0.001; r{sub DESS} = 0.68, P < 0.001) compared to other sequences (P > 0.05). Meniscus WORMS was significantly higher in subjects with chondrocalcinosis compared to controls (P = 0.005). Cartilage defects were significantly more frequent in compartments with CaC than without (patella: P = 0.006; lateral tibia: P < 0.001; lateral femur condyle: P = 0.017). Gradient-echo sequences were most useful for the detection of chondrocalcinosis and presence of CaC was associated with higher prevalence of cartilage and meniscal damage. (orig.)

  15. Targeted physiotherapy for patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: A protocol for a randomised, single-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schache Anthony G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patellofemoral joint (PFJ is one compartment of the knee that is frequently affected by osteoarthritis (OA and is a potent source of OA symptoms. However, there is a dearth of evidence for compartment-specific treatments for PFJ OA. Therefore, this project aims to evaluate whether a physiotherapy treatment, targeted to the PFJ, results in greater improvements in pain and physical function than a physiotherapy education intervention in people with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA. Methods 90 people with PFJ OA (PFJ-specific history, signs and symptoms and radiographic evidence of PFJ OA will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated into one of two treatments. A randomised controlled trial adhering to CONSORT guidelines will evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks, as well as a home exercise program 4 times/week compared to a physiotherapist-delivered OA education control treatment (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks. Physiotherapy treatment will consist of (i quadriceps muscle retraining; (ii quadriceps and hip muscle strengthening; (iii patellar taping; (iv manual PFJ and soft tissue mobilisation; and (v OA education. Resistance and dosage of exercises will be tailored to the participant's functional level and clinical state. Primary outcomes will be evaluated by a blinded examiner at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months using validated and reliable pain, physical function and perceived global effect scales. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis using linear mixed regression models, including respective baseline scores as a covariate, subjects as a random effect, treatment condition as a fixed factor and the covariate by treatment interaction. Conclusion This RCT is targeting PFJ OA, an important sub-group of knee OA patients, with a specifically designed conservative intervention. The project's outcome will influence PFJ OA rehabilitation, with the

  16. Effect of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of knee joint load in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Elizabeth G; Kean, Crystal O; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of the knee adduction moment (KAM) and pain in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 30 individuals (mean (SD): age, 61 (7) yr; 15 (50%) male) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA under three walking conditions in a randomized order: i) wearing rocker-soled shoes (Skechers Shape-ups), ii) wearing non-rocker-soled shoes (ASICS walking shoes), and iii) barefoot. Peak KAM and KAM angular impulse were measured as primary indicators of knee load distribution. Secondary measures included the knee flexion moment (KFM) and knee pain during walking. Peak KAM was significantly lower when wearing the rocker-soled shoes compared with that when wearing the non-rocker-soled shoes (mean difference (95% confidence interval), -0.27 (-0.42 to -0.12) N·m/BW × Ht%; P < 0.001). Post hoc tests revealed no significant difference in KAM impulse between rocker-soled and non-rocker-soled shoe conditions (P = 0.13). Both peak KAM and KAM impulse were significantly higher during both shoe conditions compared with those during the barefoot condition (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in KFM (P = 0.36) or knee pain (P = 0.89) between conditions. Rocker-soled shoes significantly reduced peak KAM when compared with non-rocker-soled shoes, without a concomitant change in KFM, and thus may potentially reduce medial knee joint loading. However, KAM parameters in the rocker-soled shoes remained significantly higher than those during barefoot walking. Wearing rocker-soled shoes did not have a significant immediate effect on walking pain. Further research is required to evaluate whether rocker-soled shoes can influence symptoms and progression of knee OA with prolonged wear.

  17. Evaluation of Chondrocalcinosis and Associated Knee Joint Degeneration Using MR Imaging: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersing, Alexandra S; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Heilmeier, Ursula; Joseph, Gabby B; Facchetti, Luca; Kretzschmar, Martin; Lynch, John A; McCulloch, Charles E; Nevitt, Michael C; Steinbach, Lynne S; Link, Thomas M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of different MRI sequences to detect chondrocalcinosis within knee cartilage and menisci, and to analyze the association with joint degeneration. Subjects with radiographic knee chondrocalcinosis (n = 90, age 67.7 ± 7.3 years, 50 women) were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative and matched to controls without radiographic chondrocalcinosis (n = 90). Visualization of calcium-containing crystals (CaC) was compared between 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (T1GE), 3D dual echo steady-state (DESS), 2D intermediate-weighted (IW), and proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences obtained with 3T MRI and correlated with a semiquantitative CaC score obtained from radiographs. Structural abnormalities were assessed using Whole-Organ MRI Score (WORMS) and logistic regression models were used to compare cartilage compartments with and without CaC. Correlations between CaC counts of MRI sequences and degree of radiographic calcifications were highest for GE (r T1GE  = 0.73, P  0.05). Meniscus WORMS was significantly higher in subjects with chondrocalcinosis compared to controls (P = 0.005). Cartilage defects were significantly more frequent in compartments with CaC than without (patella: P = 0.006; lateral tibia: P < 0.001; lateral femur condyle: P = 0.017). Gradient-echo sequences were most useful for the detection of chondrocalcinosis and presence of CaC was associated with higher prevalence of cartilage and meniscal damage. • Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for assessing burden of calcium-containing crystals (CaC). • Gradient-echo sequences are superior to fast spin echo sequences for CaC imaging. • Presence of CaC is associated with meniscus and cartilage degradation.

  18. Effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on knee joint mechanics: a novel conservative treatment for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini Pagani, Cynthia H; Willwacher, Steffen; Benker, Rita; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Several conservative treatments for medial knee osteoarthritis such as knee orthosis and laterally wedged insoles have been shown to reduce the load in the medial knee compartment. However, those treatments also present limitations such as patient compliance and inconsistent results regarding the treatment success. To analyze the effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on the knee adduction moment and knee joint alignment in the frontal plane in subjects with knee varus alignment. Controlled laboratory study, repeated measurements. In total, 14 healthy subjects with knee varus alignment were analyzed in five different conditions: without orthotic, with laterally wedged insoles, and with an ankle-foot orthosis in three different adjustments. Three-dimensional kinetic and kinematic data were collected during gait analysis. Significant decreases in knee adduction moment, knee lever arm, and joint alignment in the frontal plane were observed with the ankle-foot orthosis in all three different adjustments. No significant differences could be found in any parameter while using the laterally wedged insoles. The ankle-foot orthosis was effective in reducing the knee adduction moment. The decreases in this parameter seem to be achieved by changing the knee joint alignment and thereby reducing the knee lever arm in the frontal plane. This study presents a novel approach for reducing the load in the medial knee compartment, which could be developed as a new treatment option for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  19. Associations between serum ghrelin and knee symptoms, joint structures and cartilage or bone biomarkers in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Wang, K; Xu, J; Ruan, G; Zhu, Q; Cai, J; Ren, J; Zheng, S; Zhu, Z; Otahal, P; Ding, C

    2017-09-01

    The roles of ghrelin in knee osteoarthritis (OA) are unclear. This study aimed to examine cross-sectional associations of ghrelin with knee symptoms, joint structures and cartilage or bone biomarkers in patients with knee OA. This study included 146 patients with symptomatic knee OA. Serum levels of ghrelin and cartilage or bone biomarkers including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), cross linked C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTXI), cross linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTXI), N-terminal procollagen III propeptide (PIIINP), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, 10, 13 were measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Knee symptoms were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) volume, IPFP signal intensity alternation, cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and effusion-synovitis were assessed using the (MRI). Osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) were assessed using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International atlas. After adjustment for potential confounders, ghrelin quartiles were positively associated with knee symptoms including pain, stiffness, dysfunction and total score (quartile 4 vs 1: β 24.19, 95% CI 8.13-40.25). Ghrelin quartiles were also significantly associated with increased IPFP signal intensity alteration (quartile 4 vs 1: OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.55-8.25) and NTXI, PIIINP, MMP3 and MMP13. Ghrelin was not significantly associated with other joint structures and biomarkers. Serum levels of ghrelin were significantly associated with increased knee symptoms, IPFP signal intensity alteration and serum levels of MMP3, MMP13, NTXI and PIIINP, suggesting that ghrelin may have a role to play in knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An adult case of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis treated with splint therapy and the subsequent orthodontic occlusal reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanefi Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report treatment for a 19-year-old female patient with severe osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The patient had severe open bite with a Class II molar relationship. She had limited mouth opening and pain. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that she had anterior disc displacement without reduction. By splint therapy, limited mouth opening and pain was eliminated, but an anterior open bite developed after the treatment. By orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship.

  1. Influence of weight loss on the clinical manifestations of osteoarthritis of the knee-joints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Vladimirovna Solov'eva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity consistently associated with the development of a number of chronic diseases, leading to a decrease in quality of life, disability and death. The article examines the connection between obesity and disease of the musculoskeletal system, describes the mechanisms by means of which obesity leads to the development of osteoarthritis. It is evident that reduction of body mass can slow the progression of osteoporosis. The own experience of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of obesity with the use of orlistat in 50 obese patients with osteoarthritis of the knee II–III stage is presented. Treatment has resulted in a decrease in body weight, waist circumference, accompanied by a decrease in symptoms osteoarthritis among all the patients. Our results showed that the addition of orlistat to standard osteoarthritis scheme leads to significant reduction in weight and reduction of clinical manifestations of osteoarthritis. According to the above, the drugs that have impact on weight loss, should be included in the treatment regimen of patients with osteoarthritis and obesity.

  2. The association between knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control and moderate knee osteoarthritis radiographic and pain severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, J L; Deluzio, K J; Dunbar, M J; Caldwell, G E; Hubley-Kozey, C L

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between biomechanical and neuromuscular factors of clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) with radiographic severity and pain severity separately. Three-dimensional gait analysis and electromyography were performed on a group of 40 participants with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate medial knee OA. Associations between radiographic severity, defined using a visual analog radiographic score, and pain severity, defined with the pain subscale of the WOMAC osteoarthritis index, with knee joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography patterns of periarticular knee muscles, BMI and gait speed were determined with correlation analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses of radiographic and pain severity were also explored. Statistically significant correlations between radiographic severity and the overall magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance (r²=21.4%, P=0.003) and the magnitude of the knee flexion angle during the gait cycle (r²=11.4%, P=0.03) were found. Significant correlations between pain and gait speed (r²=28.2%, Pjoint biomechanical variables are associated with structural knee OA severity measured from radiographs in clinically diagnosed mild to moderate levels of disease, but that pain severity is only reflected in gait speed and neuromuscular activation patterns. A combination of the knee adduction moment and BMI better explained structural knee OA severity than any individual factor alone. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hand joint space narrowing and osteophytes are associated with magnetic resonance imaging-defined knee cartilage thickness and radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Ida K; Cotofana, Sebastian; Englund, Martin; Kvien, Tore K; Dreher, Donatus; Nevitt, Michael; Lane, Nancy E; Eckstein, Felix

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether features of radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA) are associated with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined knee cartilage thickness, radiographic knee OA, and 1-year structural progression. A total of 765 participants in Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI; 455 women, mean age 62.5 yrs, SD 9.4) obtained hand radiographs (at baseline), knee radiographs (baseline and Year 1), and knee MRI (baseline and Year 1). Hand radiographs were scored for presence of osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Knee radiographs were scored according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) scale. Cartilage thickness in the medial and lateral femorotibial compartments was measured quantitatively from coronal FLASHwe images. We examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between features of hand OA (total osteophyte and JSN scores) and knee cartilage thickness, 1-year knee cartilage thinning (above smallest detectable change), presence of knee OA (KL grade ≥ 3), and progression of knee OA (KL change ≥ 1) by linear and logistic regression. Both hand OA features were included in a multivariate model (if p ≤ 0.25) adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Hand JSN was associated with reduced knee cartilage thickness (ß = -0.02, 95% CI -0.03, -0.01) in the medial femorotibial compartment, while hand osteophytes were associated with the presence of radiographic knee OA (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.18; multivariate models) with both hand OA features as independent variables adjusted for age, sex, and BMI). Radiographic features of hand OA were not associated with 1-year cartilage thinning or radiographic knee OA progression. Our results support a systemic OA susceptibility and possibly different mechanisms for osteophyte formation and cartilage thinning.

  4. The effect of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise on knee-joint load in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Clausen, B; Søndergaard, J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a NEuro-Muscular EXercise (NEMEX) therapy program compared with instructions in optimized analgesics and anti-inflammatory drug use (PHARMA), on measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that knee joint...... loading during walking would be reduced by NEMEX and potentially increased by PHARMA. DESIGN: Single-blind, RCT comparing NEMEX therapy twice a week with PHARMA. Participants with mild-to-moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments...

  5. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    , compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. METHOD/DESIGN: One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical...... during walking (the Knee Index, a composite score of the first external peak total reaction moment on the knee joint from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in the external peak knee-adduction moment and impulse and functional...

  6. FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS: PERCUTANEOUS SURGERY, CHOICE OF A SURGICAL PROCEDURE, CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux rigidus is observed in approximately 2.5% of the adult population. Until now neither a unified classification of hallux rigidus appears to exist nor any clear principles to choose the surgical method. The variety of clinical and radiological signs explains the difficulties in establishing a comprehensive classification system and in selection of the criteria for surgical procedure. There are few published reports about hallux rigidus percutaneous surgical treatment. Existing papers are dedicated to a limited number of percutaneous techniques.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous techniques for surgical treatment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis; to specify factors determining the choice of procedure; to develop a grading system of the hallux rigidus severity which will help in selection of surgery. Materials and methods. Based on 156 surgeries (107 patients the author demonstrated the possibilities of percutaneous techniques in the surgical treatment of hallux rigidus of different stages as well as provided a brief description of used surgical techniques.Results. The mean age of patients was 48.8 years (ranged from 18 to 73. The mean follow-up was 7 months (ranged from 3 to 54. At the specified time the treatment outcomes of 103 patients (150 feet were analyzed. Mean hospital stay was 0.78 days (ranged from 0 to 1. No infectious or wound-healing problems were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 89 surgical treatment, qualified satisfaction was reported with patients in respect of outcomes of 57 surgeries. Four unsatisfactory outcomes were observed. The role of the relatively long first metatarsal in the development of hallux rigidus was confirmed. Conclusion. Percutaneous techniques provide successful treatment for all stages of hallux rigidus. The choice of a specific surgical technique may be challenging and requires

  7. Prevalence of malformations of the hip joint and their relationship to sex, groin pain, and risk of osteoarthritis: a population-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2010-01-01

    ratio, 2.2). Acetabular dysplasia and the subject's sex were not found to be significant risk factors for the development of hip osteoarthritis (p = 0.053 and p = 0.063, respectively). The prevalence of hip osteoarthritis was 9.5% in men and 11.2% in women. The prevalence of concomitant malformations...... of Østerbro, Copenhagen, Denmark. The inclusion criteria for this study were met by 1332 men and 2288 women. On the basis of radiographic criteria, the hips were categorized as being without malformations or as having an abnormality consisting of a deep acetabular socket, a pistol grip deformity......, or a combination of a deep acetabular socket and a pistol grip deformity. Hip osteoarthritis was defined radiographically as a minimum joint-space width of 0.13). A deep acetabular socket was a significant risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (risk ratio, 2.4), as was a pistol grip deformity (risk...

  8. The Influence of Radiographic Severity on the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Joint Loading in Obese Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Aaboe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between knee muscle strength and the external knee adduction moment during walking in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and whether disease severity influences this relationship. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 136 elderly obese (BMI>30 adults with predominant medial knee osteoarthritis. Muscle strength, standing radiographic severity as measured by the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, and the peak external knee adduction moment were measured at self-selected walking speed. Results. According to radiographic severity, patients were classified as “less severe” (KL 1-2, N=73 or “severe” (KL 3-4, N=63. A significant positive association was demonstrated between the peak knee adduction moment and hamstring muscle strength in the whole cohort (P=.047. However, disease severity did not influence the relationship between muscle strength and dynamic medial knee joint loading. Severe patients had higher peak knee adduction moment and more varus malalignment (P<.001. Conclusion. Higher hamstring muscle strength relates to higher estimates of dynamic knee joint loading in the medial compartment. No such relationship existed for quadriceps muscle strength. Although cross sectional, the results suggest that hamstrings function should receive increased attention in future studies and treatments that aim at halting disease progression.

  9. Associations between socioeconomic status and primary total knee joint replacements performed for osteoarthritis across Australia 2003-10: data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sharon L; Lane, Stephen E; Lorimer, Michelle; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Wluka, Anita E; Page, Richard S; Osborne, Richard H; Pasco, Julie A; Sanders, Kerrie M; Cashman, Kara; Ebeling, Peter R; Graves, Stephen E

    2014-10-28

    Relatively little is known about the social distribution of total knee joint replacement (TKR) uptake in Australia. We examine associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and TKR performed for diagnosed osteoarthritis 2003-10 for all Australian males and females aged ≥ 30 yr. Data of primary TKR (n=213,018, 57.4% female) were ascertained from a comprehensive national joint replacement registry. Residential addresses were matched to Australian Census data to identify area-level social disadvantage, and categorised into deciles. Estimated TKR rates were calculated. Poisson regression was used to model the relative risk (RR) of age-adjusted TKR per 1,000py, stratified by sex and SES. A negative relationship was observed between TKR rates and SES deciles. Females had a greater rate of TKR than males. Surgery utilisation was greatest for all adults aged 70-79 yr. In that age group differences in estimated TKR per 1,000py between deciles were greater for 2010 than 2003 (females: 2010 RR 4.32 and 2003 RR 3.67; males: 2010 RR 2.04 and 2003 RR 1.78). Identifying factors associated with TKR utilisation and SES may enhance resource planning and promote surgery utilisation for end-stage osteoarthritis.

  10. Association of knee confidence with pain, knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skou, Søren T; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-05-01

    To investigate associations between self-reported knee confidence and pain, self-reported knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 100 participants with symptomatic and radiographic medial tibiofemoral compartment osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment recruited for a randomized controlled trial. The extent of knee confidence, assessed using a 5-point Likert scale item from the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, was set as the dependent variable in univariable and multivariable ordinal regression, with pain during walking, self-reported knee instability, quadriceps strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking as independent variables. One percent of the participants were not troubled with lack of knee confidence, 17% were mildly troubled, 50% were moderately troubled, 26% were severely troubled, and 6% were extremely troubled. Significant associations were found between worse knee confidence and higher pain intensity, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion. The multivariable model consisting of the same variables significantly accounted for 24% of the variance in knee confidence (P knee confidence is associated with higher pain, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps muscle strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. Since previous research has shown that worse knee confidence is predictive of functional decline in knee OA, addressing lack of knee confidence by treating these modifiable impairments could represent a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Biomechanical Effects of Prefabricated Foot Orthoses and Rocker‐Sole Footwear in Individuals With First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auhl, Maria; Tan, Jade M.; Levinger, Pazit; Roddy, Edward; Munteanu, Shannon E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of prefabricated foot orthoses and rocker‐sole footwear on spatiotemporal parameters, hip and knee kinematics, and plantar pressures in people with first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A total of 102 people with first MTP joint OA were randomly allocated to receive prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker‐sole footwear. The immediate biomechanical effects of the interventions (compared to usual footwear) were examined using a wearable sensor motion analysis system and an in‐shoe plantar pressure measurement system. Results Spatiotemporal/kinematic and plantar pressure data were available from 88 and 87 participants, respectively. The orthoses had minimal effect on spatiotemporal or kinematic parameters, while the rocker‐sole footwear resulted in reduced cadence, percentage of the gait cycle spent in stance phase, and sagittal plane hip range of motion. The orthoses increased peak pressure under the midfoot and lesser toes. Both interventions significantly reduced peak pressure under the first MTP joint, and the rocker‐sole shoes also reduced peak pressure under the second through fifth MTP joints and heel. When the effects of the orthoses and rocker‐sole shoes were directly compared, there was no difference in peak pressure under the hallux, first MTP joint, or heel; however, the rocker‐sole shoes exhibited lower peak pressure under the lesser toes, second through fifth MTP joints, and midfoot. Conclusion Prefabricated foot orthoses and rocker‐sole footwear are effective at reducing peak pressure under the first MTP joint in people with first MTP joint OA, but achieve this through different mechanisms. Further research is required to determine whether these biomechanical changes result in improvements in symptoms. PMID:26640157

  12. NEW DIRECTION IN LOCAL THERAPY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Tsvetkova,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: to examine the comparative efficacy and tolerability of the Nanoplast forte therapeutic patch as compared with placebo patch with patients with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee joint (KJ in conditions of a prospective randomized multi-centered study approved by the local ethics committee.Materials and methods.120 patients with OA of the KJ of the I to III radiographic stages according to Kellgren and Lаwrence take part in the study, 2 groups with 60 patients each compared in major clinical parameters. The primary efficacy criterion was relieving of pain in the target KJ (WOMAC index, section A by ≥ 50 % as compared to the initial level. Assessment of B and C section of the WOMAC index in dynamics was performed in the course of the study. Visual and analogous scale (in mm was used for general assessment separately by the patient and the doctor; daily assessment of pain intensity was performed by the patient. The total efficiency of the Nanoplast forte patch was studied on the 14th day separately by the doctor and the patient in accordance with the following grades: significant improvement; improvement; no effect; aggravation. The need for intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs was determined during the study as follows: daily dose, dose reduction or elimination of NSAIDs was determined due to the decrease in the intensity of pain. The patch was applied onto the target joint one a day at 12 o’clock (from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.. Tolerability of the Nanoplast forte patch and the placebo patch was assessed in accordance with the frequency and manifestation of local and / or systemic undesired effects (from 1 to 3 points. The frequency of achievement of 50 % of pain decreasing (WOMAC index, section A was evidently higher in the group of active Nanoplast forte patch than in the placebo group (38.2 as compared to 16.7 %, respectively; p = 0.013; Fisher exact criterion. Intensity of pain during walking was

  13. NEW DIRECTION IN LOCAL THERAPY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Tsvetkova,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: to examine the comparative efficacy and tolerability of the Nanoplast forte therapeutic patch as compared with placebo patch with patients with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee joint (KJ in conditions of a prospective randomized multi-centered study approved by the local ethics committee.Materials and methods.120 patients with OA of the KJ of the I to III radiographic stages according to Kellgren and Lаwrence take part in the study, 2 groups with 60 patients each compared in major clinical parameters. The primary efficacy criterion was relieving of pain in the target KJ (WOMAC index, section A by ≥ 50 % as compared to the initial level. Assessment of B and C section of the WOMAC index in dynamics was performed in the course of the study. Visual and analogous scale (in mm was used for general assessment separately by the patient and the doctor; daily assessment of pain intensity was performed by the patient. The total efficiency of the Nanoplast forte patch was studied on the 14th day separately by the doctor and the patient in accordance with the following grades: significant improvement; improvement; no effect; aggravation. The need for intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs was determined during the study as follows: daily dose, dose reduction or elimination of NSAIDs was determined due to the decrease in the intensity of pain. The patch was applied onto the target joint one a day at 12 o’clock (from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.. Tolerability of the Nanoplast forte patch and the placebo patch was assessed in accordance with the frequency and manifestation of local and / or systemic undesired effects (from 1 to 3 points. The frequency of achievement of 50 % of pain decreasing (WOMAC index, section A was evidently higher in the group of active Nanoplast forte patch than in the placebo group (38.2 as compared to 16.7 %, respectively; p = 0.013; Fisher exact criterion. Intensity of pain during walking was

  14. Diagnostic Value of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in Synovial Fluid for Identifying Osteoarthritis in the Distal Interphalangeal Joint in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zrimšek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to examine the diagnostic potential of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 for identifying osteoarthritis in the horse. Horses were divided into two groups - a positive group consisting of 28 horses with cartilage damage in the distal interphalangeal joint and a negative group of 17 control horses. Clinical examination of the horses included evaluation of lameness, flexion test, diagnostic nerve blocks, X-ray and arthroscopy. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were detected in synovial fluid using gelatin zymography. Monomers of MMP-2 and MMP-9 appeared not to be specific for osteoarthritis since they also occurred in control samples. In contrast, detection of active forms of MMPs was found to be more effective than radiological examination in identifying horses with osteoarthritis, on the grounds of higher sensitivity. Active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were observed with 88.24% and 82.35% specificity respectively, indicating the high accuracy in correctly identifying horses without osteoarthritis. Thus, as an addition to clinical examination, detection of MMPs could improve the diagnosis of osteoarthritis. Detection of active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was evaluated as an additional diagnostic tool in diagnosing osteoarthritis, especially in the case of a negative X-ray result. The proportions of animals with confirmed osteoarthritis, which tested positive, were found to be 81.82% and 76.92%, respectively. The results of this study confirm that active forms of MMP occur in synovial fluid of osteoarthritic joints more frequently than in synovial fluid from normal joints of the horse. Detection of active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is shown to have an important diagnostic potential.

  15. Knee joint motion and muscle activation patterns are altered during gait in individuals with moderate hip osteoarthritis compared to asymptomatic cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Derek; Moreside, Janice; Wong, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    Knee replacements are common after hip replacement for end stage osteoarthritis. Whether abnormal knee mechanics exist in moderate hip osteoarthritis remains undetermined and has implications for understanding early osteoarthritis joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether three-dimensional (3D) knee motion and muscle activation patterns in individuals with moderate hip osteoarthritis differ from an asymptomatic cohort and whether these features differ between contra- and ipsilateral knees. 3D motions and medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstring surface electromyography were recorded on 20 asymptomatic individuals and 20 individuals with moderate hip osteoarthritis during treadmill walking, using standardized collection and processing procedures. Principal component analysis was used to derive electromyographic amplitude and temporal waveform features. 3D stance-phase range of motion was calculated. A 2-factor repeated analysis of variance determined significant within-group leg and muscle differences. Student's t-tests identified between group differences, with Bonferroni corrections where applicable (α=0.05). Lower sagittal plane motion between early and mid/late stance (5°, P=0.004, effect size: 0.96) and greater mid-stance quadriceps activity was found in the osteoarthritis group (P=0.01). Compared to the ipsilateral knee, a borderline significant increase in mid-stance hamstring activity was found in the contra-lateral knee of the hip osteoarthritis group (P=0.018). Bilateral knee mechanics were altered, suggesting potentially increased loads and knee muscle fatigue. There was no indication that one knee is more susceptible to osteoarthritis than the other, thus clinicians should include bilateral knee analysis when treating patients with hip osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Randomised sham-controlled double-blind multicentre clinical trial to ascertain the effect of percutaneous radiofrequency treatment for lumbar facet joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, C W J; Stronks, D L; Groeneweg, J G; Huygen, F J P M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a percutaneous radiofrequency heat lesion at the medial branch of the primary dorsal ramus with a sham procedure, for the treatment of lumbar facet joint pain. A randomised sham-controlled double blind multicentre trial was carried out at the multidisciplinary pain centres of two hospitals. A total of 60 patients aged > 18 years with a history and physical examination suggestive of facet joint pain and a decrease of ≥ 2 on a numerical rating scale (NRS 0 to 10) after a diagnostic facet joint test block were included. In the treatment group, a percutaneous radiofrequency heat lesion (80 o C during 60 seconds per level) was applied to the medial branch of the primary dorsal ramus. In the sham group, the same procedure was undertaken without for the radiofrequency lesion. Both groups also received a graded activity physiotherapy programme. The primary outcome measure was decrease in pain. A secondary outcome measure was the Global Perceived Effect scale (GPE). There was a statistically significant effect on the level of pain in the factor Period (T0-T1). However, there was no statistically significant difference with the passage of time between the groups (Group × Period) or in the factor Group. In the crossover group, 11 of 19 patients had a decrease in NRS of ≥ 2 at one month crossover (p = 0.65). There was no statistically significant difference in satisfaction with the passage of time between the groups (Group × Period). The independent factors Group and Period also showed no statistically significant difference. There was no statistically significant Group × Period effect for recovery, neither an effect of Group or of Period. The null hypothesis of no difference in the decrease in pain and in GPE between the treatment and sham groups cannot be rejected. Post hoc analysis revealed that the age of the patients and the severity of the initial pain significantly predicted a positive outcome. Cite this article

  17. Stem cell application for osteoarthritis in the knee joint: A minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uth, Kristin; Trifonov, Dimitar

    2014-11-26

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, indolent disease that will affect an ever increasing number of patients, especially the elderly and the obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage substance inside the knee which leads to pain, stiffness and tenderness. By some estimations in 2030, only in the United States, this medical condition will burden 67 million people. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Moreover, in severe cases of knee osteoarthritis total knee replacement may be required. Total knee replacements come together with high effort and costs and are not always successful. The aim of this review is to outline the latest advances in stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis as well as highlight some of the advantages of stem cell therapy over traditional approaches aimed at restoration of cartilage function in the knee. In addition to the latest advances in the field, challenges associated with stem cell therapy regarding knee cartilage regeneration and chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo are also outlined and analyzed. Furthermore, based on their critical assessment of the present academic literature the authors of this review share their vision about the future of stem cell applications in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Stem cell application for osteoarthritis in the knee joint: A minireview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristin; Uth; Dimitar; Trifonov

    2014-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, indolent disease that will affect an ever increasing number of patients, especially the elderly and the obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage substance inside the knee which leads to pain, stiffness and tenderness. By some estimations in 2030, only in the United States, this medical condition will burden 67 million people. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Moreover, in severe cases of knee osteoarthritis total knee replacement may be required. Total knee replacements come together with high effort and costs and are not always successful. The aim of this review is to outline the latest advances in stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis as well as highlight some of the advantages of stem cell therapy over traditional approaches aimed at restoration of cartilage function in the knee. In addition to the latest advances in the field, challenges associated with stem cell therapy regarding knee cartilage regeneration and chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo are also outlined and analyzed. Furthermore, based on their critical assessment of the present academic literature the authors of this review share their vision about the future of stem cell applications in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, Pknee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System: an implantable joint-unloading prosthesis for treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford AG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anton G Clifford,1 Stefan M Gabriel,1 Mary O’Connell,1 David Lowe,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block31Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in adults. Therapies intended to unload the medial knee compartment have yielded unsatisfactory results due to low patient compliance with conservative treatments and high complication rates with surgical options. There is no widely available joint-unloading treatment for medial knee OA that offers clinically important symptom alleviation, low complication risk, and high patient acceptance. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System (Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA is a first-of-its-kind, implantable, extra-articular, extra-capsular prosthesis intended to alleviate knee OA-related symptoms by reducing medial knee compartment loading while overcoming the limitations of traditional joint-unloading therapies. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated excellent prosthesis durability, substantial reductions in medial compartment and total joint loads, and clinically important improvements in OA-related pain and function. The purpose of this report is to describe the KineSpring System, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The KineSpring System has potential to bridge the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and irreversible surgical interventions for medial compartment knee OA.Keywords: KineSpring, knee, medial, osteoarthritis, prosthesis

  1. Weight loss is effective for symptomatic relief in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis independently of joint damage severity assessed by high-field MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, H.; Boesen, M.; Lohmander, L. S.

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing prevalence of older and obese citizens, the problems of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) will escalate. Weight loss is recommended for obese KOA patients and in a majority of cases this leads to symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that pre-treatment structural status of the knee joint......, assessed by radiographs, 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and knee-joint alignment, may influence the symptomatic changes following a significant weight reduction....

  2. Tibial coverage, meniscus position, size and damage in knees discordant for joint space narrowing – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, K.; Guermazi, A.; Wirth, W.; Benichou, O.; Kwoh, C.K.; Hunter, D.J.; Englund, M.; Resch, H.; Eckstein, F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction Meniscal extrusion is thought to be associated with less meniscus coverage of the tibial surface, but the association of radiographic disease stage with quantitative measures of tibial plateau coverage is unknown. We therefore compared quantitative and semi-quantitative measures of meniscus position and morphology in individuals with bilateral painful knees discordant on medial joint space narrowing (mJSN). Methods A sample of 60 participants from the first half (2,678 cases) of the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort fulfilled the inclusion criteria: bilateral frequent pain, Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) mJSN grades 1–3 in one, no-JSN in the contra-lateral (CL), and no lateral JSN in either knee (43 unilateral mJSN1; 17 mJSN2/3; 22 men, 38 women, body mass index (BMI) 31.3 ± 3.9 kg/m2). Segmentation and three-dimensional quantitative analysis of the tibial plateau and meniscus, and semi-quantitative evaluation of meniscus damage (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) osteoarthritis knee score – MOAKS) was performed using coronal 3T MR images (MPR DESSwe and intermediate-weighted turbo spin echo (IW-TSE) images). CL knees were compared using paired t-tests (between-knee, within-person design). Results Medial tibial plateau coverage was 36 ± 9% in mJSN1 vs 45 ± 8% in CL no-JSN knees, and was 31 ± 9% in mJSN2/3 vs 46 ± 6% in no-JSN knees (both P meniscus extrusion and damage (MOAKS), but no significant difference in meniscus volume. No significant differences in lateral tibial coverage, lateral meniscus morphology or position were observed. Conclusions Knees with medial JSN showed substantially less medial tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus. We suggest that the less meniscal coverage, i.e., less mechanical protection may be a reason for greater rates of cartilage loss observed in JSN knees. PMID:23220556

  3. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Wing P.; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yue-Cune; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wing P. [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Huang, Guo-Shu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Hsu, Shu-Mei [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Department of Public Health, Taipei (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Tamkang University, Department of Mathematics, Taipei County (China); Ho, Wei-Pin [Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taipei (China)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  5. EFFECTS OF KINESIOTAPING ALONG WITH QUADRICEPS STRENGTHENING EXERCISES ON PAIN, JOINT RANGE OF MOTION AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES OF KNEE IN SUBJECTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Harshitha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patello femoral Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative disease in older age group, causing pain, physical disability, and decreased quality of life.As many treatment options available, kinesiotaping is an efficacious treatment for management of pain & disability in patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that kinesiotaping as well as quadriceps strengthening significantly yields functional benefits. But there is lack of evidence revealing combined effectiveness & effects of kinesiotaping along with quadriceps strengthening in subjects with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Methods: 30 subjects with symptoms of patellofemoral osteoarthritis fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned into 2 groups of 15 in each group. Taping along with quadriceps strengthening program is compared to the quadriceps strengthening program alone. Pain were measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, knee ROM were measured by Goniometer, Functional status were measured by Western Ontario McMaster Universities index (WOMAC, score. Measurements were taken pre & post intervention. Results: The results indicated that kinesiotaping along with quadriceps strengthening exercises showed there was statistically significant improvement in pain (<0.05, knee ROM (<0.05 and functional activities (<0.05 after 6 weeks compared to quadriceps strengthening alone. Conclusion: Subjects with kinesiotaping along with quadriceps strengthening showed significant improvement in reducing pain, in improving ROM & functional activities at the end of 6th week treatment when compared to subjects with patellofemoral osteoarthritis underwent quadriceps strengthening exercises alone.

  6. Faceted Search

    CERN Document Server

    Tunkelang, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We live in an information age that requires us, more than ever, to represent, access, and use information. Over the last several decades, we have developed a modern science and technology for information retrieval, relentlessly pursuing the vision of a "memex" that Vannevar Bush proposed in his seminal article, "As We May Think." Faceted search plays a key role in this program. Faceted search addresses weaknesses of conventional search approaches and has emerged as a foundation for interactive information retrieval. User studies demonstrate that faceted search provides more

  7. Knee joint laxity does not moderate the relationship between quadriceps strength and physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altubasi, Ibrahim M

    2018-06-07

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common and a disabling musculoskeletal disorder. Patients with knee osteoarthritis have activity limitations which are linked to the strength of the quadriceps muscle. Previous research reported that the relationship between quadriceps muscle strength and physical function is moderated by the level of knee joint frontal plane laxity. The purpose of the current study is to reexamine the moderation effect of the knee joint laxity as measured by stress radiographs on the relationship between quadriceps muscle strength and physical function. One-hundred and sixty osteoarthritis patients participated in this cross-sectional study. Isometric quadriceps muscle strength was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Self-rated and performance-based physical function were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and Get Up and Go test, respectively. Stress radiographs which were taken while applying varus and valgus loads to knee using the TELOS device. Knee joint laxity was determined by measuring the distance between joint surfaces on the medial and lateral sides. Hierarchical multiple regression models were constructed to study the moderation effect of laxity on the strength function relationship. Two regression models were constructed for self-rated and performance-based function. After controlling for demographics, strength contributed significantly in the models. The addition of laxity and laxity-strength interaction did not add significant contributions in the regression models. Frontal plane knee joint laxity measured by stress radiographs does not moderate the relationship between quadriceps muscle strength and physical function in patients with osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Degenerative osteoarthritis of atlanto-odontoid joint: CT findings and clinical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aide; Wang Song; Mao Yunhua

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the CT appearances and clinical aspects of the degeneration at atlanto-odontoid(A-O) joint. Methods: Thin section axial CT scans, of AO joints were studied in 317 consecutive patients who underwent brain or cervical spine CT examinations. The images were viewed using double-blind method. Observation included: osteophytosis, changes of joint space and transverse ligament, and the clinical symptoms as well. Results: CT findings of AO joint degeneration included: formation of osteophyte, narrowing of joint space, transverse ligament calcification, and joint vacuum phenomenon. Among individuals above 40 years of age, the incidence of degeneration at AO joint went up gradually (P<0.01). Conclusion: Degeneration of AO joint was not uncommon among aged people, CT could better demonstrate the pathological changes

  9. Anxiety, splint treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint and dental students – a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Badel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of splint treatment for therapy of osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint, and to compare the level of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory,STAI and clinical characteristics between 16 patients and 20 asymptomatic dental school students. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used for all subjects. Dental students showed a statistically signiicant higher capacity of mouth opening (p<0.05, and lower level of anxiety (p<0.05 for STAI 1, and p<0.001 for STAI 2 than patients. Patients who had suffered chronic pain before splint treatment had a higher value of anxiety by STAI 1 test (p<0.05.

  10. Low bone mineral density is associated with reduced hip joint space width in women: results from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Jensen, Trine W; Bach-Mortensen, Pernille

    2007-01-01

    inconclusive. The present cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between reduced bone mineral density (BMD), as a surrogate parameter of endogenous estrogen status assessed by digital x-ray radiogrammetry, and reduced minimum hip joint space width (JSW). DESIGN: Standardized hand radiographs...... of the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study cohort of 3,913 adults (1,470 male/2,443 female) with a mean age of 60 years (range, 18-92) were analyzed using X-Posure digital software, version 2.0 (Sectra-Pronosco). The system is operator independent. From 1,200 individual measurements per radiograph, mean BMD...... was calculated. Minimum hip JSW was assessed on standardized pelvic radiographs. RESULTS: Digital x-ray radiogrammetry BMD decreased in both men and women after the age of 45 years, progressively more so in women. Although minimum hip JSW in men remained relatively unaltered throughout life, a marked decline...

  11. Expression and significance of MMP3 in synovium of knee joint at different stage in osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Huang, Jie-Feng; Du, Wen-Xi; Tong, Pei-Jian

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the expression and significance of MMP-3 in synovium of knee joint at different stage in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Knee synovial tissue were collected in 90 OA patients (the OA group). Patients in the OA group was divided into 3 subgroups: grade I subgroup (n=30), grade II subgroup (n=30), grade III; subgroup (n=30). Thirty patients served as control group. Immunohistochemical assay was used to detect the expression of MMP-3 protein in the knee synovial tissue. MMP-3 protein was detected in all knee synovial tissue. The expression of MMP-3 protein in the OA group was significantly higher that in the normal synovium (Posteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of an Oral Joint Supplement When Compared to Carprofen in the Management of Hip Osteoarthritis in Working Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, João Carlos; Santos, Ana Margarida; Jorge, Patrícia Isabel

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an oral joint supplement in working dogs with hip osteoarthritis compared with a positive control group (CG). Fifteen animals were divided in treatment group (TG, n = 10) and CG (n = 5). To TG a commercially available joint supplement, containing glucosamine HCl, chondroitin sulphate, and hyaluronic acid was given for 40 days and a 70-day course of a placebo, to be administered as if it was carprofen. The CG received carprofen for 70 days, and a placebo to be administered as the joint supplement. Response to treatment, measured by the canine brief pain inventory (CBPI) and the Hudson visual analog scale, was evaluated before treatment (T0), after 15 days (T1) and 1 (T2), 2 (T3), 3 (T4), 4 (T5), and 5 (T6) months. With CBPI, no differences were found in pain interference score and pain severity score between TG and CG throughout or when comparing results within groups. Individual results were considered successful in a maximal of three dogs of the TG by T3 (30%) and 1 in CG (25%). With Hudson visual analog scale, improvements where registered with individual results, for 40%-50% of the animals in TG and 60%-80% of cases in CG. The oral joint supplement and carprofen produced some improvements in individual scores but where unable to do so when overall results were considered. Each of these options may not be able, by itself, to fully address the demands of a working dog with joint disease and related pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A systematic review of the relationship between subchondral bone features, pain and structural pathology in peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Andrew J; Campbell, T Mark; Hopkinson, Devan; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Bowes, Mike A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-08-25

    Bone is an integral part of the osteoarthritis (OA) process. We conducted a systematic literature review in order to understand the relationship between non-conventional radiographic imaging of subchondral bone, pain, structural pathology and joint replacement in peripheral joint OA. A search of the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases was performed for original articles reporting association between non-conventional radiographic imaging-assessed subchondral bone pathologies and joint replacement, pain or structural progression in knee, hip, hand, ankle and foot OA. Each association was qualitatively characterised by a synthesis of the data from each analysis based upon study design, adequacy of covariate adjustment and quality scoring. In total 2456 abstracts were screened and 139 papers were included (70 cross-sectional, 71 longitudinal analyses; 116 knee, 15 hip, six hand, two ankle and involved 113 MRI, eight DXA, four CT, eight scintigraphic and eight 2D shape analyses). BMLs, osteophytes and bone shape were independently associated with structural progression or joint replacement. BMLs and bone shape were independently associated with longitudinal change in pain and incident frequent knee pain respectively. Subchondral bone features have independent associations with structural progression, pain and joint replacement in peripheral OA in the hip and hand but especially in the knee. For peripheral OA sites other than the knee, there are fewer associations and independent associations of bone pathologies with these important OA outcomes which may reflect fewer studies; for example the foot and ankle were poorly studied. Subchondral OA bone appears to be a relevant therapeutic target. PROSPERO registration number: CRD 42013005009.

  14. Chronic whiplash-associated disorder and traumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak. Analysis of cases with radioisotope cisternography, epidural blood patch, and cervical facet joint blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Takahara, Hiroshi; Kojo, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Hidenori; Moriyama, Eiji; Nishida, Ayumi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes RI cisternographic (RIC) examinations of whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) and results of their treatment with nerve block and epidural blood patch (EBP) conducted in authors' facilities. Subjects were 40 chronic (av. symptomatic period of 3.1 y) WAD patients (av. age 34 y) with traffic (28 cases), sports (7) and falling (5) causes with complication of suspicious cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. RIC was done 2.5-24 hr after injection of 37 MBq of 111 In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) in the medullary space through epidural puncturing needle. Positive finding of clear leak or early accumulation of RI in the bladder was seen in 21 cases and negative, in 19. Positive patients had significantly higher rates of headache, abnormal vision and fatigue than negative ones. EBP was conducted through X-ray to all positive patients and to negative ones with strongly suspicious leak complication (7 cases), which resulted in improvement of symptoms like headache and vision in the former, but no improvement in the latter cases. Repeated RIC of the patients with poor improvement in the former was suggested effective for judgment of repetition of EBP treatment. Cervical facet joint blocks were found effective in cases with posterior cervical pain. Symptoms in WAD accompanying headache should be differentially diagnosed whether it is derived from posttraumatic CSF leak or from pain due to cervical facet arthritis. (R.T.)

  15. A systematic review of recommendations and guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis: The chronic osteoarthritis management initiative of the U.S. bone and joint initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amanda E; Allen, Kelli D; Golightly, Yvonne M; Goode, Adam P; Jordan, Joanne M

    2014-06-01

    Although a number of osteoarthritis (OA) management guidelines exist, uptake has been suboptimal. Our aim was to review and critically evaluate existing OA management guidelines to better understand potential issues and barriers. A systematic review of the literature in MEDLINE published from January 1, 2000 to April 1, 2013 was performed and supplemented by bibliographic reviews, following PRISMA guidelines and a written protocol. Following initial title and abstract screening, 2 authors independently reviewed full-text articles; a third settled disagreements. Two independent reviewers extracted data into a standardized form. Two authors independently assessed guideline quality using the AGREE II instrument; three generated summary recommendations based on the extracted guideline data. Overall, 16 articles were included in the final review. There was broad agreement on recommendations by the various organizations. For non-pharmacologic modalities, education/self-management, exercise, weight loss if overweight, walking aids as indicated, and thermal modalities were widely recommended. For appropriate patients, joint replacement was recommended; arthroscopy with debridement was not recommended for symptomatic knee OA. Pharmacologic modalities most recommended included acetaminophen/paracetamol (first line) and NSAIDs (topical or oral, second line). Intra-articular corticosteroids were generally recommended for hip and knee OA. Controversy remains about the use of acupuncture, knee braces, heel wedges, intra-articular hyaluronans, and glucosamine/chondroitin. The relative agreement on many OA management recommendations across organizations indicates a problem with dissemination and implementation rather than a lack of quality guidelines. Future efforts should focus on optimizing implementation in primary care settings, where the majority of OA care occurs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pain from intra-articular NGF or joint injury in the rat requires contributions from peptidergic joint afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, Jeffrey V; Weisshaar, Christine L; Pall, Parul S; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-09-14

    Non-physiological stretch of the cervical facet joint's capsular ligament induces persistent behavioral hypersensitivity and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability via an intra-articular NGF-dependent mechanism. Although that ligament is innervated by nociceptors, it is unknown if a subpopulation is exclusively responsible for the behavioral and spinal neuronal responses to intra-articular NGF and/or facet joint injury. This study ablated joint afferents using the neurotoxin saporin targeted to neurons involved in either peptidergic ([Sar(9),Met (O2)(11)]-substance P-saporin (SSP-Sap)) or non-peptidergic (isolectin B4-saporin (IB4-Sap)) signaling to investigate the contributions of those neuronal populations to facet-mediated pain. SSP-Sap, but not IB4-Sap, injected into the bilateral C6/C7 facet joints 14 days prior to an intra- articular NGF injection prevents NGF-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in the forepaws. Similarly, only SSP- Sap prevents the increase in mechanical forepaw stimulation- induced firing of spinal neurons after intra-articular NGF. In addition, intra-articular SSP-Sap prevents both behavioral hypersensitivity and upregulation of NGF in the dorsal root ganglion after a facet joint distraction that normally induces pain. These findings collectively suggest that disruption of peptidergic signaling within the joint may be a potential treatment for facet pain, as well as other painful joint conditions associated with elevated NGF, such as osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ALPHA-CTX is associated with subchondral bone turnover and predicts progression of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Janet L; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Huffman, Kim M; He, Yi; Leeming, Diana J; McDaniel, Gary E; Karsdal, Morten A; Kraus, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate joint tissue remodeling, with urinary collagen biomarkers, uALPHA CTX and uCTXII, and their association with osteoarthritis (OA) severity, progression, and localized knee bone turnover. Methods Participants (N=149) with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA underwent fixed flexion knee radiography at baseline and 3 years, and late-phase bone scintigraphy of both knees at baseline, scored semi-quantitatively for osteophyte (OST) and joint space narrowing (JSN) severity and uptake intensity with scores summed across knees. Urinary concentrations of ALPHA CTX and CTXII were determined by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry of human OA knees was performed to localize the joint tissue origin of the biomarker epitopes. Results uALPHA CTX correlated strongly with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, and JSN and OST progression (risk ratio=13.2 and 3, respectively). uCTXII was strongly associated with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, with JSN and OST severity, and OA progression based on OST. uALPHA CTX localized primarily to high bone turnover areas in subchondral bone; CTXII localized to the bone-cartilage interface, the tidemark, and damaged articular cartilage. Conclusion Baseline uALPHA CTX, localized to high turnover areas of subchondral bone, was associated with dynamic bone turnover of knees signified by scintigraphy, and progression of both OST and JSN. uCTXII correlated with JSN and OST severity, and progression of OST. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of serological markers reflecting subchondral bone turnover. These collagen markers may be useful for non-invasive detection and quantification of active subchondral bone turnover and joint remodeling in knee OA. PMID:24909851

  18. The Influence of Oblique Angle Forced Exercise in Surgically Destabilized Stifle Joints Is Synergistic with Bone, but Antagonistic with Cartilage in an Ovine Model of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J. Hill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large animal models of osteoarthritis are a necessary testing ground for FDA approval of human medicine applications. Sheep models have advantages over other available large animals, but development and progression of osteoarthritis in sheep is exceedingly slow, which handicaps progress in development of potential treatments. We combined oblique angle forced exercise to increase stress on the stifle, with surgical destabilization to hasten the development of osteoarthritis in ewes. Methods for early detection of clinical signs included radiography, urine, and serum biomarker assays and gait analysis and ex vivo we used microcomputed tomography and macroscopic joint analysis. Our model was able to produce clinically detectable signs of osteoarthritis in a relatively short period (14 weeks. Changes in bone were highly correlated between microcomputed tomography and radiographic analysis and changes in cartilage correlated well between urinary glycosaminoglycan levels and serum aggrecanase analyses. Exercise improved the negative effects of destabilization in bone but exacerbated the negative effects of destabilization in cartilage. These observations suggest that we may need to consider treatments for bone and cartilage separately. These results represent an improved large animal model of osteoarthritis with rapid onset of disease and superior detection of bone and soft tissue changes.

  19. Clinical significance of subchondral cortical signal intensities in osteoarthritis of knee joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Eijiro; Torisu, Takehiko; Nakamura, Taro; Masumi, Shogo [Oita Medical Univ., Hazama (Japan); Tomari, Kazuhide; Asao, Tunenori; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abnormal intensity in medial femoral condyle on MR imaging in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Eighty knees of fifty-eight patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were underwent plain radiography and MR imaging. According to the extension of the abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted images in medial femoral chondyle, all cases were classified into four types (no exist: 30.0%, small: 30.0%, middle: 30.0%, large: 10.0%). The extension of the abnormal low intensity was closely related to radiographic stage and femoral tibial angle. After radiological examination, in thirteen knees, the biopsy of the abnormal low intensity area on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging was performed at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Pathological examination revealed that the causative factor of abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging in the medial femoral condyle was trabecular hypertrophy. Our results suggest that the abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging reflects the loading force. (author)

  20. Clinical significance of subchondral cortical signal intensities in osteoarthritis of knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Eijiro; Torisu, Takehiko; Nakamura, Taro; Masumi, Shogo; Tomari, Kazuhide; Asao, Tunenori; Takagi, Kazuhiro.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abnormal intensity in medial femoral condyle on MR imaging in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Eighty knees of fifty-eight patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were underwent plain radiography and MR imaging. According to the extension of the abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted images in medial femoral chondyle, all cases were classified into four types (no exist: 30.0%, small: 30.0%, middle: 30.0%, large: 10.0%). The extension of the abnormal low intensity was closely related to radiographic stage and femoral tibial angle. After radiological examination, in thirteen knees, the biopsy of the abnormal low intensity area on T 1 weighted MR imaging was performed at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Pathological examination revealed that the causative factor of abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted MR imaging in the medial femoral condyle was trabecular hypertrophy. Our results suggest that the abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted MR imaging reflects the loading force. (author)

  1. Low-level laser therapy of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Levon V.

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the given research is the comparison of efficiency of conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and knee joints and therapy with additional application of low level laser therapy (LLLT) under dynamic control of clinical picture, rheovasographic, electromyographic examinations, and parameters of peroxide lipid oxidation. The investigation was made on 143 patients with OA of hip and knee joints. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: basic group included 91 patients, receiving conventional therapy with a course of LLLT, control group included 52 patients, receiving conventional treatment only. Transcutaneous ((lambda) equals 890 nm, output peak power 5 W, frequency 80 - 3000 Hz) and intravenous ((lambda) equals 633 nm, output 2 mW in the vein) laser irradiation were used for LLLT. Studied showed, that clinical efficiency of LLLT in the complex with conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes at the patients with OA is connected with attenuation of pain syndrome, normalization of parameters of myofascial syndrome, normalization of the vascular tension and parameters of rheographic curves, as well as with activation of antioxidant protection system.

  2. The effect of age and knee osteoarthritis on muscle activation patterns and knee joint biomechanics during dual belt treadmill gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Derek; Baker, Matthew; Wong, Ivan; Stanish, William

    2017-06-01

    To compare a group of individuals with moderate medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) to both an age-matched asymptomatic group of older adults and younger adults to determine whether differences in knee joint muscle activation patterns and joint biomechanics exist during gait between these three groups. 20 young adults, 20 older adults, and 40 individuals with moderate knee OA were recruited. Using standardized procedures, surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis and medialis, rectus femoris and the medial and lateral hamstrings. All individuals walked on a dual belt instrumented treadmill while segment motions and ground reaction forces were recorded. Sagittal plane motion and net external sagittal and frontal plane moments were calculated. Discrete measures and principal component analyses extracted amplitude and temporal waveform features. Analysis of Variance models using Bonferroni corrections determined between and within group differences in these gait features (α=0.05). Individuals with knee OA have distinct biomechanics and muscle activation patterns when compared to age-matched asymptomatic adults and younger adults whereas differences between the young and older adults were few and included only measures of muscle activation amplitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An Accurate Full-flexion Anterolateral Portal for Needle Placement in the Knee Joint With Dry Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Accurate delivery of an injection into the intra-articular space of the knee is achieved in only two thirds of knees when using the standard anterolateral portal. The use of a modified full-flexion anterolateral portal provides a highly accurate, less painful, and more effective method for reproducible intra-articular injection without the need for ultrasonographic or fluoroscopic guidance in patients with dry osteoarthritis of the knee. The accuracy of needle placement was assessed in a prospective series of 140 consecutive injections in patients with symptomatic degenerative knee arthritis without clinical knee effusion. Procedural pain was determined using the Numerical Rating Scale. The accuracy rates of needle placement were confirmed with fluoroscopic imaging to document the dispersion pattern of injected contrast material. Using the standard anterolateral portal, 52 of 70 injections were confirmed to have been placed in the intra-articular space on the first attempt (accuracy rate, 74.2%). Using the modified full-flexion anterolateral portal, 68 of 70 injections were placed in the intra-articular space on the first attempt (accuracy rate, 97.1%; P = 0.000). This study revealed that using the modified full-flexion anterolateral portal for injections into the knee joint resulted in more accurate and less painful injections than those performed by the same orthopaedic surgeon using the standard anterolateral portal. In addition, the technique offered therapeutic delivery into the joint without the need for fluoroscopic confirmation. Therapeutic Level II.

  4. Naringenin regulates production of matrix metalloproteinases in the knee-joint and primary cultured articular chondrocytes and alleviates pain in rat osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Guo, L; Tian, F D; An, N; Luo, L; Hao, R H; Wang, B; Zhou, Z H

    2017-03-23

    Inflammation of cartilage is a primary symptom for knee-joint osteoarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to play an important role in the articular cartilage destruction related to osteoarthritis. Naringenin is a plant-derived flavonoid known for its anti-inflammatory properties. We studied the effect of naringenin on the transcriptional expression, secretion and enzymatic activity of MMP-3 in vivo in the murine monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) osteoarthritis model. The assessment of pain behavior was also performed in the MIA rats. The destruction of knee-joint tissues was analyzed microscopically. Moreover, the effect of naringenin was also studied in vitro in IL-1β activated articular chondrocytes. The transcriptional expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS-4) and ADAMTS-5 was also studied in primary cultured chondrocytes of rats. Naringenin caused significant reduction in pain behavior and showed marked improvement in the tissue morphology of MIA rats. Moreover, a significant inhibition of MMP-3 expression in MIA rats was observed upon treatment with naringenin. In the in vitro tests, naringenin caused a significant reduction in the transcriptional expression, secretion and enzymatic activity of the studied degradative enzymes. The NF-κB pathway was also found to be inhibited upon treatment with naringenin in vitro. Overall, the study suggests that naringenin alleviated pain and regulated the production of matrix-metalloproteinases via regulation of NF-κB pathway. Thus, naringenin could be a potent therapeutic option for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  5. Naringenin regulates production of matrix metalloproteinases in the knee-joint and primary cultured articular chondrocytes and alleviates pain in rat osteoarthritis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Wang

    Full Text Available Inflammation of cartilage is a primary symptom for knee-joint osteoarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are known to play an important role in the articular cartilage destruction related to osteoarthritis. Naringenin is a plant-derived flavonoid known for its anti-inflammatory properties. We studied the effect of naringenin on the transcriptional expression, secretion and enzymatic activity of MMP-3 in vivo in the murine monosodium iodoacetate (MIA osteoarthritis model. The assessment of pain behavior was also performed in the MIA rats. The destruction of knee-joint tissues was analyzed microscopically. Moreover, the effect of naringenin was also studied in vitro in IL-1β activated articular chondrocytes. The transcriptional expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 was also studied in primary cultured chondrocytes of rats. Naringenin caused significant reduction in pain behavior and showed marked improvement in the tissue morphology of MIA rats. Moreover, a significant inhibition of MMP-3 expression in MIA rats was observed upon treatment with naringenin. In the in vitro tests, naringenin caused a significant reduction in the transcriptional expression, secretion and enzymatic activity of the studied degradative enzymes. The NF-κB pathway was also found to be inhibited upon treatment with naringenin in vitro. Overall, the study suggests that naringenin alleviated pain and regulated the production of matrix-metalloproteinases via regulation of NF-κB pathway. Thus, naringenin could be a potent therapeutic option for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  6. Progression of cartilage degradation, bone resorption and pain in rat temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis induced by injection of iodoacetate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. OBJECTIVE: To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. METHODS: Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. RESULTS: The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches.

  7. Association of baseline knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness during gait and 2-year patellofemoral cartilage damage worsening in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A H; Chmiel, J S; Almagor, O; Guermazi, A; Prasad, P V; Moisio, K C; Belisle, L; Zhang, Y; Hayes, K; Sharma, L

    2017-02-01

    Knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness (DJS) describes the biomechanical interaction between change in external knee flexion moment and flexion angular excursion during gait. In theory, greater DJS may particularly stress the patellofemoral (PF) compartment and thereby contribute to PF osteoarthritis (OA) worsening. We hypothesized that greater baseline knee sagittal DJS is associated with PF cartilage damage worsening 2 years later. Participants all had OA in at least one knee. Knee kinematics and kinetics during gait were recorded using motion capture systems and force plates. Knee sagittal DJS was computed as the slope of the linear regression line for knee flexion moments vs angles during the loading response phase. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained at baseline and 2 years later. We assessed the association between baseline DJS and baseline-to-2-year PF cartilage damage worsening using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE). Our sample had 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); body mass index (BMI) 28.4 kg/m 2 (5.7); 76.5% women. Baseline knee sagittal DJS was associated with baseline-to-2-year cartilage damage worsening in the lateral (OR = 5.35, 95% CI: 2.37-12.05) and any PF (OR = 2.99, 95% CI: 1.27-7.04) compartment. Individual components of baseline DJS (i.e., change in knee moment or angle) were not associated with subsequent PF disease worsening. Capturing the concomitant effect of knee kinetics and kinematics during gait, knee sagittal DJS is a potentially modifiable risk factor for PF disease worsening. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Web-Based Osteoarthritis Management Resource My Joint Pain Improves Quality of Care: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umapathy, Hema; Bennell, Kim; Dickson, Chris; Dobson, Fiona; Fransen, Marlene; Jones, Graeme; Hunter, David J

    2015-07-07

    Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for conservative treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), management is often confined to the use of analgesics and waiting for eventual total joint replacement. This suggests a gap in knowledge for persons with OA regarding the many different treatments available to them. Our objective was to evaluate outcomes after usage of a Web-based resource called My Joint Pain that contains tailored, evidence-based information and tools aimed to improve self-management of OA on self-management and change in knowledge. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the My Joint Pain website intervention over a 12-month period. The intervention provided participants with general and user-specific information, monthly assessments with validated instruments, and progress-tracking tools. A nationwide convenience sample of 195 participants with self-assessed hip and/or knee OA completed both baseline and 12-month questionnaires (users: n=104; nonusers: n=91). The primary outcome measure was the Health Evaluation Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) to evaluate 8 different domains (health-directed activity, positive and active engagement in life, emotional distress, self-monitoring and insight, constructive attitudes and approaches, skill and technique acquisition, social integration and support, health service navigation) and the secondary outcome measure was the 17-item Osteoarthritis Quality Indicator (OAQI) questionnaire to evaluate the change in appropriateness of care received by participants. Independent t tests were used to compare changes between groups for the heiQ and chi-square tests to identify changes within and between groups from baseline to 12 months for each OAQI item. Baseline demographics between groups were similar for gender (152/195, 77.9% female), age (mean 60, SD 9 years) and body mass index (mean 31.1, SD 6.8 kg/m(2)). With the exception of health service navigation, mean effect sizes from all other heiQ domains

  9. Clinical and ultrasonographic features associated to response to intraarticular corticosteroid injection. A one year follow up prospective cohort study in knee osteoarthritis patient with joint effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo, Carlos; García-Manrique, María; Navarro, Noemí; Caixàs, Assumpta; Larrosa, Marta; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Intraarticular injection is used for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but there is not a well defined profile of patient who could get more benefit from it. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of pain relief at one year after corticosteroids intraarticular injection and to identify clinical factors associated to response in patients with knee osteoarthritis with joint effusion. Methods One-year prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA with joint effusion confirmed by ultrasound. An intraarticular injection was performed following a clinical protocol. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters, clinical severity, ultrasound parameters and radiological severity were collected. Response regarding pain and presence of synovial fluid on ultrasound at one month and at one year were evaluated. Clinical responder were consider in subjects with enough improvement to carry out normal daily activities with pain VASeffusion. PMID:29351562

  10. MRI of degenerative bone marrow lesions in experimental osteoarthritis of canine knee joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52057 Aachen (Germany); Adam, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52057 Aachen (Germany); Buehne, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52057 Aachen (Germany); Prescher, A. [Department of Anatomy, University of Technology, Aachen (Germany); Guenther, R.W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52057 Aachen (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to determine the value of MRI in the detection of degenerative bone marrow abnormalities in an animal osteoarthritis model. Design. In 10 dogs with experimentally induced unilateral osteoarthritis of the knee, MRI was performed using two-dimensional spin-echo (2D-SE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D-GE) imaging. Contrast enhanced T1-weighted 2D-SE sequences were also obtained after injection of gadolinium-DTPA. The results were compared with the gross and histopathologic findings and with radiography. Results. Histopathologic specimens revealed 21 osteosclerotic lesions and 5 intraosseous cysts. On 2D-SE images, 24 of 26 lesions were detected, while 21 of 26 lesions were identified on 2D-GE sequences. Radiography, including conventional tomography, demonstrated 9 of 26 lesions. Regardless of the sequence weighting, all osteosclerotic lesions appeared hypointense on MRI. Signal loss in bone sclerosis resulted primarily from the reduction of intact fat marrow, the increased bone density being of secondary importance. Quantitative signal analysis allowed approximate estimation of the grade of sclerosis. On postcontrast images, sclerotic bone remained hypointense, although significant but non-specific enhancement relative to the normal fat marrow was observed. The extent of contrast enhancement did not correlate with the grade of osteosclerosis. All five cysts were readily diagnosed by MRI. Cysts displayed either central or marginal contrast enhancement within their cavities. Conclusions. MRI provides a sensitive method for the diagnosis of osteoarthritic bone abnormalities, allowing their differentiation from most non-degenerative subarticular lesions. (orig.). With 1 tab.

  11. Efficacy of physiotherapy management of knee joint osteoarthritis: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, K; Hinman, R; Metcalf, B; Buchbinder, R; McConnell, J; McColl, G; Green, S; Crossley, K

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a multimodal physiotherapy programme including taping, exercises, and massage is effective for knee osteoarthritis, and if benefits can be maintained with self management. Methods: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial; 140 community volunteers with knee osteoarthritis participated and 119 completed the trial. Physiotherapy and placebo interventions were applied by 10 physiotherapists in private practices for 12 weeks. Physiotherapy included exercise, massage, taping, and mobilisation, followed by 12 weeks of self management. Placebo was sham ultrasound and light application of a non-therapeutic gel, followed by no treatment. Primary outcomes were pain measured by visual analogue scale and patient global change. Secondary measures included WOMAC, knee pain scale, SF-36, assessment of quality of life index, quadriceps strength, and balance test. Results: Using an intention to treat analysis, physiotherapy and placebo groups showed similar pain reductions at 12 weeks: –2.2 cm (95% CI, –2.6 to –1.7) and –2.0 cm (–2.5 to –1.5), respectively. At 24 weeks, pain remained reduced from baseline in both groups: –2.1 (–2.6 to –1.6) and –1.6 (–2.2 to –1.0), respectively. Global improvement was reported by 70% of physiotherapy participants (51/73) at 12 weeks and by 59% (43/73) at 24 weeks. Similarly, global improvement was reported by 72% of placebo participants (48/67) at 12 weeks and by 49% (33/67) at 24 weeks (all p>0.05). Conclusions: The physiotherapy programme tested in this trial was no more effective than regular contact with a therapist at reducing pain and disability. PMID:15897310

  12. Choroba zwyrodnieniowa stawów biodrowych - pacjent i problemy funkcjonalne = The hip joint Osteoarthritis - patient and functional problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Biegański

    2015-08-01

      Streszczenie             Coxarthrosis to przewlekłe schorzenie powodujące destrukcje w obrębie stawu biodrowego i tkanek okołostawowych. Choroba zwyrodnieniowa stawów jest jednym z najczęściej spotykanych schorzeń ortopedycznych i drugim po chorobach układu krążenia powodujące niepełnosprawność. Pacjenci najczęściej borykają się z bólem i sztywnością, które wpływają na spadek możliwości lokomocji, samoobsługi i jakości życia. Stanowi to wyzwanie dla zespołu medycznego, który ma zadanie  utrzymywać sprawność pacjenta jak najdłużej.   Abstract             Coxarthrosis is a chronic illness which makes destruction in the area of joint and tissues surrounding  it. The hip joint Osteoarthritis  is one of the most popular orthopaedic disease and second after  cardiovascular disease causing disability. Patients generally feel pain and stiffness which causes decrease the possibility of locomotion, self-servive and quality of life. It is challenge for medical team to maintain efficiency as long as it is possible.   Słowa kluczowe: coxarthrosis, choroba zwyrodnieniowa stawu biodrowego, ból, problemy funkcjonalne. Key word: coxarthrosis, hip joint osteoarthrosis, pain, functional problems.

  13. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Can the ICF osteoarthritis core set represent a future clinical tool in measuring functioning in persons with osteoarthritis undergoing hip and knee joint replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviar, Maria Jenelyn; Olver, John; Pallant, Julie F; Brand, Caroline; de Steiger, Richard; Pirpiris, Marinis; Bucknill, Andrew; Khan, Fary

    2012-11-01

    To determine the dimensionality, reliability, model fit, adequacy of the qualifier levels, response patterns across different factors, and targeting of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) osteoarthritis core set categories in people with osteoarthritis undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty. The osteoarthritis core set was rated in 316 persons with osteoarthritis who were either in the pre-operative or within one year post-operative stage. Rasch analyses were performed using the RUMM 2030 program. Twelve of the 13 body functions categories and 13 of the 19 activity and participation categories had good model fit. The qualifiers displayed disordered thresholds necessitating rescoring. There was uneven spread of ICF categories across the full range of the patients' scores indicating off--targeting. Subtest analysis of the reduced ICF categories of body functions and activity and participation showed that the two components could be integrated to form one measure. The results suggest that it is possible to measure functioning using a unidimensional construct based on ICF osteoarthritis core set categories of body functions and activity and participation in this population. However, omission of some categories and reduction in qualifier levels are necessary. Further studies are needed to determine whether better targeting is achieved, particularly during the pre-operative and during the sub-acute care period.

  15. The Relationship Between Early-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis and Lower-Extremity Alignment, Joint Laxity, and Subjective Scores of Pain, Stiffness, and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks-Little, Charlie A; Peindl, Richard D; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia J; Cordova, Mitchell L

    2016-08-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease that affects an estimated 27 million Americans. Changes in lower-extremity alignment and joint laxity have been found to redistribute the medial and/or lateral loads at the joint. However, the effect that changes in anteroposterior knee-joint laxity have on lower-extremity alignment and function in individuals with knee OA remains unclear. To examine anteroposterior knee-joint laxity, lower-extremity alignment, and subjective pain, stiffness, and function scores in individuals with early-stage knee OA and matched controls and to determine if a relationship exists among these measures. Case control. Sports-medicine research laboratory. 18 participants with knee OA and 18 healthy matched controls. Participants completed the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis questionnaire and were tested for total anteroposterior knee-joint laxity (A-P) and knee-joint alignment (ALIGN). WOMAC scores, A-P (mm), and ALIGN (°). A significant multivariate main effect for group (Wilks' Λ = 0.30, F7,26 = 8.58, P Knee-OA participants differed in WOMAC scores (P knee OA had worse pain, stiffness, and functional outcome scores than the matched controls; however, ALIGN and A-P were no different. There was no association identified among participants' subjective scores, ALIGN, or A-P measures in this study.

  16. Characterization of 3D joint space morphology using an electrostatic model (with application to osteoarthritis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Qian; Gang, Grace J; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Thawait, Gaurav; Demehri, Shadpour; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images (e.g. cone-beam CT (CBCT)) using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g. the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g. the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies. (paper)

  17. Characterization of 3D joint space morphology using an electrostatic model (with application to osteoarthritis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images (e.g. cone-beam CT (CBCT)) using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g. the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g. the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies.

  18. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2...... was significantly associated to self reported pain in or around the hip joint in both sexes. CONCLUSION: Measurements of minimum hip JSW did not seem to be significantly influenced by varying spatial orientation of the pelvis during X-ray recordings. An inclusion criteria of minimum JSW

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis: comparison with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and macroscopic and microscopic synovial pathologic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Synovial biopsies...... were performed, and macroscopic grades of synovitis assigned, at preselected knee sites during arthroscopy or arthrotomy in 17 knees with RA and 25 with OA. Synovial inflammation and 9 separate tissue characteristics were graded histologically. Synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes were...... membrane and effusion volumes may be sensitive markers and/or predictors of disease activity and treatment outcome in RA....

  20. The alignment of the knee joint in relationship to age and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in the axis of the knee joint in both radiologically osteoarthritic and non-osteoarthritic knees, on the basis of angles measurable in standardized clinical short knee radiographs, in a cross sectional study of an epidemiologi......INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in the axis of the knee joint in both radiologically osteoarthritic and non-osteoarthritic knees, on the basis of angles measurable in standardized clinical short knee radiographs, in a cross sectional study...

  1. Adipose Derived Stromal Cell (ADSC) Injections for Pain Management of Osteoarthritis in the Human Knee Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Peter B; Paulseth, Stephen G

    2016-02-01

    This safety and feasibility study used autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular cells (the stromal vascular fraction [SVF] of adipose tissue), to treat 8 osteoarthritic knees in 6 patients of grade I to III (K-L scale) with initial pain of 4 or greater on a 10-point Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The primary objective of the study was evaluation of the safety of intra-articular injection of SVF. The secondary objective was to assess initial feasibility for reduction of pain in osteoarthritic knees. Adipose-derived SVF cells were obtained through enzymatic disaggregation of lipoaspirate, resuspension in 3 mL of Lactated Ringer's Solution, and injection directly into the intra-articular space of the knee, with a mean of 14.1 million viable, nucleated SVF cells per knee. Metrics included monitoring of adverse events and preoperative to postoperative changes in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the VAS pain scale, range of motion (ROM), timed up-and-go (TUG), and MRI. No infections, acute pain flares, or other adverse events were reported. At 3-months postoperative, there was a statistically significant improvement in WOMAC and VAS scores (P knee pain. Autologous SVF was shown to be safe and to present a new potential therapy for reduction of pain for osteoarthritis of the knee. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 4: Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cannabis and joints: scientific evidence for the alleviation of osteoarthritis pain by cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Melissa; McDougall, Jason J

    2018-04-07

    Cannabis has been used for millennia to treat a multitude of medical conditions including chronic pain. Osteoarthritis (OA) pain is one of the most common types of pain and patients often turn to medical cannabis to manage their symptoms. While the majority of these reports are anecdotal, there is a growing body of scientific evidence which supports the analgesic potential of cannabinoids to treat OA pain. OA pain manifests as a combination of inflammatory, nociceptive, and neuropathic pain, each requiring modality-specific analgesics. The body's innate endocannabinoid system (ECS) has been shown to ameliorate all of these pain subtypes. This review summarizes the components of the ECS and details the latest research pertaining to plant-based and man-made cannabinoids for the treatment of OA pain. Recent pre-clinical evidence supporting a role for the ECS to control OA pain is described as well as current clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabinoids for treating OA pain in mixed patient populations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniatis, I; Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G; Panagiotopoulos, E

    2009-01-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of 'Mild / Moderate' or 'Severe' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  4. Effect of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Joint Injury and Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis: an Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Talal; Mitchell, Reed; Bhasin, Priya; Guo, Yi; Paudel, Sharada; Schon, Lew; Zhang, Zijun

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic potential of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) in post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Intra-articular fracture of the medial tibial plateau was surgically created in 30 rats. LIPUS was applied to the operated joints either for the first 2 wk (LIPUS 1-2 group) or in weeks 4 and 5 after intra-articular fracture (LIPUS 4-5 group). In controls, the operated knees were not treated with LIPUS (LIPUS 0 group). The rats were monitored with weekly gait analysis and euthanized at week 8. Among the altered gait parameters, the maximal and average paw print areas in the LIPUS 1-2 and LIPUS 4-5 groups, but not the LIPUS 0 group, had either reached baseline or significantly recovered (70%, p <0.05) by week 8. PTOA pathology in both the LIPUS 1-2 and LIPUS 4-5 groups was less severe than that in the LIPUS 0 group (Mankin score: 5.4 and 4.5 vs. 8.8, p <0.05). In conclusion, LIPUS treatment partially improved the gait of the affected limbs and reduced cartilage degeneration in PTOA. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of continuous versus interval walking exercise on knee joint loading and pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Jayabalan, Prakash; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Klatt, Brian A; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Piva, Sara R

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether knee contact force and knee pain are different between continuous and interval walking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty seven patients with unilateral symptomatic knee OA completed two separate walking exercise sessions on a treadmill at 1.3m/s on two different days: 1) a continuous 45min walking exercise session, and 2) three 15min bouts of walking exercise separated by 1h rest periods for a total of 45min of exercise in an interval format. Estimated knee contact forces using the OpenSim software and knee pain were evaluated at baseline (1st minute of walking) and after every 15min between the continuous and interval walking conditions. A significant increase from baseline was observed in peak knee contact force during the weight-acceptance phase of gait after 30 and 45min of walking, irrespective of the walking exercise condition. Additionally, whereas continuous walking resulted in an increase in knee pain, interval walking did not lead to increased knee pain. Walking exercise durations of 30min or greater may lead to undesirable knee joint loading in patients with knee OA, while performing the same volume of exercise in multiple bouts as opposed to one continuous bout may be beneficial for limiting knee pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (Pknee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acetabular labrum of hip joint in osteoarthritis: A qualitative original study and short review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, S; Dermon, A; Gkantsinikoudis, N; Kommata, V; Soukakos, P; Dermon, C R

    2017-01-01

    Histological architecture of normal acetabular labrum regarding free nerve endings (FNEs) and mechanoreceptors (MRs) has been satisfactorily described in the literature. However, the presence of FNEs and MRs in acetabular labrum of hip joint has been analyzed only once in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Aim of this article is to report histological distribution pattern of FNEs and MRs in acetabular labrum of patients with severe OA, at the same time conducting a comparison with normal acetabular labrum described in the literature. Seven patients with severe hip OA were enrolled in this study. Patient selection was assisted by the utilization of specific clinical scales delineated by the American College of Rheumatology. After successful total hip arthroplasty, tissue samples of acetabular labra of seven patients were histologically processed and stained with the gold standard chloride method, which was subsequently examined under a compound microscope. FNEs and MRs constituted the major histological structures. Identified MRs included Pacini corpuscles, Ruffini corpuscles, and Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscles. The presence of FNEs was predominant in the middle part of the acetabular labrum, featuring a remarkable decrease in peripheral parts. In contrast, MRs were detected basically in peripheral parts and less in the middle part. Differentiation of the distribution pattern of MRs and FNEs in acetabular labrum of hip joint is remarkable between normal patients and patients with severe OA. The abundance of FNEs in the middle part of the pathologic labrum is mainly responsible for the observed discrimination. A "conversion" of MRs to FNEs may occur during OA progression, modulating therefore this pattern as well as the upcoming clinical manifestations.

  8. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton M Fernandes

    Full Text Available Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin, ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  9. Hyaline cartilage calcification of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is associated with osteoarthritis but independent of age and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Hawellek, Thelonius; Hischke, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Krause, Matthias; Püschel, Klaus; Rüther, Wolfgang; Niemeier, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Hyaline cartilage calcification (CC) is associated with osteoarthritis (OA) in hip and knee joints. The first metatarsophalangeal joint (1 st MTPJ) is frequently affected by OA, but it is unclear if CC occurs in the 1 st MTPJ. The aim of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of CC of the 1 st MTPJ in the general population by high-resolution digital contact radiography (DCR) and to determine its association with histological OA severity, age and body mass index (BMI). 168 metatarsal heads of 84 donors (n = 47 male, n = 37 female; mean age 62.73 years, SD ±18.8, range 20-93) were analyzed by DCR for the presence of CC. Histological OA grade (hOA) by OARSI was analyzed in the central load-bearing zone of the first metatarsal head (1 st MH). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to analyze the interrelationship between CC, hOA, age and BMI. The prevalence of CC of 1 st MH was 48.8 % (41/84) (95 %-CI [37.7 %, 60.0 %]), independent of the affected side (p = 0.42), gender (p = 0.41) and BMI (p = 0.51). The mean amount of CC of one MH correlated significantly with that of the contralateral side (r s  = 0.4, 95 %-CI [0.26, 0.52], p cartilage area) of the MH correlated significantly with the severity of hOA (r s  = 0.51, 95 %-CI [0.32, 0.65], p studies.

  10. Treatment choice for osteoarthritis of the knee joint according to semi-automatic MRI based assessment of disease severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasho, Takahisa; Suzuki, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Koichi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Matsuki, Megumi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Moriya, Hideshige

    2008-01-01

    Objective assessment of disease severity of osteoarthritis of the knee joint (OA knee) is fundamental to establish adequate treatment system. Regrettably, there is no such a reliable system. Grading system based upon X-ray findings or measurement of joint space narrowing is widely used method for this purpose but they are still far from satisfaction. Our previous study elucidated that measuring irregularity of the contour of the femoral condyle on MRI (irregularity index) using newly developed software enabled us to assess disease severity of OA objectively. Advantages of this system are expressing severity by metric variable and semi-automatic character. In the present study, we examined relationship between treatment selection and irregularity index. Sixty-one medial type OA knees that received total knee arthroplasty (TKA), arthroscopic surgery (AS), and conservative treatment (CT) were involved. Their x-ray grading, irregularity index were recorded at the time of corresponding treatment. Irregularity index of each group were compared. As for AS group, pre- and post-operative knee score employing JOA score were also examined to study relationship between irregularity index and improvement of knee score. All the four parameters that represent irregularity of femoral condyle were significantly higher in TKA group than in AS group, whereas no significant difference was observed between AS group and CT group. Negative correlation was observed between irregularity index and improvement of knee score after arthroscopic surgery. Although treatment selection was determined by skillful knee surgeon in this series, irregularity index could indicate adequate timing of TKA. It also served as an indicator to predict outcome of arthroscopic surgery, and could be used as to show limitation of arthroscopic surgery. Our new system to assess disease severity of OA knee can serve as an index to determine treatment options. (author)

  11. [Hand osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šenolt, Ladislav

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder causing pain and limitation of mobility of affected joints. The prevalence of hand OA increases with age and more often affects females. Clinical signs obviously do not correlate with radiographic findings - symptomatic hand OA affects approximately 26 % of adult subjects, but radiographic changes can be found in up to two thirds of females and half of males older than 55 years.Disease course differ among individual patients. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease. Nodal hand OA is the most common subtype affecting interphalangeal joints, thumb base OA affects first carpometacarpal joint. Erosive OA represents a specific subtype of hand OA, which is associated with joint inflammation, more pain, functional limitation and erosive findings on radiographs.Treatment of OA is limited. Analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the only agents reducing symptoms. New insights into the pathogenesis of disease should contribute to the development of novel effective treatment of hand OA.

  12. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1,2 Miki Sode,3 Thomas Fuerst,3 Jon E Block2 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Bioclinica, Newark, CA, USA Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System.Methods: Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex.Results: WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee.Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. Keywords: disease modification, KineSpring, joint space, pain, trabecular

  13. Identification of novel adipokines in the joint. Differential expression in healthy and osteoarthritis tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Conde

    Full Text Available Emerging data suggest that several metabolic factors, released mainly by white adipose tissue (WAT and joint tissues, and collectively named adipokines, might have a role in the pathophysiology of OA. Recently, novel adipokines such as SERPINE2, WISP2, GPNMB and ITIH5 have been identified in WAT. The main goal of this study was to analyse the expression of these novel adipokines in synovium, infrapatellar fat pad and chondrocytes and to compare the expression of these molecules in healthy and OA tissues.Synovial tissues, infrapatellar fat pad and chondrocytes were obtained from 36 OA patients (age 52-85; mean BMI 28.9 who underwent total knee replacement surgery. Healthy synovial tissues and infrapatellar fat pad were obtained from 15 traumatic knee patients (age 23-53; mean BMI 23.5. mRNA and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis respectively.All the novel adipokines, matter of our study, are expressed in OA synovium, infrapatellar fat pad and chondrocytes. Moreover, we detected a differential expression of SERPINE2 and ITIH5 in OA synovial tissues as compared to healthy samples. Finally, we also observed an increased expression of WISP2 in OA infrapatellar fat pad in comparison to healthy controls.In this study we demonstrated for the first time the expression of four novel adipokines in different joint tissues and how these molecules are differentially expressed in healthy and OA joint tissues.

  14. Bending stresses in Facetted Glass Shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Jönsson, Jeppe; Almegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    A shell structure of glass combines a highly effective structural principle with a material of optimal permeability to light. A facetted shell structure has a piecewise plane geometry, and together the facets form an approximation to a curved surface. A distributed load on a plane-based facetted...... structure will locally cause bending moments in the loaded facets. The bending stresses are dependent on the stiffness of the joints. Approximate solutions are developed to estimate the magnitude of the bending stresses. A FE-model of a facetted glass shell structure is used to validate the expressions...

  15. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTIVENESS OF THORACIC FACET JOINT INTERVENTIONS IN CHRONIC THORACIC PAIN%X光引导胸椎小关节注射治疗胸背痛的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓宏; 李世杰; 黄翔; 富沛勇; 杨承祥

    2013-01-01

    目的:评价小关节注射治疗胸背部疼痛的临床疗效及安全性.方法:60例经保守治疗无效的慢性胸背痛患者,随机分为超激光治疗组(S组,n=30)和介入治疗组(Ⅰ组,n=30).S组患者取俯卧位,超激光照射病变关节部位,每天1次,每次15 rain,共14次;Ⅰ组患者取俯卧位,在X光引导下确定病变小关节平面,穿刺针经皮正确无误到达胸椎后关节突关节间隙,到位后注射消炎镇痛液.对治疗后第1周、2周、1个月、3个月的VAS进行评分、生活质量改善情况及安全性进行评估.结果:与S组比较,Ⅰ组治疗患者术后3个月的VAS评分较治疗前有显著性降低(P<0.05),且未发现有严重并发症.结论:小关节注射治疗胸背痛是一项操作简便、安全,疗效确切、可靠的微创介入治疗方法.%Objective:To determine the clinical effectiveness of zygapophysial joint injections with fluoroscopy in managing chronic mid back or upper back pain of facet joint origin.Methods:A total of 60 patients were randomized divided into two groups,with 30 patients in each of the super laser and facet joint interventions groups.All of the patients met the diagnostic criteria of thoracic facet joint pain by means of the inclusion criteria.Group S patients received thoracic facet joint with super laser,whereas Group Ⅰ patients received thoracic facet joint intervention with bupivacaine and non-particulate betamethasone.The clinical efficacy were assessed by patients with visual analogue scale(VAS).All outcomes were assessed at baseline,1 week,2 weeks,1 month,and 3 months after treatment.Results:In Group S,compared with baseline,patients showed significant pain relief and functional improvement at 1 week (P < 0.05) But there were no significant pain relief after 2 weeks.In Group Ⅰ,patients showed significant pain relief and functional improvement after facet joint injection,a significant change 3 months after treatment from baseline (P < 0

  16. Relationships between in vivo dynamic knee joint loading, static alignment and tibial subchondral bone microarchitecture in end-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B C; Solomon, L B; Mercer, G; Reynolds, K J; Thewlis, D; Perilli, E

    2018-04-01

    To study, in end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, relationships between indices of in vivo dynamic knee joint loads obtained pre-operatively using gait analysis, static knee alignment, and the subchondral trabecular bone (STB) microarchitecture of their excised tibial plateau quantified with 3D micro-CT. Twenty-five knee OA patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty underwent pre-operative gait analysis. Mechanical axis deviation (MAD) was determined radiographically. Following surgery, excised tibial plateaus were micro-CT-scanned and STB microarchitecture analysed in four subregions (anteromedial, posteromedial, anterolateral, posterolateral). Regional differences in STB microarchitecture and relationships between joint loading and microarchitecture were examined. STB microarchitecture differed among subregions (P knee adduction moment (KAM) and internal rotation moment (|r|-range: 0.54-0.74). When controlling for walking speed, KAM and MAD, the ERM explained additional 11-30% of the variations in anteromedial BV/TV and medial-to-lateral BV/TV ratio (R 2  = 0.59, R 2  = 0.69, P knee joint loading indices in end-stage knee OA patients. Particularly, anteromedial BV/TV correlates strongest with ERM, whereas medial-to-lateral BV/TV ratio correlates strongest with indicators of medial-to-lateral joint loading (MAD, KAM) and rotational moments. However, associations with ERM should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Association of Perceived Memory Loss with Osteoarthritis and Related Joint Pain in a Large Appalachian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2017-05-19

    Previous studies have documented memory impairment in several chronic pain syndromes. However, the potential link between memory loss and osteoarthritis (OA), the second most common cause of chronic pain, remains little explored. In this cross-sectional study, we examine the association of perceived memory loss to OA and assess the potential mediating influence of sleep and mood disturbance in a large Appalachian population.  Cross-sectional.  US Ohio Valley.  A total of 21,982 Appalachian adults age 40 years or older drawn from the C8 Health Project (N = 19,004 adults without and 2,478 adults with OA). All participants completed a comprehensive health survey between 2005 and 2006. Medical history, including physician diagnosis of OA, lifestyle factors, short- and long-term memory loss, sleep quality, and mood were assessed via self-report.  After adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, health-related, and other factors, participants with OA were almost three times as likely to report frequent memory loss (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] for short- and long-term memory loss, respectively = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-3.3, and 2.6, 95% CI = 2.0-3.3). The magnitude of these associations increased significantly with rising frequency of reported joint pain (adjusted OR for OA with frequent joint pain vs no OA = 3.3, 95% CI = 2.6-4.1, P trend  memory loss = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.6-2.4, and 2.1, 95% CI = 1.7-2.8, adjusted for sleep and mood impairment, respectively; OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.4-2.2, adjusted for both factors).  In this large cross-sectional study, OA and related joint pain were strongly associated with perceived memory loss; these associations may be partially mediated by sleep and mood disturbance. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Long-term use of minimal footwear on pain, self-reported function, analgesic intake, and joint loading in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombini-Souza, Francis; Matias, Alessandra B; Yokota, Mariane; Butugan, Marco K; Goldenstein-Schainberg, Claudia; Fuller, Ricardo; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2015-12-01

    Efforts have been made to retard the progressive debilitating pain and joint dysfunction in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a low-cost minimalist footwear on pain, function, clinical and gait-biomechanical aspects of elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. Throughout a randomized, parallel and controlled clinical trial, fifty-six patients with medial knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated to an intervention (n=28) or control group (n=28), and assessed at baseline and after three and six months. The intervention involved wearing Moleca(®) footwear for at least 6h/day, 7 days/week, over 6 months. The pain subscale of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was the primary outcome. The secondary outcomes were the other subscales, Lequesne score, distance walked in 6 min, knee oedema and effusion, knee adduction moment and paracetamol intake. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed using two-way casewise ANOVA (coefficient. Intervention group showed improvement in pain (effect size: 1.41, p<.001), function (effect size: 1.22, p=.001), stiffness (effect size: 0.76, p=.001), Lequesne score (effect size: 1.07, p<.001), and reduction by 21.8% in the knee adduction moment impulse (p=.017) during gait wearing Moleca(®). The analgesic intake was lower in the intervention group. The long-term use of Moleca(®) footwear relieves pain, improves self-reported function, reduces the knee loading while wearing Moleca(®), refrains the increase of analgesic intake in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis and can be considered as a conservative mechanical treatment option. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01342458). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of a 3-Telsa magnet to perform delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the distal interphalangeal joint of horses with and without naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, Andrea S; Fürst, Anton E; Torgerson, Paul R; Carstens, Ann; Hilbe, Monika; Kircher, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) features of healthy hyaline cartilage of the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) of horses, to determine whether dGEMRIC can be used to differentiate various stages of naturally occurring osteoarthritis of the DIPJ, and to correlate relaxation times determined by dGEMRIC with the glycosaminoglycan concentration, water content, and macroscopic and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage of DIPJs with and without osteoarthritis. SAMPLE 1 cadaveric forelimb DIPJ from each of 12 adult warmblood horses. PROCEDURES T1-weighted cartilage relaxation times were obtained for predetermined sites of the DIPJ before (T1 preGd ) and after (T1 postGd ) intra-articular gadolinium administration. Corresponding cartilage sites underwent macroscopic, histologic, and immunohistochemical evaluation, and cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration and water content were determined. Median T1 preGd and T1 postGd were correlated with macroscopic, histologic, and biochemical data. Mixed generalized linear models were created to evaluate the effects of cartilage site, articular surface, and macroscopic and histologic scores on relaxation times. RESULTS 122 cartilage specimens were analyzed. Median T1 postGd was lower than the median T1 preGd for normal and diseased cartilage. Both T1 preGd and T1 postGd were correlated with macroscopic and histologic scores, whereby T1 preGd increased and T1 postGd decreased as osteoarthritis progressed. There was topographic variation of T1 preGd and T1 postGd within the DIPJ. Cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration and water content were significantly correlated with T1 preGd and macroscopic and histologic scores but were not correlated with T1 postGd . CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that dGEMRIC relaxation times varied for DIPJs with various degrees of osteoarthritis. These findings may help facilitate early detection of osteoarthritis.

  20. Detection of early osteoarthritis in the centrodistal joints of Icelandic horses: Evaluation of radiography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, C J; Björnsdóttir, S; Ekman, S; Boyde, A; Hansson, K

    2016-01-01

    Validated noninvasive detection methods for early osteoarthritis (OA) are required for OA prevention and early intervention treatment strategies. To evaluate radiography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of early stage OA osteochondral lesions in equine centrodistal joints using microscopy as the reference standard. Prospective imaging of live horses and imaging and microscopy of cadaver tarsal joints. Centrodistal (distal intertarsal) joints of 38 Icelandic research horses aged 27-29 months were radiographed. Horses were subjected to euthanasia approximately 2 months later and cadaver joints examined with low-field MRI. Osteochondral joint specimens were classified as negative or positive for OA using light microscopy histology or scanning electron microscopy. Radiographs and MRIs were evaluated for osteochondral lesions and results compared with microscopy. Forty-two joints were classified OA positive with microscopy. Associations were detected between microscopic OA and the radiography lesion categories; mineralisation front defect (Pradiography and low-field MRI pooled lesion categories, but radiography was often superior when individual lesion categories were compared. Early stage centrodistal joint OA changes may be detected with radiography and low-field MRI. Detection of mineralisation front defects in radiographs may be a useful screening method for detection of early OA in centrodistal joints of young Icelandic horses. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  1. CT evaluation of chronic hip joint diseases: avascular necrosis vs. osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Suh, Jin Seok; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Chang Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Computed tomography (CT) of the hip was done on 37 patients those who have been suffered from chronic hip joint pain. There were 18 patients of avascular necrosis of hip (AVN), 67% of whom were affected bilaterally, 15 patients of degenerative arthritis (DA), 33% bilaterally; one patient of tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and traumatic arthritis respectively. Comparison of the staging by means of the CT and plain film showed good correlation between the two methods. The CT findings of the AVN and OA were also compared; crescent sign or fissure, loss of congruity, and loss or change of normal asterisk sign were more commonly seen in AVN. Acetabular change especially associated cystic appearance, osteophytes formation and joint narrowing were more frequent in OA. CT showed primary and secondary change of AVN and OA more clearly without confusion than plain film. We think that CT can be helpful in evaluation and understanding of each disease process and differentiation of the two lesions in difficult case000.

  2. CT evaluation of chronic hip joint diseases: avascular necrosis vs. osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Suh, Jin Seok; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Chang Yoon

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the hip was done on 37 patients those who have been suffered from chronic hip joint pain. There were 18 patients of avascular necrosis of hip (AVN), 67% of whom were affected bilaterally, 15 patients of degenerative arthritis (DA), 33% bilaterally; one patient of tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and traumatic arthritis respectively. Comparison of the staging by means of the CT and plain film showed good correlation between the two methods. The CT findings of the AVN and OA were also compared; crescent sign or fissure, loss of congruity, and loss or change of normal asterisk sign were more commonly seen in AVN. Acetabular change especially associated cystic appearance, osteophytes formation and joint narrowing were more frequent in OA. CT showed primary and secondary change of AVN and OA more clearly without confusion than plain film. We think that CT can be helpful in evaluation and understanding of each disease process and differentiation of the two lesions in difficult cases.

  3. Rocker-sole footwear versus prefabricated foot orthoses for the treatment of pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot is a common condition which results in pain, stiffness and impaired ambulation. Footwear modifications and foot orthoses are widely used in clinical practice to treat this condition, but their effectiveness has not been rigorously evaluated. This article describes the design of a randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of rocker-sole footwear and individualised prefabricated foot orthoses in reducing pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis. Methods Eighty people with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis will be randomly allocated to receive either a pair of rocker-sole shoes (MBT® Matwa, Masai Barefoot Technology, Switzerland) or a pair of individualised, prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Customs, Vasyli Medical™, Queensland, Australia). At baseline, the biomechanical effects of the interventions will be examined using a wireless wearable sensor motion analysis system (LEGSys™, BioSensics, Boston, MA, USA) and an in-shoe plantar pressure system (Pedar®, Novel GmbH, Munich, Germany). The primary outcome measure will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ), measured at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures will include the function, footwear and general foot health subscales of the FHSQ, severity of pain and stiffness at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (measured using 100 mm visual analog scales), global change in symptoms (using a 15-point Likert scale), health status (using the Short-Form-12® Version 2.0 questionnaire), use of rescue medication and co-interventions to relieve pain, the frequency and type of self-reported adverse events and physical activity levels (using the Incidental and Planned Activity Questionnaire). Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to compare the effectiveness of rocker

  4. The effects of resistance training on muscle strength, joint pain, and hand function in individuals with hand osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Nicoló Edoardo; McNair, Peter John; Rice, David Andrew

    2017-06-13

    Hand osteoarthritis is a common condition characterised by joint pain and muscle weakness. These factors are thought to contribute to ongoing disability. Some evidence exists that resistance training decreases pain, improves muscle strength, and enhances function in people with knee and hip osteoarthritis. However, there is currently a lack of consensus regarding its effectiveness in people with hand osteoarthritis. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to establish whether resistance training in people with hand osteoarthritis increases grip strength, decreases joint pain, and improves hand function. Seven databases were searched from 1975 until July 1, 2016. Randomised controlled trials were included. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess studies' methodological quality. The Grade of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system was adopted to rate overall quality of evidence. Suitable studies were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. Five studies were included with a total of 350 participants. The majority of the training programs did not meet recommended intensity, frequency, or progression criteria for muscle strengthening. There was moderate-quality evidence that resistance training does not improve grip strength (mean difference = 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.84, 3.54; I 2  = 50%; p = 0.23 ). Low-quality evidence showed significant improvements in joint pain (standardised mean difference (SMD) = -0.23; 95% CI = -0.42, -0.04; I 2  = 0%; p = 0.02) which were not clinically relevant. Low-quality evidence demonstrated no improvements in hand function following resistance training (SMD = -0.1; 95% CI = -0.33, 0.13; I 2  = 28%; p = 0.39). There is no evidence that resistance training has a significant effect on grip strength or hand function in people with hand osteoarthritis. Low-quality evidence suggests it has a small, clinically

  5. Predictors of response to prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker-sole footwear in individuals with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Tan, Jade M; Levinger, Pazit; Roddy, Edward; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2017-05-12

    Osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1st MTPJ OA) is a common and disabling condition commonly managed with footwear and orthotic interventions. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with a successful treatment response in people with 1st MTPJ OA provided with prefabricated orthoses or rocker-sole footwear as part of a randomised clinical trial. People with 1st MTPJ OA (n = 88) who participated in a randomised trial were allocated to receive prefabricated foot orthoses (n = 47) or rocker-sole footwear (n = 41) and completed a baseline questionnaire including information on demographics, anthropometrics, general health, pain characteristics (including the Foot Health Status Questionnaire [FHSQ] and Foot Function Index [FFI]) and perceptions of the interventions, and a clinical assessment of foot posture, range of motion, radiographic severity and in-shoe plantar pressures. Adherence was documented using diaries. At 12 weeks, participants documented their perception of improvement on a 15-point scale. Those reporting at least moderate improvement on this scale were classified as 'responders'. There were 29 responders (62%) in the orthoses group and 16 responders (39%) in the rocker-sole group. In the orthoses group, responders had greater baseline pain severity while walking, a higher FFI difficulty score, and wore their orthoses more frequently. In the rocker-sole group, responders had a higher FFI stiffness score and greater radiographic severity. However, the accuracy of these variables in identifying responders in each group was modest (62 and 53%, respectively). The response to prefabricated orthoses or rocker-sole footwear in people with 1st MTPJ OA is related to measures of increased pain and disease severity. However, the overall classification accuracy associated with these factors is not sufficient for identifying individuals who are most likely to benefit from these interventions. Australian New

  6. Osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb: a new MR imaging technique for the standardized detection of relevant ligamental lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, Clemens [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Georg-August-Universitaet, Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Lerzer, Sebastian; Tezval, Mohammad; Stuermer, Klaus Michael [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Vafa, Morad Ali; Lotz, Joachim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Interventional Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Dechent, Peter [University Medical Center Goettingen, MR-Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Cognitive Neurology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To assess ligament lesions and subluxations of the carpometacarpal joints of the thumbs (CMC I) of asymptomatic volunteers and of patients with CMC I osteoarthritis using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 20 CMC I joints of 14 asymptomatic volunteers (6 x both sides) and 28 CMC I joints of 22 patients (6 x both sides) with symptomatic and X-ray-diagnosed osteoarthritis of CMC I joints were studied. During extension, flexion, abduction and adduction of the thumb, the anterior oblique (AOL), intermetacarpal (IML), posterior oblique (POL) and dorsal radial (DRL) ligaments were evaluated using 3-T MRI on two standard planes, and translation of metacarpal I (MC I) was assessed. The MRI demonstrated that ligament lesions of the AOL and IML are frequent. Isolated rupture of the AOL was found in 6 of 28 (21 %), combined rupture of the AOL + IML in 5 of 28 (18 %) and isolated IML rupture in 4 of 28 (14 %) joints. The patients had a significantly increased dorsal translation of MC I during extension with a median of 6.4 mm vs. 5.4 mm in asymptomatic volunteers (p < 0.05). MRIs of CMC I in two standardized planes frequently show combined ligament ruptures. The dorsal subluxation of MC I, which is increased in patients, correlates with OA severity based on X-ray and can be quantified by MRI. For joint-preserving surgical procedures and for prosthesis implantation of the CMC I, we recommend performing an MRI in two planes of the thumb - extension and abduction - to evaluate the ligaments and dorsal subluxation of MC I. (orig.)

  7. The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large g...... from the facet joints has been described in the literature. Furthermore, the acute, uncomplicated facet syndrome was considered to have an uncomplicated clinical course, responding quickly to spinal manipulative therapy....

  8. The effect of low-load exercise on joint pain, function, and activities of daily living in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Jason; Ripat, Jacquie

    2018-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis has a lifetime risk of nearly one in two, with obese individuals being most susceptible. While exercise is universally recognized as a critical component for management, unsafe or ineffective exercise frequently leads to exacerbation of joint symptoms. Evaluate the effect of a 12week lower body positive pressure (LBPP) supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee pain, joint function, and performance of daily activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community based, multidisciplinary musculoskeletal medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients, aged 50-75, with a BMI ≥25kg/m 2 and radiographic confirmed mild to moderate knee OA. Twelve week LBPP treadmill walking exercise regimen. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) were used to quantify joint symptoms and patient function; isokinetic thigh muscle strength was evaluated; and a 10-point VAS was used to quantify acute knee pain while walking. Baseline and follow-up data were compared in order to examine the effect of the 12week exercise intervention. There was a significant difference between baseline and follow-up data: KOOS and COPM scores both improved; thigh muscle strength increased; and acute knee pain during full weight bearing walking diminished significantly. Participation in a 12week LBPP supported treadmill walking exercise regimen significantly enhanced patient function and quality of life, as well as the ability to perform activities of daily living that patient's self-identified as being important, yet difficult to perform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise on knee-joint load in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Clausen, B; Søndergaard, J; Christensen, R; Andriacchi, T P; Roos, E M

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of a neuro-muscular exercise (NEMEX) therapy program compared with instructions in optimized analgesics and anti-inflammatory drug use (PHARMA), on measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that knee joint loading during walking would be reduced by NEMEX and potentially increased by PHARMA. Single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing NEMEX therapy twice a week with PHARMA. Participants with mild-to-moderate medial tibiofemoral knee OA were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments. Primary outcome was change in knee load during walking (Knee Index, a composite score from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes were frontal plane peak knee adduction moment (KAM), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) and functional performance tests. Ninety three participants (57% women, 58 ± 8 years with a body mass index [BMI] of 27 ± 4 kg/m 2 (mean ± standard deviation [SD])) were randomized to NEMEX group (n = 47) or PHARMA (n = 46); data from 44 (94%) and 41 (89%) participants respectively, were available at follow-up. 49% of the participants in NEMEX and only 7% in PHARMA demonstrated good compliance. We found no difference in the primary outcome as evaluated by the Knee Index -0.07 [-0.17; 0.04] Nm/%BW HT. Secondary outcomes largely supported this finding. We found no difference in the primary outcome; knee joint load change during walking from a NEMEX program vs information on the recommended use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01638962 (July 3, 2012). Ethical Committee: S-20110153. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and ultrasonographic features associated to response to intraarticular corticosteroid injection. A one year follow up prospective cohort study in knee osteoarthritis patient with joint effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Joan; Orellana, Cristóbal; Galisteo, Carlos; García-Manrique, María; Navarro, Noemí; Caixàs, Assumpta; Larrosa, Marta; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Intraarticular injection is used for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but there is not a well defined profile of patient who could get more benefit from it. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of pain relief at one year after corticosteroids intraarticular injection and to identify clinical factors associated to response in patients with knee osteoarthritis with joint effusion. One-year prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA with joint effusion confirmed by ultrasound. An intraarticular injection was performed following a clinical protocol. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters, clinical severity, ultrasound parameters and radiological severity were collected. Response regarding pain and presence of synovial fluid on ultrasound at one month and at one year were evaluated. Clinical responder were consider in subjects with enough improvement to carry out normal daily activities with pain VAS<40mm. One hundred and thirty-two patients were included.A significant number of patients (61.4%) improved pain at one year following the protocol established in this study. Pain and ultrasound synovial fluid at one month appeared to predict the response at one year. The Lequesne index and the percentage of body fat were independently associated to pain at one year while the Lequesne index and ultrasound synovial hypertrophy were independently related to the presence of synovial fluid at one year. The status regarding pain or ultrasound synovial fluid at one month after an intraarticular joint injection appeared to predict the status at one year in patients with knee osteoarthritis and synovial effusion.

  11. Effects of administration of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and platelet-rich plasma to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, David A; Renberg, Walter C; Roush, James K; Milliken, George A; Weiss, Mark L

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of simultaneous intra-articular and IV injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints. ANIMALS 22 client-owned dogs (12 placebo-treated [control] dogs and 10 treated dogs). PROCEDURES Dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints that caused signs of lameness or discomfort were characterized on the basis of results of orthopedic examination, goniometry, lameness score, the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI), a visual analogue scale, and results obtained by use of a pressure-sensing walkway at week 0 (baseline). Dogs received a simultaneous intraarticular and IV injection of SVF and PRP or a placebo. Dogs were examined again 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. RESULTS CBPI scores were significantly lower for the treatment group at week 24, compared with scores for the control group. Mean visual analogue scale score for the treatment group was significantly higher at week 0 than at weeks 4, 8, or 24. Dogs with baseline peak vertical force (PVF) in the lowest 25th percentile were compared, and the treatment group had a significantly higher PVF than did the control group. After the SVF-PRP injection, fewer dogs in the treated group than in the control group had lameness confirmed during examination. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints treated with SVF and PRP, improvements in CBPI and PVF were evident at some time points, compared with results for the control group.

  12. No associations between self-reported knee joint instability and radiographic features in knee osteoarthritis patients prior to Total Knee Arthroplasty: A cross-sectional analysis of the Longitudinal Leiden Orthopaedics Outcomes of Osteo-Arthritis study (LOAS) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Meesters, Jorit J L; Kroon, Herman M; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Tilbury, Claire; Dekker, Joost; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Esch, Martin

    2017-08-01

    To describe the prevalence of self-reported knee joint instability in patients with pre-surgery knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to explore the associations between self-reported knee joint instability and radiological features. A cross-sectional study including patients scheduled for primary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). Self-reported knee instability was examined by questionnaire. Radiological features consisted of osteophyte formation and joint space narrowing (JSN), both scored on a 0 to three scale. Scores >1 are defined as substantial JSN or osteophyte formation. Regression analyses were provided to identify associations of radiological features with self-reported knee joint instability. Two hundred and sixty-five patients (mean age 69years and 170 females) were included. Knee instability was reported by 192 patients (72%). Substantial osteophyte formation was present in 78 patients (41%) reporting and 33 patients (46%) not reporting knee joint instability. Substantial JSN was present in 137 (71%) and 53 patients (73%), respectively. Self-reported knee instability was not associated with JSN (relative to score 0, odds ratios (95% CI) of score 1, 2 and 3 were 0.87 (0.30-2.54), 0.98 (0.38-2.52), 0.68 (0.25-1.86), respectively) or osteophyte formation (relative to score 0, odds ratios (95% CI) of score 1, 2 and 3 were 0.77 (0.36-1.64), 0.69 (0.23-1.45), 0.89 (0.16-4.93), respectively). Stratified analysis for pain, age and BMI showed no associations between self-reported knee joint instability and radiological features. Self-reported knee joint instability is not associated with JSN or osteophyte formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The hamatolunate facet: characterization and association with cartilage lesions - magnetic resonance arthrography and anatomic correlation in cadaveric wrists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Forchstrasse 340, 8008 Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H.; Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the appearance of the hamatolunate facet using high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in cadavers and to correlate the presence of this anatomic variant with the presence of osteoarthritis in the wrist. High-resolution MR images of 22 cadaveric wrist specimens were obtained after tri-compartmental arthrography. Two readers in consensus analyzed the MR images and recoded the presence or absence of a hamatolunate facet. Geometric characteristics and cartilage and ligament integrity were analyzed. A third reader, who was blinded to the purpose of the study, recorded cartilage lesions of all the bones of the proximal and distal carpal rows. A hamatolunate facet was present in 11 of 22 wrists (50%). The mean coronal size of the lunate facet at the lunate (type II lunate) was 4.5 mm (range, 2-6 mm). The highest frequencies of cartilage lesions were seen in the scapho-trapezio-trapezoid joint (45.5%) and at the proximal pole of the hamate (54.4% and 40.9% for consensus reading/blinded reading, respectively). In cases with a hamatolunate facet, the frequency of cartilage lesions in the proximal pole of the hamate was 81.8% and 63.6% versus 27.3% and 18.2% without such a facet (chi-squared, P=0.01/P=0.03). No correlation of the presence of a hamatolunate facet with interosseous ligament tears or lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage was seen. In conclusion, the hamatolunate facet is a very common anatomic variant. The presence of a hamatolunate facet is associated with cartilage damage in the proximal pole of the hamate. (orig.)

  14. Knee joint contact mechanics during downhill gait and its relationship with varus/valgus motion and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p = 0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with deficits in muscle strength.

  15. Different thresholds for detecting osteophytes and joint space narrowing exist between the site investigators and the centralized reader in a multicenter knee osteoarthritis study - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali; Hayashi, Daichi [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Hunter, David J. [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); University of Sydney, Northern Clinical School, Sydney (Australia); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Benichou, Olivier [Eli Lilly and Co, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Eckstein, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nevitt, Michael [University of California, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate how the reading of knee radiographs by site investigators differs from that by an expert musculoskeletal radiologist who trained and validated them in a multicenter knee osteoarthritis (OA) study. A subset of participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative progression cohort was studied. Osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) were evaluated using Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) grading. Radiographs were read by site investigators, who received training and validation of their competence by an expert musculoskeletal radiologist. Radiographs were re-read by this radiologist, who acted as a central reader. For KL and OARSI grading of osteophytes, discrepancies between two readings were adjudicated by another expert reader. Radiographs from 96 subjects (49 women) and 192 knees (138 KL grade {>=} 2) were included. The site reading showed moderate agreement for KL grading overall (kappa=0.52) and for KL {>=} 2 (i.e., radiographic diagnosis of ''definite OA''; kappa=0.41). For OARSI grading, the site reading showed substantial agreement for lateral and medial JSN (kappa=0.65 and 0.71), but only fair agreement for osteophytes (kappa=0.37). For KL grading, the adjudicator's reading showed substantial agreement with the centralized reading (kappa=0.62), but only slight agreement with the site reading (kappa = 0.10). Site investigators over-graded osteophytes compared to the central reader and the adjudicator. Different thresholds for scoring of JSN exist even between experts. Our results suggest that research studies using radiographic grading of OA should use a centralized reader for all grading. (orig.)

  16. Different thresholds for detecting osteophytes and joint space narrowing exist between the site investigators and the centralized reader in a multicenter knee osteoarthritis study - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Hayashi, Daichi; Hunter, David J.; Li, Ling; Benichou, Olivier; Eckstein, Felix; Kwoh, C.K.; Nevitt, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate how the reading of knee radiographs by site investigators differs from that by an expert musculoskeletal radiologist who trained and validated them in a multicenter knee osteoarthritis (OA) study. A subset of participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative progression cohort was studied. Osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) were evaluated using Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) grading. Radiographs were read by site investigators, who received training and validation of their competence by an expert musculoskeletal radiologist. Radiographs were re-read by this radiologist, who acted as a central reader. For KL and OARSI grading of osteophytes, discrepancies between two readings were adjudicated by another expert reader. Radiographs from 96 subjects (49 women) and 192 knees (138 KL grade ≥ 2) were included. The site reading showed moderate agreement for KL grading overall (kappa=0.52) and for KL ≥ 2 (i.e., radiographic diagnosis of ''definite OA''; kappa=0.41). For OARSI grading, the site reading showed substantial agreement for lateral and medial JSN (kappa=0.65 and 0.71), but only fair agreement for osteophytes (kappa=0.37). For KL grading, the adjudicator's reading showed substantial agreement with the centralized reading (kappa=0.62), but only slight agreement with the site reading (kappa = 0.10). Site investigators over-graded osteophytes compared to the central reader and the adjudicator. Different thresholds for scoring of JSN exist even between experts. Our results suggest that research studies using radiographic grading of OA should use a centralized reader for all grading. (orig.)

  17. Aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-3 expressions in the temporo-mandibular joint condylar cartilage after an experimentally induced osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Juan-hong; Ma, Xu-chen; Li, Zhi-min; Wu, Deng-cheng

    2007-12-20

    Over 70% of the total tissue weight in the cartilage matrix consists of water, and the early-stage osteoarthritic cartilage is characterized by swelling. Water transport in the cartilage matrix and across the membranes of chondrocytes may be important in normal and pathological conditions of cartilage. The purpose of this study was to identify aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-3 (AQP3) expressions in the mandibular condylar cartilage after experimentally induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. An experimental temporomandibular joint OA was induced by partial discectomy in rats. The pathological characteristics of the normal, early-stage, and late-stage osteoarthritic TMJ cartilages were verified by histological techniques. The AQP1 and AQP3 gene expressions in the normal and osteoarthritic cartilages were measured using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR analysis. The cartilage sections were incubated in primary polyclonal antibodies to AQP3; immunofluorescent microscopy was used to examine the AQP3 expression shown by its protein level. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1 and AQP3, analyzed using quantitative PCR, revealed that AQP3 mRNA was highly up-regulated in the OA cartilage, which was considered significant. There was no notable difference in the expression of AQP1 mRNA between OA and normal controls. With the progressing of the OA, the localization of the AQP3 protein was quite different from that of the normal cartilage. Compared to the normal cartilage, the expressions of AQP3 protein were observed mainly in the proliferative zone and the upper mid-zone chondrocytes at the early-stage of OA, and were observed to appear frequently throughout the mid- and deep zone during the late-stage of OA. The high expression of AQP3 mRNA in the OA cartilage and the different localization of the AQP3 protein suggest that it may play a particular role in OA pathogenesis. Further study of AQP3 function may provide new insight into the understanding of the

  18. The diagnostic performance of radiography for detection of osteoarthritis-associated features compared with MRI in hip joints with chronic pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Li; Hayashi, Daichi; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David J.; Li, Ling; Winterstein, Anton; Bohndorf, Klaus; Roemer, Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of radiography for the detection of MRI-detected osteoarthritis-associated features in various articular subregions of the hip joint. Forty-four patients with chronic hip pain (mean age, 63.3 ± 9.5 years), who were part of the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring (HOAMS) cohort, underwent both weight-bearing anteroposterior pelvic radiography and 1.5 T MRI. The HOAMS study was a prospective observational study involving 52 subjects, conducted to develop a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for hip osteoarthritis features. In the present study, eight subjects were excluded because of a lack of radiographic assessment. On radiography, the presence of superior and medial joint space narrowing, superior and inferior acetabular/femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts, and bone attrition of femoral head was noted. On MRI, cartilage, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and bone attrition were evaluated in the corresponding locations. Diagnostic performance of radiography was compared with that of MRI, and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated for each pathological feature. Compared with MRI, radiography provided high specificity (0.76-0.90) but variable sensitivity (0.44-0.78) for diffuse cartilage damage (using JSN as an indirect marker), femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts and bone attrition of the femoral head, and a low specificity (0.42 and 0.58) for acetabular osteophytes. The AUC of radiography for detecting overall diffuse cartilage damage, marginal osteophytes, subchondral cysts and bone attrition was 0.76, 0.78, 0.67, and 0.82, respectively. Diagnostic performance of radiography is good for bone attrition, fair for marginal osteophytes and cartilage damage, but poor for subchondral cysts. (orig.)

  19. Hyperintense signal alteration in the suprapatellar fat pad on MRI is associated with degeneration of the patellofemoral joint over 48 months. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Gersing, Alexandra S.; Mbapte Wamba, John; Facchetti, Luca; Link, Thomas M.; Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E.

    2018-01-01

    To analyze associations of suprapatellar fat pad (SPFP) hyperintense signal alterations and mass effect with progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) and clinical symptoms over 48 months. Subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 426; 51.8 ± 3.8 years; 49.8% women) without radiographic tibiofemoral OA underwent 3T-MRI of their right knees and clinical evaluation using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score at baseline and at 48 months. Elevated SPFP signal was assessed on intermediate-weighted, fat-saturated turbo spin-echo (TSE) images. Mass effect was defined as a convex posterior contour. Patellofemoral cartilage, bone marrow lesions (BML), and subchondral cysts were assessed using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS). Associations of SPFP imaging findings with MRI and clinical progression were assessed using general linear models and logistic regressions. Baseline SPFP signal alterations were found in 51% of the subjects (n = 217), of whom 11% (n = 23) additionally had a mass effect. Progression of cartilage lesions was significantly higher in subjects with signal alteration versus without (adjusted mean increases, 95% CI; patella: 0.29, -0.07 to 0.64 vs -0.04, -0.40 to 0.31; p < 0.001; trochlea: 0.47, 0.16 to 0.77 vs 0.31, 0.01 to 0.61; p = 0.007). BML progression was also more likely in subjects with signal alteration (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82; p = 0.021). Mass effect was not associated with joint degeneration and SPFP findings were not associated with clinical worsening (p > 0.18 for all). Patellofemoral joint degeneration over 48 months was significantly increased in subjects with SPFP signal alteration, suggesting an association between SPFP abnormalities and the progression of patellofemoral OA. (orig.)

  20. The Immediate Effects of Conventional Physical Therapy on the Knee Joint Load in Subjects with Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis; A Preliminary Single Blinded Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fattahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subjects with knee osteoarthritis typically have higher knee adduction moment. Current research efforts are mainly focused on therapeutic procedures that potentially may modify disease progression. This preliminary study was designed as a single blind (examiner randomized control trial to investigate the impact of conventional physical therapy on pain, and knee joint load in subjects with moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Twelve participants diagnosed with moderate knee OA were randomly assigned into control and intervention groups. Three-dimensional knee kinematic and kinetic data were recorded during the gait before and after 10 sessions of conventional physical therapy. In addition, pain intensity was evaluated by visual analog scale and pain subscale of KOOS questionnaire. The control group did not receive any intervention during the same period. Gait parameters were analyzed within and between groups using nonparametric tests. Results: There was a significant difference between groups in baseline KOOS-pain Score and ML knee force (P=0.048 and P=0.01. Immediately after ten sessions of physical therapy the initial (first peak of knee adduction moment was significantly (P=0.03 lower than that of the control group while the first and second peak of knee AP velocity were significantly (P=0.02, P=0.01 respectively higher. In the intervention group, the second peaks of vertical and anteroposterior (AP knee forces were strongly correlated with the pretest KOOS-pain Score (r=0.99 and r=0.98, P<0.001. Therefore a multivariate general linear model was adopted with adjustment to baseline KOOS-pain. By this adjustment, 51% alleviation of VAS pain score and 81% decrement of first peak of knee adduction moment in comparison to control group was statistically significant (P=0.02, P=0.03 respectively. Conclusion: It seems that ten sessions of conventional physical therapy may modify knee joint load in subjects with moderate knee

  1. Hyperintense signal alteration in the suprapatellar fat pad on MRI is associated with degeneration of the patellofemoral joint over 48 months. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Gersing, Alexandra S. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Mbapte Wamba, John; Facchetti, Luca; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2018-03-15

    To analyze associations of suprapatellar fat pad (SPFP) hyperintense signal alterations and mass effect with progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) and clinical symptoms over 48 months. Subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 426; 51.8 ± 3.8 years; 49.8% women) without radiographic tibiofemoral OA underwent 3T-MRI of their right knees and clinical evaluation using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score at baseline and at 48 months. Elevated SPFP signal was assessed on intermediate-weighted, fat-saturated turbo spin-echo (TSE) images. Mass effect was defined as a convex posterior contour. Patellofemoral cartilage, bone marrow lesions (BML), and subchondral cysts were assessed using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS). Associations of SPFP imaging findings with MRI and clinical progression were assessed using general linear models and logistic regressions. Baseline SPFP signal alterations were found in 51% of the subjects (n = 217), of whom 11% (n = 23) additionally had a mass effect. Progression of cartilage lesions was significantly higher in subjects with signal alteration versus without (adjusted mean increases, 95% CI; patella: 0.29, -0.07 to 0.64 vs -0.04, -0.40 to 0.31; p < 0.001; trochlea: 0.47, 0.16 to 0.77 vs 0.31, 0.01 to 0.61; p = 0.007). BML progression was also more likely in subjects with signal alteration (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82; p = 0.021). Mass effect was not associated with joint degeneration and SPFP findings were not associated with clinical worsening (p > 0.18 for all). Patellofemoral joint degeneration over 48 months was significantly increased in subjects with SPFP signal alteration, suggesting an association between SPFP abnormalities and the progression of patellofemoral OA. (orig.)

  2. The diagnostic performance of radiography for detection of osteoarthritis-associated features compared with MRI in hip joints with chronic pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Hayashi, Daichi; Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Hunter, David J. [University of Sydney, Department of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Winterstein, Anton; Bohndorf, Klaus [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of radiography for the detection of MRI-detected osteoarthritis-associated features in various articular subregions of the hip joint. Forty-four patients with chronic hip pain (mean age, 63.3 {+-} 9.5 years), who were part of the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring (HOAMS) cohort, underwent both weight-bearing anteroposterior pelvic radiography and 1.5 T MRI. The HOAMS study was a prospective observational study involving 52 subjects, conducted to develop a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for hip osteoarthritis features. In the present study, eight subjects were excluded because of a lack of radiographic assessment. On radiography, the presence of superior and medial joint space narrowing, superior and inferior acetabular/femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts, and bone attrition of femoral head was noted. On MRI, cartilage, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and bone attrition were evaluated in the corresponding locations. Diagnostic performance of radiography was compared with that of MRI, and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated for each pathological feature. Compared with MRI, radiography provided high specificity (0.76-0.90) but variable sensitivity (0.44-0.78) for diffuse cartilage damage (using JSN as an indirect marker), femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts and bone attrition of the femoral head, and a low specificity (0.42 and 0.58) for acetabular osteophytes. The AUC of radiography for detecting overall diffuse cartilage damage, marginal osteophytes, subchondral cysts and bone attrition was 0.76, 0.78, 0.67, and 0.82, respectively. Diagnostic performance of radiography is good for bone attrition, fair for marginal osteophytes and cartilage damage, but poor for subchondral cysts. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Artificial Joint Replacement between Musculoskeletal Tumors and Osteoarthritis of the Knee by a Single Surgeon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Fu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the event of VTE (Venous Thromboembolism Event after total artificial joint replacement between two groups diagnosed with either musculoskeletal tumors or osteoarthritis (OA of the knee. From 2004 to 2014, a total of 1,402 patients (308 in tumor group, 1,094 in OA group were involved in this study. The rate of asymptomatic DVT (Deep vein thrombosis was significantly higher in tumor group when compared with OA group. Though both the incidence of symptomatic DVT and PE (Pulmonary embolism were slightly higher in tumor group, no significant difference was detected. Tumor patients suffered an almost equal risk of VTE compared with OA patients except a higher rate of asymptomatic DVT after total artificial joint replacement. For patients with tumor, no significant association was observed between any potential risk factor and DVT.

  4. Design and Evaluation of a New Type of Knee Orthosis to Align the Mediolateral Angle of the Knee Joint with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Esrafilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoarthritis (OA is a disease which influences the performance of the knee joint. Moreover, the force and moments applied on the joint increase in contrast to normal subjects. Various types of knee orthoses have been designed to solve the mentioned problems. However, there are other problems in terms of distal migration during walking and the alignment of the orthosis which cannot be changed following the use of brace. Therefore, the main aim of the research was to design an orthosis to solve the aforementioned problems. Method. A new type of knee orthosis was designed with a modular structure. Two patients with knee OA participated in this research project. The force applied on the foot, moment transmitted through the knee joint, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured by use of a motion analysis system. Results. The results of the research showed that the adduction moment applied on the knee joint decreased while subjects walked with the new knee orthosis (P-value < 0.05. Conclusion. The new design of the knee brace can be used as an effective treatment to decrease the loads applied on the knee joint and to improve the alignment whilst walking.

  5. Evaluation of the novel avocado/soybean unsaponifiable Arthrocen to alter joint pain and inflammation in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Ramin; Reid, Allison; McDougall, Jason J

    2018-01-01

    Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables such as Arthrocen have been reported to reduce cartilage catabolism and chondrocytic synthesis of inflammatory mediators associated with osteoarthritis (OA). While there is some clinical evidence that avocado/soybean unsaponifiables can reduce OA pain, no preclinical studies have corroborated this observation. The present study determined whether addition of an avocado/soybean unsaponifiable (Arthrocen) to the drinking water of OA rats reduced direct and referred joint pain. OA was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA: 0.3mg) and animals were allowed to recover for 14 days. Arthrocen was added to the drinking water which was available to animals ad libitum. On day 30, joint pain was assessed by dynamic incapacitance while referred pain was determined by von Frey hair algesiometry. The joint damage induced by MIA injection was severe and was consistent with end-stage OA. Arthrocen consumption (approximately 35 mg/day) attenuated the joint oedema associated with MIA injection. Hindlimb weight bearing also significantly improved in Arthrocen-treated rats (P<0.05); however, von Frey hair mechanosensitivity was unaffected by this treatment. These data indicate that Arthrocen has the potential to reduce joint inflammation and pain associated with end-stage OA.

  6. Relationships between the center of pressure and the movements of the ankle and knee joints during the stance phase in patients with severe medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Takashi; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Okubo, Tomoyuki; Mori, Koichi; Wadano, Yasuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    The knee joint movement during the stance phase is affected by altered ankle movement and the center of pressure (COP). However the relationships between changes in the center of pressure (COP) and the altered kinematics and kinetics of the ankle and knee joints in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between changes in the COP and the altered kinematic and kinetic variables in ankle and knee joints during the stance phase in patients with medial knee OA. Fourteen patients with knee OA (21 knees) and healthy subjects were assessed by gait analysis using an eight-camera motion analysis system to record forward and lateral shifts in the COP and the angle and net internal moments of the knee and ankle joint. Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between these results. In knees with medial OA, lateral shifts in the COP were correlated with knee flexion angle. Lateral shifts in the COP were correlated with the second peak of the knee extensor moment and correlated with the knee abductor moment. In patients with medial knee OA, lateral shifts in the COP were negatively correlated with the kinematic and kinetic variables in the sagittal plane of the knee joints. Controlling such lateral shifts in the COP may thus be an effective intervention for mechanical loads on the knee during the stance phase in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. On Patellofemoral joint replacement - Clinical, radiological, and numerical studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonbergen, J.P.W. van

    2011-01-01

    Patellofemoral, osteoarthritis, joint replacement, arthroplasty, anterior knee pain Isolated patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disorder of the knee estimated to occur in approximately 4% to 24% of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Mild isolated patellofemoral

  8. Superior facet syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Igarashi, Seishi; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1985-01-01

    Sciatica caused by root entrapment in the lateral recess was named superior facet syndrome by Epstein in 1972. Few reports on this subject based on large numbers of cases have been documented to date. Of the patients with sciatica, 32 patients were diagnosed to have root entrapment at the lateral recess L 5 or/and S 1 lumbar spine. Out of 32 patients, 20 patients were operated on and the lateral entrapment was recognized in all of surgical cases. Neuroradiological findings, especially of metrizamide CT (met. CT), were documented in detail. Thirty two patients were classified in three types according to radiological findings. They were congenital or developmental, degenerative, and combined type, respectively, Fourteen cases belonged to the congenital type, 13 to the degenerative and 5 to the combined type. Each group had the mean ages of 23.4, 53.8, and 36.8 years old, respectively. Of 32 cases the entrapment occured in 47 L 5 roots and 11 S 1 roots. There was no remarkable laterality. In operation the unroofing of the lateral recess were done and the sciatica subsided postoperatively in all of surgical cases. Met. CT revealed extreme medial protrusion of the superior articular joint in 18 of 24 cases(75%) and none filling of the root in the lateral recess in 21 of 24 cases (87.5%). In the degenerative type, met. CT showed some degenerative changes that were hypertrophy or deformity of the articular joints and spur formation of the vertebral body. In contrast to met. CT, metrizamide myelography revealed only slight changes, which were poor filling of the root before it turned out the pedicle of lateral compression of the root. In plain films or lumbar spine articular joints at Lsub(4/5) were formed in coronal plane in 69% of cases of the L 5 root entrapment. Met. CT using ReView technique was of great diagnostic value in superior facet syndrome. (author)

  9. Age and osteoarthritis: are AGEs the link?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease in the elderly. By far the most important risk factor for osteoarthritis is aging. Age-related changes in the articular cartilage may be responsible for age-related increase in the number of people with osteoarthritis. One of the most striking changes in

  10. FacetGist: Collective Extraction of Document Facets in Large Technical Corpora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Tarique; Ren, Xiang; Parameswaran, Aditya; Han, Jiawei

    2016-10-01

    Given the large volume of technical documents available, it is crucial to automatically organize and categorize these documents to be able to understand and extract value from them. Towards this end, we introduce a new research problem called Facet Extraction. Given a collection of technical documents, the goal of Facet Extraction is to automatically label each document with a set of concepts for the key facets ( e.g. , application, technique, evaluation metrics, and dataset) that people may be interested in. Facet Extraction has numerous applications, including document summarization, literature search, patent search and business intelligence. The major challenge in performing Facet Extraction arises from multiple sources: concept extraction, concept to facet matching, and facet disambiguation. To tackle these challenges, we develop FacetGist, a framework for facet extraction. Facet Extraction involves constructing a graph-based heterogeneous network to capture information available across multiple local sentence-level features, as well as global context features. We then formulate a joint optimization problem, and propose an efficient algorithm for graph-based label propagation to estimate the facet of each concept mention. Experimental results on technical corpora from two domains demonstrate that Facet Extraction can lead to an improvement of over 25% in both precision and recall over competing schemes.

  11. Exploring the relationships between International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) constructs of Impairment, Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction in people with osteoarthritis prior to joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Beth; Johnston, Marie; Dieppe, Paul

    2011-05-16

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) proposes three main constructs, impairment (I), activity limitation (A) and participation restriction (P). The ICF model allows for all paths between the constructs to be explored, with significant paths likely to vary for different conditions. The relationships between I, A and P have been explored in some conditions but not previously in people with osteoarthritis prior to joint replacement. The aim of this paper is to examine these relationships using separate measures of each construct and structural equation modelling. A geographical cohort of 413 patients with osteoarthritis about to undergo hip and knee joint replacement completed the Aberdeen measures of Impairment, Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction (Ab-IAP). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the three factor (I, A, P) measurement model. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the I, A and P pathways in the ICF model. There was support from confirmatory factor analysis for the three factor I, A, P measurement model. The structural equation model had good fit [S-B Chi-square = 439.45, df = 149, CFI robust = 0.91, RMSEA robust = 0.07] and indicated significant pathways between I and A (standardised coefficient = 0.76 p < 0.0001) and between A and P (standardised coefficient = 0.75 p < 0.0001). However, the path between I and P was not significant (standardised coefficient = 0.01). The significant pathways suggest that treatments and interventions aimed at reducing impairment, such as joint replacement, may only affect P indirectly, through A, however, longitudinal data would be needed to establish this.

  12. Bipolar Radiofrequency Facet Ablation of the Lumbar Facet Capsule: An Adjunct to Conventional Radiofrequency Ablation for Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert E; Palea, Ovidiu; Granville, Michelle

    2017-09-01

    Radiofrequency facet ablation (RFA) has been performed using the same technique for over 50 years. Except for variations in electrode size, tip shape, and change in radiofrequency (RF) stimulation parameters, using standard, pulsed, and cooled RF wavelengths, the target points have remained absolutely unchanged from the original work describing RFA for lumbar pain control. Degenerative changes in the facet joint and capsule are the primary location for the majority of lumbar segmental pathology and pain. Multiple studies show that the degenerated facet joint is richly innervated as a result of the inflammatory overgrowth of the synovium. The primary provocative clinical test to justify an RFA is to perform an injection with local anesthetic into the facet joint and the posterior capsule and confirm pain relief. However, after a positive response, the radiofrequency lesion is made not to the facet joint but to the more proximal fine nerve branches that innervate the joint. The accepted target points for the recurrent sensory branch ignore the characteristic rich innervation of the pathologic lumbar facet capsule and assume that lesioning of these recurrent branches is sufficient to denervate the painful pathologic facet joint. This report describes the additional targets and technical steps for further coagulation points along the posterior capsule of the lumbar facet joint and the physiologic studies of the advantage of the bipolar radiofrequency current in this location. Bipolar RF to the facet capsule is a simple, extra step that easily creates a large thermo-coagulated lesion in this capsule region of the pathologic facet joint. Early studies demonstrate bipolar RF to the facet capsule can provide long-term pain relief when used alone for specific localized facet joint pain, to coagulate lumbar facet cysts to prevent recurrence, and to get more extensive pain control by combining it with traditional lumbar RFA, especially when RFA is repeated.

  13. Outcomes associated with early post-traumatic osteoarthritis and other negative health consequences 3-10 years following knee joint injury in youth sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J L; Woodhouse, L J; Nettel-Aguirre, A; Emery, C A

    2015-07-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) commonly affects the knee joint. Although the risk of PTOA substantially increases post-joint injury, there is little research examining PTOA outcomes early in the period between joint injury and disease onset. Improved understanding of this interval would inform secondary prevention strategies aimed at preventing and/or delaying PTOA progression. This study examines the association between sport-related knee injury and outcomes related to development of PTOA, 3-10 years post-injury. This preliminary analysis of the first year of a historical cohort study includes 100 (15-26 years) individuals. Fifty with a sport-related intra-articular knee injury sustained 3-10 years previously and 50 uninjured age, sex and sport matched controls. The primary outcome was the 'Symptoms' sub-scale of the Knee Osteoarthritis and Injury Outcome Score (KOOS). Secondary outcomes included; the remaining KOOS subscales, body mass index (BMI), hip abductor/adductor and knee extensor/flexor strength, estimated aerobic capacity (VO2max) and performance scores on three dynamic balance tests. Descriptive statistics (mean within-pair difference; 95% Confidence interval (CI) and conditional odds ratio (OR, 95% CI; BMI) were used to compare study groups. Injured participants demonstrated poorer KOOS outcomes [symptoms -9.4 (-13.6, -5.2), pain -4.0 (-6.8, -1.2), quality-of-life -8.0 (-11.0, -5.1), daily living -3.0 (-5.0, -1.1) and sport/recreation -6.9 (-9.9, -3.8)], were 3.75 times (95% CI 1.24, 11.3) more likely to be overweight/obese and had lower triple single leg hop scores compared to controls. No significant group differences existed for remaining balance scores, estimated VO2max, hip or knee strength ratios or side-to-side difference in hip abductor/adductor or quadricep/hamstring strength. This study provides preliminary evidence that youth/young adults following sport-related knee injury report more symptoms and poorer function, and are at

  14. Osteoarthritis after osteosynthesis of ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Mechsner, K.; Langenscheidt, P.; Krankenhaus Spandau, Berlin

    1984-01-01

    98 patients were clinically and radiographically examined 2 to 9 years following the osteosynthesis of ankle fractures. The rate of secondary osteoarthritis was 70% including 40% of minor, 17% of medium and 13% of serious changes. Depending on the injured structures the frequency of posttraumatic osteoarthritis varies. Medium and serious radiology changes cause obvious dysfunction in 56% and 62% respectively. Joints free of Osteoarthritis one year after the injury will not develop secondary osteoarthritis later. (orig.) [de

  15. Reproducibility of joint space width and the intermargin distance measurements in patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee in various degrees of flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu; Yamanaka, Norio; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the variability and reproducibility of measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and intermargin distance (IMD) of the medial tibial plateau in specific positions of knee flexion in osteoarthritic knees in order to evaluate the most useful knee angle for radiographic measurements. Radiographs from 56 knees with osteoarthritis from 46 patients were taken with the knees in conventional full extension and 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with weight bearing. Three orthopedic surgeons independently measured the JSW and IMD at the narrowest point and the midpoint of medial tibial plateau using a computer-assisted method. The JSW and IMD were smallest at 15 flexion, both measured at the narrowest point and the midpoint of the medial compartment. Reproducibility of the IMD at the midpoint was better than at the narrowest point for all four flexion angles. Measurements of the medial JSW and IMD are smallest at 15 of knee flexion indicating that radiographs should be obtained at this angle in order to best demonstrate the extent of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  16. Reproducibility of joint space width and the intermargin distance measurements in patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee in various degrees of flexion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bone and Joint Surgery, Toon, Ehime (Japan); Yamanaka, Norio; Ikeuchi, Masahiko [Kochi University, Department of Orthopaedics, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    This study tested the variability and reproducibility of measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and intermargin distance (IMD) of the medial tibial plateau in specific positions of knee flexion in osteoarthritic knees in order to evaluate the most useful knee angle for radiographic measurements. Radiographs from 56 knees with osteoarthritis from 46 patients were taken with the knees in conventional full extension and 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with weight bearing. Three orthopedic surgeons independently measured the JSW and IMD at the narrowest point and the midpoint of medial tibial plateau using a computer-assisted method. The JSW and IMD were smallest at 15 flexion, both measured at the narrowest point and the midpoint of the medial compartment. Reproducibility of the IMD at the midpoint was better than at the narrowest point for all four flexion angles. Measurements of the medial JSW and IMD are smallest at 15 of knee flexion indicating that radiographs should be obtained at this angle in order to best demonstrate the extent of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  17. Pathophysiology of osteoarthritis: perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Viapiana

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is generally considered a degenerative disorder driven by mechanical alteration of joint cartilage, with the bone changes being reactive to cartilage changes. According to this pathogenetic mechanism the only strategy to prevent osteoarthritis should be based on the so-called “chondro-protective agents”. However, a number of recent finding suggests that both the initiation and the progression of the disease is driven by subchondral bone changes reactive to mechanical microdamages. These increase osteoblastic activity at the “tide-mark” with consequent enlargement of the epiphyses and osteophyte formation. The increased bone turnover is secondary to overproduction of cytokines that diffuse to cartilage tissue, where they suppress condrocyte activity and activate metallo-proteases. Preliminary observational finding and experimental data showed that inhibitors of bone turnover might slow osteoarthritis progression. The pathogenetic hypothesis for osteoarthritis illustrated here provides the rational for a new therapeutic approach to the disease.

  18. The combined therapy with chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine sulfate or chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine hydrochloride does not improve joint damage in an experimental model of knee osteoarthritis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Mediero, Aránzazu; Tardío, Lidia; Portal-Nuñez, Sergio; Gratal, Paula; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Largo, Raquel

    2017-01-05

    Osteoarthritis is the most common chronic joint disorder especially during aging. Although with controversies, glucosamine, both in its forms of sulfate and hydrochloride, and chondroitin sulfate are commonly employed to treat osteoarthritis. Due to the modest improve in the symptoms observed in patients treated with these drugs alone, a formulation combining both agents has been considered. The discrepant results achieved for pain control or structural improvement in osteoarthritis patients has been attributed to the quality of chemical formulations or different bias in clinical studies. The current study has been designed to test the effects of two different combined formulations with adequate pharmaceutical grade of these drugs in osteoarthritic joints, and to explore the underlying mechanisms modulated by both formulations in different osteoarthritis target tissues. Knee osteoarthritis was surgically induced in experimental rabbits. Some animals received the combined therapy (CT)1, (chondroitin sulfate 1200mg/day + glucosamine sulfate 1500mg/day), or the CT2 ((chondroitin sulfate 1200mg/day + glucosamine hydrochloride 1500mg/day). Neither CT1 nor CT2 significantly modified the cartilage damage or the synovial inflammation observed in osteoarthritic animals. Treatments were also unable to modify the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators, and the synthesis of metalloproteinases in the cartilage or in the synovium of osteoarthritic animals. Combined therapies did not modify the decrease in the subchondral bone mineral density observed in osteoarthritic rabbits. Therapies of chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine sulfate or chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine hydrochloride failed to improve structural damage or to ameliorate the inflammatory profile of joint tissues during experimental osteoarthritis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Hidden osteophyte formation on plain X-ray is the predictive factor for development of knee osteoarthritis after 48 months--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, J; Sasho, T; Yamaguchi, S; Sato, Y; Watanabe, A; Akagi, R; Muramatsu, Y; Mukoyama, S; Akatsu, Y; Fukawa, T; Endo, J; Hoshi, H; Yamamoto, Y; Sasaki, T; Takahashi, K

    2015-03-01

    To examine whether the detection of osteophytes anywhere in the knee could serve as a pre-radiographic biomarker for osteoarthritis (OA) development. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of 132 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) were studied. Based on radiographs, 66 knees were assessed as osteoarthritis-free (no-osteoarthritis [NOA], or Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] severity grade 0/1 both at baseline and 48 months), and another 66 knees were assessed as having radiographic OA changes (pre-radiographic osteoarthritis [PROA], or with K/L grade 0/1 at baseline and grade ≥ 2 at 48 months). Using baseline MRI data, we examined eight sites of osteophyte formation: the medial and lateral femoral condyle (MFC and LFC, respectively); medial and lateral tibial plateau (MTP and LTP, respectively); medial and lateral facets of the patellofemoral joint (PM and PL, respectively); tibial spine (TS); and femoral intercondylar notch (IC). Knee joint osteophyte size was assessed via the 8-point marginal osteophytes item of the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). The frequencies and distributions of osteophytes were compared between groups. Mild-size osteophytes (defined as score ≥ 2) were observed more frequently at the MFC (P = 0.00278), MTP (P = 0.0046), TS (P = 0.0146), PM (P formation at the IC, even those of K/L severity grade 0/1, are at risk for the development of radiographic OA by 48 months. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional ankle instability as a risk factor for osteoarthritis: using T2-mapping to analyze early cartilage degeneration in the ankle joint of young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golditz, T; Steib, S; Pfeifer, K; Uder, M; Gelse, K; Janka, R; Hennig, F F; Welsch, G H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using T2-mapping, the impact of functional instability in the ankle joint on the development of early cartilage damage. Ethical approval for this study was provided. Thirty-six volunteers from the university sports program were divided into three groups according to their ankle status: functional ankle instability (FAI, initial ankle sprain with residual instability); ankle sprain Copers (initial sprain, without residual instability); and controls (without a history of ankle injuries). Quantitative T2-mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at the beginning ('early-unloading') and at the end ('late-unloading') of the MR-examination, with a mean time span of 27 min. Zonal region-of-interest T2-mapping was performed on the talar and tibial cartilage in the deep and superficial layers. The inter-group comparisons of T2-values were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical analysis of variance was performed. T2-values showed significant to highly significant differences in 11 of 12 regions throughout the groups. In early-unloading, the FAI-group showed a significant increase in quantitative T2-values in the medial, talar regions (P = 0.008, P = 0.027), whereas the Coper-group showed this enhancement in the central-lateral regions (P = 0.05). Especially the comparison of early-loading to late-unloading values revealed significantly decreasing T2-values over time laterally and significantly increasing T2-values medially in the FAI-group, which were not present in the Coper- or control-group. Functional instability causes unbalanced loading in the ankle joint, resulting in cartilage alterations as assessed by quantitative T2-mapping. This approach can visualize and localize early cartilage abnormalities, possibly enabling specific treatment options to prevent osteoarthritis in young athletes. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, J A D; Nair, S C; Custers, R J H; van Laar, J M; Kuchuck, N O; Lafeber, F P J G; Welsing, P M J

    2016-01-01

    In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90-95% for the younger age categories. A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient.

  2. The Joint Clinic: Managing Excess Demand for Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis Referrals Using a New Physiotherapy-Led Outpatient Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne-Jones, David P; Hutton, Liam R; Stout, Kirsten M; Abbott, J Haxby

    2018-04-01

    There are increasing problems with access to both outpatient assessment and joint replacement surgery for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. Data were collected on all patients seen at the Joint Clinic over a 2-year period with minimum 12-month follow-up. Patients were assessed by a nurse and a physiotherapist, baseline scores and demographic details collected, and an individualized personal care plan developed. Patients could be referred for a first specialist assessment (FSA) if their severity justified surgical assessment. Three hundred fifty-eight patients were seen at Joint Clinic, of whom 150 (44%) had hip and 189 (56%) had knee OA. The mean age was 67.4 years and there were 152 men (45%) and 187 women (55%). The mean baseline Oxford score was 19.8 (standard deviation 8.2). Fifty-four patients were referred directly to FSA (mean Oxford score 13.0, standard deviation 6.7) and 89 after a subsequent review. The scores of patients referred for FSA were significantly worse than those managed in the Joint Clinic (P < .001). Of the 143 referred for FSA, 115 underwent or were awaiting surgery, 18 were recommended surgery but scored below prioritization threshold, and 10 were not recommended surgery. The Oxford scores of the 194 patients managed non-operatively improved from 22.0 to 25.0 (P = .0013). This study shows that the Joint Clinic was effective as a triage tool with 93% of those referred for FSA being recommended surgery. This has freed up surgeon time to see only those patients most in need of surgical assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomechanical considerations in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Andras; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Madry, Henning; Drobnič, Matej; Filardo, Giuseppe; Espregueira-Mendes, João; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and a major cause of disability. The knee is the large joint most affected. While chronological age is the single most important risk factor of osteoarthritis, the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis in the young patient is predominantly related to an

  4. Combination COX-2 inhibitor and metformin attenuate rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis with diabetes: A nationwide, retrospective, matched-cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Hung, Yi-Jen; Lin, Fu-Huang; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis associated with an increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), however their impact on decreasing joint replacement surgery has yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate if the combination of COX-2 inhibitor and metformin therapy in OA with T2DM were associated with lower the rate of joint replacement surgery than COX-2 inhibitor alone. In total, 968 subjects with OA and T2DM under COX-2 inhibitor and metformin therapy (case group) between 1 January to 31 December 2000 were selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, along with 1936 patients were the 1:2 gender-, age-, and index year-controls matched without metformin therapy (control group) in this study. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to compare the rate of receiving joint replacement surgery during 10 years of follow-up. At the end of follow-up, 438 of all enrolled subjects (15.08%) had received the joint replacement surgery, including 124 in the case group (12.81%) and 314 in the control group (16.22%). The case group tended to be associated with lower rate of receiving the joint replacement surgery at the end of follow-up than the control group (p = 0.003). Cox proportional hazards regression (HR) analysis revealed that study subjects under combination therapy with metformin had lower rate of joint replacement surgery (adjusted HR 0.742 (95% CI = 0.601-0.915, p = 0.005)). In the subgroups, study subjects in the combination metformin therapy who were female, good adherence (>80%), lived in the highest urbanization levels of residence, treatment in the hospital center and lower monthly insurance premiums were associated with a lower risk of joint replacement surgery than those without. Patients who have OA and T2DM receiving combination COX-2 inhibitors and metformin therapy associated with lower joint replacement surgery rates than those without and this may be attributable to combination

  5. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis: state of the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D.; Golightly, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review focuses on recent studies of osteoarthritis epidemiology, including research on prevalence, incidence, and a broad array of potential risk factors at the person level and joint level. Recent findings Studies continue to illustrate the high impact of osteoarthritis worldwide, with increasing incidence. Person-level risk factors with strong evidence regarding osteoarthritis incidence and/or progression include age, sex, socioeconomic status, family history, and obesity. Joint-level risk factors with strong evidence for incident osteoarthritis risk include injury and occupational joint loading; the associations of injury and joint alignment with osteoarthritis progression are compelling. Moderate levels of physical activity have not been linked to increased osteoarthritis risk. Some topics of high recent interest or emerging evidence for association with osteoarthritis include metabolic pathways, vitamins, joint shape, bone density, limb length inequality, muscle strength and mass, and early structural damage. Summary Osteoarthritis is a complex, multifactorial disease, and there is still much to learn regarding mechanisms underlying incidence and progression. However, there are several known modifiable and preventable risk factors, including obesity and joint injury; efforts to mitigate these risks can help to lessen the impact of osteoarthritis. PMID:25775186

  6. Fifty-seven cases of osteoarthritis of knee joint treated with needling method of Canggui Tanxue%苍龟探穴针法治疗膝关节骨性关节炎57例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡伟民; 东贵荣

    2011-01-01

    @@ Osteoarthritis (OA) of knee joint is a common chronic joint disease in community.It is seen in middle-aged and old people generally.In clinic, a great deal of attention is paid because of its serious pain and motor impairment of knee joint.These symptoms become the important factors affecting the survival quality of the middle-aged and old people.The authors adopted the needling method of Canggui tanxue (needling manipulation for promoting qi) to treat 57 cases of the disease in Community Health Service Center.The report is as follows.

  7. Osteoarthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Osteoarthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * ...

  8. Osteoarthritis in the Knee Joints of Göttingen Minipigs after Resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament? Missing Correlation of MRI, Gene and Protein Expression with Histological Scoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Reisig

    Full Text Available The Göttingen Minipig (GM is used as large animal model in articular cartilage research. The aim of the study was to introduce osteoarthritis (OA in the GM by resecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLR according to Pond and Nuki, verified by histological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scoring as well as analysis of gene and protein expression.The eight included skeletally mature female GM were assessed after ACLR in the left and a sham operation in the right knee, which served as control. 26 weeks after surgery the knee joints were scanned using a 3-Tesla high-field MR tomography unit with a 3 T CP Large Flex Coil. Standard proton-density weighted fat saturated sequences in coronal and sagittal direction with a slice thickness of 3 mm were used. The MRI scans were assessed by two radiologists according to a modified WORMS-score, the X-rays of the knee joints by two evaluators. Osteochondral plugs with a diameter of 4mm were taken for histological examination from either the main loading zone or the macroscopic most degenerated parts of the tibia plateau or condyle respectively. The histological sections were blinded and scored by three experts according to Little et al. Gene expression analysis was performed from surrounding cartilage. Expression of adamts4, adamts5, acan, col1A1, col2, il-1ß, mmp1, mmp3, mmp13, vegf was determined by qRT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining (IH of Col I and II was performed. IH was scored using a 4 point grading (0-no staining; 3-intense staining.Similar signs of OA were evident both in ACLR and sham operated knee joints with the histological scoring result of the ACLR joints with 6.48 ± 5.67 points and the sham joints with 6.86 ± 5.84 points (p = 0.7953 The MRI scoring yielded 0.34 ± 0.89 points for the ACLR and 0.03 ± 0.17 for the sham knee joints. There was no correlation between the histological and MRI scores (r = 0.10021. The gene expression profiles as well as the immunohistochemical findings

  9. Comparison of Photo Optical Imaging with Musculoskeletal Ultrasound and Clinical Examination in the Assessment of Inflammatory Activity in Proximal Interphalangeal Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Isabella; Werner, Stephanie; Schicke, Bernd; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Minet, Olaf; Zabaryło, Urszula; Backhaus, Marina; Ohrndorf, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Lightscan is a novel, rapid, low-cost, easily operated and noninvasive imaging technology used to assess inflammatory activity in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. The results are calculated automatically. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative study of photo optical imaging (POI), with clinical examination (CE), disease activity score at 28 joints (DAS28)-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis (OA). There were 688 PIP joints of both hands examined in 87 subjects (38 RA, 21 OA, 28 healthy) by Lightscan and compared with CE for clinically swollen and tender joints, DAS28-ESR (only RA), and US. With US as reference, POI had a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 93%. In the receiver-operating curve (ROC) analysis, the Lightscan showed a higher sensitivity and specificity [area under the curve (AUC) 0.879] for the distinction of healthy subjects versus patients (OA, RA) than US in greyscale (GSUS; AUC 0.797) and power Doppler (PDUS; AUC 0.67). POI correlated significantly with GSUS (r 0.473, p POI and GSUS were up to 79%, between POI and PDUS up to 92%, and between POI and CE up to 66%. POI did not correlate with DAS28-ESR. The Lightscan is a new technology offering sensitive imaging detection of inflammatory changes in subjects with RA and OA with PIP arthritis. POI was more sensitive than CE and correlated significantly to GSUS and PDUS, while presenting a higher sensitivity and specificity for the detection of healthy subjects versus patients (RA, OA) based on the ROC analysis.

  10. Alpha C-telopeptide of type I collagen is associated with subchondral bone turnover and predicts progression of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Janet L; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Huffman, Kim M; He, Yi; Leeming, Diana J; McDaniel, Gary E; Karsdal, Morten A; Kraus, Virginia B

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate joint tissue remodeling using the urinary collagen biomarkers urinary α-C-telopeptide of type I collagen (α-CTX) and urinary C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and to determine the association of these biomarkers with osteoarthritis (OA) severity, progression, and localized knee bone turnover. Participants (n = 149) with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA underwent fixed-flexion knee radiography at baseline and 3 years, and late-phase bone scintigraphy of both knees at baseline, which were scored semiquantitatively for osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) severity and uptake intensity, with scores summed across knees. Urinary concentrations of α-CTX and CTX-II were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemical analysis of human OA knees was performed to localize the joint tissue origin of the biomarker epitopes. Urinary α-CTX concentrations correlated strongly with the intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake and with JSN progression (risk ratio 13.2) and osteophyte progression (risk ratio 3). Urinary CTX-II concentrations were strongly associated with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, with JSN and osteophyte severity, and with OA progression based on osteophyte score. Urinary α-CTX localized primarily to high bone turnover areas in subchondral bone. CTX-II localized to the bone-cartilage interface, the tidemark, and damaged articular cartilage. Baseline urinary α-CTX, which was localized to high turnover areas of subchondral bone, was associated with dynamic bone turnover of knees, as signified by scintigraphy, and progression of both osteophytes and JSN. Urinary CTX-II correlated with JSN and osteophyte severity and progression of osteophytes. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of serologic markers reflecting subchondral bone turnover. These collagen markers may be useful for noninvasive detection and quantification of active subchondral bone turnover and joint remodeling in knee OA

  11. Effects of intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection on immunohistochemical characterization of joint afferents in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, M; Izumi, M; Aso, K; Sugimura, N; Kato, T; Tani, T

    2015-03-01

    Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) injection, known as viscosupplementation, is a widely used therapy for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Long-term clinical efficacy of HA has been reported in spite of a relatively short residence time. Herein, we evaluated our hypothesis that intra-articular HA injection could reduce the OA-associated changes in joint afferents. OA was induced by intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate in rats. Animals in the OA + HA group were given three weekly intra-articular HA injections. Pain-related behaviours, including weight-bearing asymmetry and mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw, knee joint histology and immunohistochemistry of joint afferents identified by retrograde labelling, were compared between groups (naïve, OA and OA + HA). OA rats showed pain-related behaviours and up-regulation of pain-related neurochemical markers [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tyrosine receptor kinase A (TrkA) and acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3)] in joint afferents. HA injections reduced not only the severity of OA and pain behaviours but also OA-associated neurochemical changes in joint afferents. The differences between OA and OA + HA were statistically significant in CGRP (61 ± 10% vs. 51 ± 10%; p = 0.0406) but not significant in TrkA (62 ± 10% vs. 54 ± 9%; p = 0.0878) and ASIC3 (38 ± 9% vs. 32 ± 8%; p = 0.3681). Intra-articular HA injections reduced the severity of OA, decreased mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw, but not weight-bearing asymmetry, and attenuated OA-associated up-regulation of CGRP, but not TrkA and ASIC3, in joint afferents. The modulatory effects of HA on joint afferents is one of the underlying mechanisms of the gap between HA residence time and duration of clinical efficacy. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  12. Prevalence of osteoarthritis of knee joint among adult population in a rural area of Kanchipuram District, Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Jayaseelan; Natesan, Murugan; Eswaran, Muthurajesh; Johnson, Abel K Samuel; Bharath, V; Singh, Zile

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common degenerative disorders among the elderly population; although aging is the most important cause, research has shown that it is a complex disease with many etiologies. It is not an inevitable part of aging but rather the result of a combination of factors, many of which can be modified or prevented. The objective of this study was to assess the burden and determinants of OA knee among the adult population. A community-based, cross-sectional study among 1986 adult persons living in a rural area in Kanchipuram district, Tamil Nadu, South India, was interviewed and examined from January 2014 to December 2014. Data collection was done by the postgraduates, trained health workers under the supervision of principal investigator. Written and informed consent was obtained before data collection. OA was diagnosed using the criteria laid down by the American College of Rheumatology, and it was validated and tested in the study area. A total of 1986 adult respondents were interviewed out of which 27.1% had OA of knee. Age more than 50 years, female gender, tobacco usage, illiteracy, lower socioeconomic class, positive family history of OA, diabetes, and hypertension were found to be associated with OA knee (P < 0.05). The burden of osteoarthritis knee was high in this region. Hence, effective preventive strategy has to be taken to minimize this burden.

  13. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-20

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications.

  14. Trend of Cadherin-11 expression and its impact on cartilage degradation in the temporomandibular joints of guinea pigs with spontaneous osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengjie; Lu, Haiping; Yu, Fengyang; Zhou, Yiqun

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate spatial and temporal changes in cadherin-11 (CAD-11) expression and their effects on cartilage degeneration in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of guinea pigs with spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA). Dunkin-Hartley (DH) and Bristol strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs at ages of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months were categorized into two groups and analyzed. The bilateral TMJ condyles of DH and BS2 guinea pigs were harvested and fixed. The distribution and expression profiles of CAD-11, collagen type II, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) were detected by immunohistological assays. Histological micrographs of the condyle cartilage were obtained and analyzed. Osteoarthritis can be spontaneously induced by mechanical stress in DH guinea pigs. The main histopathological changes in the TMJ structure and increased expression of MMP-3 occurred within 6-9 months of ages in DH guinea pigs with spontaneous OA. By contrast, minimal to mild cartilage degradations were observed in the TMJ of BS2 guinea pigs even at the age of 12 months. From as early as 3 months of age, the expression levels of CAD-11 were upregulated in the TMJ of DH guinea pigs compared with those in BS2 animals. CAD-11 expression differed between the two groups at 12 months of age. Increased CAD-11 expression within cartilage is associated with the development and progression of OA between the two strains of guinea pigs. Therefore, CAD-11 expression in TMJ could be an important predisposing factor for the development of spontaneous OA. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis--treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, E; Roos, E M; Ageberg, E; Nilsdotter, A

    2013-09-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters. The dataset consisted of knee (n = 66) and hip (n = 47) OA patients assigned for total joint replacement at Lund University Hospital undergoing pre-operative neuromuscular exercise and 43 matched controls. Sensitivity to pressure pain was assessed by pressure algometry at 10 sites. Subjects were then instructed to perform a standardized static knee extension. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed at the contracting quadriceps muscle (Q) and at the resting deltoid muscle (D) before and during contraction. The relative increase in PPTs during contraction was taken as a measure of localized (Q) or generalized (D) EIA. Patients were assessed at baseline, following on average 12 weeks of neuromuscular exercise and 3 months following surgery. We found a normal function of EIA in OA patients at baseline. Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of physical exercise on pain modulation in healthy subjects. However, no treatment effects on EIA were seen in OA patients despite the increase in muscle strength following neuromuscular exercise and reduced pain following surgery. Compared to controls, OA patients had increased pain sensitivity and no beneficial effects on pain sensitivity were seen following treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first study of EIA in OA patients. Despite increased pain sensitivity, OA patients had a normal function of EIA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement Properties of Performance-Specific Pain Ratings of Patients Awaiting Total Joint Arthroplasty as a Consequence of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Paul W.; Kennedy, Deborah M.; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Spadoni, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the test–retest reliability of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain sub-scale and performance-specific assessments of pain, as well as the association between these measures for patients awaiting primary total hip or knee arthroplasty as a consequence of osteoarthritis. Methods: A total of 164 patients awaiting unilateral primary hip or knee arthroplasty completed four performance measures (self-paced walk, timed up and go, stair test, six-minute walk) and the WOMAC. Scores for 22 of these patients provided test–retest reliability data. Estimates of test–retest reliability (Type 2,1 intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] and standard error of measurement [SEM]) and the association between measures were examined. Results: ICC values for individual performance-specific pain ratings were between 0.70 and 0.86; SEM values were between 0.97 and 1.33 pain points. ICC estimates for the four-item performance pain ratings and the WOMAC pain sub-scale were 0.82 and 0.57 respectively. The correlation between the sum of the pain scores for the four performance measures and the WOMAC pain sub-scale was 0.62. Conclusion: Reliability estimates for the performance-specific assessments of pain using the numeric pain rating scale were consistent with values reported for patients with a spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions. The reliability estimate for the WOMAC pain sub-scale was lower than typically reported in the literature. The level of association between the WOMAC pain sub-scale and the various performance-specific pain scales suggests that the scores can be used interchangeably when applied to groups but not for individual patients. PMID:20145758

  17. Effect of an integrated approach of yoga therapy on quality of life in osteoarthritis of the knee joint: A randomized control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ebnezar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of addition of integrated yoga therapy to therapeutic exercises in osteoarthritis (OA of knee joints. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective randomized active control trial. A total of t participants with OA of knee joints between 35 and 80 years (yoga, 59.56 ± 9.54 and control, 59.42 ± 10.66 from the outpatient department of Dr. John′s Orthopedic Center, Bengaluru, were randomly assigned to receive yoga or physiotherapy exercises after transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment of the affected knee joints. Both groups practiced supervised intervention (40 min per day for 2 weeks (6 days per week with followup for 3 months. The module of integrated yoga consisted of shithilikaranavyayama (loosening and strengthening, asanas, relaxation techniques, pranayama, meditation and didactic lectures on yama, niyama, jnana yoga, bhakti yoga, and karma yoga for a healthy lifestyle change. The control group also had supervised physiotherapy exercises. A total of 118 (yoga and 117 (control were available for final analysis. Results: Significant differences were observed within (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon′s and between groups (P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test on all domains of the Short Form-36 (P < 0.004, with better results in the yoga group than in the control group, both at 15 th day and 90 th day. Conclusion: An integrated approach of yoga therapy is better than therapeutic exercises as an adjunct to transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment in improving knee disability and quality of life in patients with OA knees.

  18. Evaluation of a novel photo optical imaging (Lightscan) with musculoskeletal ultrasound and clinical examination in the assessment of inflammatory activity in PIP joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Amitai, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lightscan is a novel rapid, low cost and non-invasive imaging technology to assess inflammatory activity in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints, which can easily be performed. The results are calculated automatically. This is the first comparative study of photo optical imaging (POI), ‘Lightscan’, with musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US), clinical examination (CE) and DAS28 (only RA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and in healthy subjects. Me...

  19. Comparison of diclofenac-emulgel local application with oral ibuprofen administration for the treatment of active interphalangeal hand joints osteoarthritis (Heberden and/or Bushar nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Zacher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac-emulgel local application in comparison with oral ibuprofen administration for the treatment of active interphalangeal hand joints osteoarthritis (Heberden and/or Bushar nodules. Material and methods. 321 pts were randomized into two groups. Diclofenac-emulgel (active drug and placebo ibuprofen tablets were administered in one of them, placebo diclofenac-emulgel and ibuprofen tablets (active drug — in the other. Diclofenac was administered as 10 cm strip locally 4 times a day and 400 mg of ibuprofen were given 3 times a day. Frequency of improvement was used as the main outcome measure. Improvement was registered if pain on 100 mm visual analog scale decreased at least by 40%. Disease activity, pain at rest, pain at movement, morning stiffness, grip strength and quality of life were used as additional outcome measures. Results. To the end of treatment according to 5% lower equivalency limit local therapy was at least as effective as oral administration of ibuprofen (p=0,007. Administration of both treatment methods provided also comparable improvement of all additional outcome measures. Both treatment methods showed good tolerability but more pts with receiving ibuprofen experienced serious adverse events than those using diclofenac (9 and 4 pts respectively. There was also similar proportion of pts prematurely withdrawn due to side effects (n=21: 5 (3% from them received diclofenac and 16 (10% - ibuprofen. Similar ratio of adverse events attributed to study treatment was revealed. Such events were present in 2 pts using diclofenac and in 13 (8,3% receiving ibuprofen. Most of these events applied to gastrointestinal tract (in 1 pt using diclofenac and in 8 pts receiving ibuprofen. Conclusion. Local treatment of active interphalangeal hand joints osteoarthritis (Heberden and/or Bushar nodules with diclofenac is at least as effective as systemic administration of ibuprofen

  20. An observational feasibility study to assess the safety and effectiveness of intranasal fentanyl for radiofrequency ablations of the lumbar facet joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoszek MW

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael W Bartoszek,1 Amy McCoart,2 Kyung-soo Jason Hong,3 Chelsey Haley,2 Krista Beth Highland,4 Anthony R Plunkett1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC, 2Clinical Investigations, Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC, 3Research Department, The Center for Clinical Research, Sceptor Pain Foundation, Winston Salem, NC, 4Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, USA Purpose: The purpose of the present observational, feasibility study is to assess the preliminary safety and effectiveness of intranasal fentanyl for lumbar facet radiofrequency ablation procedures.Patients and methods: This cohort observational study included 23 adult patients. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, oxygen saturation percent, Pasero Opioid-Induced Sedation Scale score, and the Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale pain score were assessed prior to the procedure and intranasal fentanyl (100 μg administration and every 15 minutes after administration, up to 60 minutes post administration. Follow-up of patient satisfaction with pain control and treatment was assessed 24 hours after discharge. The primary outcome was safety as evidenced by adverse events. Secondary outcomes included the above-mentioned vital signs and pain ratings.Results: No adverse events occurred in the present study and all participants maintained an acceptable level of awareness throughout the assessment period. One-way repeated measures analyses of covariance tests with Bonferroni-adjusted means indicated that oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and heart rate changed from baseline, whereas pain scores were lower at post-administration levels compared with baseline. Finally, the majority of participants reported being satisfied with pain control and treatment

  1. Joint loading decreased by inexpensive and minimalist footwear in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis during stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, I C N; Trombini-Souza, F; Butugan, M K; Pássaro, A C; Arnone, A C; Fuller, R

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that flexible footwear, which mimics the biomechanics of walking barefoot, results in decreased knee loads in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) during walking. However, the effect of flexible footwear on other activities of daily living, such as descending stairs, remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of inexpensive and minimalist footwear (Moleca) on knee adduction moment (KAM) during stair descent of elderly women with and without knee OA. Thirty-four elderly women were equally divided into an OA group and a control group (CG). Stair descent was evaluated in barefoot condition, while wearing the Moleca, and while wearing heeled shoes. Kinematics and ground reaction forces were measured to calculate KAM by using inverse dynamics. The OA group experienced a higher KAM during midstance under the barefoot condition (233.3%; P = 0.028), the Moleca (379.2%; P = 0.004), and heeled shoes (217.6%; P = 0.007). The OA group had a similar knee load during early, mid, and late stance with the Moleca compared with the barefoot condition. Heeled shoes increased the knee loads during the early-stance (versus barefoot [16.7%; P stair descent. The loads are similar to the barefoot condition and effectively decreased when compared with heeled shoes. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Is increased joint loading detrimental to obese patients with knee osteoarthritis? A secondary data analysis from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Hunter, D J; Dam, E B

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether increased knee joint loading due to improved ambulatory function and walking speed following weight loss achieved over 16 weeks accelerates symptomatic and structural disease progression over a subsequent 1 year weight maintenance period in an obese population with knee ost...

  3. Comparison of radiographic joint space width and magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of knee replacement: A longitudinal case-control study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian; Boudreau, Robert; Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J.; Duryea, Jeff; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael; John, Markus R.; Ladel, Christoph; Sharma, Leena; Hunter, David J.; Kwoh, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether change in fixed-location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Knees replaced between 36 and 60 months' follow-up in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 T MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T 0 ) and 2 years before T 0 (T -2 ) were compared using conditional logistic regression. One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5 % women; age 64.2 ± 8.7 [mean ± SD] years) were studied. Fixed-location JSW change at 22.5 % from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR = 1.57; 95 % CI: 1.23-2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR = 1.38; 95 % CI: 1.11-1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed-location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were elevated prior to knee replacement. Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of radiographic joint space width and magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of knee replacement: A longitudinal case-control study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg Austria and Chondrometrics GmbH, Institute of Anatomy, Ainring (Germany); Boudreau, Robert [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J. [University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh VAHS, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Duryea, Jeff [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), LLC, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank [Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), LLC, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nevitt, Michael [OAI Coordinating Ctr., UCSF, San Francisco, CA (United States); John, Markus R. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland); Ladel, Christoph [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany); Sharma, Leena [Northwestern University, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Hunter, David J. [University Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Arizona, Division of Rheumatology and the University of Arizona Arthritis Center, Tucson, AZ (United States); Collaboration: OAI Investigators

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate whether change in fixed-location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Knees replaced between 36 and 60 months' follow-up in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 T MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T{sub 0}) and 2 years before T{sub 0} (T{sub -2}) were compared using conditional logistic regression. One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5 % women; age 64.2 ± 8.7 [mean ± SD] years) were studied. Fixed-location JSW change at 22.5 % from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR = 1.57; 95 % CI: 1.23-2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR = 1.38; 95 % CI: 1.11-1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed-location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were elevated prior to knee replacement. Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of Radiographic Joint Space Width and Magnetic-Resonance-Imaging for Prediction of Knee Replacement – A Longitudinal Case-Control Study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Boudreau, Robert; Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J.; Duryea, Jeff; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael; John, Markus R.; Ladel, Christoph; Sharma, Leena; Hunter, David J.; Kwoh, C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether change in fixed location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and in cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Methods Knees replaced between 36-60 months follow-up (M) in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex, and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs, and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 Tesla MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T0) and 2 years before T0 (T-2) were compared using conditional logistic regression. Results One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5% women; age 64.2±8.7 [mean±SD]) were studied. Fixed location JSW change at 22.5% from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR=1.57; 95%CI: 1.23,2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.11,1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were both elevated prior to knee replacement. Conclusions Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than for minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. PMID:26376884

  6. Aging and Osteoarthritis: An Inevitable Encounter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hügle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a major health burden of our time. Age is the most prominent risk factor for the development and progression of OA. The mechanistic influence of aging on OA has different facets. On a molecular level, matrix proteins such as collagen or proteoglycans are modified, which alters cartilage function. Collagen cross-linking within the bone results in impaired plasticity and increased stiffness. Synovial or fat tissue, menisci but also ligaments and muscles play an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. In the elderly, sarcopenia or other causes of muscle atrophy are frequently encountered, leading to a decreased stability of the joint. Inflammation in form of cellular infiltration of synovial tissue or subchondral bone and expression of inflammatory cytokines is more and more recognized as trigger of OA. It has been demonstrated that joint movement can exhibit anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Therefore physical activity or physiotherapy in the elderly should be encouraged, also in order to increase the muscle mass. A reduced stem cell capacity in the elderly is likely associated with a decrease of repair mechanisms of the musculoskeletal system. New treatment strategies, for example with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are investigated, despite clear evidence for their efficacy is lacking.

  7. T2 relaxation times of the glenohumeral joint at 3.0 T MRI in patients with and without primary and secondary osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Park, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Heon-Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Eugene

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage has recently been applied to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). T2 mapping is a sensitive method of detecting changes in the chemical composition and structure of cartilage. To establish baseline T2 values of glenohumeral joint cartilage at 3.0 T and compare T2 values among subjects with and without OA. The study involved 30 patients (18 women, 12 men; median age, 67 years; age range, 51-78 years) with primary (n = 7) and secondary OA (n = 23) in the glenohumeral joint and 34 subjects without OA (19 women, 15 men; median age, 49 years; age range, 23-63 years). All subjects were evaluated by radiography and 3.0 T MRI including a multi-echo T2-weighted spin echo pulse sequence. The T2 value of the cartilage was measured by manually drawing the region of interest on the T2 map. Per-zone comparison of T2 values was performed using Mann-Whitney U test. Median T2 values differed significantly between subjects without OA (36.00 ms [interquartile range, 33.89-37.31 ms]) and those with primary (37.52 ms [36.84-39.11], P = 0.028), but not secondary (36.87 ms [34.70-41.10], P = 0.160) OA. Glenohumeral cartilage T2 values were higher in different zones between patients with primary and secondary OA than in subjects without OA. These T2 values can be used for comparison to assess cartilage degeneration in patients with shoulder OA. Significant differences in T2 were observed among subjects without OA and those with primary and secondary OA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  8. An Unexplored Facet of International Business in Greece: Foreign and Diaspora Shareholders in Joint Stock Company Start-Ups, 1833-1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Sapfo Pepelasis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on an unexplored aspect of the history of international business in Greece, the presence of international shareholders in Greek Joint stock company start-ups. Our main findings are that these investors participated in numerous such firms usually as minority shareholders in capital and or knowledge intensive firms. Rarely did they opt for the exclusive international ownership of a joint stock company in Greece and the dividing line  between foreign direct investment and foreign portfolio investment was not always clear. It is also the case that international capital inflow into the nascent corporate sector involved a mosaic of collaborating actors including not only the foreign but also the diasporic.

  9. Osteoarthritis in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, W.; Hayek, W.H.; Bens, G.

    1979-01-01

    A fatally ending index case of sepsis osteoarthritis that was diagnosed retrospectively initiated this report. This patient had severe, asymmetrically distributed metaphyseal growthdisturbances, many long bones. In order to determine the features of early radiologic diagnosis we report the findings of 7 further patients with neonatal septic osteoarthritis with clinical and radiological follow-up. The most important observation for early radiologic diagnosis of osteoarthritis is the displacement of fat layers along the metaphysis. Other findings of the soft tissues have the same diagnostic value as bone destruction and subperiosteal new bone formation found one to three weeks later on roentgenfilms. Detecting early signs of osteoarthritis helps in localizing the focus for bacteriologic diagnosis, which is to be more successful than blood cultures. Diagnosing a joint empyema initiates surgical intervention for pressure relief in order to avoid necrosis of the epiphysis as seen in the femoral bone in septic arthritis of the hip joint. Early diagnosis and treatment to destruction of growing cartilage is necessary to avoid gross disturbances and length discrepancies of long bones. In cases of sepsis called 'babygram' and a repeat examination 10 to 14 days later is mandatory. (orig.) [de

  10. Increase in vastus medialis cross-sectional area is associated with reduced pain, cartilage loss, and joint replacement risk in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wluka, Anita E; Berry, Patricia A; Siew, Terence; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Urquhart, Donna M; Lloyd, David G; Jones, Graeme; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2012-12-01

    Although there is evidence for a beneficial effect of increased quadriceps strength on knee symptoms, the effect on knee structure is unclear. We undertook this study to examine the relationship between change in vastus medialis cross-sectional area (CSA) and knee pain, tibial cartilage volume, and risk of knee replacement in subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred seventeen subjects with symptomatic knee OA underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee at baseline and at 2 and 4.5 years. Vastus medialis CSA was measured at baseline and at 2 years. Tibial cartilage volume was measured at baseline and at 2 and 4.5 years. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index at baseline and at 2 years. The frequency of knee joint replacement over 4 years was determined. Regression coefficients (B) and odds ratios were determined along with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). After adjusting for confounders, baseline vastus medialis CSA was inversely associated with current knee pain (r = -0.16, P = 0.04) and with medial tibial cartilage volume loss from baseline to 2 years (B coefficient -10.9 [95% CI -19.5, -2.3]), but not with baseline tibial cartilage volume. In addition, an increase in vastus medialis CSA from baseline to 2 years was associated with reduced knee pain over the same time period (r = 0.24, P = 0.007), reduced medial tibial cartilage loss from 2 to 4.5 years (B coefficient -16.8 [95% CI -28.9, -4.6]), and reduced risk of knee replacement over 4 years (odds ratio 0.61 [95% CI 0.40, 0.94]). In a population of patients with symptomatic knee OA, increased vastus medialis size was associated with reduced knee pain and beneficial structural changes at the knee, suggesting that management of knee pain and optimizing vastus medialis size are important in reducing OA progression and subsequent knee replacement. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. The contribution of 3D quantitative meniscal and cartilage measures to variation in normal radiographic joint space width—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Melanie; Wirth, Wolfgang; Emmanuel, Katja; Culvenor, Adam G.; Eckstein, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore to what extent three-dimensional measures of the meniscus and femorotibial cartilage explain the variation in medial and lateral femorotibial radiographic joint space width (JSW), in healthy men and women. Methods: The right knees of 87 Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference participants (no symptoms, radiographic signs or risk factors of osteoarthritis; 37 men, 50 women; age 55.0 ± 7.6; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) were assessed. Quantitative measures of subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness and meniscal position and morphology were computed from segmented magnetic resonance images. Minimal and medial/lateral fixed-location JSW were determined from fixed-flexion radiographs. Correlation and regression analyses were used to explore the contribution of demographic, cartilage and meniscal parameters to JSW in healthy subjects. Results: The correlation with (medial) minimal JSW was somewhat stronger for cartilage thickness (0.54 ≤ r ≤ 0.67) than for meniscal (−0.31 ≤ r ≤ 0.50) or demographic measures (−0.15 ≤ r ≤ 0.48), in particular in men. In women, in contrast, the strength of the correlations of cartilage thickness and meniscal measures with minimal JSW were in the same range. Fixed-location JSW measures showed stronger correlations with cartilage thickness (r ≥ 0.68 medially; r ≥ 0.59 laterally) than with meniscal measures (r ≤ |0.32| medially; r ≤ |0.32| laterally). Stepwise regression models revealed that meniscal measures added significant independent information to the total variance explained in minimal JSW (adjusted multiple r 2 = 58%) but not in medial or lateral fixed-location JSW (r 2 = 60/51%, respectively). Conclusions: In healthy subjects, minimal JSW was observed to reflect a combination of cartilage and meniscal measures, particularly in women. Fixed-location JSW, in contrast, was found to be dominated by variance in cartilage thickness in both men and women, with somewhat higher correlations between

  12. The contribution of 3D quantitative meniscal and cartilage measures to variation in normal radiographic joint space width—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.roth@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Wirth, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.wirth@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404, Ainring (Germany); Emmanuel, Katja, E-mail: katja.emmanuel@icloud.com [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Paracelsus Medical University, Müllner Hauptstraße 48, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Culvenor, Adam G., E-mail: adam.culvenor@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Plenty Road, Bundoora, 3086, Victoria (Australia); Eckstein, Felix, E-mail: felix.eckstein@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404, Ainring (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Objective: To explore to what extent three-dimensional measures of the meniscus and femorotibial cartilage explain the variation in medial and lateral femorotibial radiographic joint space width (JSW), in healthy men and women. Methods: The right knees of 87 Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference participants (no symptoms, radiographic signs or risk factors of osteoarthritis; 37 men, 50 women; age 55.0 ± 7.6; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) were assessed. Quantitative measures of subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness and meniscal position and morphology were computed from segmented magnetic resonance images. Minimal and medial/lateral fixed-location JSW were determined from fixed-flexion radiographs. Correlation and regression analyses were used to explore the contribution of demographic, cartilage and meniscal parameters to JSW in healthy subjects. Results: The correlation with (medial) minimal JSW was somewhat stronger for cartilage thickness (0.54 ≤ r ≤ 0.67) than for meniscal (−0.31 ≤ r ≤ 0.50) or demographic measures (−0.15 ≤ r ≤ 0.48), in particular in men. In women, in contrast, the strength of the correlations of cartilage thickness and meniscal measures with minimal JSW were in the same range. Fixed-location JSW measures showed stronger correlations with cartilage thickness (r ≥ 0.68 medially; r ≥ 0.59 laterally) than with meniscal measures (r ≤ |0.32| medially; r ≤ |0.32| laterally). Stepwise regression models revealed that meniscal measures added significant independent information to the total variance explained in minimal JSW (adjusted multiple r{sup 2} = 58%) but not in medial or lateral fixed-location JSW (r{sup 2} = 60/51%, respectively). Conclusions: In healthy subjects, minimal JSW was observed to reflect a combination of cartilage and meniscal measures, particularly in women. Fixed-location JSW, in contrast, was found to be dominated by variance in cartilage thickness in both men and women, with somewhat higher correlations

  13. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis - treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, E; Roos, Ewa M.; Ageberg, E

    2013-01-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters.......To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters....

  14. Hand osteoarthritis : natural course and determinants of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijsterbosch, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the clinical and radiographic disease course of hand osteoarthritis as well as determinants of poor clinical outcome and radiographic progression over a period of six years in 289 patients with hand osteoarthritis. Because these patients had osteoarthritis at multiple joints this

  15. Geographic region, socioeconomic position and the utilisation of primary total joint replacement for hip or knee osteoarthritis across western Victoria: a cross-sectional multilevel study of the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Olsen, Sharon; Vogrin, Sara; Holloway, Kara L; Page, Richard S; Sajjad, Muhammad A; Kotowicz, Mark A; Livingston, Patricia M; Khasraw, Mustafa; Hakkennes, Sharon; Dunning, Trish L; Brumby, Susan; Pedler, Daryl; Sutherland, Alasdair; Venkatesh, Svetha; Williams, Lana J; Duque, Gustavo; Pasco, Julie A

    2017-11-06

    Compared to urban residents, those in rural/regional areas often experience inequitable healthcare from specialist service providers. Independent of small between-area differences in utilisation, socially advantaged groups had the greatest uptake of joint replacement. These data suggest low correlation between 'need' vs. 'uptake' of surgery in rural/regional areas. Compared to urban residents, those in rural and regional areas often experience inequitable healthcare from specialist service providers, often due to geographical issues. We investigated associations between socioeconomic position (SEP), region of residence and utilisation of primary total knee replacement (TKR) and/or total hip replacement (THR) for osteoarthritis. As part of the Ageing, Chronic Disease and Injury study, we extracted data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (2011-2013) for adults that utilised primary TKR (n = 4179; 56% female) and/or THR (n = 3120; 54% female). Residential addresses were matched with the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2011 census data: region of residence was defined according to local government areas (LGAs), and area-level SEP (quintiles) defined using an ABS-derived composite index. The ABS-determined control population (n = 591,265; 51% female) excluded individuals identified as cases. We performed multilevel logistic regression modelling using a stratified two-stage cluster design. TKR was higher for those aged 70-79 years (AOR 1.4 95%CI 1.3-1.5; referent = 60-69 years) and in the most advantaged SEP quintile (AOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.8-2.3; referent = SEP quintile 3); results were similar for THR (70-79 years = AOR 1.7, 95%CI 1.5-1.8; SEP quintile 5 = AOR 2.5, 95%CI 2.2-2.8). Total variances contributed by the variance in LGAs were 2% (SD random effects ± 0.28) and 3% (SD ± 0.32), respectively. Independent of small between-LGA differences in utilisation, and in contrast to the expected greater

  16. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial (the EXERPHARMA trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, Robin; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Roos, Ewa M

    2014-11-15

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a mechanically driven disease, and it is suggested that medial tibiofemoral knee-joint load increases with pharmacologic pain relief, indicating that pharmacologic pain relief may be positively associated with disease progression. Treatment modalities that can both relieve pain and reduce knee-joint load would be preferable. The knee-joint load is influenced by functional alignment of the trunk, pelvis, and lower-limb segments with respect to the knee, as well as the ground-reaction force generated during movement. Neuromuscular exercise can influence knee load and decrease knee pain. It includes exercises to improve balance, muscle activation, functional alignment, and functional knee stability. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the efficacy of a NEuroMuscular EXercise (NEMEX) therapy program, compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical practices and randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments, either (a) NEMEX therapy twice a week or (b) information on the recommended use of analgesics and antiinflammatory drugs (acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs) via a pamphlet and video materials. The primary outcome is change in knee load during walking (the Knee Index, a composite score of the first external peak total reaction moment on the knee joint from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in the external peak knee-adduction moment and impulse and functional performance measures, in addition to changes in self-reported pain, function, health status, and quality of life. These findings will help determine whether 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise is superior to optimized use

  17. Development and Prevention of Running-Related Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Studies investigating the effect of running on risk for developing osteoarthritis at weight-bearing joints have reported with conflicting results. Generally, moderate-level running is not likely detrimental to joint health. However, many factors may be associated with the increased risk of developing osteoarthritis in runners. Factors often implicated in the development of osteoarthritis comprise those that increase joint vulnerability and those which increase joint loading. It is therefore suggested that running has different effects on different people. Efforts should be made to identify those with joint vulnerability and joint loading, and measures should be taken to have those factors and/or their running programs modified to run safely. Further investigations are needed to examine the effect of running on joint health under different conditions to confirm the association between exposure to risk factors and development of osteoarthritis, as well as to validate the effectiveness of measures for preventing running-related osteoarthritis.

  18. Semiquantitative analysis of ECM molecules in the different cartilage layers in early and advanced osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, Andreas; Kasch, Richard; Mrosek, Eike; Spank, Heiko; Erggelet, Christoph; Esser, Jan; Merk, Harry

    2012-05-01

    The study was conducted to examine the expression of collagen type I and II in the different cartilage layers in relation to other ECM molecules during the progression of early osteoarthritic degeneration in human articular cartilage (AC). Quantitative real-time (RT)-PCR and colorimetrical techniques were used for calibration of Photoshop-based image analysis in detecting such lesions. Immunohistochemistry and histology were performed with 40 cartilage tissue samples showing mild (ICRS grade 1b) respectively moderate/advanced (ICRS grade 3a or 3b) (20 each) osteoarthritis compared with 15 healthy biopsies. Furthermore, we quantified our results on the gene expression of collagen type I and II and aggrecan with the help of real-time (RT)-PCR. Proteoglycan content was measured colorimetrically. The digitized images of histology and immunohistochemistry stains were analyzed with Photoshop software. T-test and Spearman correlation analysis were used for statistical analysis. In the earliest stages of AC deterioration the loss of collagen type II was associated with the appearance of collagen type I, shown by increasing amounts of collagen type I mRNA. During subsequent stages, a progressive loss of structural integrity was associated with increasing deposition of collagen type I as part of a natural healing response. A decrease of collagen type II is visible especially in the upper fibrillated area of the advanced osteoarthritic samples, which then leads to an overall decrease. Analysis of proteoglycan showed losses of the overall content and a loss of the classical zonal formation. Correlation analysis of the proteoglycan Photoshop measurements with the RT-PCR revealed strong correlation for Safranin O and collagen type I, medium for collagen type II, alcian blue and glycoprotein but weak correlation with PCR aggrecan results. Photoshop based image analysis might become a valuable supplement for well known histopathological grading systems of lesioned articular

  19. Osteoarthritis. Radiological aspects in the appendicular skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2001-01-01

    The osteoarthritis is a degenerative and inflammatory disease that affects all articular structures, especially cartilage and intervertebral disc, which conduce to progressive impairment of the joint. In this paper it Is showed the most significative cardiology findings of osteoarthritis in the appendicular skeleton that are fundamental for the diagnosis of this frequent pathology

  20. Association between MRI-defined osteoarthritis, pain, function and strength 3-10 years following knee joint injury in youth sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Toomey, Clodagh M; Woodhouse, Linda J; Jaremko, Jacob L; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-10-10

    Youth and young adults who participate in sport have an increased risk of knee injury and subsequent osteoarthritis. Improved understanding of the relationship between structural and clinical outcomes postinjury could inform targeted osteoarthritis prevention interventions. This secondary analysis examines the association between MRI-defined osteoarthritis and self-reported and functional outcomes, 3-10 years following youth sport-related knee injury in comparison to healthy controls. Participants included a subsample (n=146) of the Alberta Youth Prevention of Early Osteoarthritis cohort: specifically, 73 individuals with 3-10 years history of sport-related intra-articular knee injury and 73 age-matched, sex-matched and sport-matched controls with completed MRI studies. Outcomes included: MRI-defined osteoarthritis, radiographic osteoarthritis, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain, knee extensor/flexor strength, triple-hop and Y-balance test. Descriptive statistics and univariate logistic regression were used to compare those with and without MRI-defined osteoarthritis. Associations between MRI-defined osteoarthritis and each outcome were assessed using multivariable linear regression considering the influence of injury history, sex, body mass index and time since injury. Participant median age was 23 years (range 15-27), and 63% were female. MRI-defined osteoarthritis varied by injury history, injury type and surgical history and was not isolated to participants with ACL and/or meniscal injuries. Those with a previous knee injury had 10-fold (95% CI 2.3 to 42.8) greater odds of MRI-defined osteoarthritis than uninjured participants. MRI-defined osteoarthritis was independently significantly associated with quality of life, but not symptoms, strength or function. MRI-detected structural changes 3-10 years following youth sport-related knee injury may not dictate clinical symptomatology, strength or function

  1. A Qualitative Study of Factors Underlying Decision Making for Joint Replacement among African Americans and Latinos with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Michael L.; Hebert-Beirne, Jennifer; Rojas, Mary; Tuzzio, Leah; Nelson, Charles L.; Boutin-Foster, Carla

    2015-01-01

    To support patients in making decisions that align with their unique cultural beliefs, an understanding of factors underlying patient preferences is needed. We sought to identify psychosocial factors that influenced decision making among African-American and Hispanic patients referred for knee or hip arthroplasty. Thirty-six participants deciding on surgery were interviewed. Responses were audio-taped, transcribed, and read. Codes were assigned to the raw data and then clustered into categories that were analyzed to yield overarching themes. This process was repeated independently by two corroborators. Six categories described the mental calculations made in patients' decision-making processes: 1) self-assessment of ft for surgery based on age and comorbidity, 2) research and development of mental report cards of their surgeons, 3) reliving of social network experiences, 4) reliance on faith and spirituality for guidance, 5) acknowledgment of fear and anxiety, and 6) setting expectations for recovery. This study advanced the understanding of how decisions about joint replacement are constructed and identified cultural levers that can be targeted for intervention. Developing culturally tailored health information that addresses some of our findings and disseminating messages through social networks may reduce the underutilization of joint replacement among racial and ethnic minority populations. PMID:25272219

  2. Effects of dietary calcium fructoborate supplementation on joint comfort and flexibility and serum inflammatory markers in dogs with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A K; de Godoy, M R C; Harper, T A; Knap, K E; Joslyn, S; Pietrzkowski, Z; Cross, B K; Detweiler, K B; Swanson, K S

    2017-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the short-term effects of calcium fructoborate (CFB) on gait, joint range of motion, serum inflammatory markers, and owner perception of pain in client-owned dogs. We used 59 osteoarthritic dogs with impairment, with dogs being randomly assigned to 4 treatments: placebo (60 mg fructose; = 15), low dose (69 mg CFB; = 14), high dose (127 mg CFB; = 14), or combination (69 mg CFB, 500 mg glucosamine hydrochloride and 200 mg chondroitin sulfate; = 16). Dogs up to 22.9 kg received 1 capsule/d, while dogs weighing 23 to 50 kg received 2 capsules/d. A physical examination, radiographs, goniometry measurements, gait analysis, blood sample collection, and a canine brief pain inventory questionnaire were performed on d 0 and 28. Change from baseline values were statistically analyzed among groups. After 28 d, dogs fed the low and high doses had an improved ( Dogs fed the high dose also had a greater ( = 0.05) increase in soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products concentration than dogs fed the placebo. Sub-analysis of only large dogs (> 23 kg) showed that dogs fed the low dose had decreased ( dogs fed the placebo. Large dogs fed the low dose also were shown to improve ( dogs fed the placebo. Overall, CFB supplementation was well-tolerated and may aid in mitigating joint discomfort in dogs.

  3. Development and validation of a computational model of the knee joint for the evaluation of surgical treatments for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mootanah, R; Imhauser, C W; Reisse, F; Carpanen, D; Walker, R W; Koff, M F; Lenhoff, M W; Rozbruch, S R; Fragomen, A T; Dewan, Z; Kirane, Y M; Cheah, K; Dowell, J K; Hillstrom, H J

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) knee joint computational model was developed and validated to predict knee joint contact forces and pressures for different degrees of malalignment. A 3D computational knee model was created from high-resolution radiological images to emulate passive sagittal rotation (full-extension to 65°-flexion) and weight acceptance. A cadaveric knee mounted on a six-degree-of-freedom robot was subjected to matching boundary and loading conditions. A ligament-tuning process minimised kinematic differences between the robotically loaded cadaver specimen and the finite element (FE) model. The model was validated by measured intra-articular force and pressure measurements. Percent full scale error between FE-predicted and in vitro-measured values in the medial and lateral compartments were 6.67% and 5.94%, respectively, for normalised peak pressure values, and 7.56% and 4.48%, respectively, for normalised force values. The knee model can accurately predict normalised intra-articular pressure and forces for different loading conditions and could be further developed for subject-specific surgical planning.

  4. Erosive osteoarthritis: a more severe form of radiographic hand osteoarthritis rather than a distinct entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Michelle; Nicholls, Elaine; Kwok, Wing-Yee; Peat, George; Kloppenburg, Margreet; van der Windt, Danielle; Myers, Helen; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether erosive osteoarthritis shares the same pattern of joint involvement and risk profile as increasing grades of non-erosive hand osteoarthritis. Methods Participants were from two population-based cohorts, aged ≥50 years, reporting hand symptoms in the previous month. Interphalangeal joints were assessed for erosive osteoarthritis (Verbruggen–Veys erosive or remodelled phase) and radiographic osteoarthritis (sliding cut-offs of K&L≥2, K&L≥3 and K&L=4). At the joint level, similarities in the frequency and pattern of erosive and non-erosive osteoarthritis were assessed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and generalised estimating equations. At the person level, individuals with erosive osteoarthritis were compared to those with non-erosive osteoarthritis using logistic regression, adjusted for age and gender (aOR), for the following exposures: family history, previous injury, overuse and metabolic factors (BMI, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes). Results In 1076 symptomatic participants the ranked frequency of involvement for erosive joints was comparable to joints with K&L≥3 and K&L=4 (r>0.95). Patterns of joint involvement in erosive osteoarthritis were strongest for symmetry (aOR=6.5; 95% CI 3.0 to 14.1), followed by row (2.0; 0.8 to 5.0) and ray (0.3; 0.0 to 2.5), which was similar to joints with K&L≥3 and K&L=4. Individuals with erosive osteoarthritis (n=80) had an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (2.7; 1.0 to 7.1), notably dyslipidaemia (4.7; 2.1 to 10.6) compared with non-erosive osteoarthritis classed K&L≥3 (n=193). Conclusions The similar frequency of radiographic joint involvement and patterning in erosive osteoarthritis and more severe non-erosive osteoarthritis is consistent with prevalent erosive osteoarthritis being a severe form of hand osteoarthritis rather than a distinct entity. Metabolic exposures, dyslipidaemia in particular, may be implicated in erosive osteoarthritis. PMID:24095935

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging based Cartilage Loss in Painful Contra-Lateral Knees with and without Radiographic Joint Space Narrowing – Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Benichou, Olivier; Wirth, Wolfgang; Nelson, David R; Maschek, Susanne; Hudelmaier, Martin; Kwoh, C. Kent; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess whether knees with advanced radiographic disease (medial joint space narrowing = mJSN) encounter greater longitudinal cartilage loss than contra-lateral knees with earlier disease (no or less mJSN). Methods Participants were selected from 2678 cases in the Osteoarthritis Initiative, based on exhibition of bilateral pain, BMI>25, mJSN in one knee, no or less mJSN in the contra-lateral knee, and no lateral JSN in both knees. 80 participants (age 60.6±9.1 yrs) fulfilled these criteria. Medial tibial and femoral cartilage morphology was analyzed from baseline and 1-year follow-up sagittal DESSwe 3 Tesla MRI of both knees, by experienced readers blinded to the timepoint and mJSN status. Results Knees with more radiographic mJSN displayed greater medial cartilage loss (-80 μm), assessed by MRI, than contra-lateral knees with less mJSN (-57μm). The difference reached statistical significance in participants with mJSN grade 2 or 3 (p=0.005 to p=0.08), but not in participants with mJSN grade 1 (p=0.28 to 0.98). In knees with more mJSN, cartilage loss increased with higher grades of mJSN (p=0.003 in the medial femur). Knees with mJSN grade 2 or 3 displayed greater cartilage loss in the weight-bearing medial femur than in the posterior femur or in the medial tibia (p=0.048). Conclusion Knees with advanced mJSN displayed greater cartilage loss than contra-lateral knees with less mJSN. These data suggest that radiography can be used to stratify fast structural progressors, and that MRI cartilage thickness loss is more pronounced at advanced radiographic disease stage. PMID:19714595

  6. Osteoarthritis, Application of Physical Therapy Proceduers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Avdić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a group of overlapping disorders, which may have different aetiology but similar biological, morphologic and clinical outcome. In osteoarthritis, process will not encompass the joint cartilage only, but the entire joint, including sub-hondral bone, ligaments, capsule, and sinovial membrane and surrounding muscles. Osteoarthritis is a multi-factor disorder of sinovial joints, which occurs as result of mechanical and biological factors, which destabilise normal hondrocyte function, partitioning of cartilage, extra-cellular matrix and sub-hondral bone. The earliest changes, which are restricted to the joint cartilage surface only, do not cause any subjective feeling. The pain in arthrosis occurs (or re-occurs a bit later, Diagnosis will be determined based on clinical exam as well as signs and symptoms present. Symptomatic and functional treatment of osteoarthritis as one of rheumatic disorders must be taken throughout years, sometimes throughout a lifetime. It encompasses application of many medications and physical therapy procedures.

  7. How to define responders in osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, C.; Adachi, J.D.; Bardin, T; Berenbaum, F.; Flamion, B.; Jonsson, H.; Kanis, J.A.; Pelousse, F.; Lems, W.F.; Pelletier, J.P.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Reiter, S.; Reginster, J.Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Bruyere, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Scope: Regulatory agencies require

  8. Osteoarthritis - histology and pathogenetic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulzbacher, I.

    2000-01-01

    Osteoarthitis is the most common joint disease affecting over 60% of the elderly population. It is characterized by the progressive erosion of articular cartilage leading to incapacity of movement. In the great majority of instances, osteoarthritis appears insidiously, without apparent initiating cause. This primary form is usually oligoarticular involving hip, knee, cervical vertebrae, interphalangeal joints of the fingers or tarsometatarsal joints of the feet. In case of an underlying systemic diasease or local injury the cartilage destruction is considered as secondary osteoarthritis. The pathogenesis of primary osteoarthritis suggests an intrinsic disease of cartilage in which biochemical and metabolic alterations result in its breakdown. Within the last decades different models were stablished which also concentrated on other joint structures such as bone or ligaments. Changes of the subchondral bone were found to precide cartilage damage suggesting a primary alteration of the subchondral region. Other studies concentrated on the metabolic activity of chondrocytes in healthy cartilage of osteoarthritis patients. The precise event that leads to these changes is still not clear. This review concentrates on the histological features in the course of the disease and tries to provide a summary on different pathogenetic concepts. (orig.) [de

  9. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  10. A systematic review and meta-analysis into the effect of lateral wedge arch support insoles for reducing knee joint load in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fei; Lu, Bin; Kuang, Ming-jie; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Yun-long; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Lei; Wang, Yan; Ma, Jian-xiong; Ma, Xin-long

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles (LWAS) on reducing the knee joint load in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) compared with an appropriate control. Methods: Databases including Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, Cochrane library, and Google Scholar were searched with no limits on study date or language, from the earliest available date to October 31, 2016. The included studies had to have the aim of reducing knee load and have an appropriate control. The main measured values were the first and second peak external knee adduction moments (EKAM) and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). The random-effects model was used for analyzing the eligible studies. Results: Nine studies met the inclusion criteria with a total of 356 participants of whom 337 received LWAS treatment. The risk of methodological bias scores (quality index) ranged from 21 to 27 of 32. Treatment with LWAS resulted in statistically significant reductions in the first peak EKAM (P = .005), the second peak EKAM (P = .01), and the KAAI (P = .03). However, among trials in which the control treatment was control shoes, the LWAS showed no associations on the first peak EKAM (P = .10) or the KAAI (P =  .06); among trials in which the control treatment was neutral insoles, the LWAS showed no associations on the second peak EKAM (P = .21) or the KAAI (P = .23). At the same time, the LWAS showed no statistically significant reduction on the first peak EKAM (P = .39) when compared with flat insoles. Conclusion: Although meta-analysis outcomes of all studies indicated statistically significant associations between LWAS and reductions of the first peak EKAM, second peak EKAM and KAAI in people with medial knee OA while walking, different results existed in subgroups using various control conditions for comparison. These findings do not support the use of LWAS

  11. Does increased femoral antetorsion predispose to cartilage lesions of the patellofemoral joint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, Johannes; Bredow, Jan; Wissusek, Boris; Spies, Christian Karl; Boese, Christoph Kolja; Chang, Shi-Min; Eysel, Peer; Dargel, Jens

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between femoral neck antetorsion and the presence and p