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  1. [Fabry disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paula; Luna, Paula Carolina; Abad, María Eugenia; Larralde, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Fabry disease is an uncommon, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by partial or complete deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. The defect leads to accumulation of uncleaved globotriaosylceramide on the vascular endothelium and visceral tissues, being the skin, heart, kidneys and central nervous system the most affected organs. We performed review of the literature related to the disease and emphasized that early recognition of angiokeratomas and hypohidrosis are key diagnostic signs of this serious disease. We also addressed the need of multidisciplinary assessment of these patients.

  2. Substrate reduction augments the efficacy of enzyme therapy in a mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Marshall

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-gal. This deficiency results in accumulation of the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (GL-3 in lysosomes. Endothelial cell storage of GL-3 frequently leads to kidney dysfunction, cardiac and cerebrovascular disease. The current treatment for Fabry disease is through infusions of recombinant α-gal (enzyme-replacement therapy; ERT. Although ERT can markedly reduce the lysosomal burden of GL-3 in endothelial cells, variability is seen in the clearance from several other cell types. This suggests that alternative and adjuvant therapies may be desirable. Use of glucosylceramide synthase inhibitors to abate the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids (substrate reduction therapy, SRT has been shown to be effective at reducing substrate levels in the related glycosphingolipidosis, Gaucher disease. Here, we show that such an inhibitor (eliglustat tartrate, Genz-112638 was effective at lowering GL-3 accumulation in a mouse model of Fabry disease. Relative efficacy of SRT and ERT at reducing GL-3 levels in Fabry mouse tissues differed with SRT being more effective in the kidney, and ERT more efficacious in the heart and liver. Combination therapy with ERT and SRT provided the most complete clearance of GL-3 from all the tissues. Furthermore, treatment normalized urine volume and uromodulin levels and significantly delayed the loss of a nociceptive response. The differential efficacies of SRT and ERT in the different tissues indicate that the combination approach is both additive and complementary suggesting the possibility of an improved therapeutic paradigm in the management of Fabry disease.

  3. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AJ, Germain DP, Goldman M, Grabowski G, Packman S, Wilcox WR. Fabry disease, an under-recognized multisystemic disorder: ... Sims K, Brodie SE, Pastores GM, Strotmann JM, Wilcox WR. Fabry disease: guidelines for the evaluation and ...

  5. Fabry disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Rasmussen, AK

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, multiorgan disease. The most serious complications involve the kidney, brain and heart. This study aims to assess the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using agalsidase-beta in children with Fabry disease. We carried out a nationwide, descriptive and observational...... retrospective cohort study of 10 children (9-16 years at baseline), who underwent regular systematic investigations for 1-8 years after initiation of ERT with agalsidase-beta (Fabryzyme®, Genzyme). Ophthalmological, echocardiographic abnormalities and hypohidrosis were found at baseline and during the follow......-up period. Serious kidney, heart or brain involvement had not developed at the last follow-up examination. For the majority of the patients improvements were found concerning headache, acroparaesthesias and gastrointestinal pain during the follow-up period. The level of energy and physical activity also...

  6. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  7. Fabry disease simulating Crohn's ileitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Carlos A; Villnow, Elizabeth; Sundelin, Birgitta; Eriksson, Elina; Dolapcsiev, Karoli; Björk, Jan; Befrits, Ragnar; Tengvar, Magnus; Iversen, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited (X-linked) lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, leading to accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in various tissues. A 57-year-old male with a family history and laboratory findings of Fabry disease, was consulted for severe abdominal pain, undulating pyrexia, weight loss and diarrhea. The tentative clinical diagnosis of Crohn's ileitis was supported at computed tomographic examination, at laparotomy and at inspection of the resected ileal segment. Histology revealed chronic and acute inflammation, thick-walled occluded vessels, fibrosis and characteristic bi-refringent lamellar deposits of globotriaosylceramide and calcifications. Multi-nucleated giant cells contained phagocytized bi-refringent material. Transmission electron microscopy showed cells with irregular cytoplasmic bodies displaying distinctive zebra-like lamellar structures. It is submitted that the gastrointestinal phenotype of Fabry disease may concur with symptoms resembling abdominal Crohn's disease.

  8. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a defect in the gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Symptoms arise because of accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in multiple organs, resulting in severely reduced quality of life and premature death....... Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...

  9. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  10. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  11. Cochleovestibular Manifestations in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ciceran MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide accumulation throughout the body. This accumulation leads to various clinical disorders, including inner ear lesions, with sensorineural hearing loss and dizziness. Although hearing loss is recognized in these patients, its incidence and natural history have not been characterized. Hearing disorders develop mainly in adulthood, and tinnitus may be an earlier symptom in Fabry disease. A significant incidence of mid- and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in affected males is commonly reported, whereas in female carriers, it is much less frequent. In addition, a high incidence of vestibular disorders with dizziness and chronic instability is also observed in these patients. The few studies about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT on cochleovestibular symptoms show controversial results. Based on the model of densely stained material accumulation in the inner ear, stria vascularis cell, and organ damage, an early indication of ERT may prevent hearing loss due to the reduction in substrate accumulation.

  12. Cochleovestibular Manifestations in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ciceran MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide accumulation throughout the body. This accumulation leads to various clinical disorders, including inner ear lesions, with sensorineural hearing loss and dizziness. Although hearing loss is recognized in these patients, its incidence and natural history have not been characterized. Hearing disorders develop mainly in adulthood, and tinnitus may be an earlier symptom in Fabry disease. A significant incidence of mid- and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in affected males is commonly reported, whereas in female carriers, it is much less frequent. In addition, a high incidence of vestibular disorders with dizziness and chronic instability is also observed in these patients. The few studies about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT on cochleovestibular symptoms show controversial results. Based on the model of densely stained material accumulation in the inner ear, stria vascularis cell, and organ damage, an early indication of ERT may prevent hearing loss due to the reduction in substrate accumulation.

  13. Neurological manifestations in Fabry disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks; Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare, progressive, multisystem and highly debilitating disease. FD is an X-linked lysosome storage disorder that results in α-galactosidase A deifciency. The subsequent accumulation of glycosphingolipids is more evident in vascular endothelium and smooth-muscle cells. The resulting effect of the deposition is generalized inlfammation and vasculopathy, which can also affect the central and peripheral nervous system. FD progresses with kidney dysfunction, angiokeratoma of the skin, cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular events and neurological disorders. In the present review, the neurological manifestations of FD are summarized with emphasis on cerebral vasculopathy, cochlear nerve dysfunction, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, autonomic dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Enzyme replacement therapy is also discussed in the light of its more prominent effects when administered early in life, which make it essential to diagnose FD as soon as possible.

  14. Dermatologic Aspects of Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Luna MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Isolated angiokeratomas (AKs are common cutaneous lesions, generally deemed unworthy of further investigation. In contrast, diffuse AKs should alert the physician to a possible diagnosis of Fabry disease (FD. Angiokeratomas often do not appear until adolescence or young adulthood. The number of lesions and the extension over the body increase progressively with time, so that generalization and mucosal involvement are frequent. Although rare, FD remains an important diagnosis to consider in patients with AKs, with or without familial history. Dermatologists must have a high index of suspicion, especially when skin features are associated with other earlier symptoms such as acroparesthesia, hypohidrosis, or heat intolerance. Once the diagnosis is established, prompt screening of family members should be performed. In all cases, a multidisciplinary team is necessary for the long-term follow-up and treatment.

  15. Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia in Fabry Disease

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    Juan Politei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fabry disease (FD is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with marked cerebrovascular involvement. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI shows different abnormalities, like white matter lesions that may already be present at an early stage in the disease. Aim: To present observations from a series of brain MRIs performed among a cohort of patients with FD and the relationship of imaging abnormalities with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs. Methods: A total of 70 patients with FD (43 women were enrolled. The cardiac, renal, ophthalmic, and peripheral nerve functioning was assessed. The MRI evaluation included assessment for evidence of ischemia, microbleeds, pulvinar sign, Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformation, and vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD. The presence or absence of CVRFs was examined for all patients. Results: Renal involvement was found in 60%, cardiac compromise in 30%, cornea verticillata in 91.4%, and acroparesthesias in 87.1% of patients. Brain MRI analysis found evidence of cerebral ischemic injury in 25.9% of men and 30.2% of women. Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia was observed in imaging from 55.5% of men and 34.8% of women. The logistic regression analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risks factors, using ischemia or VBD as a dependent variable, showed no statistically significant results. Discussion: Our results have demonstrated cerebrovascular involvement before the third decade in many patients with FD. This study is further evidence confirming that women are not just carriers of FD and should be followed clinically and evaluated comprehensively to monitor for disease burden and progression. Although silent brain ischemias in MRI should be included as a key feature for the diagnoses of FD, VBD is an earlier and frequent sign.

  16. Doença de Fabry Fabry disease

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    Paula Boggio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Fabry é enfermidade de armazenamento lisossômico rara, ligada ao cromossomo-X, causada pela deficiência parcial ou completa da enzima alfagalactosidase A. O defeito resulta no acúmulo de globotriaosilceramida no endotélio vascular e tecidos viscerais, sendo a pele, o coração, os rins e o sistema nervoso central os mais afetados. As autoras realizam revisão da literatura relacionada a essa afecção e ressaltam que o reconhecimento precoce dos angioqueratomas e da hipoidrose constitui sinal-chave no diagnóstico dessa doença grave. Destacam também a necessidade de esses doentes serem avaliados por equipe multidisciplinar.Fabry disease is an uncommon, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by partial or complete deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. The defect leads to accumulation of uncleaved globotriaosylceramide on the vascular endothelium and visceral tissues, being the skin, heart, kidneys and central nervous system the most affected organs. We performed review of the literature related to the disease and emphasized that early recognition of angiokeratomas and hypohidrosis are key diagnostic signs of this serious disease. We also addressed the need of multidisciplinary assessment of these patients.

  17. Cognitive and Psychological Functioning in Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsdottir, Linda; Tchan, Michel C.; Knopman, Alex A.; Menzies, Graham C.; Batchelor, Jennifer; Sillence, David O.

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder which can result in renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular disease. Patients are at increased risk of stroke and neuroimaging studies note cerebrovascular pathology. This study provides a cognitive profile of a cohort of individuals with Fabry disease and investigates the impact of pain, age, renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular functioning on cognition and psychological functioning. Seventeen Fabry patients (12 males) with ages ranging 25 to 60 years (M = 46.6+11.8), and 15 age-matched healthy controls (M = 46.2+12.7) were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Fabry males demonstrated slower speed of information processing, reduced performance on measures of executive functions (verbal generation, reasoning, problem solving, perseveration), were more likely to show clinically significant reductions, and were more likely to report symptoms of anxiety and depression. Conversely, Fabry females performed at a similar level to controls. Correlational analyses indicated a link between cognitive and clinical measures of disease severity. PMID:25319043

  18. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA(α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B...

  19. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    abnormalities in patients with Fabry disease. Electron microscopy of lung biopsy and induced sputum show lamellar inclusion bodies (Zebra bodies) in the cytoplasm of cells in the airway wall. X-ray and CT scan have shown patchy ground-glass pulmonary infiltrations, fibrosis, and air trapping. Fibrosis diagnosed...

  20. Females with Fabry disease frequently have major organ involvement: lessons from the Fabry Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, W.R.; Oliveira, J.P.; Hopkin, R.J.;

    2008-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The Fabry Registry is a global clinical effort to collect longitudinal data on FD. In the past, most "carrier" females were usually thought to be clinically unaffected. A systematic effort has ...

  1. Multiple parapelvic cysts in Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azancot, María A; Vila, Josefa; Domínguez, Carmen; Serres, Xavier; Espinel, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A (alpha-GLA A), which leads to glycosphingolipid accumulation, mainly globotriaosylceramide, in tissues. Disease prevalence and the index of suspicion are both low, which tends to result in delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a male Fabry disease patient who manifested no angiokeratoma lesions but presented multiple parapelvic cysts and renal failure. The genetic study revealed an alpha-GLA A gene mutation that had not been recorded in the mutations registry. The de novo mutation was not found in his relatives and it was not transmitted to his offspring. The large number and peculiar appearance of the parapelvic cysts led to the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic Indicators of Renal Disease Progression in Adults with Fabry Disease: Natural History Data from the Fabry Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Wanner; J.P. Oliveira; A. Ortiz; M. Mauer; D.P. Germain; G.E. Linthorst; A.L. Serra; L. Marodi; R. Mignani; B. Cianciaruso; B. Vujkovac; R. Lemay; D. Beitner-Johnson; S. Waldek; D.G. Warnock

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: These analyses were designed to characterize renal disease progression in untreated adults with Fabry disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Data from the Fabry Registry for 462 untreated adults (121 men and 341 women) who had at least two estimated GFR (e

  3. Fabry's disease and psychosis: causality or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairing, S; Wiest, R; Metzler, S; Theodoridou, A; Hoff, P

    2011-01-01

    A 21-year-old female with Fabry's disease (FD) presented acute psychotic symptoms such as delusions, auditory hallucinations and formal thought disorders. Since the age of 14, she had suffered from various psychiatric symptoms increasing in frequency and intensity. We considered the differential diagnoses of prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia and organic schizophrenia-like disorder. Routine examinations including cognitive testing, electroencephalography and structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed no pathological findings. Additional structural and functional imaging demonstrated a minor CNS involvement of FD, yet without functional limitations. In summary our examination results support the thesis that in the case of our patient a mere coincidence of FD and psychotic symptoms is more likely than a causal connection.

  4. Involvement of dorsal root ganglia in Fabry's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadoth, N; Sandbank, U

    1983-08-01

    Bouts of shooting pain along the extremities are common in the early stages of Fabry's disease. No pathological explanation has been advanced to clarify the mechanism of such pain. In the present case neuronal storage of glycolipid was confined to dorsal root ganglia neurones only. It is suggested that this may explain the shooting pain in Fabry's disease. In hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy, familial dysautonomia, and tabes dorsalis, changes in dorsal root ganglia cells cause similar clinical signs and thus it may be concluded that shooting pains in Fabry's disease may be caused by damage to dorsal root ganglia neurones.

  5. Urinary Podocyte Loss Is Increased in Patients with Fabry Disease and Correlates with Clinical Severity of Fabry Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Brent; Scott, C. Ronald; Mauer, Michael; Shankland, Stuart; Pippin, Jeffrey; Jefferson, Jonathan A.; Wallace, Eric; Warnock, David; Najafian, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major complication of Fabry disease. Podocytes accumulate globotriaosylceramide inclusions more than other kidney cell types in Fabry patients. Podocyte injury occurs early in age, and is progressive. Since injured podocytes detach into the urine (podocyturia), we hypothesized that podocyturia would increase in Fabry patients and correlate with clinical severity of Fabry nephropathy. Urine specimens from 39 Fabry patients and 24 healthy subjects were evaluated for podocyturia. Most of the Fabry patients and many healthy subjects had podocyturia. The number of podocytes per gram of urine creatinine (UPodo/g Cr) was 3.6 fold greater in Fabry patients (3,741 ± 2796; p = 0.001) than healthy subjects (1,040 ± 972). Fabry patients with normoalbuminuria and normoproteinuria had over 2-fold greater UPodo/g Cr than healthy subjects (p = 0.048). UPodo/gCr was inversely related to eGFR in male patients (r = -0.69, p = 0.003). UPodo/gCr was directly related to urine protein creatinine ratio (r = 0.33; p = 0.04) in all Fabry patients. These studies confirm increased podocyturia in Fabry disease, even when proteinuria and albuminuria are absent. Podocyturia correlates with clinical severity of Fabry nephropathy, and potentially may be of prognostic value. PMID:27992580

  6. Autonomic skin responses in females with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Bach, Flemming W.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    dysfunction. This study examined peripheral autonomic nerve function in 19 female patients with Fabry disease and 19 sex and age-matched controls by measuring (1) sweat production following acetylcholine challenge; (2) the sympathetically mediated vasoconstrictor responses to inspiratory gasp, stress......, and the cold pressor test; and (3) cutaneous blood flow following capsaicin. The vasoconstrictor response to inspiratory gasp was increased in Fabry patients compared to controls (p = 0.03), while the response to cold and mental stress did not change. Female patients with Fabry disease had a reduced sweat...

  7. Fabry disease: recent advances in pathology, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Björn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Fabry disease (α-galactosidase A deficiency accumulation of Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 leads to progressive organ failure and premature death. The introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT was the beginning of a new era in this disorder, and has prompted a broad range of research activities. This review aims to summarize recent developments and progress with high impact for Fabry disease. Methods A Pubmed analysis was performed using the search terms "Fabry disease", "Anderson-Fabry disease", "alpha-galactosidase A" and "Gb3". Of the given publications by 31st January 2009 only original articles recently published in peer reviewed journals were included for this review. Case reports were included only when they comprised a new aspect. In addition we included relevant conference abstracts when the results had not already been published as original articles. Results Apart from Gb3-accumulation cellular and organ specific damages may be related also to inflammatory and immunological consequences. It will be interesting whether this may lead to new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Fabry disease. Since newborn screening is still difficult in Fabry disease, detection of patients in populations at risk is of great importance. Undiagnosed patients with Fabry disease may still be found in cohorts of subjects with renal diseases, cardiomyopathy and TIA or stroke. Efforts should be undertaken to identify these individuals and initialise ERT in order to hault disease progression. It has also been demonstrated that Gb3-accumulation leads to pre-clinical damages and it is believed that early treatment may be the only possibility so far to prevent irreversible organ damage.

  8. Arterial Wall Properties and Womersley Flow in Fabry Disease

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    Dimitriadis Emilios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting in the cellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide particularly globotriaosylceramide. The disease is characterized by a dilated vasculopathy with arterial ectasia in muscular arteries and arterioles. Previous venous plethysomographic studies suggest enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Fabry disease indicating a functional abnormality of resistance vessels. Methods We examined the mechanical properties of the radial artery in Fabry disease, a typical fibro-muscular artery. Eight control subjects and seven patients with Fabry disease had a right brachial arterial line placed allowing real time recording of intra-arterial blood pressure. Real time B-mode ultrasound recordings of the right radial artery were obtained simultaneously allowing calculation of the vessel wall internal and external diameter, the incremental Young's modulus and arterial wall thickness. By simultaneously measurement of the distal index finger-pulse oximetry the pulse wave speed was calculated. From the wave speed and the internal radial artery diameter the volume flow was calculated by Womersley analysis following truncation of the late diastolic phase. Results No significant difference was found between Fabry patients and controls for internal or external arterial diameters, the incremental Young's modulus, the arterial wall thickness, the pulse wave speed and the basal radial artery blood flow. Further, no significant difference was found for the radial artery blood flow in response to intra-arterial acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Both drugs however, elevated the mean arterial flow. Conclusions The current study suggests that no structural or mechanical abnormality exists in the vessel wall of fibro-muscular arteries in Fabry disease. This may indicate that a functional abnormality downstream to the conductance vessels is the dominant feature in

  9. A case of minimal change disease in a Fabry patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Yuri A; Patterson, Larry; Yin, Hong; Hopkin, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene and deficiency in alpha-galactosidase A activity. Glycosphingolipids accumulation causes renal injury that manifests early during childhood as tubular dysfunction and later in adulthood as proteinuria and renal insufficiency. Nephrotic syndrome as the first evidence of Fabry-related kidney damage is rare. We report the case of a teenager with known Fabry disease and normal renal function who developed acute nephrotic syndrome. He was found to have typical glycosphingolipids accumulation with no other findings suggestive of alternative causes of nephrotic syndrome on kidney biopsy. After treatment with enzyme replacement therapy and oral steroids, he went into complete remission from nephrotic syndrome, a response that is atypical for Fabry disease patients who develop heavy proteinuria as a result of longstanding disease and chronic renal injury. The nephrotic syndrome in this patient appears to have developed secondary to minimal change disease. We recommend considering immunotherapy in addition to enzyme replacement therapy in those patients with confirmed Fabry disease and acute nephrotic syndrome with clinical and microscopic findings suggestive of minimal change disease.

  10. Screening, diagnosis, and management of patients with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffmann, Raphael; Hughes, Derralynn A; Linthorst, Gabor E

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) are at a high risk for developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. The availability of specific but costly therapy has elevated the profile of this rare condition. This KDIGO conference addressed controversial areas in the diagnosis, screening, a...

  11. Cardiac device implantation in Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sené, Thomas; Lidove, Olivier; Sebbah, Joel; Darondel, Jean-Marc; Picard, Hervé; Aaron, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Zenone, Thierry; Joly, Dominique; Charron, Philippe; Ziza, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and predictive factors of arrhythmias and/or conduction abnormalities (ACAs) requiring cardiac device (CD) implantation are poorly characterized in Fabry disease (FD). The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with ACA requiring CD implantation in a monocentric cohort of patients with confirmed FD who were followed up in a department of internal medicine and reference center for FD. Forty-nine patients (20M, 29F) were included. Nine patients (4M, 5F; 18%) had at least one episode of ACA leading to device therapy. Six patients (4M/2F) required a pacemaker (PM) for sinus node dysfunction (n = 4) or atrioventricular disease (n = 2). One female patient required an internal cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to prevent sudden cardiac death because of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (nSVT). One female patient required PM-ICD for sinus node dysfunction and nSVT. One patient underwent CD implantation before the diagnosis of FD. The annual rate of CD implantation was estimated at 1.90 per 100 person years. On univariate analysis at the end of the follow-up period, the factors associated with ACAs requiring CD implantation were as follows: delayed diagnosis of FD, delayed initiation of enzyme replacement therapy, age at the last follow-up visit, and severe multiorgan phenotype (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, chronic kidney disease, and/or sensorineural hearing loss). On multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis of FD and age at the last follow-up visit were independently associated with an increased risk of ACAs requiring CD (P sudden death in patients with FD, regular monitoring is mandatory, especially in patients with a late diagnosis of FD and/or with a severe phenotype. Regular Holter ECGs, therapeutic education of patients, and deliverance of an emergency card including a phenotype summary are crucial in the care of FD patients. Available guidelines for device therapy and the

  12. Fabry disease - current treatment and new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motabar, Omid; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei

    2010-07-23

    Fabry disease is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α-galactosidase A (GLA), resulting in the storage of excess cellular glycosphingolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for the treatment of Fabry disease, but it is a costly, intravenous treatment. Alternative therapeutic approaches, including small molecule chaperone therapy, are currently being explored. High throughput screening (HTS) technologies can be utilized to discover other small molecule compounds, including non-inhibitory chaperones, enzyme activators, molecules that reduce GLA substrate, and molecules that activate GLA gene promoters. This review outlines the current therapeutic approaches, emerging treatment strategies, and the process of drug discovery and development for Fabry disease.

  13. A case of Fabry's disease with congenital agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Yeol; Jeon, Su-Young; Hong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sung-Eun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hun; Kim, Ki-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by abnormalities in the α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene, which leads to a GLA deficiency and to the intracellular deposition of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) within vascular endothelium and other tissues. It manifests as progressive multiple organ dysfunctions caused by the deposition of Gb3. On the other hand, congenital agammaglobulinemia is usually caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene with X-linked dominence, suppresses B cell maturation, and causes recurrent pyogenic infections. In former reports, the distance between the loci in the Xq22 region of the human X chromosome was found to be about 69 kilobases. A 23-yr-old man diagnosed with congenital agammaglobulinemia at age 5, showed typical clinical and laboratory and histopathological findings of Fabry's disease. The genetic basis of this combination of the two syndromes was studied in this patient. Here, we report a case of Fabry's disease with congenital agammaglobulinemia.

  14. Fabry disease, a complex pathology not easy to diagnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Colomba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a multisystemic lysosomal storage disorder, inherited in an X-linked manner. It is a defect of metabolism of the glycosphingolipids, due to the reduction or absence of the activity of lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. This reduction of activity causes the storage of globotriaosylceramide and derivatives in the lysosomes, triggering a cascade of cellular events, mainly in vascular endothelium. These events are the responsible for the systemic clinical manifestations and the renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular complications, or a combination of them. The symptomatology can lead to the premature death of patient between the fourth or fifth decade of life. The first symptoms can occur at different ages, generally in childhood, with different severity and course. Fabry disease is suspected on the basis of clinical and anamnestic-familial data, and it is confirmed by enzymatic and genetic assays. However, Fabry disease could be a pathology more complex than previously considered, and the diagnostic tests that are currently in use could be not always sufficient to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Probably, other factors could be also involved in the onset of symptomatology. In the last years, the knowledge of the disease is considerably increased but other studies are necessary to make a prompt and reliable diagnosis. An early diagnosis of Fabry disease is essential for the beginning of the enzyme replacement therapy, which can contribute to arrest its progression and improve the quality of life of patients.

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with Fabry and Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, S., E-mail: stephan@nmr.at [Department of Radiology, MR-Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bogner, W. [Department of Radiology, MR-Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Stadlbauer, A. [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten (Austria); Krssak, M. [Department of Radiology, MR-Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodamer, O. [Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: Fabry and Gaucher diseases are rare progressive inherited disorders of glycosphingolipid metabolism that affect multiple organ systems. The aim of this study was to investigate evidence for metabolic changes in the central nervous system involvement using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Seven Fabry and eight Gaucher patients were included into this study. A two-dimensional, spectroscopic imaging method with an ultra-short echo-time of 11 ms was used at a 3 T whole body magnet. Absolute metabolic values were retrieved using internal water scaling. Results were compared, with sex- and age-matched controls. Results: In contrast to previous findings, absolute and relative metabolite values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) or NAA/Creatine (Cr), Cr, Choline (Cho) or Cho/Cr and myo-Inositol (mI) or mI/Cr revealed no, differences between Fabry and Gaucher Type 1 (GD1) patients and controls. Average values were, 10.22, 6.32, 2.15 and 5.39 mMol/kg wet weight for NAA, Cr, Cho and mI, respectively. In this study, we found significantly decreasing NAA/Cho with increasing age in all three groups (Fabry, GD1, patients and healthy controls) (between 5 and 8% per decade). Conclusions: There were no changes of the quantified metabolites detected by MRS in normal appearing white matter. This study shows the importance of sex- and age-matched controls.

  16. The Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Turkey: The TURKFAB Study

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    Kultigin Turkmen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fabry disease is a treatable cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD characterized by a genetic deficiency of α-galactosidase A. European Renal Best Practice (ERBP recommends screening for Fabry disease in CKD patients. However, this is based on expert opinion and there are no reports of the prevalence of Fabry disease in stage 1-5 CKD. Hence, we investigated the prevalence of Fabry disease in CKD patients not receiving renal replacement therapy. Methods: This prospective study assessed α-galactosidase activity in dried blood spots in 313 stage 1-5 CKD patients, 167 males, between ages of 18-70 years whose etiology of CKD was unknown and were not receiving renal replacement therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed by GLA gene mutation analysis. Results: Three (all males of 313 CKD patients (0.95% were diagnosed of Fabry disease, for a prevalence in males of 1.80%. Family screening identified 8 aditional Fabry patients with CKD. Of a total of 11 Fabry patients, 7 were male and started enzyme replacement therapy and 4 were female. The most frequent manifestations in male patients were fatigue (100%, tinnitus, vertigo, acroparesthesia, hypohidrosis, cornea verticillata and angiokeratoma (all 85%, heat intolerance (71%, and abdominal pain (57%. The most frequent manifestations in female patients were fatigue and cornea verticillata (50%, and tinnitus, vertigo and angiokeratoma (25%. Three patients had severe episodic abdominal pain attacks and proteinuria, and were misdiagnosed as familial Mediterranean fever. Conclusions: The prevalence of Fabry disease in selected CKD patients is in the range found among renal replacement therapy patients, but the disease is diagnosed at an earlier, treatable stage. These data support the ERBP recommendation to screen for Fabry disease in patients with CKD of unknown origin.

  17. Fabry disease presenting with sudden hearing loss and otosclerosis: a case report

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    Felisati Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting in a multiple-system disorder with a wide spectrum of physical signs and symptoms, predominantly affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems, skin, heart, kidneys, and eyes. Case presentation We describe the case of a 26-year-old European Caucasian man who had Fabry disease and who presented with episodic sudden unilateral hearing loss and was treated with glucocorticoids, pentoxifylline, hyperbaric oxygen, and fluoride because of concomitant audiometric evidence of otosclerosis. This case demonstrates the partial and transient beneficial effect of standard treatment for sudden hearing loss not related to Fabry disease and analyzes the possible connection between typical Fabry disease inner-ear lesions and otosclerosis. Whereas hearing loss has been described in connection with Fabry disease, otosclerosis-associated hearing loss in Fabry disease has not yet been described. Conclusions Although progressive hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease seems to be influenced by replacement therapy, few data concerning treatment of sudden hearing loss are available. The lack of literature concerning the pathogenesis of the otological involvement in Fabry disease makes it impossible to identify a connection between the latter and otosclerosis. Therefore, this report may help to reinforce the importance of a thorough evaluation of hearing in patients with Fabry disease and may be of help with therapeutic decision-making.

  18. Avascular necrosis of bilateral femoral heads in a patient with Fabry's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Francis

    2012-07-13

    The underlying cause of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is often not apparent. We report the case of a 26 year old builder with a four month history of bilateral hip pain, and a diagnosis of bilateral femoral head avascular necrosis. Fabry\\'s disease was identified as the probable cause. Since 2001, enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry\\'s disease has become available, with a potential to influence the disease process, and this is of potential importance to clinicians treating AVN.

  19. Upregulation of inward rectifying currents and Fabry disease neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Tchan, Michel; Sillence, David; Vucic, Steve

    2012-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain are common clinical manifestations of Fabry disease (FD). Although the mechanisms underlying the development of sensory neuropathy remain to be fully elucidated, a chronic ischemic process was proposed. Consequently, this study utilized axonal excitability techniques to gain further insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of FD neuropathy. Median motor and sensory axonal excitability studies were undertaken in 13 FD patients and results were compared to 19 healthy subjects. A "fanning-in" of threshold electrotonus, suggestive of membrane depolarization, was evident only in motor axons in FD patients. In contrast, the sensory axons exhibited a lower threshold in FD (p < 0.05) and a significantly increased hyperpolarizing current/threshold (I/V) gradient (FD 0.48 ± 0.03; controls, 0.31 ± 0.02, p < 0.001), which correlated with clinical scores of disease severity (Rho = 0.65, p < 0.05), neuropathy (Rho = 0.54, p < 0.05) and neuropathic pain (Rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). These findings indicate that upregulation of I(h) , rather than ischemia, may underlie the sensory symptoms and possibly development of neuropathy in FD. Modulation of sensory I(h) may prove therapeutically useful in Fabry disease.

  20. Analysis of Placental Tissue in Fabry Disease With and Without Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Bouwman; C.E.M. Hollak; M.A. van den Bergh Weerman; F.A. Wijburg; G.E. Linthorst

    2010-01-01

    There are only a few reports on the histology of placental tissue of pregnancies from mothers with Fabry disease. Fabry disease is a lysosomal disorder caused by alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. Extensive glycosphingolipid (GSL) accumulation in fetal and maternal placenta tissue obtained from a Fab

  1. Enfermedad de Fabry: Comunicación de ocho casos Fabry disease: Report of eight cases

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    M Palombo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La Enfermedad de Fabry (EF constituye una alteración hereditaria del metabolismo de los glicoesfingolípidos, debida a la deficiencia parcial o completa de la enzima alfa-galactosidasa A. Es una enfermedad de transmisión genética ligada a X, que afecta universalmente a todas las etnias humanas con una incidencia comunicada de 1 cada 100.000 nacimientos, aunque es probable que esta cifra subestime la real prevalencia de la enfermedad, especialmente por el gran número de casos no diagnosticados. La EF se manifiesta en su forma más florida, en varones homocigotas que carecen completamente de actividad alfa-galactosidasa A, provocando una miríada de alteraciones, incluyendo anomalías renales (proteinuria progresiva e insuficiencia renal, cardiovasculares (cardiopatías, arritmias, accidentes cerebrovasculares, neurológicas (dolor acral y abdominal, y cocleo-vestibulares, entre las más importantes. Sin embargo, la afectación cutánea constituye la alteración más específica de la enfermedad y es en general, la que conduce a la sospecha diagnóstica. La EF no tratada reduce francamente la expectativa de vida de acuerdo a la severidad de la afectación renal y cardiovascular, si bien la terapia con reemplazo enzimático puede modificar e incluso detener el curso de la enfermedad. En 2010, una paciente de 28 años oriunda de la Provincia de Santa Fe, consultó porangioqueratomas, que condujeron al diagnóstico de enfermedad de Fabry. Desde entonces hemos estudiado y tratado a toda la familia, con ocho casos confirmados a la fecha y otros tantos en evaluación.Fabry disease (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 301500 is an X-linked inherited condition due to absence or reduction of ɑ galactosidase activity in lysosomes that results in accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and related neutral glycosphingolipids (storage disorder. It is estimated to occur in 1 in 40.000 to 117.000 live male births, although a more recent screening study in

  2. [Treatment of Fabry disease: Successes, failures, and expectations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidove, Olivier; Barbey, Frédéric; Joly, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, results from α-galactosidase A deficiency. Two different recombinant enzyme treatments (algalsidase alpha agalsidase beta) have been available since 2001 to treat a disease that affects not only men but also women. Enzyme replacement therapy promotes cell clearance of susbtrate, and improves some clinical parameters (heart, kidney damage, pain, quality of life). However, there is no proven efficacy to date on central nervous system lesions, on cardiac morbidity and mortality, nor on renal damage beyond a certain stage (proteinuria>1g/day and/or estimated glomerular filtration rate<60mL/min/1.73m(2)). In this review, we discuss the potential benefit of an early intervention, the vascular protective measures to be associated with enzyme therapy and their rationale, and some alternative treatments under development, such as chaperones and substrate molecules inhibitors.

  3. Fabry disease in genetic counseling practice: recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robin L; Hart, Kimberly A; O'Rourke, Erin; Barranger, John A; Johnson, Jack; MacDermot, Kay D; Pastores, Gregory M; Steiner, Robert D; Thadhani, Ravi

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this document is to provide health care professionals with recommendations for genetic counseling and testing of individuals with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of Fabry disease, with a family history of Fabry disease, and those identified as female carriers of Fabry disease. These recommendations are the opinions of a multicenter working group of genetic counselors, medical geneticists, and other health professionals with expertise in Fabry disease counseling, as well as an individual with Fabry disease who is a founder of a Fabry disease patient advocacy group in the United States. The recommendations are U.S. Preventive Task Force Class III, and they are based on clinical experience, a review of pertinent English-language articles, and reports of expert committees. This document reviews the genetics of Fabry disease, the indications for genetic testing and interpretation of results, psychosocial considerations, and references for professional and patient resources. These recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. The professional judgment of a healthcare provider, familiar with the facts and circumstances of a specific case, will always supersede these recommendations.

  4. [Atypical symptoms of Fabry's disease: sudden bilateral deafness, lymphoedema and Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undas, Anetta; Ryś, Donata; Wegrzyn, Wojciech; Musiał, Jacek

    2002-11-01

    A 40-year-old man with Fabry disease, confirmed by decreased leukocyte alpha-galactosidase A activity in 2001, complained of sudden bilateral deafness, as evidenced by clinical history and audiometry. Magnetic resonance of the brain revealed features typical of Fabry disease. Other clinical manifestations of the disease included: angiokeratoma, mild proteinuria with normal renal function, lymphoedema of the lower limbs, pre-excitation syndrome, myocardial hypertrophy.

  5. [Fabry's disease: an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Gianluca; Romagnoli, Stefano; Sharma, Aashish; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    Fabry's disease (FD) is a severe congenital metabolic disorder characterized by the deficient activity of lysosomal exoglycohydrolase alpha-galactosidase, characterized by glycosphingolipid deposition in several cells, such as capillary endothelial cells, renal, cardiac, and nerve cells. As a systemic disease leading to a contemporaneous myocardial and renal dysfunction, FD might be an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5). Kidney damage is commonly characterized by proteinuria, isosthenuria and altered tubular function when occurs at the second-third decade, azotemia and end-stage renal disease in third-fifth decade. Beyond the irreversible glomerular, tubular and vascular damages, the podocytes foot process effacement is the major cause of kidney dysfunction. Myocardial damage is usually observed with right and left ventricular hypertrophy, arrhythmias (due to sinus node and conduction system impairment), diastolic dysfunction, congestive heart failure, myocardial ischemia, fibrosis and cardiac death. The enzymatic replacement therapy is essential for the management of FD, as well as the control of renal (with anti-proteinuric agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors- and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers), brain (coated aspirin, clopidogrel and statins to prevent strokes) and heart complications (calcium channel blockers for ischemic cardiomyopathy, warfarin and amiodarone or cardioverter device for arrhythmias). Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  6. Clinical prodromes of neurodegeneration in Anderson-Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Derralynn; Milligan, Alan; Richfield, Linda; Reichmann, Heinz; Mehta, Atul; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of prodromal clinical features of neurodegeneration in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) in comparison to age-matched controls. Methods: This is a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional study in 167 participants (60 heterozygous females and 50 hemizygous males with genetically confirmed AFD, 57 age-matched controls) using a clinical screening program consisting of structured interview, quantitative tests of motor function, and assessments of cognition, depression, olfaction, orthostatic intolerance, pain, REM sleep behavior disorder, and daytime sleepiness. Results: In comparison to age-matched controls (mean age 48.3 years), patients with AFD (mean age 49.0 years) showed slower gait and transfer speed, poorer fine manual dexterity, and lower hand speed, which was independent of focal symptoms due to cerebrovascular disease. Patients with AFD were more severely affected by depression, pain, and daytime sleepiness and had a lower quality of life. These motor and nonmotor manifestations significantly correlated with clinical disease severity. However, patients with AFD did not reveal extrapyramidal motor features or signs of significant cognitive impairment, hyposmia, orthostatic intolerance, or REM sleep behavior disorder, which commonly precede later neurodegenerative disease. In our cohort, there were no differences in neurologic manifestations of AFD between heterozygous females and hemizygous males. Conclusions: Aside from cerebrovascular manifestations and small fiber neuropathy, AFD results in a distinct neurologic phenotype comprising poorer motor performance and specific nonmotor features. In contrast to functional loss of glucocerebrosidase in Gaucher disease, α-galactosidase deficiency in AFD is not associated with a typical cluster of clinical features prodromal for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease. PMID:25762709

  7. Fabry disease in Spain. Description of Spanish patients and a comparison with other European countries using data from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Barba Romero, Miguel Angel; Rivera Gallego, Alberto; Pintos Morell, Guillem

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Fabry disease (FD) is an X chromosome-linked transmitted lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficient activity of enzyme ?-galactosidase A. This leads to accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids associated with organ involvement and premature death. We report the clinical characteristics of Spanish patients enrolled on the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS; an international multicentre registry for the disease) and also compare these data with those from the rest of Eur...

  8. Gaucher disease and Fabry disease: new markers and insights in pathophysiology for two distinct glycosphingolipidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Maria J; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Mirzaian, Mina; Herrera Moro, Daniela; Marques, Andre; Wisse, Patrick; Boot, Rolf G; Willems, Lianne I; Overkleeft, H S; Aerts, J M

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) and Fabry disease (FD) are two relatively common inherited glycosphingolipidoses caused by deficiencies in the lysosomal glycosidases glucocerebrosidase and alpha-galactosidase A, respectively. For both diseases enzyme supplementation is presently used as therapy. Cells and tissues of GD and FD patients are uniformly deficient in enzyme activity, but the two diseases markedly differ in cell types showing lysosomal accumulation of the glycosphingolipid substrates glucosylceramide and globotriaosylceramide, respectively. The clinical manifestation of Gaucher disease and Fabry disease is consequently entirely different and the response to enzyme therapy is only impressive in the case of GD patients. This review compares both glycosphingolipid storage disorders with respect to similarities and differences. Presented is an update on insights regarding pathophysiological mechanisms as well as recently available biochemical markers and diagnostic tools for both disorders. Special attention is paid to sphingoid bases of the primary storage lipids in both diseases. The value of elevated glucosylsphingosine in Gaucher disease and globotriaosylsphingosine in Fabry disease for diagnosis and monitoring of disease is discussed as well as the possible contribution of the sphingoid bases to (patho)physiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology.

  9. Agalsidase benefits renal histology in young patients with Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndel, Camilla; Bostad, Leif; Larsen, Kristin Kampevold; Hirth, Asle; Vikse, Bjørn Egil; Houge, Gunnar; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-01-01

    The effect of early-onset enzyme replacement therapy on renal morphologic features in Fabry disease is largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the effect of 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa or agalsidase beta in 12 consecutive patients age 7-33 years (median age, 16.5 years). We performed renal biopsies at baseline and after 5 years of enzyme replacement therapy; 7 patients had additional biopsies after 1 and 3 years. After a median of 65 months, biopsy findings from all patients showed total clearance of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cell inclusions, and findings from 2 patients showed complete clearance of inclusions from epithelial cells of the distal tubule. The 4 patients who received the highest dose of agalsidase exhibited substantial clearance of podocyte inclusions, and the youngest patient had nearly complete clearance of these inclusions. Linear regression analysis showed a highly significant correlation between podocyte globotriaocylceramide clearance and cumulative agalsidase dose (r=0.804; P=0.002). Microalbuminuria normalized in five patients. In summary, long-term enzyme replacement therapy in young patients can result in complete globotriaocylceramide clearance of mesangial and glomerular endothelial cells across all dosage regimens, and clearance of podocyte inclusions is dose-dependent.

  10. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  11. Measuring patient experiences in Fabry disease: validation of the Fabry-specific Pediatric Health and Pain Questionnaire (FPHPQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswami Uma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Common symptoms for children with Anderson-Fabry Disease (FD such as acroparaesthesia and gastrointestinal manifestations can only be objectively assessed in patients using a valid instrument. To date, no such instrument exists. Methods A preliminary 40-item measure of symptoms and experience with FD, the Fabry-specific Paediatric Health and Pain Questionnaire (FPHPQ was developed, but lacked a formal assessment of its measurement properties. The FPHPQ was used in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS, a registry for all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of FD who are receiving agalsidase alfa, or are treatment naïve and who are managed by physicians participating in FOS. After an item analysis to explore how items performed and combined into domains, a battery of psychometric analyses was performed to assess the measurement properties of this new instrument. Results Eighty-seven children (ages 4-18 years completed the questionnaire. Twenty-three items in three subscales of the questionnaire emerged: pain associated with heat or exertion, pain associated with cold, and abdominal pain and fatigue symptoms. Internal consistency reliability for all three subscales was good (Cronbach alpha ≥ 0.84. Reliability was equally high for all age groups (4-7, 8-12, and 13-18. Test-retest reliability was high for all three subscales (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.74. Construct validity was demonstrated by moderate correlation with brief pain inventory (BPI, KINDL, and EQ-5D. Known group validity showed all subscales were able to discriminate between Fabry disease severity groups as classified by above or below median of the FOS MSSI (Mainz Severity Score Index grade. The heat or exertion subscale was responsive to change in symptoms between responders and non-responders as defined by change in EQ-5D index scores between the first and second visit. Conclusions Preliminary results indicate that the measurement properties

  12. Plasma globotriaosylsphingosine: diagnostic value and relation to clinical manifestations of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombach, S M; Dekker, N; Bouwman, M G; Linthorst, G E; Zwinderman, A H; Wijburg, F A; Kuiper, S; Vd Bergh Weerman, M A; Groener, J E M; Poorthuis, B J; Hollak, C E M; Aerts, J M F G

    2010-09-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of alpha-Galactosidase A, causing accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and elevated plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (lysoGb3). The diagnostic value and clinical relevance of plasma lysoGb3 concentration was investigated. All male and adult female patients with classical Fabry disease could be discerned by an elevated plasma lysoGb3. In young pre-symptomatic Fabry heterozygotes, lysoGb3 levels can be normal. Individuals carrying the R112H and P60L mutations, without classical Fabry symptoms, showed no elevated plasma lysoGb3. Multiple regression analysis showed that there is no correlation of plasma lysoGb3 concentration with total disease severity score in Fabry males. However, plasma lysoGb3 concentration did correlate with white matter lesions (odds ratio: 6.1 per 100 nM lysoGb3 increase (95% CI: 1.4-25.9, p=0.015). In females, plasma lysoGb3 concentration correlated with overall disease severity. Furthermore, plasma lysoGb3 level was related to left ventricular mass (19.5+/-5.5 g increase per 10 nM lysoGb3 increase; p=0.001). In addition, it was assessed whether lifetime exposure to lysoGb3 correlates with disease manifestations. Male Fabry patients with a high lysoGb3 exposure (>10,000 U), were moderately or severely affected, only one mildly. Female patients with a low exposure (1000 U showed disease complications. Plasma lysoGb3 is useful for the diagnosis of Fabry disease. LysoGb3 is an independent risk factor for development of cerebrovascular white matter lesions in male patients and left ventricular hypertrophy in females. Disease severity correlates with exposure to plasma lysoGb3.

  13. Neuro-Otological and Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Weinschelbaum, Romina; Pardal, Ana; Marchesoni, Cintia; Zuberbuhler, Paz; Acosta, Patricia; Cáceres, Guillermo; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Bayón, Luciana; Reisin, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, with multisystemic glycosphingolipids deposits. Neuro-otological involvement leading to hearing loss and vestibular dysfunctions has been described, but there is limited information about the frequency, site of lesion, or the relationship with peripheral neuropathy. The aim was to evaluate the presence of auditory and vestibular symptoms, and assess neurophysiological involvement of the VIII cranial nerve, correlating these findings with clinical and neurophysiological features of peripheral neuropathy. We studied 36 patients with FD with a complete neurological and neuro-otological evaluation including nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory testing (to evaluate small fiber by warm and cold threshold detection and cold and heat pain), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, videonistagmography, audiometry and brainstem auditory evoked potentials. Neuro-otologic symptoms included hearing loss (22.2%), vertigo (27.8%) or both (25%). An involvement of either cochlear or vestibular function was identified in most patients (75%). In 70% of our patients the involvement of both cochlear and vestibular function could not be explained by a neural or vascular mechanism. Small fiber neuropathy was identified in 77.7%. There were no significant associations between neuro-otological and QST abnormalities. Neuro-otologic involvement is frequent and most likely under-recognized in patients with FD. It lacks a specific neural or vascular pattern, suggesting multi-systemic, end organ damage. Small fiber neuropathy is an earlier manifestation of FD, but there is no correlation between the development of neuropathy and neuro-otological abnormalities. PMID:28794847

  14. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Fabry Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Granqvist, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    risk of cerebrovascular disease at a young age in addition to heart and kidney failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess brain function and structure in the Danish cohort of patients with Fabry disease in a prospective way using 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission....... CONCLUSION: Our data indicated that, in patients with Fabry disease, MRI is the preferable clinical modality--if applicable--when monitoring cerebral status, as no additional major brain-pathology was detected with FDG-PET.......BACKGROUND: Fabry disease is a rare metabolic glycosphingolipid storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A--leading to cellular accumulation of globotriasylceramide in different organs, vessels, tissues, and nerves. The disease is associated with an increased...

  15. Fabry Disease: A Turkish Case with a Novel Mutation and Dermatological Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Onenli Mungan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked disease, caused by the deficiency of lysosomal and #945;-galactosidase. Clinical fetaures are; acroparesthesia, unexplained fever, hypohidrosis and angiokeratomas. Untreated cases die early from cardiac complications, renal insuffiency or stroke. Currently there is no cure for Fabry disease, enzyme replacement therapy is the only choice in this progressive disease. A 9-year-old boy admitted to the Dermatology Clinic with reddish papular skin lesions, joint pain and anhydrosis. Hystological examination of the skin biopsy revealed angiokeratoma. There was no renal dysfunction or proteinuria. Biochemical confirmation of Fabry disease was made by determining the deficient leukocyte and #945;-galactosidase activity. Subsequently, the patient's molecular analysis was identified a novel nonsense mutation c. 785G>T in the GLA gene. Enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase beta was started. He is on enzyme replacement therapy for 8 years, significant improvement was obtained in severity and frequency of pain crisis and fatigue. We report this case to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis of Fabry disease restricted to dermatological findings, especially before renal and cardiac involvement occurs, while enzyme replacement therapy is now available. Also this patient is one of the first Fabry patients under enzyme replacement therapy in Turkey. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 156-160

  16. Copious Podocyturia without Proteinuria and with Normal Renal Function in a Young Adult with Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, H.; Canzonieri, R.; Muryan, A.; Schiel, A.; Forrester, M.; Karl, A.; Lombi, F.; Andrews, J.; Pomeranz, V.; Rengel, T.; Zotta, E.

    2015-01-01

    The time for starting a patient with Fabry disease on enzyme replacement therapy is still a matter of debate, particularly when no overt classical clinical signs or symptoms are present. With respect to Fabry nephropathy, a dual problem coexists: the reluctance of many nephrologists to start enzyme replacement infusion until signs of renal disease appear as the appearance of proteinuria or an elevation in serum creatinine and the lack of validated biomarkers of early renal damage. In this regard, proteinuria is nowadays considered as an early and appropriate marker of kidney disease and of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in this report we demonstrate that podocyturia antedates the classical appearance of proteinuria and could be considered as an even earlier biomarker of kidney damage. Podocyturia may be a novel indication for the initiation of therapy in Fabry disease. PMID:26064721

  17. Copious Podocyturia without Proteinuria and with Normal Renal Function in a Young Adult with Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Trimarchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The time for starting a patient with Fabry disease on enzyme replacement therapy is still a matter of debate, particularly when no overt classical clinical signs or symptoms are present. With respect to Fabry nephropathy, a dual problem coexists: the reluctance of many nephrologists to start enzyme replacement infusion until signs of renal disease appear as the appearance of proteinuria or an elevation in serum creatinine and the lack of validated biomarkers of early renal damage. In this regard, proteinuria is nowadays considered as an early and appropriate marker of kidney disease and of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in this report we demonstrate that podocyturia antedates the classical appearance of proteinuria and could be considered as an even earlier biomarker of kidney damage. Podocyturia may be a novel indication for the initiation of therapy in Fabry disease.

  18. The coincidence of IgA nephropathy and Fabry disease

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    Maixnerová Dita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common glomerulonephritis, which may also coexist with other diseases. We present two patients with an unusual coincidence of IgAN and Fabry disease (FD. Case presentation A 26 year-old man underwent a renal biopsy in February 2001. Histopathology showed very advanced IgAN and vascular changes as a result of hypertension. Because of his progressive renal insufficiency the patient began hemodialysis in August 2001. By means of the blood spot test screening method the diagnosis of FD was suspected. Low activity of alpha-galactosidase A in the patient’s plasma and leukocytes and DNA analysis confirmed the diagnosis of FD. Enzyme replacement therapy started in July 2004. Then the patient underwent kidney transplantation in November 2005. Currently, his actual serum creatinine level is 250 μmol/l. Other organ damages included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neuropathic pain and febrile crisis. After enzyme replacement therapy, myocardial hypertrophy has stabilized and other symptoms have disappeared. No further progression of the disease has been noted. The other patient, a 30 year-old woman, suffered from long-term hematuria with a good renal function. Recently, proteinuria (2.6 g/day appeared and a renal biopsy was performed. Histopathology showed IgAN with remarkably enlarged podocytes. A combination of IgAN and a high suspicion of FD was diagnosed. Electron microscopy revealed dense deposits in paramesangial areas typical for IgAN and podocytes with inclusive zebra bodies and myelin figures characteristic of FD. FD was confirmed by the decreased alpha-galactosidase A activity in plasma and leukocytes and by DNA and RNA analysis. Enzyme replacement therapy and family screening were initiated. Conclusions Our results emphasize the role of complexity in the process of diagnostic evaluation of kidney biopsy samples. Electron microscopy represents an integral part of histopathology, and genetic

  19. Fabry disease mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: genetic screening needed for establishing the diagnosis in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havndrup, Ole; Christiansen, Michael; Stoevring, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Fabry disease, an X-linked storage disorder caused by defective lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A activity, may resemble sarcomere-gene-associated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The 'cardiac variant' of Fabry disease which only affects the heart may be missed unless specifically...... tested for. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated 90 consecutively recruited HCM probands and their relatives. Probands without sarcomere-gene mutations were tested for alpha-galactosidase A gene (GLA) mutations. Of the 90 families, 31 (34%) had sarcomere gene mutations and were therefore excluded...... without sarcomere gene mutations. GLA mutations were found in 3/90 (3%) of HCM families and in 2/20 (10%) of females without sarcomere-gene mutations. None of the probands presented other indices of Fabry disease. This, in combination with putative reversibility of cardiac changes by enzyme replacement...

  20. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of α-galactosidase A in human podocytes in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabakaran, Thaneas; Nielsen, Rikke; Larsen, Jakob Vejby;

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the glomerular podocyte is a key mechanism in human glomerular disease and podocyte repair is an important therapeutic target. In Fabry disease, podocyte injury is caused by the intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. This study identifies in the human podocyte three endocy...

  1. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of α-Galactosidase A in Human Podocytes in Fabry Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabakaran, Thaneas; Nielsen, Rikke; Larsen, Jakob Vejby;

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the glomerular podocyte is a key mechanism in human glomerular disease and podocyte repair is an important therapeutic target. In Fabry disease, podocyte injury is caused by the intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. This study identifies in the human podocyte three endocy...

  2. [Fabry disease: clinic and enzymatic diagnosis of homozygous and heterozygous. New therapeutic prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Olea, T

    2002-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide, the glycolipid substrate of this enzyme, leads to severe painful neuropathy with progressive renal, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular dysfunction and early death. Men are predominantly affected but many female carriers have similar clinical involvement, including increased risk of stroke. Physical stigmata, such as angiokeratomas in skin and mucous membranes and characteristic benign corneal abnormalities, facilitate identification of Fabry disease. The finding of a marked decreased activity of (alpha-galactosidase A in plasma, white blood cells or cultured skin fibroblasts confirms the diagnosis. Treatment thus far has been symptomatic only. Etiology-based therapies are being developed that include enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, and substrate deprivation. The recently completed double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of intravenous infusions of (alpha-galactosidase A in patients with Fabry disease demonstrated the safety and efficacy of this treatment. We report a family with Fabry disease composed of hemicygous and heterocygous. The propositus developed chronic renal failure and received a cadaver renal transplant, which remained with adequate renal function during 15 years.

  3. Functional and structural nerve fiber findings in heterozygote patients with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Bach, Flemming Winther; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla;

    2009-01-01

    recently disease manifestations in female carriers of Fabry disease have been questioned. To explore the frequency of symptoms and the functional and structural involvement of the nervous system in female patients we examined the presence of pain, manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and nerve density...... in skin biopsies in 19 female patients with Fabry disease and 19 sex- and age-matched controls. Diaries, quantitative sensory testing, neurophysiologic tests and skin biopsies were performed. Daily pain was present in 63% of patients, with a median VAS score of 4.0. Tactile detection threshold...... and pressure pain threshold were lower and cold detection thresholds increased in patients. Sensory nerve action potential amplitude and maximal sensory conduction velocity were not different, whereas there was a highly significant reduction in intraepidermal nerve fiber density. We found no correlation...

  4. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Ana, E-mail: baptista-ana@hotmail.com; Magalhães, Pedro; Leão, Sílvia; Carvalho, Sofia; Mateus, Pedro; Moreira, Ilídio [Centro Hospitalar de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Unidade de Vila Real (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m{sup 2} for women or ≥ 116 g/m{sup 2} for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m{sup 2} (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m{sup 2}] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%). Nine (19.1%) showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5), a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5)

  5. Altered dynamics of a lipid raft associated protein in a kidney model of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labilloy, Anatália; Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Kukic, Ira; Kiselyov, Kirill; Halfter, Willi; Finegold, David; do Monte, Semiramis Jamil Hadad; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and other neutral glycosphingolipids with galactosyl residues is the hallmark of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). These lipids are incorporated into the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, with a preference for lipid rafts. Disruption of raft mediated cell processes is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, but little is known about the effects of the accumulation of glycosphingolipids on raft dynamics in the context of Fabry disease. Using siRNA technology, we have generated a polarized renal epithelial cell model of Fabry disease in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These cells present increased levels of Gb3 and enlarged lysosomes, and progressively accumulate zebra bodies. The polarized delivery of both raft-associated and raft-independent proteins was unaffected by α-gal A knockdown, suggesting that accumulation of Gb3 does not disrupt biosynthetic trafficking pathways. To assess the effect of α-gal A silencing on lipid raft dynamics, we employed number and brightness (N&B) analysis to measure the oligomeric status and mobility of the model glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein GFP-GPI. We observed a significant increase in the oligomeric size of antibody-induced clusters of GFP-GPI at the plasma membrane of α-gal A silenced cells compared with control cells. Our results suggest that the interaction of GFP-GPI with lipid rafts may be altered in the presence of accumulated Gb3. The implications of our results with respect to the pathogenesis of Fabry disease are discussed.

  6. Renal histology before and after effective enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with classical Fabry's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashio, S; Taguchi, T; Naito, T; Maki, K; Ogata, S; Taniyama, K; Taniguchi, Y; Yorioka, N

    2009-05-01

    A 38-year-old man underwent renal biopsy because of proteinuria. It revealed swelling and vacuolation of glomerular epithelial cells, as well as myelin-like structures characteristic of Fabry's disease. Detection of decreased plasma activity of alpha-galactosidase A confirmed the diagnosis. Enzyme replacement therapy was provided with recombinant agalsidase-beta, resulting in improvement of his symptoms. When renal biopsy was repeated, specific staining for globotriaosylceramide showed that renal deposits were decreased by enzyme therapy.

  7. Home infusion program for Fabry disease: experience with agalsidase alfa in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Kisinovsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement treatment using agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain, improves cardiac function and quality of life, and slows renal deterioration. Nevertheless, it is a life-long treatment which requires regular intravenous infusions and entails a great burden for patients. Our objective was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and tolerability of the home infusion of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease in Argentina. We evaluated all the patients with Fabry disease who received home infusion with agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg between January 2005 and June 2011. The program included 87 patients; 51 males (mean age: 30 years and 36 females (mean age: 34 years. A total of 5229 infusions (mean: 59 per patient; range: 1-150 were administered. A total of 5 adverse reactions were seen in 5 patients (5.7% of patients and 0.9% of the total number of infusions. All were mild in severity and resolved by reducing the rate of infusion and by using antihistaminics. All these 5 patients were positive for IgG antibodies, but none of them presented IgE antibodies and none suffered an anaphylactic shock. In our group 18 patients were switched from agalsidase beta to agalsidase alfa without complications. Home infusion with agalsidase alfa is safe, well tolerated and is associated to high compliance.

  8. Fabry disease : Baseline medical characteristics of a cohort of 1765 males and females in the Fabry Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, C. M.; Fletcher, J.; Wilcox, W. R.; Waldek, S.; Scott, C. R.; Sillence, D. O.; Breunig, F.; Charrow, J.; Germain, D. P.; Nicholls, K.; Banikazemi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Fabry Registry is a global observational research platform established to define outcome data on the natural and treated course of this rare disorder. Participating physicians submit structured longitudinal data to a centralized, confidential database. This report describes the baseline demograp

  9. Oral pharmacological chaperone migalastat compared with enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Nicholls, Kathleen; Shankar, Suma P

    2017-01-01

    therapy (ERT), stabilises specific mutant (amenable) forms of α-Gal to facilitate normal lysosomal trafficking. METHODS: The main objective of the 18-month, randomised, active-controlled ATTRACT study was to assess the effects of migalastat on renal function in patients with Fabry disease previously...... ventricular mass index decreased significantly with migalastat treatment (-6.6 g/m(2) (-11.0 to -2.2)); there was no significant change with ERT. Predefined renal, cardiac or cerebrovascular events occurred in 29% and 44% of patients in the migalastat and ERT groups, respectively. Plasma...... globotriaosylsphingosine remained low and stable following the switch from ERT to migalastat. PROs were comparable between groups. Migalastat was generally safe and well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Migalastat offers promise as a first-in-class oral monotherapy alternative treatment to intravenous ERT for patients with Fabry...

  10. COMPUTER ASSISTED RETINAL VESSEL TORTUOSITY EVALUATION IN NOVEL MUTATION FABRY DISEASE: Towards New Prognostic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, Irene; Rodríguez, María-Elena; Caporossi, Orsola; Zoppetti, Claudia; Sodi, Andrea; Mecocci, Alessandro; López, David; Rodríguez, Beatriz; Gimeno, Juan-Ramón

    2017-03-01

    Fabry disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder with systemic involvement. The authors report on a large Fabry family with GLA p.M187R mutation and exhaustive ophthalmologic assessment. Comprehensive systemic evaluation and genetic diagnosis were performed. Ophthalmologic evaluation included intraocular pressure/visual acuity measurement, refractometry, slit lamp examination, retinography, and optical coherence tomography. Three parameters quantified retinal vessel tortuosity: sum of angle metrics, product of angle distance, and triangular index. Calculations were semiautomatized using dedicated software. Ten individuals (2 males and 8 females) were described. Seventy-five percent had retinal vessel tortuosity. One hundred percent had cornea verticillata. Perimacular vessels were predominantly involved. The correlation between the right and left eye tortuosity measurements was very tight. A significant correlation between retinal vessel tortuosity and systemic severity measured by general Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI), renal MSSI, and neurological MSSI but no cardiac MSSI was observed. Right sum of angle metrics value was an independent statistical predictor of the general-MSSI score in presence of age. p.M187R mutation causes a severe systemic and ophthalmologic phenotype, in both male and female patients. Semiautomatic assessment of retinal vessel tortuosity is an objective and reproducible tool. All three parameters of tortuosity are closely associated with Fabry severity scores. Studies of larger series are being awaited to establish the role of retinal vessel tortuosity as a noninvasive marker of disease progression.

  11. Skin-impedance in Fabry Disease: A prospective, controlled, non-randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidicker Jeffrey R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated improved sweating after enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in Fabry disease using the thermo-regularity sweat and quantitative sudomotor axon reflex tests. Skin-impedance, a measure skin-moisture (sweating, has been used in the clinical evaluation of burns and pressure ulcers using the portable dynamic dermal impedance monitor (DDIM system. Methods We compared skin impedance measurements in hemizygous patients with Fabry disease (22 post 3-years of bi-weekly ERT and 5 ERT naive and 22 healthy controls. Force compensated skin-moisture values were used for statistical analysis. Outcome measures included 1 moisture reading of the 100th repetitive reading, 2 rate of change, 3 average of 60–110th reading and 4 overall average of all readings. Results All outcome measures showed a significant difference in skin-moisture between Fabry patients and control subjects (p Conclusion The instrument portability, ease of its use, a relatively short time required for the assessment, and the fact that DDIM system was able to detect the difference in skin-moisture renders the instrument a useful clinical tool.

  12. Evaluación de pacientes con enfermedad de Fabry en la Argentina Evaluation of patients with Fabry disease in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Fabry es un desorden lisosomal de transmisión ligada al cromosoma X debida al déficit de la enzima alfa galactosidasa A, con acumulación multisistémica de globotriaosilceramida y compromiso neurológico, gastrointestinal, cardíaco, renal, dermatológico y oftalmológico. Estudios recientes indican que las mujeres heterocigotas desarrollan síntomas similares a los de los varones, pero no existen en nuestro país datos comparativos respecto de la frecuencia relativa de manifestaciones clínicas, edad de inicio y gravedad entre hombres y mujeres con enfermedad de Fabry. Identificamos 59 pacientes adultos sintomáticos con enfermedad de Fabry: 32 varones (edad media: 34.8 años y 27 mujeres (edad media: 46.6 años. El diagnóstico se hizo por estudios enzimáticos en los hombres y genéticos en las mujeres. Se evaluó la frecuencia y la gravedad de las manifestaciones de la enfermedad. Las manifestaciones más frecuentes fueron acroparestesias, angioqueratomas, hipohidrosis y córnea verticilada; las tres primeras fueron estadísticamente más frecuentes en hombres, en los cuales la gravedad de estos síntomas fue significativamente mayor. Proteinuria e hipertrofia ventricular izquierda fueron hallazgos frecuentes tanto en hombres como en mujeres. Hubo una latencia prolongada entre la edad del inicio y la del diagnóstico de 14 años para varones y 30 para mujeres. La enfermedad de Fabry es una enfermedad subdiagnosticada y potencialmente letal que afecta a ambos sexos. La existencia de reemplazo enzimático obliga a identificar precozmente los síntomas y signos sugestivos de la enfermedad para realizar un diagnóstico y tratamiento precoces.Fabry disease is an X- linked lysosomal disorder due to deficient activity of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A which leads to multisystemic storage of globotriaosylceramide with neurologic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, renal, skin and ophtalmological involvement. Recent studies indicate

  13. Recommendations for initiation and cessation of enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; Arngrímsson, Reynir; Barbey, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting in progressive nervous system, kidney and heart disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) may halt or attenuate disease progression. Since administration is burdensome and expensive, appropriate use is mandatory. We aimed...... to define European consensus recommendations for the initiation and cessation of ERT in patients with FD. METHODS: A Delphi procedure was conducted with an online survey (n = 28) and a meeting (n = 15). Patient organization representatives were present at the meeting to give their views. Recommendations...

  14. Morphological features of iPS cells generated from Fabry disease skin fibroblasts using Sendai virus vector (SeVdp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Shiho; Higuchi, Takashi; Otaka, Manami; Shimada, Yohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya; Okano, Hirotaka J; Nakanishi, Mahito; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2013-08-01

    We generated iPS cells from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) of Fabry disease using a Sendai virus (SeVdp) vector; this method has been established by Nakanishi et al. for pathogenic evaluation. We received SeVdp vector from Nakanishi and loaded it simultaneously with four reprogramming factors (Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc) to HDFs of Fabry disease; subsequently, we observed the presence of human iPS-like cells. The Sendai virus nucleocapsid protein was not detected in the fibroblasts by RT-PCR analysis. Additionally, we confirmed an undifferentiated state, alkaline phosphatase staining, and the presence of SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81. Moreover, ultrastructural features of these iPS cells included massive membranous cytoplasmic bodies typical of HDFs of Fabry disease. Thus, we successfully generated human iPS cells from HDFs of Fabry disease that retained the genetic conditions of Fabry disease; also, these abnormal iPS cells could not be easily differentiated into mature cell types such as neuronal cells, cardiomyocytes, etc. because of a massive accumulation of membranous cytoplasmic bodies in lysosomes, possibly the persistent damages of intracellular architecture.

  15. Uric Acid as a Marker of Mortality and Morbidity in Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Daniel; Marek, Josef; Dostálová, Gabriela; Goláň, Lubor; Linhart, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Serum uric acid (UA) elevation is common in patients with cardiovascular, renal and metabolic diseases. However, no study to date has analysed the role of UA in Fabry disease (FD). To evaluate the association between serum UA levels and mortality and morbidity in FD. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a prospectively followed-up cohort of 124 patients with genetically proven FD. Serum UA levels were acquired at baseline; clinical events and mortality were assessed during regular visits every 6 to 12 months. The primary endpoint was a composite of multiple secondary outcomes: all-cause mortality, adverse cardiovascular events, progression of renal dysfunction and stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Predictive value was assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan Meyer estimator. During follow-up of 7.4 ± 3.7 years, 64 (52%) patients reached the primary combined endpoint. Overall, UA levels were significantly associated with combined outcome (p < 0.001) and remained independently associated after correcting for age, sex and estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio [HR] per 20 μmol/l increase 1.09, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] (1.00-1.19), p = 0.04). UA was associated with overall mortality in univariate analysis (p = 0.021); however, the association did not reach statistical significance after multivariate correction (HR per 20 μmol/l increase 1.07 95%CI 0.93-1.25, p = 0.32). Higher UA levels were also associated with cardiac adverse outcomes, progression of left ventricular hypertrophy and progression of renal dysfunction (ps < 0.001). No association was observed between UA levels and stroke or TIA (p = 0.323). Increased serum UA levels may represent an independent risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes in Fabry patients and are associated with all-cause mortality. UA is a widely available and cheap biomarker that may improve risk stratification of Fabry patients in clinical practice.

  16. The right ventricle in Fabry disease: natural history and impact of enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Markus; Breunig, Frank; Beer, Meinrad; Herrmann, Sebastian; Strotmann, Jörg; Hu, Kai; Emmert, Andrea; Voelker, Wolfram; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Storage of globotriaosylceramides is present in the left and right ventricles of patients with Fabry disease. Improvement of left ventricular morphology and function during enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has previously been reported. To analyse the effects of long term ERT on right ventricular morphology and function. This was a prospective follow-up of 75 genetically confirmed consecutive Fabry patients for 3.1±1.8 years. According to treatment guidelines the natural history was followed in 18 patients, whereas 57 patients received ERT. Standard echocardiography, strain rate imaging for regional deformation of the right and left ventricle, and magnetic resonance tomography with late enhancement (LE) imaging for the detection of fibrosis were all performed at yearly intervals. Right ventricular hypertrophy was evident in 53 patients (71%) at baseline. A significant positive correlation was found between left and right ventricular wall thickness (r=0.76; pright ventricle. Patients with LE in the left ventricle presented with the lowest right ventricular deformation properties. In contrast to the left ventricle, there was no change in right ventricular wall thickness (baseline 6.9±1.6 mm vs follow-up 6.7±1.5 mm; p=0.44) or systolic strain rate (2.2±0.7/s vs 2.1±0.8/s; p=0.31) during follow-up with ERT. The degree of right ventricular involvement in Fabry disease is related to the left ventricular cardiomyopathy stage. ERT seems to have no direct impact on right ventricular morphology and function.

  17. Therapy of Fabry disease with pharmacological chaperones: from in silico predictions to in vitro tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cammisa Marco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is a rare disorder caused by a large variety of mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha-galactosidase. Many of these mutations are unique to individual families. Fabry disease can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy, but a promising novel strategy relies on small molecules, so called "pharmacological chaperones", which can be administered orally. Unfortunately only 42% of genotypes respond to pharmacological chaperones. Results A procedure to predict which genotypes responsive to pharmacological chaperones in Fabry disease has been recently proposed. The method uses a position-specific substitution matrix to score the mutations. Using this method, we have screened public databases for predictable responsive cases and selected nine representative mutations as yet untested with pharmacological chaperones. Mutant lysosomal alpha galactosidases were produced by site directed mutagenesis and expressed in mammalian cells. Seven out of nine mutations responded to pharmacological chaperones. Nineteen other mutations that were tested with pharmacological chaperones, but were not included in the training of the predictive method, were gathered from literature and analyzed in silico. In this set all five mutations predicted to be positive were responsive to pharmacological chaperones, bringing the percentage of responsive mutations among those predicted to be positive and not used to train the classifier to 86% (12/14. This figure differs significantly from the percentage of responsive cases observed among all the Fabry mutants tested so far. Conclusions In this paper we provide experimental support to an "in silico" method designed to predict missense mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha galactosidase responsive to pharmacological chaperones. We demonstrated that responsive mutations can be predicted with a low percentage of false positive cases. Most of the mutations tested to validate the method

  18. High Variability of Fabry Disease Manifestations in an Extended Italian Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cammarata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by partial or full inactivation of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-GAL. The impairment of α-GAL results in the accumulation of undegraded glycosphingolipids in lysosomes and subsequent cell and microvascular dysfunctions. This study reports the clinical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of 15 members of the same family. Eight members showed the exonic mutation M51I in the GLA gene, a disease-causing mutation associated with the atypical phenotype. The clinical history of this family highlights a wide phenotypic variability, in terms of involved organs and severity. The phenotypic variability of two male patients is not related to differences in α-GAL enzymatic activity: though both have no enzymatic activity, the youngest shows severe symptoms, while the eldest is asymptomatic. It is noticeable that for two female patients with the M51I mutation the initial clinical diagnosis was different from FD. One of them was diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever, the other with Multiple Sclerosis. Overall, this study confirms that the extreme variability of the clinical manifestations of FD is not entirely attributable to different mutations in the GLA gene and emphasizes the need to consider other factors or mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of Fabry Disease.

  19. Long Term Treatment with Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Patients with Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oder, Daniel; Nordbeck, Peter; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a potentially life-threatening hereditary lysosomal storage disorder taking origin in over 1,000 known pathogenic mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A encoding gene. Over the past 15 years, intravenous replacement therapy of the deficient alpha agalsidase A enzyme has been well-established retarding the progression of a multisystemic disease and organ involvement. Despite this innovative treatment approach, premature deaths still do occur. The response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies considerably and appears to depend on gender, genotype (classic or later onset/non-classic), stage of disease or age and agalsidase inhibition by anti-agalsidase antibodies. Early ERT treatment at young age, a personalized approach, and adjunctive therapies for specific disease manifestations appear to impact on prognosis and are currently favored with the expectance of more effective intravenous and oral treatments in the short future.

  20. Accidente cerebro-vascular en la enfermedad de Fabry: Algo más que una simple estenosis Stroke in Fabry disease: More than a simple stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Politei

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la evidencia existente a la fecha sobre los mecanismos fisiopatológicos que pueden generar accidentes cerebrovasculares en la enfermedad de Fabry. Esta entidad es el resultado de la deficiencia de a-galactosidasa A, lo que resulta en depósito patológico de glicoesfingilípidos en distintas poblaciones celulares. Asociados a la insuficiencia renal y cardíaca, los accidentes cerebrovasculares pueden derivar en la muerte de los pacientes. Durante mucho tiempo el único mecanismo generador de daño vascular informado fue la oclusión vascular por depósito lipídico a nivel endotelial. En la actualidad se describen otros mecanismos. El advenimiento de la terapia de reemplazo enzimático ha generado gran expectativa en cuanto la posibilidad de reversión de estos mecanismos. Si bien la evidencia es escasa y son necesarios más estudios a largo plazo, algunos informes demuestran que luego de meses, el tratamiento ha logrado revertir algunos de los mecanismos implicados.The objective is to analyze the updated evidence on the physiopathological mechanisms that can generate cerebrovascular damage in Fabry disease. Fabry disease is the result of the deficiency of a-galactosidasa A, which causes pathological storage of glycosphingolipids, in different cells. Associated to renal and cardiac insufficiency, cerebrovascular complications can derive in the death of the patients. During a long time the only reported mechanism was the vascular occlusion by deposit of lipids at endothelial level. At the present time, other mechanisms are postulated. The arrival of enzyme replacement therapy has generated great expectation on the possibility of reversion of these alterations. Although the evidence is scarce and more long term studies are necessary, some reports demonstrate that after months, the treatment has managed to revert some of the mechanisms involved.

  1. Expert opinion on temporary treatment recommendations for Fabry disease during the shortage of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Linthorst; D.P. Germain; C.E.M. Hollak; D. Hughes; A. Rolfs; C. Wanner; A. Mehta

    2011-01-01

    The shortage of enzyme for treatment of Fabry disease has caused anxiety among patients, physicians and governments. Following a request from the European Medicines Agency, consensus was reached on the temporary prioritization of patients for treatment based on disease severity and potential reversi

  2. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P personality (P Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety, depression, antisocial behavior, and AD/H problems in a sampling of our male and female patients aged between 18 years and 59 years.

  3. Screening, diagnosis, and management of patients with Fabry disease: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Raphael; Hughes, Derralynn A; Linthorst, Gabor E; Ortiz, Alberto; Svarstad, Einar; Warnock, David G; West, Michael L; Wanner, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) are at a high risk for developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. The availability of specific but costly therapy has elevated the profile of this rare condition. This KDIGO conference addressed controversial areas in the diagnosis, screening, and management of FD, and included enzyme replacement therapy and nonspecific standard-of-care therapy for the various manifestations of FD. Despite marked advances in patient care and improved overall outlook, there is a need to better understand the pathogenesis of this glycosphingolipidosis and to determine the appropriate age to initiate therapy in all types of patients. The need to develop more effective specific therapies was also emphasized.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: some answers but more questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Alfadhel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Majid Alfadhel1, Sandra Sirrs21Division of Biochemical Diseases, Department of Paediatrics, BC Children’s and Women’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Adult Metabolic Diseases Clinic, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Fabry disease (FD is a multisystem, X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by enzyme deficiency of α-galactosidase A. Affected patients have symptoms including acroparesthesias, angiokeratomas, and hypohidrosis. More serious manifestations include debilitating pain and gastrointestinal symptoms, proteinuria and gradual deterioration of renal function leading to end-stage renal disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and stroke. Heterozygous females may have symptoms as severe as males with the classic phenotype. Before 2001, treatment of patients with FD was supportive. The successful development of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been a great advancement in the treatment of patients with FD and can stabilize renal function and cardiac size, as well as improve pain and quality of life of patients with FD. In this review, we have provided a critical appraisal of the literature on the effects of ERT for FD. This analysis shows that data available on the treatment of FD are often derived from studies which are not controlled, rely on surrogate markers, and are of insufficient power to detect differences on hard clinical endpoints. Further studies of higher quality are needed to answer the questions that remain concerning the efficacy of ERT for FD.Keywords: Fabry disease, agalsidase α, agalsidase β, Replagal, Fabrazyme, critical appraisal, evidence-based medicine

  5. Monitoring renal function in children with Fabry disease: comparisons of measured and creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Tondel; U. Ramaswami; K.M. Aakre; F. Wijburg; M. Bouwman; E. Svarstad

    2010-01-01

    Methods. Eighty-two examinations were done in 42 children (24 boys, 18 girls) with Fabry disease from three different centres. The mean age was 12.3 years. GFR was measured with iohexol, Cr-51-EDTA or iothalamate, and the mean mGFR was 108 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Results. The widely used original Schwartz

  6. Recommendations for the inclusion of Fabry disease as a rare febrile condition in existing algorithms for fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raffaele; Cauda, Roberto; Feriozzi, Sandro; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Lacombe, Didier; Livneh, Avi; Martini, Alberto; Ozdogan, Huri; Pisani, Antonio; Riccio, Eleonora; Verrecchia, Elena; Dagna, Lorenzo

    2017-07-19

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a rather rare clinical syndrome representing a major diagnostic challenge. The occurrence of more than three febrile attacks with fever-free intervals of variable duration during 6 months of observation has recently been proposed as a subcategory of FUO, Recurrent FUO (RFUO). A substantial number of patients with RFUO have auto-inflammatory genetic fevers, but many patients remain undiagnosed. We hypothesize that this undiagnosed subgroup may be comprised of, at least in part, a number of rare genetic febrile diseases such as Fabry disease. We aimed to identify key features or potential diagnostic clues for Fabry disease as a model of rare genetic febrile diseases causing RFUO, and to develop diagnostic guidelines for RFUO, using Fabry disease as an example of inserting other rare diseases in the existing FUO algorithms. An international panel of specialists in recurrent fevers and rare diseases, including internists, infectious disease specialists, rheumatologists, gastroenterologists, nephrologists, and medical geneticists convened to review the existing diagnostic algorithms, and to suggest recommendations for arriving at accurate diagnoses on the basis of available literature and clinical experience. By combining specific features of rare diseases with other diagnostic considerations, guidelines have been designed to raise awareness and identify rare diseases among other causes of FUO. The proposed guidelines may be useful for the inclusion of rare diseases in the diagnostic algorithms for FUO. A wide spectrum of patients will be needed to validate the algorithm in different clinical settings.

  7. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11–12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11–12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11–12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  8. Multicomponent nanoparticles as nonviral vectors for the treatment of Fabry disease by gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz de Garibay AP

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aritz Pérez Ruiz de Garibay, Diego Delgado, Ana del Pozo-Rodríguez, María Ángeles Solinís, Alicia Rodríguez GascónPharmacokinetics, Nanotechnology and Gene Therapy Group, Pharmacy Faculty, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, SpainPurpose: Gene-mediated enzyme replacement is a reasonable and highly promising approach for the treatment of Fabry disease (FD. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the potential applications of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN-based nonviral vectors for the treatment of FD.Methods: SLNs containing the pR-M10-αGal A plasmid that encodes the α-Galactosidase A (α-Gal A enzyme were prepared and their in vitro transfection efficacy was studied in Hep G2 cells. We also studied the cellular uptake of the vectors and the intracellular disposition of the plasmid.Results: The enzymatic activity of the cells treated with the vectors increased significantly relative to the untreated cells, regardless of the formulation assayed. When the SLNs were prepared with protamine or dextran and protamine, the activity of the α-Gal A enzyme by the transfected Hep G2 cells increased up to 12-fold compared to that of untreated cells.Conclusion: With this work we have revealed in Hep G2 cells the ability of a multicomponent system based on SLNs to act as efficient nonviral vectors to potentially correct low α-Gal A activity levels in FD with gene therapy.Keywords: solid lipid nanoparticles, Fabry disease, nonviral vectors, gene therapy

  9. Impaired Left Atrial Function in Fabry Disease: A Longitudinal Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichette, Maxime; Serri, Karim; Pagé, Maude; Di, Lu Zhao; Bichet, Daniel G; Poulin, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is characterized by the accumulation of sphingolipids in multiple organs, including the left atrium. It is uncertain if the left atrial (LA) reservoir, conduit, and contractile functions evaluated by speckle-tracking echocardiography are affected in Fabry cardiomyopathy and whether enzyme replacement therapy can improve LA function. In this retrospective cohort study, LA strain, strain rates, and phasic LA volumes were studied in 50 patients with FD and compared with values in 50 healthy control subjects. All three LA phasic functions were altered. Peak positive strain (reservoir function) was 38.9 ± 14.9% versus 46.5 ± 10.9% (P = .004), and late diastolic strain (contractile function) was 12.6 ± 5.9% versus 15.6 ± 5.3% (P = .010). In 15 patients who started enzyme replacement therapy during the study, most of the LA parameters improved at 1-year follow-up (peak positive strain from 32.0 ± 13.5% to 38.0 ± 13.5%, P = .006), whereas there was a trend toward deterioration in 15 patients who never received treatment (peak positive strain from 47.3 ± 10.8% to 41.3 ± 9.3%, P = .058). Nine patients with FD (21%) experienced new-onset atrial fibrillation or stroke during 4-year follow-up. By univariate analysis, peak positive strain and early diastolic strain demonstrated significant associations with clinical events, surpassing conventional echocardiographic parameters and clinical characteristics. LA reservoir, conduit, and contractile functions by speckle-tracking echocardiography were all affected in FD. Enzyme replacement therapy improved LA function. LA strain parameters were associated with atrial fibrillation and stroke. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Globosides as key players in the pathophysiology of Shiga toxin-associated acute kidney failure and Fabry disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubsky, S

    2014-11-01

    Globosides and their isomeric counterparts isoglobosides belong to the class of neutral glycosphingolipids with an as yet undefined physiological function. In the pathogenesis of human diseases, globosides play an important role as cellular receptors for Shiga toxins which are produced by certain strains of S. dysenteriae and E. coli. In order to elucidate the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-associated kidney failure, we studied human kidney biopsies and animal models. Our work showed that in patients suffering from Shiga toxin-elicited kidney failure, no complement activation could be demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis of kidney biopsies. Therefore, complement activation is unlikely to play a major role in mediating thrombotic microangiopathy on exposure to Shiga toxin. Moreover, analysis of the human biopsies and of a murine model of Shiga toxin-associated disease pinpointed acute tubular damage as an important and previously neglected contributor to acute kidney failure in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. Furthermore, globosides play a decisive role in the pathogenesis of Fabry disease which results from a decreased or absent activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. The results on transgenic mice showed that in vital organs, such as the heart, kidneys and liver, it was possible to revert the phenotype of Fabry disease by eliminating the synthesis of globosides. This implicates that substrate reduction therapy through inhibition of globosides might represent a new therapeutic option for Fabry disease, all the more so as globosides seem to be dispensable.

  11. Postmortem diagnosis of Fabry disease with acromegaly and a unique vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Masaki; Mori, Taisuke; Orikasa, Hideki; Oh, Haengphil; Suzuki, Kinuko; Koto, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Kazuto

    2007-09-01

    A 44-year-old Japanese man with elevated growth hormone levels and gradual deterioration of mental and renal function was admitted to the hospital. With his deteriorated general condition and renal failure, the patient developed pulmonary thromboembolism and died of respiratory failure. Autopsy examination was conducted, which revealed abnormal accumulation or intracytoplasmic storage of lipid-rich material in the small blood vessels, kidney, heart, and nervous system. After postmortem pathologic studies, including light-microscopic histochemistry, electron microscopy, and biochemical analysis of the stored lipid contents, a final diagnosis of Fabry disease was made. Histopathologic examination revealed a unique vasculopathy characterized by the presence of abnormal intracytoplasmic lipid inclusions and vascular remodeling. With regard to the clinical presentation of acromegaly, hyperplasia but not adenomatous transformation of the acidophils of the anterior pituitary gland with immunohistochemical detection of growth hormone within the cells was noted. In this case, the complication of acromegaly with hyperplasia of the acidophilic cells of the anterior pituitary gland and the unique vasculopathy causing significant organ failure, mainly of the kidney, heart, and central nervous systems, possibly as a result of microcirculatory failure, are considered to be not incidental findings but to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of Farby disease.

  12. The attenuated/late onset lysosomal storage disorders: Therapeutic goals and indications for enzyme replacement treatment in Gaucher and Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollak, Carla E M; Weinreb, Neal J

    2015-03-01

    Enzyme replacement therapies have been developed and authorized for commercial use for six different lysosomal storage disorders. For Gaucher disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type 1, disease-specific treatments have been available for more than a decade. Although long term follow-up data are still sparse, therapeutic goals for patients with Gaucher disease and Fabry disease have been formulated and published for both adults and children. Without adaptation or modification, these goals are often applied in clinical research and in routine patient care across the entire phenotypic spectrum of disease, although in practice, patients commonly manifest high variability in clinical presentation and course of the illness. In this context, establishing goals for the follow-up and treatment of late onset/attenuated phenotypes is particularly challenging. In this chapter, we review current therapeutic goals for Gaucher disease and Fabry disease and discuss approaches for those with attenuated disease manifestations.

  13. Anderson-Fabry, the histrionic disease: from genetics to clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cecchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD is an Xlinked lysosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism, due to deficiency or absence of a galactosidase A (α-gal A enzyme. The disease may affect males and females, the latter with an average 10 years delay. Metabolites storage (mostly Gb3 and lyso-Gb3 leads to progressive cellular and multiorgan dysfunction, with either early and late onset variable clinical manifestations that usually reduce quality of life and life expectancy. Heart and kidney failure, stroke and sudden death are the most devastating complications. AFD is always been considered a very rare disease, although new epidemiologic data, based on newborn screening, showed that AFD prevalence is probably underestimated and much higher than previously reported, especially for late-onset atypical phenotypes. Currently, the diagnosis may be easier and simpler by evaluating α-gal A enzyme activity and genetic analysis for GLA gene mutations on dried blood spot. While a marked α-gal A deficiency leads to diagnosis of AFD in hemizygous males, the molecular analysis is mandatory in heterozygous females. However, referral to a center with an expert multidisciplinary team is highly advisable, in order to ensure careful management and treatment of patients, based also on accurate molecular and biochemical data interpretation. While long-term efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in advanced stage is still debated, increasing evidence shows greater efficacy of early treatment initiation. Concomitant, organ-specific therapy is also needed. New treatment approaches, such as chemical chaperone therapy, alone or in combination with ERT, are currently under investigation. The present review illustrates the major features of the disease, focusing also on biochemical and genetic aspects.

  14. Fabry disease in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a practical approach to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jiwon; Kim, Minji; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Dae-Seong; Son, Jang-Won; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a new set of screening criteria that is easily applicable and highly sensitive for the detection of patients at high risk of Fabry disease (FD) among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. We prospectively studied 273 consecutive unrelated patients who were referred to HCM clinic for unknown left ventricular hypertrophy. Among the 273 patients, we selected 65 high-risk patients who fulfilled at least one of our newly proposed screening criteria. All 273 patients were assayed for plasma α-galactosidase A (α-GAL A) activity. The new screening criteria were: (1) atypical HCM, (2) history or presence of documented arrhythmia, (3) short PR interval defined as <120 ms on electrocardiogram, and (4) symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. From this screening study, three unrelated patients (4.6%; 2 females and 1 male) were newly diagnosed with FD using α-GAL A activity and mutation analysis of the GLA gene. Using the screening method based on the newly proposed criteria, the prevalence of FD in our HCM population was 4.6% if at least one criterion was met and 18.8% if ⩾3 criteria were met. Therefore, our proposed criteria are easily applicable and highly sensitive for classifying patients at high risk of FD from HCM patients.

  15. Persistent increase in cardiac troponin I in Fabry disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a frequent manifestation in Fabry disease (FD - an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In FD an elevation of specific cardiac biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin I (cTNI has been reported in case of clinical manifestation suggestive of myocardial ischemia. In diagnosing acute myocardial infarction cTNI is considered the most reliable parameter. Case Presentation In the referred case we present a 59 years old female patient with the diagnosis of FD presenting with persistently increased cTNI level (lowest value 0.46 ng/ml, highest value 0.69 ng/ml; normal range Conclusions Our case report demonstrates a persistent cTNI release in FD with cardiac involvement. Proving the persistence in a symptom free interval, it might be related to a direct damage of myocytes. In FD cTNI could serve as a beneficial long term parameter providing new perspectives for screening strategies.

  16. Corpus callosum involvement: a useful clue for differentiating Fabry disease from multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozza, Sirio; Olivo, Gaia; Pontillo, Giuseppe; Ugga, Lorenzo; De Rosa, Dario; Imbriaco, Massimo; Brunetti, Arturo; Tedeschi, Enrico [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Riccio, Eleonora; Migliaccio, Silvia; Pisani, Antonio [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Public Health, Nephrology Unit, Naples (Italy); Russo, Camilla [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Feriozzi, Sandro [Belcolle Hospital, Nephrology and Dialysis Department, Viterbo (Italy); Veroux, Massimiliano [University Hospital of Catania, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies, Catania (Italy); Battaglia, Yuri [St. Anna Hospital-University, Department of Specialized Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Ferrara (Italy); Concolino, Daniela [University Magna Graecia, Department of Pediatrics, Catanzaro (Italy); Pieruzzi, Federico [University of Milano-Bicocca, Nephrology Unit, Milan (Italy); Tuttolomondo, Antonino [University of Palermo, Internal Medicine, DiBiMIS, Palermo (Italy); Caronia, Aurelio [Triolo Zancia Care Home, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Lanzillo, Roberta; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed as a possible differential diagnosis for Fabry disease (FD). The aim of this work was to evaluate the involvement of corpus callosum (CC) on MR images and its possible role as a radiological sign to differentiate between FD and MS. In this multicentric study, we retrospectively evaluated the presence of white matter lesions (WMLs) on the FLAIR images of 104 patients with FD and 117 patients with MS. The incidence of CC-WML was assessed in the two groups and also in a subgroup of 37 FD patients showing neurological symptoms. WMLs were detected in 50 of 104 FD patients (48.1%) and in all MS patients. However, a lesion in the CC was detected in only 3 FD patients (2.9%) and in 106 MS patients (90.6%). In the FD subgroup with neurological symptoms, WMLs were present in 26 of 37 patients (70.3%), with two subjects (5.4%) showing a definite callosal lesion. FD patients have a very low incidence of CC involvement on conventional MR images compared to MS, independently from the clinical presentation and the overall degree of WM involvement. Evaluating the presence of CC lesions on brain MR scans can be used as a radiological sign for a differential diagnosis between MS and FD, rapidly addressing the physician toward a correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment options. (orig.)

  17. Mutational analysis of the GLA gene in Mexican families with Fabry disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIANCA ETHEL GUTIÉRREZ-AMAVIZCA; ANDREAS GAL; ROCÍO ORTÍZ-OROZCO; ULRICH ORTH; ERNESTO PRADO MONTES DE OCA; JAIME PAUL GUTIÉRREZ-AMAVIZCA; LUIS E. FIGUERA

    2017-03-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in the hydrolytic enzyme, α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Alpha-Gal A hydrolyzes glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and an α-Gal Adeficiency leads to Gb3 accumulation in tissues and cells in the body. This pathology is likely to involve multiple systems, but it is generally considered to affect primarily vascular endothelium. In this study, we investigated mutations in the GLA gene, which encodes α-Gal A, in Mexican families with FD. We included seven probands with FD that carried known mutations. We analysed pedigrees of the probands, and performed molecular screening in 65 relatives with the potential of carrying a GLA mutation. Five mutations (P40S, IVS4+4, G328V, R363H, R404del) were detected in seven unrelated Mexican familieswith the classic FD phenotype. Of the 65 relatives examined, 42 (64.6%) had a GLA gene mutation. In summary, among seven Mexican probands with FD, 65 relatives were at risk of carrying a known GLA mutation, and molecular screening identified 42 individuals with the mutation. Thus, our findings showed that it is important to perform molecular analysis in families with FD to detect mutations and to provide accurate diagnoses for individuals that could be affected.

  18. Two-dimensional speckle tracking as a non-invasive tool for identification of myocardial fibrosis in Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Johannes; Niemann, Markus; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad; Wanner, Christoph; Ertl, Georg; Weidemann, Frank

    2013-06-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to analyse myocardial deformation in patients with Fabry disease (FD) in order to evaluate speckle tracking as a method for non-invasive determination of myocardial fibrosis. Myocardial fibrosis is common in Fabry cardiomyopathy and is associated with disease progression and severe prognosis. In 101 consecutive Fabry patients (39.8 ± 12.9 years; 42 males), the quantitative measurement of myocardial fibrosis with magnetic resonance imaging was compared with regional myocardial deformation assessed by speckle-tracking imaging. Patients were analysed in relation to per cent of late-enhancement (LE)-positive areas of left-ventricular (LV) mass. Fifty-two patients (51%) displayed LE with a mean volume of 1.2 ± 1.8% of total LV mass. Predominantly basal lateral and posterior segments were affected. Patients with LE had lower global systolic longitudinal strain than those without (LE -14.8 ± 3.5% and -18.9 ± 2.1%, respectively; P speckle tracking, was predominantly caused by basal posterior (P = 0.049) and lateral (P = 0.005) segments and global systolic strain correlated with the amount of LE (r = 0.543; P 2%, n = 22) showed the lowest deformation values (-5.9 ± 8.4%) in basal postero-lateral segments when compared with those with mild (Speckle tracking can be used as a tool for the indirect evaluation of LE in FD.

  19. Globotriaosylsphingosine accumulation and not alpha-galactosidase-A deficiency causes endothelial dysfunction in Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Namdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fabry disease (FD is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (GLA resulting in the accumulation of globotriaosylsphingosine (Gb3 in a variety of tissues. While GLA deficiency was always considered as the fulcrum of the disease, recent attention shifted towards studying the mechanisms through which Gb3 accumulation in vascular cells leads to endothelial dysfunction and eventually multiorgan failure. In addition to the well-described macrovascular disease, FD is also characterized by abnormalities of microvascular function, which have been demonstrated by measurements of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. To date, the relative importance of Gb3 accumulation versus GLA deficiency in causing endothelial dysfunction is not fully understood; furthermore, its differential effects on cardiac micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to assess the effects of Gb3 accumulation versus GLA deficiency, human macro- and microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (ECs were incubated with Gb3 or silenced by siRNA to GLA. Gb3 loading caused deregulation of several key endothelial pathways such as eNOS, iNOS, COX-1 and COX-2, while GLA silencing showed no effects. Cardiac microvascular ECs showed a greater susceptibility to Gb3 loading as compared to macrovascular ECs. CONCLUSIONS: Deregulation of key endothelial pathways as observed in FD vasculopathy is likely caused by intracellular Gb3 accumulation rather than deficiency of GLA. Human microvascular ECs, as opposed to macrovascular ECs, seem to be affected earlier and more severely by Gb3 accumulation and this notion may prove fundamental for future progresses in early diagnosis and management of FD patients.

  20. Angiotensinogen promoter and angiotensinogen II receptor type 1 gene polymorphisms and incidence of ischemic stroke and neurologic phenotype in Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarescu, Gheona; Haim, Shimon; Elstein, Deborah

    2013-11-01

    Stroke and/or white matter lesions (WMLs) are significant in Fabry disease. Polymorphisms of angiotensinogen (AGT), AGT Promoter and angiotensinogen II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) are correlated with WMLs. We compared AGT. AGT Promoter and AGTR1 genotypes to stroke incidence, Fabry-specific [Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI)] severity score, and neurologic sub-score (n-MSSI). Sixty-three Fabry patients and 49 matched controls plus historic controls were genotyped. Institutional Review Board approval was received. Results. C and/or CC alleles of AGT Promoter and AGTR1 were significantly correlated with stroke and n-MSSI. Findings are suggestive of role of AGT Promoter and AGTR1 genotypes in Fabry phenotypes.

  1. Early diagnosis of peripheral nervous system involvement in Fabry disease and treatment of neuropathic pain: the report of an expert panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommer Claudia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by progressive lysosomal accumulation of lipids in a variety of cell types, including neural cells. Small, unmyelinated nerve fibers are particularly affected and small fiber peripheral neuropathy often clinically manifests at young age. Peripheral pain can be chronic and/or occur as provoked attacks of excruciating pain. Manifestations of dysfunction of small autonomic fibers may include, among others, impaired sweating, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal pain perception. Patients with Fabry disease often remain undiagnosed until severe complications involving the kidney, heart, peripheral nerves and/or brain have arisen. Methods An international expert panel convened with the goal to provide guidance to clinicians who may encounter unrecognized patients with Fabry disease on how to diagnose these patients early using simple diagnostic tests. A further aim was to offer recommendations to control neuropathic pain. Results We describe the neuropathy in Fabry disease, focusing on peripheral small fiber dysfunction - the hallmark of early neurologic involvement in this disorder. The clinical course of peripheral pain is summarized, and the importance of medical history-taking, including family history, is highlighted. A thorough physical examination (e.g., angiokeratoma, corneal opacities and simple non-invasive sensory perception tests could provide clues to the diagnosis of Fabry disease. Reported early clinical benefits of enzyme replacement therapy include reduction of neuropathic pain, and adequate management of residual pain to a tolerable and functional level can substantially improve the quality of life for patients. Conclusions Our recommendations can assist in diagnosing Fabry small fiber neuropathy early, and offer clinicians guidance in controlling peripheral pain. This is particularly important since management of pain in young patients with

  2. Lentivector Iterations and Pre-Clinical Scale-Up/Toxicity Testing: Targeting Mobilized CD34+ Cells for Correction of Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder (LSD. We designed multiple recombinant lentivirus vectors (LVs and tested their ability to engineer expression of human α-galactosidase A (α-gal A in transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We further investigated the safety and efficacy of a clinically directed vector, LV/AGA, in both ex vivo cell culture studies and animal models. Fabry mice transplanted with LV/AGA-transduced hematopoietic cells demonstrated α-gal A activity increases and lipid reductions in multiple tissues at 6 months after transplantation. Next we found that LV/AGA-transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells produced even higher levels of α-gal A activity than normal CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We successfully transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells with “near-clinical grade” LV/AGA in small-scale cultures and then validated a clinically directed scale-up transduction process in a GMP-compliant cell processing facility. LV-transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells were subsequently infused into NOD/SCID/Fabry (NSF mice; α-gal A activity corrections and lipid reductions were observed in several tissues 12 weeks after the xenotransplantation. Additional toxicology studies employing NSF mice xenotransplanted with the therapeutic cell product demonstrated minimal untoward effects. These data supported our successful clinical trial application (CTA to Health Canada and opening of a “first-in-the-world” gene therapy trial for Fabry disease.

  3. PrEFiNe Plan: Strategic plan for Fabry diseases in Nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino, M D; Ortiz, A; Torra, R; Hernandez, D

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure is one of the main causes of death in patients with Fabry disease (FD). Due to the low prevalence of FD, delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis, often the correct diagnosis is made when organ damage is already present. Early recognition of the disease would allow the prevention of severe complications and the premature death of patients with FD. We present here the PrEFiNE project, which includes a wide spectrum of activities with the aim of improve knowledge and diagnosis of FD. The project is sponsored by Shire Iberia (http://shireiberica.com/) From January 2016 to the end of 2017 several activities will be carried out, starting with a survey to evaluate current FD knowledge among nephrologists; in addition some studies to assess prevalence of this disease will be performed. One study will include patients receiving dialysis, another study will cover kidney transplant patients, and a pilot study in chronic kidney disease in stage 3-5 predialysis. Also planned is a pharmacoeconomic study to focus on burden of FD. At the same time medical education activities will be conducted both on line and on site. Plan for dissemination will include medical publications and diffusion to media. PrEFiNE Project will finish with the publication of a compilation book on FD in Nephrology including all planned activities and proposing recommendations based on results and detected unmet needs. PrEfiNE Plan will be coordinated by severa scientific committees, one at national level and 10 other regionals comittees, tha will be responsible to ensure the maximum scientific quality of proposed activities. An advisory board will supervise the project. PrEfiNE project will evaluate an action plan focused on improving FD knowledge to make necessary recommendations for an early recognition of the disease. In addition will generate a plan to improve previously undetected needs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights

  4. Non-invasive determination of myocardial lipid content in Fabry disease by {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petritsch, B.; Koestler, H.; Machann, W.; Horn, M.; Weng, A.M.; Goltz, J.P.; Hahn, D.; Beer, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik im ZOM; Niemann, M.; Weidemann, F.; Wanner, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Medizinische Klinik I

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In Fabry disease (FD), a progressive deposition of sphingolipids is reported in different organs. The present study applied {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to investigate the myocardial lipid content in FD. Materials and Methods: In patients (PTS, n = 15) with genetically proven FD, {sup 1}H MRS of the heart was acquired in the same examination as routine cardiac cine and late enhancement MR imaging. Healthy volunteers (n = 11) without history of cardiac disease served as control (CTL). Myocardial triglycerides in vivo were quantified in {sup 1}H MRS. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and late enhancement were assessed for the determination of LV systolic function, and onset or absence of myocardial fibrosis. Results: All {sup 1}H MRS revealed resonances for intramyocardial triglycerides. Clinical parameters, e.g. EF (PTS 64 {+-} 2 % vs. CTL 61 {+-} 1 %) were similar in PTS and CTL or showed a non-significant trend (LV mass). Apart from a single patient with elevated myocardial triglycerides, no significant impact of Fabry disease on the triglyceride/water resonance ratio (PTS 0.47 {+-} 0.11 vs. CTL 0.52 {+-} 0.11 %) was observed in our patient cohort. Conclusion: A comprehensive cardiac evaluation of morphology, function as well as metabolism in Fabry PTS with suspected cardiac involvement is feasible in a single examination. No significant effect of myocardial triglyceride deposition could be observed in patients. The remarkably high myocardial triglyceride content in one patient with advanced FD warrants further studies in PTS with an extended history of the disease. (orig.)

  5. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction and Switch-2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Sommer, Claudia; Stypmann, Jörg; Blaschke, Daniela; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Hense, Hans-Werner; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Brand, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-β supply between 2009 and 2012, patients with Fabry disease either were treated with reduced doses or were switched to agalsidase-α. In this observational study, we assessed end organ damage and clinical symptoms with special focus on renal outcome after 2 years of dose-reduction and/or switch to agalsidase-α. A total of 89 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-β (1.0 mg/kg body wt) for >1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=24), to receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg and a subsequent switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (dose-reduction-switch group, n=28), or to directly switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (switch group, n=37) and were followed-up for 2 years. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD), changes in cardiac and renal function, Fabry-related symptoms (pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea), and disease severity scores. Determination of renal function by creatinine and cystatin C-based eGFR revealed decreasing eGFRs in the dose-reduction-switch group and the switch group. The Mainz Severity Score Index increased significantly in these two groups (P=0.02 and Pswitch or a direct switch to agalsidase-α showed a decline of renal function independent of the eGFR formula used.

  6. Alpha-Galactosidase A p.A143T, a non-Fabry disease-causing variant

    OpenAIRE

    Lenders, Malte; Weidemann, Frank; Kurschat, Christine; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Duning, Thomas; Stypmann, Jörg; Schmitz, Boris; Reiermann, Stefanie; Krämer, Johannes; Blaschke, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked multisystemic disorder with a heterogeneous phenotype. Especially atypical or late-onset type 2 phenotypes present a therapeutical dilemma. Methods To determine the clinical impact of the alpha-Galactosidase A (GLA) p.A143T/ c.427G > A variation, we retrospectively analyzed 25 p.A143T patients in comparison to 58 FD patients with other missense mutations. Results p.A143T patients suffering from stroke/ transient ischemic attacks had slightly decrea...

  7. Long-term enzyme replacement therapy is associated with reduced proteinuria and preserved proximal tubular function in women with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabakaran, Thaneas; Birn, Henrik; Bibby, Bo M;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the GLA gene. Deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) causes intracellular accumulations of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) and related glycosphingolipids in all organs, including the kidney, often leading...... to end-stage renal failure. In women with Fabry disease, accumulation of GL-3 in the glomerular podocytes and other renal cells induces progressive, proteinuric nephropathy, but not as severe as in men. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant α-Gal A reduces cellular GL-3 deposits in podocytes...

  8. Oftalmopatía fabry : nuevos marcadores pronósticos para una enfermedad sistémica= Fabry ophthalmopathy: new prognostic markers for a systemic disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: La enfermedad de Fabry es un raro error innato del metabolismo de los glicoesfingolípidos perteneciente al grupo más numeroso de las enfermedades por depósito lisosomal, las lipidosis. Se estima una prevalencia de 1/40000 varones. Sigue un patrón de herencia dominante ligado a X y se origina por mutaciones en el gen GLA (Xq221). Estas mutaciones resultan en una enzima lisosomal α-galactosidasa-A (AGA) con actividad deficiente. El depósito ubícuo de moléculas glicolipídicas...

  9. Home infusion program for Fabry disease: experience with agalsidase alfa in Argentina Programa de infusión domiciliaria para la enfermedad de Fabry: experiencia con agalsidasa alfa en la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Kisinovsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement treatment using agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain, improves cardiac function and quality of life, and slows renal deterioration. Nevertheless, it is a life-long treatment which requires regular intravenous infusions and entails a great burden for patients. Our objective was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and tolerability of the home infusion of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease in Argentina. We evaluated all the patients with Fabry disease who received home infusion with agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg between January 2005 and June 2011. The program included 87 patients; 51 males (mean age: 30 years and 36 females (mean age: 34 years. A total of 5229 infusions (mean: 59 per patient; range: 1-150 were administered. A total of 5 adverse reactions were seen in 5 patients (5.7% of patients and 0.9% of the total number of infusions. All were mild in severity and resolved by reducing the rate of infusion and by using antihistaminics. All these 5 patients were positive for IgG antibodies, but none of them presented IgE antibodies and none suffered an anaphylactic shock. In our group 18 patients were switched from agalsidase beta to agalsidase alfa without complications. Home infusion with agalsidase alfa is safe, well tolerated and is associated to high compliance.La enfermedad de Fabry es un trastorno de almacenamiento lisosomal hereditario ligado al cromosoma X ocasionado por el déficit de la enzima alfa galactosidasa A. La terapia de reemplazo enzimático utilizando agalsidasa alfa reduce significativamente el dolor, mejora la función cardíaca y la calidad de vida y enlentece el deterioro renal. Sin embargo, es un tratamiento de por vida que requiere infusiones intravenosas regulares y supone una gran carga para los pacientes. Nuestro objetivo fue evaluar retrospectivamente la

  10. Right ventricular involvement in patients with Fabry's disease and the effect of enzyme replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.; Machann, W.; Koestler, H.; Hahn, D.; Beer, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Breunig, F.; Weidemann, F.; Wanner, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Medizinische Klinik I

    2011-11-15

    According to echocardiography reports, Fabry cardiomyopathy not only affects the left ventricle (LV) but also the right ventricle (RV). Until now no MRI studies about the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on the RV are available. We evaluated the effect of ERT on the RV. In this prospective trial 14 patients with genetically proven Fabry's disease were examined using a 1.5 T MR scanner before ERT and after 13 {+-} 1 months of ERT. All patients underwent cardiac MR imaging and the RV/LV cardiac morphology and function were analyzed. At baseline examination the values were as follows: RV mass 31 {+-} 6 g/m{sup 2}, end-diastolic volume (EDV) 88 {+-} 13 ml/m{sup 2}, end-systolic volume (ESV) 39 {+-} 9 ml/m{sup 2}, stroke volume (SV) 49 {+-} 7 ml/m{sup 2} and ejection fraction (EF) 56 {+-} 5 %. The RV mass and EDV decreased significantly after 13 {+-} 1 months on ERT (mass 27 {+-} 7 g/m{sup 2}, p < 0.05, EDV 76 {+-} 24 ml/m{sup 2}, p < 0.05), with no significant change of ESV (33 {+-} 13 ml/m{sup 2}), SV (43 {+-} 12 ml/m{sup 2}) and EF (57 {+-} 7 %). The LV mass (102 {+-} 26 g/m{sup 2} vs. 94 {+-} 27 g/m{sup 2}, p < 0.05), EDV (76 {+-} 13 ml/m{sup 2} vs. 66 {+-} 22 ml/m{sup 2}, p < 0.05) and ESV (29 {+-} 9 ml/m{sup 2} vs. 23 {+-} 9 ml/m{sup 2}, p < 0.05) decreased significantly while the EF (64 {+-} 7 % vs. 66 {+-} 5 %; p < 0.05) increased significantly. Besides the known beneficial effect on the LV, ERT improves RV mass and EDV. (orig.)

  11. Characterization of Fabry mice treated with recombinant adeno-associated virus 2/8-mediated gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jin-Ok

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A is currently the most effective therapeutic strategy for patients with Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disease. However, ERT has limitations of a short half-life, requirement for frequent administration, and limited efficacy for patients with renal failure. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated gene therapy for a Fabry disease mouse model and compared it with that of ERT. Methods A pseudotyped rAAV2/8 vector encoding α-Gal A cDNA (rAAV2/8-hAGA was prepared and injected into 18-week-old male Fabry mice through the tail vein. The α-Gal A expression level and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 levels in the Fabry mice were examined and compared with Fabry mice with ERT. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies were conducted. Results Treatment of Fabry mice with rAAV2/8-hAGA resulted in the clearance of accumulated Gb3 in tissues such as liver, spleen, kidney, heart, and brain with concomitant elevation of α-Gal A enzyme activity. Enzyme activity was elevated for up to 60 weeks. In addition, expression of the α-Gal A protein was identified in the presence of rAAV2/8-hAGA at 6, 12, and 24 weeks after treatment. α-Gal A activity was significantly higher in the mice treated with rAAV2/8-hAGA than in Fabry mice that received ERT. Along with higher α-Gal A activity in the kidney of the Fabry mice treated with gene therapy, immunohistochemical studies showed more α-Gal A expression in the proximal tubules and glomerulus, and less Gb3 deposition in Fabry mice treated with this gene therapy than in mice given ERT. The α-gal A gene transfer significantly reduced the accumulation of Gb3 in the tubules and podocytes of the kidney. Electron microscopic analysis of the kidneys of Fabry mice also showed that gene therapy was more effective than ERT. Conclusions The rAAV2/8-hAGA mediated α-Gal A gene

  12. Co-existence of Phenylketonuria and Fabry disease on a 3 year-old boy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonapace Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-existence of two genetically distinct metabolic disorders in the same patient has rarely been reported. Phenylketonuria (PKU is an inborn error of the metabolism resulting from a phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. Fabry disease (FD is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to a deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Case presentation We report a case of a 3 year- old boy affected by classic PKU and FD, both confirmed by molecular data. The FD was suspected at the age of 21 months on the presence of non-specific GI symptoms (severe abdominal pain and periodically appearance of not specific episodes of gastroenteritis apparently non related to PKU. Conclusion This is the first report of co-existence of FD and PKU, two different congenital inborn of metabolism and in consideration of the prevalence of each disease this chance association is a very unusual event. The co-existence of this diseases made very difficult the correct interpretation of clinical symptoms as lack of appetite, severe abdominal pain and non-specific gastroenteritis episodes. Furthermore, this case report helps to define the early clinical phenotype of FD.

  13. Pedigree analysis of Mexican families with Fabry disease as a powerful tool for identification of heterozygous females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Amavizca, B E; Orozco-Castellanos, R; R Padilla-Gutiérrez, J; Valle, Y; Figuera, L E

    2014-08-28

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency; in contrast to other X-linked diseases, heterozygous females can be as affected as men. The construction and analysis of a family pedigree is a powerful tool to aid clinicians in diagnosis, establishment of inheritance pattern, and early detection of potentially affected relatives. The present study highlights the importance of pedigree analysis in families with FD for identifying other possibly affected relatives and investigating the clinical manifestations. This clinical report included 12 Mexican index cases with confirmed FD diagnosis. We constructed and analyzed their pedigree, and diagnosed FD in 24 affected relatives. Clinical features were similar to those reported for other populations. Pedigree analysis further identified an additional 30 women as possible carriers. We conclude that pedigree construction and analysis is a useful tool to help physicians detect and diagnose relatives at risk for FD, particularly heterozygous females, so that they can receive genetic counseling and early treatment. Mexican families with FD were similar to other populations reported in the literature, and our findings confirmed that heterozygous females can have signs and symptoms ranging from subtle manifestations to the classical severe presentation described in males.

  14. Identification of an Allosteric Binding Site on Human Lysosomal Alpha-Galactosidase Opens the Way to New Pharmacological Chaperones for Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    den-Haan, Helena; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Del Prete, Rosita; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Personalized therapies are required for Fabry disease due to its large phenotypic spectrum and numerous different genotypes. In principle, missense mutations that do not affect the active site could be rescued with pharmacological chaperones. At present pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease bind the active site and couple a stabilizing effect, which is required, to an inhibitory effect, which is deleterious. By in silico docking we identified an allosteric hot-spot for ligand binding where a drug-like compound, 2,6-dithiopurine, binds preferentially. 2,6-dithiopurine stabilizes lysosomal alpha-galactosidase in vitro and rescues a mutant that is not responsive to a mono-therapy with previously described pharmacological chaperones, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin and galactose in a cell based assay. PMID:27788225

  15. Fabry disease: a study of 6 hemizygous men and 5 heterozygous women with emphasis on dermatologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Margarita; Boggio, Paula; Amartino, Hernán; Chamoles, Néstor

    2004-12-01

    To determine the significance of the dermatologic and systemic abnormalities found in 11 patients with Fabry disease (FD) which is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the partial or complete deficiency of the alpha-galactosidase A enzyme. This defect leads to the accumulation of uncleaved glycosphingolipids throughout vascular endothelium and visceral tissues. Case series. Pediatric Dermatology Division, Ramos Mejia Hospital (primary care center) and Laboratory of Neurochemistry (referral center for metabolic diseases). Eleven patients with FD were studied: 6 hemizygous men (mean age, 23.0 years) and 5 heterozygous women (mean age, 49.4 years). Mucocutaneous angiokeratomas (AKs) were found in 5 (83%) of 6 hemizygotes and 4 (80%) of 5 heterozygotes. The AKs appeared at an average age of 13 years, affecting predominantly genitalia, back, elbows, and other frequently traumatized areas. All the hemizygotes and none of the heterozygotes suffered from hypohidrosis. Angiokeratomas on the trunk and oral mucosa without sweat abnormalities were detected in 80% of heterozygous women. All hemizygotic men presented with acral pain in childhood. We emphasize the value of early recognition of AKs and hypohidrosis as diagnostic clues to FD, a severe and progressive disorder.

  16. Characterization of Early Disease Status in Treatment-Naive Male Paediatric Patients with Fabry Disease Enrolled in a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijburg, Frits A.; Bénichou, Bernard; Bichet, Daniel G.; Clarke, Lorne A.; Dostalova, Gabriela; Fainboim, Alejandro; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Forcelini, Cassiano; An Haack, Kristina; Hopkin, Robert J.; Mauer, Michael; Najafian, Behzad; Scott, C. Ronald; Shankar, Suma P.; Thurberg, Beth L.; Tøndel, Camilla; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Ramaswami, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design This analysis characterizes the degree of early organ involvement in a cohort of oligo-symptomatic untreated young patients with Fabry disease enrolled in an ongoing randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase 3B clinical trial. Methods Males aged 5–18 years with complete α-galactosidase A deficiency, without symptoms of major organ damage, were enrolled in a phase 3B trial evaluating two doses of agalsidase beta. Baseline disease characteristics of 31 eligible patients (median age 12 years) were studied, including cellular globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) accumulation in skin (n = 31) and kidney biopsy (n = 6; median age 15 years; range 13–17 years), renal function, and glycolipid levels (plasma, urine). Results Plasma and urinary GL-3 levels were abnormal in 25 of 30 and 31 of 31 patients, respectively. Plasma lyso-GL-3 was elevated in all patients. GL-3 accumulation was documented in superficial skin capillary endothelial cells (23/31 patients) and deep vessel endothelial cells (23/29 patients). The mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR), measured by plasma disappearance of iohexol, was 118.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (range 90.4–161.0 mL/min/1.73 m2) and the median urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was 10 mg/g (range 4.0–27.0 mg/g). On electron microscopy, renal biopsy revealed GL-3 accumulation in all glomerular cell types (podocytes and parietal, endothelial, and mesangial cells), as well as in peritubular capillary and non-capillary endothelial, interstitial, vascular smooth muscle, and distal tubules/collecting duct cells. Lesions indicative of early Fabry arteriopathy and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were found in all 6 patients. Conclusions These data reveal that in this small cohort of children with Fabry disease, histological evidence of GL-3 accumulation, and cellular and vascular injury are present in renal tissues at very early stages of the disease, and are noted before onset of microalbuminuria and development of

  17. Rapid preparation of (3R,4S,5R) polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine-based libraries to discover a pharmacological chaperone for treatment of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hon; Yun, Wen-Yi; Li, Huang-Yi; Hu, Jia-Ming

    2017-01-27

    The rapid discovery of a pharmacological chaperone toward human α-Gal A for the treatment of Fabry disease is described. Two polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines with the (3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern underwent rapid substituent diversity by conjugating the primary aminomethyl moiety of each with a variety of carboxylic acids to generate two libraries (2 × 60 members). Our bioevaluation results showed one member with the (2R,3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern and bearing a 5-cyclohexylpentanoyl group as a substituent moiety possessed sufficient chaperoning capability to rescue α-Gal A activity in the lymphocyte of the N215S Fabry patient-derived cell line and other α-Gal A mutants in COS7 cells.

  18. Comprehensive clinical evaluation of a large Spanish family with Anderson-Fabry disease, novel GLA mutation and severe cardiac phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román-Monserrat, Irene; Moreno-Flores, Victoria; López-Cuenca, David; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Elena; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Beatriz; Alegría-Fernández, Marisol; Poza-Cisneros, Gabriela; Piñero-Fernández, Juan A; Sornichero-Martínez, Javier; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2014-06-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal-storage condition. We describe a large family with a novel GLA mutation: p.M187R/g7219 T>G. Anamnesis/physical-exam, blood/urine analysis, α-Gal-A activity and/or genetic study of at-risk individuals and multidisciplinary evaluation in confirmed cases. 4 males and 13 heterozygous-females displayed the mutation. Cardiac/renal/neurological disease was diagnosed at a mean age of 41/29/39 years in males and 51/56/46 years in females. Onset mean age was 20 years versus 42 years. 9/15 had cardiomyopathy. Delta wave suggestive of accessory pathway was identified in 1 male and 2 females. 1 female had cardiac arrest (ventricular fibrillation, 61 years). 2 females and 1 male died suddenly (63, 64 and 57 years). Cardiac-subscore of Mainz Severity-Score-Index was severe for males and females over 40 years. 4/15(26%) developed early renal disease. 2 males needed dialysis. 1 male died at 69 years in spite of kidney-heart transplant. We describe the largest genetically confirmed Spanish family using multidisciplinary evaluation and MSSI calculation. The novel mutation p.M187R/g7219 T>G is associated with a particularly malignant cardiac phenotype in males and females over 40 years. Severity was higher than that of the largest Spanish FOS-cohort. Short-PR with delta is being reported for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Patients affected with Fabry disease have an increased incidence of progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness: an investigation of twenty-two hemizygous male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chassaing Augustin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease (FD, OMIM 301500 is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to the deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. While the progressive systemic deposition of uncleaved glycosphingolipids throughout the body is known to have protean clinical manifestations, few data are available regarding the cochlear involvement. Methods We non-invasively investigated cochlear functions in 22 consecutive hemizygous males (age 19–64 years, mean 39 affected with classic FD. Conventional audiometry, tympanometry, ABR audiometry, otoacoustic emissions were performed in all patients, together with medical history record and physical examination as part of an exhaustive baseline evaluation prior to enzyme replacement therapy. Results A total of 12 patients (54.5% with classic FD were found to have abnormal audition. Five patients had progressive hearing loss and seven patients (32% experienced sudden deafness. In addition, a hearing loss on high-tone frequencies was found in 7 out of the 10 remaining patients without clinical impairment, despite their young age at time of examination. The incidence of hearing loss appeared significantly increased in FD patients with kidney failure (P tinnitus aurium was also found in six patients (27%. Conclusion This is the first evidence of a high incidence of both progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness in a cohort of male patients affected with classic Fabry disease. The exact pathophysiologic mechanism(s of the cochlear involvement deserves further studies.

  20. Kidney transplantation from a mother with unrecognized Fabry disease to her son with low α-galactosidase A activity: A 14-year follow-up without enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odani, Keiko; Okumi, Masayoshi; Honda, Kazuho; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of kidney transplantation from mother to son, both of whom were likely to have had an unrecognized renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. The patient was a 54-year-old man, with an unknown primary cause of end stage renal disease. He had no notable past medical history, other than end stage renal disease. He underwent living-related kidney transplantation from his mother at age 40 years. Foam cells in the glomeruli were identified on histology assessment of a 0-hour allograft biopsy, with zebra bodies identified in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells by electron microscopy. These findings were indicative of Fabry disease in the donated kidney. As a definitive diagnosis of Fabry's disease could not be confirmed, enzyme replacement therapy was not initiated. Thirteen years after kidney transplantation, the patient underwent left nephrectomy for a left renal tumour, with pathological findings of clear cell carcinoma, foam cells and zebra bodies in the native kidney. Detailed examinations identified low α-galactosidase A activity and mutation of the α-Gal A gene, confirming a diagnosis of a renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. Histology of several allograft biopsies performed over the 14 years from the time of kidney transplantation revealed only moderate interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, with no evidence of disease progression on electron microscopy, despite the presence of zebra bodies in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells.

  1. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Lysosome-associated protein 1 (LAMP-1) and lysosome-associated protein 2 (LAMP-2) in a larger family carrier of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ester M; do Monte, Semiramis J H; do Nascimento, Fernando F; de Castro, Jose A F; Sousa, Jackeline L M; Filho, Henrique C S A L C; da Silva, Raimundo N; Labilloy, Anatália; Monte Neto, José T; da Silva, Adalberto S

    2014-02-15

    This study investigated the potential relationship between the expression levels of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) 1 and 2 and responses to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in the members of a single family with Fabry disease (FD). LAMP levels were assessed by flow cytometry in leukocytes from 17 FD patients who received an eight-month course of ERT course and 101 healthy individuals. We found that phagocytic cells from the FD patients had higher expression levels of both LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, relative to the levels in phagocytes from the healthy controls (p=0.001). Furthermore, the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 levels in phagocytes from the FD carriers continuously decreased with ERT administration to reach levels similar to those in healthy controls. We suggest that LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 could be used as additional markers with which to assess ERT effectiveness in FD.

  3. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  4. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Graham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile virus (WNV leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans.

  5. Investigation of multiple organ involvement in Fabry disease%法布里病患者多器官病变的临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张巍; 康曼德; 赵亚雯; 李凡; 舒俊龙; 左越焕; 刘靖; 黄一宁; 袁云

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate incidence and clinical features of multiple organ involvement in Chinese patients with Fabry disease.Methods We collected 151 patients of 31 families with Fabry disease,all of whom were confirmed by classic pathology,decreased α-galactosidase A activity or GLA mutation from the year of 2011 to 2014 in Department of Neurology,Peking University First Hospital.The clinical data included incidence and onset of neuralgia,renal dysfunction,heart disease,hypertension and cerebral stroke.We calculate the incidence of these symptoms and analyze their gender difference using chisquare with SPSS 17.0 software.Results Among 31 families with Fabry disease,151 patients (82 males and 69 females) were affected,including 91 patients (60.26%) with neuralgia,62 patients (41.06%) with renal disease,33 patients (21.85%) with heart disease,33 patients (21.85%) with hypertension,and 21 patients (13.91%) with cerebral stroke.The peak incidence of neuralgia was from 10 to 20 years old,followed by renal disease from 30 to 40 years old,heart disease and stroke from 40 to 50 years old.There is no peak period for hypertension.Except for males with higher incidence of renal dysfunction than females (P < 0.05),there were no gender difference in the incidence of other organ involvement.Conclusion The incidence and onset of multiple organ dysfunction in Chinese patients with Fabry disease displayed special regularity.Gender difference appeared only in renal disease.%目的 总结我国法布里病患者多器官病变的发生率和临床表现特点.方法 收集北京大学第一医院神经内科2001-2014年依据病理改变、α-半乳糖苷酶活性A测定和GLA基因突变检查确诊的31个法布里病家系发病者的临床资料,统计其神经痛、肾脏病变、心脏病变、高血压病和脑卒中的发生率和起病时间,使用SPSS 17.0统计软件对男女患者不同器官损害的发生率进行x2检验,比较男女患者上述

  6. Anti-BlyS antibody reduces the immune reaction against enzyme and enhances the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yohei; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2017-02-02

    Formation of antibodies against a therapeutic enzyme is an important complication during enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for lysosomal storage diseases. Fabry disease (FD) is caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase (GLA), which results in the accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3). We have shown immune tolerance induction (ITI) during ERT in FD model mice by using an anti-B lymphocyte stimulator (anti-BlyS) antibody (belimumab). A single dose of the anti-BlyS antibody temporarily lowered the percentage of B cells and IgG antibody titer against recombinant human GLA. Administration of a low maintenance dose of the anti-BlyS antibody suppressed the B cell population and immunotolerance was induced in 20% of mice, but antibody formation could not be prevented. We then increased the maintenance dose of the anti-BlyS antibody and immunotolerance was induced in 50% of mice. Therapeutic enzyme distribution and clearance of GL-3 were also enhanced by a high maintenance dose of the anti-BlyS antibody.

  7. Neuron Loss in Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

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    Oliver Wirths

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their initial generation in the mid 1990s, transgenic mouse models of Alzheimers's disease (AD have been proven to be valuable model systems which are indispensable for modern AD research. Whereas most of these models are characterized by extensive amyloid plaque pathology, inflammatory changes and often behavioral deficits, modeling of neuron loss was much less successful. The present paper discusses the current achievements of modeling neuron loss in transgenic mouse models based on APP/Aβ and Tau overexpression and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  8. The Large Phenotypic Spectrum of Fabry Disease Requires Graduated Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy: A Meta-Analysis Can Help to Differentiate Missense Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Citro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the GLA gene and is characterized by a large genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. Missense mutations pose a special problem for graduating diagnosis and choosing a cost-effective therapy. Some mutants retain enzymatic activity, but are less stable than the wild type protein. These mutants can be stabilized by small molecules which are defined as pharmacological chaperones. The first chaperone to reach clinical trial is 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, but others have been tested in vitro. Residual activity of GLA mutants has been measured in the presence or absence of pharmacological chaperones by several authors. Data obtained from transfected cells correlate with those obtained in cells derived from patients, regardless of whether 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin was present or not. The extent to which missense mutations respond to 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin is variable and a reference table of the results obtained by independent groups that is provided with this paper can facilitate the choice of eligible patients. A review of other pharmacological chaperones is provided as well. Frequent mutations can have residual activity as low as one-fourth of normal enzyme in vitro. The reference table with residual activity of the mutants facilitates the identification of non-pathological variants.

  9. The Large Phenotypic Spectrum of Fabry Disease Requires Graduated Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy: A Meta-Analysis Can Help to Differentiate Missense Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citro, Valentina; Cammisa, Marco; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the GLA gene and is characterized by a large genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. Missense mutations pose a special problem for graduating diagnosis and choosing a cost-effective therapy. Some mutants retain enzymatic activity, but are less stable than the wild type protein. These mutants can be stabilized by small molecules which are defined as pharmacological chaperones. The first chaperone to reach clinical trial is 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, but others have been tested in vitro. Residual activity of GLA mutants has been measured in the presence or absence of pharmacological chaperones by several authors. Data obtained from transfected cells correlate with those obtained in cells derived from patients, regardless of whether 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin was present or not. The extent to which missense mutations respond to 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin is variable and a reference table of the results obtained by independent groups that is provided with this paper can facilitate the choice of eligible patients. A review of other pharmacological chaperones is provided as well. Frequent mutations can have residual activity as low as one-fourth of normal enzyme in vitro. The reference table with residual activity of the mutants facilitates the identification of non-pathological variants. PMID:27916943

  10. History and milestones of mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinhua; Huang, Qiaoniang; Petersen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders mediated by self-reactive T cells and/or autoantibodies. Mice, as the most widely used animal for modeling autoimmune disorders, have been extensively used in the investigation of disease pathogenesis as well as in the search for novel therapeutics. Since the first mouse model of multiple sclerosis was established more than 60 years ago, hundreds of mouse models have been established for tens of autoimmune diseases. These mouse models can be divided into three categories based on the approaches used for disease induction. The first one represents the induced models in which autoimmunity is initiated in mice by immunization, adoptive transfer or environmental factors. The second group is formed by the spontaneous models where mice develop autoimmune disorders without further induction. The third group refers to the humanized models in which mice bearing humanized cells, tissues, or genes, develop autoimmune diseases either spontaneously or by induction. This article reviews the history and highlights the milestones of the mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  11. Fabry-Perot interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Mora-Hernandez, G

    1988-01-01

    This book describes the Fabry-Perot interferometer and its variants as well as its use, optimisation and applications. The author begins with an historical perspective on the development of the instrument. Because of the quantitative uses of the device, the text tends to be mostly mathematical in its treatment. However, there is also much practical detail on the use and optimization of the Fabry-Perot interferometer and discussion of its classical uses (such as in metrology) and its contemporary applications (such as in lasers). In addition the book contains a comprehensive bibliography summarizing the extensive literature on the subject. This book will appeal both to high-resolution practitioners, such as spectroscopists, and to the laser community, since the Fabrv-Perot is not only an integral part of the laser but is also usea to characterize its optical and spectroscopic behaviour.

  12. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  13. The value of incomplete mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Cecilia; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    To study Alzheimer's disease (AD), a variety of mouse models has been generated through the overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein and/or the presenilins harboring one or several mutations found in familial AD. With aging, these mice develop several lesions similar to those of AD, including diffuse and neuritic amyloid deposits, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, dystrophic neurites and synapses, and amyloid-associated neuroinflammation. Other characteristics of AD, such as neurofibrillary tangles and nerve cell loss, are not satisfactorily reproduced in these models. Mouse models that recapitulate only specific aspects of AD pathogenesis are of great advantage when deciphering the complexity of the disease and can contribute substantially to diagnostic and therapeutic innovations. Incomplete mouse models have been key to the development of Abeta42-targeted therapies, as well as to the current understanding of the interrelationship between cerebral beta-amyloidosis and tau neurofibrillary lesions, and are currently being used to develop novel diagnostic agents for in vivo imaging.

  14. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  15. Evaluating diabetes and hypertension disease causality using mouse phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jing-Dong J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have found hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with common diseases. However, it is largely unknown what genes linked with the SNPs actually implicate disease causality. A definitive proof for disease causality can be demonstration of disease-like phenotypes through genetic perturbation of the genes or alleles, which is obviously a daunting task for complex diseases where only mammalian models can be used. Results Here we tapped the rich resource of mouse phenotype data and developed a method to quantify the probability that a gene perturbation causes the phenotypes of a disease. Using type II diabetes (T2D and hypertension (HT as study cases, we found that the genes, when perturbed, having high probability to cause T2D and HT phenotypes tend to be hubs in the interactome networks and are enriched for signaling pathways regulating metabolism but not metabolic pathways, even though the genes in these metabolic pathways are often the most significantly changed in expression levels in these diseases. Conclusions Compared to human genetic disease-based predictions, our mouse phenotype based predictors greatly increased the coverage while keeping a similarly high specificity. The disease phenotype probabilities given by our approach can be used to evaluate the likelihood of disease causality of disease-associated genes and genes surrounding disease-associated SNPs.

  16. First experience of simultaneous PET/MRI for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappi, Carmela; Altiero, Michele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Giudice, Caterina Anna; Spinelli, Letizia; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Diomiaiuti, Claudio Tommaso [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); Pisani, Antonio [University Federico II, Department of Public Health, Naples (Italy)

    2015-03-26

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder associated with severe multiorgan dysfunction and premature death. Early diagnosis and treatment strategies play a key role in patient outcome. We investigated the potential role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in the assessment of early cardiac involvement in AFD patients. Thirteen AFD patients without cardiac symptoms and with normal left ventricular function underwent simultaneous cardiac PET/MR imaging after administration of {sup 18}F-FDG. Cardiac FDG uptake was quantified by measuring the standardized uptake value in 17 myocardial segments in each subject. The coefficient of variation (COV, i.e. the standard deviation divided by the average) of the uptake of the 17 segments was calculated as an index of heterogeneity in the heart. Six patients exhibited focal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) indicating intramyocardial fibrosis, and four of these also had positive short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. All patients with LGE and positive STIR MR images showed focal FDG uptake in the corresponding myocardial segments indicating inflammation. Of the seven patients with negative LGE and STIR images, five showed homogeneous FDG cardiac uptake and two showed heterogeneous FDG uptake. The COV was significantly greater in patients with focal FDG uptake (0.25 ± 0.02) than in those without (0.14 ± 0.07, p < 0.01). PET/MR imaging is clinically feasible for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with AFD. Further studies evaluating the role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in management of the disease in larger patient populations are warranted. (orig.)

  17. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  18. Relationship between left ventricular diastolic function and myocardial sympathetic denervation measured by {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine imaging in Anderson-Fabry disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Letizia; Giudice, Caterina Anna; Imbriaco, Massimo; Trimarco, Bruno; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Pellegrino, Teresa [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Pisani, Antonio; Riccio, Eleonora [University Federico II, Department of Public Health, Naples (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Whether cardiac sympathetic nervous function abnormalities may be present in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) remains unexplored. We investigated the relationship between left ventricular (LV) function and cardiac sympathetic nervous function in patients with AFD. Twenty-five patients (12 men, mean age 43 ± 13 years) with genetically proved AFD and preserved LV ejection fraction and ten age and gender-matched control subjects underwent speckle tracking echocardiography and {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging from which early and late heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rate values were calculated. In AFD patients, a significant correlation between late H/M ratio and LV mass index (r = -61, p = 0.001), left atrial volume (r = -0.72, p < 0.001), systolic pulmonary artery pressure (r = -0.75, p < 0.001), and early diastolic untwisting rate (r = -0.66, p < 0.001) was found. Ten AFD patients exhibited a late H/M ratio below two fold standard deviation of control subjects (≤1.75). Patients showing late H/M ratio ≤ 1.75 had significantly higher LV mass index, relative wall thickness, left atrial volume and systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower systolic longitudinal strain and an early diastolic untwisting rate compared to patients with late H/M ratio > 1.75. At multivariable linear regression analysis, early diastolic untwisting rate was the only independent predictor of late H/M ratio ≤ 1.75 (odds ratio 1.15, 95 % confidence interval 1.07-1.31, p < 0.05). The present findings provide the first demonstration of a cardiac sympathetic derangement in AFD patients with preserved LV ejection fraction, which is mostly related to LV diastolic dysfunction. (orig.)

  19. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48% for plasma and 42% for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15% for plasma and 13% for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids.

  20. Safety and pharmacodynamic effects of a pharmacological chaperone on α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide clearance in Fabry disease: report from two phase 2 clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain Dominique P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease (FD is a genetic disorder resulting from deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A, which leads to globotriaosylceramide (GL-3 accumulation in multiple tissues. We report on the safety and pharmacodynamics of migalastat hydrochloride, an investigational pharmacological chaperone given orally at 150 mg every-other-day. Methods Two open-label uncontrolled phase 2 studies of 12 and 24 weeks (NCT00283959 and NCT00283933 in 9 males with FD were combined. At multiple time points, α-Gal A activity and GL-3 levels were quantified in blood cells, kidney and skin. GL-3 levels were also evaluated through skin and renal histology. Results Compared to baseline, increased α-Gal A activity of at least 50% was demonstrated in blood, skin and kidney in 6 of 9 patients. Patients’ increased α-Gal A activities paralleled the α-Gal A increases observed in vitro in HEK-293 cells transfected with the corresponding mutant form of the enzyme. The same 6 patients who demonstrated increases of α-Gal A activity also had GL-3 reduction in skin, urine and/or kidney, and had α-Gal A mutations that responded in transfected cells incubated with the drug. The 3 patients who did not show a consistent response in vivo had α-Gal A mutations that did not respond to migalastat HCl in transfected cells. Migalastat HCl was well tolerated. Conclusions Migalastat HCl is a candidate pharmacological chaperone that provides a novel genotype-specific treatment for FD. It enhanced α-Gal A activity and resulted in GL-3 substrate decrease in patients with responsive GLA mutations. Phase 3 studies are ongoing. Trial registration Clinicaltrial.gov: NCT00283959 and NCT00283933

  1. Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease: Focus on Electrophysiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cepeda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the HD (Huntington's disease gene in 1993 led to the creation of genetic mouse models of the disease and opened the doors for mechanistic studies. In particular, the early changes and progression of the disease could be followed and examined systematically. The present review focuses on the contribution of these genetic mouse models to the understanding of functional changes in neurons as the HD phenotype progresses, and concentrates on two brain areas: the striatum, the site of most conspicuous pathology in HD, and the cortex, a site that is becoming increasingly important in understanding the widespread behavioural abnormalities. Mounting evidence points to synaptic abnormalities in communication between the cortex and striatum and cell-cell interactions as major determinants of HD symptoms, even in the absence of severe neuronal degeneration and death.

  2. Klinefelter syndrome with fabry disease--a case of nondisjunction of the X-chromosome with sex-linked recessive mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Victoria J; Fietz, Michael J; Tchan, Michel C; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thomas, Liza; Sadick, Norman

    2014-12-01

    A 52 year-old male with Klinefelter syndrome presented with chest tightness and rapid atrial fibrillation with hypotension. His echocardiogram demonstrated symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy with minimal diastolic dysfunction. Subsequent investigations confirmed the diagnosis of Fabry cardiomyopathy. This is the first reported case of Klinefelter syndrome with homozygous sex-linked recessive mutation presenting primarily with cardiac manifestation.

  3. Enzyme replacement therapy for Anderson-Fabry disease: A complementary overview of a Cochrane publication through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Dib, Regina; Gomaa, Huda; Ortiz, Alberto; Politei, Juan; Kapoor, Anil; Barreto, Fellype

    2017-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Renal failure, heart and cerebrovascular involvement reduce survival. A Cochrane review provided little evidence on the use of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We now complement this review through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ERT for AFD. For the systematic review, a literature search was performed, from inception to March 2016, using Medline, EMBASE and LILACS. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies, patients with AFD on ERT or natural history, and at least one patient-important outcome (all-cause mortality, renal, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, and adverse events) reported. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI) are shown for each outcome. Simple linear regressions for composite endpoints were performed. 77 cohort studies involving 15,305 participants proved eligible. The pooled proportions were as follows: a) for renal complications, agalsidase alfa 15.3% [95% CI 0.048, 0.303; I2 = 77.2%, p = 0.0005]; agalsidase beta 6% [95% CI 0.04, 0.07; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 21.4% [95% CI 0.1522, 0.2835; I2 = 89.6%, p<0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta compared to untreated patients; b) for cardiovascular complications, agalsidase alfa 28% [95% CI 0.07, 0.55; I2 = 96.7%, p<0.0001]; agalsidase beta 7% [95% CI 0.05, 0.08; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 26.2% [95% CI 0.149, 0.394; I2 = 98.8%, p<0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta compared to untreated patients; and c) for cerebrovascular complications, agalsidase alfa 11.1% [95% CI 0.058, 0.179; I2 = 70.5%, p = 0.0024]; agalsidase beta 3.5% [95% CI 0.024, 0.046; I2 = 0%, p = 0.4209]; and untreated patients 18.3% [95% CI 0.129, 0.245; I2 = 95% p < 0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta

  4. Cardiac disease and arrhythmogenesis: Mechanistic insights from mouse models

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    Lois Choy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is the second mammalian species, after the human, in which substantial amount of the genomic information has been analyzed. With advances in transgenic technology, mutagenesis is now much easier to carry out in mice. Consequently, an increasing number of transgenic mouse systems have been generated for the study of cardiac arrhythmias in ion channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. Mouse hearts are also amenable to physical manipulation such as coronary artery ligation and transverse aortic constriction to induce heart failure, radiofrequency ablation of the AV node to model complete AV block and even implantation of a miniature pacemaker to induce cardiac dyssynchrony. Last but not least, pharmacological models, despite being simplistic, have enabled us to understand the physiological mechanisms of arrhythmias and evaluate the anti-arrhythmic properties of experimental agents, such as gap junction modulators, that may be exert therapeutic effects in other cardiac diseases. In this article, we examine these in turn, demonstrating that primary inherited arrhythmic syndromes are now recognized to be more complex than abnormality in a particular ion channel, involving alterations in gene expression and structural remodelling. Conversely, in cardiomyopathies and heart failure, mutations in ion channels and proteins have been identified as underlying causes, and electrophysiological remodelling are recognized pathological features. Transgenic techniques causing mutagenesis in mice are extremely powerful in dissecting the relative contributions of different genes play in producing disease phenotypes. Mouse models can serve as useful systems in which to explore how protein defects contribute to arrhythmias and direct future therapy.

  5. Sex effects in mouse prion disease incubation time.

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    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion disease incubation time in mice is determined by many factors including PrP expression level, Prnp alleles, genetic background, prion strain and route of inoculation. Sex differences have been described in age of onset for vCJD and in disease duration for both vCJD and sporadic CJD and have also been shown in experimental models. The sex effects reported for mouse incubation times are often contradictory and detail only one strain of mice or prions, resulting in broad generalisations and a confusing picture. To clarify the effect of sex on prion disease incubation time in mice we have compared male and female transmission data from twelve different inbred lines of mice inoculated with at least two prion strains, representing both mouse-adapted scrapie and BSE. Our data show that sex can have a highly significant difference on incubation time. However, this is limited to particular mouse and prion strain combinations. No sex differences were seen in endogenous PrP(C levels nor in the neuropathological markers of prion disease: PrP(Sc distribution, spongiosis, neuronal loss and gliosis. These data suggest that when comparing incubation times between experimental groups, such as testing the effects of modifier genes or therapeutics, single sex groups should be used.

  6. Genetic Disorders with Dyshidrosis: Ectodermal Dysplasia, Incontinentia Pigmenti, Fabry Disease, and Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sweating is regulated by various neurohormonal mechanisms. A disorder in any part of the sweating regulatory pathways, such as the thermal center, neurotransmitters in the central to peripheral nerve, innervation of periglandular neurotransmission, and sweat secretion in the sweat gland itself, induces dyshidrosis. Therefore, hereditary disorders with dyshidrosis result from a variety of causes. These diseases have characteristic symptoms derived from each pathogenesis besides dyshidrosis. The information in this chapter is useful for the differential diagnosis of representative genetic disorders with dyshidrosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria J.; Mourão, Ana F.; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E.; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry’s disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No “classic” pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292). PMID:28299312

  8. Generalized connective tissue disease in Crtap-/- mouse.

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    Dustin Baldridge

    Full Text Available Mutations in CRTAP (coding for cartilage-associated protein, LEPRE1 (coding for prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 [P3H1] or PPIB (coding for Cyclophilin B [CYPB] cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta and loss or decrease of type I collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation. A comprehensive analysis of the phenotype of the Crtap-/- mice revealed multiple abnormalities of connective tissue, including in the lungs, kidneys, and skin, consistent with systemic dysregulation of collagen homeostasis within the extracellular matrix. Both Crtap-/- lung and kidney glomeruli showed increased cellular proliferation. Histologically, the lungs showed increased alveolar spacing, while the kidneys showed evidence of segmental glomerulosclerosis, with abnormal collagen deposition. The Crtap-/- skin had decreased mechanical integrity. In addition to the expected loss of proline 986 3-hydroxylation in alpha1(I and alpha1(II chains, there was also loss of 3Hyp at proline 986 in alpha2(V chains. In contrast, at two of the known 3Hyp sites in alpha1(IV chains from Crtap-/- kidneys there were normal levels of 3-hydroxylation. On a cellular level, loss of CRTAP in human OI fibroblasts led to a secondary loss of P3H1, and vice versa. These data suggest that both CRTAP and P3H1 are required to maintain a stable complex that 3-hydroxylates canonical proline sites within clade A (types I, II, and V collagen chains. Loss of this activity leads to a multi-systemic connective tissue disease that affects bone, cartilage, lung, kidney, and skin.

  9. Mouse, man, and meaning: bridging the semantics of mouse phenotype and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Beck, Tim; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Mungall, Chris; Schofield, Paul N

    2009-08-01

    Now that the laboratory mouse genome is sequenced and the annotation of its gene content is improving, the next major challenge is the annotation of the phenotypic associations of mouse genes. This requires the development of systematic phenotyping pipelines that use standardized phenotyping procedures which allow comparison across laboratories. It also requires the development of a sophisticated informatics infrastructure for the description and interchange of phenotype data. Here we focus on the current state of the art in the description of data produced by systematic phenotyping approaches using ontologies, in particular, the EQ (Entity-Quality) approach, and what developments are required to facilitate the linking of phenotypic descriptions of mutant mice to human diseases.

  10. Dissecting Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome using mouse models

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    Xun Yu eChoong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a common genetic condition caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (trisomy 21. This greatly increases the risk for Alzheimer disease (AD, but although virtually all people with DS have AD neuropathology by 40 years of age, not all develop dementia. To dissect the genetic contribution of trisomy 21 to DS phenotypes including those relevant to AD, a range of DS mouse models has been generated which are trisomic for chromosome segments syntenic to human chromosome 21. Here, we consider key characteristics of human AD in DS (AD-DS, and our current state of knowledge on related phenotypes in AD and DS mouse models. We go on to review important features needed in future models of AD-DS, to understand this type of dementia and so highlight pathogenic mechanisms relevant to all populations at risk of AD.

  11. Holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Matos, O; Rodrigo, José A; Vaveliuk, P; Calvo, M L

    2011-02-15

    We propose a spectrum analyzer based on the properties of a hologram recorded with the field transmitted by a Fabry-Perot etalon. The spectral response of this holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer (HFPS) is analytically investigated in the paraxial approximation and compared with a conventional Fabry-Perot etalon of similar characteristics. We demonstrate that the resolving power is twice increased and the free spectral range (FSR) is reduced to one-half. The proposed spectrometer could improve the operational performance of the etalon because it can exhibit high efficiency and it would be insensible to environmental conditions such as temperature and vibrations. Our analysis also extends to another variant of the HFPS based on holographic multiplexing of the transmitted field of a Fabry-Perot etalon. This device increases the FSR, keeping the same HFPS performance.

  12. Presymptomatic diagnosis of Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Madsen, Per Lav; Bundgaard, Henning;

    2016-01-01

    differential diagnoses in patients presenting with cardiac hypertrophy. In boys, onset has been reported in early childhood with complaints initially comprising neuropathic pain, reduced sweat production, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Later the cardiac, renal, and central nervous systems may become affected...

  13. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of three dosing regimens of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in adults with Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goláň, Lubor; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Holida, Myrl; Kantola, Ikka; Klopotowski, Mariusz; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linhart, Aleš; Musial, Jacek; Nicholls, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Derlis; Sharma, Reena; Vujkovac, Bojan; Chang, Peter; Wijatyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Efficacy and safety of agalsidase alfa at 0.2 mg/kg weekly were compared with 0.2 mg/kg every other week (EOW). Exploratory analyses were performed for 0.4 mg/kg weekly. Patients and methods This was a 53-week, Phase III/IV, multicenter, open-label study (NCT01124643) in treatment-naïve adults (≥18 years) with Fabry disease. Inclusion criteria were left ventricular hypertrophy at baseline, defined as left ventricular mass indexed to height >50 g/m2.7 for males and >47 g/m2.7 for females. Primary endpoint was reduction of left ventricular mass indexed to height as assessed by echocardiography. Secondary endpoints included cardiac (peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, New York Heart Association classification), renal (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and biomarker (plasma globotriaosylceramide) assessments. Safety endpoints were adverse events and anti–agalsidase alfa antibodies. Results Twenty patients were randomized to 0.2 mg/kg EOW (mean age, 50.3 years; 70% male), 19 to 0.2 mg/kg weekly (51.8 years; 53% male), and 5 to 0.4 mg/kg weekly (49.4 years; 40% male). The mean change in left ventricular mass indexed to height by Week 53 in the 0.2-mg/kg EOW and weekly groups was 3.2 g/m2.7 and 0.5 g/m2.7, with no significant difference between groups. No clinically meaningful changes by Week 53 were found within or between the 0.2-mg/kg groups for peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, or Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Two patients in each group improved by ≥1 New York Heart Association classification. No significant differences were found between 0.2 mg/kg EOW and weekly for mean change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (−1.21 mL/min/1.73 m2 vs −3.32 mL/min/1.73 m2) or plasma globotriaosylceramide (−1.05 nmol/mL vs −2.13 nmol/mL), respectively. Infusion-related adverse events were experienced by 25% and 21% in the

  15. The gut microbiota in mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease

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    Kalliopi eGkouskou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestine and the intestinal immune system have evolved through a symbiotic homeostasis under which a highly diverse microbial flora is maintained in the gastrointestinal tract while pathogenic bacteria are recognized and eliminated. Disruption of the balance between the immune system and the gut microbiota results in the development of multiple pathologies in humans. Inflammatory bowel diseases have been associated with alterations in the composition of intestinal flora but whether these changes are causal or result of inflammation is still under dispute. Various chemical and genetic models of inflammatory bowel diseases have been developed and utilized to elucidate the complex relationship between intestinal epithelium, immune system and the gut microbiota. In this review we describe some of the most commonly used mouse models of colitis and Crohn’s disease and summarize the current knowledge of how changes in microbiota composition may affect intestinal disease pathogenesis. The pursuit of gut-microbiota interactions will no doubt continue to provide invaluable insight into the complex biology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  16. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease.

  17. Therapeutic Effect of Berberine on Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model.

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    Wenxiao Jiang

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD represents a family of neurodegenerative diseases that are caused by misfolded proteins. The misfolded proteins accumulate in the affected brain regions in an age-dependent manner to cause late-onset neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models expressing the HD protein, huntingtin, have been widely used to identify therapeutics that may retard disease progression. Here we report that Berberine (BBR, an organic small molecule isolated from plants, has protective effects on transgenic HD (N171-82Q mice. We found that BBR can reduce the accumulation of mutant huntingtin in cultured cells. More importantly, when given orally, BBR could effectively alleviate motor dysfunction and prolong the survival of transgenic N171-82Q HD mice. We found that BBR could promote the degradation of mutant huntingtin by enhancing autophagic function. Since BBR is an orally-taken drug that has been safely used to treat a number of diseases, our findings suggest that BBR can be tested on different HD animal models and HD patients to further evaluate its therapeutic effects.

  18. The prevalent deep intronic c. 639+919 G>A GLA mutation causes pseudoexon activation and Fabry disease by abolishing the binding of hnRNPA1 and hnRNP A2/B1 to a splicing silencer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palhais, Bruno; Dembic, Maja; Sabaratnam, Rugivan;

    2016-01-01

    with the ESS is also able to inhibit inclusion of an unrelated pseudoexon in the FGB gene, and that also in the FGB context inactivation of the ESS by the c.639+919 G>A mutation causes pseudoexon activation, underscoring the universal nature of the ESS. Finally, we demonstrate that splice switching......Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive inborn disorder of the glycosphingolipid metabolism, caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal α-galactosidase A enzyme due to mutations in the GLA gene. The prevalent c.639+919 G>A mutation in GLA leads to pathogenic insertion of a 57bp...... pseudoexon sequence from intron 4, which is responsible for the cardiac variant phenotype. In this study we investigate the splicing regulatory mechanism leading to GLA pseudoexon activation. Splicing analysis of GLA minigenes revealed that pseudoexon activation is influenced by cell-type. We demonstrate...

  19. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  20. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model

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    Chen Xi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. Our group has previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca2+ signaling is abnormal in MSNs from the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128. Moreover, we demonstrated that deranged intracellular Ca2+ signaling sensitizes YAC128 MSNs to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity when compared to wild type (WT MSNs. In previous studies we also observed abnormal neuronal Ca2+ signaling in neurons from spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2 and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3 mouse models and demonstrated that treatment with dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and clinically relevant Ca2+ signaling stabilizer, was neuroprotective in experiments with these mouse models. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential beneficial effects of dantrolene in experiments with YAC128 HD mouse model. Results The application of caffeine and glutamate resulted in increased Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in YAC128 MSN cultures when compared to WT MSN cultures. Pre-treatment with dantrolene protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate excitotoxicty, with an effective concentration of 100 nM and above. Feeding dantrolene (5 mg/kg twice a week to YAC128 mice between 2 months and 11.5 months of age resulted in significantly improved performance in the beam-walking and gait-walking assays. Neuropathological analysis revealed that long-term dantrolene feeding to YAC128 mice significantly reduced the loss of NeuN-positive striatal neurons and reduced formation of Httexp nuclear aggregates. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that deranged Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in HD pathology. Our data also implicate the RyanRs as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HD and demonstrate that Ryan

  1. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of three dosing regimens of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in adults with Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goláň L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lubor Goláň,1 Ozlem Goker-Alpan,2 Myrl Holida,3 Ikka Kantola,4 Mariusz Klopotowski,5 Johanna Kuusisto,6 Aleš Linhart,1 Jacek Musial,7 Kathleen Nicholls,8 Derlis Gonzalez-Rodriguez,9 Reena Sharma,10 Bojan Vujkovac,11 Peter Chang,12 Anna Wijatyk12 1First Faculty of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Lysosomal Research and Treatment Unit, Fairfax, VA, USA; 3Stead Family Department of Pediatrics, Division of Medical Genetics, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; 5Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland; 6Department of Medicine, Center for Medicine and Clinical Research, University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; 7Department of Internal Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 8Department of Nephrology, Royal Melbourne Hospital and the University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 9Instituto Privado de Hematologia E Investigacion Clinica (IPHIC, Asuncion, Paraguay; 10Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK; 11General Hospital Slovenj Gradec, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia; 12Shire, Lexington, MA, USA Purpose: Efficacy and safety of agalsidase alfa at 0.2 mg/kg weekly were compared with 0.2 mg/kg every other week (EOW. Exploratory analyses were performed for 0.4 mg/kg weekly.Patients and methods: This was a 53-week, Phase III/IV, multicenter, open-label study (NCT01124643 in treatment-naïve adults (≥18 years with Fabry disease. Inclusion criteria were left ventricular hypertrophy at baseline, defined as left ventricular mass indexed to height >50 g/m2.7 for males and >47 g/m2.7 for females. Primary endpoint was reduction of left ventricular mass indexed to height as assessed by echocardiography. Secondary endpoints included cardiac (peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, New

  2. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  3. Cardiac Dysfunction in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

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    Analyne M Schroeder

    Full Text Available While Huntington's disease (HD is classified as a neurological disorder, HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure and death. In this study, we sought to better understand the cardiovascular phenotype of HD using the BACHD mouse model. The age-related decline in cardiovascular function was assessed by echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, histological and microarray analysis. We found that structural and functional differences between WT and BACHD hearts start at 3 months of age and continue throughout life. The aged BACHD mice develop cardiac fibrosis and ultimately apoptosis. The BACHD mice exhibited adaptive physiological changes to chronic isoproterenol treatment; however, the medication exacerbated fibrotic lesions in the heart. Gene expression analysis indicated a strong tilt toward apoptosis in the young mutant heart as well as changes in genes involved in cellular metabolism and proliferation. With age, the number of genes with altered expression increased with the large changes occurring in the cardiovascular disease, cellular metabolism, and cellular transport clusters. The BACHD model of HD exhibits a number of changes in cardiovascular function that start early in the disease progress and may provide an explanation for the higher cardiovascular risk in HD.

  4. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-04

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  5. Isofagomine in vivo effects in a neuronopathic Gaucher disease mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    Full Text Available The pharmacological chaperone, isofagomine (IFG, enhances acid β-glucosidase (GCase function by altering folding, trafficking, and activity in wild-type and Gaucher disease fibroblasts. The in vivo effects of IFG on GCase activity, its substrate levels, and phenotype were evaluated using a neuronopathic Gaucher disease mouse model, 4L;C* (V394L/V394L + saposin C-/- that has CNS accumulation of glucosylceramide (GC and glucosylsphingosine (GS as well as progressive neurological deterioration. IFG administration to 4L;C* mice at 20 or 600 mg/kg/day resulted in life span extensions of 10 or 20 days, respectively, and increases in GCase activity and protein levels in the brain and visceral tissues. Cerebral cortical GC and GS levels showed no significant reductions with IFG treatment. Increases of GC or GS levels were detected in the visceral tissues of IFG treated (600 mg/kg/day mice. The attenuations of brain proinflammatory responses in the treated mice were evidenced by reductions in astrogliosis and microglial cell activation, and decreased p38 phosphorylation and TNFα levels. Terminally, axonal degeneration was present in the brain and spinal cord from untreated and treated 4L;C* mice. These data demonstrate that IFG exerts in vivo effects by enhancing V394L GCase protein and activity levels, and in mediating suppression of proinflammation, which led to delayed onset of neurological disease and extension of the life span of 4L;C* mice. However, this was not correlated with a reduction in the accumulation of lipid substrates.

  6. GFAP expression as an indicator of disease severity in mouse models of Alexander disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albee Messing

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available AxD (Alexander disease is a rare disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein resulting in accumulation of the GFAP protein and elevation of Gfap mRNA. To test whether GFAP itself can serve as a biomarker of disease status or progression, we investigated two independent measures of GFAP expression in AxD mouse models, one using a genetic reporter of promoter activity and the other quantifying GFAP protein directly in a manner that could also be employed in human studies. Using a transgenic reporter line that expresses firefly luciferase under the control of the murine Gfap promoter (Gfap-luc, we found that luciferase activity reflected the regional CNS (central nervous system variability of Gfap mRNA in Gfap+/+ mice, and increased in mice containing a point mutation in Gfap that mimics a common human mutation in AxD (R239H in the human sequence, and R236H in the murine sequence. In a second set of studies, we quantified GFAP protein in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid taken from three different AxD mouse models and littermate controls. GFAP levels in CSF were increased in all three AxD models, in a manner corresponding to the concentrations of GFAP in brain. These studies demonstrate that transactivation of the Gfap promoter is an early and sustained indicator of the disease process in the mouse. Furthermore, GFAP in CSF serves as a potential biomarker that is comparable between mouse models and human patients.

  7. A novel mouse model of advanced diabetic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Thibodeau

    Full Text Available Currently available rodent models exhibit characteristics of early diabetic nephropathy (DN such as hyperfiltration, mesangial expansion, and albuminuria yet features of late DN (hypertension, GFR decline, tubulointerstitial fibrosis are absent or require a significant time investment for full phenotype development. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of advanced DN with hypertension superimposed (HD mice. Mice transgenic for human renin cDNA under the control of the transthyretin promoter (TTRhRen were employed as a model of angiotensin-dependent hypertension. Diabetes was induced in TTRhRen mice through low dose streptozotocin (HD-STZ mice or by intercrossing with OVE26 diabetic mice (HD-OVE mice. Both HD-STZ and HD-OVE mice displayed more pronounced increases in urinary albumin levels as compared with their diabetic littermates. Additionally, HD mice displayed renal hypertrophy, advanced glomerular scarring and evidence of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Both HD-OVE and HD-STZ mice showed evidence of GFR decline as FITC-inulin clearance was decreased compared to hyperfiltering STZ and OVE mice. Taken together our results suggest that HD mice represent a robust model of type I DN that recapitulates key features of human disease which may be significant in studying the pathogenesis of DN and in the assessment of putative therapeutics.

  8. Mouse models of rhinovirus infection and airways disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Singanayagam, Aran; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are invaluable tools for gaining insight into host immunity during virus infection. Until recently, no practical mouse model for rhinovirus infection was available. Development of infection models was complicated by the existence of distinct groups of viruses that utilize different host cell surface proteins for binding and entry. Here, we describe mouse infection models, including virus purification and measurement of host immune responses, for representative viruses from two of these groups: (1) infection of unmodified Balb/c mice with minor group rhinovirus serotype 1B (RV-1B) and (2) infection of transgenic Balb/c mice with major group rhinovirus serotype 16 (RV-16).

  9. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Justice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings.

  10. Complement protein C3 exacerbates prion disease in a mouse model of chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Brady; Ferguson, Adam; Johnson, Theodore; Bender, Heather; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Wyckoff, A Christy; Pulford, Bruce; Telling, Glenn C; Zabel, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows a critical role of the complement system in facilitating attachment of prions to both B cells and follicular dendritic cells and assisting in prion replication. Complement activation intensifies disease in prion-infected animals, and elimination of complement components inhibits prion accumulation, replication and pathogenesis. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly infectious prion disease of captive and free-ranging cervid populations that utilizes the complement system for efficient peripheral prion replication and most likely efficient horizontal transmission. Here we show that complete genetic or transient pharmacological depletion of C3 prolongs incubation times and significantly delays splenic accumulation in a CWD transgenic mouse model. Using a semi-quantitative prion amplification scoring system we show that C3 impacts disease progression in the early stages of disease by slowing the rate of prion accumulation and/or replication. The delayed kinetics in prion replication correlate with delayed disease kinetics in mice deficient in C3. Taken together, these data support a critical role of C3 in peripheral CWD prion pathogenesis.

  11. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  12. Phylogeographic Structure of the White-Footed Mouse and the Deer Mouse, Two Lyme Disease Reservoir Hosts in Quebec.

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    Jessica Fiset

    Full Text Available Modification of a species range is one of many consequences of climate change and is driving the emergence of Lyme disease in eastern Canada. The primary reservoir host of the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus, whose range is rapidly shifting north into southern Québec. The deer mouse, P. maniculatus, is occurring over most Québec province and is a less competent host for B. burgdorferi. Here, we compared the phylogeographic structure of both Peromyscus species in Québec. Using a combination of multiple mitochondrial DNA markers and phylogeographic methods, we detected an ongoing and rapid expansion of P. leucopus, while P. maniculatus appears more stable. Haplotype and populations networks indicated that populations of P. maniculatus exhibit more genetic structure than P. leucopus across the study area. Furthermore, significant and consistent genetic divergences between populations of the two species on both sides of the St. Lawrence River suggest that distinct lineages of P. leucopus and P. maniculatus with different ancestral origins colonized Southern Québec following the Last Glacial Maximum. The phylogeographic structure of pathogens is expected to mirror the structure observed in their reservoir hosts. As different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi may be associated with different levels of pathogenicity and immune responses of their hosts, our results are helpful at better understanding the pattern of spread of Lyme disease in a zone of emergence, and associated risk for human populations.

  13. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging studies of Anderson-Fabry disease: 2 cases report%表现为早发缺血性卒中的Fabry病二例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小璇; 王璐; 张赟; 张巍; 洪道俊; 王朝霞; 高惠珍; 袁云

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report 2 cases of Fabry disease with early-onset ischemic stroke and investigate the clinical and image features. Methods The 2 patients developed dizziness, diplopia and progressive memory decline at 32 and 25 years of age respectively. The α-galactosidase A (GLA)activity was 4. 3 U in case 1 and 1. 0 U in case 2 ( normal range 100-500 U). Skin biopsy showed numerous membrane bounded osmiophilic laminar material in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. GLA gene analysis revealed GLA exon 7 1033-1034 TC del in case 1 and GLA exon 3 466G > A in case 2. The 2 patients were evaluated by Mainz severity score index (MSSI) and cranial MRI. Results The general MSSI was 32 in case 1 and 16 in case 2, with the highest score of neurological score ( 11 and 14). Both cases showed multifocal infarcts in bilateral cerebellum, occipital lobe, basal ganglia, which were hypointensity on T1 WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. There were hyperintensity changes in the pulvinar and basal ganglia on T1 WI in case 2. Conclusions Cerebral ischemic stroke could appear as initial symptoms in Fabry disease,which predominantly involved the posterior circulation. There might be no dilation of basal-vertebral artery.%目的 报道以早发缺血性卒中为主要表现的2例Fabry病,分析其卒中表现规律和影像学改变特点.方法 2例Fabry病患者分别在32岁和25岁出现头晕和突发视物成双,伴随记忆力下降.α-半乳糖苷酶活性在例1为4.3 U,例2为1.0 U(正常值100~500 U).皮肤病理检查发现血管平滑肌细胞和内皮细胞内充满膜性包裹的板层样小体.α-半乳糖苷酶基因检查显示例1的7号外显子存在1033-1034 TC del突变,而例2存在3号外显子c.466G>A突变.对2例患者进行美茵滋严重度评分(MSSI)和头MRI检查.结果 例1的MSSI总分为32,其中神经系统评分最高(11分),例2的总分为16,其中神经系统评分最高(14分).MRI均表现为双侧小脑、枕叶、基

  14. Vascular Tortuosities of the Upper Eyelid: A New Clinical Finding in Fabry Patient Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langis Michaud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report a new clinical finding related to Fabry disease. Methods. Fabry subjects were enrolled in the study, matched for age and sex with healthy individuals as a control group. This is a prospective review of all upper lid pictures taken for every subject at their last visit. A 4-step grading scale is proposed to classify this new entity. Results. Group A (Fabry comprised 16 males and 22 females, aged 40 (±14 years on average. Group B (control comprised 7 males and 8 females, aged 37 (±12 Vessels tortuosity was identified on the external superior lid in 36 of the Fabry patients (94.7%, while none of the subjects in group B showed similar vessels tortuosity. In addition, microaneurysms (MAs were found in 10/38 group A subjects while none in group B presented a similar finding. The differences are highly significant. Conclusion. This paper proposes that blood vessels tortuosity on the upper eyelid be recognized as a new clinical entity for inclusion among the classic ocular manifestations of Fabry’s disease. Without evidence of any negative impact, it should be considered a benign sign contributing to evidence of suspected Fabry disease.

  15. Is the Mouse a Good Model of Human PPARγ-Related Metabolic Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Attila; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Peloquin, Matthew; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients affected with metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies are eager to better understand metabolic syndrome and develop new drugs for its treatment. Many studies have focused on the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), which plays a crucial role in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. These studies have been able to connect this transcription factor to several human metabolic diseases. Due to obvious limitations concerning experimentation in humans, animal models—mainly mouse models—have been generated to investigate the role of PPARγ in different tissues. This review focuses on the metabolic features of human and mouse PPARγ-related diseases and the utility of the mouse as a model. PMID:27483259

  16. Pathological features of glycogen storage disease type II highlighted in the knockout mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijvoet, A G; Van Hirtum, H; Vermey, M; Van Leenen, D; Van Der Ploeg, A T; Mooi, W J; Reuser, A J

    1999-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe's disease) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency. Skeletal muscle weakness is the most conspicuous clinical symptom of patients suffering from GSDII and skeletal muscle also is prominently involved in the knockout mouse model of this disease. Thus far, however, little detailed information has been published on the pathological changes in other mouse tissues. This paper aims to provide these data and gives a record of the clinical course of the mouse model over a 2-year period. Four-month-old affected mice perform worse in a running wheel than their unaffected littermates, but do not yet display other clear signs of disease. The lysosomal glycogen storage, already evident at birth, becomes more severe in time, leading to muscle wasting by 9-10 months of age and then limb girdle weakness and kyphosis. The disease does not markedly shorten the animal's life span despite the serious tissue pathology, which is not limited to heart and skeletal muscle, but is also seen in the smooth muscle of blood vessels and of the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital tracts. In addition, the mice have lysosomal glycogen storage in the liver, kidney, spleen, and salivary gland; in Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves, and in a subset of neurons in the central nervous system. By pathological criteria, the knockout mouse model parallels the human infantile form of GSDII and is attractive for studying the possible reversal of tissue pathology and symptomatology under different therapeutic regimes.

  17. Distributed Fabry-Perot Measurement System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Jian-hua

    2003-01-01

    The theoretic analysis indicates that if the lengths of the cascaded and paralleled Fabry-Perot sensors are properly selected, the crosstalk can be well restricted.And the experiment simulation results agree with that of the theoretic analysis.

  18. Understanding melatonin receptor pharmacology: latest insights from mouse models, and their relevance to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications toward type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances, and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2 , which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1 /MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models.

  19. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  20. A Novel Rapid MALDI-TOF-MS-Based Method for Measuring Urinary Globotriaosylceramide in Fabry Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Fahad J.; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in various organs. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and its isoforms and analogues have been identified and quantified as biomarkers of disease severity and treatment efficacy. The current study aimed to establish rapid methods for urinary Gb3 extraction and quantitation. Urine samples from 15 Fabry patients and 21 healthy control subjects were processed to extract Gb3 by mixing equal volumes of urine, methanol containing an internal standard, and chloroform followed by sonication and centrifugation. Thereafter, the lower phase was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the relative peak areas of the internal standard and four major species of Gb3 determined. The results showed high reproducibility with intra- and inter-assay coefficients variation of 9.9% and 13.7%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.15 ng/μL and the limit of quantitation was 0.30 ng/μL. Total urinary Gb3 levels in both genders of classic Fabry patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Gb3 levels in Fabry males were higher than in Fabry females (p = 0.08). We have established a novel assay for urinary total Gb3 that takes less than 15 min from start to finish.

  1. Imaging noradrenergic influence on amyloid pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkeler, A.; Waerzeggers, Y.; Klose, A.; Monfared, P.; Thomas, A.V.; Jacobs, A.H. [Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch-Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Schubert, M. [Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Heneka, M.T. [Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); University of Muenster, Department of Neurology, Muenster (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims towards the non-invasive characterization of disease-specific molecular alterations in the living organism in vivo. In that, molecular imaging opens a new dimension in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, as it allows the non-invasive determination of the dynamics of changes on the molecular level. The imaging technology being employed includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging as well as optical-based imaging technologies. These imaging modalities are employed together or alone for disease phenotyping, development of imaging-guided therapeutic strategies and in basic and translational research. In this study, we review recent investigations employing positron emission tomography and MRI for phenotyping mouse models of Alzheimers' disease by imaging. We demonstrate that imaging has an important role in the characterization of mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. (orig.)

  2. MicroRNAs and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Human Disease Mouse Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingiz Underbayev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human disease animal models are absolutely invaluable tools for our understanding of mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathological processes. By studying various genetic abnormalities in these organisms we can get a better insight into potential candidate genes responsible for human disease development. To this point a mouse represents one of the most used and convenient species for human disease modeling. Hundreds if not thousands of inbred, congenic, and transgenic mouse models have been created and are now extensively utilized in the research labs worldwide. Importantly, pluripotent stem cells play a significant role in developing new genetically engineered mice with the desired human disease-like phenotype. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells which represent reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells represent a significant advancement in research armament. The novel application of microRNA manipulation both in the generation of iPS cells and subsequent lineage-directed differentiation is discussed. Potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cell—a relatively new type of pluripotent stem cells—for human disease modeling by employing human iPS cells derived from normal and diseased somatic cells and iPS cells derived from mouse models of human disease may lead to uncovering of disease mechanisms and novel therapies.

  3. Structural characterization of mouse neutrophil serine proteases and identification of their substrate specificities: relevance to mouse models of human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalupov, Timofey; Brillard-Bourdet, Michèle; Dadé, Sébastien; Serrano, Hélène; Wartelle, Julien; Guyot, Nicolas; Juliano, Luiz; Moreau, Thierry; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Gauthier, Francis

    2009-12-01

    It is widely accepted that neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) play a critical role in neutrophil-associated lung inflammatory and tissue-destructive diseases. To investigate NSP pathogenic role(s), various mouse experimental models have been developed that mimic acutely or chronically injured human lungs. We and others are using mouse exposure to cigarette smoke as a model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with or without exacerbation. However, the relative contribution of NSPs to lung disease processes as well as their underlying mechanisms remains still poorly understood. And the lack of purified mouse NSPs and their specific substrates have hampered advances in these studies. In this work, we compared mouse and human NSPs and generated three-dimensional models of murine NSPs based on three-dimensional structures of their human homologs. Analyses of these models provided compelling evidence that peptide substrate specificities of human and mouse NSPs are different despite their conserved cleft and close structural resemblance. These studies allowed us to synthesize for the first time novel sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates for individual mouse NSPs. Our findings and the newly identified substrates should better our understanding about the role of NSPs in the pathogenesis of cigarette-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as other neutrophils-associated inflammatory diseases.

  4. Olfaction in three genetic and two MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available Various genetic or toxin-induced mouse models are frequently used for investigation of early PD pathology. Although olfactory impairment is known to precede motor symptoms by years, it is not known whether it is caused by impairments in the brain, the olfactory epithelium, or both. In this study, we investigated the olfactory function in three genetic Parkinson's disease (PD mouse models and mice treated with MPTP intraperitoneally and intranasally. To investigate olfactory function, we performed electro-olfactogram recordings (EOGs and an olfactory behavior test (cookie-finding test. We show that neither a parkin knockout mouse strain, nor intraperitoneal MPTP treated animals display any olfactory impairment in EOG recordings and the applied behavior test. We also found no difference in the responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorants in a mouse strain over-expressing doubly mutated α-synuclein, while this mouse strain was not suitable to test olfaction in a cookie-finding test as it displays a mobility impairment. A transgenic mouse expressing mutated α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons performed equal to control animals in the cookie-finding test. Further we show that intranasal MPTP application can cause functional damage of the olfactory epithelium.

  5. Inhibition of Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated K Channel (KCa3.1) and Fibroblast Mitogenesis by α-Linolenic Acid and Alterations of Channel Expression in the Lysosomal Storage Disorders, Fabry Disease, and Niemann Pick C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Lozano-Gerona, Javier; López de Frutos, Laura; Cebolla, Jorge J.; Irún, Pilar; Abarca-Lachen, Edgar; García-Malinis, Ana J.; García-Otín, Ángel Luis; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Giraldo, Pilar; Köhler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-gated KCa3.1 channel regulates normal and abnormal mitogenesis by controlling K+-efflux, cell volume, and membrane hyperpolarization-driven calcium-entry. Recent studies suggest modulation of KCa3.1 by omega-3 fatty acids as negative modulators and impaired KCa3.1 functions in the inherited lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), Fabry disease (FD). In the first part of present study, we characterize KCa3.1 in murine and human fibroblasts and test the impact of omega-3 fatty acids on fibroblast proliferation. In the second, we study whether KCa3.1 is altered in the LSDs, FD, and Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Our patch-clamp and mRNA-expression studies on murine and human fibroblasts show functional expression of KCa3.1. KCa currents display the typical pharmacological fingerprint of KCa3.1: Ca2+-activation, potentiation by the positive-gating modulators, SKA-31 and SKA-121, and inhibition by TRAM-34, Senicapoc (ICA-17043), and the negative-gating modulator, 13b. Considering modulation by omega-3 fatty acids we found that α-linolenic acid (α-LA) and docosahexanenoic acid (DHA) inhibit KCa3.1 currents and strongly reduce fibroblast growth. The α-LA-rich linseed oil and γ-LA-rich borage oil at 0.5% produce channel inhibition while α-LA/γ-LA-low oils has no anti-proliferative effect. Concerning KCa3.1 in LSD, mRNA expression studies, and patch-clamp on primary fibroblasts from FD and NPC patients reveal lower KCa3.1-gene expression and membrane expression than in control fibroblasts. In conclusion, the omega-3 fatty acid, α-LA, and α-LA/γ-LA-rich plant oils, inhibit fibroblast KCa3.1 channels and mitogenesis. Reduced fibroblast KCa3.1 functions are a feature and possible biomarker of cell dysfunction in FD and NPC and supports the concept that biased lipid metabolism is capable of negatively modulating KCa3.1 expression. PMID:28197106

  6. Intravenous transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cells attenuates demyelination in an ICR outbred mouse model of demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kidsadagon Pringproa; Anucha Sathanawongs; Chananthida Khamphilai; Sarocha Sukkarinprom; Apichart Oranratnachai

    2016-01-01

    Induction of demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) of experimental mice using cuprizone is widely used as an animal model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of demyelination. How-ever, different mouse strains used result in different pathological outcomes. Moreover, because current medicinal treatments are not always effective in multiple sclerosis patients, so the study of exogenous cell transplantation in an animal model is of great importance. hTe aims of the present study were to establish an alternative ICR outbred mouse model for studying demyelination and to evaluate the effects of intrave-nous cell transplantation in the present developed mouse model. Two sets of experiments were conducted. Firstly, ICR outbred and BALB/c inbred mice were fed with 0.2% cuprizone for 6 consecutive weeks; then demyelinating scores determined by luxol fast blue stain or immunolabeling with CNPase were evaluated. Secondly, attenuation of demyelination in ICR mice by intravenous injection of mES cells was studied. Scores for demyelination in the brains of ICR mice receiving cell injection (mES cells-injected group) and vehicle (sham-inoculated group) were assessed and compared. hTe results showed that cuprizone signiif-cantly induced demyelination in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of both ICR and BALB/c mice. Additionally, intravenous transplantation of mES cells potentially attenuated demyelination in ICR mice compared with sham-inoculated groups. hTe present study is among the earliest reports to describe the cuprizone-induced demyelination in ICR outbred mice. Although it remains unclear whether mES cells or trophic effects from mES cells are the cause of enhanced remyelination, the results of the present study may shed some light on exogenous cell therapy in central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Translation from Mouse Models to Human Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kathleen M; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-06-21

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by single-protein dysfunction and aggregation. Treatment strategies for these diseases have often targeted downstream pathways to ameliorate consequences of protein dysfunction; however, targeting the source of that dysfunction, the affected protein itself, seems most judicious to achieve a highly effective therapeutic outcome. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are small sequences of DNA able to target RNA transcripts, resulting in reduced or modified protein expression. ASOs are ideal candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, given numerous advancements made to their chemical modifications and delivery methods. Successes achieved in both animal models and human clinical trials have proven ASOs both safe and effective. With proper considerations in mind regarding the human applicability of ASOs, we anticipate ongoing in vivo research and clinical trial development of ASOs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An Anatomically Resolved Mouse Brain Proteome Reveals Parkinson Disease-relevant Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Yun; Choi, Jong Min; Rousseaux, Maxime W C; Malovannaya, Anna; Kim, Jean J; Kutzera, Joachim; Wang, Yi; Huang, Yin; Zhu, Weimin; Maity, Suman; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya; Qin, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Here, we present a mouse brain protein atlas that covers 17 surgically distinct neuroanatomical regions of the adult mouse brain, each less than 1 mm(3) in size. The protein expression levels are determined for 6,500 to 7,500 gene protein products from each region and over 12,000 gene protein products for the entire brain, documenting the physiological repertoire of mouse brain proteins in an anatomically resolved and comprehensive manner. We explored the utility of our spatially defined protein profiling methods in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. We compared the proteome from a vulnerable region (substantia nigra pars compacta) of wild type and parkinsonian mice with that of an adjacent, less vulnerable, region (ventral tegmental area) and identified several proteins that exhibited both spatiotemporal- and genotype-restricted changes. We validated the most robustly altered proteins using an alternative profiling method and found that these modifications may highlight potential new pathways for future studies. This proteomic atlas is a valuable resource that offers a practical framework for investigating the molecular intricacies of normal brain function as well as regional vulnerability in neurological diseases. All of the mouse regional proteome profiling data are published on line at http://mbpa.bprc.ac.cn/. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The mouse age phenome knowledgebase and disease-specific inter-species age mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nophar Geifman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Similarities between mice and humans lead to generation of many mouse models of human disease. However, differences between the species often result in mice being unreliable as preclinical models for human disease. One difference that might play a role in lowering the predictivity of mice models to human diseases is age. Despite the important role age plays in medicine, it is too often considered only casually when considering mouse models. METHODS: We developed the mouse-Age Phenotype Knowledgebase, which holds knowledge about age-related phenotypic patterns in mice. The knowledgebase was extensively populated with literature-derived data using text mining techniques. We then mapped between ages in humans and mice by comparing the age distribution pattern for 887 diseases in both species. RESULTS: The knowledgebase was populated with over 9800 instances generated by a text-mining pipeline. The quality of the data was manually evaluated, and was found to be of high accuracy (estimated precision >86%. Furthermore, grouping together diseases that share similar age patterns in mice resulted in clusters that mirror actual biomedical knowledge. Using these data, we matched age distribution patterns in mice and in humans, allowing for age differences by shifting either of the patterns. High correlation (r(2>0.5 was found for 223 diseases. The results clearly indicate a difference in the age mapping between different diseases: age 30 years in human is mapped to 120 days in mice for Leukemia, but to 295 days for Anemia. Based on these results we generated a mice-to-human age map which is publicly available. CONCLUSIONS: We present here the development of the mouse-APK, its population with literature-derived data and its use to map ages in mice and human for 223 diseases. These results present a further step made to bridging the gap between humans and mice in biomedical research.

  10. Caspase-3 triggers early synaptic dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amelio M; Cavallucci V; Middei S; Marchetti C; Pacioni S; Ferri A; Diamantini A; De Zio D; Carrara P; Battistini L; Moreno S; Bacci A.,; Ammassari-Teule M; Marie H; Cecconi F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic loss is the best pathological correlate of the cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease; yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are unknown. Here we report a non-apoptotic baseline caspase-3 activity in hippocampal dendritic spines, and an enhancement of this activity at the onset of memory decline in the Tg2576-APPswe mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease. We show that, in spines, caspase-3 activates calcineurin which, in turn, triggers dephosphor...

  11. Impairment of adolescent hippocampal plasticity in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease precedes disease phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hartl

    Full Text Available The amyloid precursor protein (APP was assumed to be an important neuron-morphoregulatory protein and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. In the study presented here, we analyzed the APP-transgenic mouse model APP23 using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis technology in combination with DIGE and mass spectrometry. We investigated cortex and hippocampus of transgenic and wildtype mice at 1, 2, 7 and 15 months of age. Furthermore, cortices of 16 days old embryos were analyzed. When comparing the protein patterns of APP23 with wildtype mice, we detected a relatively large number of altered protein spots at all age stages and brain regions examined which largely preceded the occurrence of amyloid plaques. Interestingly, in hippocampus of adolescent, two-month old mice, a considerable peak in the number of protein changes was observed. Moreover, when protein patterns were compared longitudinally between age stages, we found that a large number of proteins were altered in wildtype mice. Those alterations were largely absent in hippocampus of APP23 mice at two months of age although not in other stages compared. Apparently, the large difference in the hippocampal protein patterns between two-month old APP23 and wildtype mice was caused by the absence of distinct developmental changes in the hippocampal proteome of APP23 mice. In summary, the absence of developmental proteome alterations as well as a down-regulation of proteins related to plasticity suggest the disturption of a normally occurring peak of hippocampal plasticity during adolescence in APP23 mice. Our findings are in line with the observation that AD is preceded by a clinically silent period of several years to decades. We also demonstrate that it is of utmost importance to analyze different brain regions and different age stages to obtain information about disease-causing mechanisms.

  12. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (Phypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies.

  13. Mouse models of cholestatic liver disease: PFIC revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunne, C.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a severe inherited form of cholestasis. This disease consists of 3 types (PFIC1-3) and is caused by mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11 and ABCB4, respectively. All these genes encode for transport proteins in the canalicular membrane of the hepatocyte

  14. Alterations in Striatal Synaptic Transmission are Consistent across Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI*** (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  15. Alterations in striatal synaptic transmission are consistent across genetic mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  16. Global gene expression profile progression in Gaucher disease mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wujuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaucher disease is caused by defective glucocerebrosidase activity and the consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide. The pathogenic pathways resulting from lipid laden macrophages (Gaucher cells in visceral organs and their abnormal functions are obscure. Results To elucidate this pathogenic pathway, developmental global gene expression analyses were conducted in distinct Gba1 point-mutated mice (V394L/V394L and D409 V/null. About 0.9 to 3% of genes had altered expression patterns (≥ ± 1.8 fold change, representing several categories, but particularly macrophage activation and immune response genes. Time course analyses (12 to 28 wk of INFγ-regulated pro-inflammatory (13 and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory (11 cytokine/mediator networks showed tissue differential profiles in the lung and liver of the Gba1 mutant mice, implying that the lipid-storage macrophages were not functionally inert. The time course alterations of the INFγ and IL-4 pathways were similar, but varied in degree in these tissues and with the Gba1 mutation. Conclusions Biochemical and pathological analyses demonstrated direct relationships between the degree of tissue glucosylceramides and the gene expression profile alterations. These analyses implicate IFNγ-regulated pro-inflammatory and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory networks in differential disease progression with implications for understanding the Gaucher disease course and pathophysiology.

  17. Consequences of a global enzyme shortage of agalsidase beta in adult Dutch Fabry patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Smid; S.M. Rombach; J.M.F.G. Aerts; S. Kuiper; M. Mirzaian; H.S. Overkleeft; B.J.H.M. Poorthuis; C.E.M. Hollak; J.E.M. Groener; G.E. Linthorst

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Enzyme replacement therapy is currently the only approved therapy for Fabry disease. From June 2009 on, viral contamination of Genzyme's production facility resulted in a worldwide shortage of agalsidase beta leading to involuntary dose reductions (approved dose 1 mg/kg/eow, re

  18. Inhibiting Glycogen Synthesis Prevents Lafora Disease in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Bartholomew A.; Turnbull, Julie; Epp, Jonathan R.; Weaver, Staci A.; Zhao, Xiaochu; Pencea, Nela; Roach, Peter J.; Frankland, Paul; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Minassian, Berge A.

    2013-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized neuropathologically by aggregates of abnormally structured glycogen and proteins (Lafora bodies, LB), and neurodegeneration. Whether LB could be prevented by inhibiting glycogen synthesis and whether they are pathogenic remain uncertain. We genetically eliminated brain glycogen synthesis in LD mice. This resulted in long-term prevention of LB formation, neurodegeneration, and seizure susceptibility. This study establishes that glycogen synthesis is requisite for LB formation and that LB are pathogenic. It opens a therapeutic window for potential treatments in LD with known and future small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthesis. PMID:23913475

  19. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, C Dirk; Darvas, Martin; Kraemer, Brian; Liggitt, Denny; Sigurdson, Christina; Ladiges, Warren

    2016-01-01

    Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2) structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3) cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines and standards

  20. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dirk Keene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2 structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG, and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3 cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines

  1. Human and mouse neuroinflammation markers in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologna, Stephanie M; Cluzeau, Celine V M; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Blank, Paul S; Dail, Michelle K; Siebel, Stephan; Toth, Cynthia L; Wassif, Christopher A; Lieberman, Andrew P; Porter, Forbes D

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder in which a pathological cascade, including neuroinflammation occurs. While data demonstrating neuroinflammation is prevalent in mouse models, data from NPC1 patients is lacking. The current study focuses on identifying potential markers of neuroinflammation in NPC1 from both the Npc1 mouse model and NPC1 patients. We identified in the mouse model significant changes in expression of genes associated with inflammation and compared these results to the pattern of expression in human cortex and cerebellar tissue. From gene expression array analysis, complement 3 (C3) was increased in mouse and human post-mortem NPC1 brain tissues. We also characterized protein levels of inflammatory markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from NPC1 patients and controls. We found increased levels of interleukin 3, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5, interleukin 16 and chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), and decreased levels of interleukin 4, 10, 13 and 12p40 in CSF from NPC1 patients. CSF markers were evaluated with respect to phenotypic severity. Miglustat treatment in NPC1 patients slightly decreased IL-3, IL-10 and IL-13 CSF levels; however, further studies are needed to establish a strong effect of miglustat on inflammation markers. The identification of inflammatory markers with altered levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of NPC1 patients may provide a means to follow secondary events in NPC1 disease during therapeutic trials.

  2. Establishment of mouse Mac-2 binding protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its application for mouse chronic liver disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Ayumi; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Ebisutani, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Ueda, Yui; Arai, Hitomi; Fujii, Hironobu; Takamatsu, Shinji; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Maeda, Masahiro; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2017-08-01

    We identified Mac-2 (galectin-3) binding protein (Mac-2bp) as a novel diagnostic and liver fibrosis predicting biomarker for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in humans. In mouse models, there are no serum biomarkers predicting liver disease severity. In this study, we developed a mouse Mac-2bp enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system and determined its efficacy for predicting the severity of liver disease in mouse models, especially in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. We established several rat monoclonal antibodies against mouse Mac-2bp, selected two clones for the ELISA, and checked the accuracy and reproducibility of the ELISA, especially for NAFLD models and liver fibrosis models. We also investigated the relationships between serum levels and hepatic gene expression of Mac-2bp in mouse models. Our ELISA system had high accuracy and reproducibility (R(2)  = 0.999). The intra-assay and inter-assay results for the coefficient of variation were 2.0-3.7% and 1.7-6.9%, respectively. The levels of bilirubin, hemoglobin, and chyle did not affect the Mac-2bp serum levels detected by our ELISA kit. In the mouse models, serum Mac-2bp levels increased with liver disease progression (F0/F1/F2/F3, 239.1 ± 36.7 / 259.1 ± 43.0 / 457.5 ± 162.0 / 643.7 ± 116.0 ng/mL; P Mac-2bp (R = 0.42, P Mac-2bp ELISA system effectively predicts severity of NAFLD and liver fibrosis in mouse models. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  3. Suppression of Somatic Expansion Delays the Onset of Pathophysiology in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Budworth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. The inherited disease allele expresses a toxic protein, and whether further somatic expansion adds to toxicity is unknown. We have created an HD mouse model that resolves the effects of the inherited and somatic expansions. We show here that suppressing somatic expansion substantially delays the onset of disease in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. Furthermore, a pharmacological inhibitor, XJB-5-131, inhibits the lengthening of the repeat tracks, and correlates with rescue of motor decline in these animals. The results provide evidence that pharmacological approaches to offset disease progression are possible.

  4. Defective tryptophan catabolism underlies inflammation in mouse chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina; Fallarino, Francesca; De Luca, Antonella; Montagnoli, Claudia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Zelante, Teresa; Vacca, Carmine; Bistoni, Francesco; Fioretti, Maria C; Grohmann, Ursula; Segal, Brahm H; Puccetti, Paolo

    2008-01-10

    Half a century ago, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was first described as a disease fatally affecting the ability of children to survive infections. Various milestone discoveries have since been made, from an insufficient ability of patients' leucocytes to kill microbes to the underlying genetic abnormalities. In this inherited disorder, phagocytes lack NADPH oxidase activity and do not generate reactive oxygen species, most notably superoxide anion, causing recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Patients with CGD also suffer from chronic inflammatory conditions, most prominently granuloma formation in hollow viscera. The precise mechanisms of the increased microbial pathogenicity have been unclear, and more so the reasons for the exaggerated inflammatory response. Here we show that a superoxide-dependent step in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is blocked in CGD mice with lethal pulmonary aspergillosis, leading to unrestrained Vgamma1(+) gammadelta T-cell reactivity, dominant production of interleukin (IL)-17, defective regulatory T-cell activity and acute inflammatory lung injury. Although beneficial effects are induced by IL-17 neutralization or gammadelta T-cell contraction, complete cure and reversal of the hyperinflammatory phenotype are achieved by replacement therapy with a natural kynurenine distal to the blockade in the pathway. Effective therapy, which includes co-administration of recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), restores production of downstream immunoactive metabolites and enables the emergence of regulatory Vgamma4(+) gammadelta and Foxp3(+) alphabeta T cells. Therefore, paradoxically, the lack of reactive oxygen species contributes to the hyperinflammatory phenotype associated with NADPH oxidase deficiencies, through a dysfunctional kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism. Yet, this condition can be reverted by reactivating the pathway downstream of the superoxide-dependent step.

  5. Neurological aspects of Gaucher and Fabry disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, M.

    2011-01-01

    Momenteel zijn er meer dan vijftig stapelingsziekten bekend, waarvan de ernst zeer uiteen loopt. Sommige aandoeningen worden gekenmerkt door ernstige mentale retardatie, neurologische problemen en overlijden op kinderleeftijd; andere vormen hebben nauwelijks een lagere levensverwachting. Ook in de l

  6. DG-CST (Disease Gene Conserved Sequence Tags), a database of human–mouse conserved elements associated to disease genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Angelo; Petrillo, Mauro; di Bernardo, Diego; Guffanti, Alessandro; Mignone, Flavio; Confalonieri, Stefano; Luzi, Lucilla; Pesole, Graziano; Paolella, Giovanni; Ballabio, Andrea; Banfi, Sandro

    2005-01-01

    The identification and study of evolutionarily conserved genomic sequences that surround disease-related genes is a valuable tool to gain insight into the functional role of these genes and to better elucidate the pathogenetic mechanisms of disease. We created the DG-CST (Disease Gene Conserved Sequence Tags) database for the identification and detailed annotation of human–mouse conserved genomic sequences that are localized within or in the vicinity of human disease-related genes. CSTs are defined as sequences that show at least 70% identity between human and mouse over a length of at least 100 bp. The database contains CST data relative to over 1088 genes responsible for monogenetic human genetic diseases or involved in the susceptibility to multifactorial/polygenic diseases. DG-CST is accessible via the internet at http://dgcst.ceinge.unina.it/ and may be searched using both simple and complex queries. A graphic browser allows direct visualization of the CSTs and related annotations within the context of the relative gene and its transcripts. PMID:15608249

  7. A DNA Vaccine for Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Protects Against Disease and Death in Two Lethal Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    currently no licensed vaccines to prevent CCHFV infection. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the M-segment glycoprotein genes of CCHFV and assessed its...immunogenicity and protective efficacy in two lethal mouse models of disease: type I interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR-/-) mice; and a novel...humoral immune responses with neutralizing titers after three vaccinations in both IFNAR-/- and IS mouse models.

  8. Mouse Models of Diabetes, Obesity and Related Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; Teh, Rachel; McGrath, Rachel T.; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol A.; Wong, Muh Geot; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rodent models have been used to study diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The purpose of the present study was to compare models of diabetes and obesity-induced metabolic syndrome and determine differences in renal outcomes. C57BL/6 male mice were fed either normal chow or high fat diet (HFD). At postnatal week 8, chow-fed mice were randomly assigned to low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day, five consecutive days) or vehicle control, whereas HFD-fed mice were given either one high-dose of STZ (100 mg/kg) or vehicle control. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed at Week 14, 20 and 30. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine were measured, and renal structure was assessed using Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining at Week 32. Results showed that chow-fed mice exposed to five doses of STZ resembled type 1 diabetes mellitus with a lean phenotype, hyperglycaemia, microalbuminuria and increased serum creatinine levels. Their kidneys demonstrated moderate tubular injury with evidence of tubular dilatation and glycogenated nuclear inclusion bodies. HFD-fed mice resembled metabolic syndrome as they were obese with dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and significantly impaired glucose tolerance. One dose STZ, in addition to HFD, did not worsen metabolic features (including fasting glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and triglyceride levels). There were significant increases in urinary ACR and serum creatinine levels, and renal structural changes were predominantly related to interstitial vacuolation and tubular dilatation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:27579698

  9. Radioimmunoassay for detection of VP1 specific neutralizing antibodies of foot and mouse disease virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzer, E.J.; Jackson, M.L. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco CA (USA)); Moore, D.M. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY (USA))

    1985-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of antibodies against a specific region of the VP1 protein of the A24 and O1 serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus. The antibody titers from the radioimmunoassay showed a positive correlation with neutralizing antibody titers determined by a mouse protection assay. The specificity of the assay resides in the peptide used as antigen. The assay is rapid, reproducible and does not require the use of whole virions.

  10. Pathogenic sequence for dissecting aneurysm formation in a hypomorphic polycystic kidney disease 1 mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Hassane, S.; Claij, N.; Lantinga-van Leeuwen, I.S.; Munsteren, J.C. van; Lent, N. van; Hanemaaijer, R; Breuning, M H; Peters, D.J.M.; Ruiter, M.C. de

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a multi-system disorder characterized by progressive cyst formation in the kidneys. Serious complications of ADPKD are intracranial and aortic aneurysms. The condition is mainly caused by mutations in the PKD1 or PKD2 gene. We have carefully analyzed vascular remodeling in hypomorphic Pkd1 mouse model with dissecting aneurysms in the aorta. METHODS AND RESULTS - Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that i...

  11. Mouse models of rhinovirus-induced disease and exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoviruses cause serious morbidity and mortality as the major etiological agents of asthma exacerbations and the common cold. A major obstacle to understanding disease pathogenesis and to the development of effective therapies has been the lack of a small-animal model for rhinovirus infection. Of the 100 known rhinovirus serotypes, 90% (the major group) use human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as their cellular receptor and do not bind mouse ICAM-1; the remaining 10% (the minor ...

  12. Sex Differences in Circadian Dysfunction in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dika A Kuljis

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects men and women in equal numbers, but some epidemiological studies indicate there may be sex differences in disease progression. One of the early symptoms of HD is disruptions in the circadian timing system, but it is currently unknown whether sex is a factor in these alterations. Since sex differences in HD could provide important insights to understand cellular and molecular mechanism(s and designing early intervention strategies, we used the bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (BACHD to examine whether sex differences in circadian behavioral rhythms are detectable in an animal model of the disease. Similar to BACHD males, BACHD females display circadian disruptions at both 3 and 6 months of age; however, deficits to BACHD female mouse activity levels, rhythm precision, and behavioral fragmentation are either delayed or less severe relative to males. These sex differences are associated with a smaller suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN in BACHD male mice at age of symptom onset (3 months, but are not associated with sex-specific differences in SCN daytime electrical activity deficits, or peptide expression (arginine vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide within the SCN. Notably, BACHD females exhibited delayed motor coordination deficits, as measured using rotarod and challenge beam. These findings suggest a sex specific factor plays a role both in non-motor and motor symptom progression for the BACHD mouse.

  13. A Mathematical Model of Skeletal Muscle Disease and Immune Response in the mdx Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Salam Jarrah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic disease that results in the death of affected boys by early adulthood. The genetic defect responsible for DMD has been known for over 25 years, yet at present there is neither cure nor effective treatment for DMD. During early disease onset, the mdx mouse has been validated as an animal model for DMD and use of this model has led to valuable but incomplete insights into the disease process. For example, immune cells are thought to be responsible for a significant portion of muscle cell death in the mdx mouse; however, the role and time course of the immune response in the dystrophic process have not been well described. In this paper we constructed a simple mathematical model to investigate the role of the immune response in muscle degeneration and subsequent regeneration in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our model suggests that the immune response contributes substantially to the muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Furthermore, the analysis of the model predicts that the immune system response oscillates throughout the life of the mice, and the damaged fibers are never completely cleared.

  14. Mouse models of rhinovirus-induced disease and exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Walton, Ross P; Edwards, Michael R; Aniscenko, Juliya; Caramori, Gaetano; Zhu, Jie; Glanville, Nicholas; Choy, Katherine J; Jourdan, Patrick; Burnet, Jerome; Tuthill, Tobias J; Pedrick, Michael S; Hurle, Michael J; Plumpton, Chris; Sharp, Nigel A; Bussell, James N; Swallow, Dallas M; Schwarze, Jurgen; Guy, Bruno; Almond, Jeffrey W; Jeffery, Peter K; Lloyd, Clare M; Papi, Alberto; Killington, Richard A; Rowlands, David J; Blair, Edward D; Clarke, Neil J; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2008-02-01

    Rhinoviruses cause serious morbidity and mortality as the major etiological agents of asthma exacerbations and the common cold. A major obstacle to understanding disease pathogenesis and to the development of effective therapies has been the lack of a small-animal model for rhinovirus infection. Of the 100 known rhinovirus serotypes, 90% (the major group) use human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as their cellular receptor and do not bind mouse ICAM-1; the remaining 10% (the minor group) use a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and can bind the mouse counterpart. Here we describe three novel mouse models of rhinovirus infection: minor-group rhinovirus infection of BALB/c mice, major-group rhinovirus infection of transgenic BALB/c mice expressing a mouse-human ICAM-1 chimera and rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation. These models have features similar to those observed in rhinovirus infection in humans, including augmentation of allergic airway inflammation, and will be useful in the development of future therapies for colds and asthma exacerbations.

  15. Accelerated microglial pathology is associated with Aβ plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Rona; Babcock, Alicia A; Nemirovsky, Anna

    2014-01-01

    with aging and in Alzheimer's-like disease. We show that, compared with microglia in young mice, microglia in old mice are less ramified and possess fewer branches and fine processes along with a slightly increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. A similar microglial pathology appeared 6-12 months...... earlier in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), along with a significant increase in brain parenchyma lacking coverage by microglial processes. We further demonstrate that microglia near amyloid plaques acquire unique activated phenotypes with impaired process complexity. We thus show that along...

  16. The sirtuin 2 inhibitor AK-7 is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vanita; Quinti, Luisa; Kim, Jinho; Vollor, Lorraine; Narayanan, K Lakshmi; Edgerly, Christina; Cipicchio, Patricia M; Lauver, Molly A; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Silverman, Richard B; Ferrante, Robert J; Hersch, Steven; Kazantsev, Aleksey G

    2012-12-27

    Inhibition of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) deacetylase mediates protective effects in cell and invertebrate models of Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease (HD). Here we report the in vivo efficacy of a brain-permeable SIRT2 inhibitor in two genetic mouse models of HD. Compound treatment resulted in improved motor function, extended survival, and reduced brain atrophy and is associated with marked reduction of aggregated mutant huntingtin, a hallmark of HD pathology. Our results provide preclinical validation of SIRT2 inhibition as a potential therapeutic target for HD and support the further development of SIRT2 inhibitors for testing in humans.

  17. Reverse genetic studies of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases using a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakada, Kazuto; Sato, Akitsugu; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    In the situation that it would not be able to produce model animals for mitochondrial diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with pathogenic mutations, we succeeded in generating mice with pathogenic deletion mutant mtDNA (ΔmtDNA), named “mito-mice”, by direct introduction of mitochondria with ΔmtDNA into mouse zygotes. In the mito-mice, accumulation of ΔmtDNA induced mitochondrial respiration defects in various tissues, resulting in mitochondrial disease phenotypes, such as low body we...

  18. Insights into the genetic basis of systemic sclerosis: immunity in human disease and in mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Minghua Wu, Maureen D Mayes Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunogenetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by vasculopathy, fibrosis, and autoantibodies. In the past decade, great efforts have been made to investigate genetic susceptibility for SSc. To date, over 20 gene loci have been identified as risk factors for SSc in large genome-wide association studies and confirmed by independent replication studies. However, the biological relevance of these genetic associations is still largely unknown. Exploring the mechanism behind these risk loci is essential to better understand disease pathogenesis and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Mouse model studies including knockout, knockin and knockdown of these genes can advance our understanding of pathogenic cellular and molecular mechanisms in human disease. Although such mouse model systems do not exactly correspond to human disease, they can provide insight into pathological mechanisms that influence disease pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the genetic basis of SSc in the setting of genetic manipulation of these pathways in murine models. Keywords: GWAS, Immunochip study, type I interferon pathway, genetic mutation animal models

  19. A novel transgenic mouse model of Chinese Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruxu Zhang; Qian Pan; Beisha Tang; Fufeng Zhang; Xiaobo Li; Shunxiang Huang; Xiaohong Zi; Ting Liu; Sanmei Liu; Xuning Li; Kun Xia

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that the K141N mutation in heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) was respon-sible for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L in a large Chinese family. The objective of the present study was to generate a transgenic mouse model bearing the K141N mutation in the human HSPB8 gene, and to determine whether this K141NHSPB8 transgenic mouse model would manifest the clinical phenotype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L, and consequently be suitable for use in studies of disease pathogenesis. Transgenic mice overexpressing K141NHSPB8 were generated using K141N mutant HSPB8 cDNA cloned into a pCAGGS plasmid driven by a human cytomegalovirus expression system. PCR and western blot analysis conifrmed integra-tion of the K141NHSPB8 gene and widespread expression in tissues of the transgenic mice. The K141NHSPB8 transgenic mice exhibited decreased muscle strength in the hind limbs and impaired motor coordination, but no obvious sensory disturbance at 6 months of age by behavioral assess-ment. Electrophysiological analysis showed that the compound motor action potential amplitude in the sciatic nerve was signiifcantly decreased, but motor nerve conduction velocity remained normal at 6 months of age. Pathological analysis of the sciatic nerve showed reduced myelinated ifber density, notable axonal edema and vacuolar degeneration in K141NHSPB8 transgenic mice, suggesting axonal involvement in the peripheral nerve damage in these animals. These ifndings indicate that the K141NHSPB8 transgenic mouse successfully models Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L and can be used to study the pathogenesis of the disease.

  20. Application of mouse model for effective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Yong; Ko, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; You, Su-Hwa; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-07-19

    Efficacy evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines has been conducted in target animals such as cows and pigs. In particular, handling FMD virus requires a high level of biosafety management and facilities to contain the virulent viruses. The lack of a laboratory animal model has resulted in inconvenience when it comes to using target animals for vaccine evaluation, bringing about increased cost, time and labor for the experiments. The FMD mouse model has been studied, but most FMD virus (FMDV) strains are not known to cause disease in adult mice. In the present study, we created a series of challenge viruses that are lethal to adult C57BL/6 mice. FMDV types O, A, and Asia1, which are related to frequent FMD outbreaks, were adapted for mice and the pathogenesis of each virus was evaluated in the mouse model. Challenge experiments after vaccination using in-house and commercial vaccines demonstrated vaccine-mediated protection in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we propose that FMD vaccine evaluation should be carried out using mouse-adapted challenge viruses as a swift, effective efficacy test of experimental or commercial vaccines.

  1. MicroRNAs and Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models: Current Insights and Future Research Avenues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Delay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from clinical trials as well as from studies performed in animal models suggest that both amyloid and tau pathologies function in concert with other factors to cause the severe neurodegeneration and dementia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Accumulating data in the literature suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs could be such factors. These conserved, small nonprotein-coding RNAs are essential for neuronal function and survival and have been implicated in the regulation of key genes involved in genetic and sporadic AD. The study of miRNA changes in AD mouse models provides an appealing approach to address the cause-consequence relationship between miRNA dysfunction and AD pathology in humans. Mouse models also provide attractive tools to validate miRNA targets in vivo and provide unique platforms to study the role of specific miRNA-dependent gene pathways in disease. Finally, mouse models may be exploited for miRNA diagnostics in the fight against AD.

  2. Early-onset behavioral and synaptic deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J. Steven; Wu, Chi-Cheng; Redwine, Jeffrey M.; Comery, Thomas A.; Arias, Robert; Bowlby, Mark; Martone, Robert; Morrison, John H.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Reinhart, Peter H.; Bloom, Floyd E.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which numerous mouse models have been generated. In both AD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ)-containing plaques and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of preplaque dysfunction is important for understanding the progression of this disease and to identify pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Hence, we have examined the progression of dysfunction at the morphological, functional, and behavioral levels in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Our data show that decreased dendritic spine density, impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), and behavioral deficits occurred months before plaque deposition, which was first detectable at 18 months of age. We detected a decrease in spine density in the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) beginning as early as 4 months of age. Furthermore, by 5 months, there was a decline in LTP in the DG after perforant path stimulation and impairment in contextual fear conditioning. Moreover, an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was first observed at these early ages. However, total amyloid levels did not significantly increase until ≈18 months of age, at which time significant increases in reactive astrocytes and microglia could be observed. Overall, these data show that the perforant path input from the entorhinal cortex to the DG is compromised both structurally and functionally, and this pathology is manifested in memory defects long before significant plaque deposition. PMID:16549764

  3. Increased urinary lysophosphatidic acid in mouse with subtotal nephrectomy: potential involvement in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Koryun; Baïotto, Anna; Dupuy, Aude; Marsal, Dimitri; Denis, Colette; Vinel, Claire; Sicard, Pierre; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P; Klein, Julie; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Increased incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with consecutive progression to end-stage renal disease represents a significant burden to healthcare systems. Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a classical hallmark of CKD and is well correlated with the loss of renal function. The bioactive lysophospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting through specific G-protein-coupled receptors, was previously shown to be involved in TIF development in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Here, we study the role of LPA in a mouse subjected to subtotal nephrectomy (SNx), a more chronic and progressive model of CKD. Five months after surgical nephron reduction, SNx mice showed massive albuminuria, extensive TIF, and glomerular hypertrophy when compared to sham-operated animals. Urinary and plasma levels of LPA were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. LPA was significantly increased in SNx urine, not in plasma, and was significantly correlated with albuminuria and TIF. Moreover, SNx mice showed significant downregulation in the renal expression of lipid phosphate phosphohydrolases (LPP1, 2, and 3) that might be involved in reduced LPA bioavailability through dephosphorylation. We concluded that SNx increases urinary LPA through a mechanism that could involve co-excretion of plasma LPA with albumin associated with a reduction of its catabolism in the kidney. Because of the previously demonstrated profibrotic activity of LPA, the association of urinary LPA with TIF suggests the potential involvement of LPA in the development of advanced CKD in the SNx mouse model. Targeting LPA metabolism might represent an interesting approach in CKD treatment.

  4. The value of incomplete mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Cecilia; Jucker, Mathias [University of Tuebingen, Department of Cellular Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Tuebingen (Germany); Goedert, Michel [Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    To study Alzheimer's disease (AD), a variety of mouse models has been generated through the overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein and/or the presenilins harboring one or several mutations found in familial AD. With aging, these mice develop several lesions similar to those of AD, including diffuse and neuritic amyloid deposits, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, dystrophic neurites and synapses, and amyloid-associated neuroinflammation. Other characteristics of AD, such as neurofibrillary tangles and nerve cell loss, are not satisfactorily reproduced in these models. Mouse models that recapitulate only specific aspects of AD pathogenesis are of great advantage when deciphering the complexity of the disease and can contribute substantially to diagnostic and therapeutic innovations. Incomplete mouse models have been key to the development of A{beta}42-targeted therapies, as well as to the current understanding of the interrelationship between cerebral {beta}-amyloidosis and tau neurofibrillary lesions, and are currently being used to develop novel diagnostic agents for in vivo imaging. (orig.)

  5. 以慢性肾炎综合征为主要表现的Fabry病2例报道并文献复习%Fabry disease with chronic nephritis syndrome as the main manifestation and literature study:2 cases report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖武琼; 李典耕; 谢大洋; 陈仆; 李清刚; 陈香美

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical manifestation and renal pathology of Fabry disease which characteri zed with chronic nephritis syndrome as the main manifestation. Methods Retrospectively review the 2 cases of Fabry disease, which characterized as chronic nephritis syndrome as the main manifestation, the clinical signs and pathology were analyzed, and review of the relevant literature to master the methods of diagnosis and treatment. Results One case was male patient, the other was female patient, and onset age was 46 years old and 44 years old, 2 cases showed proteinuria, hematuria, hyperten-sion, and no characteristic of extra-renal manifestations. Under the light microscope, glomerular sclerosis rates were 30. 8%and 32. 1% respectively, significant swelling of glomerular podocytes, visible vacuoles formed in the cytoplasm, renal tubular multifocal atrophic were found. Dense and irregular osmiophilic myelin bodies also can be found. There is no effective cure methods for Fabry disease, combined with renal damage, the treatment mainly was to protect the kidney function, reducing protein, control symptom, the main medicine are ARB, such as losartan potassium, leflunomide. Conclusion Fabry disease is a rare genetic chromosome X diseases, renal damage is one of the most common clinical manifestation, under microscopic osmiophilic myelin bodies is the pathological finding, symptomatic treatment with enzyme replacement therapy are the main treatment, and combined with the genetics of appropriate intervention to block the genetics of the disease.%目的:探讨以慢性肾炎综合征为主要表现的Fabry病临床表现和肾脏病理学特点。方法回顾性分析收治的以慢性肾炎综合征为主要表现的Fabry病2例,分析其临床体征及病理学特征,同时复习相关文献掌握其诊断及治疗方法。结果男女患者各1例,发病年龄分别为46岁和44岁,2例均表现为蛋白尿、血尿、高血压,而无特征性的肾外表现

  6. Blockade of gap junction hemichannel suppresses disease progression in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Doi, Yukiko; Jin, Shijie; Noda, Mariko; Liang, Jianfeng; Li, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Mori, Rarami; Yasuoka, Satoko; Li, Endong; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Sato, Jun; Yamanaka, Koji; Sobue, Gen; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate released by activated microglia induces excitotoxic neuronal death, which likely contributes to non-cell autonomous neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Although both blockade of glutamate receptors and inhibition of microglial activation are the therapeutic candidates for these neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate receptor blockers also perturbed physiological and essential glutamate signals, and inhibitors of microglial activation suppressed both neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel. Hence, blockade of gap junction hemichannel may be potentially beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we generated a novel blood-brain barrier permeable gap junction hemichannel blocker based on glycyrrhetinic acid. We found that pharmacologic blockade of gap junction hemichannel inhibited excessive glutamate release from activated microglia in vitro and in vivo without producing notable toxicity. Blocking gap junction hemichannel significantly suppressed neuronal loss of the spinal cord and extended survival in transgenic mice carrying human superoxide dismutase 1 with G93A or G37R mutation as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Moreover, blockade of gap junction hemichannel also significantly improved memory impairments without altering amyloid β deposition in double transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein with K595N and M596L mutations and presenilin 1 with A264E mutation as an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Our results suggest that gap junction hemichannel blockers may represent a new therapeutic strategy to target neurotoxic microglia specifically and prevent microglia-mediated neuronal death in various neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Blockade of gap junction hemichannel suppresses disease progression in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Takeuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutamate released by activated microglia induces excitotoxic neuronal death, which likely contributes to non-cell autonomous neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Although both blockade of glutamate receptors and inhibition of microglial activation are the therapeutic candidates for these neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate receptor blockers also perturbed physiological and essential glutamate signals, and inhibitors of microglial activation suppressed both neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel. Hence, blockade of gap junction hemichannel may be potentially beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we generated a novel blood-brain barrier permeable gap junction hemichannel blocker based on glycyrrhetinic acid. We found that pharmacologic blockade of gap junction hemichannel inhibited excessive glutamate release from activated microglia in vitro and in vivo without producing notable toxicity. Blocking gap junction hemichannel significantly suppressed neuronal loss of the spinal cord and extended survival in transgenic mice carrying human superoxide dismutase 1 with G93A or G37R mutation as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Moreover, blockade of gap junction hemichannel also significantly improved memory impairments without altering amyloid β deposition in double transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein with K595N and M596L mutations and presenilin 1 with A264E mutation as an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that gap junction hemichannel blockers may represent a new therapeutic strategy to target neurotoxic microglia specifically and prevent microglia-mediated neuronal

  8. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  9. Direct production of mouse disease models by embryo microinjection of TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Benedikt; Meyer, Melanie; Ortiz, Oskar; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Hansen, Jens; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2013-03-05

    The study of genetic disease mechanisms relies mostly on targeted mouse mutants that are derived from engineered embryonic stem (ES) cells. Nevertheless, the establishment of mutant ES cells is laborious and time-consuming, restricting the study of the increasing number of human disease mutations discovered by high-throughput genomic analysis. Here, we present an advanced approach for the production of mouse disease models by microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides into one-cell embryos. Within 2 d of embryo injection, we created and corrected chocolate missense mutations in the small GTPase RAB38; a regulator of intracellular vesicle trafficking and phenotypic model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Because ES cell cultures and targeting vectors are not required, this technology enables instant germline modifications, making heterozygous mutants available within 18 wk. The key features of direct mutagenesis by TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides, minimal effort and high speed, catalyze the generation of future in vivo models for the study of human disease mechanisms and interventions.

  10. Musical Electroacupuncture May Be a Better Choice than Electroacupuncture in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To compare musical electroacupuncture and electroacupuncture in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Methods. In this study, 7.5-month-old male senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice were used as an Alzheimer's disease animal model. In the normal control paradigm, 7.5-month-old male SAMR1 mice were used as the blank control group (N group). After 15 days of treatment, using Morris water maze test, micro-PET, and immunohistochemistry, the differences among the musical electroacupuncture (MEA), electroacupuncture (EA), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and normal (N) groups were assessed. Results. The Morris water maze test, micro-PET, and immunohistochemistry revealed that MEA and EA therapies could improve spatial learning and memory ability, glucose metabolism level in the brain, and Aβ amyloid content in the frontal lobe, compared with the AD group (P therapy performed better than EA treatment in decreasing amyloid-beta levels in the frontal lobe of mice with AD. Conclusion. MEA therapy may be superior to EA in treating Alzheimer's disease as demonstrated in SAMP8 mice. PMID:27974974

  11. Transplantation of cholinergic neural stem cells in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-hua; XU Ru-xiang; Seigo Nagao

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is believed that the degeneration of cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) and the loss of cortical cholinergic innervation cause dementia of Alzheimer's disease (AD).1 Currently available therapeutic interventions are mainly aimed at alleviating the cholinergic deficits. Unfortunately, these strategies do not prevent the disease, but instead offer limited symptomatic improvement.2 A recent study demonstrated that transplantation of in vitro expanded neural stem cells (NSCs) in an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) resulted in functional recovery of the animals to some extent,2 suggesting that such neural precursors might offer a useful future therapy for AD. In this study, we tried to find whether mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell derived cholinergic NSCs grafted in the prefrontal and parietal cortex have effects on the disruption of spatial memory following development of lesion in NBM.

  12. Changes in voiding behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart T eBiallosterski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Besides cognitive decline and behavioral alteration, urinary incontinence often occurs in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. To determine whether the transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, APPSL/PS1M146L mouse, shows alteration of the urinary bladder function and anxiety, as for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, we examined the urinary marking behavior in relation to affective behavior. At 18 months of age voiding behavior of APPSL/PS1M146L (APP/PS1 and wild type (WT mice was assessed by using a modified filter paper assay in combination with video tracing, with the cage divided into a center and corner zones. Anxiety-related behavior and locomotion were respectively tested in an elevated zero maze and an open field. The APP/PS1 mice urinated more in the center zone than the WT mice. The total volume of markings was significantly lower in the APP/PS1 mice. In both groups, the average volume of a marking in the corner zone was larger than in the center zone. In the elevated zero maze, the APP/PS1 mice spent less time in the open arms of the arena, considered as anxiogenic zones, than the WT mice. During the open field task, the APP/PS1 mice covered a longer distance than the WT mice. These findings show that the APP/PS1 mice have a different voiding behavior compared to the WT mice, i.e. urinating with small volumes and voiding in the center of the cage, and suggest that increased locomotor activity and anxiety-related behaviors are factors in the change in voiding pattern in the APP/PS1 mouse.

  13. Fourier Transform Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Hilary E.; Hays, Paul B.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a compact, rugged, high-resolution remote sensing instrument with wide spectral scanning capabilities. This relatively new type of instrument, which we have chosen to call the Fourier-Transform Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FT-FPI), is accomplished by mechanically scanning the etalon plates of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) through a large optical distance while examining the concomitant signal with a Fourier-transform analysis technique similar to that employed by the Michelson interferometer. The FT-FPI will be used initially as a ground-based instrument to study near-infrared atmospheric absorption lines of trace gases using the techniques of solar absorption spectroscopy. Future plans include modifications to allow for measurements of trace gases in the stratosphere using spectral lines at terahertz frequencies.

  14. Ataxia with loss of Purkinje cells in a mouse model for Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Zomer, Anna W M; Komen, Jasper C; van den Brink, Christina E; Thanos, Melissa; Hamers, Frank P T; Wanders, Ronald J A; van der Saag, Paul T; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Brites, Pedro

    2008-11-18

    Refsum disease is caused by a deficiency of phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase (PHYH), the first enzyme of the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation system, resulting in the accumulation of the branched-chain fatty acid phytanic acid. The main clinical symptoms are polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa. To study the pathogenesis of Refsum disease, we generated and characterized a Phyh knockout mouse. We studied the pathological effects of phytanic acid accumulation in Phyh(-/-) mice fed a diet supplemented with phytol, the precursor of phytanic acid. Phytanic acid accumulation caused a reduction in body weight, hepatic steatosis, and testicular atrophy with loss of spermatogonia. Phenotype assessment using the SHIRPA protocol and subsequent automated gait analysis using the CatWalk system revealed unsteady gait with strongly reduced paw print area for both fore- and hindpaws and reduced base of support for the hindpaws. Histochemical analyses in the CNS showed astrocytosis and up-regulation of calcium-binding proteins. In addition, a loss of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum was observed. No demyelination was present in the CNS. Motor nerve conduction velocity measurements revealed a peripheral neuropathy. Our results show that, in the mouse, high phytanic acid levels cause a peripheral neuropathy and ataxia with loss of Purkinje cells. These findings provide important insights in the pathophysiology of Refsum disease.

  15. Fingolimod: A Disease-Modifier Drug in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Rosa Luisa; De Simone, Roberta; Armida, Monica; Mazziotti, Valentina; Pèzzola, Antonella; Popoli, Patrizia; Minghetti, Luisa

    2016-10-01

    Fingolimod phosphate (FTY720), the first approved oral therapy for multiple sclerosis, primarily acts as an immunomodulator. Its concomitant effects in the central nervous system, however, indicate a potentially broader spectrum of activity in neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible effects of fingolimod in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a strong neuroinflammatory component. Fingolimod (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to mSOD1(G93A) mice, a well-characterized mouse model of ALS, starting from the onset of motor symptoms to the end stage of the disease. The drug was able to improve the neurological phenotype (p < 0.05) and to extend the survival (p < 0.01) of ALS mice. The beneficial effect of fingolimod administration was associated with a significant modulation of neuroinflammatory and protective genes (CD11b, Foxp3, iNOS, Il1β, Il10, Arg1, and Bdnf) in motor cortex and spinal cord of animals. Our data show, for the first time, that fingolimod is protective in ALS mice and that its beneficial effects are accompanied by a modulation of microglial activation and innate immunity. Considering that the treatment was started in already symptomatic mice, our data strongly support fingolimod as a potential new therapeutic approach to ALS.

  16. Specific disruption of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Scott A; Raam, Tara; Antonios, Joseph K; Bushong, Eric A; Koo, Edward H; Ellisman, Mark H; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF) synapse between dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control - they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease.

  17. Specific disruption of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Wilke

    Full Text Available The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF synapse between dentate gyrus (DG and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control - they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease.

  18. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse intestinal macrophages is mediated by activation of JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y-L; Du, Y-F; Du, H; Shao, P

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been considered as a metabolic disorder disease, which closely related to insulin signaling impairment. Therefore, identifying the potential mechanism of insulin resistance is important for AD treatment. An APP/PS1 double transgenic AD mouse model was introduced to study insulin resistance in gut. The expressions of AD markers and key elements of insulin signaling were detected in ileum and intestinal macrophages of AD mice by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, mouse intestinal macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was treated by Aβ25-35 or Aβ25-35 + insulin to explore the mechanism of insulin resistance in vitro. The expression of IR-β and the activation of cell signaling related proteins (Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), protein kinase B (AKT) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)) in Aβ25-35-stimulated macrophages were performed via Western blotting. The expressions of IRS1, Aβ and Tuj in AD mice ileum were significantly different from WT mice (pinsulin could reverse these changes (pinsulin addition. Activation of JNK pathway played an important role in insulin resistance of AD mice, suggesting that inhibition of JNK pathway might be a new strategy toward resolving insulin resistance related diseases, such as AD.

  19. Disease model discovery from 3,328 gene knockouts by The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Terrence F; Conte, Nathalie; West, David B; Jacobsen, Julius O; Mason, Jeremy; Warren, Jonathan; Chen, Chao-Kung; Tudose, Ilinca; Relac, Mike; Matthews, Peter; Karp, Natasha; Santos, Luis; Fiegel, Tanja; Ring, Natalie; Westerberg, Henrik; Greenaway, Simon; Sneddon, Duncan; Morgan, Hugh; Codner, Gemma F; Stewart, Michelle E; Brown, James; Horner, Neil; Haendel, Melissa; Washington, Nicole; Mungall, Christopher J; Reynolds, Corey L; Gallegos, Juan; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Sorg, Tania; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Bower, Lynette R; Moore, Mark; Morse, Iva; Gao, Xiang; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Obata, Yuichi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seavitt, John; Beaudet, Arthur L; Dickinson, Mary E; Herault, Yann; Wurst, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Lloyd, K C Kent; Flenniken, Ann M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Justice, Monica J; Murray, Stephen A; Svenson, Karen L; Braun, Robert E; White, Jacqueline K; Bradley, Allan; Flicek, Paul; Wells, Sara; Skarnes, William C; Adams, David J; Parkinson, Helen; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M; Smedley, Damian

    2017-08-01

    Although next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the ability to associate variants with human diseases, diagnostic rates and development of new therapies are still limited by a lack of knowledge of the functions and pathobiological mechanisms of most genes. To address this challenge, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalog of gene function by characterizing new knockout-mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardized phenotyping tests. All mice will be readily available to the biomedical community. Analyzing the first 3,328 genes identified models for 360 diseases, including the first models, to our knowledge, for type C Bernard-Soulier, Bardet-Biedl-5 and Gordon Holmes syndromes. 90% of our phenotype annotations were novel, providing functional evidence for 1,092 genes and candidates in genetically uncharacterized diseases including arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 3. Finally, we describe our role in variant functional validation with The 100,000 Genomes Project and others.

  20. Towards spatial frequency domain optical imaging of neurovascular coupling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alexander J.; Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler B.; Green, Kim N.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-02-01

    Early neurovascular coupling (NVC) changes in Alzheimer's disease can potentially provide imaging biomarkers to assist with diagnosis and treatment. Previous efforts to quantify NVC with intrinsic signal imaging have required assumptions of baseline optical pathlength to calculate changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during evoked stimuli. In this work, we present an economical spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) platform utilizing a commercially available LED projector, camera, and off-the-shelf optical components suitable for imaging dynamic optical properties. The fast acquisition platform described in this work is validated on silicone phantoms and demonstrated in neuroimaging of a mouse model.

  1. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O; Garbis, Spiros D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets.

  2. Evaluation of TorsinA as a target for Parkinson disease therapy in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinru Li

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a common and disabling disorder. No current therapy can slow or reverse disease progression. An important aspect of research in this field is target validation, a systematic approach to evaluating the likelihood that modification of a certain molecule, mechanism or biological pathway may be useful for the development of pharmacological or molecular treatments for the disease. TorsinA, a member of the AAA+ family of chaperone proteins, has been proposed as a potential target of neuroprotective therapy. TorsinA is found in Lewy bodies in human PD, and can suppress toxicity in cellular and invertebrate models of PD. Here, we evaluated the neuroprotective properties of torsinA in mouse models of PD based on intoxication with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP as well as recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV induced overexpression of alpha-synuclein (α-syn. Using either transgenic mice with overexpression of human torsinA (hWT mice or mice in which torsinA expression was induced using an rAAV vector, we found no evidence for protection against acute MPTP intoxication. Similarly, genetic deletion of the endogenous mouse gene for torsinA (Dyt1 using an rAAV delivered Cre recombinase did not enhance the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons to MPTP. Overexpression of α-syn using rAAV in the mouse substantia nigra lead to a loss of TH positive neurons six months after administration, and no difference in the degree of loss was observed between transgenic animals expressing forms of torsinA and wild type controls. Collectively, we did not observe evidence for a protective effect of torsinA in the mouse models we examined. Each of these models has limitations, and there is no single model with established predictive value with respect to the human disease. Nevertheless, these data do seem to support the view that torsinA is unlikely to be successfully translated as a target of therapy for human PD.

  3. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Actin nemaline myopathy mouse reproduces disease, suggests other actin disease phenotypes and provides cautionary note on muscle transgene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina Ravenscroft

    Full Text Available Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1 cause congenital myopathies including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy and rod-core disease. The majority of patients with ACTA1 mutations have severe hypotonia and do not survive beyond the age of one. A transgenic mouse model was generated expressing an autosomal dominant mutant (D286G of ACTA1 (identified in a severe nemaline myopathy patient fused with EGFP. Nemaline bodies were observed in multiple skeletal muscles, with serial sections showing these correlated to aggregates of the mutant skeletal muscle α-actin-EGFP. Isolated extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were significantly weaker than wild-type (WT muscle at 4 weeks of age, coinciding with the peak in structural lesions. These 4 week-old mice were ~30% less active on voluntary running wheels than WT mice. The α-actin-EGFP protein clearly demonstrated that the transgene was expressed equally in all myosin heavy chain (MHC fibre types during the early postnatal period, but subsequently became largely confined to MHCIIB fibres. Ringbinden fibres, internal nuclei and myofibrillar myopathy pathologies, not typical features in nemaline myopathy or patients with ACTA1 mutations, were frequently observed. Ringbinden were found in fast fibre predominant muscles of adult mice and were exclusively MHCIIB-positive fibres. Thus, this mouse model presents a reliable model for the investigation of the pathobiology of nemaline body formation and muscle weakness and for evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. The occurrence of core-like regions, internal nuclei and ringbinden will allow analysis of the mechanisms underlying these lesions. The occurrence of ringbinden and features of myofibrillar myopathy in this mouse model of ACTA1 disease suggests that patients with these pathologies and no genetic explanation should be screened for ACTA1 mutations.

  5. An Archetype Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; VanZyl, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate the generation of a novel resonator, termed Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP), that exhibits unique features, such as, its use of one plane mirror, allowing the SRFP to be easily fabricated as a symmetrical device. In addition to its unique features, it exhibits advantages of ring and Fabry-Perot resonators: 1) compared to a ring resonator that only allows a transmitted intensity, the Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) supports standing waves, allowing both a reflected and transmitted intensity; 2) the reflected light spectrum of the SRFP resonator is much narrower than similar Fabry-Perot, implying higher finesse.

  6. FTY720 (fingolimod) is a neuroprotective and disease-modifying agent in cellular and mouse models of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pardo, Alba; Amico, Enrico; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Castrataro, Roberta; Fucile, Sergio; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Maglione, Vittorio

    2014-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder for which there is currently no cure and no way to stop or even slow the brain changes it causes. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether FTY720, the first approved oral therapy for multiple sclerosis, may be effective in HD models and eventually constitute an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of the disease. Here, we utilized preclinical target validation paradigms and examined the in vivo efficacy of chronic administration of FTY720 in R6/2 HD mouse model. Our findings indicate that FTY720 improved motor function, prolonged survival and reduced brain atrophy in R6/2 mice. The beneficial effect of FTY720 administration was associated with a significant strengthening of neuronal activity and connectivity and, with reduction of mutant huntingtin aggregates, and it was also paralleled by increased phosphorylation of mutant huntingtin at serine 13/16 residues that are predicted to attenuate protein toxicity.

  7. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Heike; Damme, Markus; Stroobants, Stijn;

    2016-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fuc...... demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model may be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis....

  8. Analysis of the cartilage proteome from three different mouse models of genetic skeletal diseases reveals common and discrete disease signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Bell

    2013-06-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia are genetic skeletal diseases resulting from mutations in cartilage structural proteins. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry previously showed that the appearance of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM in targeted mouse models of these diseases is disrupted; however, the precise changes in ECM organization and the pathological consequences remain unknown. Our aim was to determine the effects of matrilin-3 and COMP mutations on the composition and extractability of ECM components to inform how these detrimental changes might influence cartilage organization and degeneration. Cartilage was sequentially extracted using increasing denaturants and the extraction profiles of specific proteins determined using SDS-PAGE/Western blotting. Furthermore, the relative composition of protein pools was determined using mass spectrometry for a non-biased semi-quantitative analysis. Western blotting revealed changes in the extraction of matrilins, COMP and collagen IX in mutant cartilage. Mass spectrometry confirmed quantitative changes in the extraction of structural and non-structural ECM proteins, including proteins with roles in cellular processes such as protein folding and trafficking. In particular, genotype-specific differences in the extraction of collagens XII and XIV and tenascins C and X were identified; interestingly, increased expression of several of these genes has recently been implicated in susceptibility and/or progression of murine osteoarthritis. We demonstrated that mutation of matrilin-3 and COMP caused changes in the extractability of other cartilage proteins and that proteomic analyses of Matn3 V194D, Comp T585M and Comp DelD469 mouse models revealed both common and discrete disease signatures that provide novel insight into skeletal disease mechanisms and cartilage degradation.

  9. Hearing loss in infantile Pompe's disease and determination of underlying pathology in the knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphoven, Joep H J; de Ruiter, Martijn M; Winkel, Leon P F; Van den Hout, Hannerieke M P; Bijman, Jan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoeve, Hans L; Van Zanten, Bert A; Van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2004-06-01

    Hearing deficit occurs in several lysosomal storage disorders but has so far not been recognized as a symptom of Pompe's disease (glycogen storage disease type II). We discovered quite unexpectedly 30-90 dB hearing loss in four infants with Pompe's disease, who participated in a study on the safety and efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. Three other patients with juvenile Pompe's disease did not have this symptom. The ABR (auditory brainstem response) thresholds but not the interpeak latency times were increased. This pointed to middle or inner ear pathology rather than to involvement of the central auditory nervous system. The possible occurrence of cochlear pathology was supported by the absence of oto-acoustic emissions. We investigated this hypothesis in a knockout mouse model of Pompe's disease and found glycogen storage in the inner and outer hair cells of the cochlea, the supporting cells, the stria vascularis, and the spiral ganglion cells. We conclude that cochlear pathology is the most likely cause of hearing loss in infantile Pompe's disease and possibly a characteristic feature of this clinical subtype.

  10. Hypertension accelerates the progression of Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Dere, Ekrem; Broquères-You, Dong; Bonnin, Philippe; Benessiano, Joëlle; Pocard, Marc; Mariani, Jean; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular impairment is frequent in patients with Alzheimer disease and is believed to influence clinical manifestation and severity of the disease. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially hypertension, have been associated with higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypertension, Alzheimer disease cross talk, we established a mouse model of dual pathology by infusing hypertensive doses of angiotensin II into transgenic APPPS1 mice overexpressing mutated human amyloid precursor and presenilin 1 proteins. At 4.5 months, at the early stage of disease progression, only hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented impairment of temporal order memory performance in the episodic-like memory task. This cognitive deficit was associated with an increased number of cortical amyloid deposits (223±5 versus 207±5 plaques/mm(2); PHypertensive APPPS1 mice presented several cerebrovascular alterations, including a 25% reduction in cerebral microvessel density and a 30% to 40% increase in cerebral vascular amyloid deposits, as well as a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor A expression in the brain, compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice. Moreover, the brain levels of nitric oxide synthase 1 and 3 and the nitrite/nitrate levels were reduced in hypertensive APPPS1 mice (by 49%, 34%, and 33%, respectively, compared with wild-type mice; Phypertension accelerates the development of Alzheimer disease-related structural and functional alterations, partially through cerebral vasculature impairment and reduced nitric oxide production.

  11. Genetically modified mouse models for the study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perumal Nagarajan; M Jerald Mahesh Kumar; Ramasamy Venkatesan; Subeer S Majundar; Ramesh C Juyal

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity,insulin resistance,and type 2 diabetes.NAFLD represents a large spectrum of diseases ranging from (1) fatty liver (hepatic steatosis); (2) steatosis with inflammation and necrosis; to (3) cirrhosis.The animal models to study NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are extremely useful,as there are still many events to be elucidated in the pathology of NASH.The study of the established animal models has provided many clues in the pathogenesis of steatosis and steatohepatitis,but these remain incompletely understood.The different mouse models can be classified in two large groups.The first one includes genetically modified (transgenic or knockout) mice that spontaneously develop liver disease,and the second one includes mice that acquire the disease after dietary or pharmacological manipulation.Although the molecular mechanism leading to the development of hepatic steatosis in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is complex,genetically modified animal models may be a key for the treatment of NAFLD.Ideal animal models for NASH should closely resemble the pathological characteristics observed in humans.To date,no single animal model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression,but they can imitate particular characteristics of human disease.Therefore,it is important that the researchers choose the appropriate animal model.This review discusses various genetically modified animal models developed and used in research on NAFLD.

  12. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27(Kip1) expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice.

  13. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Martínez-García

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2 knockout (KO mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice.

  14. Assembly, plasticity and selective vulnerability to disease of mouse neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alexandre Ferrão; Caroni, Pico

    2003-01-01

    Although physiological differences among neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) have long been known, NMJs have usually been considered as one type of synapse, restricting their potential value as model systems to investigate mechanisms controlling synapse assembly and plasticity. Here we discuss recent evidence that skeletal muscles in the mouse can be subdivided into two previously unrecognized subtypes, designated FaSyn and DeSyn muscles. These muscles differ in the pattern of neuromuscular synaptogenesis during embryonic development. Differences between classes are intrinsic to the muscles, and manifest in the absence of innervation or agrin. The distinct rates of synaptogenesis in the periphery may influence processes of circuit maturation through retrograde signals. While NMJs on FaSyn and DeSyn muscles exhibit a comparable anatomical organization in postnatal mice, treatments that challenge synaptic stability result in nerve sprouting, NMJ remodeling, and ectopic synaptogenesis selectively on DeSyn muscles. This anatomical plasticity of NMJs diminishes greatly between 2 and 6 months postnatally. NMJs lacking this plasticity are lost selectively and very early on in mouse models of motoneuron disease, suggesting that disease-associated motoneuron dysfunction may fail to initiate maintenance processes at "non-plastic" NMJs. Transgenic mice overexpressing growth-promoting proteins in motoneurons exhibit greatly enhanced stimulus-induced sprouting restricted to DeSyn muscles, supporting the notion that anatomical plasticity at the NMJ is primarily controlled by processes in the postsynaptic muscle. The discovery that entire muscles in the mouse differ substantially in the anatomical plasticity of their synapses establishes NMJs as a uniquely advantageous experimental system to investigate mechanisms controlling synaptic rearrangements at defined synapses in vivo.

  15. BCG vaccine-induced neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-01-31

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions.

  16. The fornix provides multiple biomarkers to characterize circuit disruption in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Alexandra; Kane, Lauren; Anderson, Robert J; Qi, Yi; Foster, Mark; Cofer, Gary P; Medvitz, Neil; Buckley, Anne F; Badea, Andreas K; Wetsel, William C; Colton, Carol A

    2016-11-15

    Multivariate biomarkers are needed for detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD), understanding its etiology, and quantifying the effect of therapies. Mouse models provide opportunities to study characteristics of AD in well-controlled environments that can help facilitate development of early interventions. The CVN-AD mouse model replicates multiple AD hallmark pathologies, and we identified multivariate biomarkers characterizing a brain circuit disruption predictive of cognitive decline. In vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that CVN-AD mice replicate the hippocampal atrophy (6%), characteristic of humans with AD, and also present changes in subcortical areas. The largest effect was in the fornix (23% smaller), which connects the septum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In characterizing the fornix with diffusion tensor imaging, fractional anisotropy was most sensitive (20% reduction), followed by radial (15%) and axial diffusivity (2%), in detecting pathological changes. These findings were strengthened by optical microscopy and ultrastructural analyses. Ultrastructual analysis provided estimates of axonal density, diameters, and myelination-through the g-ratio, defined as the ratio between the axonal diameter, and the diameter of the axon plus the myelin sheath. The fornix had reduced axonal density (47% fewer), axonal degeneration (13% larger axons), and abnormal myelination (1.5% smaller g-ratios). CD68 staining showed that white matter pathology could be secondary to neuronal degeneration, or due to direct microglial attack. In conclusion, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that the fornix plays a role in AD, and can be used as a disease biomarker and as a target for therapy.

  17. Surveying quality of life in patients with Fabry disease by the SF-36 scale%SF-36量表评估Fabry病患者生活质量的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳彦; 潘晓霞; 王朝晖; 沈平雁; 王伟铭; 任红; 张文; 陈楠

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the availability of the SF-36 scale for the Chinese patient with Fabry disease (FD),the quality of life(QOL) and its probable influence factors were analyzed.Methods The data were obtained from 50 healthy volunteers and 57 patients with FD enrolled in nephrology department of Ruijin hospital from Jan,2003 to Jan,2013.The SF-36 scale was used to evaluate the QOL of patients and to compare the difference between the patients and controls.Furthermore,the influencing factors were estimated by multiple linear regressions.Results Between the patients and controls,the differences of 8 dimensionalitiy's scores had statistical significance,which claimed that the reaction was sensitive.Especially,in the patient group,the Pearson correlation coefficient among each domain of the SF-36 was lower than its Cronbach's α coefficient (0.934),which indicated good internal consistency reliability.The two common factors were much the same to the theory assume,which illustrated the construct validity was available.Even the acceptability of the patient' group at 100% proved the scale was appropriate for patients with FD.In addition,in rolephysical (RP) and bodily pain (BP),the scores of the male patients were less than the females (P <0.01),declared that the QOL of the males was inferior to the females.In the physical function (PF) and the mental health (MH),the scores of the patients with angiokeratoma were less than the group without it,so the patients who had evident clinical symptoms more likely contributed to depression.Using multiple linear regression,age,gender and clinical types were chosen into regression equation by stepwise regression,and the main potential predictor was age.Conclusions The SF-36 scale applies to evaluate the QOL of patients with FD.It is critical to concern and manage the QOL of FD patients,especially in their mental health aspect.%目的 调查中国Fabry病患者生存质量(quality of life,QOL),分析其可能的影响因

  18. The therapeutic effects of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-A; Kim, Hee Jin; Joo, Yuyoung; Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease, still lacking proper clinical treatment. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the possibility of therapeutic use of stem cells for AD. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency and their ability to differentiate into multiple tissue types and have immune modulatory properties similar to those of MSCs from other origins. Because of their biological properties, ASCs can be considered for cell therapy and neuroregeneration. Our recent results clearly showed the therapeutic potential of these cells after transplantation into Tg2576 mice (an AD mouse model). Intravenously or intracerebrally transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) greatly improved the memory impairment and the neuropathology, suggesting that hASCs have a high therapeutic potential for AD.

  19. PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade reduces pathology and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Rosenzweig, Neta; Tsitsou-Kampeli, Afroditi; Sharif, Alaa Mohammad; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Kertser, Alexander; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Systemic immune suppression may curtail the ability to mount the protective, cell-mediated immune responses that are needed for brain repair. By using mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we show that immune checkpoint blockade directed against the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway evokes an interferon (IFN)-γ-dependent systemic immune response, which is followed by the recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages to the brain. When induced in mice with established pathology, this immunological response leads to clearance of cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and improved cognitive performance. Repeated treatment sessions were required to maintain a long-lasting beneficial effect on disease pathology. These findings suggest that immune checkpoints may be targeted therapeutically in AD.

  20. Elevation of glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B in type 1 Gaucher disease patients and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Gertjan; Wegdam, Wouter; Donker-Koopman, Wilma; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Gaspar, Paulo; Verhoek, Marri; Nelson, Jessica; Gabriel, Tanit; Kallemeijn, Wouter; Boot, Rolf G; Laman, Jon D; Vissers, Johannes P C; Cox, Timothy; Pavlova, Elena; Moran, Mary Teresa; Aerts, Johannes M; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase. Proteome analysis of laser-dissected splenic Gaucher cells revealed increased amounts of glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (gpNMB). Plasma gpNMB was also elevated, correlating with chitotriosidase and CCL18, which are established markers for human Gaucher cells. In Gaucher mice, gpNMB is also produced by Gaucher cells. Correction of glucocerebrosidase deficiency in mice by gene transfer or pharmacological substrate reduction reverses gpNMB abnormalities. In conclusion, gpNMB acts as a marker for glucosylceramide-laden macrophages in man and mouse and gpNMB should be considered as candidate biomarker for Gaucher disease in treatment monitoring.

  1. The Sirtuin 2 Inhibitor AK-7 Is Neuroprotective in Huntington’s Disease Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Chopra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2 deacetylase mediates protective effects in cell and invertebrate models of Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease (HD. Here we report the in vivo efficacy of a brain-permeable SIRT2 inhibitor in two genetic mouse models of HD. Compound treatment resulted in improved motor function, extended survival, and reduced brain atrophy and is associated with marked reduction of aggregated mutant huntingtin, a hallmark of HD pathology. Our results provide preclinical validation of SIRT2 inhibition as a potential therapeutic target for HD and support the further development of SIRT2 inhibitors for testing in humans.

  2. A Dysregulated Endocannabinoid-Eicosanoid Network Supports Pathogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Piro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although inflammation in the brain is meant as a defense mechanism against neurotoxic stimuli, increasing evidence suggests that uncontrolled, chronic, and persistent inflammation contributes to neurodegeneration. Most neurodegenerative diseases have now been associated with chronic inflammation, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Whether anti-inflammatory approaches can be used to treat AD, however, is a major unanswered question. We recently demonstrated that monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL hydrolyzes endocannabinoids to generate the primary arachidonic acid pool for neuroinflammatory prostaglandins. In this study, we show that genetic inactivation of MAGL attenuates neuroinflammation and lowers amyloid β levels and plaques in an AD mouse model. We also find that pharmacological blockade of MAGL recapitulates the cytokine-lowering effects through reduced prostaglandin production, rather than enhanced endocannabinoid signaling. Our findings thus reveal a role of MAGL in modulating neuroinflammation and amyloidosis in AD etiology and put forth MAGL inhibitors as a potential next-generation strategy for combating AD.

  3. Restoration of glyoxalase enzyme activity precludes cognitive dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Swati S; Vartak, Ashish P; Vince, Robert

    2013-02-20

    Pathologically high brain levels of reactive dicarbonyls such as methylglyoxal or glyoxal initiate processes that lead ultimately to neurodegeneration, presented clinically as Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive or motor impairment disorders. Methylglyoxal and glyoxal result from glycolysis and normal metabolic pathways. Their reaction products with proteins (advanced glycation end products), and their primary chemical toxicities are both linked unequivocally to the primary pathologies of Alzheimer's disease, namely, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Generation of dicarbonyls is countered through the reduction of dicarbonyls by the glutathione-dependent glyoxalase enzyme system. Although glyoxalase-I is overexpressed in early and middle stages of Alzheimer's disease, glutathione depletion in the Alzheimer's afflicted brain cripples its efficacy. Due to the lack of a suitable pharmacological tool, the restoration of glyoxalase enzyme activity in pre-Alzheimer's or manifest Alzheimer's remains yet unvalidated as a means for anti-Alzheimer's therapy development. Disclosed herein are the results of a preclinical study into the therapeutic efficacy of ψ-GSH, a synthetic cofactor of glyoxalase, in mitigating Alzheimer's indicators in a transgenic mouse model (APP/PS1) that is predisposed to Alzheimer's disease. ψ-GSH administration completely averts the development of spatial mnemonic and long-term cognitive/cued-recall impairment. Amyloid β deposition and oxidative stress indicators are drastically reduced in the ψ-GSH-treated APP/PS1 mouse. ψ-GSH lacks discernible toxicity at strikingly high doses of 2000 mg/kg. The hypothesis that restoring brain glyoxalase activity would ameliorate neurogeneration stands validated, thus presenting a much needed new target for design of anti-Alzheimer's therapeutics. Consequently, ψ-GSH is established as a candidate for drug-development.

  4. Diet-induced obesity and kidney disease - In search of a susceptible mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Shawna E; Nguyen, Trang-Tiffany; Breaux, Chelsea; Kruger, Claudia; Stadler, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease, even without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Here, we compare two mouse models that are susceptible to diet-induced obesity: the relatively renal injury resistant C57BL/6J strain and the DBA2/J strain which is more sensitive to renal injury. Our studies focused on characterizing the effects of high fat diet feeding on renal oxidative stress, albuminuria, fibrosis and podocyte loss/insulin resistance. While the C57BL/6J strain does not develop significant pathological changes in the kidney, at least on lard based diets within the time frame investigated, it does show increased renal iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels and elevated mitochondrial respiration which may be indicative of mitochondrial lipid overfueling. Restricting the high fat diet to decrease adiposity decreased the levels of cellular oxidative stress markers, indicating that adiposity-related proinflammatory changes such as increased iNOS levels may trigger similar responses in the kidney. Mitochondrial respiration remained higher, suggesting that eating excess lipids, despite normal adiposity may still lead to renal mitochondrial overfueling. In comparison, DBA/2J mice developed albuminuria on similar diets, signs of fibrosis, oxidative stress, early signs of podocyte loss (evaluated by the markers podocin and WT-1) and podocyte insulin resistance (unable to phosphorylate their glomerular Akt when insulin was given). To summarize, while the C57BL/6J strain is not particularly susceptible to renal disease, changes in its mitochondrial lipid handling combined with the easy availability of transgenic technology may be an advantage to design new knockout models related to mitochondrial lipid metabolism. The DBA/2J model could serve as a basis for studying podocyte insulin resistance and identifying early renal markers in obesity before more severe kidney disease develops. Based on our observations, we encourage further critical

  5. Mouse studies to shape clinical trials for mitochondrial diseases: high fat diet in Harlequin mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Schiff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic options in human mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS diseases have been poorly evaluated mostly because of the scarcity of cohorts and the inter-individual variability of disease progression. Thus, while a high fat diet (HFD is often recommended, data regarding efficacy are limited. Our objectives were 1 to determine our ability to evaluate therapeutic options in the Harlequin OXPHOS complex I (CI-deficient mice, in the context of a mitochondrial disease with human hallmarks and 2 to assess the effects of a HFD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Before launching long and expensive animal studies, we showed that palmitate afforded long-term death-protection in 3 CI-mutant human fibroblasts cell lines. We next demonstrated that using the Harlequin mouse, it was possible to draw solid conclusions on the efficacy of a 5-month-HFD on neurodegenerative symptoms. Moreover, we could identify a group of highly responsive animals, echoing the high variability of the disease progression in Harlequin mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that a reduced number of patients with identical genetic disease should be sufficient to reach firm conclusions as far as the potential existence of responders and non responders is recognized. They also positively prefigure HFD-trials in OXPHOS-deficient patients.

  6. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity.

  7. Small-fibre neuropathy in female Fabry patients: reduced allodynia and skin blood flow after topical capsaicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Åse K.;

    2006-01-01

    affected. Recently, attention has been drawn to female patients whether they also show signs of nerve involvement. An early sign of the disease is painful small-fibre neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate a small-fibre dysfunction in female Fabry patients by using capsaicin applied topically....... The response to capsaicin was evaluated by laser Doppler imaging. We found that the female Fabry patients had a significantly smaller increase in blood flow (p = 0.0003) after capsaicin application. The area of static mechanical allodynia and dynamic mechanical hyperalgesia was also significantly smaller (p...

  8. 'Too much good news' - are Alzheimer mouse models trying to tell us how to prevent, not cure, Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahs, Kathleen R; Ashe, Karen H

    2010-08-01

    Scores of compounds ameliorate cognitive deficits or neuropathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet these triumphs in mice have not translated into successful therapies for people. Why have studies in mice failed to predict results of human trials? We argue that most transgenic mouse 'models of AD' actually simulate the asymptomatic phase of the disease, and the results of interventional studies in these mice should be considered in the context of disease prevention. In addition, recent advances in imaging technology and biomarker discovery should aid in comparisons of mouse and human neurological status and, importantly, might allow us to predict better the response of people to drugs tested in mice. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Soluble Fn14 Is Detected and Elevated in Mouse and Human Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nusrat Sharif

    Full Text Available The cytokine TWEAK and its cognate receptor Fn14 are members of the TNF/TNFR superfamily and are upregulated in tissue injury to mediate local tissue responses including inflammation and tissue remodeling. We found that in various models of kidney disease, Fn14 expression (mRNA and protein is upregulated in the kidney. These models include: lupus nephritis mouse models (Nephrotoxic serum Transfer Nephritis and MRL.Faslpr/lpr, acute kidney injury models (Ischemia reperfusion injury and Folic acid injury, and a ZSF-1 diabetic nephropathy rat model. Fn14 expression levels correlate with disease severity as measured by disease histology. We have also shown for the first time the detection of soluble Fn14 (sFn14 in the urine and serum of mice. Importantly, we found the sFn14 levels are markedly increased in the diseased mice and are correlated with disease biomarkers including proteinuria and MCP-1. We have also detected sFn14 in human plasma and urine. Moreover, sFn14 levels, in urine are significantly increased in DN patients and correlated with proteinuria and MCP-1 levels. Thus our data not only confirm the up-regulation of Fn14/TWEAK pathway in kidney diseases, but also suggest a novel mechanism for its regulation by the generation of sFn14. The correlation of sFn14 levels and disease severity suggest that sFn14 may serve as a potential biomarker for both acute and chronic kidney diseases.

  10. Effect of mouse strain as a background for Alzheimer's disease models on the clearance of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qosa, Hisham; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-04-01

    Novel animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are relentlessly being developed and existing ones are being fine-tuned; however, these models face multiple challenges associated with the complexity of the disease where most of these models do not reproduce the full phenotypical disease spectrum. Moreover, different AD models express different phenotypes that could affect their validity to recapitulate disease pathogenesis and/or response to a drug. One of the most important and understudied differences between AD models is differences in the phenotypic characteristics of the background species. Here, we used the brain clearance index (BCI) method to investigate the effect of strain differences on the clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) from the brains of four mouse strains. These mouse strains, namely C57BL/6, FVB/N, BALB/c and SJL/J, are widely used as a background for the development of AD mouse models. Findings showed that while Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was comparable between the 4 strains, levels of LRP1, an Aβ clearance protein, was significantly lower in SJL/J mice compared to other mouse strains. Furthermore, these mouse strains showed a significantly different response to rifampicin treatment with regard to Aβ clearance and effect on brain level of its clearance-related proteins. Our results provide for the first time an evidence for strain differences that could affect ability of AD mouse models to recapitulate response to a drug, and opens a new research avenue that requires further investigation to successfully develop mouse models that could simulate clinically important phenotypic characteristics of AD.

  11. A high resolution scanning fabry-perot for OSIRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bernal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the directives of the workshop on the interferometric mode of OSIRIS, the Mexican team has received support to ac- quire a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for OSIRIS. In this presentation we will try to define which Fabry-Perot will be selected as well as which filters need to be acquired. We will also discuss the acquisition software

  12. Poleward expansion of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus under climate change: implications for the spread of lyme disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Roy-Dufresne

    Full Text Available The white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus is an important reservoir host for Borrelia burgdorferi, the pathogen responsible for Lyme disease, and its distribution is expanding northward. We used an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis to identify the climatic factors associated with the distribution shift of the white-footed mouse over the last 30 years at the northern edge of its range, and modeled its current and potential future (2050 distributions using the platform BIOMOD. A mild and shorter winter is favouring the northern expansion of the white-footed mouse in Québec. With more favorable winter conditions projected by 2050, the distribution range of the white-footed mouse is expected to expand further northward by 3° latitude. We also show that today in southern Québec, the occurrence of B. burgdorferi is associated with high probability of presence of the white-footed mouse. Changes in the distribution of the white-footed mouse will likely alter the geographical range of B. burgdorferi and impact the public health in northern regions that have yet to be exposed to Lyme disease.

  13. Poleward expansion of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) under climate change: implications for the spread of lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Dufresne, Emilie; Logan, Travis; Simon, Julie A; Chmura, Gail L; Millien, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    The white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) is an important reservoir host for Borrelia burgdorferi, the pathogen responsible for Lyme disease, and its distribution is expanding northward. We used an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis to identify the climatic factors associated with the distribution shift of the white-footed mouse over the last 30 years at the northern edge of its range, and modeled its current and potential future (2050) distributions using the platform BIOMOD. A mild and shorter winter is favouring the northern expansion of the white-footed mouse in Québec. With more favorable winter conditions projected by 2050, the distribution range of the white-footed mouse is expected to expand further northward by 3° latitude. We also show that today in southern Québec, the occurrence of B. burgdorferi is associated with high probability of presence of the white-footed mouse. Changes in the distribution of the white-footed mouse will likely alter the geographical range of B. burgdorferi and impact the public health in northern regions that have yet to be exposed to Lyme disease.

  14. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy and localisation of globotriaosylceramide deposits in paraffin-embedded kidney tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Carmen; Leitão, Dina; Carneiro, Fátima; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2012-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipids, mostly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Proteinuric chronic kidney disease develops frequently, and recognition of Fabry nephropathy on a kidney biopsy may be the first clue to the underlying diagnosis. Since the accumulated glycosphingolipids are largely extracted by the paraffin-embedding procedure, the most characteristic feature of Fabry nephropathy on routine light microscopy (LM) is nonspecific cell vacuolization. To test whether residual Gb3 in kidney tissue might be exploited for the specific diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies of nine FD patients (one boy, four men, four women) and of a female carrier of a mild genetic mutation, with no evidence of Fabry nephropathy, were immunostained with an anti-Gb3 antibody. The adult biopsies were additionally co-stained with a lysosomal marker (anti-lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (anti-LAMP2) antibody). The distribution of Gb3 deposits was scored per cell type and compared to the histological scorings of glycosphingolipid inclusions on semi-thin sections. FD patients had residual Gb3 in all types of glomerular, tubular, interstitial and vascular kidney cells. The highest expression of LAMP2 was seen in tubular cells, but there were no meaningful associations between LAMP2 expression and prevalence of Gb3 deposits on different kidney cell types. The histological scorings of glycosphingolipid inclusions were relatively higher than the corresponding immunohistochemical scorings of Gb3 deposits. In the mildly affected female, Gb3 expression was limited to tubular cells, a pattern similar to controls. Gb3 immunostaining allows the specific diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy even in kidney biopsies routinely processed for LM.

  15. Huntington's disease mouse models online: high-resolution MRI images with stereotaxic templates for computational neuroanatomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Sawiak

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has proved to be an ideal modality for non-destructive and highly detailed assessment of structural morphology in biological tissues. Here we used MRI to make a dataset of ex vivo brains from two different rodent models of Huntington's disease (HD, the R6/2 line and the YAC 128 mouse. We are making the whole dataset (399 transgenic HD and wildtype (WT brains, from mice aged 9-80 weeks publicly available. These data will be useful, not only to investigators interested in the study of HD, but also to researchers of computational neuroanatomy who may not have access to such large datasets from mouse models. Here we demonstrate a number of uses of such data, for example to produce maps of grey and white matter and cortical thickness. As an example of how the library might provide insights in mouse models of HD, we calculated whole brain grey matter volumes across different age groups with different numbers of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeats in a fragment of the gene responsible for HD in humans. (The R6/2 dataset was obtained from an allelic series of R6/2 mice carrying a range of CAG repeat lengths between 109 and 464. This analysis revealed different trajectories for each fragment length. In particular there was a gradient of decreasing pathology with longer CAG repeat lengths, reflecting our previous findings with behavioural and histological studies. There will be no constraints placed on the use of the datasets included here. The original data will be easily and permanently accessible via the University of Cambridge data repository (http://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/243361.

  16. Changes in voiding behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biallosterski, B. T.; Prickaerts, J.; Rahnama’i, M. S.; de Wachter, S.; van Koeveringe, G. A.; Meriaux, C.

    2015-01-01

    Besides cognitive decline and behavioral alteration, urinary incontinence often occurs in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To determine whether the transgenic mouse model of AD, APP/PS1 (APPSL/PS1M146L) mouse, shows alteration of the urinary bladder function and anxiety, as for patients with AD, we examined the urinary marking behavior in relation to affective behavior. At 18 months of age voiding behavior of APP/PS1 and wild type (WT) mice was assessed by using a modified filter paper assay in combination with video tracing, with the cage divided into a center and corner zones. Anxiety-related behavior and locomotion were respectively tested in an elevated zero maze (EZM) and an open field (OF). The APP/PS1 mice urinated more in the center zone than the WT mice. The total volume of markings was significantly lower in the APP/PS1 mice. In both groups, the average volume of a marking in the corner zone was larger than in the center zone. In the EZM, the APP/PS1 mice spent less time in the open arms of the arena, considered as anxiogenic zones, than the WT mice. During the OF task, the APP/PS1 mice covered a longer distance than the WT mice. These findings show that the APP/PS1 mice have a different voiding behavior compared to the WT mice, i.e., urinating with small volumes and voiding in the center of the cage, and suggest that increased locomotor activity and anxiety-related behaviors are factors in the change in voiding pattern in the APP/PS1 mouse. PMID:26379542

  17. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms of

  18. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  19. Ophthalmic experience over 10 years in an observational nationwide Danish cohort of Fabry patients with access to enzyme replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Hans C.; Sandfeld, Lisbeth; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was offered from year 2001 to patients with Fabry disease. The ophthalmic experience was analysed, as part of a general 10-year status. METHODS: A retrospective observational series comprising 39 patients (25 females, 14 males) closely followed by the end...

  20. Gliovascular disruption and cognitive deficits in a mouse model with features of small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Philip R; Searcy, James L; Salvadores, Natalia; Scullion, Gillian; Chen, Guiquan; Lawson, Greig; Scott, Fiona; Bastin, Mark E; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Rajesh; Wood, Emma R; Smith, Colin; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Horsburgh, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major cause of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia. The pathophysiology of SVD is not well understood and is hampered by a limited range of relevant animal models. Here, we describe gliovascular alterations and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of sustained cerebral hypoperfusion with features of SVD (microinfarcts, hemorrhage, white matter disruption) induced by bilateral common carotid stenosis. Multiple features of SVD were determined on T2-weighted and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans and confirmed by pathologic assessment. These features, which were absent in sham controls, included multiple T2-hyperintense infarcts and T2-hypointense hemosiderin-like regions in subcortical nuclei plus increased cerebral atrophy compared with controls. Fractional anisotropy was also significantly reduced in several white matter structures including the corpus callosum. Investigation of gliovascular changes revealed a marked increase in microvessel diameter, vascular wall disruption, fibrinoid necrosis, hemorrhage, and blood-brain barrier alterations. Widespread reactive gliosis, including displacement of the astrocytic water channel, aquaporin 4, was observed. Hypoperfused mice also demonstrated deficits in spatial working and reference memory tasks. Overall, gliovascular disruption is a prominent feature of this mouse, which could provide a useful model for early-phase testing of potential SVD treatment strategies.

  1. Toll like receptor 4 mediates cell death in a mouse MPTP model of Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noelker, Carmen; Morel, Lydie; Lescot, Thomas; Osterloh, Anke; Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Breloer, Minka; Henze, Carmen; Depboylu, Candan; Skrzydelski, Delphine; Michel, Patrick P.; Dodel, Richard C.; Lu, Lixia; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Hunot, Stéphane; Hartmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In mammalians, toll-like receptors (TLR) signal-transduction pathways induce the expression of a variety of immune-response genes, including inflammatory cytokines. It is therefore plausible to assume that TLRs are mediators in glial cells triggering the release of cytokines that ultimately kill DA neurons in the substantia nigra in Parkinson disease (PD). Accordingly, recent data indicate that TLR4 is up-regulated by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in a mouse model of PD. Here, we wished to evaluate the role of TLR4 in the acute mouse MPTP model of PD: TLR4-deficient mice and wild-type littermates control mice were used for the acute administration way of MPTP or a corresponding volume of saline. We demonstrate that TLR4-deficient mice are less vulnerable to MPTP intoxication than wild-type mice and display a decreased number of Iba1+ and MHC II+ activated microglial cells after MPTP application, suggesting that the TLR4 pathway is involved in experimental PD. PMID:23462811

  2. Therapeutic potentials of human adipose-derived stem cells on the mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Soon; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Jin-Hwan; Park, Hyeong-Geun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Chang, Keun-A; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) using stem cells has long been the focus of many researchers, but the ideal therapeutic strategy has not yet been developed. The consistency and high reliability of the experimental results confirmed by animal models are considered to be a critical factor in the stability of stem cell transplantation for PD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the preventive and therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) for PD and was to identify the related factors to this therapeutic effect. The hASC were intravenously injected into the tail vein of a PD mouse model induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Consequently, the behavioral performances were significantly improved at 3 weeks after the injection of hASC. Additionally, dopaminergic neurons were rescued, the number of structure-modified mitochondria was decreased, and mitochondrial complex I activity was restored in the brains of the hASC-injected PD mouse model. Overall, this study underscores that intravenously transplanted hASC may have therapeutic potential for PD by recovering mitochondrial functions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sodium selenate regulates the brain ionome in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin; Zhu, Hua-Zhang; Wang, Bing-Tao; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Du, Xiu-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Jiang, Liang; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that imbalance of mineral metabolism may play an important role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. It was recently reported that selenium could reverse memory deficits in AD mouse model. We carried out multi-time-point ionome analysis to investigate the interactions among 15 elements in the brain by using a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD with/without high-dose sodium selenate supplementation. Except selenium, the majority of significantly changed elements showed a reduced level after 6-month selenate supplementation, especially iron whose levels were completely reversed to normal state at almost all examined time points. We then built the elemental correlation network for each time point. Significant and specific elemental correlations and correlation changes were identified, implying a highly complex and dynamic crosstalk between selenium and other elements during long-term supplementation with selenate. Finally, we measured the activities of two important anti-oxidative selenoenzymes, glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase, and found that they were remarkably increased in the cerebrum of selenate-treated mice, suggesting that selenoenzyme-mediated protection against oxidative stress might also be involved in the therapeutic effect of selenate in AD. Overall, this study should contribute to our understanding of the mechanism related to the potential use of selenate in AD treatment. PMID:28008954

  4. Expression of the Norrie disease gene (Ndp) in developing and adult mouse eye, ear, and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Smallwood, Philip; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The Norrie disease gene (Ndp) codes for a secreted protein, Norrin, that activates canonical Wnt signaling by binding to its receptor, Frizzled-4. This signaling system is required for normal vascular development in the retina and for vascular survival in the cochlea. In mammals, the pattern of Ndp expression beyond the retina is poorly defined due to the low abundance of Norrin mRNA and protein. Here we characterize Ndp expression during mouse development by studying a knock-in mouse that carries the coding sequence of human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) inserted at the Ndp locus (NdpAP). In the CNS, NdpAP expression is apparent by E10.5 and is dynamic and complex. The anatomically delimited regions of NdpAP expression observed prenatally in the CNS are replaced postnatally by widespread expression in astrocytes in the forebrain and midbrain, Bergman glia in the cerebellum, and Müller glia in the retina. In the developing and adult cochlea, NdpAP expression is closely associated with two densely vascularized regions, the stria vascularis and a capillary plexus between the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion. These observations suggest the possibility that Norrin may have developmental and/or homeostatic functions beyond the retina and cochlea. PMID:21055480

  5. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung W; Gerencser, Akos A; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R; Gibson, Bradford W; Nicholls, David G; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D

    2012-11-21

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months, and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to age-matched controls. No consistent bioenergetic deficiencies were detected in synaptosomes from the three models; only APP/PS cortical synaptosomes from 14-month-old mice showed an increase in respiration associated with proton leak. J20 mice were chosen for a highly stringent investigation of mitochondrial function and content. There were no significant differences in the quality of the synaptosomal preparations or the mitochondrial volume fraction. Furthermore, respiratory variables, calcium handling, and membrane potentials of synaptosomes from symptomatic J20 mice under calcium-imposed stress were not consistently impaired. The recovery of marker proteins during synaptosome preparation was the same, ruling out the possibility that the lack of functional bioenergetic defects in synaptosomes from J20 mice was due to the selective loss of damaged synaptosomes during sample preparation. Our results support the conclusion that the intrinsic bioenergetic capacities of presynaptic nerve terminals are maintained in these symptomatic AD mouse models.

  6. Oligomannan Prebiotic Attenuates Immunological, Clinical and Behavioral Symptoms in Mouse Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczi, Szilamér; Szegi, Krisztián; Winkler, Zsuzsanna; Barna, Teréz; Kovács, Krisztina J.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease shows increasing prevalence, however its pathomechanism and treatment is not fully resolved. Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrates which might provide an alternative to treat inflammatory conditions in the gut due to their positive effects either on the microbiome or through their direct effect on macrophages and mucosa. To test the protective effects of an oligomannan prebiotic, yeast cell wall mannooligosaccharide (MOS) was administered in dextran-sulphate-sodium (DSS)-induced mouse model of acute colitis. MOS reduced DSS-induced clinical- (weight loss, diarrhea) and histological scores (mucosal damage) as well as sickness-related anxiety. DSS treatment resulted in changes in colon microbiome with selective increase of Coliform bacteria. MOS administration attenuated colitis-related increase of Coliforms, normalized colonic muc2 expression and attenuated local expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1a, IL1b, IL6, KC, G-CSF and MCP1 as well as toll-like receptor TLR4 and NLRP3 inflammasome. Some of the protective effects of MOS were likely be mediated directly through local macrophages because MOS dose-dependently inhibited IL-1b and G-CSF induction following in vitro DSS challenge and IL1a, IL1b, G-SCF-, and IL6 increases after LPS treatment in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7. These results highlight oligomannan prebiotics as therapeutic functional food for testing in clinical trials. PMID:27658624

  7. Progranulin protects against amyloid β deposition and toxicity in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, S Sakura; Min, Sang-Won; Krabbe, Grietje; Wang, Chao; Zhou, Yungui; Asgarov, Rustam; Li, Yaqiao; Martens, Lauren H; Elia, Lisa P; Ward, Michael E; Mucke, Lennart; Farese, Robert V; Gan, Li

    2014-10-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the progranulin (PGRN) gene (GRN) causes familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and modulates an innate immune response in humans and in mouse models. GRN polymorphism may be linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of PGRN in AD pathogenesis is unknown. Here we show that PGRN inhibits amyloid β (Aβ) deposition. Selectively reducing microglial expression of PGRN in AD mouse models impaired phagocytosis, increased plaque load threefold and exacerbated cognitive deficits. Lentivirus-mediated PGRN overexpression lowered plaque load in AD mice with aggressive amyloid plaque pathology. Aβ plaque load correlated negatively with levels of hippocampal PGRN, showing the dose-dependent inhibitory effects of PGRN on plaque deposition. PGRN also protected against Aβ toxicity. Lentivirus-mediated PGRN overexpression prevented spatial memory deficits and hippocampal neuronal loss in AD mice. The protective effects of PGRN against Aβ deposition and toxicity have important therapeutic implications. We propose enhancing PGRN as a potential treatment for PGRN-deficient FTLD and AD.

  8. Assessment of photoacoustic computed tomography to classify tissue in a polycystic-kidney disease mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Gattone, Vincent H., II; Kruger, Robert A.; Stantz, Keith M.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate PCT Imaging technique to classify tissue and extract kidney cysts in pcy mice model of human adolescent nephronophthisis. Method: Four mice with late stages of nephronophthisis with polycystic kidney disease-PKD and one normal mouse were scanned in the PCT Small Animal Scanner. Both vivo and ex-vivo images of mice kidney were taken at wavelength from 680 nm to 940 nm. The ex-vivo PCT images were compared with histology photographs to check the sensitivity of detecting cysts. Histograms of kidney images were generated over slices and fitted to Gaussian-curve model for volumetric analysis. The portions of cysts in kidneys were estimated and kidney images were segmented by three different colors to present the distribution of different tissues. Result: A good correspondence between PCT imaging findings and PKD histology result was observed. Histogram curves from images of pcy kidneys and normal kidneys were fitted to Gaussian-curve model. Portions of cysts, parenchyma and area of high level hemoglobin were estimated according to the curve fit result. A growth of cysts associated with relatively volume decrease of parenchyma and tissues with high perfusion of hemoglobin was observed. Conclusion: The PCT enabled visualization of renal cysts for mouse model and had the potential for volumetric measurements of kidney.

  9. Bee venom and its component apamin as neuroprotective agents in a Parkinson disease mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarez-Fischer

    Full Text Available Bee venom has recently been suggested to possess beneficial effects in the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD. For instance, it has been observed that bilateral acupoint stimulation of lower hind limbs with bee venom was protective in the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of PD. In particular, a specific component of bee venom, apamin, has previously been shown to have protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in vitro. However, no information regarding a potential protective action of apamin in animal models of PD is available to date. The specific goals of the present study were to (i establish that the protective effect of bee venom for dopaminergic neurons is not restricted to acupoint stimulation, but can also be observed using a more conventional mode of administration and to (ii demonstrate that apamin can mimic the protective effects of a bee venom treatment on dopaminergic neurons. Using the chronic mouse model of MPTP/probenecid, we show that bee venom provides sustained protection in an animal model that mimics the chronic degenerative process of PD. Apamin, however, reproduced these protective effects only partially, suggesting that other components of bee venom enhance the protective action of the peptide.

  10. An economic Fabry-Perot wavelength reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Glenday, Alex; Latham, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements are key in studying exoplanets, and so are wavelength calibrators in PRV instruments. ThAr lamps offer an affordable but somewhat limited solution for the visible passband. Laser frequency combs are ideal calibrators, except the (still) narrow wavelength coverage and large price tag. White light Fabry-Perot (FP) calibrators offer frequency-comb like properties in a more affordable and less complicated package1. Using a commercial solid FP etalon and off-the shelf components we have constructed an economic FP calibrator suitable for observatories on a smaller budget.

  11. ACE overexpression in myelomonocytic cells: effect on a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya; Shah, Kandarp; Koronyo, Yosef; Bernstein, Ellen; Giani, Jorge F; Janjulia, Tea; Black, Keith L; Shi, Peng D; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Fuchs, Sebastien; Shen, Xiao Z; Bernstein, Kenneth E

    2014-07-01

    While it is well known that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure control, ACE also has effects on renal function, hematopoiesis, reproduction, and aspects of the immune response. ACE 10/10 mice overexpress ACE in myelomonocytic cells. Macrophages from these mice have an increased polarization towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that results in a very effective immune response to challenge by tumors or bacterial infection. In a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the ACE 10/10 phenotype provides significant protection against AD pathology, including reduced inflammation, reduced burden of the neurotoxic amyloid-β protein and preserved cognitive function. Taken together, these studies show that increased myelomonocytic ACE expression in mice alters the immune response to better defend against many different types of pathologic insult, including the cognitive decline observed in an animal model of AD.

  12. Chlamydophila abortus infection in the mouse: a useful model of the ovine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, M R; Buendía, A J; Del Rio, L; Ortega, N; Gallego, M C; Cuello, F; Navarro, J A; Sanchez, J; Salinas, J

    2009-03-16

    Chlamydophila (C.) abortus is an obligate intracellular bacterium able to colonize the placenta of several species of mammals, which may induce abortion in the last third of pregnancy. The infection affects mainly small ruminants resulting in major economic losses in farming industries worldwide. Furthermore, its zoonotic risk has been reported in pregnant farmers or abattoir workers. Mouse models have been widely used to study both the pathology of the disease and the role of immune cells in controlling infection. Moreover, this animal experimental model has been considered a useful tool to evaluate new vaccine candidates and adjuvants that could prevent abortion and reduce fetal death. Future studies using these models will provide and reveal information about the precise mechanisms in the immune response against C. abortus and will increase the knowledge about poorly understood issues such as chlamydial persistence.

  13. Inhibition of calpains improves memory and synaptic transmission in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchese, Fabrizio; Fa', Mauro; Liu, Shumin; Zhang, Hong; Hidalgo, Ariel; Schmidt, Stephen D; Yamaguchi, Hisako; Yoshii, Narihiko; Mathews, Paul M; Nixon, Ralph A; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-08-01

    Calpains are calcium-dependent enzymes that determine the fate of proteins through regulated proteolytic activity. Calpains have been linked to the modulation of memory and are key to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). When abnormally activated, calpains can also initiate degradation of proteins essential for neuronal survival. Here we show that calpain inhibition through E64, a cysteine protease inhibitor, and the highly specific calpain inhibitor BDA-410 restored normal synaptic function both in hippocampal cultures and in hippocampal slices from the APP/PS1 mouse, an animal model of AD. Calpain inhibition also improved spatial-working memory and associative fear memory in APP/PS1 mice. These beneficial effects of the calpain inhibitors were associated with restoration of normal phosphorylation levels of the transcription factor CREB and involved redistribution of the synaptic protein synapsin I. Thus, calpain inhibition may prove useful in the alleviation of memory loss in AD.

  14. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening.

  15. Dysfunctional kynurenine pathway metabolism in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Stachowski, Erin K; Amori, Laura; Guidetti, Paolo; Muchowski, Paul J; Schwarcz, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Elevated concentrations of neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation may play a causative role in Huntington's disease (HD). The brain levels of one of these compounds, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), are increased in both HD and several mouse models of the disease. In the present study, we examined this impairment in greater detail using the R6/2 mouse, a well-established animal model of HD. Initially, mutant and age-matched wild-type mice received an intrastriatal injection of (3)H-tryptophan to assess the acute, local de novo production of kynurenine, the immediate bioprecursor of 3-HK, in vivo. No effect of genotype was observed between 4 and 12 weeks of age. In contrast, intrastriatally applied (3)H-kynurenine resulted in significantly increased neosynthesis of (3)H-3-HK, but not other tritiated KP metabolites, in the R6/2 striatum. Subsequent ex vivo studies in striatal, cortical and cerebellar tissue revealed substantial increases in the activity of the biosynthetic enzyme of 3-HK, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and significant reductions in the activity of its degradative enzyme, kynureninase, in HD mice starting at 4 weeks of age. Decreased kynureninase activity was most evident in the cortex and preceded the increase in kynurenine 3-monooxygenase activity. The activity of other KP enzymes showed no consistent brain abnormalities in the mutant mice. These findings suggest that impairments in its immediate metabolic enzymes jointly account for the abnormally high brain levels of 3-HK in the R6/2 model of HD.

  16. Miglustat Reverts the Impairment of Synaptic Plasticity in a Mouse Model of NPC Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D’Arcangelo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C disease is an autosomal recessive storage disorder, characterized by abnormal sequestration of unesterified cholesterol within the late endolysosomal compartment of cells and accumulation of gangliosides and other sphingolipids. Progressive neurological deterioration and insurgence of symptoms like ataxia, seizure, and cognitive decline until severe dementia are pathognomonic features of the disease. Here, we studied synaptic plasticity phenomena and evaluated ERKs activation in the hippocampus of BALB/c NPC1−/− mice, a well described animal model of the disease. Our results demonstrated an impairment of both induction and maintenance of long term synaptic potentiation in NPC1−/− mouse slices, associated with the lack of ERKs phosphorylation. We then investigated the effects of Miglustat, a recent approved drug for the treatment of NPCD. We found that in vivo Miglustat administration in NPC1−/− mice was able to rescue synaptic plasticity deficits, to restore ERKs activation and to counteract hyperexcitability. Overall, these data indicate that Miglustat may be effective for treating the neurological deficits associated with NPCD, such as seizures and dementia.

  17. Inhibitory neuron and hippocampal circuit dysfunction in an aged mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Anupam Hazra

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, a decline in explicit memory is one of the earliest signs of disease and is associated with hippocampal dysfunction. Amyloid protein exerts a disruptive impact on neuronal function, but the specific effects on hippocampal network activity are not well known. In this study, fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging and extracellular and whole-cell electrophysiology were used on entorhinal cortical-hippocampal slice preparations to characterize hippocampal network activity in 12-16 month old female APPswe/PSEN1DeltaE9 (APdE9 mice mice. Aged APdE9 mice exhibited profound disruptions in dentate gyrus circuit activation. High frequency stimulation of the perforant pathway in the dentate gyrus (DG area of APdE9 mouse tissue evoked abnormally large field potential responses corresponding to the wider neural activation maps. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of the identified inhibitory interneurons in the molecular layer of DG revealed that they fail to reliably fire action potentials. Taken together, abnormal DG excitability and an inhibitory neuron failure to generate action potentials are suggested to be important contributors to the underlying cellular mechanisms of early-stage Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology.

  18. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  20. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

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    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  1. GDNF-transfected macrophages produce potent neuroprotective effects in Parkinson's disease mouse model.

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    Yuling Zhao

    Full Text Available The pathobiology of Parkinson's disease (PD is associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc projecting to the striatum. Currently, there are no treatments that can halt or reverse the course of PD; only palliative therapies, such as replacement strategies for missing neurotransmitters, exist. Thus, the successful brain delivery of neurotrophic factors that promote neuronal survival and reverse the disease progression is crucial. We demonstrated earlier systemically administered autologous macrophages can deliver nanoformulated antioxidant, catalase, to the SNpc providing potent anti-inflammatory effects in PD mouse models. Here we evaluated genetically-modified macrophages for active targeted brain delivery of glial cell-line derived neurotropic factor (GDNF. To capitalize on the beneficial properties afforded by alternatively activated macrophages, transfected with GDNF-encoded pDNA cells were further differentiated toward regenerative M2 phenotype. A systemic administration of GDNF-expressing macrophages significantly ameliorated neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in PD mice. Behavioral studies confirmed neuroprotective effects of the macrophage-based drug delivery system. One of the suggested mechanisms of therapeutic effects is the release of exosomes containing the expressed neurotropic factor followed by the efficient GDNF transfer to target neurons. Such formulations can serve as a new technology based on cell-mediated active delivery of therapeutic proteins that attenuate and reverse progression of PD, and ultimately provide hope for those patients who are already significantly disabled by the disease.

  2. BAFF blockade prevents anti-drug antibody formation in a mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Morel, Laurence; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies formed against the therapeutic protein are a life-threatening complication that arises during enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency; GAA). To provide an effective alternative to current practices, we investigated the capacity of anti-B-cell activating factor (BAFF) as a novel drug candidate to prevent antibody formation in a Pompe disease mouse model. A BAFF-neutralizing antibody was administered prophylactically and with maintenance doses in association with enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human GAA in Gaa(-/-) mice. BAFF blockade delayed antibody production and increased GAA activity within tissues with protection from anaphylaxis. Anti-BAFF also resolved antibody formation during an immune response and precluded the maturation of antibody secreting cells from entering the bone marrow compartment. This treatment modality may therefore be a viable alternative for the clinical management of antibody formation for Pompe disease and has potential use against antibody formation in other protein replacement therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cyclophilin D deficiency improves mitochondrial function and learning/memory in aging Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Heng; Guo, Lan; Zhang, Wensheng; Rydzewska, Monika; Yan, Shidu

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondrial stress is one of the early features of Alzheimer disease (AD). Mitochondrial Aβ has been linked to mitochondrial toxicity. Our recent study demonstrated that cyclophilin D (CypD) mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is an important mechanism for neuronal and synaptic stress induced by both Aβ and oxidative stress. In transgenic AD-type mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ (mAPP), CypD deficiency improves mitochondrial and synaptic function and learning/memory up to 12 months old. Here we provide evidence of the protective effects of CypD deficiency in aged AD mice (22-24 months). Cyp D deficient mAPP mice demonstrate less calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling, increased mitochondrial calcium uptake capacity, preserved mitochondrial respiratory function and improved spatial learning/memory even in old age (known to be the age for late stage AD pathology and synaptic dysfunction). These data demonstrate that abrogation of CypD results in persistent life-long protection against Aβ toxicity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, thereby suggesting that blockade of CypD may be of benefit for Alzheimer disease treatment.

  4. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Poliana C. M.; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Onofre-Oliveira, Paula; Malheiros, Jackeline M.; Tannus, Alberto; de Sousa, Paulo L.; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs). We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies. PMID:23798567

  5. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana C. M. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs. We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  6. Manifestation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Different Dietary Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera HI Fengler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, which are usually associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, are considerable health and economic issues due to the rapid increase of their prevalence in Western society. Histologically, the diseases are characterised by steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and if further progressed, fibrosis. Dietary-induced mouse models are widely used in investigations of the development and progression of NAFLD and NASH; these models attempt to mimic the histological and metabolic features of the human diseases. However, the majority of dietary mouse models fail to reflect the whole pathophysiological spectrum of NAFLD and NASH. Some models exhibit histological features similar to those seen in humans while lacking the metabolic context, while others resemble the metabolic conditions leading to NAFLD in humans but fail to mimic the whole histological spectrum, including progression from steatosis to liver fibrosis, and thus fail to mimic NASH. This review summarises the advantages and disadvantages of the different dietary-induced mouse models of NAFLD and NASH, with a focus on the genetic background of several commonly used wild-type mouse strains as well as gender and age, which influence the development and progression of these liver diseases.

  7. Protocol and methodology of the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients (sifap1) study: a prospective multicenter European study of 5,024 young stroke patients aged 18-55 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    Stroke in the young has not been thoroughly investigated with most previous studies based on a small number of patients from single centers. Furthermore, recent reports indicate that Fabry disease may be a significant cause for young stroke. The primary aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of Fabry disease in young stroke patients, while the secondary aim was to describe patterns of stroke in young patients.

  8. Disease severity and mortality can be independently regulated in a mouse model of experimental graft versus host disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo G Galvani

    Full Text Available Graft versus host disease (GVHD is the major limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT presenting high mortality and morbidity rates. However, the exact cause of death is not completely understood and does not correlate with specific clinical and histological parameters of disease. Here we show, by using a semi-allogeneic mouse model of GVHD, that mortality and morbidity can be experimentally separated. We injected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC from NOD2/CARD15-deficient donors into semi-allogeneic irradiated chimaeras and observed that recipients were protected from death. However, no protection was observed regarding clinical or pathological scores up to 20 days after transplantation. Protection from death was associated with decreased bacterial translocation, faster hematologic recovery and epithelial integrity maintenance despite mononuclear infiltration at day 20 post-GVHD induction with no skew towards different T helper phenotypes. The protected mice recovered from aGVHD and progressively reached scores compatible with healthy animals. Altogether, our data indicate that severity and mortality can be separate events providing a model to study transplant-related mortality.

  9. Augmented TLR2 Expression on Monocytes in both Human Kawasaki Disease and a Mouse Model of Coronary Arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    I-Chun Lin; Ho-Chang Kuo; Ying-Jui Lin; Feng-Shen Wang; Lin Wang; Shun-Chen Huang; Shao-Ju Chien; Chien-Fu Huang; Chih-Lu Wang; Hong-Ren Yu; Rong-Fu Chen; Yang, Kuender D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD) of unknown immunopathogenesis is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and the leading cause of acquired heart diseases in childhood. To search for a better strategy for the prevention and treatment of KD, this study compared and validated human KD immunopathogenesis in a mouse model of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced coronary arteritis. METHODS: Recruited subjects fulfilled the criteria of KD and were admitted for intravenous gamma globul...

  10. Responses to Environmental Enrichment Differ with Sex and Genotype in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Nigel I.; Valentina Carta; Stefan Milde; Elizabeth A. Skillings; Catherine J McAllister; Y L Mabel Ang; Alasdair Duguid; Nadeev Wijesuriya; Samira Mohd Afzal; Joe X Fernandes; Leong, T.W.; A Jennifer Morton

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Environmental enrichment (EE) in laboratory animals improves neurological function and motor/cognitive performance, and is proposed as a strategy for treating neurodegenerative diseases. EE has been investigated in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD), where increased social interaction, sensory stimulation, exploration, and physical activity improved survival. We have also shown previously that HD patients and R6/2 mice have disrupted circadian rhythms, treatment of ...

  11. Interleukin-18 deteriorates Fabry cardiomyopathy and contributes to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy in Fabry patients with GLA IVS4+919 G>A mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Lin; Chou, Shih-Jie; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Liu, Yung-Yang; Lu, Kai-Hsi; Li, Hsin-Yang; Sung, Yen-Jen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Chen, Yann-Jang; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Yu, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Rationale A high incidence of GLA IVS4+919 G>A mutation in patients with Fabry disease of the later-onset cardiac phenotype, has been reported in Taiwan. However, suitable biomarkers or potential therapeutic surrogates for Fabry cardiomyopathy (FC) in such patients under enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) remain unknown. Objective Using FC patients carrying IVS4+919 G>A mutation, we constructed an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based disease model to investigate the pathogenetic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in ERT-treated FC. Results and methods The iPSC-differentiated cardiomyocytes derived from FC-patients (FC-iPSC-CMs) carried IVS4+919 G>A mutation recapitulating FC characteristics, including low α-galactosidase A enzyme activity, cellular hypertrophy, and massive globotriaosylceramide accumulation. Microarray analysis revealed that interleukin-18 (IL-18), a pleiotropic cytokine involved in various myocardial diseases, was the most highly upregulated marker in FC-iPSC-CMs. Meanwhile, IL-18 levels were found to be significantly elevated in the culture media of FC-iPSC-CMs and patients’ sera. Notably, the serum IL-18 levels were highly paralleled with the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy in Fabry patients receiving ERT. Finally, using FC-iPSC-CMs as in vitro FC model, neutralization of IL-18 with specific antibodies combined with ERT synergistically reduced the secretion of IL-18 and the progression of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in FC-iPSC-CMs. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that cardiac IL-18 and circulating IL-18 are involved in the pathogenesis of FC and LVH. IL-18 may be a novel marker for evaluating ERT efficacy, and targeting IL-18 might be a potential adjunctive therapy combined with ERT for the treatment of advanced cardiomyopathy in FC patients with IVS4+919 G>A mutation. PMID:27888626

  12. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; da Cunha, Sandro Torrentes; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. METHODS To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. FINDINGS At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. MAIN CONCLUSIONS iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice. PMID:28767980

  13. Dysfunction of the CNS-heart axis in mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mielcarek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodelling and contractile dysfunction occur during both acute and chronic disease processes including the accumulation of insoluble aggregates of misfolded amyloid proteins that are typical features of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (HD. While HD has been described mainly as a neurological disease, multiple epidemiological studies have shown that HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure, and that this is the second highest cause of death. Given that huntingtin is ubiquitously expressed, cardiomyocytes may be at risk of an HD-related dysfunction. In mice, the forced expression of an expanded polyQ repeat under the control of a cardiac specific promoter led to severe heart failure followed by reduced lifespan. However the mechanism leading to cardiac dysfunction in the clinical and pre-clinical HD settings remains unknown. To unravel this mechanism, we employed the R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ150 knock-in mouse models of HD. We found that pre-symptomatic animals developed connexin-43 relocation and a significant deregulation of hypertrophic markers and Bdnf transcripts. In the symptomatic animals, pronounced functional changes were visualised by cardiac MRI revealing a contractile dysfunction, which might be a part of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM. This was accompanied by the re-expression of foetal genes, apoptotic cardiomyocyte loss and a moderate degree of interstitial fibrosis. To our surprise, we could identify neither mutant HTT aggregates in cardiac tissue nor a HD-specific transcriptional dysregulation, even at the end stage of disease. We postulate that the HD-related cardiomyopathy is caused by altered central autonomic pathways although the pathogenic effects of mutant HTT acting intrinsically in the heart may also be a contributing factor.

  14. Dysfunction of the CNS-heart axis in mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Michal; Inuabasi, Linda; Bondulich, Marie K; Muller, Thomas; Osborne, Georgina F; Franklin, Sophie A; Smith, Donna L; Neueder, Andreas; Rosinski, Jim; Rattray, Ivan; Protti, Andrea; Bates, Gillian P

    2014-08-01

    Cardiac remodelling and contractile dysfunction occur during both acute and chronic disease processes including the accumulation of insoluble aggregates of misfolded amyloid proteins that are typical features of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (HD). While HD has been described mainly as a neurological disease, multiple epidemiological studies have shown that HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure, and that this is the second highest cause of death. Given that huntingtin is ubiquitously expressed, cardiomyocytes may be at risk of an HD-related dysfunction. In mice, the forced expression of an expanded polyQ repeat under the control of a cardiac specific promoter led to severe heart failure followed by reduced lifespan. However the mechanism leading to cardiac dysfunction in the clinical and pre-clinical HD settings remains unknown. To unravel this mechanism, we employed the R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ150 knock-in mouse models of HD. We found that pre-symptomatic animals developed connexin-43 relocation and a significant deregulation of hypertrophic markers and Bdnf transcripts. In the symptomatic animals, pronounced functional changes were visualised by cardiac MRI revealing a contractile dysfunction, which might be a part of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This was accompanied by the re-expression of foetal genes, apoptotic cardiomyocyte loss and a moderate degree of interstitial fibrosis. To our surprise, we could identify neither mutant HTT aggregates in cardiac tissue nor a HD-specific transcriptional dysregulation, even at the end stage of disease. We postulate that the HD-related cardiomyopathy is caused by altered central autonomic pathways although the pathogenic effects of mutant HTT acting intrinsically in the heart may also be a contributing factor.

  15. Behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of Crohn's disease: Role of nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarpour, Pouria; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Khoshkish, Shayan; Fakhraei, Nahid; Salehi-Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Wang, Hongxing; Abbasi, Ata; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased psychiatric co-morbidities. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in inflammation and tissue injury in CD, and it may also play a central role in pathogenesis of the accompanying behavioral despair. This study investigated the role of the NO pathway in behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of CD. Colitis was induced by intrarectal (i.r.) injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (10mg TNBS in 50% ethanol). Forced swimming test (FST), pharmacological studies and tissues collection were performed 72 h following TNBS administration. To address a possible inflammatory origin for the behavioral despair following colitis induction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level was measured in both the hippocampal and colonic tissue samples. In parallel, hippocampal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrite level were evaluated. Pharmacological studies targeting the NO pathway were performed 30-60 min before behavioral test. Colitis was confirmed by increased colonic TNF-α level and microscopic score. Colitic mice demonstrated a significantly higher immobility time in the FST associated to a significant increase of hippocampal TNF-α, iNOS expression and nitrite content. Acute NOS inhibition using either Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) or aminoguanidine hydrochloride (a specific iNOS inhibitor) decreased the immobility time in colitic groups. Moreover, acute treatment with both NOS inhibitors decreased the TNF-α level and nitrite content in the hippocampal samples. This study suggests that the NO pathway may be involved in the behavioral effects in the mouse TNBS model of CD. These findings endow new insights into the gut-brain communication during the development of colonic inflammation, which may ultimately lead to improved therapeutic strategies to combat behavior changes associated with gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. Whole-food diet worsened cognitive dysfunction in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Matthew D; Winocur, Gordon; Bazinet, Richard P; Ma, David W L; Greenwood, Carol E

    2015-01-01

    Food combinations have been associated with lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that a combination whole-food diet containing freeze-dried fish, vegetables, and fruits would improve cognitive function in TgCRND8 mice by modulating brain insulin signaling and neuroinflammation. Cognitive function was assessed by a comprehensive battery of tasks adapted to the Morris water maze. Unexpectedly, a "Diet × Transgene" interaction was observed in which transgenic animals fed the whole-food diet exhibited even worse cognitive function than their transgenic counterparts fed the control diet on tests of spatial memory (p < 0.01) and strategic rule learning (p = 0.034). These behavioral deficits coincided with higher hippocampal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (p = 0.013). There were no differences in cortical amyloid-β peptide species according to diet. These results indicate that a dietary profile identified from epidemiologic studies exacerbated cognitive dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We suggest that normally adaptive cellular responses to dietary phytochemicals were impaired by amyloid-beta deposition leading to increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and behavioral deficits.

  17. REAC technology modifies pathological neuroinflammation and motor behaviour in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Lorenzini; Alessandro, Giuliani; Sandra, Sivilia; Antonio, Baldassarro Vito; Mercedes, Fernandez; Matteo, Lotti Margotti; Luciana, Giardino; Vania, Fontani; Salvatore, Rinaldi; Laura, Calzà

    2016-01-01

    The search for new therapeutic approaches to Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major goal in medicine and society, also due to the impressive economic and social costs of this disease. In this scenario, biotechnologies play an important role. Here, it is demonstrated that the Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyer (REAC), an innovative technology platform for neuro- and bio-modulation, used according to the neuro-regenerative protocol (RGN-N), significantly increases astroglial reaction around the amyloid plaques in an AD mouse model, as evaluated by GFAP-immunoreactivity, and reduces microglia-associated neuroinflammation markers, as evaluated by Iba1-immunoreactivity and mRNA expression level of inflammatory cytokines TREM. IL1beta, iNOS and MRC1 were not affected neither by the genotype or by REAC RGN-N treatment. Also observed was an increase in locomotion in treated animals. The study was performed in 24-month-old male Tg2576 mice and age-matching wild-type animals, tested for Y-maze, contextual fear conditioning and locomotion immediately after the end of a specific REAC treatment administered for 15 hours/day for 15 days. These results demonstrated that REAC RGN-N treatment modifies pathological neuroinflammation, and mitigates part of the complex motor behaviour alterations observed in very old Tg2576 mice. PMID:27775040

  18. Progressive neurologic and somatic disease in a novel mouse model of human mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Marcó

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPSIIIC is a severe lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency in activity of the transmembrane enzyme heparan-α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT that catalyses the N-acetylation of α-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate. Enzyme deficiency causes abnormal substrate accumulation in lysosomes, leading to progressive and severe neurodegeneration, somatic pathology and early death. There is no cure for MPSIIIC, and development of new therapies is challenging because of the unfeasibility of cross-correction. In this study, we generated a new mouse model of MPSIIIC by targeted disruption of the Hgsnat gene. Successful targeting left LacZ expression under control of the Hgsnat promoter, allowing investigation into sites of endogenous expression, which was particularly prominent in the CNS, but was also detectable in peripheral organs. Signs of CNS storage pathology, including glycosaminoglycan accumulation, lysosomal distension, lysosomal dysfunction and neuroinflammation were detected in 2-month-old animals and progressed with age. Glycosaminoglycan accumulation and ultrastructural changes were also observed in most somatic organs, but lysosomal pathology seemed most severe in liver. Furthermore, HGSNAT-deficient mice had altered locomotor and exploratory activity and shortened lifespan. Hence, this animal model recapitulates human MPSIIIC and provides a useful tool for the study of disease physiopathology and the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  19. The mouse mutation muscle deficient (mdf) is characterized by a progressive motoneuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, S; Poirier, C; Dreyfus, P A

    1995-11-01

    Muscle deficient (mdf) is an autosomal-recessive mutation mapped to mouse chromosome 19. The clinical phenotype and the muscle histopathology, briefly described in 1980, and the nervous system histopathology are detailed in the present study. Homozygotes develop a posterior waddle at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Soon thereafter, the hindlimbs become paralyzed and weakness appears in forelimbs, leading to a serious disability. The disease progresses slowly and the mean lifespan is reduced to 8 months. Skeletal muscles exhibit a neurogenic atrophy with signs of reinnervation. Peripheral nerves display axonal degeneration. Neurons within the spinal cord ventral horn, and some motor nuclei of the brain stem, are affected by a cytoplasmic vacuolar degeneration. Ascending and descending spinal cord tracts appear normal. An astrogliosis, restricted to the ventral horn of the spinal cord, occurs in mdf/mdf mice of 10 weeks of age. These clinical and histological features are indicative of a progressive motor neuronopathy. Among the murine spinal muscular atrophies, the programmed cell death of the mdf motoneurons is morphologically similar to wobbler. Because of the long time course, the mdf mutation may represent a valuable tool for understanding juvenile motoneuron diseases with chronic evolution, even though the murine locus is not syntenic with the human ones.

  20. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  1. Computed tomography of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease using diffraction enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, D.M.; Miller, L.; Benveniste, H.; Dilmanian, A.; Kritzer, M.; Zhong, Z.

    2009-03-19

    Our understanding of early development in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clouded by the scale at which the disease progresses; amyloid beta (A{beta}) plaques, a hallmark feature of AD, are small ({approx} 50 {micro}m) and low contrast in diagnostic clinical imaging techniques. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), a phase contrast x-ray imaging technique, has greater soft tissue contrast than conventional radiography and generates higher resolution images than magnetic resonance microimaging. Thus, in this proof of principle study, DEI in micro-CT mode was performed on the brains of AD-model mice to determine if DEI can visualize A{beta} plaques. Results revealed small nodules in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain. Histology confirmed that the features seen in the DEI images of the brain were A{beta} plaques. Several anatomical structures, including hippocampal subregions and white matter tracks, were also observed. Thus, DEI has strong promise in early diagnosis of AD, as well as general studies of the mouse brain.

  2. Effects of Chung-Pae Inhalation Therapy on a Mouse Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Joon-Ho; Lee, Beom-Joon; Jung, Hee Jae; Kim, Kwan-Il; Choi, Jun-Yong; Joo, Myungsoo; Jung, Sung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Chung-pae (CP) inhalation therapy is a method frequently used in Korea to treat lung disease, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study investigated the effects of CP inhalation on a COPD animal model. C57BL/6 mice received porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alternately three times for 3 weeks to induce COPD. Then, CP (5 or 20 mg/kg) was administered every 2 h after the final LPS administration. The effect of CP was evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis, histological analysis of lung tissue, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of mRNA of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, IL-6, and tumor growth factor- (TGF-) β. Intratracheal CP administration reduced the number of leukocytes and neutrophils in BAL fluid, inhibited the histological appearance of lung damage, and decreased the mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and TGF-β. Intratracheal CP administration effectively decreased the chronic inflammation and pathological changes in a PPE- and LPS-induced COPD mouse model. Therefore, we suggest that CP is a promising strategy for COPD.

  3. Central insulin dysregulation and energy dyshomeostasis in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Ramon; Tran, An; Ishimwe, Egide; Denner, Larry; Dave, Nikhil; Oddo, Salvatore; Dineley, Kelly T

    2017-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. While the causes of AD are not known, several risk factors have been identified. Among these, type two diabetes (T2D), a chronic metabolic disease, is one of the most prevalent risk factors for AD. Insulin resistance, which is associated with T2D, is defined as diminished or absent insulin signaling and is reflected by peripheral blood hyperglycemia and impaired glucose clearance. In this study, we used complementary approaches to probe for peripheral insulin resistance, central nervous system (CNS) insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis in Tg2576 and 3xTg-AD mice, two widely used animal models of AD. We report that CNS insulin signaling abnormalities are evident months before peripheral insulin resistance. In addition, we find that brain energy metabolism is differentially altered in both mouse models, with 3xTg-AD mice showing more extensive changes. Collectively, our data suggest that early AD may reflect engagement of different signaling networks that influence CNS metabolism, which in turn may alter peripheral insulin signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. IFN-{gamma} enhances neurogenesis in wild-type mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Rona; Nemirovsky, Anna; Harpaz, Idan

    2008-01-01

    the spatial learning and memory performance of the animals. In older mice, the effect of IFN-gamma is more pronounced in both wild-type mice and mice with Alzheimer's-like disease and is associated with neuroprotection. In addition, IFN-gamma reverses the increase in oligodendrogenesis observed in a mouse...... model of Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that limited amounts of IFN-gamma in the brain shape the neuropoietic milieu to enhance neurogenesis, possibly representing the normal function of the immune system in controlling brain inflammation and repair.-Baron, R., Nemirovsky, A., Harpaz, I., Cohen, H......., Owens, T., Monsonego, A. IFN-gamma enhances neurogenesis in wild-type mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease....

  5. EGFR inhibitor erlotinib delays disease progression but does not extend survival in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Le Pichon

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive paralysis due to motor neuron death. Several lines of published evidence suggested that inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling might protect neurons from degeneration. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we treated the SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS with erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor clinically approved for oncology indications. Although erlotinib failed to extend ALS mouse survival it did provide a modest but significant delay in the onset of multiple behavioral measures of disease progression. However, given the lack of protection of motor neuron synapses and the lack of survival extension, the small benefits observed after erlotinib treatment appear purely symptomatic, with no modification of disease course.

  6. Identification of age- and disease-related alterations in circulating miRNAs in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eGarza-Manero

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by the progressive decline of memory and cognition. Histopathologically, two main hallmarks have been identified in AD: amyloid-β peptide extracellular neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles formed by posttranslational modified tau protein. A definitive diagnosis can only be achieved after the post mortem verification of the histological mentioned alterations. Therefore the development of biomarkers that allow an early diagnosis and/or predict disease progression is imperative. The prospect of a blood-based biomarker is possible with the finding of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs of 22-25 nucleotides length that regulate mRNA translation rate. miRNAs travel through blood and recent studies performed in potential AD cases suggest the possibility of finding pathology-associated differences in circulating miRNA levels that may serve to assist in early diagnosis of the disease. However, these studies analyzed samples at a single time-point, limiting the use of miRNAs as biomarkers in AD progression. In this study we evaluated miRNA levels in plasma samples at different time-points of the evolution of an AD-like pathology in a transgenic mouse model of the disease (3xTg-AD. We performed multiplex qRT-PCR and compared the plasmatic levels of 84 miRNAs previously associated to central nervous system development and disease. No significant differences were detected between WT and transgenic young mice. However, age-related significant changes in miRNA abundance were observed for both WT and transgenic mice, and some of these were specific for the 3xTg-AD. In agreement, variations in the levels of particular miRNAs were identified between WT and transgenic old mice thus suggesting that the age-dependent evolution of the AD-like pathology, rather than the presence and expression of the transgenes, modifies the circulating miRNA levels in

  7. Fabry-Perot resonance of water waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couston, Louis-Alexandre; Guo, Qiuchen; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-10-01

    We show that significant water wave amplification is obtained in a water resonator consisting of two spatially separated patches of small-amplitude sinusoidal corrugations on an otherwise flat seabed. The corrugations reflect the incident waves according to the so-called Bragg reflection mechanism, and the distance between the two sets controls whether the trapped reflected waves experience constructive or destructive interference within the resonator. The resulting amplification or suppression is enhanced with increasing number of ripples and is most effective for specific resonator lengths and at the Bragg frequency, which is determined by the corrugation period. Our analysis draws on the analogous mechanism that occurs between two partially reflecting mirrors in optics, a phenomenon named after its discoverers Charles Fabry and Alfred Perot.

  8. Line-imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; Hemsing, W.F.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    A method for measuring the velocity history of a line element on a shock-loaded solid has been demonstrated. Light from single-frequency laser is focused through a cylindrical lens to a line on a moving target. The return Doppler-shifted image is passed through a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Because only specific combinations of incident light angle and frequency can pass through the interferometer the output is an incomplete image of the moving target appearing as a set of fringes. This image is focused onto an electronic streak camera and swept in time. The fringe pattern changes with time as the target surface moves, allowing determination of velocity for each point on the target that forms a fringe. Because the velocity can only be measured at the fringe positions, it is necessary to use an interpolating polynomial to obtain a continuous function of time and velocity along the sampled lien. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  9. An estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia mouse model recapitulating human disease progression and genetic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Almomen, Aliyah; Wee, Yin Shen; Jarboe, Elke A; Peterson, C Matthew; Janát-Amsbury, Margit M

    2015-07-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia (EH) is a condition originating from uterine endometrial glands undergoing disordered proliferation including the risk to progress to endometrial adenocarcinoma. In recent years, a steady increase in EH cases among younger women of reproductive age accentuates the demand of therapeutic alternatives, which emphasizes that an improved disease model for therapeutic agents evaluation is concurrently desired. Here, a new hormone-induced EH mouse model was developed using a subcutaneous estradiol (E2)-sustained releasing pellet, which elevates the serum E2 level in mice, closely mimicking the effect known as estrogen dominance with underlying, pathological E2 levels in patients. The onset and progression of EH generated within this model recapitulate a clinically relevant, pathological transformation, beginning with disordered proliferation developing to simple EH, advancing to atypical EH, and then progressing to precancerous stages, all following a chronologic manner. Although a general increase in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR) expression occurred after E2 expression, a total loss in PR was noted in some endometrial glands as disease advanced to simple EH. Furthermore, estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the nucleus of endometrial cells was reduced in disordered proliferation and increased when EH progressed to atypical EH and precancerous stages. This EH model also resembles other pathological patterns found in human disease such as leukocytic infiltration, genetic aberrations in β-catenin, and joint phosphatase and tensin homolog/paired box gene 2 (PTEN/PAX2) silencing. In summary, this new and comprehensively characterized EH model is cost-effective, easily reproducible, and may serve as a tool for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents and facilitate further investigation of EH.

  10. Pharmacological Inhibition of PKCθ Counteracts Muscle Disease in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marrocco

    2017-02-01

    Research in context: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle disease affecting 1:3500 male births. DMD is caused by a mutation in dystrophin gene, coding for a protein required for skeletal and cardiac muscle integrity. Lack of a functional dystrophin is primarily responsible for the muscle eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage, observed in dystrophic muscle. However, inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of DMD. Glucocorticoids, which have anti-inflammatory properties, are being used to treat DMD with some success; however, long term treatment with these drugs induces muscle atrophy and wasting, outweighing their benefit. The identification of specific targets for anti-inflammatory therapies is one of the ongoing therapeutic options. Although blunting inflammation would not be a “cure” for the disease, the emerging clue is that multiple strategies, addressing different aspects of the pathology, which may eventually converge, may be successful. In this context, we previously showed that genetic ablation of Protein Kinase C θ (PKCθ, an enzyme known to be involved in immune response, in mdx, the mouse model of DMD, improves muscle healing and regeneration, preventing massive inflammation. To establish whether pharmacological targeting of PKCθ in DMD can be proposed as a therapeutic option, in this study we treated young mdx mice with the PKCθ inhibitor Compound 20 (C20. We show that C20 treatment led to a significant reduction in muscle damage associated with reduced immune cells infiltration, reduced inflammatory pathways activation, and maintained muscle regeneration. Importantly, C20 treatment is efficient in recovering muscle performance in mdx mice, by preserving muscle integrity. Together, these results provide proof of principle that pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ in DMD can be considered an attractive strategy to modulate immune response and prevent the progression of the disease.

  11. The many facets of the Fabry-Perot

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Soto, Luis L; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    We address the response, both in amplitude and intensity, of a Fabry-Perot from a variety of viewpoints. These complementary pictures conspire to achieve a comprehensive and consistent theory of the operation of this system.

  12. Pharmacological Inhibition of PKCθ Counteracts Muscle Disease in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, V; Fiore, P; Benedetti, A; Pisu, S; Rizzuto, E; Musarò, A; Madaro, L; Lozanoska-Ochser, B; Bouché, M

    2017-02-01

    Inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle disease caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. We previously showed that genetic ablation of Protein Kinase C θ (PKCθ) in mdx, the mouse model of DMD, improves muscle healing and regeneration, preventing massive inflammation. To establish whether pharmacological targeting of PKCθ in DMD can be proposed as a therapeutic option, in this study we treated young mdx mice with the PKCθ inhibitor Compound 20 (C20). We show that C20 treatment led to a significant reduction in muscle damage associated with reduced immune cells infiltration, reduced inflammatory pathways activation, and maintained muscle regeneration. Importantly, C20 treatment is efficient in recovering muscle performance in mdx mice, by preserving muscle integrity. Together, these results provide proof of principle that pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ in DMD can be considered an attractive strategy to modulate immune response and prevent the progression of the disease. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle disease affecting 1:3500 male births. DMD is caused by a mutation in dystrophin gene, coding for a protein required for skeletal and cardiac muscle integrity. Lack of a functional dystrophin is primarily responsible for the muscle eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage, observed in dystrophic muscle. However, inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of DMD. Glucocorticoids, which have anti-inflammatory properties, are being used to treat DMD with some success; however, long term treatment with these drugs induces muscle atrophy and wasting, outweighing their benefit. The identification of specific targets for anti-inflammatory therapies is one of the ongoing therapeutic options. Although blunting inflammation would not be a "cure" for the disease, the emerging clue is that multiple strategies, addressing different aspects of the pathology

  13. Structural Changes in Synapses in the Hippocampus of a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Aß amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderman, Andreas; Jensen, George Bach; West, Mark

     This project examines the extent to which synaptic morphology is altered by the gradual in vivo build up of beta amyloid (Aß) protein in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) Aß amyloidosis. It constitutes a test of the amyloid cascade hypothesis for the development of Alzheimer......'s Disease (AD), which, in its extended form, predicts that alterations in synapses during the early stages of the disease ultimately lead to the development of plaques, tangles and neuron death.              ...

  14. Contribution of complement activation pathways to neuropathology differs among mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Yuko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement proteins and activation products have been found associated with neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, a C5a receptor antagonist was shown to suppress neuropathology in two murine models of AD, Tg2576 and 3xTg. Previously, a genetic deficiency of C1q in the Tg2576 mouse model showed an accumulation of fibrillar plaques similar to the complement sufficient Tg2576, but reactive glia were significantly decreased and neuronal integrity was improved suggesting detrimental consequences for complement activation in AD. The goal of this study was to define the role of the classical complement activation pathway in the progression of pathology in the 3xTg mouse that develops tangles in addition to fibrillar plaques (more closely reflecting human AD pathology and to assess the influence of complement in a model of AD with a higher level of complement hemolytic activity. Methods 3xTg mice deficient in C1q (3xTgQ-/- were generated, and both 3xTg and 3xTgQ-/- were backcrossed to the BUB mouse strain which has higher in vitro hemolytic complement activity. Mice were aged and perfused, and brain sections stained for pathological markers or analyzed for proinflammatory marker expression. Results 3xTgQ-/- mice showed similar amounts of fibrillar amyloid, reactive glia and hyperphosphorylated tau as the C1q-sufficient 3xTg at the ages analyzed. However, 3xTg and 3xTgQ-/- on the BUB background developed pathology earlier than on the original 3xTg background, although the presence of C1q had no effect on neuropathological and pro-inflammatory markers. In contrast to that seen in other transgenic models of AD, C1q, C4 and C3 immunoreactivity was undetectable on the plaques of 3xTg in any background, although C3 was associated with reactive astrocytes surrounding the plaques. Importantly, properdin a component of the alternative complement pathway was associated with plaques in all models. Conclusions In contrast to

  15. Neuritin attenuates cognitive function impairments in tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoori Choi

    Full Text Available Neuritin, also known as CPG15, is a neurotrophic factor that was initially discovered in a screen to identify genes involved in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Neuritin plays multiple roles in the process of neural development and synaptic plasticity, although its binding receptor(s and downstream signaling effectors remain unclear. In this study, we found that the cortical and hippocampal expression of neuritin is reduced in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients and demonstrated that viral-mediated expression of neuritin in the dentate gyrus of 13-month-old Tg2576 mice, an AD animal model, attenuated a deficit in learning and memory as assessed by a Morris water maze test. We also found that neuritin restored the reduction in dendritic spine density and the maturity of individual spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures prepared from Tg2576 mice. It was also shown that viral-mediated expression of neuritin in the dentate gyrus of 7-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats increased neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Taken together, our results demonstrate that neuritin restores the reduction in dendritic spine density and the maturity of individual spines in primary hippocampal neurons from Tg2576 neurons, and also attenuates cognitive function deficits in Tg2576 mouse model of AD, suggesting that neuritin possesses a therapeutic potential for AD.

  16. Chemical Control of Grafted Human PSC-Derived Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuejun; Xiong, Man; Dong, Yi; Haberman, Alexander; Cao, Jingyuan; Liu, Huisheng; Zhou, Wenhao; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived neurons is a promising avenue for treating disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). Precise control over engrafted cell activity is highly desired, as cells do not always integrate properly into host circuitry and can cause suboptimal graft function or undesired outcomes. Here, we show tunable rescue of motor function in a mouse model of PD, following transplantation of human midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons differentiated from hPSCs engineered to express DREADDs (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug). Administering clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) enabled precise DREADD-dependent stimulation or inhibition of engrafted neurons, revealing D1 receptor-dependent regulation of host neuronal circuitry by engrafted cells. Transplanted cells rescued motor defects, which could be reversed or enhanced by CNO-based control of graft function, and activating engrafted cells drives behavioral changes in transplanted mice. These results highlight the ability to exogenously and noninvasively control and refine therapeutic outcomes following cell transplantation.

  17. Data mining strategies to improve multiplex microbead immunoassay tolerance in a mouse model of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Akshay; Ravindran, Resmi; Mannepalli, Soujanya; Vang, Daniel; Luciw, Paul A; Hogarth, Michael; Khan, Imran H; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex methodologies, especially those with high-throughput capabilities generate large volumes of data. Accumulation of such data (e.g., genomics, proteomics, metabolomics etc.) is fast becoming more common and thus requires the development and implementation of effective data mining strategies designed for biological and clinical applications. Multiplex microbead immunoassay (MMIA), on xMAP or MagPix platform (Luminex), which is amenable to automation, offers a major advantage over conventional methods such as Western blot or ELISA, for increasing the efficiencies in serodiagnosis of infectious diseases. MMIA allows detection of antibodies and/or antigens efficiently for a wide range of infectious agents simultaneously in host blood samples, in one reaction vessel. In the process, MMIA generates large volumes of data. In this report we demonstrate the application of data mining tools on how the inherent large volume data can improve the assay tolerance (measured in terms of sensitivity and specificity) by analysis of experimental data accumulated over a span of two years. The combination of prior knowledge with machine learning tools provides an efficient approach to improve the diagnostic power of the assay in a continuous basis. Furthermore, this study provides an in-depth knowledge base to study pathological trends of infectious agents in mouse colonies on a multivariate scale. Data mining techniques using serodetection of infections in mice, developed in this study, can be used as a general model for more complex applications in epidemiology and clinical translational research.

  18. Immunotherapy Added to Antibiotic Treatment Reduces Relapse of Disease in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourik, Bas C; Leenen, Pieter J M; de Knegt, Gerjo J; Huizinga, Ruth; van der Eerden, Bram C J; Wang, Jinshan; Krois, Charles R; Napoli, Joseph L; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-02-01

    Immune-modulating drugs that target myeloid-derived suppressor cells or stimulate natural killer T cells have been shown to reduce mycobacterial loads in tuberculosis (TB). We aimed to determine if a combination of these drugs as adjunct immunotherapy to conventional antibiotic treatment could also increase therapeutic efficacy against TB. In our model of pulmonary TB in mice, we applied treatment with isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide for 13 weeks alone or combined with immunotherapy consisting of all-trans retinoic acid, 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D3, and α-galactosylceramide. Outcome parameters were mycobacterial load during treatment (therapeutic activity) and 13 weeks after termination of treatment (therapeutic efficacy). Moreover, cellular changes were analyzed using flow cytometry and cytokine expression was assessed at the mRNA and protein levels. Addition of immunotherapy was associated with lower mycobacterial loads after 5 weeks of treatment and significantly reduced relapse of disease after a shortened 13-week treatment course compared with antibiotic treatment alone. This was accompanied by reduced accumulation of immature myeloid cells in the lungs at the end of treatment and increased TNF-α protein levels throughout the treatment period. We demonstrate, in a mouse model of pulmonary TB, that immunotherapy consisting of three clinically approved drugs can improve the therapeutic efficacy of standard antibiotic treatment.

  19. Reduced thermal sensitivity and increased opioidergic tone in the TASTPM mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Yahyah; Pitcher, Thomas; Simeoli, Raffaele; Ballard, Clive; Malcangio, Marzia

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are in susceptible patient groups in which pain is an important clinical issue that is often underdiagnosed. However, it is unclear whether decreased pain complaints in patients with AD result from elevated pain tolerance or an impaired ability to communicate sensations. Here, we explored if AD-related pathology is present in key regions of the pain pathway and assessed whether nociceptive thresholds to acute noxious stimulation are altered in the double-mutant APPswe × PS1.M146V (TASTPM) transgenic mouse model of AD. TASTPM mice exhibited an age-dependant cognitive deficit at the age of 6 months, but not at 4 months, a deficit that was accompanied by amyloid plaques in the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. In the spinal cord, β-amyloid (APP/Aβ) immunoreactivity was observed in dorsal and ventral horn neurons, and the expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) was significantly reduced, while the expression of the inhibitory peptides enkephalins was increased in TASTPM dorsal horn, consistent with an increased inhibitory tone. TASTPM mice displayed reduced sensitivity to acute noxious heat, which was reversed by naloxone, an opioid antagonist. This study suggests that increased inhibition and decreased excitation in the spinal cord may be responsible for the reduced thermal sensitivity associated with AD-related pathology.

  20. Altered microglial copper homeostasis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiqiang; White, Carine; Lee, Jaekwon; Peterson, Troy S; Bush, Ashley I; Sun, Grace Y; Weisman, Gary A; Petris, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration associated with the aggregation and deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ(40) and Aβ(42) ) peptide in senile plaques. Recent studies suggest that copper may play an important role in AD pathology. Copper concentrations are elevated in amyloid plaques and copper binds with high affinity to the Aβ peptide and promotes Aβ oligomerization and neurotoxicity. Despite this connection between copper and AD, it is unknown whether the expression of proteins involved in regulating copper homeostasis is altered in this disorder. In this study, we demonstrate that the copper transporting P-type ATPase, ATP7A, is highly expressed in activated microglial cells that are specifically clustered around amyloid plaques in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD. Using a cultured microglial cell line, ATP7A expression was found to be increased by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma, but not by TNF-α or IL-1β. Interferon-gamma also elicited marked changes in copper homeostasis, including copper-dependent trafficking of ATP7A from the Golgi to cytoplasmic vesicles, increased copper uptake and elevated expression of the CTR1 copper importer. These findings suggest that pro-inflammatory conditions associated with AD cause marked changes in microglial copper trafficking, which may underlie the changes in copper homeostasis in AD. It is concluded that copper sequestration by microglia may provide a neuroprotective mechanism in AD.

  1. Ret is essential to mediate GDNF's neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effect in a Parkinson disease mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkut, Anja; Tillack, Karsten; Meka, Durga P; Schulz, Jorg B; Kügler, Sebastian; Kramer, Edgar R

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival and regeneration-promoting factor for dopaminergic neurons in cell and animal models of Parkinson disease (PD). GDNF is currently tested in clinical trials on PD patients with so far inconclusive results. The receptor tyrosine kinase Ret is the canonical GDNF receptor, but several alternative GDNF receptors have been proposed, raising the question of which signaling receptor mediates here the beneficial GDNF effects. To address this question we overexpressed GDNF in the striatum of mice deficient for Ret in dopaminergic neurons and subsequently challenged these mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Strikingly, in this established PD mouse model, the absence of Ret completely abolished GDNF's neuroprotective and regenerative effect on the midbrain dopaminergic system. This establishes Ret signaling as absolutely required for GDNF's effects to prevent and compensate dopaminergic system degeneration and suggests Ret activation as the primary target of GDNF therapy in PD. PMID:27607574

  2. LDLR expression and localization are altered in mouse and human cell culture models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F Abisambra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. The major molecular risk factor for late-onset AD is expression of the epsilon-4 allele of apolipoprotein E (apoE, the major cholesterol transporter in the brain. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR has the highest affinity for apoE and plays an important role in brain cholesterol metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RT-PCR and western blotting techniques we found that over-expression of APP caused increases in both LDLR mRNA and protein levels in APP transfected H4 neuroglioma cells compared to H4 controls. Furthermore, immunohistochemical experiments showed aberrant localization of LDLR in H4-APP neuroglioma cells, Abeta-treated primary neurons, and in the PSAPP transgenic mouse model of AD. Finally, immunofluorescent staining of LDLR and of gamma- and alpha-tubulin showed a change in LDLR localization preferentially away from the plasma membrane that was paralleled by and likely the result of a disruption of the microtubule-organizing center and associated microtubule network. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that increased APP expression and Abeta exposure alters microtubule function, leading to reduced transport of LDLR to the plasma membrane. Consequent deleterious effects on apoE uptake and function will have implications for AD pathogenesis and/or progression.

  3. Gene expression profile of amyloid beta protein-injected mouse model for Alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-na KONG; Ping-ping ZUO; Liang MU; Yan-yong LIU; Nan YANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the gene expression profile changes in the cerebral cortex of mice injected icv with amyloid beta-protein (Aβ) fragment 25-35 using cDNA microarray. Methods: Balb/c mice were randomly divided into a control group and Aβ-treated group. The Morris water maze test was performed to detect the effect of Aβ-injection on the learning and memory of mice. Atlas Mouse 1.2 Expression Arrays containing 1176 genes were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of each group. Results: The gene expression profiles showed that 19 genes including TBX1, NF-κB, AP-1/c-Jun, cadherin, integrin, erb-B2, and FGFR1 were up-regulated after 2 weeks oficv administration of Aβ; while 12 genes were downregulated, including NGF, glucose phosphate isomerase 1, AT motif binding factor 1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and Akt. Conclusions: The results provide important leads for pursuing a more complete understanding of the molecular events of Aβ-injection into mice with Alzheimer disease.

  4. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  5. Reduction of the cerebrovascular volume in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasset, Fanchon; Ouellet, Mélissa; Tremblay, Cyntia; Julien, Carl; Do, Tuan Minh; Oddo, Salvatore; LaFerla, Frank; Calon, Frédéric

    2009-03-01

    Combined evidence from neuroimaging and neuropathological studies shows that signs of vascular pathology and brain hypoperfusion develop early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the functional implication of these abnormalities, we have studied the cerebrovascular volume and selected markers of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in 11-month-old 3 x Tg-AD mice, using the in situ brain perfusion technique. The cerebrovascular volume of distribution of two vascular space markers, [3H]-inulin and [14C]-sucrose, was significantly lower (-26% and -27%, respectively; p diazepam was similar between 3xTg-AD mice and controls, suggesting no difference in the functional integrity of the BBB. We also report a 32% increase (p < 0.001) in the thickness of basement membranes surrounding cortical microvessels along with a 20% increase (p < 0.05) of brain collagen content in 3xTg-AD mice compared to controls. The present data indicate that the cerebrovascular space is reduced in a mouse model of Abeta and tau accumulation, an observation consistent with the presence of cerebrovascular pathology in AD.

  6. Obesity, diabetes, and leptin resistance promote tau pathology in a mouse model of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, T L; Beckett, T L; Kohler, K; Niedowicz, D M; Murphy, M P

    2016-02-19

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) convey an increased risk for developing dementia. The microtubule-associated protein tau is implicated in neurodegenerative disease by undergoing hyperphosphorylation and aggregation, leading to cytotoxicity and neurodegeneration. Enzymes involved in the regulation of tau phosphorylation, such as GSK3β, are tightly associated with pathways found to be dysregulated in T2DM. We have shown previously that leptin-resistant mice, which develop obesity and a diabetic phenotype, display elevated levels of tau phosphorylation. Here we show cells cultured with leptin, an adipokine shown to have neuroprotective effects, reduces tau phosphorylation. To explore how this mechanism works in vivo we transduced an existing diabetic mouse line (Lepr(db/db)) with a tau mutant (tau(P301L)) via adeno-associated virus (AAV). The resulting phenotype included a striking increase in tau phosphorylation and the number of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) found within the hippocampus. We conclude that leptin resistance-induced obesity and diabetes accelerates the development of tau pathology. This model of metabolic dysfunction and tauopathy provides a new system in which to explore the mechanisms underlying the ways in which leptin resistance and diabetes influence development of tau pathology, and may ultimately be related to the development of NFTs.

  7. Loss of presenilin function causes Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Nakajima, Akira; Choi, Se Hoon; Xiong, Xiaoli; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-05-15

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that gain-of-function in beta-amyloid production may be not the necessary mechanism for mutant presenilin-1 (PS1) or PS2 to cause familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present article, we show that conditional knockout of PS1 from the adult stage in the forebrain of mice with the PS2 null mutation triggers robust AD-like neurodegeneration including brain shrinkage, cortical and hippocampal atrophy,ventricular enlargement, severe neuronal loss, gliosis, tau hyperphosphorylation, neurofillament tangle-like structures, and intracellular filaments. Learning and memory functions in these mice are almost completely lost. Notably, there is no beta-amyloid deposition, indicating that presenilin dysfunction can directly cause neurodegeneration without the involvement of beta-amyloid. Furthermore, neurodegeneration occurs in a progressive manner following aging, suggesting that an accumulating effect of presenilin dysfunction over time might be a pathogenic mechanism for the involvement of mutant PS1/PS2 in causing AD. These results validate a mouse model characterized by the presence of many features of AD pathology. Furthermore, the demonstration of AD-like neurodegeneration in the absence of beta-amyloid deposition challenges the long-standing beta-amyloid cascade hypothesis and encourages an open debate on the role of beta-amyloid in causing AD. Most important, our results strongly suggest that to develop gamma-secretase inhibitors for the pharmacological treatment of AD may be not a reasonable strategy because antagonism of presenilin function may worsen neurodegeneration.

  8. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  9. Nanoparticulate Radiolabelled Quinolines Detect Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste A. Roney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting aggregated amyloid peptides (Aβ plaques presents targets for developing biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Polymeric n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (PBCA nanoparticles (NPs were encapsulated with radiolabelled amyloid affinity I125-clioquinol (CQ, 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline as in vivo probes. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs crossed the BBB (2.3±0.9 ID/g (P<.05 in the WT mouse (N = 210, compared to I125-CQ (1.0±0.4 ID/g. I125-CQ-PBCA NP brain uptake increased in AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1 versus WT (N = 38; 2.54×105±5.31×104 DLU/mm2; versus 1.98×105±2.22×104 DLU/mm2 and in APP/PS1/Tau. Brain increases were in mice intracranially injected with aggregated Aβ42 peptide (N = 17; 7.19×105±1.25×105 DLU/mm2, versus WT (6.07×105±7.47×104 DLU/mm2. Storage phosphor imaging and histopathological staining of the plaques, Fe2+ and Cu2+, validated results. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs have specificity for Aβ in vitro and in vivo and are promising as in vivo SPECT (I123, or PET (I124 amyloid imaging agents.

  10. A disruption mechanism of the molecular clock in a MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akane; Matsunaga, Naoya; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Kimura, Yoshinori; Azuma, Hiroki; Ikeda, Eriko; Shiba, Takeshi; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2013-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and dopamine depletion in the striatum. Although the motor symptoms are still regarded as the main problem, non-motor symptoms in PD also markedly impair the quality of life. Several non-motor symptoms, such as sleep disturbances and depression, are suggested to be implicated in the alteration in circadian clock function. In this study, we investigated circadian disruption and the mechanism in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP-treated mice exhibited altered 24-h rhythms in body temperature and locomotor activity. In addition, MPTP treatment also affected the circadian clock system at the genetic level. The exposure of human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) to 1-metyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) increased or decreased the mRNA levels of several clock genes in a dose-dependent manner. MPP(+)-induced changes in clock genes expression were reversed by Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Most importantly, addition of ATP to the drinking water of MPTP-treated mice attenuated neurodegeneration in dopaminergic neurons, suppressed AMPK activation and prevented circadian disruption. The present findings suggest that the activation of AMPK caused circadian dysfunction, and ATP may be a novel therapeutic strategy based on the molecular clock in PD.

  11. Data Mining Strategies to Improve Multiplex Microbead Immunoassay Tolerance in a Mouse Model of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Akshay; Ravindran, Resmi; Mannepalli, Soujanya; Vang, Daniel; Luciw, Paul A.; Hogarth, Michael; Khan, Imran H.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex methodologies, especially those with high-throughput capabilities generate large volumes of data. Accumulation of such data (e.g., genomics, proteomics, metabolomics etc.) is fast becoming more common and thus requires the development and implementation of effective data mining strategies designed for biological and clinical applications. Multiplex microbead immunoassay (MMIA), on xMAP or MagPix platform (Luminex), which is amenable to automation, offers a major advantage over conventional methods such as Western blot or ELISA, for increasing the efficiencies in serodiagnosis of infectious diseases. MMIA allows detection of antibodies and/or antigens efficiently for a wide range of infectious agents simultaneously in host blood samples, in one reaction vessel. In the process, MMIA generates large volumes of data. In this report we demonstrate the application of data mining tools on how the inherent large volume data can improve the assay tolerance (measured in terms of sensitivity and specificity) by analysis of experimental data accumulated over a span of two years. The combination of prior knowledge with machine learning tools provides an efficient approach to improve the diagnostic power of the assay in a continuous basis. Furthermore, this study provides an in-depth knowledge base to study pathological trends of infectious agents in mouse colonies on a multivariate scale. Data mining techniques using serodetection of infections in mice, developed in this study, can be used as a general model for more complex applications in epidemiology and clinical translational research. PMID:25614982

  12. Pharmacologic inhibition of ROCK2 suppresses amyloid-β production in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Feng, Yangbo; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Hales, Chadwick M; Higginbotham, Lenora A; Duong, Duc M; Montine, Thomas J; Troncoso, Juan C; Thambisetty, Madhav; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J

    2013-12-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and has no cure. Genetic, cell biological, and biochemical studies suggest that reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) production may serve as a rational therapeutic avenue to delay or prevent AD progression. Inhibition of RhoA, a Rho GTPase family member, is proposed to curb Aβ production. However, a barrier to this hypothesis has been the limited understanding of how the principal downstream effectors of RhoA, Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) 1 and ROCK2, modulate Aβ generation. Here, we report that ROCK1 knockdown increased endogenous human Aβ production, whereas ROCK2 knockdown decreased Aβ levels. Inhibition of ROCK2 kinase activity, using an isoform-selective small molecule (SR3677), suppressed β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) enzymatic action and diminished production of Aβ in AD mouse brain. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses revealed that SR3677 alters BACE1 endocytic distribution and promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) traffic to lysosomes. Moreover, SR3677 blocked ROCK2 phosphorylation of APP at threonine 654 (T654); in neurons, T654 was critical for APP processing to Aβ. These observations suggest that ROCK2 inhibition reduces Aβ levels through independent mechanisms. Finally, ROCK2 protein levels were increased in asymptomatic AD, mild cognitive impairment, and AD brains, demonstrating that ROCK2 levels change in the earliest stages of AD and remain elevated throughout disease progression. Collectively, these findings highlight ROCK2 as a mechanism-based therapeutic target to combat Aβ production in AD.

  13. Experimental diabetes mellitus exacerbates tau pathology in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Yazi D Ke

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by hyperglycemia caused by a lack of insulin, insulin resistance, or both. There is increasing evidence that insulin also plays a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD as it is involved in the metabolism of beta-amyloid (Abeta and tau, two proteins that form Abeta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, respectively, the hallmark lesions in AD. Here, we examined the effects of experimental DM on a pre-existing tau pathology in the pR5 transgenic mouse strain that is characterized by NFTs. pR5 mice express P301L mutant human tau that is associated with dementia. Experimental DM was induced by administration of streptozotocin (STZ, which causes insulin deficiency. We determined phosphorylation of tau, using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Solubility of tau was determined upon extraction with sarkosyl and formic acid, and Gallyas silver staining was employed to reveal NFTs. Insulin depletion by STZ administration in six months-old non-transgenic mice causes increased tau phosphorylation, without its deposition or NFT formation. In contrast, in pR5 mice this results in massive deposition of hyperphosphorylated, insoluble tau. Furthermore, they develop a pronounced tau-histopathology, including NFTs at this early age, while the pathology in sham-treated pR5 mice is moderate. Whereas experimental DM did not result in deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau in non-transgenic mice, a predisposition to develop a tau pathology in young pR5 mice was both sufficient and necessary to exacerbate tau deposition and NFT formation. Hence, DM can accelerate onset and increase severity of disease in individuals with a predisposition to developing tau pathology.

  14. A mouse-adapted SARS-coronavirus causes disease and mortality in BALB/c mice.

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    Anjeanette Roberts

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available No single animal model for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS reproduces all aspects of the human disease. Young inbred mice support SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV replication in the respiratory tract and are available in sufficient numbers for statistical evaluation. They are relatively inexpensive and easily accessible, but their use in SARS research is limited because they do not develop illness following infection. Older (12- to 14-mo-old BALB/c mice develop clinical illness and pneumonitis, but they can be hard to procure, and immune senescence complicates pathogenesis studies. We adapted the SARS-CoV (Urbani strain by serial passage in the respiratory tract of young BALB/c mice. Fifteen passages resulted in a virus (MA15 that is lethal for mice following intranasal inoculation. Lethality is preceded by rapid and high titer viral replication in lungs, viremia, and dissemination of virus to extrapulmonary sites accompanied by lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and pathological changes in the lungs. Abundant viral antigen is extensively distributed in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar pneumocytes, and necrotic cellular debris is present in airways and alveoli, with only mild and focal pneumonitis. These observations suggest that mice infected with MA15 die from an overwhelming viral infection with extensive, virally mediated destruction of pneumocytes and ciliated epithelial cells. The MA15 virus has six coding mutations associated with adaptation and increased virulence; when introduced into a recombinant SARS-CoV, these mutations result in a highly virulent and lethal virus (rMA15, duplicating the phenotype of the biologically derived MA15 virus. Intranasal inoculation with MA15 reproduces many aspects of disease seen in severe human cases of SARS. The availability of the MA15 virus will enhance the use of the mouse model for SARS because infection with MA15 causes morbidity, mortality, and pulmonary pathology. This virus will be of value as

  15. GFAP isoforms in adult mouse brain with a focus on neurogenic astrocytes and reactive astrogliosis in mouse models of Alzheimer disease.

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    Willem Kamphuis

    Full Text Available Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP is the main astrocytic intermediate filament (IF. GFAP splice isoforms show differential expression patterns in the human brain. GFAPδ is preferentially expressed by neurogenic astrocytes in the subventricular zone (SVZ, whereas GFAP(+1 is found in a subset of astrocytes throughout the brain. In addition, the expression of these isoforms in human brain material of epilepsy, Alzheimer and glioma patients has been reported. Here, for the first time, we present a comprehensive study of GFAP isoform expression in both wild-type and Alzheimer Disease (AD mouse models. In cortex, cerebellum, and striatum of wild-type mice, transcripts for Gfap-α, Gfap-β, Gfap-γ, Gfap-δ, Gfap-κ, and a newly identified isoform Gfap-ζ, were detected. Their relative expression levels were similar in all regions studied. GFAPα showed a widespread expression whilst GFAPδ distribution was prominent in the SVZ, rostral migratory stream (RMS, neurogenic astrocytes of the subgranular zone (SGZ, and subpial astrocytes. In contrast to the human SVZ, we could not establish an unambiguous GFAPδ localization in proliferating cells of the mouse SVZ. In APPswePS1dE9 and 3xTgAD mice, plaque-associated reactive astrocytes had increased transcript levels of all detectable GFAP isoforms and low levels of a new GFAP isoform, Gfap-ΔEx7. Reactive astrocytes in AD mice showed enhanced GFAPα and GFAPδ immunolabeling, less frequently increased vimentin and nestin, but no GFAPκ or GFAP(+1 staining. In conclusion, GFAPδ protein is present in SVZ, RMS, and neurogenic astrocytes of the SGZ, but also outside neurogenic niches. Furthermore, differential GFAP isoform expression is not linked with aging or reactive gliosis. This evidence points to the conclusion that differential regulation of GFAP isoforms is not involved in the reorganization of the IF network in reactive gliosis or in neurogenesis in the mouse brain.

  16. "Brain training" improves cognitive performance and survival in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

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    Wood, Nigel I; Glynn, Dervila; Morton, A Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) has been shown to improve neurological function and cognitive performance in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). We have shown recently that even when they are already living in an enriched environment, additional EE had beneficial effects in R6/2 mice. Here we examined the effects of three different enrichment paradigms on cognitive dysfunction in R6/2 mice in a longitudinal study. The EE consisted of either enforced physical exercise on the Rotarod (predominantly motor stimulation), training in a novel type of maze, the 'noughts and crosses' (OX) maze (mainly cognitive stimulation), or access to a playground, that gave the mice the opportunity for increased, self-motivated activity using running wheels and other toys in a social context (mixed EE). We designed the OX maze to test spatial memory in the R6/2 mouse while minimizing motor demands. Control mice remained in their home cages during the training period. Mice were given enrichment between 6 and 8 weeks of age, followed by cognitive (Lashley maze) and motor testing (Rotarod) between 8 and 10 weeks. Mice were then given a further period of enrichment between 10 and 12 weeks, and their behavior was re-tested between 12 and 14 weeks of age. We also collected body weights and age at death from all mice. The OX maze was as sensitive for detecting learning deficits in the R6/2 mice as other types of mazes (such as the Morris water maze). Interestingly, providing cognitive stimulation via training in the OX maze produced significant improvements in subsequent cognitive performance by male, but not female, R6/2 mice in the Lashley maze task. OX maze training also significantly improved loss of body weight and survival in male R6/2 mice. These effects became apparent after as little as 2 weeks of training in the OX maze. These data suggest that there is a cognitive reserve that may be exploited in neurodegenerative disease

  17. Vascular amyloidosis impairs the gliovascular unit in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

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    Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robel, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebral blood flow impairs cognitive function and ultimately causes irreparable damage to brain tissue. The gliovascular unit, composed of neural and vascular cells, assures sufficient blood supply to active brain regions. Astrocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and pericytes are important players within the gliovascular unit modulating vessel diameters. While the importance of the gliovascular unit and the signals involved in regulating local blood flow to match neuronal activity is now well recognized, surprisingly little is known about this interface in disease. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow. Here, we studied how the gliovascular unit is affected in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, using a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging approaches. We specifically labelled vascular amyloid in living mice using the dye methoxy-XO4. We elicited vessel responses ex vivo using either pharmacological stimuli or cell-specific calcium uncaging in vascular smooth muscle cells or astrocytes. Multi-photon in vivo imaging through a cranial window allowed us to complement our ex vivo data in the presence of blood flow after label-free optical activation of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intact brain. We found that vascular amyloid deposits separated astrocyte end-feet from the endothelial vessel wall. High-resolution 3D images demonstrated that vascular amyloid developed in ring-like structures around the vessel circumference, essentially forming a rigid cast. Where vascular amyloid was present, stimulation of astrocytes or vascular smooth muscle cells via ex vivo Ca2+ uncaging or in vivo optical activation produced only poor vascular responses. Strikingly, vessel segments that were unaffected by vascular amyloid responded to the same extent as vessels from age-matched control animals. We conclude that while astrocytes can still release vasoactive substances, vascular amyloid deposits render blood vessels rigid and

  18. Impaired satiation and increased feeding behaviour in the triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

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    Adedolapo Adebakin

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is associated with non-cognitive symptoms such as changes in feeding behaviour that are often characterised by an increase in appetite. Increased food intake is observed in several mouse models of AD including the triple transgenic (3×TgAD mouse, but the mechanisms underlying this hyperphagia are unknown. We therefore examined feeding behaviour in 3×TgAD mice and tested their sensitivity to exogenous and endogenous satiety factors by assessing food intake and activation of key brain regions. In the behavioural satiety sequence (BSS, 3×TgAD mice consumed more food after a fast compared to Non-Tg controls. Feeding and drinking behaviours were increased and rest decreased in 3×TgAD mice, but the overall sequence of behaviours in the BSS was maintained. Exogenous administration of the satiety factor cholecystokinin (CCK; 8-30 µg/kg, i.p. dose-dependently reduced food intake in Non-Tg controls and increased inactive behaviour, but had no effect on food intake or behaviour in 3×TgAD mice. CCK (15 µg/kg, i.p. increased c-Fos protein expression in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS and area postrema of the brainstem to the same extent in Non-Tg and 3×TgAD mice, but less c-Fos positive cells were detected in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus of CCK-treated 3×TgAD compared to Non-Tg mice. In response to a fast or a period of re-feeding, there was no difference in the number of c-Fos-positive cells detected in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, NTS and area postrema of 3×TgAD compared to Non-Tg mice. The degree of c-Fos expression in the NTS was positively correlated to food intake in Non-Tg mice, however, this relationship was absent in 3×TgAD mice. These data demonstrate that 3×TgAD mice show increased feeding behaviour and insensitivity to satiation, which is possibly due to defective gut-brain signalling in response to endogenous satiety factors released

  19. Reduction of β-amyloid pathology by celastrol in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Bachmeier Corbin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aβ deposits represent a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Both soluble and insoluble Aβ species are considered to be responsible for initiating the pathological cascade that eventually leads to AD. Therefore, the identification of therapeutic approaches that can lower Aβ production or accumulation remains a priority. NFκB has been shown to regulate BACE-1 expression level, the rate limiting enzyme responsible for the production of Aβ. We therefore explored whether the known NFκB inhibitor celastrol could represent a suitable compound for decreasing Aβ production and accumulation in vivo. Methods The effect of celastrol on amyloid precursor protein (APP processing, Aβ production and NFκB activation was investigated by western blotting and ELISAs using a cell line overexpressing APP. The impact of celastrol on brain Aβ accumulation was tested in a transgenic mouse model of AD overexpressing the human APP695sw mutation and the presenilin-1 mutation M146L (Tg PS1/APPsw by immunostaining and ELISAs. An acute treatment with celastrol was investigated by administering celastrol intraperitoneally at a dosage of 1 mg/Kg in 35 week-old Tg PS1/APPsw for 4 consecutive days. In addition, a chronic treatment (32 days with celastrol was tested using a matrix-driven delivery pellet system implanted subcutaneously in 5 month-old Tg PS1/APPsw to ensure a continuous daily release of 2.5 mg/Kg of celastrol. Results In vitro, celastrol dose dependently prevented NFκB activation and inhibited BACE-1 expression. Celastrol potently inhibited Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 production by reducing the β-cleavage of APP, leading to decreased levels of APP-CTFβ and APPsβ. In vivo, celastrol appeared to reduce the levels of both soluble and insoluble Aβ1-38, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. In addition, a reduction in Aβ plaque burden and microglial activation was observed in the brains of Tg PS1/APPsw following a chronic administration of

  20. Early-onset and robust amyloid pathology in a new homozygous mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Antje Willuweit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transgenic mice expressing mutated amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin (PS-1 or -2 have been successfully used to model cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. However, the use of many transgenic lines is limited by premature death, low breeding efficiencies and late onset and high inter-animal variability of the pathology, creating a need for improved animal models. Here we describe the detailed characterization of a new homozygous double-transgenic mouse line that addresses most of these issues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transgenic mouse line (ARTE10 was generated by co-integration of two transgenes carrying the K670N/M671L mutated amyloid precursor protein (APP(swe and the M146V mutated presenilin 1 (PS1 both under control of a neuron-specific promoter. Mice, hemi- as well as homozygous for both transgenes, are viable and fertile with good breeding capabilities and a low rate of premature death. They develop robust AD-like cerebral beta-amyloid plaque pathology with glial inflammation, signs of neuritic dystrophy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Using our novel image analysis algorithm for semi-automatic quantification of plaque burden, we demonstrate an early onset and progressive plaque deposition starting at 3 months of age in homozygous mice with low inter-animal variability and 100%-penetrance of the phenotype. The plaques are readily detected in vivo by PiB, the standard human PET tracer for AD. In addition, ARTE10 mice display early loss of synaptic markers and age-related cognitive deficits. By applying a gamma-secretase inhibitor we show a dose dependent reduction of soluble amyloid beta levels in the brain. CONCLUSIONS: ARTE10 mice develop a cerebral beta-amyloidosis closely resembling the beta-amyloid-related aspects of human AD neuropathology. Unifying several advantages of previous transgenic models, this line particularly qualifies for

  1. Protective effects of positive lysosomal modulation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models.

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    David Butler

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-related neurodegenerative pathology in which defects in proteolytic clearance of amyloid β peptide (Aβ likely contribute to the progressive nature of the disorder. Lysosomal proteases of the cathepsin family exhibit up-regulation in response to accumulating proteins including Aβ(1-42. Here, the lysosomal modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK was used to test whether proteolytic activity can be enhanced to reduce the accumulation events in AD mouse models expressing different levels of Aβ pathology. Systemic PADK injections in APP(SwInd and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice caused 3- to 8-fold increases in cathepsin B protein levels and 3- to 10-fold increases in the enzyme's activity in lysosomal fractions, while neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme remained unchanged. Biochemical analyses indicated the modulation predominantly targeted the active mature forms of cathepsin B and markedly changed Rab proteins but not LAMP1, suggesting the involvement of enhanced trafficking. The modulated lysosomal system led to reductions in both Aβ immunostaining as well as Aβ(x-42 sandwich ELISA measures in APP(SwInd mice of 10-11 months. More extensive Aβ deposition in 20-22-month APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice was also reduced by PADK. Selective ELISAs found that a corresponding production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38 occurs as Aβ(1-42 levels decrease in the mouse models, indicating that PADK treatment leads to Aβ truncation. Associated with Aβ clearance was the elimination of behavioral and synaptic protein deficits evident in the two transgenic models. These findings indicate that pharmacologically-controlled lysosomal modulation reduces Aβ(1-42 accumulation, possibly through intracellular truncation that also influences extracellular deposition, and in turn offsets the defects in synaptic composition and cognitive functions. The selective modulation promotes clearance at different levels of Aβ pathology and provides proof

  2. Protective effects of positive lysosomal modulation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, David; Hwang, Jeannie; Estick, Candice; Nishiyama, Akiko; Kumar, Saranya Santhosh; Baveghems, Clive; Young-Oxendine, Hollie B; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Charalambides, Ana; Bahr, Ben A

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative pathology in which defects in proteolytic clearance of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) likely contribute to the progressive nature of the disorder. Lysosomal proteases of the cathepsin family exhibit up-regulation in response to accumulating proteins including Aβ(1-42). Here, the lysosomal modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) was used to test whether proteolytic activity can be enhanced to reduce the accumulation events in AD mouse models expressing different levels of Aβ pathology. Systemic PADK injections in APP(SwInd) and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice caused 3- to 8-fold increases in cathepsin B protein levels and 3- to 10-fold increases in the enzyme's activity in lysosomal fractions, while neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme remained unchanged. Biochemical analyses indicated the modulation predominantly targeted the active mature forms of cathepsin B and markedly changed Rab proteins but not LAMP1, suggesting the involvement of enhanced trafficking. The modulated lysosomal system led to reductions in both Aβ immunostaining as well as Aβ(x-42) sandwich ELISA measures in APP(SwInd) mice of 10-11 months. More extensive Aβ deposition in 20-22-month APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice was also reduced by PADK. Selective ELISAs found that a corresponding production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38) occurs as Aβ(1-42) levels decrease in the mouse models, indicating that PADK treatment leads to Aβ truncation. Associated with Aβ clearance was the elimination of behavioral and synaptic protein deficits evident in the two transgenic models. These findings indicate that pharmacologically-controlled lysosomal modulation reduces Aβ(1-42) accumulation, possibly through intracellular truncation that also influences extracellular deposition, and in turn offsets the defects in synaptic composition and cognitive functions. The selective modulation promotes clearance at different levels of Aβ pathology and provides proof

  3. Acupuncture Enhances the Synaptic Dopamine Availability to Improve Motor Function in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Seung-Nam Kim; Ah-Reum Doo; Ji-Yeun Park; Hyungjin Bae; Younbyoung Chae; Insop Shim; Hyangsook Lee; Woongjoon Moon; Hyejung Lee; Hi-Joon Park

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and the depletion of striatal dopamine (DA). Acupuncture, as an alternative therapy for PD, has beneficial effects in both PD patients and PD animal models, although the underlying mechanisms therein remain uncertain. The present study investigated whether acupuncture treatment affected dopamine neurotransmission in a PD mouse model using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (...

  4. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung W.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M.; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Nicholls, David G.; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to ag...

  5. Microarray analysis of gene expression by skeletal muscle of three mouse models of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

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    Kaiguo Mo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence implicates altered gene expression within skeletal muscle in the pathogenesis of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA. We therefore broadly characterized gene expression in skeletal muscle of three independently generated mouse models of this disease. The mouse models included a polyglutamine expanded (polyQ AR knock-in model (AR113Q, a polyQ AR transgenic model (AR97Q, and a transgenic mouse that overexpresses wild type AR solely in skeletal muscle (HSA-AR. HSA-AR mice were included because they substantially reproduce the KD/SBMA phenotype despite the absence of polyQ AR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed microarray analysis of lower hindlimb muscles taken from these three models relative to wild type controls using high density oligonucleotide arrays. All microarray comparisons were made with at least 3 animals in each condition, and only those genes having at least 2-fold difference and whose coefficient of variance was less than 100% were considered to be differentially expressed. When considered globally, there was a similar overlap in gene changes between the 3 models: 19% between HSA-AR and AR97Q, 21% between AR97Q and AR113Q, and 17% between HSA-AR and AR113Q, with 8% shared by all models. Several patterns of gene expression relevant to the disease process were observed. Notably, patterns of gene expression typical of loss of AR function were observed in all three models, as were alterations in genes involved in cell adhesion, energy balance, muscle atrophy and myogenesis. We additionally measured changes similar to those observed in skeletal muscle of a mouse model of Huntington's Disease, and to those common to muscle atrophy from diverse causes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By comparing patterns of gene expression in three independent models of KD/SBMA, we have been able to identify candidate genes that might mediate the core myogenic features of KD/SBMA.

  6. Correlation of disease severity with body weight and high fat diet in the FATZO/Pco mouse.

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    Droz, Brian A; Sneed, Bria L; Jackson, Charles V; Zimmerman, Karen M; Michael, M Dodson; Emmerson, Paul J; Coskun, Tamer; Peterson, Richard G

    2017-01-01

    Obesity in many current pre-clinical animal models of obesity and diabetes is mediated by monogenic mutations; these are rarely associated with the development of human obesity. A new mouse model, the FATZO mouse, has been developed to provide polygenic obesity and a metabolic pattern of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, that support the presence of insulin resistance similar to metabolic disease in patients with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes. The FATZO mouse resulted from a cross of C57BL/6J and AKR/J mice followed by selective inbreeding for obesity, increased insulin and hyperglycemia. Since many clinical studies have established a close link between higher body weight and the development of type 2 diabetes, we investigated whether time to progression to type 2 diabetes or disease severity in FATZO mice was dependent on weight gain in young animals. Our results indicate that lighter animals developed metabolic disturbances much slower and to a lesser magnitude than their heavier counterparts. Consumption of a diet containing high fat, accelerated weight gain in parallel with disease progression. A naturally occurring and significant variation in the body weight of FATZO offspring enables these mice to be identified as low, mid and high body weight groups at a young age. These weight groups remain into adulthood and correspond to slow, medium and accelerated development of type 2 diabetes. Thus, body weight inclusion criteria can optimize the FATZO model for studies of prevention, stabilization or treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Striatal pre-enkephalin overexpression improves Huntington's disease symptoms in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

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    Stéphanie Bissonnette

    Full Text Available The reduction of pre-enkephalin (pENK mRNA expression might be an early sign of striatal neuronal dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD, due to mutated huntingtin protein. Indeed, striatopallidal (pENK-containing neurodegeneration occurs at earlier stage of the disease, compare to the loss of striatonigral neurons. However, no data are available about the functional role of striatal pENK in HD. According to the neuroprotective properties of opioids that have been recognized recently, the objective of this study was to investigate whether striatal overexpression of pENK at early stage of HD can improve motor dysfunction, and/or reduce striatal neuronal loss in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. To achieve this goal recombinant adeno-associated-virus (rAAV2-containing green fluorescence protein (GFP-pENK was injected bilaterally in the striatum of R6/2 mice at 5 weeks old to overexpress opioid peptide pENK. Striatal injection of rAAV2-GFP was used as a control. Different behavioral tests were carried out before and/or after striatal injections of rAAV2. The animals were euthanized at 10 weeks old. Our results demonstrate that striatal overexpression of pENK had beneficial effects on behavioral symptoms of HD in R6/2 by: delaying the onset of decline in muscular force; reduction of clasping; improvement of fast motor activity, short-term memory and recognition; as well as normalization of anxiety-like behavior. The improvement of behavioral dysfunction in R6/2 mice having received rAAV2-GFP-pENK associated with upregulation of striatal pENK mRNA; the increased level of enkephalin peptide in the striatum, globus pallidus and substantia nigra; as well as the slight increase in the number of striatal neurons compared with other groups of R6/2. Accordingly, we suggest that at early stage of HD upregulation of striatal enkephalin might play a key role at attenuating illness symptoms.

  8. Striatal pre-enkephalin overexpression improves Huntington's disease symptoms in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, Stéphanie; Vaillancourt, Mylène; Hébert, Sébastien S; Drolet, Guy; Samadi, Pershia

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of pre-enkephalin (pENK) mRNA expression might be an early sign of striatal neuronal dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD), due to mutated huntingtin protein. Indeed, striatopallidal (pENK-containing) neurodegeneration occurs at earlier stage of the disease, compare to the loss of striatonigral neurons. However, no data are available about the functional role of striatal pENK in HD. According to the neuroprotective properties of opioids that have been recognized recently, the objective of this study was to investigate whether striatal overexpression of pENK at early stage of HD can improve motor dysfunction, and/or reduce striatal neuronal loss in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. To achieve this goal recombinant adeno-associated-virus (rAAV2)-containing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-pENK was injected bilaterally in the striatum of R6/2 mice at 5 weeks old to overexpress opioid peptide pENK. Striatal injection of rAAV2-GFP was used as a control. Different behavioral tests were carried out before and/or after striatal injections of rAAV2. The animals were euthanized at 10 weeks old. Our results demonstrate that striatal overexpression of pENK had beneficial effects on behavioral symptoms of HD in R6/2 by: delaying the onset of decline in muscular force; reduction of clasping; improvement of fast motor activity, short-term memory and recognition; as well as normalization of anxiety-like behavior. The improvement of behavioral dysfunction in R6/2 mice having received rAAV2-GFP-pENK associated with upregulation of striatal pENK mRNA; the increased level of enkephalin peptide in the striatum, globus pallidus and substantia nigra; as well as the slight increase in the number of striatal neurons compared with other groups of R6/2. Accordingly, we suggest that at early stage of HD upregulation of striatal enkephalin might play a key role at attenuating illness symptoms.

  9. Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Component Cyclophilin D Distinguishes Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Death Paradigms in the MPTP Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Bobby; Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkova, Natalia N.; Zhang, Steven F.; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Yang, Lichuan; Wille, Elizabeth; Lorenzo, Beverly J.; Ho, Daniel J.; Beal, M. Flint; Starkov, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Mitochondrial damage due to Ca2+ overload-induced opening of permeability transition pores (PTP) is believed to play a role in selective degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Genetic ablation of mitochondrial matrix protein cyclophilin D (CYPD) has been shown to increase Ca2+ threshold of PTP in vitro and to prevent cell death in several in vivo disease models. We investigated the role of CYPD in a mouse model of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-...

  10. Progressive Impairment of Lactate-based Gluconeogenesis in the Huntington's Disease Mouse Model R6/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Marie Borch; Hasholt, Lis; Nørremølle, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative illness, where selective neuronal loss in the brain caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein leads to motor dysfunction and cognitive decline in addition to peripheral metabolic changes. In this study we confirm our previous observation...... of impairment of lactate-based hepatic gluconeogenesis in the transgenic HD mouse model R6/2 and determine that the defect manifests very early and progresses in severity with disease development, indicating a potential to explore this defect in a biomarker context. Moreover, R6/2 animals displayed lower blood...

  11. Therapeutic and preventive effects of methylene blue on Alzheimer's disease pathology in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paban, V; Manrique, C; Filali, M; Maunoir-Regimbal, S; Fauvelle, F; Alescio-Lautier, B

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) belongs to the phenothiazinium family. It has been used to treat a variety of human conditions and has beneficial effects on the central nervous system in rodents with and without brain alteration. The present study was designed to test whether chronic MB treatment taken after (therapeutic effect) or before (preventive effect) the onset of beta-amyloid pathology influences cognition in a transgenic mouse model (APP/PS1). In addition, the present study aims at revealing whether these behavioral effects might be related to brain alteration in beta-amyloid deposition. To this end, we conducted an in vivo study and compared two routes of drug administration, drinking water versus intraperitoneal injection. Results showed that transgenic mice treated with MB orally or following intraperitoneal injection were protected from cognitive impairments in a variety of social, learning, and exploratory tasks. Immunoreactive beta-amyloid deposition was significantly reduced in the hippocampus and adjacent cortex in MB-treated transgenic mice. Interestingly, these beneficial effects were observed independently of beta-amyloid load at the time of MB treatment. This suggests that MB treatment is beneficial at both therapeutic and preventive levels. Using solid-state High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS-NMR), we showed that MB administration after the onset of amyloid pathology significantly restored the concentration of two metabolites related to mitochondrial metabolism, namely alanine and lactate. We conclude that MB might be useful for the therapy and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator.

  13. Insulin signaling, resistance, and the metabolic syndrome: insights from mouse models into disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaodong

    2014-02-01

    Insulin resistance is a major underlying mechanism responsible for the 'metabolic syndrome', which is also known as insulin resistance syndrome. The incidence of the metabolic syndrome is increasing at an alarming rate, becoming a major public and clinical problem worldwide. The metabolic syndrome is represented by a group of interrelated disorders, including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. It is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and increased morbidity and mortality. Animal studies have demonstrated that insulin and its signaling cascade normally control cell growth, metabolism, and survival through the activation of MAPKs and activation of phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), in which the activation of PI3K associated with insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 and subsequent Akt→Foxo1 phosphorylation cascade has a central role in the control of nutrient homeostasis and organ survival. The inactivation of Akt and activation of Foxo1, through the suppression IRS1 and IRS2 in different organs following hyperinsulinemia, metabolic inflammation, and overnutrition, may act as the underlying mechanisms for the metabolic syndrome in humans. Targeting the IRS→Akt→Foxo1 signaling cascade will probably provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications. This review discusses the basis of insulin signaling, insulin resistance in different mouse models, and how a deficiency of insulin signaling components in different organs contributes to the features of the metabolic syndrome. Emphasis is placed on the role of IRS1, IRS2, and associated signaling pathways that are coupled to Akt and the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxo1.

  14. A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Leuven Fred

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily strikes the elderly. Studies in both humans and animal models have linked the consumption of cholesterol and saturated fats with amyloid-β (Aβ deposition and development of AD. Yet, these studies did not examine high fat diets in combination with reduced carbohydrate intake. Here we tested the effect of a high saturated fat/low carbohydrate diet on a transgenic mouse model of AD. Results Starting at three months of age, two groups of female transgenic mice carrying the "London" APP mutation (APP/V717I were fed either, a standard diet (SD composed of high carbohydrate/low fat chow, or a ketogenic diet (KD composed of very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat chow for 43 days. Animals fed the KD exhibited greatly elevated serum ketone body levels, as measured by β-hydroxybutyrate (3.85 ± 2.6 mM, compared to SD fed animals (0.29 ± 0.06 mM. In addition, animals fed the KD lost body weight (SD 22.2 ± 0.6 g vs. KD 17.5 ± 1.4 g, p = 0.0067. In contrast to earlier studies, the brief KD feeding regime significantly reduced total brain Aβ levels by approximately 25%. Despite changes in ketone levels, body weight, and Aβ levels, the KD diet did not alter behavioral measures. Conclusion Previous studies have suggested that diets rich in cholesterol and saturated fats increased the deposition of Aβ and the risk of developing AD. Here we demonstrate that a diet rich in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates can actually reduce levels of Aβ. Therefore, dietary strategies aimed at reducing Aβ levels should take into account interactions of dietary components and the metabolic outcomes, in particular, levels of carbohydrates, total calories, and presence of ketone bodies should be considered.

  15. Disease progression and phasic changes in gene expression in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F Loeser

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and has multiple risk factors including joint injury. The purpose of this study was to characterize the histologic development of OA in a mouse model where OA is induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM model and to identify genes regulated during different stages of the disease, using RNA isolated from the joint "organ" and analyzed using microarrays. Histologic changes seen in OA, including articular cartilage lesions and osteophytes, were present in the medial tibial plateaus of the DMM knees beginning at the earliest (2 week time point and became progressively more severe by 16 weeks. 427 probe sets (371 genes from the microarrays passed consistency and significance filters. There was an initial up-regulation at 2 and 4 weeks of genes involved in morphogenesis, differentiation, and development, including growth factor and matrix genes, as well as transcription factors including Atf2, Creb3l1, and Erg. Most genes were off or down-regulated at 8 weeks with the most highly down-regulated genes involved in cell division and the cytoskeleton. Gene expression increased at 16 weeks, in particular extracellular matrix genes including Prelp, Col3a1 and fibromodulin. Immunostaining revealed the presence of these three proteins in cartilage and soft tissues including ligaments as well as in the fibrocartilage covering osteophytes. The results support a phasic development of OA with early matrix remodeling and transcriptional activity followed by a more quiescent period that is not maintained. This implies that the response to an OA intervention will depend on the timing of the intervention. The quiescent period at 8 weeks may be due to the maturation of the osteophytes which are thought to temporarily stabilize the joint.

  16. Neuroprotective efficacy of aminopropyl carbazoles in a mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Xu, Pin; Drawbridge, Jordan; Estill, Sandi Jo; Huntington, Paula; Tran, Stephanie; Britt, Jeremiah; Tesla, Rachel; Morlock, Lorraine; Naidoo, Jacinth; Melito, Lisa M; Wang, Gelin; Williams, Noelle S; Ready, Joseph M; McKnight, Steven L; Pieper, Andrew A

    2012-10-16

    We previously reported the discovery of P7C3, an aminopropyl carbazole having proneurogenic and neuroprotective properties in newborn neural precursor cells of the dentate gyrus. Here, we provide evidence that P7C3 also protects mature neurons in brain regions outside of the hippocampus. P7C3 blocks 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-mediated cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of adult mice, a model of Parkinson disease (PD). Dose-response studies show that the P7C3 analog P7C3A20 blocks cell death with even greater potency and efficacy, which parallels the relative potency and efficacy of these agents in blocking apoptosis of newborn neural precursor cells of the dentate gyrus. P7C3 and P7C3A20 display similar relative effects in blocking 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as in preserving C. elegans mobility following MPP(+) exposure. Dimebon, an antihistaminergic drug that is weakly proneurogenic and neuroprotective in the dentate gyrus, confers no protection in either the mouse or the worm models of PD. We further demonstrate that the hippocampal proneurogenic efficacy of eight additional analogs of P7C3 correlates with their protective efficacy in MPTP-mediated neurotoxicity. In vivo screening of P7C3 analogs for proneurogenic efficacy in the hippocampus may thus provide a reliable means of predicting neuroprotective efficacy. We propose that the chemical scaffold represented by P7C3 and P7C3A20 provides a basis for optimizing and advancing pharmacologic agents for the treatment of patients with PD.

  17. Insulin Signaling, Resistance, and the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Mouse Models to Disease Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaodong

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major underlying mechanism for the “metabolic syndrome”, which is also known as insulin resistance syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is increasing at an alarming rate, becoming a major public and clinical problem worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is represented by a group of interrelated disorders, including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. It is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and increased morbidity and mortality. Animal studies demonstrate that insulin and its signaling cascade normally control cell growth, metabolism and survival through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphotidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), of which activation of PI-3K-associated with insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 (IRS1, 2) and subsequent Akt→Foxo1 phosphorylation cascade has a central role in control of nutrient homeostasis and organ survival. Inactivation of Akt and activation of Foxo1, through suppression IRS1 and IRS2 in different organs following hyperinsulinemia, metabolic inflammation, and over nutrition may provide the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome in humans. Targeting the IRS→Akt→Foxo1 signaling cascade will likely provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications. This review discusses the basis of insulin signaling, insulin resistance in different mouse models, and how a deficiency of insulin signaling components in different organs contributes to the feature of the metabolic syndrome. Emphasis will be placed on the role of IRS1, IRS2, and associated signaling pathways that couple to Akt and the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxo1. PMID:24281010

  18. Reduced Levels of Proteasome Products in a Mouse Striatal Cell Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayani Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is the result of a long polyglutamine tract in the gene encoding huntingtin protein, which in turn causes a large number of cellular changes and ultimately results in neurodegeneration of striatal neurons. Although many theories have been proposed, the precise mechanism by which the polyglutamine expansion causes cellular changes is not certain. Some evidence supports the hypothesis that the long polyglutamine tract inhibits the proteasome, a multiprotein complex involved in protein degradation. However, other studies report normal proteasome function in cells expressing long polyglutamine tracts. The controversy may be due to the methods used to examine proteasome activity in each of the previous studies. In the present study, we measured proteasome function by examining levels of endogenous peptides that are products of proteasome cleavage. Peptide levels were compared among mouse striatal cell lines expressing either 7 glutamines (STHdhQ7/Q7 or 111 glutamines in the huntingtin protein, either heterozygous (STHdhQ7/Q111 or homozygous (STHdhQ111/Q111. Both of the cell lines expressing huntingtin with 111 glutamines showed a large reduction in nearly all of the peptides detected in the cells, relative to levels of these peptides in cells homozygous for 7 glutamines. Treatment of STHdhQ7/Q7 cells with proteasome inhibitors epoxomicin or bortezomib also caused a large reduction in most of these peptides, suggesting that they are products of proteasome-mediated cleavage of cellular proteins. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that proteasome function is impaired by the expression of huntingtin protein containing long polyglutamine tracts.

  19. Treadmill exercise represses neuronal cell death in an aged transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Hyun-Sub; Kang, Eun-Bum; Koo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Tae; Jin-Lee; Kim, Eung-Joon; Yang, Chun-Ho; An, Gil-Young; Cho, In-Ho; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2011-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to further investigate the protective effect of treadmill exercise on the hippocampal proteins associated with neuronal cell death in an aged transgenic (Tg) mice with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To address this, Tg mouse model of AD, Tg-NSE/PS2m, which expresses human mutant PS2 in the brain, was chosen. Animals were subjected to treadmill exercise for 12 weeks from 24 months of age. The exercised mice were treadmill run at speed of 12 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week on a 0% gradient for 3 months. Treadmill exercised mice improved cognitive function in water maze test. Treadmill exercised mice significantly reduced the expression of Aβ-42, Cox-2, and caspase-3 in the hippocampus. In parallel, treadmill exercised Tg mice decreased the phosphorylation levels of JNK, p38MAPK and tau (Ser404, Ser202, Thr231), and increased the phosphorylation levels of ERK, PI3K, Akt and GSK-3α/β. In addition, treadmill exercised Tg mice up-regulated the expressions of NGF, BDNF and phospho-CREB, and the expressions of SOD-1, SOD-2 and HSP-70. Treadmill exercised Tg mice up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2, and down-regulated the expressions of cytochrome c and Bax in the hippocampus. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in the hippocampus in mice was significantly decreased after treadmill exercise. Finally, serum TC, insulin, glucose, and corticosterone levels were significantly decreased in the Tg mice after treadmill exercise. As a consequence of such change, Aβ-dependent neuronal cell death in the hippocampus of Tg mice was markedly suppressed following treadmill exercise. These results strongly suggest that treadmill exercise provides a therapeutic potential to inhibit both Aβ-42 and neuronal death pathways. Therefore, treadmill exercise may be beneficial in prevention or treatment of AD.

  20. Environmental enrichment mitigates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowsky, Joanna L; Melnikova, Tatiana; Fadale, Daniel J; Xu, Guilian M; Slunt, Hilda H; Gonzales, Victoria; Younkin, Linda H; Younkin, Steven G; Borchelt, David R; Savonenko, Alena V

    2005-05-25

    Epidemiological studies suggest that individuals with greater education or more cognitively demanding occupations have diminished risk of developing dementia. We wanted to test whether this effect could be recapitulated in rodents using environmental enrichment, a paradigm well documented to attenuate behavioral deficits induced by various pathological insults. Here, we demonstrate that learning and memory deficits observed in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease can be ameliorated by enrichment. Female transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and/or presenilin-1 and nontransgenic controls were placed into enriched or standard cages at 2 months of age and tested for cognitive behavior after 6 months of differential housing. Enrichment significantly improved performance of all genotypes in the radial water maze and in the classic and repeated-reversal versions of the Morris water maze. However, enrichment did not benefit all genotypes equally. Mice overproducing amyloid-beta (Abeta), particularly those with amyloid deposits, showed weaker memory for the platform location in the classic Morris water maze and learned new platform positions in the repeated-reversals task less quickly than their nontransgenic cagemates. Nonetheless, enrichment normalized the performance of Abeta-overproducing mice to the level of standard-housed nontransgenic mice. Moreover, this functional preservation occurred despite increased neuritic plaque burden in the hippocampus of double-transgenic animals and elevated steady-state Abeta levels, because both endogenous and transgene-derived Abeta are increased in enriched animals. These results demonstrate that the generation of Abeta in vivo and its impact on the function of the nervous system can be strongly modulated by environmental factors.

  1. Impaired neurovascular coupling in the APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancillac, Armelle; Geoffroy, Helene; Rossier, Jean

    2012-12-01

    The tight coupling between neuronal activity and the local increase of blood flow termed neurovascular coupling is essential for normal brain function. This mechanism of regulation is compromised in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In order to determine whether a purely vascular dysfunction or a neuronal alteration of blood vessels diameter control could be responsible for the impaired neurovascular coupling observed in AD, blood vessels reactivity in response to different pharmacological stimulations was examined in double transgenic APPxPS1 mice model of AD. Blood vessels movements were monitored using infrared videomicroscopy ex vivo, in cortical slices of 8 month-old APPxPS1 and wild type (WT) mice. We quantified vasomotor responses induced either by direct blood vessel stimulation with a thromboxane A2 analogue, the U46619 (9,11-dideoxy-11a,9a-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α) or via the stimulation of interneurons with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) agonist DMPP (1,1-Dimethyl-4- phenylpiperazinium iodide). Using both types of stimulation, no significant differences were detected for the amplitude of blood vessel diameter changes between the transgenic APPxPS1 mice model of AD and WT mice, although the kinetics of recovery were slower in APPxPS1 mice. We find that activation of neocortical interneurons with DMPP induced both vasodilation via Nitric Oxide (NO) release and constriction via Neuropeptide Y (NPY) release. However, we observed a smaller proportion of reactive blood vessels following a neuronal activation in transgenic mice compared with WT mice. Altogether, these results suggest that in this mouse model of AD, deficiency in the cortical neurovascular coupling essentially results from a neuronal rather than a vascular dysfunction.

  2. Formulation of a Medical Food Cocktail for Alzheimer's Disease: Beneficial Effects on Cognition and Neuropathology in a Mouse Model of the Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary supplements have been extensively studied for their beneficial effects on cognition and AD neuropathology. The current study examines the effect of a medical food cocktail consisting of the dietary supplements curcumin, piperine, epigallocatechin gallate, α-lipoic acid, N-acetylcysteine, B vitamins, vitamin C, and folate on cognitive functioning and the AD hallmark features and amyloid-beta (Aβ) in the Tg2576 mouse model of the disease. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study found ...

  3. The GREGOR Fabry-P\\'erot Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Puschmann, K G; Kneer, F; Erdogan, N Al; Balthasar, H; Bauer, S M; Beck, C; González, N Bello; Collados, M; Hahn, T; Hirzberger, J; Hofmann, A; Louis, R E; Nicklas, H; Okunev, O; Pillet, V Martínez; Popow, E; Seelemann, T; Volkmer, R; Wittmann, A D; Woche, M

    2012-01-01

    The GREGOR Fabry-P\\'erot Interferometer (GFPI) is one of three first-light instruments of the German 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The GFPI uses two tunable etalons in collimated mounting. Thanks to its large-format, high-cadence CCD detectors with sophisticated computer hard- and software it is capable of scanning spectral lines with a cadence that is sufficient to capture the dynamic evolution of the solar atmosphere. The field-of-view (FOV) of 50" x 38" is well suited for quiet Sun and sunspot observations. However, in the vector spectropolarimetric mode the FOV reduces to 25" x 38". The spectral coverage in the spectroscopic mode extends from 530-860 nm with a theoretical spectral resolution R of about 250,000, whereas in the vector spectropolarimetric mode the wavelength range is at present limited to 580-660 nm. The combination of fast narrow-band imaging and post-factum image restoration has the potential for discovery science concerning the dynamic Su...

  4. PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates β-amyloid and tau deposition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Magali; Stack, Cliona; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Jainuddin, Shari; Launay, Nathalie; Gerges, Meri; Starkova, Natalia; Starkov, Anatoly A; Calingasan, Noel Y; Tampellini, Davide; Pujol, Aurora; Beal, M Flint

    2014-04-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) interacts with various transcription factors involved in energy metabolism and in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α mRNA levels are reduced in a number of neurodegenerative diseases and contribute to disease pathogenesis, since increased levels ameliorate behavioral defects and neuropathology of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PGC-1α and its downstream targets are reduced both in postmortem brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in transgenic mouse models of AD. Therefore, we investigated whether increased expression of PGC-1α would exert beneficial effects in the Tg19959 transgenic mouse model of AD; Tg19959 mice express the human amyloid precursor gene (APP) with 2 familial AD mutations and develop increased β-amyloid levels, plaque deposition, and memory deficits by 2-3 mo of age. Rather than an improvement, the cross of the Tg19959 mice with mice overexpressing human PGC-1α exacerbated amyloid and tau accumulation. This was accompanied by an impairment of proteasome activity. PGC-1α overexpression induced mitochondrial abnormalities, neuronal cell death, and an exacerbation of behavioral hyperactivity in the Tg19959 mice. These findings show that PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates the neuropathological and behavioral deficits that occur in transgenic mice with mutations in APP that are associated with human AD.

  5. Transcriptional profile of muscle following acute induction of symptoms in a mouse model of Kennedy's disease/spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Halievski

    Full Text Available Kennedy's disease/Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA is a degenerative neuromuscular disease affecting males. This disease is caused by polyglutamine expansion mutations of the androgen receptor (AR gene. Although KD/SBMA has been traditionally considered a motor neuron disease, emerging evidence points to a central etiological role of muscle. We previously reported a microarray study of genes differentially expressed in muscle of three genetically unique mouse models of KD/SBMA but were unable to detect those which are androgen-dependent or are associated with onset of symptoms.In the current study we examined the time course and androgen-dependence of transcriptional changes in the HSA-AR transgenic (Tg mouse model, in which females have a severe phenotype after acute testosterone treatment. Using microarray analysis we identified differentially expressed genes at the onset and peak of muscle weakness in testosterone-treated Tg females. We found both transient and persistent groups of differentially expressed genes and analysis of gene function indicated functional groups such as mitochondrion, ion and nucleotide binding, muscle development, and sarcomere maintenance.By comparing the current results with those from the three previously reported models we were able to identify KD/SBMA candidate genes that are androgen dependent, and occur early in the disease process, properties which are promising for targeted therapeutics.

  6. Effect of Systemic Iron Overload and a Chelation Therapy in a Mouse Model of the Neurodegenerative Disease Hereditary Ferritinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Goodwin, Charles B.; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; Chan, Rebecca J.; Peacock, Munro; Muhoberac, Barry B.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene cause the neurodegenerative disease neuroferritinopathy or hereditary ferritinopathy (HF). HF is characterized by a severe movement disorder and by the presence of nuclear and cytoplasmic iron-containing ferritin inclusion bodies (IBs) in glia and neurons throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and in tissues of multiple organ systems. Herein, using primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts from a mouse model of HF, we show significant intracellular accumulation of ferritin and an increase in susceptibility to oxidative damage when cells are exposed to iron. Treatment of the cells with the iron chelator deferiprone (DFP) led to a significant improvement in cell viability and a decrease in iron content. In vivo, iron overload and DFP treatment of the mouse model had remarkable effects on systemic iron homeostasis and ferritin deposition, without significantly affecting CNS pathology. Our study highlights the role of iron in modulating ferritin aggregation in vivo in the disease HF. It also puts emphasis on the potential usefulness of a therapy based on chelators that can target the CNS to remove and redistribute iron and to resolubilize or prevent ferritin aggregation while maintaining normal systemic iron stores. PMID:27574973

  7. Structural and metabolic changes in Atp7b-/- mouse liver and potential for new interventions in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is caused by ATP7B mutations and results in copper accumulation and toxicity in liver and brain tissues. The specific mechanisms underlying copper toxicity are still poorly understood. Mouse models have revealed new insights into pathomechanisms of hepatic WD. Mitochondrial damage is observed in livers of WD patients and in mouse models; copper induces fragmentation of mitochondrial membrane lipids, particularly cardiolipin, with deleterious effects on both mitochondrial integrity and function. Copper accumulation also induces chronic inflammation in WD livers, which is followed by regeneration in parts of the liver and occasionally neoplastic proliferation. Gene expression studies using microarrays have aided our understanding of the molecular basis of these changes. Copper overload alters cholesterol biosynthesis in hepatocytes resulting in reduced liver and serum cholesterol. Experiments are currently underway to elucidate the link between copper and cholesterol metabolism. These findings may facilitate the development of specific therapies to ameliorate WD progression.

  8. Generating embryonic stem cells from the inbred mouse strain DBA/2J, a model of glaucoma and other complex diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G Reinholdt

    Full Text Available Mouse embryonic stem (ES cells are derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst stage embryos and are used primarily for the creation of genetically engineered strains through gene targeting. While some inbred strains of mice are permissive to the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines and are therefore easily engineered, others are nonpermissive or recalcitrant. Genetic engineering of recalcitrant strain backgrounds requires gene targeting in a permissive background followed by extensive backcrossing of the engineered allele into the desired strain background. The inbred mouse strain DBA/2J is a recalcitrant strain that is used as a model of many human diseases, including glaucoma, deafness and schizophrenia. Here, we describe the generation of germ-line competent ES cell lines derived from DBA/2J mice. We also demonstrate the utility of DBA/2J ES cells with the creation of conditional knockout allele for Endothelin-2 (Edn2 directly on the DBA/2J strain background.

  9. Loss of GPR3 reduces the amyloid plaque burden and improves memory in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunhong; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Horré, Katrien; Vandewyer, Elke; Wolfs, Leen; Snellinx, An; Saito, Takashi; Radaelli, Enrico; Corthout, Nikky; Colombelli, Julien; Lo, Adrian C; Van Aerschot, Leen; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Trabzuni, Daniah; Bossers, Koen; Verhaagen, Joost; Ryten, Mina; Munck, Sebastian; D'Hooge, Rudi; Swaab, Dick F; Hardy, John; Saido, Takaomi C; De Strooper, Bart; Thathiah, Amantha

    2015-10-14

    The orphan G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR3 regulates activity of the γ-secretase complex in the absence of an effect on Notch proteolysis, providing a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, given the vast resources required to develop and evaluate any new therapy for AD and the multiple failures involved in translational research, demonstration of the pathophysiological relevance of research findings in multiple disease-relevant models is necessary before initiating costly drug development programs. We evaluated the physiological consequences of loss of Gpr3 in four AD transgenic mouse models, including two that contain the humanized murine Aβ sequence and express similar amyloid precursor protein (APP) levels as wild-type mice, thereby reducing potential artificial phenotypes. Our findings reveal that genetic deletion of Gpr3 reduced amyloid pathology in all of the AD mouse models and alleviated cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice. Additional three-dimensional visualization and analysis of the amyloid plaque burden provided accurate information on the amyloid load, distribution, and volume in the structurally intact adult mouse brain. Analysis of 10 different regions in healthy human postmortem brain tissue indicated that GPR3 expression was stable during aging. However, two cohorts of human AD postmortem brain tissue samples showed a correlation between elevated GPR3 and AD progression. Collectively, these studies provide evidence that GPR3 mediates the amyloidogenic proteolysis of APP in four AD transgenic mouse models as well as the physiological processing of APP in wild-type mice, suggesting that GPR3 may be a potential therapeutic target for AD drug development. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Global changes of phospholipids identified by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Hye; Kang, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong Kyu; Baik, Sung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Ho; Shanta, Selina Rahman; Jung, Jae Hun; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia; however, at the present time there is no disease-modifying drug for AD. There is increasing evidence supporting the role of lipid changes in the process of normal cognitive aging and in the etiology of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. AD is characterized by the presence of intraneuronal protein clusters and extracellular aggregates of β-amyloid (Aβ). Disrupted Aβ kinetics may activate intracellular signaling pathways, including tau hyperphosphorylation and proinflammatory pathways. We analyzed and visualized the lipid profiles of mouse brains using MALDI-TOF MS. Direct tissue analysis by MALDI-TOF imaging MS (IMS) can determine the relative abundance and spatial distribution of specific lipids in different tissues. We used 5XFAD mice that almost exclusively generate and rapidly accumulate massive cerebral levels of Aβ-42 (1). Our data showed changes in lipid distribution in the mouse frontal cortex, hippocampus, and subiculum, where Aβ plaques are first generated in AD. Our results suggest that MALDI-IMS is a powerful tool for analyzing the distribution of various phospholipids and that this application might provide novel insight into the prediction of disease.

  11. Modifications of hippocampal circuits and early disruption of adult neurogenesis in the tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Krezymon

    Full Text Available At advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, cognitive dysfunction is accompanied by severe alterations of hippocampal circuits that may largely underlie memory impairments. However, it is likely that anatomical remodeling in the hippocampus may start long before any cognitive alteration is detected. Using the well-described Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease that develops progressive age-dependent amyloidosis and cognitive deficits, we examined whether specific stages of the disease were associated with the expression of anatomical markers of hippocampal dysfunction. We found that these mice develop a complex pattern of changes in their dentate gyrus with aging. Those include aberrant expression of neuropeptide Y and reduced levels of calbindin, reflecting a profound remodeling of inhibitory and excitatory circuits in the dentate gyrus. Preceding these changes, we identified severe alterations of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in Tg2576 mice. We gathered converging data in Tg2576 mice at young age, indicating impaired maturation of new neurons that may compromise their functional integration into hippocampal circuits. Thus, disruption of adult hippocampal neurogenesis occurred before network remodeling in this mouse model and therefore may account as an early event in the etiology of Alzheimer's pathology. Ultimately, both events may constitute key components of hippocampal dysfunction and associated cognitive deficits occurring in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Intravitreal administration of HA-1077, a ROCK inhibitor, improves retinal function in a mouse model of huntington disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that affects multiple brain regions. It is caused by an expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin (Htt. The development of therapies for HD and other neurodegenerative diseases has been hampered by multiple factors, including the lack of clear therapeutic targets, and the cost and complexity of testing lead compounds in vivo. The R6/2 HD mouse model is widely used for pre-clinical trials because of its progressive and robust neural dysfunction, which includes retinal degeneration. Profilin-1 is a Htt binding protein that inhibits Htt aggregation. Its binding to Htt is regulated by the rho-associated kinase (ROCK, which phosphorylates profilin at Ser-137. ROCK is thus a therapeutic target in HD. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 reduces Htt toxicity in fly and mouse models. Here we characterized the progressive retinopathy of R6/2 mice between 6-19 weeks of age to determine an optimal treatment window. We then tested a clinically approved ROCK inhibitor, HA-1077, administered intravitreally via liposome-mediated drug delivery. HA-1077 increased photopic and flicker ERG response amplitudes in R6/2 mice, but not in wild-type littermate controls. By targeting ROCK with a new inhibitor, and testing its effects in a novel in vivo model, these results validate the in vivo efficacy of a therapeutic candidate, and establish the feasibility of using the retina as a readout for CNS function in models of neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Calibrating echelle spectrographs with Fabry-Perot etalons

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Florian F; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades hollow-cathode lamps have been calibration standards for spectroscopic measurements. Advancing to cm/s radial velocity precisions with the next generation of instruments requires more suitable calibration sources with more lines and less dynamic range problems. Fabry-Perot interferometers provide a regular and dense grid of lines and homogeneous amplitudes making them good candidates for next generation calibrators. We investigate the usefulness of Fabry-Perot etalons in wavelength calibration, present an algorithm to incorporate the etalon spectrum in the wavelength solution and examine potential problems. The quasi periodic pattern of Fabry-Perot lines is used along with a hollow-cathode lamp to anchor the numerous spectral features on an absolute scale. We test our method with the HARPS spectrograph and compare our wavelength solution to the one derived from a laser frequency comb. The combined hollow-cathode lamp/etalon calibration overcomes large distortion (50 m/s) in the wavelengt...

  14. Comprehensive behavioral and molecular characterization of a new knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease: zQ175.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B Menalled

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive and psychiatric manifestations. Since the mutation responsible for the disease was identified as an unstable expansion of CAG repeats in the gene encoding the huntingtin protein in 1993, numerous mouse models of HD have been generated to study disease pathogenesis and evaluate potential therapeutic approaches. Of these, knock-in models best mimic the human condition from a genetic perspective since they express the mutation in the appropriate genetic and protein context. Behaviorally, however, while some abnormal phenotypes have been detected in knock-in mouse models, a model with an earlier and more robust phenotype than the existing models is required. We describe here for the first time a new mouse line, the zQ175 knock-in mouse, derived from a spontaneous expansion of the CAG copy number in our CAG 140 knock-in colony [1]. Given the inverse relationship typically observed between age of HD onset and length of CAG repeat, since this new mouse line carries a significantly higher CAG repeat length it was expected to be more significantly impaired than the parent line. Using a battery of behavioral tests we evaluated both heterozygous and homozygous zQ175 mice. Homozygous mice showed motor and grip strength abnormalities with an early onset (8 and 4 weeks of age, respectively, which were followed by deficits in rotarod and climbing activity at 30 weeks of age and by cognitive deficits at around 1 year of age. Of particular interest for translational work, we also found clear behavioral deficits in heterozygous mice from around 4.5 months of age, especially in the dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Decreased body weight was observed in both heterozygotes and homozygotes, along with significantly reduced survival in the homozygotes. In addition, we detected an early and significant decrease of striatal gene markers from 12 weeks of age

  15. Astrocyte reactivity in related brain regions in a mouse model of MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun Zhang; Chunlin Xia; Yulin Dong; Guangming Lü; Juan Liu; Lin Ding; Hengjian Ni

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe injury to dopaminergic neuronal cell bodies and their axon terminals in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) has been observed in both Parkinson's disease (PD) patients or in 1-methy-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrindine(MPTP)-induced PD animal models, but only slight injury occurs in the adjacent ventral tegmental area (VTA). The mechanisms underlying this selective injury remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To comparatively observe astrocyte reactivity in the SNC, caudate putamen (Cpu), VTA, and frontal association cortex (FrA).DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A cellular and molecular biology, randomized, controlled experiment was performed at the Institute of Neurobiology, Department of Human Anatomy, Medical School of Nantong University, between December 2006 and September 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 80 healthy adult male C57BL/6 mice were included in this study. MPTP was purchased from Sigma, USA.METHODS: Mice were randomly divided into a model group (n = 64) and a sham-operated group (n = 16). PD was induced in the mice from the model group by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg MPTP, once every three hours, for a total of 4 times.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive astrocytes were examined by dual immunofluorescence labeling. GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes in the Cpu and FrA were determined by immunofluorescent staining. GFAP mRNA expression in the SNC, Cpu, VTA, and FrA was detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. TH protein levels in the TH-immunoreactive axon terminals of the Cpu and FrA were detected by Western blotting.RESULTS: Numbers of TH-immunoreactive neurons in the SNC, and TH protein level in the Cpu, markedly decreased (by approximately 68%) 1 day after MPTP injection, and gradually increased at 3 days. Simultaneously, astrocyte reactivity was strengthened, in particular at 7 days. However, after MPTP injection, decreases in

  16. RNA interference mitigates motor and neuropathological deficits in a cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clévio Nóbrega

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease or Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Recent studies demonstrate that RNA interference is a promising approach for the treatment of Machado-Joseph disease. However, whether gene silencing at an early time-point is able to prevent the appearance of motor behavior deficits typical of the disease when initiated before onset of the disease had not been explored. Here, using a lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 in an early pre-symptomatic cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease we show that this strategy hampers the development of the motor and neuropathological phenotypic characteristics of the disease. At the histological level, the RNA-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 decreased formation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates, preserved Purkinje cell morphology and expression of neuronal markers while reducing cell death. Importantly, gene silencing prevented the development of impairments in balance, motor coordination, gait and hyperactivity observed in control mice. These data support the therapeutic potential of RNA interference for Machado-Joseph disease and constitute a proof of principle of the beneficial effects of early allele-specific silencing for therapy of this disease.

  17. Time Delay Properties of a Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shi; MAN Wei-Ning; YU Jin; GAO Jin-Yue

    2001-01-01

    The time delay properties of a Fabry-Perot interferometer are investigated. We found that the group velocity of light through a Fabry-Perot interferometer can be reduced to 10-4 of the light speed in vacuum and the time delay is 210ns, when the reflectivity is 0.999 and the distance between two mirrors is 1 cm. The system is analogous to the recently proposed one-dimensional photonic band-gap structures with a defect [Zhu et al. Opt.Commun. 174(2000)139].

  18. Consequences of a global enzyme shortage of agalsidase beta in adult Dutch Fabry patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollak Carla EM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzyme replacement therapy is currently the only approved therapy for Fabry disease. From June 2009 on, viral contamination of Genzyme's production facility resulted in a worldwide shortage of agalsidase beta leading to involuntary dose reductions (approved dose 1 mg/kg/eow, reduced dose 0.5 mg/kg/m, or switch to agalsidase alpha (administered dose 0.2 mg/kg/eow. An assessment report from the European Medicines Agency (EMA raised serious concerns about an increase in adverse events at lower dosages of agalsidase beta. We determined the influence of the shortage on clinical event incidence and the most sensitive biochemical marker (lysoGb3 in Dutch Fabry patients. Methods The incidence of clinical events per person per year was calculated from start of agalsidase beta treatment until the shortage, and was compared to the incidence of clinical events during the shortage period. In addition, plasma lysoGb3, eGFR, quality of life (SF-36 and brief pain inventory (BPI questionnaires were analysed. Results All thirty-five Dutch Fabry patients using agalsidase beta (17 males were included. Mean clinical event incidence was unchanged: 0.15 events per person per year before versus 0.15 during the shortage (p = 0.68. In total 28 clinical events occurred in 14 patients during 4.6 treatment years, compared to 7 events in 6 patients during the 1.3 year shortage period. eGFR and BPI scores were not significantly altered. Two SF-36 subscales were significantly but minimally reduced in females. In males, lysoGb3 increased with a median of 8.1 nM (range 2.5 - 29.2 after 1 year of shortage (p = 0.001. Increases in lysoGb3 were found in both patients switching to agalsidase alpha and on a reduced agalsidase beta dose. Antibody status, treatment duration or clinical event incidence showed no clear correlation to lysoGb3 increases. Conclusions No increase in clinical event incidence was found in the adult Dutch Fabry cohort during the agalsidase

  19. Sodium pump distribution is not reversed in the DBA/2FG-pcy, polycystic kidney disease model mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, G; Nagao, S; Yamamoto, A; Omori, K; Komatz, Y; Takahashi, H; Tashiro, Y

    1994-06-01

    Recently, it has been reported that Na,K-ATPase in the renal epithelia of human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and cpk mouse, a murine model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, mislocates to apical plasma membrane and that mislocated Na,K-ATPase causes the cyst formation. Whether the DBA/2FG-pcy mice, which are presumably a suitable model for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, also exhibit the reversal polarity of Na,K-ATPase localization was examined. Kidneys of newborn DBA/2FG-pcy mice, and those at early and late stages of cyst development were examined by immunohistochemical techniques. At any stage, abnormal distribution of Na,K-ATPase on the apical membranes of tubular epithelial cells could not be detected. It is suggested that cysts can be formed without reversed polarity of Na,K-ATPase distribution in pcy mice.

  20. Five choice serial reaction time performance in the HdhQ92 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, R C; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L; Brooks, S P

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, with motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. To date there is no cure. In order to understand better this disease and to develop novel treatments, many genetically modified animal models of Huntington's disease have been created. However, to utilize these models fully, appropriate functional assays need to be developed for behavioural assessments of the mice. Various facets of attention have been reported to be affected in Huntington's disease patients, and the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice have been shown to have deficits on operant tasks which have attentional components. In the present study, the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mouse model is assessed on a well established test of attentional function, the operant 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRT), in which the mice must respond with a nose poke to light stimuli presented randomly across a 5 hole light array to receive a reward. In the present paper, the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice exhibited deficits on the 5-CSRT when pseudorandomly presented with stimuli of different durations. However, alterations in the pacing of the task, therefore requiring an increase in sustained attention, did not affect the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice more than their wildtype littermates. This study indicates that the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice may have deficits in aspects of attentional function, in particular disruption in the ability to maintain attention in the visuospatial domain, suggesting that this knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease may be a relevant model of the disease for the testing of novel therapeutic interventions.

  1. The isotropic fractionator provides evidence for differential loss of hippocampal neurons in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Hannah; Steele, John W; Westaway, David; Fraser, Paul E; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Gandy, Sam; Hof, Patrick R; Dickstein, Dara L

    2012-11-22

    The accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers or fibrils is thought to be one of the main causes of synaptic and neuron loss, believed to underlie cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuron loss has rarely been documented in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models. We investigated whether two APP mouse models characterized by different folding states of amyloid showed different neuronal densities using an accurate method of cell counting. We examined total cell and neuronal populations in Swedish/Indiana APP mutant mice (TgCRND8) with severe Aβ pathology that includes fibrils, plaques, and oligomers, and Dutch APP mutant mice with only Aβ oligomer pathology. Using the isotropic fractionator, we found no differences from control mice in regional total cell populations in either TgCRND8 or Dutch mice. However, there were 31.8% fewer hippocampal neurons in TgCRND8 compared to controls, while no such changes were observed in Dutch mice. We show that the isotropic fractionator is a convenient method for estimating neuronal content in milligram quantities of brain tissue and represents a useful tool to assess cell loss efficiently in transgenic models with different types of neuropathology. Our data support the hypothesis that TgCRND8 mice with a spectrum of Aβ plaque, fibril, and oligomer pathology exhibit neuronal loss whereas Dutch mice with only oligomers, showed no evidence for neuronal loss. This suggests that the combination of plaques, fibrils, and oligomers causes more damage to mouse hippocampal neurons than Aβ oligomers alone.

  2. Photobiomodulation with near infrared light mitigates Alzheimer's disease-related pathology in cerebral cortex - evidence from two transgenic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothuman, Sivaraman; Johnstone, Daniel M; Nandasena, Charith; Mitrofanis, John; Stone, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the efficacy of irradiating tissue with red to infrared light in mitigating cerebral pathology and degeneration in animal models of stroke, traumatic brain injury, parkinsonism and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using mouse models, we explored the neuroprotective effect of near infrared light (NIr) treatment, delivered at an age when substantial pathology is already present in the cerebral cortex. We studied two mouse models with AD-related pathologies: the K369I tau transgenic model (K3), engineered to develop neurofibrillary tangles, and the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 transgenic model (APP/PS1), engineered to develop amyloid plaques. Mice were treated with NIr 20 times over a four-week period and histochemistry was used to quantify AD-related pathological hallmarks and other markers of cell damage in the neocortex and hippocampus. In the K3 mice, NIr treatment was associated with a reduction in hyperphosphorylated tau, neurofibrillary tangles and oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine) to near wildtype levels in the neocortex and hippocampus, and with a restoration of expression of the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase in surviving neurons. In the APP/PS1 mice, NIr treatment was associated with a reduction in the size and number of amyloid-β plaques in the neocortex and hippocampus. Our results, in two transgenic mouse models, suggest that NIr may have potential as an effective, minimally-invasive intervention for mitigating, and even reversing, progressive cerebral degenerations.

  3. Naringin Enhances CaMKII Activity and Improves Long-Term Memory in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Mei; Yang, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Guan, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Lian-Feng

    2013-03-11

    The Amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity is an underlying mechanism of memory loss in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human and mouse models. The inhibition of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation plays an important role in long-term memory. In this study, we isolated naringin from Pomelo peel (a Citrus species) and studied its effect on long-term memory in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of AD. Three-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to a vehicle group, two naringin (either 50 or 100 mg/kg body weight/day) groups, or an Aricept (2 mg/kg body weight/day) group. After 16 weeks of treatment, we observed that treatment with naringin (100 mg/kg body weight/day) enhanced the autophosphorylation of CaMKII, increased the phosphorylation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPA) receptor at a CaMKII-dependent site and improved long-term learning and memory ability. These findings suggest that the increase in CaMKII activity may be one of the mechanisms by which naringin improves long-term cognitive function in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of AD.

  4. Presenilin-2 Mutation Causes Early Amyloid Accumulation and Memory Impairment in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Toda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the pathophysiological role of presenilin-2 (PS2 carrying the Volga German Kindred mutation (N141I in a conventional mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD expressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish mutation (Tg2576 line, we generated a double transgenic mouse (PS2Tg2576 by crossbreeding the PS2 mutant with Tg2576 mice. Here, we demonstrate that the PS2 mutation induced the early deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ at 2-3 months of age and progressive accumulation at 4-5 months of age in the brains of the mutant mice. The PS2 mutation also accelerated learning and memory impairment associated with Aβ accumulation at 4-5 months of age in Tg2576 mice. These results suggest that the PS2 mutation causes early cerebral amyloid accumulation and memory dysfunction. PS2Tg2576 mice are a suitable mouse model for studying amyloid-lowering therapies.

  5. Protective effects of kidney-tonifying Chinese herbal preparation on substantia nigra neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Cai; Yun Tian; Ruhui Lin; Xuzheng Chen; Zhizhen Liu; Jindong Xie

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese herbs Herba Epimedii, Fructus Ligustri Lucidi and Rhizoma Polygonati were injected into Parkinson's disease mice established via intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride. The selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitor selegiline was used as a positive control drug. After successive administration for 4 weeks, Herba Epimedii could downregulate the expression of caspase-3 and increase the brain-derived neurotrophic factor level, as well as increase tyrosine hydroxylase activity in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease mouse models. Rhizoma Polygonati could downregulate the expression of caspase-3 and FasL, and increase neural growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Fructus Ligustri Lucidi could downregulate caspase-3 expression. Rhizoma Polygonati and Fructus Ligustri Lucidi did not produce obvious effects on tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Herba Epimedii and Fructus Ligustri Lucidi yielded similar effects on apoptosis-promoting factors to those elicited by selegiline. Herba Epimedii and Rhizoma Polygonati significantly increased the levels of neurotrophic factors compared with selegiline. Herba Epimedii significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity compared with selegiline. It is indicated that the kidney-tonifying Chinese herbal preparation can downregulate the expression of apoptosis-promoting factors, increase neurotrophic factors levels in the substantia nigra and striatum, as well as increase tyrosine hydroxylase activity in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease mouse models, thereby exerting a stronger or similar neuroprotective effects compared with selegiline.

  6. Galantamine slows down plaque formation and behavioral decline in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumee Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The plant alkaloid galantamine is an established symptomatic drug treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD, providing temporary cognitive and global relief in human patients. In this study, the 5X Familial Alzheimer's Disease (5XFAD mouse model was used to investigate the effect of chronic galantamine treatment on behavior and amyloid β (Aβ plaque deposition in the mouse brain. Quantification of plaques in untreated 5XFAD mice showed a gender specific phenotype; the plaque density increased steadily reaching saturation in males after 10 months of age, whereas in females the density further increased until after 14 months of age. Moreover, females consistently displayed a higher plaque density in comparison to males of the same age. Chronic oral treatment with galantamine resulted in improved performance in behavioral tests, such as open field and light-dark avoidance, already at mildly affected stages compared to untreated controls. Treated animals of both sexes showed significantly lower plaque density in the brain, i.e., the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, gliosis being always positively correlated to plaque load. A high dose treatment with a daily uptake of 26 mg/kg body weight was tolerated well and produced significantly larger positive effects than a lower dose treatment (14 mg/kg body weight in terms of plaque density and behavior. These results strongly support that galantamine, in addition to improving cognitive and behavioral symptoms in AD, may have disease-modifying and neuroprotective properties, as is indicated by delayed Aβ plaque formation and reduced gliosis.

  7. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria; Nicoline; Baandrup; Kristiansen; Sanne; Skovg?rd; Veidal; Kristoffer; Tobias; Gustav; Rigbolt; Kirstine; Sloth; T?lb?l; Jonathan; David; Roth; Jacob; Jelsing; Niels; Vrang; Michael; Feigh

    2016-01-01

    /ob chow),respectively.Furthermore,fibrosis stage was significantly elevated for DIO-NASH mice(0 vs 1.2±0.2,P<0.05 compared to lean chow)and ob/ob NASH(0.1±0.1 vs 3.0±0.2,P<0.001compared to ob/ob chow).Notably,fibrosis stage was significantly(P<0.001)increased in ob/ob-NASH mice,when compared to DIO-NASH mice.CONCLUSION:These data introduce the obese dietinduced DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mouse models with biopsy-confirmed individual disease staging as a preclinical platform for evaluation of novel NASH therapeutics.

  8. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ) and ob/ob-NASH mice (2.4 ± 0.3 vs 6.3 ± 0.2, P < 0.001 compared to ob/ob chow), respectively. Furthermore, fibrosis stage was significantly elevated for DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 1.2 ± 0.2, P < 0.05 compared to lean chow) and ob/ob NASH (0.1 ± 0.1 vs 3.0 ± 0.2, P < 0.001 compared to ob/ob chow). Notably, fibrosis stage was significantly (P < 0.001) increased in ob/ob-NASH mice, when compared to DIO-NASH mice. CONCLUSION: These data introduce the obese diet-induced DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mouse models with biopsy-confirmed individual disease staging as a preclinical platform for evaluation of novel NASH therapeutics. PMID:27326314

  9. Maternal western diet primes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adult mouse offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruis, M. G. M.; Lendvai, A.; Bloks, V. W.; Zwier, M. V.; Baller, J. F. W.; de Bruin, A.; Groen, A. K.; Plosch, T.

    AimMetabolic programming via components of the maternal diet during gestation may play a role in the development of different aspects of the metabolic syndrome. Using a mouse model, we aimed to characterize the role of maternal western-type diet in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver

  10. Oral administration of methysticin improves cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios Fragoulis

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: In summary, these findings show that methysticin administration activates the Nrf2 pathway and reduces neuroinflammation, hippocampal oxidative damage and memory loss in a mouse model of AD. Therefore, kavalactones might be suitable candidates to serve as lead compounds for the development of a new class of neuroprotective drugs.

  11. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovjan, Andreana C.; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late stage human Alzheimer’s disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher th...

  12. Commensal Bacteroides species induce colitis in host-genotype-specific fashion in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Seth M.; Bijanki, Vinieth N.; Nava, Gerardo M.; Sun, Lulu; Malvin, Nicole P.; Donermeyer, David L.; Dunne, W. Michael; Allen, Paul M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal microbiota is important for induction of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with complex shifts in microbiota composition, but it is unclear whether specific bacterial subsets induce IBD and, if so, whether their proportions in the microbiota are altered during disease. Here we fulfilled Koch’s postulates in host-genotype-specific fashion using a mouse model of IBD with human-relevant disease-susceptibility mutations. From screening experiments we isolated common commensal Bacteroides species, introduced them into antibiotic-pretreated mice, and quantitatively re-isolated them in culture. The bacteria colonized IBD-susceptible and non-susceptible mice equivalently, but induced disease exclusively in susceptible animals. Conversely, commensal Enterobacteriaceae were >100-fold enriched during spontaneous disease but an Enterobacteriaceae isolate failed to induce disease in antibiotic-pretreated mice despite robust colonization. We thus demonstrate that IBD-associated microbiota alterations do not necessarily reflect underlying disease etiology. These findings establish important experimental criteria and a conceptual framework for understanding microbial contributions to IBD. PMID:21575910

  13. Inhibition of peptidyl-arginine deiminases reverses protein-hypercitrullination and disease in mouse models of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Moscarello

    2013-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common CNS-demyelinating disease of humans, showing clinical and pathological heterogeneity and a general resistance to therapy. We first discovered that abnormal myelin hypercitrullination, even in normal-appearing white matter, by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs correlates strongly with disease severity and might have an important role in MS progression. Hypercitrullination is known to promote focal demyelination through reduced myelin compaction. Here we report that 2-chloroacetamidine (2CA, a small-molecule, PAD active-site inhibitor, dramatically attenuates disease at any stage in independent neurodegenerative as well as autoimmune MS mouse models. 2CA reduced PAD activity and protein citrullination to pre-disease status. In the autoimmune models, disease induction uniformly induced spontaneous hypercitrullination with citrulline+ epitopes targeted frequently. 2CA rapidly suppressed T cell autoreactivity, clearing brain and spinal cord infiltrates, through selective removal of newly activated T cells. 2CA essentially prevented disease when administered before disease onset or before autoimmune induction, making hypercitrullination, and specifically PAD enzymes, a therapeutic target in MS models and thus possibly in MS.

  14. Mathematical model of Fabry-Perot cavity filter%WDM设计中的Fabry-Perot腔传递函数模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雅东; 武良春

    2003-01-01

    作为WDM(Wave Division Multiplexing)一个重要的器件,Fabry-Perot腔的相关设计和算法不断更新.笔者提出一种新的数学模型:把Fabry-Perot作为系统的一个参数对待,将信号与系统的知识纳入Fabry-Perot腔中,用系统的方法(梅森公式)求解Fabry-Perot腔的传递函数,避免了繁琐的矩阵运算,这样易于理解和优化设计.

  15. Mouse ChemR23 is expressed in dendritic cell subsets and macrophages, and mediates an anti-inflammatory activity of chemerin in a lung disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangsay, Souphalone; Wittamer, Valérie; Bondue, Benjamin; De Henau, Olivier; Rouger, Laurie; Brait, Maryse; Franssen, Jean-Denis; de Nadai, Patricia; Huaux, François; Parmentier, Marc

    2009-11-15

    Chemerin is the ligand of the ChemR23 receptor and a chemoattractant factor for human immature dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, and NK cells. In this study, we characterized the mouse chemerin/ChemR23 system in terms of pharmacology, structure-function, distribution, and in vivo biological properties. Mouse chemerin is synthesized as an inactive precursor (prochemerin) requiring, as in human, the precise processing of its C terminus for generating an agonist of ChemR23. Mouse ChemR23 is highly expressed in immature plasmacytoid DCs and at lower levels in myeloid DCs, macrophages, and NK cells. Mouse prochemerin is expressed in most epithelial cells acting as barriers for pathogens but not in leukocytes. Chemerin promotes calcium mobilization and chemotaxis on DCs and macrophages and these functional responses were abrogated in ChemR23 knockout mice. In a mouse model of acute lung inflammation induced by LPS, chemerin displayed potent anti-inflammatory properties, reducing neutrophil infiltration and inflammatory cytokine release in a ChemR23-dependent manner. ChemR23 knockout mice were unresponsive to chemerin and displayed an increased neutrophil infiltrate following LPS challenge. Altogether, the mouse chemerin/ChemR23 system is structurally and functionally conserved between human and mouse, and mouse can therefore be considered as a good model for studying the anti-inflammatory role of this system in the regulation of immune responses and inflammatory diseases.

  16. UCP2 overexpression worsens mitochondrial dysfunction and accelerates disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Pablo M; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Sider, Brittany; Starkov, Anatoly; Horvath, Tamas L; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction leading to deficits in energy production, Ca(2+) uptake capacity, and free radical generation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Numerous studies link UCP2, a member of the uncoupling protein family, to protection of neurons from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in various mouse models of acute stress and neurodegeneration, including Parkinson's disease. Here, we tested the potential neuroprotective effects of UCP2 and its ability to modulate mitochondrial function, in the G93A mutant SOD1 mouse model of familial ALS. Disease phenotype, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and Ca(2+) uptake capacity were investigated in the central nervous system of double transgenic mice, expressing both human mutant G93A SOD1 and human UCP2 (hUCP2). Unexpectedly, hUCP2 expression accelerated the disease course of SOD1 mutant mice. In addition, we did not observe a classical uncoupling effect of hUCP2 in G93A brain mitochondria, although we did detect a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondria challenged with the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A. We also found that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake capacity was decreased in the double transgenic mice, as compared to G93A mice. In summary, our results indicate that the neuroprotective role of UCP2 in neurodegeneration is disease-specific and that, while a mild uncoupling by UCP2 in brain mitochondria may protect against neurodegeneration in some injury paradigms, the mitochondrial damage and the disease caused by mutant SOD1 cannot be ameliorated by UCP2 overexpression. © 2013.

  17. A Fabry-Perot Solid Etalon for Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, P. J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a solid etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer, discussing free spectral range, instrumental finesse, and temperature effects. Provides schematic of temperature control/display circuit. Explains use of 100 millimeter camera lens and 10 power micrometer eyepiece for resolving rings and measure diameters. (JM)

  18. A Coaxial Cable Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Luo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a novel coaxial cable Fabry-Perot interferometer for sensing applications. The sensor is fabricated by drilling two holes half-way into a coaxial cable. The device physics was described. The temperature and strain responses of the sensor were tested. The measurement error was calculated and analyzed.

  19. Development of the Fabry-Perot Spectrometer Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a greenhouse gas with global warming effects 20 times more detrimental than carbon dioxide. Currently, only aircraft missions measure methane and do not provide continuous monitoring, This presentation will cover the Fabry-Perot spectrometer which will provide continuous monitoring of methane. It will also cover the development of the software used to extract and process the data the spectrometer collects.

  20. Gamma irradiation of Fabry-Perot interband cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Merritt, Charles D.; Bewley, William W.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.

    2017-09-20

    Two Fabry-Perot interband cascade lasers (ICLs) were exposed to Cobalt-60 gamma rays for a dosage of 500 krad(Si) each, which is higher than is typically encountered in space applications. The ICLs do not show any significant changes in threshold current or slope efficiency, suggesting the suitability of ICLs for use in radiation environments.

  1. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  2. Variable Free Spectral Range Spherical Mirror Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, K; Yashchuk, V V; Budker, D; Kerner, Katherine; Rochester, Simon M.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2003-01-01

    A spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer with adjustable mirror spacing is used to produce interference fringes with frequency separation (c/2L)/N, N=2-15. The conditions for observation of these fringes are derived from the consideration of the eigenmodes of the cavity with high transverse indices.

  3. Presymptomatic alterations in energy metabolism and oxidative stress in the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Daniela; Schuldt, Victoria; Forler, Stephanie; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Rohe, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Glucose hypometabolism is the earliest symptom observed in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. In a former study, we analyzed the cortical proteome of the APP23 mouse model of AD at presymptomatic age (1 month) using a 2-D electrophoresis-based approach. Interestingly, long before amyloidosis can be observed in APP23 mice, proteins associated with energy metabolism were predominantly altered in transgenic as compared to wild-type mice indicating presymptomatic changes in energy metabolism. In the study presented here, we analyzed whether the observed changes were associated with oxidative stress and confirmed our previous findings in primary cortical neurons, which exhibited altered ADP/ATP levels if transgenic APP was expressed. Reactive oxygen species produced during energy metabolism have important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis as they modify proteins. We observed an overall up-regulation of protein oxidation status as shown by increased protein carbonylation in the cortex of presymptomatic APP23 mice. Interestingly, many carbonylated proteins, such as Vilip1 and Syntaxin were associated to synaptic plasticity. This demonstrates an important link between energy metabolism and synaptic function, which is altered in AD. In summary, we demonstrate that changes in cortical energy metabolism and increased protein oxidation precede the amyloidogenic phenotype in a mouse model for AD. These changes might contribute to synaptic failure observed in later disease stages, as synaptic transmission is particularly dependent on energy metabolism.

  4. The anti-inflammatory glycoprotein, CD200, restores neurogenesis and enhances amyloid phagocytosis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnum, Megan M; Kiyota, Tomomi; Ingraham, Kaitlin L; Ikezu, Seiko; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-11-01

    Cluster of Differentiation-200 (CD200) is an anti-inflammatory glycoprotein expressed in neurons, T cells, and B cells, and its receptor is expressed on glia. Both Alzheimer's disease patients and mouse models display age-related or amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-induced reductions in CD200. The goal of this study was to determine if neuronal CD200 expression restores hippocampal neurogenesis and reduces Aβ in the amyloid precursor protein mouse model. Amyloid precursor protein and wild-type mice were injected at 6 months of age with an adeno-associated virus expressing CD200 into the hippocampus and sacrificed at 12 months. CD200 expression restored neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the subgranular and granular cell layers of the dentate gyrus and reduced diffuse but not thioflavin-S(+) plaques in the hippocampus. In vitro studies demonstrated that CD200-stimulated microglia increased neural differentiation of neural stem cells and enhanced axon elongation and dendrite number. CD200 also enhanced Aβ uptake by microglia. These data indicate that CD200 is capable of enhancing microglia-mediated Aβ clearance and neural differentiation and has potential as a therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. The de-ubiquitinating enzyme ataxin-3 does not modulate disease progression in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Tallaksen-Greene, Sara J; Wang, Bo; Albin, Roger L; Paulson, Henry L

    2013-01-01

    Ataxin-3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that participates in ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control pathways and, based on studies in model systems, may be neuroprotective against toxic polyglutamine proteins such as the Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (htt). HD is one of at least nine polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases in which disease-causing proteins accumulate in ubiquitin-positive inclusions within neurons. In studies crossing mice null for ataxin-3 to an established HD knock-in mouse model (HdhQ200), we tested whether loss of ataxin-3 alters disease progression, perhaps by impairing the clearance of mutant htt or the ubiquitination of inclusions. While loss of ataxin-3 mildly exacerbated age-dependent motor deficits, it did not alter inclusion formation, ubiquitination of inclusions or levels of mutant or normal htt. Ataxin-3, itself a polyglutamine-containing protein with multiple ubiquitin binding domains, was not observed to localize to htt inclusions. Changes in neurotransmitter receptor binding known to occur in HD knock-in mice also were not altered by the loss of ataxin-3, although we unexpectedly observed increased GABAA receptor binding in the striatum of HdhQ200 mice, which has not previously been noted. Finally, we confirmed that CNS levels of hsp70 are decreased in HD mice as has been reported in other HD mouse models, regardless of the presence or absence of ataxin-3. We conclude that while ataxin-3 may participate in protein quality control pathways, it does not critically regulate the handling of mutant htt or contribute to major features of disease pathogenesis in HD.

  6. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielza Andrade Nunes

    Full Text Available The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd20Lms/2J and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  7. Insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 administration ameliorates disease manifestations in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-12-06

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1-treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease.

  8. Exercise is not beneficial and may accelerate symptom onset in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Michelle C; Yuan, Chunyan; Ottenritter, Conwell; Mughal, Mohamed; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Exercise benefits both general health and brain function in rodents and humans. However, it is less clear whether physical activity prevents or ameliorates neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine whether voluntary wheel running can delay the onset or reduce the severity of Huntington’s disease (HD) in a mouse model. To investigate whether running may delay HD symptoms lifespan, disease onset, locomotor activity, glucose levels, weight, striatal volume, inclusions, cognition and hippocampal neurogenesis were studied in male N171-82Q transgenic HD mice. Running started in pre-symptomatic (44±1 days old) male HD mice, did not improve function and appeared to accelerate disease onset. In particular, HD runners had an earlier onset of disease symptoms (shaking, hunched back and poor grooming), reduced striatal volume and impaired motor behavior, including a shorter latency to fall from the rotarod compared to sedentary controls. Furthermore, weight loss, reduced lifespan, hyperglycemia, Morris water maze learning deficits, diminished hippocampal neurogenesis, deficits in immature neuronal morphology, intranuclear inclusions and decreased dentate gyrus volume were refractory to physical activity. Taken together our research indicates that exercise is not beneficial, and may be detrimental to a vulnerable nervous system. PMID:21152076

  9. The mouse as a model for understanding chronic diseases of aging: the histopathologic basis of aging in inbred mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harrison

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inbred mice provide a unique tool to study aging populations because of the genetic homogeneity within an inbred strain, their short life span, and the tools for analysis which are available. A large-scale longitudinal and cross-sectional aging study was conducted on 30 inbred strains to determine, using histopathology, the type and diversity of diseases mice develop as they age. These data provide tools that when linked with modern in silico genetic mapping tools, can begin to unravel the complex genetics of many of the common chronic diseases associated with aging in humans and other mammals. In addition, novel disease models were discovered in some strains, such as rhabdomyosarcoma in old A/J mice, to diseases affecting many but not all strains including pseudoxanthoma elasticum, pulmonary adenoma, alopecia areata, and many others. This extensive data set is now available online and provides a useful tool to help better understand strain-specific background diseases that can complicate interpretation of genetically engineered mice and other manipulatable mouse studies that utilize these strains.

  10. Electrical Changes in Resting, Exercise, and Holter Electrocardiography in Fabry Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Johannes; Nordbeck, Peter; Störk, Stefan; Ritter, Christian; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank

    2015-10-27

    In Fabry cardiomyopathy, little is known about the interaction between its key feature of myocardial replacement fibrosis and changes in resting, Holter, and exercise electrocardiography (-ECG). Resting ECG, 24-h Holter ECG, and exercise ECG were performed in 95 patients (50 women) with Fabry disease, staged using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to measure left ventricular fibrosis. With resting ECG, T alterations were seen in patients with cardiac fibrosis, while time intervals and rhythm were unchanged (except for a longer QRS duration in patients with severe fibrosis). All patients with severe fibrosis showed T inversion, ST alteration, or both. With Holter ECG, maximum and minimum heart rate did not differ with fibrosis severity. Patients without fibrotic tissue showed less ventricular premature beats (VPB) (median 5/24 h) compared to those with mild (median 11/24 h) or severe fibrosis (median 115/24 h; P 10 mmHg) occurred in some patients with no (3/41) or mild fibrosis (3/34) but not in patients with severe fibrosis (0/20; P Holter ECG. During exercise ECG, advanced cardiomyopathy is characterized by chronotropic incompetence with limitations on blood pressure and heart rate increase.

  11. A Comparative Study of Five Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease: Cell Cycle Events Reveal New Insights into Neurons at Risk for Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luming Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic cell cycle events (CCEs in postmitotic neurons link the neurodegenerative process in human Alzheimer's disease (AD with the brain phenotype of transgenic mouse models with known familial AD genes. Most reports on the mouse models use the appearance of brain amyloid pathology as a key outcome measure. In the current paper, we focus on the induction of neurodegeneration using CCEs as markers for impending neuronal loss. We compare 5 mouse models of familial AD for the appearance of CCEs in subcortical regions—deep cerebellar nuclei, amygdala, locus coeruleus, hippocampus, and dorsal raphe. We find that the models differ in their CCE involvement as well as in the appearance of phosphorylated tau and amyloid deposition, suggesting that each model represents a different disease phenotype. Comparison with the pattern of neuron death in human AD suggests that each may represent a distinctly different disease model when used in preclinical trials.

  12. Scientists find link between allergic and autoimmune diseases in mouse study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, have discovered that a gene called BACH2 may play a central role in the development of diverse allergic and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, asthma, Crohn's disease, ce

  13. Protective Effect of Carvacrol against Gut Dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile Associated Disease in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Venkitanarayanan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of carvacrol (CR, a phytophenolic compound on antibiotic-associated gut dysbiosis and C. difficile infection in a mouse model. Five to six-week-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into seven treatment groups (challenge and control of eight mice each. Mice were fed with irradiated feed supplemented with CR (0, 0.05, and 0.1%; the challenge groups were made susceptible to C. difficile by orally administering an antibiotic cocktail in water and an intra-peritoneal injection of clindamycin. Both challenge and control groups were infected with 105CFU/ml of hypervirulent C. difficile (ATCC 1870 spores or PBS, and observed for clinical signs for 10 days. Respective control groups for CR, antibiotics, and their combination were included for investigating their effect on mouse enteric microflora. Mouse body weight and clinical and diarrhea scores were recorded daily post infection. Fecal samples were collected for microbiome analysis using rRNA sequencing in MiSeq platform. Carvacrol supplementation significantly reduced the incidence of diarrhea and improved the clinical and diarrhea scores in mice (p < 0.05. Microbiome analysis revealed a significant increase in Proteobacteria and reduction in the abundance of protective bacterial flora in antibiotic-treated and C. difficile-infected mice compared to controls (p < 0.05. However, CR supplementation positively altered the microbiome composition, as revealed by an increased abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Firmicutes, and significantly reduced the proportion of detrimental flora such as Proteobacteria, without significantly affecting the gut microbiome diversity compared to control. Results suggest that CR could potentially be used to control gut dysbiosis and reduce C. difficile infection.

  14. Transgenic mouse models resistant to diet-induced metabolic disease: is energy balance the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Neufer, P Darrell

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence and economic burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes is a driving force for the discovery of molecular targets to improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Here, we review several transgenic mouse models that identify promising targets, ranging from proteins involved in the insulin signaling pathway, alterations of genes affecting energy metabolism, and transcriptional metabolic regulators. Despite the diverse endpoints in each model, a common thread that emerges is the necessity for maintenance of energy balance, suggesting pharmacotherapy must target the development of drugs that decrease energy intake, accelerate energy expenditure in a well controlled manner, or augment natural compensatory responses to positive energy balance.

  15. Selenotranscriptomic Analyses Identify Signature Selenoproteins in Brain Regions in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Sun, Sheng-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Fan, Hui-Hui; Wu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Song-Fang; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Zhu, Jian-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Genes of selenoproteome have been increasingly implicated in various aspects of neurobiology and neurological disorders, but remain largely elusive in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this study, we investigated the selenotranscriptome (24 selenoproteins in total) in five brain regions (cerebellum, substantia nigra, cortex, pons and hippocampus) by real time qPCR in a two-phase manner using a mouse model of chronic PD. A wide range of changes in selenotranscriptome was observed in a manner depending on selenoproteins and brain regions. While Selv mRNA was not detectable and Dio1& 3 mRNA levels were not affected, 1, 11 and 9 selenoproteins displayed patterns of increase only, decrease only, and mixed response, respectively, in these brain regions of PD mice. In particular, the mRNA expression of Gpx1-4 showed only a decreased trend in the PD mouse brains. In substantia nigra, levels of 17 selenoprotein mRNAs were significantly decreased whereas no selenoprotein was up-regulated in the PD mice. In contrast, the majority of selenotranscriptome did not change and a few selenoprotein mRNAs that respond displayed a mixed pattern of up- and down-regulation in cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus, and/or pons of the PD mice. Gpx4, Sep15, Selm, Sepw1, and Sepp1 mRNAs were most abundant across all these five brain regions. Our results showed differential responses of selenoproteins in various brain regions of the PD mouse model, providing critical selenotranscriptomic profiling for future functional investigation of individual selenoprotein in PD etiology. PMID:27656880

  16. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state.

  17. A novel biomechanical analysis of gait changes in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner J. Geldenhuys

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder hallmarked by a loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Accurate recapitulation of the PD movement phenotype in animal models of the disease is critical for understanding disease etiology and developing novel therapeutic treatments. However, most existing behavioral assays currently applied to such animal models fail to adequately detect and subsequently quantify the subtle changes associated with the progressive stages of PD. In this study, we used a video-based analysis system to develop and validate a novel protocol for tracking locomotor performance in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of PD. We anticipated that (1 treated mice should use slower, shorter, and less frequent strides and (2 that gait deficits should monotonically increase following MPTP administration, as the effects of neurodegeneration become manifest. Video-based biomechanical analyses, utilizing behavioral measures motivated by the comparative biomechanics literature, were used to quantify gait dynamics over a seven-day period following MPTP treatment. Analyses revealed shuffling behaviors consistent with the gait symptoms of advanced PD in humans. Here we also document dramatic gender-based differences in locomotor performance during the progression of the MPTP-induced lesion, despite male and female mice showing similar losses of striatal dopaminergic cells following MPTP administration. Whereas female mice appeared to be protected against gait deficits, males showed multiple changes in gait kinematics, consistent with the loss of locomotor agility and stability. Overall, these data show that the novel video analysis protocol presented here is a robust method capable of detecting subtle changes in gait biomechanics in a mouse model of PD. Our findings indicate that this method is a useful means by which to easily and economically screen preclinical therapeutic

  18. The Effect of Silybum marianum on GFAP and Spatial Memory in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer\\'s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hadinia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Studies have shown that Silybum marianum have high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances and have neuro-protective effects on neurodegenerative diseases. Accordingly, this study was conducted to determine the possible effect of Silybum marianum on expression of and spatial memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2009. Thirty adult male Wistar rats were allocated in three groups: sham group, experimental group, and lesion group, each consisting of ten rats. The experimental and lesion groups received Ibotonic acid of the NBM nucleus in stereotaxic apparatus whereas the sham group underwent surgical procedure without any injection. The experimental group received 200mg/kg of Silybum mirianum extract orally, diluted in 1% Arabic gum. Also the sham group received 1% Arabic gum every day for four weeks. The lesion group did not receive anything. The behavioral assessment was measured, after treatment , by using of Y maze test on day 7 and 28 in all groups. The ELISA method was used to measure the GFAP level in Hippocamp at the end of behavioral assessment. The collected data was analyzed by the SPSS software using ANOVA and Repeated Measures of Analysis Variance tests. Results:Improvement of behavioral performance of the experimental animals compared to the lesion and sham groups were increased significantly on day 7 and 28 (P <0.01 & P <0.001 respectively. The ELISA method showed that the level of the GFAP synthesis decreased in the experimental group compared to the lesion and sham groups (P <0.001. Conclusion: The Silybum marianum plant has a protective effect on the nerve tissue in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by decreasing of the GFAP synthesis and lead to the improvement of behavioral performance. :

  19. The novel adaptive rotating beam test unmasks sensorimotor impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, Julia; Bauer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Richter, Angelika; Richter, Franziska

    2016-05-01

    Development of disease modifying therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, relies on availability of animal models which recapitulate the disease hallmarks. Only few transgenic mouse models, which mimic overexpression of alpha-synuclein, show dopamine loss, behavioral impairments and protein aggregation. Mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein under the Thy-1 promotor (Thy1-aSyn) replicate these features. However, female mice do not exhibit a phenotype. This was attributed to a potentially lower transgene expression located on the X chromosome. Here we support that female mice overexpress human wildtype alpha-synuclein only about 1.5 fold in the substantia nigra, compared to about 3 fold in male mice. Since female Thy1-aSyn mice were shown previously to exhibit differences in corticostriatal communication and synaptic plasticity similar to their male counterparts we hypothesized that female mice use compensatory mechanisms and strategies to not show overt motor deficits despite an underlying endophenotype. In order to unmask these deficits we translated recent findings in PD patients that sensory abnormalities can enhance motor dysfunction into a novel behavioral test, the adaptive rotating beam test. We found that under changing sensory input female Thy1-aSyn mice showed an overt phenotype. Our data supports that the integration of sensorimotor information is likely a major contributor to symptoms of movement disorders and that even low levels of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein has the potential to disrupt processing of these information. The here described adaptive rotating beam test represents a sensitive behavioral test to detect moderate sensorimotor alterations in mouse models.

  20. Loss of HCN1 enhances disease progression in mouse models of CNG channel-linked retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Christian; Asteriti, Sabrina; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Herms, Jochen; Seeliger, Mathias W; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-03-15

    Most inherited blinding diseases are characterized by compromised retinal function and progressive degeneration of photoreceptors. However, the factors that affect the life span of photoreceptors in such degenerative retinal diseases are rather poorly understood. Here, we explore the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) in this context. HCN1 is known to adjust retinal function under mesopic conditions, and although it is expressed at high levels in rod and cone photoreceptor inner segments, no association with any retinal disorder has yet been found. We investigated the effects of an additional genetic deletion of HCN1 on the function and survival of photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGB1-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We found that the absence of HCN1 in Cngb1 knockout (KO) mice exacerbated photoreceptor degeneration. The deleterious effect was reduced by expression of HCN1 using a viral vector. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of HCN1 also enhanced rod degeneration in Cngb1 KO mice. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that the membrane potentials of Cngb1 KO and Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO rods were both significantly depolarized. We also found evidence for altered calcium homeostasis and increased activation of the protease calpain in Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO mice. Finally, the deletion of HCN1 also exacerbated degeneration of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGA3-linked achromatopsia. Our results identify HCN1 as a major modifier of photoreceptor degeneration and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of HCN channels may enhance disease progression in RP and achromatopsia patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Effects of treadmill exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis in an MPTP /probenecid-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise on non-motor function, specifically long-term memory, in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model. [Methods] A mouse model of Parkinson's disease was developed by injecting 20 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 250 mg/kg of probenecid (P). We divided in into four groups: probenecid group, probenecid-exercise group, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group, and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group. Mice in the exercise groups ran on treadmill for 30 min/day, five times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] Latency in the passive avoidance test increased in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group compared with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. In addition, the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/NeuN-positive cells and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was higher in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group than that in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. These changes were associated with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that treadmill exercise may improve long-term memory in Parkinson's disease mice by facilitating neurogenesis via increased expression of neurotrophic factors.

  2. Blockade of Gap Junction Hemichannel Suppresses Disease Progression in Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease: e21108

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hideyuki Takeuchi; Hiroyuki Mizoguchi; Yukiko Doi; Shijie Jin; Mariko Noda; Jianfeng Liang; Hua Li; Yan Zhou; Rarami Mori; Satoko Yasuoka; Endong Li; Bijay Parajuli; Jun Kawanokuchi; Yoshifumi Sonobe; Jun Sato; Koji Yamanaka; Gen Sobue; Tetsuya Mizuno; Akio Suzumura

    2011-01-01

    ... neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel...

  3. Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases TRX1 and TMX3 Decrease Neuronal Atrophy in a Lentiviral Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jonathan; Lu, Zhen; Barrows, Lorraine

    2015-11-06

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT) that results in expression of a polyglutamine-expanded mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). N-terminal fragments of mHTT accumulate in brain neurons and glia as soluble monomeric and oligomeric species as well as insoluble protein aggregates and drive the disease process. Decreasing mHTT levels in brain provides protection and reversal of disease signs in HD mice making mHTT a prime target for disease modification. There is evidence for aberrant thiol oxidation within mHTT and other proteins in HD models. Based on this, we hypothesized that a specific thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase exists that decreases mHTT levels in cells and provides protection in HD mice. We undertook an in-vitro genetic screen of key thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases then completed secondary screens to identify those with mHTT decreasing properties. Our in-vitro experiments identified thioredoxin 1 and thioredoxin-related transmembrane protein 3 as proteins that decrease soluble mHTT levels in cultured cells. Using a lentiviral mouse model of HD we tested the effect of these proteins in striatum. Both proteins decreased mHTT-induced striatal neuronal atrophy. Findings provide evidence for a role of dysregulated protein-thiol homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HD.

  4. Differential pathlength factor informs evoked stimulus response in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alexander J; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Durkin, Anthony J; Venugopalan, Vasan; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    Baseline optical properties are typically assumed in calculating the differential pathlength factor (DPF) of mouse brains, a value used in the modified Beer-Lambert law to characterize an evoked stimulus response. We used spatial frequency domain imaging to measure in vivo baseline optical properties in 20-month-old control ([Formula: see text]) and triple transgenic APP/PS1/tau (3xTg-AD) ([Formula: see text]) mouse brains. Average [Formula: see text] for control and 3xTg-AD mice was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 460 nm; and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 530 nm. Average [Formula: see text] for control and 3xTg-AD mice was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 460 nm; and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 530 nm. The calculated DPF for control and 3xTg-AD mice was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] OD mm, respectively, at 460 nm; and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] OD mm, respectively, at 530 nm. In hindpaw stimulation experiments, the hemodynamic increase in brain tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin was threefold larger and two times longer in the control mice compared to 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, the washout of deoxyhemoglobin from increased brain perfusion was seven times larger in controls compared to 3xTg-AD mice ([Formula: see text]).

  5. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V.; Yoon, Jin H.; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages. PMID:25502280

  6. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Heike; Damme, Markus; Stroobants, Stijn; D'Hooge, Rudi; Beck, Hans Christian; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Dierks, Thomas; Lübke, Torben

    2016-09-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1) was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6)-GlcNAc(β1-N)-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS). On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis.

  7. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V; Yoon, Jin H; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-12-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide functions as a neuromodulator to regulate striatal neurotransmission in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Zhu, Jun; Pan, Yang; Dong, Jingde; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Li

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gasotransmitter, has been considered a neuromodulator to enhance hippocampal long-term potentiation and exerts neuroprotective effects against neurotoxin-induced neurodegeneration in rodent models of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether H2S can function as a neuromodulator to regulate the levels of nigrostriatal neurotransmitters and then impact the vulnerability of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in response to neurotoxins remains unknown. For this study, we prepared a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine plus probenecid (MPTP/p)-induced mouse subacute model of PD to explore the modulatory effect of H2S on monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice. This study shows that NaHS (an H2S donor, 5.6 mg/kg/day, i.p.) administration improves the survival rate and significantly ameliorates the weight loss of MPTP-treated mice. NaHS treatment attenuated MPTP-induced neuronal damage, restored the diminution of DA neurons, and suppressed the overactivation of astrocytes in the mouse striatum. Additionally, NaHS upregulated striatal serotonin levels and modulated the balance of excitatory glutamate and the inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid system in response to MPTP challenge. The current study indicates that H2S may function as an effective neuromodulator to regulate striatal neurotransmission and provides insight into the potential of H2S for PD therapy.

  9. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Wolf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1 was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6-GlcNAc(β1-N-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS. On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis.

  10. Mitochondrial base excision repair in mouse synaptosomes during normal aging and in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Weissman, Lior; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2012-04-01

    Brain aging is associated with synaptic decline and synaptic function is highly dependent on mitochondria. Increased levels of oxidative DNA base damage and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or deletions lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, playing an important role in the aging process and the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Here we have investigated the repair of oxidative base damage, in synaptosomes of mouse brain during normal aging and in an AD model. During normal aging, a reduction in the base excision repair (BER) capacity was observed in the synaptosomal fraction, which was associated with a decrease in the level of BER proteins. However, we did not observe changes between the synaptosomal BER activities of presymptomatic and symptomatic AD mice harboring mutated amyolid precursor protein (APP), Tau, and presinilin-1 (PS1) (3xTgAD). Our findings suggest that the age-related reduction in BER capacity in the synaptosomal fraction might contribute to mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction during aging. The development of AD-like pathology in the 3xTgAD mouse model was, however, not associated with deficiencies of the BER mechanisms in the synaptosomal fraction when the whole brain was analyzed.

  11. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Heike; Stroobants, Stijn; D'Hooge, Rudi; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Dierks, Thomas; Lübke, Torben

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1) was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6)-GlcNAc(β1-N)-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS). On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis. PMID:27491075

  12. TLR4 mutation reduces microglial activation, increases Aβ deposits and exacerbates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Min

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are accompanied by activated microglia. The role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of AD remains controversial: either clearing Aβ deposits by phagocytosis or releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic substances. Microglia can be activated via toll-like receptors (TLRs, a class of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune system. We previously demonstrated that an AD mouse model homozygous for a loss-of-function mutation of TLR4 had increases in Aβ deposits and buffer-soluble Aβ in the brain as compared with a TLR4 wild-type AD mouse model at 14-16 months of age. However, it is unknown if TLR4 signaling is involved in initiation of Aβ deposition as well as activation and recruitment of microglia at the early stage of AD. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 signaling and microglial activation in early stages using 5-month-old AD mouse models when Aβ deposits start. Methods Microglial activation and amyloid deposition in the brain were determined by immunohistochemistry in the AD models. Levels of cerebral soluble Aβ were determined by ELISA. mRNA levels of cytokines and chemokines in the brain and Aβ-stimulated monocytes were quantified by real-time PCR. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze. Results While no difference was found in cerebral Aβ load between AD mouse models at 5 months with and without TLR4 mutation, microglial activation in a TLR4 mutant AD model (TLR4M Tg was less than that in a TLR4 wild-type AD model (TLR4W Tg. At 9 months, TLR4M Tg mice had increased Aβ deposition and soluble Aβ42 in the brain, which were associated with decrements in cognitive functions and expression levels of IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 in the hippocampus compared to TLR4W Tg mice. TLR4 mutation diminished Aβ-induced IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 expression in monocytes. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of TLR4

  13. Restoring the balance between disease and repair in multiple sclerosis: insights from mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H. Miller; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered an autoimmune-mediated demyelinating disease that targets the central nervous system (CNS). Despite considerable research efforts over multiple decades, our understanding of the basic biological processes that are targeted in the disease and the mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood. Consequently, current therapies directed at controlling the progression of the disease are limited in their effectiveness. Historically, the primary focus of MS re...

  14. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  15. Protective effects of ferulic acid in amyloid precursor protein plus presenilin-1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Jung, Jun-Sub; Kim, Taek-Keun; Hasan, Ashraful; Hong, Chang-Won; Nam, Ju-Suk; Song, Dong-Keun

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the protective effects of long-term administration of ferulic acid against the in vivo toxicity of β-amyloid peptide administered intracerebroventricularly in mice. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ferulic acid in transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP)swe/presenilin 1 (PS1)dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD). Chronic (for 6 months from the age of 6 to 12 months) oral administration of ferulic acid at a dose of 5.3 mg/kg/day significantly enhanced the performance in novel-object recognition task, and reduced amyloid deposition and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels in the frontal cortex. These results suggest that ferulic acid at a certain dosage could be useful for prevention and treatment of AD.

  16. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad A Goupil

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91% and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI. Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%, periosteal necrosis (66%, and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%. Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains.

  17. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Brad A.; McNulty, Margaret A.; Martin, Matthew J.; McCracken, Michael K.; Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Mores, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice) to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91%) and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI). Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%), periosteal necrosis (66%), and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%). Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains. PMID:27182740

  18. Genetic knock-down of HDAC3 does not modify disease-related phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Moumné

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG/polyglutamine repeat for which there are no disease modifying treatments. In recent years, transcriptional dysregulation has emerged as a pathogenic process that appears early in disease progression and has been recapitulated across multiple HD models. Altered histone acetylation has been proposed to underlie this transcriptional dysregulation and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, have been shown to improve polyglutamine-dependent phenotypes in numerous HD models. However potent pan-HDAC inhibitors such as SAHA display toxic side-effects. To better understand the mechanism underlying this potential therapeutic benefit and to dissociate the beneficial and toxic effects of SAHA, we set out to identify the specific HDAC(s involved in this process. For this purpose, we are exploring the effect of the genetic reduction of specific HDACs on HD-related phenotypes in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. The study presented here focuses on HDAC3, which, as a class I HDAC, is one of the preferred targets of SAHA and is directly involved in histone deacetylation. To evaluate a potential benefit of Hdac3 genetic reduction in R6/2, we generated a mouse carrying a critical deletion in the Hdac3 gene. We confirmed that the complete knock-out of Hdac3 is embryonic lethal. To test the effects of HDAC3 inhibition, we used Hdac3(+/- heterozygotes to reduce nuclear HDAC3 levels in R6/2 mice. We found that Hdac3 knock-down does not ameliorate physiological or behavioural phenotypes and has no effect on molecular changes including dysregulated transcripts. We conclude that HDAC3 should not be considered as the major mediator of the beneficial effect induced by SAHA and other HDAC inhibitors in HD.

  19. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg and probenecid (250 mg/kg over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD, which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. Results We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8–12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and

  20. Single-SectionFabry-Perot Mode-Locked Semiconductor Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of the theoretical models and experimental verification of the single-section Fabry-Perot mode-locked semiconductor lasers based on multiple-spatial-mode (MSM coupling. The mode-locked operation at the repetition rates of 40 GHz and higher and the pulse width of a few picoseconds are confirmed by the intensity autocorrelation, the fast photo detection and RF spectrum, and the optical spectral interference measurement of ultrafast pulse. The spatial mode coupling theory of single-section Fabry-Perot mode-locked semiconductor lasers is also reviewed, and the results are compared with the experimental observations. The small signal modulation response of these lasers, which exhibits high-frequency responses well beyond the relaxation oscillation resonance limit, is also modeled theoretically, and the simulation is verified by the experimental measurements.

  1. Transforming Fabry-Perot resonances into a Tamm mode

    CERN Document Server

    Durach, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel photonic structure composed of metal nanolayer, Bragg mirror and metal nanolayer. The structure supports resonances that are transitional between Fabry-Perot and Tamm modes. When the dielectric contrast of the DBR is removed these modes are a pair of conventional Fabry-Perot resonances. They spectrally merge into a Tamm mode at high contrast. Such behavior differs from the results for structures supporting Tamm modes reported earlier. The optical properties of the structure in the frequency range of the DBR stop band, including highly beneficial 50% transmittivity through thick structures, are determined by the introduced in the paper hybrid resonances. The results can find a wide range of photonic applications.

  2. Curvature sensor based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Catarina; Ferreira, Marta S.; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Bierlich, Jörg; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-05-01

    A curvature sensor based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer is proposed. A capillary tube of silica is fusion spliced between two single mode fibers, producing a Fabry-Perot cavity. The light propagates in air, when passing through the capillary tube. Two different cavities are subjected to curvature and temperature. The cavity with shorter length shows insensitivity to both measurands. The larger cavity shows two operating regions for curvature measurement, where a linear response is shown, with a maximum sensitivity of 18.77pm/m-1 for the high curvature radius range. When subjected to temperature, the sensing head produces a similar response for different curvature radius, with a sensitivity of 0.87pm/°C.

  3. Targeting isoprenylcysteine methylation ameliorates disease in a mouse model of progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Sayin, Volkan I; Akula, Murali K; Liu, Meng; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Bergo, Martin O

    2013-06-14

    Several progeroid disorders, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and restrictive dermopathy (ZMPSTE24 deficiency), arise when a farnesylated and methylated form of prelamin A accumulates at the nuclear envelope. Here, we found that a hypomorphic allele of isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (ICMT) increased body weight, normalized grip strength, and prevented bone fractures and death in Zmpste24-deficient mice. The reduced ICMT activity caused prelamin A mislocalization within the nucleus and triggered prelamin A-dependent activation of AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which abolished the premature senescence of Zmpste24-deficient fibroblasts. ICMT inhibition increased AKT-mTOR signaling and proliferation and delayed senescence in human HGPS fibroblasts but did not reduce the levels of misshapen nuclei in mouse and human cells. Thus, targeting ICMT might be useful for treating prelamin A-associated progeroid disorders.

  4. IL-1β is Crucial for Induction of Coronary Artery Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho; Schulte, Danica J.; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Crother, Timothy R.; Chiba, Norika; Fishbein, Michael C.; Lehman, Thomas J.A.; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acute vasculitis and acquired cardiac disease in US children. Untreated, children may develop coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death as a result of the illness. Up to a third of KD patients fail to respond to intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIG), the standard therapy, and alternative treatments are being investigated. Genetic studies have indicated a possible role for IL-1β in KD. We therefore explored the role of IL-1β in a murine model of KD. Methods and Results Using an established mouse model of KD that involves injection of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE), we investigated the role of IL- 1β and caspase-1 (activated by the inflammasome and required for IL-1β maturation) in coronary arteritis, and evaluated the efficacy of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) as a potential treatment. LCWE-induced IL-1β maturation and secretion was dependent on the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages. Both caspase1-deficient and IL-1R-deficient mice were protected from LCWE-induced coronary lesions. Injection of recombinant IL-1β to caspase-1-deficient mice restored the ability of LCWE to cause coronary lesions in response to LCWE. Furthermore, daily injections of the IL-1Ra prevented LCWE-mediated coronary lesions, up to three days after LCWE injection. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that caspase-1 and IL-1β play critical roles in the development of coronary lesions in this KD mouse model, blocked by IL-1Ra. Therefore, anti-IL-1β treatment strategies may constitute an effective, more targeted treatment of KD to prevent coronary lesions. PMID:22361326

  5. Augmented TLR2 expression on monocytes in both human Kawasaki disease and a mouse model of coronary arteritis.

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