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Sample records for fabrication facility decommissioning

  1. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  2. Decommissioning of a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, S.; Colquhoun, A.

    1990-01-01

    Decommissioning of the coprecipitation plant, which made plutonium/uranium oxide fuel, is a lead project in the BNFL Sellafield decommissioning programme. The overall programme has the objectives of gaining data and experience in a wide range of decommissioning operations and hence in this specific project to pilot the decommissioning of plant heavily contaminated with plutonium and other actinides. Consequently the operations have been used to test improvements in temporary containment, contamination control and decontamination methods and also to develop in situ plutonium assay, plutonium recovery and size-reduction methods. Finally the project is also yielding data on manpower requirements, personnel radiation uptake and waste arisings to help in the planning of future decommissioning projects

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 350 Plutonium Fabrication Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, W.H.; Moe, H.J.; Lahey, T.J.

    1985-02-01

    In 1973, Argonne National Laboratory began consolidating and upgrading its plutonium-handling operations with the result that the research fuel-fabrication facility located in Building 350 was shut down and declared surplus. Sixteen of the twenty-three gloveboxes which comprised the system were disassembled and relocated for reuse or placed into controlled storage during 1974 but, due to funding constraints, full-scale decommissioning did not start until 1978. Since that time the fourteen remaining contaminated gloveboxes, including all internal and external equipment as well as the associated ventilation systems, have been assayed for radioactive content, dismantled, size reduced to fit acceptable packaging and sent to a US Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic retrievable-storage site or to a DOE low-level nuclear waste burial ground. The project which was completed in 1983, required 5 years to accomplish, 32 man years of effort, produced some 540 m 3 (19,000 ft 3 ) of radioactive waste of which 60% was TRU, and cost 2.4 million dollars

  4. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, S.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear facilities present a number of problems at the end of their working lives. They require dismantling and removal but public and environmental protection remain a priority. The principles and strategies are outlined. Experience of decommissioning in France and the U.K. had touched every major stage of the fuel cycle by the early 1990's. Decommissioning projects attempt to restrict waste production and proliferation as waste treatment and disposal are costly. It is concluded that technical means exist to deal with present civil plant and costs are now predictable. Strategies for decommissioning and future financial provisions are important. (UK)

  5. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Rieu, J.; Lareynie, O.; Delrive, L.; Vallet, J.; Girard, A.; Duthe, M.; Lecomte, C.; Rozain, J.P.; Nokhamzon, J.G.; Davoust, M.; Eyraud, J.L.; Bernet, Ph.; Velon, M.; Gay, A.; Charles, Th.; Leschaeva, M.; Dutzer, M.; Maocec, Ch.; Gillet, G.; Brut, F.; Dieulot, M.; Thuillier, D.; Tournebize, F.; Fontaine, V.; Goursaud, V.; Birot, M.; Le Bourdonnec, Th.; Batandjieva, B.; Theis, St.; Walker, St.; Rosett, M.; Cameron, C.; Boyd, A.; Aguilar, M.; Brownell, H.; Manson, P.; Walthery, R.; Wan Laer, W.; Lewandowski, P.; Dorms, B.; Reusen, N.; Bardelay, J.; Damette, G.; Francois, P.; Eimer, M.; Tadjeddine, A.; Sene, M.; Sene, R.

    2008-01-01

    This file includes five parts: the first part is devoted to the strategies of the different operators and includes the following files: the decommissioning of nuclear facilities Asn point of view, decommissioning of secret nuclear facilities, decommissioning at the civil Cea strategy and programs, EDF de-construction strategy, Areva strategy for decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the second one concerns the stakes of dismantling and includes the articles as follow: complete cleanup of buildings structures in nuclear facilities, decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety assessment, decommissioning wastes management issues, securing the financing of long-term decommissioning and waste management costs, organizational and human factors in decommissioning projects, training for the decommissioning professions: the example of the Grenoble University master degree; the third part is devoted to the management of dismantling work sites and includes the different articles as follow: decommissioning progress at S.I.C.N. plant, example of decommissioning work site in Cea Grenoble: Siloette reactor decommissioning, matters related to decommissioning sites, decommissioning of french nuclear installations: the viewpoint of a specialist company, specificities of inspections during decommissioning: the Asn inspector point of view; the fourth part is in relation with the international approach and includes as follow: IAEA role in establishing a global safety regime on decommissioning, towards harmonization of nuclear safety practices in Europe: W.E.N.R.A. and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, EPA superfund program policy for decontamination and decommissioning, progress with remediation at Sellafield, progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Belgium, activities of I.R.S.N. and its daughter company Risk-audit I.r.s.n./G.r.s. international in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in eastern countries

  6. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunning, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Collaborative studies are in progress in the U.K. between the U.K.A.E.A., the Generating Boards and other outside bodies, to identify the development issues and practical aspects of decommissioning redundant nuclear facilities. The various types of U.K.A.E.A. experimental reactors (D.F.R., W.A.G.R , S.G.H.W.R.) in support of the nuclear power development programme, together with the currently operating commercial 26 Magnox reactors in 11 stations, totalling some 5 GW will be retired before the end of the century and attention is focussed on these. The actual timing of withdrawal from service will be dictated by development programme requirements in the case of experimental reactors and by commercial and technical considerations in the case of electricity production reactors. Decommissioning studies have so far been confined to technical appraisals including the sequence logic of achieving specific objectives and are based on the generally accepted three stage progression. Stage 1, which is essentially a defuelling and coolant removal operation, is an interim phase. Stage 2 is a storage situation, the duration of which will be influenced by environmental pressures or economic factors including the re-use of existing sites. Stage 3, which implies removal of all active and non-active waste material and returning the site to general use, must be the ultimate objective. The engineering features and the radioactive inventory of the system must be assessed in detail to avoid personnel or environmental hazards during Stage 2. These factors will also influence decisions on the degree of Stage 2 decommissioning and its duration, bearing in mind that for Stage 3 activation may govern the waste disposal route and the associated radiation man-rem exposure during dismantling. Ideally, planning for decommissioning should be considered at the design stage of the facility. An objective of present studies is to identify features which would assist decommissioning of future systems

  7. Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Ji, Y. H.; Park, J. H.; Chung, U. S.

    2010-01-01

    Basically, when a decommissioning is planed for a nuclear facility, an investigation into the characterization of the nuclear facility is first required. The results of such an investigation are used for calculating the quantities of dismantled waste and estimating the cost of the decommissioning project. In this paper, it is presented a computer system for the characterization of nuclear facilities, called DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System). This system consists of four main parts: a management coding system for grouping items, a data input system, a data processing system and a data output system. All data is processed in a simplified and formatted manner in order to provide useful information to the decommissioning planner. For the hardware, PC grade computers running Oracle software on Microsoft Windows OS were selected. The characterization data results for the nuclear facility under decommissioning will be utilized for the work-unit productivity calculation system and decommissioning engineering system as basic sources of information

  8. Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. K.; Ji, Y. H.; Park, J. H.; Chung, U. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Basically, when a decommissioning is planed for a nuclear facility, an investigation into the characterization of the nuclear facility is first required. The results of such an investigation are used for calculating the quantities of dismantled waste and estimating the cost of the decommissioning project. In this paper, it is presented a computer system for the characterization of nuclear facilities, called DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System). This system consists of four main parts: a management coding system for grouping items, a data input system, a data processing system and a data output system. All data is processed in a simplified and formatted manner in order to provide useful information to the decommissioning planner. For the hardware, PC grade computers running Oracle software on Microsoft Windows OS were selected. The characterization data results for the nuclear facility under decommissioning will be utilized for the work-unit productivity calculation system and decommissioning engineering system as basic sources of information

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Present concepts on stages of, designing for and costs of decommissioning, together with criteria for site release, are described. Recent operations and studies and assessments in progress are summarized. Wastes from decommissioning are characterized

  10. Decommissioning of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Yashchenko, Ya.V.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first manual in Ukraine giving the complete review of the decommissioning process of the nuclear power facilities including the issues of the planning, design documentation development, advanced technology description. On the base of the international and domestic experience, the issues on the radwaste management, the decontamination methods, the equipment dismantling, the remote technology application, and also the costs estimate at decommissioning are considered. The special attention to the personnel safety provision, population and environment at decommissioning process is paid

  11. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Symposium was jointly sponsored by OECD/NEA and IAEA and was attended by more than 225 participants from 26 countries. Forty one papers were presented in eight sessions which covered the following topics: national and international policies and planning; engineering considerations relevant to decommissioning; radiological release considerations and waste classifications; decommissioning experience; and decontamination and remote operations. In addition, a panel of decommissioning experts discussed questions from the participants

  12. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  13. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Feasibility, needs and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Reactor decommissioning activities generally are considered to begin after operations have ceased and the fuel has been removed from the reactor, although in some countries the activities may be started while the fuel is still at the reactor site. The three principal alternatives for decommissioning are described. The factors to be considered in selecting the decommissioning strategy, i.e. a stage or a combination of stages that comprise the total decommissioning programme, are reviewed. One presents a discussion of the feasibility of decommissioning techniques available for use on the larger reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The numbers and types of facilities to be decommissioned and the resultant waste volumes generated for disposal will then be projected. Finally, the costs of decommissioning these facilities, the effect of these costs on electricity generating costs, and alternative methods of financing decommissioning are discussed. The discussion of decommissioning draws on various countries' studies and experience in this area. Specific details about current activities and policies in NEA Member Countries are given in the short country specific Annexes. The nuclear facilities that are addressed in this study include reactors, fuel fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, associated radioactive waste storage facilities, enrichment facilities and other directly related fuel cycle support facilities. The present study focuses on the technical feasibility, needs, and costs of decommissioning the larger commercial facilities in the OECD member countries that are coming into service up to the year 2000. It is intended to inform the public and to assist in planning for the decommissioning of these facilities

  14. Decommissioning Work Modeling System for Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Cho, W. H.; Choi, Y. D.; Moon, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    During the decommissioning activities of the KRR-1 and 2 (Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2) and UCP (Uranium Conversion Plant), all information and data, which generated from the decommissioning project, were record, input and managed at the DECOMMIS (DECOMMissioning Information management System). This system was developed for the inputting and management of the data and information of the man-power consumption, operation time of the dismantling equipment, the activities of the radiation control, dismantled waste management and Q/A activities. When a decommissioning is planed for a nuclear facility, an investigation into the characterization of the nuclear facility is first required. The results of such an investigation are used for calculating the quantities of dismantled waste volume and estimating the cost of the decommissioning project. That is why, the DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System) was established for the management of the facility characterization data. The DEWOCS (DEcommissioning WOrk-unit productivity Calculation System) was developed for the calculation of the workability on the decommissioning activities. The work-unit productivities are calculated through this system using the data from the two systems, DECOMMIS and DEFACS. This result, the factors of the decommissioning work-unit productivities, will be useful for the other nuclear facility decommissioning planning and engineering. For this, to set up the items and plan for the decommissioning of the new objective facility, the DEMOS (DEcommissioning work Modeling System) was developed. This system is for the evaluation the cost, man-power consumption of workers and project staffs and technology application time. The factor of the work-unit productivities from the DEWOCS and governmental labor cost DB and equipment rental fee DB were used for the calculation the result of the DEMOS. And also, for the total system, DES (Decommissioning Engineering System), which is now

  15. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated

  16. Waste management considerations in nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, H.K.; Murphy, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities involves the management of significant quantities of radioactive waste. This paper summarizes information on volumes of waste requiring disposal and waste management costs developed in a series of decommissioning studies performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These studies indicate that waste management is an important cost factor in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Alternatives for managing decommissioning wastes are defined and recommendations are made for improvements in waste management practices

  17. Decommissioning high-level waste surface facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The protective storage, entombment and dismantlement options of decommissioning a High-Level Waste Surface Facility (HLWSF) was investigated. A reference conceptual design for the facility was developed based on the designs of similar facilities. State-of-the-art decommissioning technologies were identified. Program plans and cost estimates for decommissioning the reference conceptual designs were developed. Good engineering design concepts were on the basis of this work identified

  18. Feedback experience from the decommissioning of Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Spain has accumulated significant experience in the field of decommissioning of nuclear and radioactive facilities. Relevant projects include the remediation of uranium mills and mines, the decommissioning of research reactors and nuclear research facilities and the decommissioning of gas-graphite nuclear power plants. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain is undertaken by ENRESA, who is also responsible for the management of radioactive wastes. The two most notable projects are the decommissioning of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant and the decommissioning of the CIEMAT nuclear research centre. The Vandellos I power plant was decommissioned in about five years to what is known as level 2. During this period, the reactor vessel was confined, most plant systems and components were dismantled, the facility was prepared for a period of latency and a large part of the site was restored for subsequent release. In 2005 the facility entered into the phase of dormancy, with minimum operating requirements. Only surveillance and maintenance activities are performed, among which special mention should be made to the five-year check of the leak tightness of the reactor vessel. After the dormancy period (25 - 30 years), level 3 of decommissioning will be initiated including the total dismantling of the remaining parts of the plant and the release of the whole site for subsequent uses. The decommissioning of the CIEMAT Research Centre includes the dismantling of obsolete facilities such as the research reactor JEN-1, a pilot reprocessing plant, a fuel fabrication facility, a conditioning plant for liquid and a liquid waste storage facility which were shutdown in the early eighties. Dismantling works have started in 2006 and will be completed by 2009. On the basis of the experience gained in the above mentioned sites, this paper describes the approaches adopted by ENRESA for large decommissioning projects. (author)

  19. Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel

  20. Final generic environmental impact statement on decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This final generic environmental impact statement was prepared as part of the requirement for considering changes in regulations on decommissioning of commercial nuclear facilities. Consideration is given to the decommissioning of pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, research and test reactors, fuel reprocessing plants (FRPs) (currently, use of FRPs in the commercial sector is not being considered), small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants, uranium hexafluoride conversion plants, uranium fuel fabrication plants, independent spent fuel storage installations, and non-fuel-cycle facilities for handling byproduct, source and special nuclear materials. Decommissioning has many positive environmental impacts such as the return of possibly valuable land to the public domain and the elimination of potential problems associated with increased numbers of radioactively contaminated facilities with a minimal use of resources. Major adverse impacts are shown to be routine occupational radiation doses and the commitment of nominally small amounts of land to radioactive waste disposal. Other impacts, including public radiation doses, are minor. Mitigation of potential health, safety, and environmental impacts requires more specific and detailed regulatory guidance than is currently available. Recommendations are made as to regulatory decommissioning particulars including such aspects as decommissioning alternatives, appropriate preliminary planning requirements at the time of commissioning, final planning requirements prior to termination of facility operations, assurance of funding for decommissioning, environmental review requirements. 26 refs., 7 figs., 68 tabs

  1. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: 'it can and has been done'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Considerable international experience gained over the last 20 years demonstrates that nuclear facilities can be safely dismantled and decommissioned once a decision is made to cease operations and permanently shut them down. The term decommissioning is used to describe all the management and technical actions associated with ceasing operation of a nuclear installation and its subsequent dismantling to facilitate its removal from regulatory control (de-licensing). These actions involve decontamination of structures and components, dismantling of components and demolition of buildings, remediation of any contaminated ground and removal of the resulting waste. Worldwide, of the more than 560 commercial nuclear power plants that are or have been in operation, about 120 plants have been permanently shut down and are at some stage of decommissioning. About 10% of all shutdown plants have been fully decommissioned, including eight reactors of more than 100 MWe. A larger number of various types of fuel cycle and research facilities have also been shut down and decommissioned, including: facilities for the extraction and enrichment of uranium, facilities for fuel fabrication and reprocessing, laboratories, isotope production facilities and particle accelerators. This brochure looks at decommissioning across a spectrum of nuclear facilities and shows worldwide examples of successful projects. Further information can be found in NEA publications and on a number of web-sites

  2. Policy on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This Regulatory Policy Statement describes the policy of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) on the decommissioning of those facilities defined as nuclear facilities in the Atomic Energy Control (AEC) Regulations. It is intended as a formal statement, primarily for the information of licensees, or potential licensees, of the regulatory process and requirements generally applicable to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities licensed and regulated by the AECB pursuant to the authority of the AEC Act and Regulations

  3. Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Significant numbers of nuclear facilities will need to be decommissioned in the coming decades. In this context, NEA member countries are placing increasing emphasis on the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. This study reviews decommissioning experience with a view to identifying stakeholder concerns and best practice in addressing them. The lessons learnt about the end of the facility life cycle can also contribute to better foresight in siting and building new facilities. This report will be of interest to all major players in the field of decommissioning, in particular policy makers, implementers, regulators and representatives of local host communities

  4. Decommissioning engineering systems for nuclear facilities and knowledge inheritance for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Information on construction, operation and maintenance of a nuclear facility is essential in order to plan and implement the decommissioning of the nuclear facility. A decommissioning engineering system collects these information efficiently, retrieves necessary information rapidly, and support to plan the reasonable decommissioning as well as the systematic implementation of dismantling activities. Then, knowledge of workers involved facility operation and dismantling activities is important because decommissioning of nuclear facility will be carried out for a long period. Knowledge inheritance for decommissioning has been carried out in various organizations. This report describes an outline of and experiences in applying decommissioning engineering systems in JAEA and activities related to knowledge inheritance for decommissioning in some organizations. (author)

  5. Methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. In response to increased international interest in decommissioning and to the needs of Member States, the IAEA's activities in this area have increased during the past few years and will be enhanced considerably in the future. A long range programme using an integrated systems approach covering all the technical, regulatory and safety steps associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is being developed. The database resulting from this work is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe time and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. The report is a review of the current state of the art of the methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities including remote systems technology. This is the first report in the IAEA's expanded programme and was of benefit in outlining future activities. Certain aspects of the work reviewed in this report, such as the recycling of radioactive materials from decommissioning, will be examined in depth in future reports. The information presented should be useful to those responsible for or interested in planning or implementing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  6. Financing the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Decommissioning of both commercial and R and D nuclear facilities is expected to increase significantly in the coming years, and the largest of such industrial decommissioning projects could command considerable budgets. It is important to understand the costs of decommissioning projects in order to develop realistic cost estimates as early as possible based on preliminary decommissioning plans, but also to develop funding mechanisms to ensure that future decommissioning expenses can be adequately covered. Sound financial provisions need to be accumulated early on to reduce the potential risk for residual, unfunded liabilities and the burden on future generations, while ensuring environmental protection. Decommissioning planning can be subject to considerable uncertainties, particularly in relation to potential changes in financial markets, in energy policies or in the conditions and requirements for decommissioning individual nuclear installations, and such uncertainties need to be reflected in regularly updated cost estimates. This booklet offers a useful overview of the relevant aspects of financing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It provides information on cost estimation for decommissioning, as well as details about funding mechanisms and the management of funds based on current practice in NEA member countries. (authors)

  7. Demonstration of safety of decommissioning of facilities using radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, Borislava; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2008-01-01

    Full text:The development of nuclear industry worldwide in the recent years has particular impact on the approach of operators, regulators and interested parties to the implementation of the final phases (decommissioning) of all facilities that use radioactive material (from nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication facilities, research reactors to small research or medical laboratories). Decommissioning is becoming an increasingly important activity for two main reasons - termination of the practice in a safe manner with the view to use the facility or the site for other purposes, or termination of the practice and reuse the facility or site for new built nuclear facilities. The latter is of special relevance to multi-facility sites where for example new nuclear power plants and envisaged. However, limited countries have the adequate legal and regulatory framework, and experience necessary for decommissioning. In order to respond to this challenge of the nuclear industry and assist Member States in the adequate planning, conduct and termination of decommissioning of wide range of facilities, over the last decade the IAEA has implemented and initiated several projects in this field. One of the main focuses of this assistance to operators, regulators and specialists involved in decommissioning is the evaluation and demonstration of safety of decommissioning. This importance of these Agency activities was also highlighted in the International Action Plan on Decommissioning, during the second Joint Convention meeting in 2006 and the International Conference on Lessons Learned from Decommissioning in Athens in 2006. The IAEA has been providing technical support to its Member States in this field through several mechanisms: (1) the establishment of a framework of safety standards on decommissioning and development of a supporting technical documents; (2) the establishment of an international peer review mechanism for decommissioning; (3) the technical cooperation projects

  8. AECL's strategy for decommissioning Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, W.M.; Pare, F.E.; Pratapagiri, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities as defined in the Atomic Energy Control Act and Regulations is administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), a Federal Government agency. It requires that these facilities be decommissioned according to approved plans which are to be developed by the owner of the nuclear facility during its early stages of design and to be refined during its operating life. In this regulatory environment, Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has developed a decommissioning strategy for power stations which consists of three distinctive phases. After presenting AECL's decommissioning philosophy, its foundations are explained and it is described how it has and soon will be applied to various facilities. A brief summary is provided of the experience gained up to date on the implementation of this strategy. (author) 3 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Quality management in nuclear facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garonis, Omar H.

    2002-01-01

    Internationally, the decommissioning organizations of nuclear facilities carry out the decommissioning according to the safety requirements established for the regulatory bodies. Some of them perform their activities in compliance with a quality assurance system. This work establishes standardization through a Specifications Requirement Document, for the management system of the nuclear facilities decommissioning organizations. It integrates with aspects of the quality, environmental, occupational safety and health management systems, and also makes these aspects compatible with all the requirements of the nuclear industry recommended for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  10. Organization and management for decommissioning of large nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    For nuclear facilities, decommissioning is the final phase in the life-cycle after siting, design, construction, commissioning and operation. It is a complex process involving operations such as detailed surveys, decontamination and dismantling of plant equipment and facilities, demolition of buildings and structures, and management of resulting waste and other materials, whilst taking into account aspects of health and safety of the operating personnel and the general public, and protection of the environment. Careful planning and management is essential to ensure that decommissioning is accomplished in a safe and cost effective manner. Guidance on organizational aspects may lead to better decision making, reductions in time and resources, lower doses to the workers and reduced impact on public health and the environment. The objective of this report is to provide information and guidance on the organization and management aspects for the decommissioning of large nuclear facilities which will be useful for licensees responsible for discharging these responsibilities. The information contained in the report may also be useful to policy makers, regulatory bodies and other organizations interested in the planning and management of decommissioning. In this report, the term 'decommissioning' refers to those actions that are taken at the end of the useful life of a nuclear facility in withdrawing it from service with adequate regard for the health and safety of workers and members of the public and for the protection of the environment. The term 'large nuclear facilities' involves nuclear power plants, large nuclear research reactors and other fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing plants, fuel conversion, fabrication and enrichment plants, as well as spent fuel storage and waste management plants. Information on the planning and management for decommissioning of smaller research reactors or other small nuclear facilities can be found elsewhere. The report covers

  11. HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

    2005-03-11

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered

  12. Integrated five station nondestructive assay system for the support of decontamination and decommissioning of a former plutonium mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.T.; Bieri, J.M.; Hastings, R.D.; Horton, W.S.; Kuckertz, T.H.; Kunz, W.E.; Plettenberg, K.; Smith, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of a safe, efficient and economic decontamination and decommissioning of plutonium facilities can be greatly enhanced through the intelligent use of an integrated system of nondestructive assay equipment. We have designed and fabricated such a system utilizing five separate NDA stations integrated through a single data acquisition and management personal computer-based controller. The initial station utilizes a passive neutron measurement to determine item Pu inventory to the 0.1 gm level prior to insertion into the decontamination cell. A large active neutron station integrated into the cell is used to measure decontamination effectiveness at the 10 nci/gm level. Cell Pu buildup at critical points is monitored with passive neutron detectors. An active neutron station having better than 1 mg Pu assay sensitivity is used to quantify final compacted waste pucks outside the cell. Bulk Pu in various forms and isotopic enrichments is quantified in a combined passive neutron coincidence and high resolution gamma ray spectrometer station outside the cell. Item control and Pu inventory are managed with bar code labeling and a station integrating algorithm. Overall economy is achieved by multiple station use of the same expensive hardware such as the neutron generator

  13. Model Regulations for Decommissioning of Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    The IAEA has systematic programmes to provide Member States with the guidance, services and training necessary for establishing a legal and regulatory framework, including the planning and implementation of decommissioning. The model regulations provided in this publication cover all aspects of the planning, conduct and termination of the decommissioning of facilities and management of the associated waste, in accordance with the relevant requirements of the IAEA safety standards. They provide a framework for establishing regulatory requirements and conditions of authorization to be incorporated into individual authorizations for the decommissioning of specific facilities. The model regulations also establish criteria to be used for assessing compliance with regulatory requirements. The publication will be of assistance to Member States in appraising the adequacy of their existing regulations and regulatory guides, and serves as a reference for those Member States developing regulations for the first time.

  14. Decommissioning of reactor facilities (2). Required technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning of reactor facilities was planned to perform progressive dismantling, decontamination and radioactive waste disposal with combination of required technology in a safe and economic way. This article outlined required technology for decommissioning as follows: (1) evaluation of kinds and amounts of residual radioactivity of reactor facilities with calculation and measurement, (2) decontamination technology of metal components and concrete structures so as to reduce worker's exposure and production of radioactive wastes during dismantling, (3) dismantling technology of metal components and concrete structures such as plasma arc cutting, band saw cutting and controlled demolition with mostly remote control operation, (3) radioactive waste disposal for volume reduction and reuse, and (4) project management of decommissioning for safe and rational work to secure reduction of worker's exposure and prevent the spreading of contamination. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Decommissioning of excess nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Jacobs, D.J.; Auxier, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing the radiological status of over 100 sites previously utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for handling uranium and thorium ores. Many of these sites have been returned to the control of private industry or to public use. Recent radiological surveys indicate that radiation levels at some of the sites exceed certain existing radiological health guidelines, some requiring remedial action. To assess the need for remedial action and to arrive at radiation levels acceptable for unrestricted use of these sites in the future, provisional radiological criteria for decontamination and decommissioning of property contaminated with radium have been developed. These criteria give due consideration to the level of risk, to consistency with existing guidelines, to achievability, enforceability, variability of natural background, flexibility in their application, and the achievement of levels as low as reasonably achievable. Based upon analyses of exposure pathways, numerical criteria have been derived for external gamma radiation, radon daughters levels in structures, radium concentrations in soil and surface contamination levels. In addition, a monitoring program has been designed to evaluate compliance with these decommissioning criteria. (author)

  16. Decontamination and Decommissioning at Small Nuclear Facilities: Facilitating the Submission of Decommissioning Funding Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, D.A.; Grumbles, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts of the Washington State Department of Health to ensure that small nuclear facilities have the tools each needs to submit Decommissioning Funding Plans. These Plans are required by both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and in some states - in the case of Washington state, the Washington State Department of Health is the regulator of radioactive materials. Unfortunately, the guidance documents provided by the U.S. NRC pertain to large nuclear facilities, such as nuclear fuel fabrication plants, not the small nuclear laboratory nor small nuclear laundry that may also be required to submit such Plans. These small facilities are required to submit Decommissioning Funding Plans by dint of their nuclear materials inventory, but have only a small staff, such as a Radiation Safety Officer and few authorized users. The Washington State Department of Health and Attenuation Environmental Company have been working on certain tools, such as templates and spreadsheets, that are intended to assist these small nuclear facilities prepare compliant Decommissioning Funding Plans with a minimum of experience and effort. (authors)

  17. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Coobs, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of certain DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 75 facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. This paper describes the scope of the ORNL program and outlines the decommissioning activities currently underway, including a brief description of the decontamination techniques being utilized. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Decommissioning strategies for facilities using radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The planning for the decommissioning of facilities that have used radioactive material is similar in many respects to other typical engineering projects. However, decommissioning differs because it involves equipment and materials that are radioactive and therefore have to be handled and controlled appropriately. The project management principles are the same. As with all engineering projects, the desired end state of the project must be known before the work begins and there are a number of strategies that can be used to reach this end state. The selection of the appropriate strategy to be used to decommission a facility can vary depending on a number of factors. No two facilities are exactly the same and their locations and conditions can result in different strategies being considered acceptable. The factors that are considered cover a wide range of topics from purely technical issues to social and economic issues. Each factor alone may not have a substantial impact on which strategy to select, but their combination could lead to the selection of the preferred or best strategy for a particular facility. This Safety Report identifies the factors that are normally considered when deciding on the most appropriate strategy to select for a particular facility. It describes the impact that each factor can have on the strategy selection and also how the factors in combination can be used to select an optimum strategy

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities using current criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, E.Y.; Swift, J.J.; Malaro, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    When a licensed nuclear facility ceases operation, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for ensuring that the facility and its site are decontaminated to an acceptable level so that it is safe to release that facility and site for unrestricted public use. Currently, the NRC is developing decommissioning criteria based on reducing public doses from residual contamination in soils and structures at sites released for unrestricted use to as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). Plans are to quantify ALARA in terms of an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to an average member of the most highly exposed population group. The NRC is working on a regulatory guidance document to provide a technical basis for translating residual contamination levels to annual dose levels. Another regulatory guide is being developed to provide guidance to the licensee on how to conduct radiological surveys to demonstration compliance with the NRC decommissioning criteria. The methods and approaches used in these regulatory guides on the decommissioning of a nuclear facility are discussed in the paper

  20. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-15

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning.

  1. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 6 (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning.

  2. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 6 (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning

  3. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1994-02-01

    Concise description of progress in hot cell facility decommissioning at Risoe National Laboratory is presented. Removal of the large contaminated equipment has been completed, all the concrete cells have been finally cleaned. The total contamination left on the concrete walls is of the order of 1850 GBq. Preliminary smear tests proved the stack to be probably clean. The delay in project completion seems to be around 7 months, the remaining work being of rather conventional character. (EG)

  4. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1991-08-01

    Concise descriptions of actions taken in relation to the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory are presented. The removal of fissile material, removal and decontamination of large cell internals, and of large equipment such as glove boxes and steel boxes, in addition to dose commitments, are explained. Tables illustrating the analysis of smear tests, constants for contamination level examination, contamination and radiation levels after cleaning and total contamination versus measured radiation are included. (AB)

  5. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs

  6. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 49 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs

  7. European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeulemeester, Y.

    2005-01-01

    SCK-CEN co-ordinates a project called European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II (EUNDETRAF II) in the Sixth Framework Programme on Community activities in the field of research, technological development and demonstration for the period 2002 to 2006. This was a continuation of the FP5 project EUNDETRAF. EUNDETRAF II is a consortium of main European decommissioners, such as SCK-CEN, EWN (Energie Werke Nord, Greifswald Germany), Belgatom (Belgium), SOGIN Societa Gestione Impiantio Nucleari, Italy), Universitaet Hannover (Germany), RWE NUKEM (United Kingdom), DECOM Slovakia Slovakia), CEA Centre d'Energie Atomique, France), UKAEA (United Kingdom's Atomic Energy Agency, United Kingdom) and NRG (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Netherlands). The primary objective of this project is to bring together this vast skill base and experience; to consolidate it for easy assimilation and to transfer to future generations by organising a comprehensive training programme.Each training course has a one-week theoretical and a one-week practical component. The theoretical part is for a broader audience and consists of lectures covering all the main aspects of a decommissioning. The practical part of the course includes site visits and desk top solutions of anticipated decommissioning problems. Due to operational constraints and safety considerations, the number of participants to this part of the course is strictly limited. The partners intend to organise altogether two two-week EUNDETRAF II training courses over a period of three years. Another goal is to disseminate the existing theory as well as the practical know-how to personnel of the third countries. Finally it is important to bring together the principal decommissioning organisations undertaking various decommissioning activities. The project creates a forum for regular contacts to exchange information and experiences for mutual benefit of these organisations as well as to enhance skill base in Europe to

  8. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C. E.; Murphy, E. S.; Schneider, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Volume 2 contains appendixes on small MOX fuel fabrication facility description, site description, residual radionuclide inventory estimates, decommissioning, financing, radiation dose methodology, general considerations, packaging and shipping of radioactive materials, cost assessment, and safety (JRD)

  9. Management of Decommissioning on a Multi-Facility Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, Michele; McIntyre, Peter; Visagie, Abrie

    2008-01-01

    The management of the decommissioning of multi-facility sites may be inadequate or inappropriate if based on approaches and strategies developed for sites consisting of only a single facility. The varied nature of activities undertaken, their interfaces and their interdependencies are likely to complicate the management of decommissioning. These issues can be exacerbated where some facilities are entering the decommissioning phase while others are still operational or even new facilities are being built. Multi-facility sites are not uncommon worldwide but perhaps insufficient attention has been paid to optimizing the overall site decommissioning in the context of the entire life cycle of facilities. Decommissioning management arrangements need to be established taking a view across the whole site. A site-wide decommissioning management system is required. This should include a project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage identified interfaces and interdependencies. A group should be created to manage decommissioning across the site, ensuring adequate and consistent practices in accordance with the management system. Decommissioning management should be aimed at the entire life cycle of facilities. In the case of multi facility sites, the process becomes more complex and decommissioning management arrangements need to be established with a view to the whole site. A site decommissioning management system, a group that is responsible for decommissioning on site, a site project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage the identified interfaces are key areas of a site decommissioning management structure that need to be addressed to ensure adequate and consistent decommissioning practices. A decommissioning strategy based on single facilities in a sequential manner is deemed inadequate

  10. Decommissioning of the LURE Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, N.; Horodynski, J.M.; Robert, P.; Tadjeddine, A.

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of obtaining the decommissioning of the LURE nuclear facility, three of its accelerators were dismantled and another was modified to be below the thresh- old of 'Installation Nucleaire de Base' status. Operations were carried out with the strategy of mechanical dismantling with no cutting process. As the civil engineering radioactivity level was low, a great majority of it has been left in place with no process- ing, but compensatory measures have been taken for public and environmental protection. The overall result of these operations is a gain in both cost and operating time. They also contribute to a significant decrease in the risks, including radiological ones. The radiological impact after decommissioning remains acceptable. (authors)

  11. Decommissioning plan depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, D.E.; Pittman, J.D.; Prewett, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    Aerojet Ordnance Tennessee, Inc. (Aerojet) is decommissioning its California depleted uranium (DU) manufacturing facility. Aerojet has conducted manufacturing and research and development activities at the facility since 1977 under a State of California Source Materials License. The decontamination is being performed by a contractor selector for technical competence through competitive bid. Since the facility will be released for uncontrolled use it will be decontaminated to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In order to fully apply the principles of ALARA, and ensure the decontamination is in full compliance with appropriate guides, Aerojet has retained Rogers and Associaties Engineering Corporation (RAE) to assist in the decommissioning. RAE has assisted in characterizing the facility and preparing contract bid documents and technical specifications to obtain a qualified decontamination contractor. RAE will monitor the decontamination work effort to assure the contractor's performance complies with the contract specifications and the decontamination plan. The specifications require a thorough cleaning and decontamination of the facility, not just sufficient cleaning to meet the numeric cleanup criteria

  12. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Pil Soo

    2003-01-01

    In 1996, it was concluded that the first Korea research reactor (KRR-1) and the second Korea research reactor (KRR-2) would be shut down and decommissioned. The main reason for the decommissioning was that the facilities became old and has become surrounded by the urbanised community. And many difficulties, including the higher cost, were faced according to the enhanced regulations. Another reason was the introduction of a new research reactor 'HANARO' in 1995. A project to decommission the reactors was launched on January of 1997 with a goal of release of the site and buildings for unrestricted use by 2008. All the radioactive wastes generated are to be transported to the national repository, planned by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP), and the final evaluation of the residual radioactivity will be made before the clearance of the site. As a first step of the project, a decommissioning plan, including the assessment of the environmental impact and the quality assurance program, was prepared and submitted to the government in 1998. It was approved, after its safety evaluation, by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in November of 2000. After some preparative works such as documentation of procedures, the decontamination and dismantling works for the laboratories and hot cells of KRR-2 were started in September, 2001 and finished in December, 2002. The spent fuels that had been generated from the reactors were transferred to the United States in 1998 and no spent fuel remained at the site. All the liquid waste, both operational and decommissioning, was very low in its radioactivity and was treated in a natural evaporation facility of 200 m3/year capacity, developed by KAERI. Especially the laundry waste was treated in a membrane filtering unit for the removal of surfactants before being introduced to the natural evaporator. The solid wastes were segregated and packed in the container of 4 m3, designed according to the ISO-1496, and also in

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords

  16. Hematite nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company LLC ('Westinghouse') acquired a nuclear fuel processing plant at Hematite, Missouri ('Hematite', the 'Facility', or the 'Plant') in April 2000. The plant has subsequently been closed, and its operations have been relocated to a newer, larger facility. Westinghouse has announced plans to complete its clean-up, decommissioning, and license retirement in a safe, socially responsible, and environmentally sound manner as required by internal policies, as well as those of its parent company, British Nuclear Fuels plc. ('BNFL'). Preliminary investigations have revealed the presence of environmental contamination in various areas of the facility and grounds, including both radioactive contamination and various other substances related to the nuclear fuel processing operations. The disparity in regulatory requirements for radiological and nonradiological contaminants, the variety of historic and recent operations, and the number of previous owners working under various contractual arrangements for both governmental and private concerns has resulted in a complex project. This paper discusses Westinghouse's efforts to develop and implement a comprehensive decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) strategy for the facility and grounds. (author)

  17. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  18. Research in decommissioning techniques for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in JNC. 7. JWTF decommissioning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru

    1999-02-01

    Decommissioning techniques such as radiation measuring and monitoring, decontamination, dismantling and remote handling in the world were surveyed to upgrading technical know-how database for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility (JWTF). As the result, five literatures for measuring and monitoring techniques, 14 for decontamination and 22 for dismantling feasible for JWTF decommissioning were obtained and were summarized in tables. On the basis of the research, practical applicability of those techniques to decommissioning of JWTF was evaluated. This report contains brief surveyed summaries related to JWTF decommissioning. (H. Itami)

  19. Governments' role in decommissioning nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guindon, S.; Wendling, R.D.; Gordelier, S.; Soederberg, O.; Averous, J.; Orlando, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives over the next 20 years; some may be life-extended, others may not. This development will precipitate enhanced industrial and regulatory activities in the area of decommissioning. We are also witnessing in many countries a significant shift in the role of government itself: new pressures on governments, such as enhanced attention on environmental impact/mitigation and strategies to implement market-oriented approaches in a variety of sectors, including the energy sector are driving the public policy agenda. The paper will examine the range of policy issues, drawing from recent NEA studies on decommissioning policies and the recent NEA study on Government and Nuclear Energy and, strategies and costs, and other current trends and developments in the nuclear industry and in the nuclear policy fields. The paper will reflect on issues to be addressed during the conference and draw conclusions on the appropriate role of government in this area. Decommissioning policy is very specific and focused: it is not a high level policy/political issue in most instances and rarely gets the same attention as the issue surrounding the future of nuclear energy itself and public concerns regarding safety, waste and economics. One reason why decommissioning does not get the same attention as for example disposal of spent nuclear fuel might be the fact that technology is available for decommissioning, while technology for disposal of spent nuclear fuel is under development. High profile or not, it will remain an important issue for governments and industry alike particularly because of the cost and long lead times involved. In some instances, governments are the owners of the facilities to be decommissioned. In addition, decommissioning factors into issues surrounding the economics of nuclear energy and the sustainability of the nuclear option. Based on results of the Tarragona Seminar (Spain, September 2-4, 2003) and

  20. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Feasibility, needs and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaney, E.G.; Mickelson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency's Working Group on Decommissioning is preparing a study entitled ''Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities: Feasibility, Needs and Costs.'' The study addresses the economics, technical feasibility and waste management aspects of decommissioning larger commercial reactors and nuclear support facilities. Experience on decommissioning small reactors and fuel cycle facilities shows that current technology is generally adequate. Several major projects that are either underway or planned will demonstrate decommissioning of the larger and more complex facilities. This experience will provide a framework for planning and engineering the decommissioning of the larger commercial reactors and fuel cycle facilities. Several areas of technology development are desired for worker productivity improvement, occupational exposure reduction, and waste volume reduction. In order to assess and plan for the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear facilities, projections have been made of the capacity of these facilities that may be decommissioned in the future and the radioactive waste that would be produced from the decommissioning of these facilities. These projections through the year 2025 are based on current data and the OECD reactor capacity forecast through the year 2000. A 25-year operating lifetime for electrical power generation was assumed. The possibilities of plant lifetime extension and the deferral of plant dismantlement make this projection very conservative

  1. Decommissioning of the Risoe hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1992-02-01

    Concise descriptions of actions taken in relation to the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory are presented. The removal of fissile material, of large contaminated equipment from the concrete cell line and a separate shielded storage facility, and the removal of large contaminated facilities such as out cell parts of a tube transport system between a concrete cell and a lead shielded steel box and a remotely operated Reichert Telatom microscope housed in a lead shielded glove box is described in addition to the initial mapping of radiation levels related to the decontamination of concrete cells. The dose commitment of 17.7 mSv was ascribed to 12 persons in the 2nd half of 1991. The work resulting in these doses was mainly handling of waste together with the frogman entrances in order to repair the in-cell crane and power manipulator. The overall time schedule for the project still appears to be applicable. (AB)

  2. Investigations on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, R.; Bastek, H.; Doerge, W.; Kruschel, K.P.

    1985-01-01

    The study discusses and evaluates safety and licensing related aspects associated with the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Important decommissioning projects and experiences with relevance to decommissioning are analyzed. Recent developments in the field of decommissioning techniques with the potential of reducing the occupational dose to decommissioning workers are described and their range of application is discussed. The radiological consequences of the recycling of scrap metal arising during decommissioning are assessed. The results may be used to evaluate present licensing practices and may be useful for future licensing procedures. Finally the environmental impact of radionuclide release via air and water pathways associated with decommissioning activities is estimated. (orig.) [de

  3. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a growing activity in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Raul

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities are no different from normal buildings and factories. Eventually, they become worn-out or old fashioned, too expensive to maintain or remodel. Decommissioning a nuclear facility is different from retiring other types because of the radioactivity involved. The most important consideration in nuclear decommissioning is to protect workers and the public from exposure to harmful levels of radiation. General criteria and strategies for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described as well as the present decommissioning activities of the Argentine CNEA (author)

  4. Several issues of uranium geology exploration facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lu; Lu Caixia; Sheng Qing; Zhuang Jingqi; Xie Shujun; Liao Yunxuan

    2013-01-01

    The environmental protection completion acceptance review work of uranium geology exploration facilities 'llth five-year plan' decommissioned and remediation projects is introduced. Some questions related to norms and standards for uranium geology exploration facilities decommissioning and remediation, scheme of decommissioning and remediation, process inspection and acceptance of project and so on are discussed, and corresponding countermeasures and suggestions are put forward, Some references can be provided for the later development of uranium geological exploration facility '12th five-year plan' decommissioning and remediation projects. (authors)

  5. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1991-02-01

    The Hot Cell facility at Risoe has been in active use since 1964. During the years several types of nuclear fuels have been handled and examined: test reactor fuel pins from the Danish reactor DR3, the Norwegian Halden reactor, etc; power reactor fuel pins from several foreign reactors, including plutonium enriched pins; HTGR fuel from the Dragon reactor. All kinds of physical and chemical non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations have been performed. Besides, different radiotherapy sources have been produced, mainly cobalt sources. The general object of the decommissioning programme for the Hot Cell facility was to obtain a safe condition for the total building that does not require the special safety provisions. The hot cell building will be usable for other purposes after decommissioning. The facilicy comprised six concrete cells, lead cells, glove boxes, a shielded unit for temporary storage of waste, frogman area, decontamination areas, workshops, various installations of importance for safe operation of the plant, offices, etc. The tasks comprised e.g. removal of all irradiated fuel items, removal of other radioactive items, removal of contaminated equipment, and decontamination of all the cells and rooms. The goal was to decontaminate all the concrete cells to a degree where no loose contamination exists in the cells, and where the radiation level is so low, that total removal of the cell structures can be done at any time in the future without significant dose commitments. (AB)

  6. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Status report. Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit 3, SAFSTOR decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.; Haffner, D.R.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-06-01

    This document explains the purpose of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program and summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 facility. Preparations to put this facility into a custodial safe storage (SAFSTOR) mode are currently scheduled for completion by June 30, 1986. This report gives the status of activities as of June 1985. A final summary report will be issued after completion of this SAFSTOR decommissioning activity. Information included in this status report has been collected from the facility decommissioning plan, environmental report, and other sources made available by the licensee. This data has been placed in a computerized data base system which permits data manipulation and summarization. A description of the computer reports that can be generated by the decommissioning data system (DDS) for Humboldt Bay and samples of those reports are included in this document

  7. Interim Storage Facility for LLW of Decommissioning Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, S.; Ugolini, D.; Basile, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Nuclear Decommissioning and Facility Management Unit, TP 800, Via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra - VA (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    JRC-Ispra has initiated a Decommissioning and Waste Management (D and WM) Programme of all its nuclear facilities. In the frame of this programme, it has been decided to build an interim storage facility to host conditioned low level waste (LLW) that had been produced during the operation of JRC-Ispra nuclear research reactors and laboratories and that will be produced from their decommissioning. This paper presents the main characteristics of the facility. The storage ISFISF has a rectangular shape with uniform height and it is about 128 m long, 41 m wide and 9 m high. The entire surface affected by the facility, including screening area and access roads, is about 27.000 m{sup 2}. It is divided in three sectors, a central one, about 16 m long, for loading/unloading operations and operational services and two lateral sectors, each about 55 m long, for the conditioned LLW storage. Each storage sector is divided by a concrete wall in two transversal compartments. The ISFISF, whose operational lifetime is 50 years, is designed to host the conditioned LLW boxed in UNI CP-5.2 packages, 2,5 m long, 1.65 m wide, and 1,25 m high. The expected nominal inventory of waste is about 2100 packages, while the maximum storage is 2540 packages, thus a considerably large reserve capacity is available. The packages will be piled in stacks of maximum number of five. The LLW is going to be conditioned with a cement matrix. The maximum weight allowed for each package has been fixed at 16.000 kg. The total radioactivity inventory of waste to be hosted in the facility is about 30 TBq (mainly {beta}/{gamma} emitters). In order to satisfy the structural, seismic, and, most of all, radiological requirements, the external walls of the ISFISF are made of pre-fabricated panels, 32 cm thick, consisting of, from inside to outside, 20 cm of reinforced concrete, 7 cm of insulating material, and again 5 cm of reinforced concrete. For the same reason the roof is made with pre-fabricated panels in

  8. Study on archive management for nuclear facility decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ling; Gong Jing; Luo Ning; Liao Bing; Zhou Hao

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the main features and status of the archive management for nuclear facility decommissioning projects, and explores and discusses the countermeasures in its archive management. Taking the practice of the archive management system of a reactor decommissioning project as an example, the paper illustrates the establishment of archive management system for the nuclear facility decommissioning projects. The results show that the development of a systematic archive management principle and system for nuclear decommissioning projects and the construction of project archives for the whole process from the design to the decommissioning by digitalized archive management system are one effective route to improve the complete, accurate and systematic archiving of project documents, to promote the standardization and effectiveness of the archive management and to ensure the traceability of the nuclear facility decommissioning projects. (authors)

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Decontamination, disassembly and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The term 'decommissioning', as used within the nuclear industry, means the actions taken at the end of a facility's useful life to retire the facility from service in a manner that provides adequate protection for the health and safety of the decommissioning workers, the general public, and for the environment. These actions can range from merely closing down the facility and a minimal removal of radioactive material coupled with continuing maintenance and surveillance, to a complete removal of residual radioactivity in excess of levels acceptable for unrestricted use of the facility and its site. This latter condition, unrestricted use, is the ultimate goal of all decommissioning actions at retired nuclear facilities. The purpose of this report is to provide an information base on the considerations important to decommissioning, the methods available for decontamination and disassembly of a nuclear facility, the management of the resulting radioactive wastes, and the areas of decommissioning methodology where improvements might be made. Specific sections are devoted to each of these topics, and conclusions are presented concerning the present status of each topic. A summary of past decommissioning experience in Member States is presented in the Appendix. The report, with its discussions of necessary considerations, available operational methods, and waste management practices, together with supporting references, provides an appreciation of the activities that comprise decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It is anticipated that the information presented in the report should prove useful to persons concerned with the development of plans for the decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities

  10. IAEA Assistance on Decommissioning of Small Facilities with Limited Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.

    2008-01-01

    The number of facilities reaching their lifetime is increasing and drawing the attention of operators, regulators, public and other interested parties (potential users of the site after decommissioning) on the importance of adequate planning, funding and implementation of decommissioning activities in compliance with regulatory requirements and criteria. Specific attention is required for small facilities that have been used for research purposes and in most cases state owned by and dependent on state funding. With the current tendency for expansion of the nuclear industry such small facilities could become less of importance for the operators which can increase the probability that these facilities become abandoned, hazardous and imposing undue burden to future generations. This concern is more related to countries with limited human and financial resources at the operating organizations and the regulatory body. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been working on the; (i) establishment of internationally recognized safety standards on decommissioning and (ii) providing Member States with assistance on the application of these standards. The recent international conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Practices (Athens, Greece, 2006) has demonstrated that the set of IAEA standards is almost complete and that the International Action Plan on Decommissioning (2004), that is addressing decommissioning of small facilities, is being successfully implemented. However the need for further assistance on decommissioning of small facilities in countries with limited resources was also recognized and the Agency is planning its future work in this field. The IAEA also addresses the needs of small nuclear countries that have only a limited number of nuclear facilities, e.g. a research reactor, in its R esearch Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R 2 D 2 P. The Philippine Research Reactor

  11. Waste management practices in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Several thousand sites exist in the United States where nuclear activities have been conducted over the past 30 to 40 years. Questions regarding potential public health hazards due to residual radioactivity and radiation fields at abandoned and inactive sites have prompted careful ongoing review of these sites by federal agencies including the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In some instances, these reviews are serving to point out poor low-level waste management practices of the past. Many of the sites in question lack adequate documentation on the radiological conditions at the time of release for unrestricted use or were released without appropriate restrictions. Recent investigations have identified residual contamination and radiation levels on some sites which exceed present-day standards and guidelines. The NRC, DOE, and Environmental Protection Agency are all involved in developing decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) procedures and guidelines which will assure that nuclear facilities are decommissioned in a manner that will be acceptable to the nuclear industry, various regulatory agencies, other stakeholders, and the general public

  12. Training practices to support decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourassa, J.; Clark, C.R.; Kazennov, A.; Laraia, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Scott, A.; Yoder, J.

    2006-01-01

    Adequate numbers of competent personnel must be available during any phase of a nuclear facility life cycle, including the decommissioning phase. While a significant amount of attention has been focused on the technical aspects of decommissioning and many publications have been developed to address technical aspects, human resource management issues, particularly the training and qualification of decommissioning personnel, are becoming more paramount with the growing number of nuclear facilities of all types that are reaching or approaching the decommissioning phase. One of the keys to success is the training of the various personnel involved in decommissioning in order to develop the necessary knowledge and skills required for specific decommissioning tasks. The operating organisations of nuclear facilities normally possess limited expertise in decommissioning and consequently rely on a number of specialized organisations and companies that provide the services related to the decommissioning activities. Because of this there is a need to address the issue of assisting the operating organisations in the development and implementation of human resource management policies and training programmes for the facility personnel and contractor personnel involved in various phases of decommissioning activities. The lessons learned in the field of ensuring personnel competence are discussed in the paper (on the basis of information and experiences accumulated from various countries and organizations, particularly, through relevant IAEA activities). Particularly, the following aspects are addressed: transition of training from operational to decommissioning phase; knowledge management; target groups, training needs analysis, and application of a systematic approach to training (SAT); content of training for decommissioning management and professional staff, and for decommissioning workers; selection and training of instructors; training facilities and tools; and training as

  13. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1993-02-01

    A concise description of the current status (December 31st, 1992) regarding the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory is given in this periodic report. During the second half of the year 1992, all remaining fissile material and a large amount of contaminated material were removed, major repair work was carried out on the in-cell crane, the shielded storage facility was decontaminated and sealed, iodine filters in the cell ventilation system were removed, remote cleaning was carried out on three concrete cells to radiation levels acceptable for final cleaning by frogmen, and the remaining work schedule was planned. These processes are briefly described. Some breakdowns of older, but vital equipment (i.e. the in-cell crane and the power manipulator) that was taken into extensive use led to a certain amount of delay. The collective radiation doses during this half-year were no higher than under normal operation of the facility, and amounted to 12 man-mSv ascribed to 14 persons. It was concluded that, when removing old epoxy paint in the cells using paint strippers applied by hand, personnel can wear polythene oversuits, although a technique for remote handling has been developed. Tables illustrate measured radiation levels in cells number 1,4,5 and 6, and a diagram describes the shielded storage facility. (AB)

  14. Decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to regulatory bodies and operating organizations on planning and provision for the safe management of the decommissioning of non-reactor nuclear fuel cycle facilities. While the basic safety considerations for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities are similar to those for nuclear power plants, there are important differences, notably in the design and operating parameters for the facilities, the type of radioactive material and the support systems available. It is the objective of this Safety Guide to provide guidance for the shutdown and eventual decommissioning of such facilities, their individual characteristics being taken into account

  15. Managing LLRW from decommissioning of nuclear facilities - a Canadian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donders, R E [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Hardy, D G [Frontenac Consulting Services, Deep River, ON (Canada); De, P L [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, Gloucester, ON (Canada)

    1994-03-01

    In Canada, considerable experience has been gained recently in decommissioning nuclear facilities and managing the resulting waste. This experience has raised important issues from both the decommissioning and waste management perspectives. This paper focuses on the waste management aspects of decommissioning. Past experience is reviewed, preliminary estimates of waste volumes and characteristics are provided, and the major technical and regulatory issues are discussed. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  16. Decommissioning and deactivation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Roberto; Harriague, Santiago; Hey, Alfredo M.; Fabbri, Silvio; Garonis, Omar H.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for the decommissioning and deactivation of all relevant nuclear facilities in Argentina. A D and D Subprogram was created in 2000, within Technology Branch of the CNEA, in order to fulfill this responsibility. The D and D Subprogram has organized its activities in four fields: Planning; Technology development; Human resources development and training; International cooperation. The paper describes the work already done in those 4 areas, as well as the nuclear facilities existing in the country. Planning is being developed for the decommissioning of research reactors, beginning with RA-1, as well as for the Atucha I nuclear power station. An integral Management System has been developed, compatibilizing requirements from ISO 9001, ISO 14001, the national norm for Safety and Occupational Health (equivalent to BS 8800), and IAEA 50-SG Q series. Technology development is for the time being concentrated on mechanical decontamination and concrete demolition. A review has been made of technologies already developed both by CNEA and Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (the nuclear power utility) in areas of chemical and electrochemical decontamination, cutting techniques and robotics. Human resources development has been based on training abroad in the areas of decontamination, cutting techniques, quality assurance and planning, as well as on specific courses, seminars and workshops. An IAEA regional training course on D and D has been given on April 2002 at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center, with the assistance of 22 university graduates from 13 countries in the Latin American and Caribbean Region, and 11 from Argentina. CNEA has also given fellowships for PhD and Master thesis on the subject. International cooperation has been intense, and based on: - IAEA Technical Cooperation Project and experts missions; - Cooperation agreement with the US Department of Energy; - Cooperation agreement with Germany

  17. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program

  18. Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities: Training and Human Resource Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of the success of nuclear facility decommissioning is the adequate competence of personnel involved in decommissioning activities. The purpose of this publication is to provide methodological guidance for, and specific examples of good practices in training as an integral part of human resource management for the personnel performing decommissioning activities. The use of the systematic methodology and techniques described in this publication may be tailored and applied to the development of training for all types of nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Examples of good practices in other aspects of human resources, such as knowledge preservation, management of the workforce and improvement of human performance, are also covered. The information contained in this publication, and the examples provided in the appendices and enclosed CD-ROM, are representative of the experience of decommissioning of a wide variety of nuclear facilities.

  19. Economical problems in connection with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dangelmaier, P.

    1977-01-01

    Discussed are: Basic questions of financing, to bring in the decommissioning costs with reference to the various types of enterprises, questions of taxes, use of the accumulated liquid means, the economy of nuclear facilities taking into account the decommissioning expenses. (HP) [de

  20. Procedure of uranium mine and mill facilities decommissioning work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Renjie

    1995-01-01

    The procedure of decommissioning work of uranium mine and mill facilities includes three stages: preparation, on-the-spot construction and acceptance after being completed. The first stage, preparation, is discussed in detail, and it is presented to take the measures of strengthening leadership and improving leading body to conduct the decommissioning work best

  1. Decommissioning and disposal of foreign uranium mine and mill facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yingjie; Xue Jianxin; Yuan Baixiang; Xu Lechang

    2012-01-01

    Disposal techniques in decommissioning of foreign uranium mine and mill facilities are systematically discussed, including covering of uranium tailing impoundment, drainaging and consolidation of uranium tailing, and treatment of mining waste water and polluted groundwater, and the costs associated with disposal are analyzed. The necessity of strengthening the decommissioning disposal technology research and international exchanges and cooperation is emphasized. (authors)

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future.

  3. Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

  4. Prospective needs for decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Yasui, M.; Laraia, M.

    1992-01-01

    The answers to the questions: How many reactors will face the end of their operating lifetime over the next few decades? To what extent are the issues of decommissioning urgent? The answers will lead us to those issues that should be tackled now in order to complete smoothly the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The prospective needs for decommissioning of nuclear power plants are illustrated from the viewpoint of reactor age, and some of the issues to be tackled, in particular by governments, in this century are discussed, to prepare for the future decommissioning activities. (author) 18 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H.

    2007-06-01

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  6. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  7. Record keeping for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Guidelines and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers record keeping for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Nuclear facilities include large commercial facilities such as nuclear power plants or chemical nuclear facilities (e.g. for fabrication and reprocessing), but also include smaller facilities such as research reactors and medical, industrial and other research facilities. Special attention may be needed for these small facilities owing to factors such as the low priority given to decommissioning by research teams and the possibility of poorly recorded structural and operational changes. A focus on research reactors is also important because of their widespread distribution. Two IAEA TECDOCs address record keeping for radioactive waste management and disposal facilities, and therefore these areas are not covered in this report. The objective of this report is to provide information, experience and assistance on how to identify, update as needed and maintain records to assist in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, including for the decommissioning plan. This report is intended to be useful to policy makers, regulators, owners, operators, decommissioning contractors and other interested parties. Record keeping is an integral part of overall QA or quality management programmes, and this is emphasized in this report. This report also indicates the possible consequences of not maintaining adequate records. This report describes the needs and the sources of the records for decommissioning (Section 3) and the process of identifying and selecting these records (Section 4). Section 5 considers the records from the decommissioning process itself and their retention, while Section 6 deals with QA, organization and responsibilities. The Records Management System (RMS) is dealt with in Section 7 and the management of new records in Section 8. A summary of observations is included in Section 9. The report is complemented by an appendix and annexes that describe case histories

  8. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1994-06-01

    Nuclear fuels have been handled and examined after irradiation by physical and chemical techniques, and radiotherapy sources, mainly 60 Co, have been produced at Risoe National Laboratory since 1964. The aims of decommissioning (during 1990-94, at IAEA Stage 2 level for reactors) were to obtain safe conditions for the remaining parts of the facility and to produce clean space areas for new projects. The facility comprises 6 concrete cells, several lead-shielded steel cells, glove boxes, shielded storage for waste, a remotely operated optical microscope, a frogman area for personnel access to the concrete cells, a decontamination facility, workshops and safety installations. All steel cells, glove boxes and the microscope were emptied and removed. The concrete cells were emptied of fissile material, scientific equipment, general tools and scrap. Decontamination should facilitate waste packing and reduce amount of waste to be stored temporarily at the Risoe waste treatment facility together with highly active waste. The concrete cells were cleaned remotely by wiping, hot spot removal, by mechanical means and vacuum cleaning. The interiors of 2 cells were decontaminated by high pressure water jetting. All master-slave manipulators and part of the contaminated ventilation system at the cells were removed. The cells are left in a non-ventilated state, connected to the atmosphere by an absolute filter. The main contaminants measured before cell closure were 60 Co, 137 Cs and alpha-emitters. Dismantling, decontamination waste disposal and received doses are described. Simple techniques involving low doses were found to be very effective. (AB)

  9. The regulatory process for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide general guidance to Member States for regulating the decommissioning of nuclear facilities within the established nuclear regulatory framework. The Guide should also be useful to those responsible for, or interested in, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The Guide describes in general terms the process to be used in regulating decommissioning and the considerations to be applied in the development of decommissioning regulations and guides. It also delineates the responsibilities of the regulatory body and the licensee in decommissioning. The provisions of this Guide are intended to apply to all facilities within the nuclear fuel cycle and larger industrial installations using long lived radionuclides. For smaller installations, however, less extensive planning and less complex regulatory control systems should be acceptable. The Guide deals primarily with decommissioning after planned shutdown. Most provisions, however, are also applicable to decommissioning after an abnormal event, once cleanup operations have been terminated. The decommissioning planning in this case must take account of the abnormal event. 28 refs, 1 fig

  10. Structure and function design for nuclear facilities decommissioning information database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yongkuo; Song Yi; Wu Xiaotian; Liu Zhen

    2014-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities is a radioactive and high-risk project which has to consider the effect of radiation and nuclear waste disposal, so the information system of nuclear facilities decommissioning project must be established to ensure the safety of the project. In this study, by collecting the decommissioning activity data, the decommissioning database was established, and based on the database, the decommissioning information database (DID) was developed. The DID can perform some basic operations, such as input, delete, modification and query of the decommissioning information data, and in accordance with processing characteristics of various types of information data, it can also perform information management with different function models. On this basis, analysis of the different information data will be done. The system is helpful for enhancing the management capability of the decommissioning process and optimizing the arrangements of the project, it also can reduce radiation dose of the workers, so the system is quite necessary for safe decommissioning of nuclear facilities. (authors)

  11. Lessons learned from the decommissioning of NORM facility in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontol, Khairuddin M.; Omar, Muhamat; Ahmad, Syed H.S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Malaysia Decommissioning of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) facility in Malaysia will run into unforeseeable complications and difficulties if there is no proper planning. The Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) plays important role in guiding and assisting the operator/contractor in this NORM decommissioning project. A local Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) processing plant located in the northern region of peninsular Malaysia had ceased its operations and decided to decommission and remediate its site for the final release of the site. The remediated site is earmarked as an industrial site. During its operations, monazites are processed for rare earth elements such as cerium and lanthanum. It's plant capable of processing monazite to produce rare earth chloride and rare earth carbonate. The main by-product of monazite processing is the radioactive cake containing primarily thorium hydroxide. Operation of the monazite processing plant started in early eighties and terminated in early nineties. The decommissioning of the plant site started in late 2003 and completed its decommissioning and remediation works in early 2006. This paper described the lesson learned by Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in conducting third party independent audit for the decommissioning of the NORM contaminated facility. By continuously reviewing the lessons learned, mistakes and/or inefficiencies in this plant decommissioning project, hopefully will result in a smoother, less costly and more productive future decommissioning works on NORM facilities in Malaysia. (author)

  12. Project and feedback experience on nuclear facility decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, J.L. [ENRESA (Spain); Benest, T.G. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Windscale, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Tardy, F.; Lefevre, Ph. [Electricite de France (EDF/CIDEN), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Willis, A. [VT Nuclear Services (United Kingdom); Gilis, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R. [Belgoprocess (Belgium); Jeanjacques, M. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bohar, M.P.; Bremond, M.P.; Poyau, C.; Mandard, L.; Boissonneau, J.F.; Fouquereau, A.; Pichereau, E.; Binet, C. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, 92 (France); Fontana, Ph.; Fraize, G. [CEA Marcoule 30 (France); Seurat, Ph. [AREVA NC, 75 - Paris (France); Chesnokov, A.V.; Fadin, S.Y.; Ivanov, O.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Lemus, A.V.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Shisha, A.D.; Volkov, V.G.; Zverkov, Y.A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-11-15

    This series of 6 short articles presents the feedback experience that has been drawn from various nuclear facility dismantling and presents 3 decommissioning projects: first, the WAGR project that is the UK demonstration project for power reactor decommissioning (a review of the tools used to dismantle the reactor core); secondly, the dismantling project of the Bugey-1 UNGG reactor for which the dismantling works of the reactor internals is planned to be done underwater; and thirdly, the decommissioning project of the MR reactor in the Kurchatov Institute. The feedback experience described concerns nuclear facilities in Spain (Vandellos-1 and the CIEMAT research center), in Belgium (the Eurochemic reprocessing plant), and in France (the decommissioning of nuclear premises inside the Fontenay-aux-roses Cea center and the decommissioning of the UP1 spent fuel reprocessing plant at the Marcoule site). (A.C.)

  13. Project and feedback experience on nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, J.L.; Benest, T.G.; Tardy, F.; Lefevre, Ph.; Willis, A.; Gilis, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R.; Jeanjacques, M.; Bohar, M.P.; Bremond, M.P.; Poyau, C.; Mandard, L.; Boissonneau, J.F.; Fouquereau, A.; Pichereau, E.; Binet, C.; Fontana, Ph.; Fraize, G.; Seurat, Ph.; Chesnokov, A.V.; Fadin, S.Y.; Ivanov, O.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Lemus, A.V.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Shisha, A.D.; Volkov, V.G.; Zverkov, Y.A.

    2008-01-01

    This series of 6 short articles presents the feedback experience that has been drawn from various nuclear facility dismantling and presents 3 decommissioning projects: first, the WAGR project that is the UK demonstration project for power reactor decommissioning (a review of the tools used to dismantle the reactor core); secondly, the dismantling project of the Bugey-1 UNGG reactor for which the dismantling works of the reactor internals is planned to be done underwater; and thirdly, the decommissioning project of the MR reactor in the Kurchatov Institute. The feedback experience described concerns nuclear facilities in Spain (Vandellos-1 and the CIEMAT research center), in Belgium (the Eurochemic reprocessing plant), and in France (the decommissioning of nuclear premises inside the Fontenay-aux-roses Cea center and the decommissioning of the UP1 spent fuel reprocessing plant at the Marcoule site). (A.C.)

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a literature search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sande, W.E.; Freeman, H.D.; Hanson, M.S.; McKeever, R.

    1975-05-01

    is bibliography includes 429 unclassified references to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The references are arranged in chronological order and cover the period from 1944 through 1974. Subject and author indexes are e provided. (U.S.)

  15. The Study on Domestic and Foreign Cases for Decommissioning of DPRK Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Ye Ji; Hhu, Joo Youn; Lee, Jung Hyun; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study was able to analyze domestic and foreign cases, and collect data on the approximate amount of waste and time required time; however, data on applied technology, input manpower, required cost, and waste disposal method was insufficient. DPRK activities such as nuclear weapon development or nuclear testing not only threaten our country's security but also have an adverse effect on nuclear nonproliferation and security in the international society. Therefore, denuclearization of the DPRK is prior task that is essential to peace on the Korean Peninsula. The fundamental purpose of denuclearization of the DPRK is to safely decommission facilities related to developing nuclear weapons and to depose related radioactive waste and nuclear materials. Understanding descriptive references and physical properties of the facility and its purpose important for decommissioning nuclear facilities. Although it was impossible to collect data on DPRK nuclear facilities to perform complete decommissioning, we were able to understand the process used at DPRK nuclear facilities with open source data. This study has been conducted to establish overall measures for decommissioning DPRK nuclear facilities. DPRK nuclear facilities in this study include a IRT- 2000 type nuclear research reactor, a 5 MWe graphite moderated reactor, nuclear fuel fabrication facility, and a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, which are considered as facilities that produce or manufacture nuclear materials needed for nuclear weapons or related to such activities.

  16. The Study on Domestic and Foreign Cases for Decommissioning of DPRK Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ye Ji; Hhu, Joo Youn; Lee, Jung Hyun; Hwang, Yong Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study was able to analyze domestic and foreign cases, and collect data on the approximate amount of waste and time required time; however, data on applied technology, input manpower, required cost, and waste disposal method was insufficient. DPRK activities such as nuclear weapon development or nuclear testing not only threaten our country's security but also have an adverse effect on nuclear nonproliferation and security in the international society. Therefore, denuclearization of the DPRK is prior task that is essential to peace on the Korean Peninsula. The fundamental purpose of denuclearization of the DPRK is to safely decommission facilities related to developing nuclear weapons and to depose related radioactive waste and nuclear materials. Understanding descriptive references and physical properties of the facility and its purpose important for decommissioning nuclear facilities. Although it was impossible to collect data on DPRK nuclear facilities to perform complete decommissioning, we were able to understand the process used at DPRK nuclear facilities with open source data. This study has been conducted to establish overall measures for decommissioning DPRK nuclear facilities. DPRK nuclear facilities in this study include a IRT- 2000 type nuclear research reactor, a 5 MWe graphite moderated reactor, nuclear fuel fabrication facility, and a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, which are considered as facilities that produce or manufacture nuclear materials needed for nuclear weapons or related to such activities.

  17. Validity evaluation of internal exposure in nuclear facility decommission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoli; Chen Dahua; You Zeyun

    2012-01-01

    During nuclear facility decommission under construction, it is very important for workers to wear respirator to avoid harm of Am aerosols. So the protection effect of respirator is very important. The protection effect of respirator was calculated and evaluated according to the data achieved from engineering practice. The result shows that the protection effect is better than target management value and the respirator is effective to protect workers from harm of Am aerosols. The respirator is applied to other nuclear facility decommission. (authors)

  18. Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures

  19. Relative evaluation on decommissioning accident scenarios of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan-Seong; Choi, Byung-Seon; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Hyun, Dong-Jun; Kim, Geun-Ho; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Jo, Kyung-Hwa; Seo, Jae-Seok; Jeong, Seong-Young; Lee, Jung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper suggests relative importance on accident scenarios during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. ► The importance of scenarios can be performed by using AHP and Sugeno fuzzy method. ► The AHP and Sugeno fuzzy method guarantee reliability of the importance evaluation. -- Abstract: This paper suggests the evaluation method of relative importance on accident scenarios during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The evaluation method consists of AHP method and Sugeno fuzzy integral method. This method will guarantee the reliability of relative importance evaluation for decommissioning accident scenarios.

  20. Beneficial Re-use of Decommissioned Former Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    With the decision to decommission a nuclear facility, it is necessary to evaluate whether to fully demolish a facility or to re-use the facility in some capacity. This evaluation is often primarily driven by both the past mission of the site and the facility and the site's perceived future mission. In the case where the facility to be decommissioned is located within a large research or industrial complex and represents a significant resource to the site's future mission, it may be a perfect candidate to be re-used in some fashion. However, if the site is a rather remote older facility with little chance of being modified to today's standards for its re-use, the chances for its re-use will be substantially reduced. In this presentation, some specific cases of former nuclear facilities being decommissioned and re-used will be reviewed and some factors required to be considered in making this decision will be reviewed

  1. In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrato, Michael G.; Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m 3 ) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international

  2. In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and

  3. The cost of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report sets out the results of a National Audit Office investigation to determine the extent of the potential Government liability for nuclear decommissioning, how this is to be financed and the possible implications for the taxpayer. Further effort are needed to improve the nuclear industry's estimates, improve efficiency and face up to the costs of decommissioning. This should also ensure that the full cost of nuclear energy is identified. (author)

  4. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities involving operations with uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, E.Y.; Neuder, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    When a licensed nuclear facility ceases operation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ensures that the facility and its site are decontaminated to acceptable levels so they may safely be released for unrestricted public use. Because specific environmental standards or broad federal guidelines governing release of residual radioactive contamination have not been issued, NRC has developed ad hoc cleanup criteria for decommissioning nuclear facilities that involved uranium and thorium. Cleanup criteria include decontamination of buildings, equipment, and land. We will address cleanup criteria and their rationale; procedures for decommissioning uranium/thorium facilities; radiological survey designs and procedures; radiological monitoring and measurement; and cost-effectiveness to demonstrate compliance

  5. Regulations and financing for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Osamu

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to survey the French legislation concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the method of financing for it. There is no clause in French regulations, which states any specific criterion or licensing procedure for the proper decommissioning. The legal problems in this domain are treated within the general regulation system on atomic energy. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities is carried out in accordance with the licensing procedure for constructing nuclear facilities or the permission procedure for operating them, according to the ''Decree on nuclear installations, 1963''. The works for the final shut-down and decommissioning are regarded as the modification to the safety report or the general operation instructions, and new permit is required. In the case that the radioactivity of substances after decommissioning is above the criteria of the Decree, 1963, the new license is required. In the case of below the criteria, the facilities are governed by the ''Act on installations classified for environmental protection, 1976''. The ''Decree on general radiation protection, 1966'', the ''Decree on radiation protection of workers in nuclear installations, 1975'', the ''Ministerial order on transport of dangerous materials, 1945'', and two ministerial orders on radioactive effluent discharge, 1974, are applied to the decommissioning works. (Kako, I.)

  6. Addressing Uncertainties in Cost Estimates for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, Serge; Descures, Sylvain; Du Pasquier, Louis; Francois, Patrice; Buonarotti, Stefano; Mariotti, Giovanni; Tarakonov, Jurij; Daniska, Vladimir; Bergh, Niklas; Carroll, Simon; AaSTRoeM, Annika; Cato, Anna; De La Gardie, Fredrik; Haenggi, Hannes; Rodriguez, Jose; Laird, Alastair; Ridpath, Andy; La Guardia, Thomas; O'Sullivan, Patrick; ); Weber, Inge; )

    2017-01-01

    The cost estimation process of decommissioning nuclear facilities has continued to evolve in recent years, with a general trend towards demonstrating greater levels of detail in the estimate and more explicit consideration of uncertainties, the latter of which may have an impact on decommissioning project costs. The 2012 report on the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, a joint recommendation by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission, proposes a standardised structure of cost items for decommissioning projects that can be used either directly for the production of cost estimates or for mapping of cost items for benchmarking purposes. The ISDC, however, provides only limited guidance on the treatment of uncertainty when preparing cost estimates. Addressing Uncertainties in Cost Estimates for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities, prepared jointly by the NEA and IAEA, is intended to complement the ISDC, assisting cost estimators and reviewers in systematically addressing uncertainties in decommissioning cost estimates. Based on experiences gained in participating countries and projects, the report describes how uncertainty and risks can be analysed and incorporated in decommissioning cost estimates, while presenting the outcomes in a transparent manner

  7. Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the

  8. Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi; Cochran, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning

  9. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.; Haffner, D.R.; Schneider, K.J.; Short, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of 3 H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of 14 C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of 123 I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of 137 Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of 241 Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires

  10. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

    2002-12-01

    Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a

  11. Decommissioning Strategies Selection for Facilities Using Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husen Zamroni; Jaka Rachmadetin

    2008-01-01

    The facilities using radioactive material that have been stopped operation will require some form of the decommissioning for public and environment safety. The approaches are identified by three decommissioning strategies: immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. If a facility undergoes immediate dismantling, most radio nuclides will have no such sufficient time to decay and therefore this strategy may not provide reduction in the worker exposure. A facility that undergoes deferred dismantling may advantage from the radioactive decay of residual radio nuclides during the long term storage period and entombment could be a viable option for other nuclear facilities containing only short lived or limited concentrations of long lived radionuclides. Mostly, only two types of the decommissioning used to be done in the world, immediate and deferred dismantling. (author)

  12. Decommissioning of the Hermes facility at AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The contract for decommissioning the HERMES (Heavy Element and Radioactive Materials Electromagnetic Separator) Facility at AERE Harwell was the first contract of its type awarded to Private Industry by the Public Sector. The work required operatives to work in pressure suits for extended periods in decommissioning a heavily alpha contaminated facility. The work required the setting up of a temporary changeroom, waste posting facilities, air suit supplies and controls and temporary ventilation for a completely self-contained site set-up. The Contractor had to provide and train his own operatives, provide all health physics supervision and control and take full responsibility for all technical matters. (author)

  13. Status of ANSI standards on decommissioning of nuclear reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    A definition of decommissioning is given, and the preparation of ANSI Standard, ''General Design Criteria for Nuclear Reprocessing Facilities'' (N101.3) is discussed. A Eurochemic report, entitled ''The Shutdown of Reprocessing Facilities--Results of Preliminary Studies on the Installations Belonging to Eurochemic,'' was used in the preparation of this standard. (U.S.)

  14. Development of the decommissioning techniques for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ken-ichi; Sugaya, Toshikatsu; Hara, Mitsuo; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Tobita, Hiroo; Enokido, Yuji

    1992-01-01

    Being developed the basement techniques such as measurement, decontamination, dismantling, remote handling and data base. For the elevating and systematizing the basement techniques, thinking over the application, forward to the facility decommissionings in the future, including the technique of waste treatment in WDF and the achievement using the dismantling and recycling technique in renewaling the research facilities. (author)

  15. Development of the Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. The monitoring system for high alpha radioactive contamination measurement will be use in the high radioactivity decommissioning sites such as hot-cell or glove box. Also, it will be use in the general nuclear facilities as the radiation monitoring unit. The preparation technology of the radiation sensor for high radioactive contamination measurement will be transferred to the company for the industrialization. The remote monitoring system can prevent the workers exposure using the optical fiber to separate the sensor and electronics

  16. The preliminary planning for decommissioning nuclear facilities in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    During the congressional hearing in 1992 for a $7 billion project for approval of the fourth nuclear power plant, the public was concerned about the decommissioning of the operating plants. In order to facilitate the public acceptance of nuclear energy and to secure the local capability for appropriate nuclear backend management, both technologically and financially, it is important to have preliminary planning for decommissioning the nuclear facilities. This paper attempted to investigate the possible scope of decommissioning activities and addressed the important regulatory, financial, and technological aspects. More research and development works regarding the issue of decommissioning are needed to carry out the government's will of decent management of nuclear energy from the cradle to the grave

  17. Selecting strategies for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This status report on Selecting Strategies for the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities is based on the viewpoints and materials presented at the Tarragona seminar as well as the experience of the WPDD. It identifies, reviews and analyses factors influencing decommissioning strategies and addresses the challenges associated with balancing these factors in the process of strategy selection. It gives recognition to the fact that, in addition to technical characteristics, there are many other factors that influence the selection of a decommissioning strategy and that cannot be quantified, such as policy, regulatory and socio-economic factors and aspects that reach far into the future. Uncertainties associated with such factors are a challenge to those who have to take decisions on a decommissioning strategy. (author)

  18. Incorporating design for decommissioning into the layout of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collum, B.; Druart, A.

    2008-01-01

    Design for Decommissioning (DfD) is the design of nuclear facilities in a manner that facilitates ultimate decommissioning in as safe, technically efficient and cost effective way as possible. Strictly speaking, (DfD) should need minimal introduction and this paper should ideally be aimed at discussing the finer points of some improvement to a practice that is already widely embedded throughout the nuclear industry. The reality though is quite different. As an industry, we all know what DfD is and indeed we do incorporate it into our designs. However, application is at best patchy and there is little evidence of applying it to the level that will be advocated here. When applied at its highest level, DfD is all about truly designing nuclear facilities with their whole life cycle in mind, such that the decommissioning phase is an integral part of the design of a facility from the very first day. In this way, when a facility comes to the end of its operational life, it can move smoothly to Post Operational Clean Out (POCO) and then through the various phases of decommissioning. Demonstrating from the start that the nuclear industry addresses the challenges posed by decommissioning will help it to gain support from the regulators and the general public for proposals to build new nuclear generating capacity. (author)

  19. A state-of-the art on decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Kook; Kim, Hee Reyoung; Chung, Un Soo; Jung, Ki Jung

    2002-05-01

    While proceeding the KRR-1 and 2 decommissioning project, we are carried out study for the state of the art on decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Japan. Also, we are studied for the research reactors and commercial power plant that has the object of decommissioning, and for the government and the organization related on decommissioning operation. We are investigated for decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities achieved by JAERI, and collected the information and data for decommissioning techniques and computational system through the JPDR(Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) decommissioning activities. Such techniques are applying for Tokai Power Station began the decommissioning project from last year, and for Fugen Nuclear Power Station to be planned the decommissioning from 2003. Recent techniques for decommissioning was acquired by direct contact. The status of the treatment for decommissioning waste and the disposal facility for the very low-level radioactive concrete wastes was grasped

  20. Development of decommissioning, decontamination and reuse technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Choi, B. S.

    2012-03-01

    In this project, the foundation of decommissioning technology through the development of core technologies applied to maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear facility was established. First of all, we developed the key technology such as safety assessment technology for decommissioning work needed at the preparatory stage of decommissioning of the highly contaminated facilities and simultaneous measurement technology of the high-level alpha/beta contamination applicable to the operation and decommissioning of the nuclear facilities. Second, we developed a remotely controlled laser ablation decontamination system which is useful for a removal of fixed contaminants and developed a chemical gel decontamination technology for a removal of non-fixed contaminants during the maintenance and decommissioning works of high radiation hot cells which have been used for a recycling or treatment of spent fuels. Third, we developed a volume reduction and self-disposal technology for dismantled concrete wastes. Also, the technology for volume reduction and stabilization of the peculiar wastes(HEPA filter and organic mixed wastes), which have been known to be very difficult to treat and manage, generated from the high radioactive facilities in operation, improvement and repair and under decommissioning was developed. Finally, this research project was developed a system for the reduction of radiotoxicity of several uranium mixtures generated in the front- and back-end nuclear fuel cycles with characteristics of highly enhanced proliferation-resistance and more environmental friendliness, which can make the uranium to be recovered or separated from the mixtures with a high purity level enough for the uranium to be reused and to be classified as C-class level for burial near the surface, and then which result in the much reduction in volume of the uranium mixture wastes

  1. Decontamination and Decommissioning Project for the Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. and others

    2006-02-15

    The final goal of this project is to complete safely and successfully the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 (KRR-1) and the Korean Research Reactor no.2 (KRR-2), and uranium conversion plant (UCP). The dismantling of the reactor hall of the KRR-2 was planned to complete till the end of 2004, but it was delayed because of a few unexpected factors such as the development of a remotely operated equipment for dismantling of the highly radioactive parts of the beam port tubes. In 2005, the dismantling of the bio-shielding concrete structure of the KRR-2 was finished and the hall can be used as a temporary storage space for the radioactive waste generated during the decommissioning of the KRR-1 and KRR-2. The cutting experience of the shielding concrete by diamond wire saw and the drilling experience by a core boring machine will be applied to another nuclear facility dismantling. An effective management tool of the decommissioning projects, named DECOMIS, was developed and the data from the decommissioning projects were gathered. This system provided many information on the daily D and D works, waste generation, radiation dose, etc., so an effective management of the decommissioning projects is expected from next year. The operation experience of the uranium conversion plant as a nuclear fuel cycle facility was much contributed to the localization of nuclear fuels for both HWR and PWR. It was shut down in 1993 and a program for its decontamination and dismantling was launched in 2001 to remove all the contaminated equipment and to achieve the environment restoration. The decommissioning project is expected to contribute to the development of the D and D technologies for the other domestic fuel cycle facilities and the settlement of the new criteria for decommissioning of the fuel cycle related facilities.

  2. The assessment system based on virtual decommissioning environments to reduce abnormal hazards from human errors for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Byung Seon; Hyun, Dong jun; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Ik June; Kang, Shin Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities has to be accomplished by assuring the safety of workers. So, it is necessary that before decommissioning, the exposure dose to workers has to be analyzed and assessed under the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). Furthermore, to improve the proficiency of decommissioning environments, method and system need to be developed. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities, it is necessary that assessment system is developed. This system has been successfully developed so that exposure dose to workers could be real-time measured and assessed in virtual decommissioning environments. It can be concluded that this system could be protected from accidents and enable workers to improve his familiarization about working environments. It is expected that this system can reduce human errors because workers are able to improve the proficiency of hazardous working environments due to virtual training like real decommissioning situations.

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Since 1973, when the IAEA first introduced the subject of decontamination and decommissioning into its programme, twelve Agency reports reflecting the needs of the Member States on these topics have been published. These reports summarize the work done by various Technical Committees, Advisory Groups, and International Symposia. While the basic technology to accomplish decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) is fairly well developed, the Agency feels that a more rapid exchange of information and co-ordination of work are required to foster technology, reduce duplication of effort, and provide useful results for Member States planning D and D activities. Although the Agency's limited financial resources do not make possible direct support of every research work in this field, the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) creates a forum for outstanding workers from different Member States brought into closer contact with one another to provide for more effective interaction and, perhaps subsequently, closer collaboration. The first IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on decontamination and decommissioning was initiated in 1984. Nineteen experts from 11 Member States and two international organizations (CEC, OECD/NEA) took part in the three Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCM) during 1984-87. The final RCM took place in Pittsburgh, USA, in conjunction with the 1987 International Decommissioning Symposium (sponsored by the US DOE and organized in co-operation with the IAEA and OECD/NEA). The present document summarizes the salient features and achievements of the co-ordinated research work performed during the 1984-87 programme period. The document consists of two parts: Part 1, Summary of the three research co-ordination meetings and Part 2, Final submissions by participants on the research work performed during 1984-1987. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 reports presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Development of simplified decommissioning cost estimation code for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Mitsuo; Shiraishi, Kunio; Ishigami, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    The simplified decommissioning cost estimation code for nuclear facilities (DECOST code) was developed in consideration of features and structures of nuclear facilities and similarity of dismantling methods. The DECOST code could calculate 8 evaluation items of decommissioning cost. Actual dismantling in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was evaluated; unit conversion factors used to calculate the manpower of dismantling activities were evaluated. Consequently, unit conversion factors of general components could be classified into three kinds. Weights of components and structures of the facility were necessary for calculation of manpower. Methods for evaluating weights of components and structures of the facility were studied. Consequently, the weight of components in the facility was proportional to the weight of structures of the facility. The weight of structures of the facility was proportional to the total area of floors in the facility. Decommissioning costs of 7 nuclear facilities in the JAEA were calculated by using the DECOST code. To verify the calculated results, the calculated manpower was compared with the manpower gained from actual dismantling. Consequently, the calculated manpower and actual manpower were almost equal. The outline of the DECOST code, evaluation results of unit conversion factors, the evaluation method of the weights of components and structures of the facility are described in this report. (author)

  5. Criteria, standards and policies regarding decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.; Lennemann, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    At the end of this century, there will probably be around 2500 operating nuclear power reactors, along with all the other nuclear fuel cycle facilities supporting their operation. Eventually these facilities, one by one, will be shut down and it will be necessary to dispose of them as with any redundant industrial facility or plant. Some parts of a nuclear fuel cycle facility can be dismantled by conventional methods, but those parts which have become contaminated with radioactive nuclear products or induced radioactivity must be subject to rigid controls and restrictions and handled by special dismantling and disposal procedures. In many cases, the resulting quantity of radioactive waste is likely to be relatively large and dismantling quite costly. Decommissioning nuclear facilities is a multifaceted problem involving planners, design engineers, operators, waste managers and regulatory authorities. Preparation for decommissioning should begin as early as site selection and plant design. The corner stone for the preparation of a decommissioning programme is the definition of its extent, meeting the requirements for public and environmental protection during the period that the radioactive material is of concern. The paper discusses the decontamination and decommissioning experience at the Eurochemic fuel reprocessing plant, the implications and the knowledge gained from this experience. It includes the results of technical reviews made by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding decommissioning nuclear facilities. The paper notes the special planning that should be arranged between those responsible for the nuclear facility and competent public authorities who should jointly make a realistic determination of the eventual disposition of the nuclear facility, even before it is built. Recommendations cover the responsibilities of nuclear plant entrepreneurs, designers, operators, and public and regulatory authorities

  6. Strategic aspects on waste management in decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannemalm, T.; Eliasson, S.; Larsson, A.; Lidar, P.; Bergh, N.; Hedin, G.

    2017-01-01

    A team composed of experts from the facility owner OKG, Westinghouse and Studsvik (today Cyclife Sweden and Studsvik Consulting) was asked to develop a basis for decision on an overall strategy for the management of the material and waste arising from the decommissioning of two BWR NPPs at the Oskarshamn site in Sweden. To be able to provide a good basis for decision the full waste management chain from generation to disposition, i.e. clearance or disposal had to be assessed, categorised, quantified and analysed with regards to costs, environmental impact and risks. A systematic approach was applied taking benefit of the decommissioning studies made previously for the two facilities, the decommissioning concepts developed by Ndcon (the partnership in decommissioning between Studsvik and Westinghouse) and the combined knowledge and experience in the project team. In total 4 different waste management concepts were compared individually and in combinations. The four concepts evaluated were based on: direct disposal in the national geological repository; treatment of the waste for volume reduction and where applicable clearance in an external waste treatment facility; decontamination and clearance in an on-site waste treatment facility; direct disposal in a near surface repository at the NPP site. It was important to be able to compare the different options in a quantifiable way. Therefore the project team set up a matrix with parameters for the different options gained from the utility, the national waste management company, external vendors and the experience of the team. In this way a quantitative analysis could be done with the four different waste management options. In addition to the quantitative analysis the team summarised decades of experience in radioactive waste management and decommissioning recommendations and risk analyses. Special attention was given to risk mitigation and redundancy in the waste management chain. The development of an overall waste

  7. Decommissioning and environmental restoration of nuclear facilities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2000-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980s, the Scientific and Technological Commission (STC) began the study on the environmental impact of the nuclear industry in China. At the end of the 1980s, the STC initiated the study on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and environmental restoration. In 1989 the STC completed the project entitled ''Radiological and Environmental Quality Assessment of the Nuclear Industry in China Over the Past Thirty Years''. The status of the environmental pollution of various nuclear facility sites was subsequently analysed. In 1994, the decommissioning and environmental restoration of the first research and manufacture complex for nuclear weapons was completed. The complex is now accessible to the public without restriction and the site has become a town. Some nuclear related facilities, such as uranium mines, are currently being decommissioned. Although uranium mining and milling has a more serious impact on the environment, the technology for decommissioning and environmental restoration in mining and milling installations is not much more complicated than that used for reactor and reprocessing facilities: much has been achieved in the area of mining and milling. (author)

  8. Development of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technologies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun

    2010-04-01

    A laser ablation decontamination technology which is reportedly effective for a removal of fixed contaminants has been developed for three years as the first stage of the development. Lab scale experimental equipment was fabricated and the process variables have been assessed for determination of appropriate decontamination conditions at the laser wave lengths of 1,064 nm and 532 nm, respectively. The decontamination tests using radioactive specimens showed that the decontamination efficiency was about 100 which is quite a high value. An electrokinetic-flushing, an agglomeration leaching and a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology were development for a decontamination of radioactive soil wastes from the decommissioned sites of the TRIGA research reactor and the uranium conversion facilities. An electrokinetic-flushing process was found to be effective for soil wastes aged for a long time and an agglomeration leaching process was effective for soil wastes of surface contamination. On the other hand, a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology was found to be applicable for U or TRU bearing soil wastes. The remediation monitoring key technologies such as a representative sample taking and a measurement concept for the vertical distribution of radionuclides were developed for an assessment of the site remediation. Also an One-Dimensional Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Unsaturated Zone (FTUNS) code was developed to interpretate the radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone

  9. Strategy selection for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    As modern nuclear power programmes mature and large, commercial nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities approach the end of their useful life by reason of age, economics or change of policy on the use of nuclear power, new challenges associated with decommissioning and dismantling come to the fore. Politicians and the public may expect there to be a 'right answer' to the choice of strategy for a particular type of facility, or even all facilities. Both this seminar and wider experience show that this is not the case. Local factors and national political positions have a significant input and often result in widely differing strategy approaches to broadly similar decommissioning projects. All facility owners represented at the seminar were able to demonstrate a rational process for strategy selection and compelling arguments for the choices made. In addition to the papers that were presented, these proceedings include a summary of the discussions that took place. (author)

  10. Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

  11. Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U 3 O 8 to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington

  12. The Practice of Cost Estimation for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidova, Ivana; Desecures, Sylvain; Lexow, Thomas; Buonarroti, Stefano; Marini, Giuseppe; Pescatore, Claudio; Rehak, Ivan; Weber, Inge; ); Daniska, Vladimir; Linan, Jorge Borque; Caroll, Simon; Hedberg, Bjoern; De La Gardie, Fredrik; Haenggi, Hannes; Laguardia, Thomas S.; Ridpath, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Decommissioning of both commercial and R and D nuclear facilities is expected to increase significantly in the coming years, and the largest of such industrial decommissioning projects could command considerable budgets. Several approaches are currently being used for decommissioning cost estimations, with an international culture developing in the field. The present cost estimation practice guide was prepared in order to offer international actors specific guidance in preparing quality cost and schedule estimates to support detailed budgeting for the preparation of decommissioning plans, for the securing of funds and for decommissioning implementation. This guide is based on current practices and standards in a number of NEA member countries and aims to help consolidate the practice and process of decommissioning cost estimation so as to make it more widely understood. It offers a useful reference for the practitioner and for training programmes. The remainder of report is divided into the following chapters: - Chapter 2 covers the purpose and nature of decommissioning cost estimates, approaches to cost estimation and the major elements of a cost estimate. - Chapter 3 examines the development of the integrated schedule of the activity-dependent work scope and the determination of the project critical path. - Chapter 4 describes the attributes of a quality assurance programme applicable to cost estimation and the use and cautions of benchmarking the estimate from other estimates or actual costs. - Chapter 5 describes the pyramidal structure of the report, and the scope and content that should be included in the cost study report to ensure consistency and transparency in the estimate underpinnings. - Chapter 6 provides some observations, conclusions and recommendations on the use of this guide

  13. Development of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Won, C. H.

    2010-04-01

    The research results could be used for a design of a remote ablation decontamination system and ultimately applicable for an decontamination of high radiation facilities such as the DUPIC and PIEF. The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. It is expected that the technology for a volume reduction and self-disposal of dismantled concrete wastes can be contributed to the establishment of a management plan for radioactive dismantled concrete wastes through the minimization of final waste volume

  14. An international contribution to decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities must be retired from service when they have completed their design objective, become obsolete or when they no longer fulfill current safety, technical or economic requirements. Decommissioning is defined as the set of technical and administrative operations that provides adequate protection of workers and public against radiation risks, minimizes impact on the environment and involves manageable costs. A traditional definition of the stages of decommissioning has been proposed by the IAEA and is largely used worldwide. A number of factors have to be considered when selecting the optimum strategy, which include the national nuclear policy, characteristics of the facility, health and safety, environmental protection, radioactive waste management, future use of the site, improvements of the technology that may be achieved in the future, costs and availability of funds and various social considerations. The paper describes the current situation of nuclear facilities and the associated forthcoming requirements and problems of decommissioning. This task requires a complete radionuclide inventory, decontamination methods, disassembly techniques and remote operations. Radiation safety presents three aspects: nuclear safety, protection of workers and protection of the public. An appropriate delay to initiate decommissioning after shutdown of a facility may considerably reduce workers exposures and costs. Decommissioning also generates significant quantities of neutron-activated and surface contaminated materials which require a specific management. A vigorous international cooperation and coordinated research programs have been encouraged by the NEA for a minimization of costs and efforts and to provide a basis for consensus of opinions on policies, strategies and criteria. (J.S.). 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Dose control during decommissioning stage 1.2 of decommissioning SGHWR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, M.J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Dose control during decommissioning stage 1.2 of the SGHWR facility, i.e preparation for an extended period of care and maintenance, is discussed. The method of control of dose uptake is described and also the systems of dose uptake review, the use of dose restraint objections and other tools for limitation of dose uptake. Dose uptake data are presented for periods of maintenance shutdowns. Finally the option of chemical clearing of the circuit following shutdown is considered. (UK).

  16. Criteria, standards and policies regarding decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.; Lennemann, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the decontamination and decommissioning experiences encountered at the Eurochemic fuel reprocessing plant, their implications and the knowledge gained from these experiences. It includes the results of technical reviews made by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding decommissioning nuclear facilities. The conlusions which are presented should weigh heavily in the considerations of the national authorities involved in regulating nuclear power programmes. The paper notes the special planning that should be arranged between those responsible for the nuclear facility and competent public authorities who jointly should make a realistic determination of the eventual disposition of the nuclear facility, even before it is built. Recommendations cover the responsibilities of nuclear plant entrepreneurs, designers, operators, and public and regulatory authorities [fr

  17. Cost update: Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

    1994-06-01

    The cost estimates originally developed in NUREG/CR-1266 for commissioning a reference low-enrichment uranium fuel fabrication plant are updated from 1978 to early 1993 dollars. During this time, the costs for labor and materials increased approximately at the rate of inflation, the cost of energy increased more slowly than the rate of inflation, and the cost of low-level radioactive waste disposal increased much more rapidly than the rate of inflation. The results of the analysis indicate that the estimated costs for the immediate dismantlement and decontamination for unrestricted facility release (DECON) of the reference plant have increased from the mid-1978 value of $3.57 million to $8.08 million in 1993 with in-compact low-level radioactive waste disposal at the US Ecoloay facility near Richland, Washington. The cost estimate rises to $19.62 million with out-of-compact radioactive waste disposal at the Chem-Nuclear facility near Barnwell, South Carolina. A methodology and a formula are presented for estimating the cost of decommissioning the reference uranium fuel fabrication plant at some future time, based on these early 1993 cost estimates. The formula contains essentially the same elements as the formula given in 10 CFR 50.75 for escalating the decommissioning costs for nuclear power reactors to some future time

  18. Design Lessons Drawn from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-05-01

    This report provides an updated compilation incorporating the most recent lessons learned from decommissioning and remediation projects. It is intended as a 'road map' to those seeking to apply these lessons. The report presents the issues in a concise and systematic manner, along with practical, thought-provoking examples. The most important lessons learned in recent years are organized and examined to enable the intended audience to gauge the importance of this aspect of the planning for new nuclear facilities. These will be of special interest to those seeking to construct nuclear facilities for the first time. In Sections 1 and 2, the current situation in the field of decommissioning is reviewed and the relevance and importance of beneficial design features is introduced. A more detailed review of previous and current lessons learned from decommissioning is given in Section 3 where different aspects of the decommissioning process are analysed. From this analysis beneficial design features have been extracted and identified in Section 4 which includes two comprehensive tables where brief descriptions of the features are summarized and responsibilities are identified. Conclusions and key design features and key recommendations are given in Section 5. Two Annexes are included to provide lessons from past projects and past experience and to record notes and extracts taken from a comprehensive list of publications listed in the References on page 47.

  19. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1993-10-01

    A concise description of the current status of the decommissioning of the hot cell capacity at Risoe National Laboratory is given in this 6th periodic report covering January 1st to June 30th, 1993. All registered and safeguarded fissile material has been removed and the task of cutting and packing scrap material and experimental equipment from the concrete cell line has been completed. Concrete cells 5 and 6 have been finally cleaned and the master slave manipulators removed from them. The major part of the contamination on the shutters and shutter houses were on their horizontal planes and the main contaminant was 137 Cs. Here the surfaces were cleaned by wiping with wet cloths. The method is described. Tables illustrating the resulting contamination levels are included, the density is now low on the shutters. The method of final inn-cell cleaning is explained, and here again tables represent the resulting contamination levels. The work on ''hot spot'' removal and remote cleaning by vacuuming continues on the remaining cells. A collective dose of ca. 16.3 man-mSv was ascribed to 18 persons in the first half of 1993, arising mainly from in-cell work and waste handling. To sum up, the main results from this period are successful removal of last waste from the cells, remote cleaning of cells 2 and 3, final condition for all shutters and shutter housings and final condition for cells 5 and 6. Tables illustrate measured dose rates in detail. (AB)

  20. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities; Le demantelement des installations nucleaires de base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Rieu, J.; Lareynie, O.; Delrive, L.; Vallet, J.; Girard, A.; Duthe, M.; Lecomte, C.; Rozain, J.P.; Nokhamzon, J.G.; Davoust, M.; Eyraud, J.L.; Bernet, Ph.; Velon, M.; Gay, A.; Charles, Th.; Leschaeva, M.; Dutzer, M.; Maocec, Ch.; Gillet, G.; Brut, F.; Dieulot, M.; Thuillier, D.; Tournebize, F.; Fontaine, V.; Goursaud, V.; Birot, M.; Le Bourdonnec, Th.; Batandjieva, B.; Theis, St.; Walker, St.; Rosett, M.; Cameron, C.; Boyd, A.; Aguilar, M.; Brownell, H.; Manson, P.; Walthery, R.; Wan Laer, W.; Lewandowski, P.; Dorms, B.; Reusen, N.; Bardelay, J.; Damette, G.; Francois, P.; Eimer, M.; Tadjeddine, A.; Sene, M.; Sene, R

    2008-11-15

    This file includes five parts: the first part is devoted to the strategies of the different operators and includes the following files: the decommissioning of nuclear facilities Asn point of view, decommissioning of secret nuclear facilities, decommissioning at the civil Cea strategy and programs, EDF de-construction strategy, Areva strategy for decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the second one concerns the stakes of dismantling and includes the articles as follow: complete cleanup of buildings structures in nuclear facilities, decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety assessment, decommissioning wastes management issues, securing the financing of long-term decommissioning and waste management costs, organizational and human factors in decommissioning projects, training for the decommissioning professions: the example of the Grenoble University master degree; the third part is devoted to the management of dismantling work sites and includes the different articles as follow: decommissioning progress at S.I.C.N. plant, example of decommissioning work site in Cea Grenoble: Siloette reactor decommissioning, matters related to decommissioning sites, decommissioning of french nuclear installations: the viewpoint of a specialist company, specificities of inspections during decommissioning: the Asn inspector point of view; the fourth part is in relation with the international approach and includes as follow: IAEA role in establishing a global safety regime on decommissioning, towards harmonization of nuclear safety practices in Europe: W.E.N.R.A. and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, EPA superfund program policy for decontamination and decommissioning, progress with remediation at Sellafield, progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Belgium, activities of I.R.S.N. and its daughter company Risk-audit I.r.s.n./G.r.s. international in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in eastern countries

  1. Evolution of some important principles on decommissioning of nuclear and radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yamin; Wu Hao

    2004-01-01

    The paper introduces the evolution of some important principles on decommissioning of nuclear and radiation facilities. Decommissioning issue should not be regarded just as an end phase of the facilities operation, but should be taken into consideration as a part of whole operation process. The decommissioning plan and management should be considered in all phases of siting, design, construction and operation. A new term 'Facilitating Decommissioning' is introduced. Three stages principle of decommissioning (storage with surveillance, restricted release and unrestricted release) is being faded. The decommissioning implementation and related regulatory body should pay attention to these principal changes

  2. Policies and Strategies for the Decommissioning of Nuclear and Radiological Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents the main elements of policies and strategies for decommissioning activities of nuclear and radiological facilities. It is intended to help in facilitating proper and systematic planning, and safe, timely and cost effective implementation of all decommissioning activities. The policy establishes the principles for decommissioning and the strategy contains the approaches for the implementation of the policy. The publication will be a useful guide for strategic planners, waste managers, operators of facilities under decommissioning, regulators and other stakeholders.

  3. Atmospheric discharges from nuclear facilities during decommissioning: German experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Goertz, R.; Weil, L.

    1997-08-01

    In Germany, a substantial amount of experience is available with planning, licensing and realization of decommissioning projects. In total, a number of 18 nuclear power plants including prototype facilities as well as 6 research reactors and 3 fuel cycle facilities have been shut down finally and are at different stages of decommissioning. Only recently the final {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} stage of the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant total dismantlement project has been achieved. From the regulatory point of view, a survey of the decommissioning experience in Germany is presented highlighting the aspects of production and retention of airborne radioactivity. Nuclear air cleaning technology, discharge limits prescribed in licences and actual discharges are presented. As compared to operation, the composition of the discharged radioactivity is different as well as the off-gas discharge rate. In practically all cases, there is no significant amount of short-lived radionuclides. The discussion further includes lessons learned, for example inadvertent discharges of radionuclides expected not to be in the plants inventory. It is demonstrated that, as for operation of nuclear power plants, the limits prescribed in the Ordinance on Radiological Protection can be met using existing air cleaning technology, Optimization of protection results in public exposures substantially below the limits. In the frame of the regulatory investigation programme a study has been conducted to assess the airborne radioactivity created during certain decommissioning activities like decontamination, segmentation and handling of contaminated or activated parts. The essential results of this study are presented, which are supposed to support planning for decommissioning, for LWRs, Co-60 and Cs-137 are expected to be the dominant radionuclides in airborne discharges. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Development of decommissioning technology for nuclear fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    There are many kinds of objects for decommissioning and their properties are greatly different in respects of morphology, constituent materials, contamination history, etc. Therefore, the techniques for decontamination and dismantlement are required to have a great applicability. In addition, most of contamination nuclides have long half-life and so, it is desirable to rapidly take measures to stop or close a contaminated facility. In consideration of these characteristics developments of elementary techniques for decontamination have been attempted. This report summarized the present states of decommissioning technology for nuclear fuel facility. The function and performance of each elementary technique were examined through test operation and simulation was made for the important techniques of them aiming at generalization and optimization. For remote handling technology, two operation tools; 'metal splitting saw cutting tool' and 'plasma cutting tool' were produced and utilizations of these tools in combination with a robot for conveyance are under investigation now. (M.N.)

  5. The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

  6. General framework and basis of decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, J. L.; Martin, N.; Correa, C.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the legal framework defining the strategies, the main activities and the basic responsibilities and roles of the various agents involved in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain. It also describes briefly the most relevant projects and activities already developed and/or ongoing nowadays, which have positioned Spain within the small group of countries having an integrated and proved experience and know how in this particular field. (Author)

  7. Decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Most of the technical literature on decommissioning addresses the regulatory, organizational, technical and other aspects for large facilities such as nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants and relatively large prototype, research and test reactors. There are, however, a much larger number of licensed users of radioactive material in the fields of medicine, research and industry. Most of these nuclear facilities are smaller in size and complexity and may present a lower radiological risk during their decommissioning. Such facilities are located at research establishments, biological and medical laboratories, universities, medical centres, and industrial and manufacturing premises. They are often operated by users who have not been trained or are unfamiliar with the decommissioning, waste management and associated safety aspects of these types of facility at the end of their operating lives. Also, for many small users of radioactive material such as radiation sources, nuclear applications are a small part of the overall business or process and, although the operating safety requirements may be adhered to, concern or responsibility may not go much beyond this. There is concern that even the minimum requirements of decommissioning may be disregarded, resulting in avoidable delays, risks and safety implications (e.g. a loss of radioactive material and a loss of all records). Incidents have occurred in which persons have been injured or put at risk. It is recognized that the strategies and specific requirements for small facilities may be much less onerous than for large ones such as nuclear power plants or fuel processing facilities, but many of the same principles apply. There has been considerable attention given to nuclear facilities and many IAEA publications are complementary to this report. This report, however, attempts to give specific guidance for small facilities. 'Small' in this report does not necessarily mean small in size but generally modest in terms

  8. Procedure for estimating facility decommissioning costs for non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been reappraising its regulatory position relative to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities over the last several years. Approximately 30 reports covering the technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear facilities have been published during this period in support of this effort. One of these reports, Technology, Safety, and Costs of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Nuclear Facilities (NUREG/CR-1754), was published in 1981 and was felt by the NRC staff to be outdated. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by the NRC staff to revise the information provided in this report to reflect the latest information on decommissioning technology and costs and publish the results as an addendum to the previous report. During the course of this study, the NRC staff also asked that PNL provide a simplified procedure for estimating decommissioning costs of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities. The purpose being to provide NRC staff with the means to easily generate their own estimate of decommissioning costs for a given facility for comparison against a licensee's submittal. This report presents the procedure developed for use by NRC staff

  9. National policies and regulations for decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This report, though produced as a follow-up to Safety Series No. 105, The Regulatory Process for the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities, is not primarily intended as guidance. Rather, its objective is to provide an overview of national decommissioning policies and regulatory practices as part of the background knowledge which is an essential precondition for good decision making. It discusses the reasons for the similarities and differences in national approach using specific examples but without giving preference to any particular scheme; it aims rather to provide factual, general information on the choices that have been or are being made, and why. As many Member States are in a transient situation between the case-by-case approach to decommissioning and the establishment of national policies, strategies and regulations, this seems the right moment to assess existing national practices worldwide and that is the purpose for which the document is issued at this time. The information gathered in this report is based on submissions by Member States which have developed or are in the process of developing decommissioning oriented policies and regulations. 29 refs

  10. Present status of decommissioning in the Musashi Reactor Facility (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Takafumi; Tanzawa, Tomio; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Morishima, Kayoko; Matsumoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Musashi reactor was decided in 2003. Permanent shutdown of the reactor and stopping the operational functions were conducted in 2004. Transportation of the spent fuels was finished in 2006. After 2007, the system and equipment stopping the functions were stored as installed in the reactor facility as radioactive wastes. After separating nonradioactive wastes such as concretes from radioactive wastes with a contamination test, stopping the functions of liquid waste management facility was performed with newly installed drainage facility for radioisotope use in 2010. Solid waste management facility was also dismantled and removed in the same way as liquid waste management facility in 2011. Radioactive wastes packed in containers were moved and stored in the reactor facility. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Plan for reevaluation of NRC policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Recognizing that the current generation of large commercial reactors and supporting nuclear facilities would substantially increase future decommissioning needs, the NRC staff began an in-depth review and re-evaluation of NRC's regulatory approach to decommissioning in 1975. Major technical studies on decommissioning have been initiated at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory in order to provide a firm information base on the engineering methodology, radiation risks, and estimated costs of decommissioning light water reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is now considering development of a more explicit overall policy for nuclear facility decommissioning and amending its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 50, and 70 to include more specific guidance on decommissioning criteria for production and utilization facility licensees and byproduct, source, and special nuclear material licensees. The report sets forth in detail the NRC staff plan for the development of an overall NRC policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  12. The IAEA review of methods of reducing occupational exposures during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alejnikov, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    International interest in decommissioning has increased rapidly in the last few years because of the large number of older facilities which are or soon will be retired from service and because of the many hundreds of new facilities which have been built or planned and will eventually require decommissioning. A state-of-the-art review of methods of reducing occupational exposures during decommissioning of nuclear facilities has been prepared recently by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The report concludes that decommissioning can be carried out without unacceptable impact on man or his environment. However, additional development is required to reduce occupational exposures during decommissioning. (author)

  13. Experimental Fabrication Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides aviation fabrication support to special operations aircraft residing at Fort Eustis and other bases in the United States. Support is also provided to AATD...

  14. Decommissioning of Australian nuclear facilities - a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, T.V.; Mabbott, P.E.; Lawrence, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    Decommissioning has been a key political, economic and technical issue for the nuclear industry in recent years as older nuclear facilities have been retired. The management of decommissioning is an important part of nuclear safety as the potential exists for occupational exposures that are several times those expected during normal operation. It involves pre-planning and preparatory measures, procedures and instructions, technical and safety assessments, technology for handling large volumes of radioactive material, cost analyses, and a complex decision process. A challenge for the Commonwealth Government regulatory body, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), is to allow the Commonwealth entities that operate nuclear facilities ample freedom to address the above, at the same time ensuring that international best practice is invoked to ensure safety. Accordingly, ARPANSA has prepared a regulatory guideline, first drafted by the Nuclear Safety Bureau in March 1997, that documents the process and the criteria that it uses when assessing an application from an operating organisation for a decommissioning licence. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  15. A study on the influence of the regulatory requirements of a nuclear facility during decommissioning activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Seong; Park, Seung Kook; Park, Kook Nam; Hong, Yun Jeong; Park, Jang Jin; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The preliminary decommissioning plan should be written with various chapters such as a radiological characterization, a decommissioning strategy and methods, a design for decommissioning usability, a safety evaluation, decontamination and dismantling activities, radioactive waste management, an environmental effect evaluation, and fire protection. The process requirements of the decommissioning project and the technical requirements and technical criteria should comply with regulatory requirements when dismantling of a nuclear facility. The requirements related to safety in the dismantling of a nuclear facility refer to the IAEA safety serious. The present paper indicates that a decommissioning design and plan, dismantling activities, and a decommissioning project will be influenced by the decommissioning regulatory requirements when dismantling of a nuclear facility. We hereby paved the way to find the effect of the regulatory requirements on the decommissioning of a whole area from the decommissioning strategy to the radioactive waste treatment when dismantling a nuclear facility. The decommissioning requirements have a unique feature in terms of a horizontal relationship as well as a vertical relationship from the regulation requirements to the decommissioning technical requirements. The decommissioning requirements management will be conducted through research that can recognize a multiple relationship in the next stage.

  16. The technological study on the decommissioning of nuclear facility, etc. in the Tokai Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomii, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Kunio; Kato, Rokuro; Watabe, Kozou; Higashiyama, Yutaka; Nagane, Satoru

    2005-03-01

    Since JPDR is dismantled and is removed, in Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the dismantling of nuclear facility which finished the mission, etc. is advanced. At present, nuclear facility as a dismantling object count the approximately 20 facilities, and decommissioning plan of these facilities becomes an important problem, when the decommissioning countermeasure is considered. However, decommissioning techniques in proportion to various nuclear facility, etc. are clearly, and it has not been determined. In this report, the technical consideration on decommissioning techniques of nuclear facility promoted on the basis of this experience in future, while until now decommissioning experience and technical knowledge are arranged, etc. was added in order to appropriately and surely carry out decommissioning techniques and legal procedures, etc. (author)

  17. Development programs on decommissioning technology for reactors and fuel cycle facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiki, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency (STA) of Japan is promoting technology development for decommissioning of nuclear facilities by entrusting various research programs to concerned research organisations: JAERI, PNC and RANDEC, including first full scale reactor decommissioning of JPDR. According to the results of these programs, significant improvement on dismantling techniques, decontamination, measurement etc. has been achieved. Further development of advanced decommissioning technology has been started in order to achieve reduction of duration of decommissioning work and occupational exposures in consideration of the decommissioning of reactors and fuel cycle facilities. (author) 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Several issues on the decommissioning of uranium mining/milling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Xu Jianxin; Gao Shangxiong

    2007-01-01

    Several issues on the decommissioning of uranium mining/milling facilities are discussed at the national and international level of decommissioning, including radiation, monitoring, dose evaluation, covering, water treatment and stabilization of uranium tailings impoundment, etc. Some suggestions are made: drawing international lessons on decommissioning of uranium mining/milling facilities; enhancing monitoring and database construction in decommissioning management; stressing utilization of measured dose data; using the experience of other countries for reference on covering designs for uranium tailings impoundment and water treatment; strengthening decommissioning management, etc. (authors)

  19. Nondestructive assay system for use in decommissioning a plutonium-handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.T.; Vronich, J.J.; Bellinger, F.O.; Perry, R.B.

    1979-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is decommissioning a facility used to fabricate reactor fuel elements. The equipment is contaminated with alpha emitters at levels up to 10 12 dpm/100 cm 2 . The objective of decontamination is to reduce the TRU concentrations below 10 nCi/g of waste. A portable NDA procedure using NaI(T1) gamma-spectrometric techniques was selected to measure the residual Pu and 241 Am in the glove boxes. Assays were performed at different stages in the decontamination process to estimate the detection system sensitivity and the effectiveness of the cleaning efforts

  20. Remote machine engineering applications for nuclear facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toto, G.; Wyle, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of a nuclear facility require the application of techniques that protect the worker and the enviroment from radiological contamination and radiation. Remotely operated portable robotic arms, machines, and devices can be applied. The use of advanced systems should enhance the productivity, safety, and cost facets of the efforts; remote automatic tooling and systems may be used on any job where job hazard and other factors justify application. Many problems based on costs, enviromental impact, health, waste generation, and political issues may be mitigated by use of remotely operated machines. The work that man can not do or should not do will have to be done by machines

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints

  3. DECOMMISSIONING THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY BUILDING 830 GAMMA IRRADIATION FACILITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWERMAN, B.S.; SULLIVAN, P.T.

    2001-08-13

    The Building 830 Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was decommissioned because its design was not in compliance with current hazardous tank standards and its cobalt-60 sources were approaching the end of their useful life. The facility contained 354 stainless steel encapsulated cobalt-60 sources in a pool, which provided shielding. Total cobalt-60 inventory amounted to 24,000 Curies when the sources were shipped for disposal. The decommissioning project included packaging, transport, and disposal of the sources and dismantling and disposing of all other equipment associated with the facility. Worker exposure was a major concern in planning for the packaging and disposal of the sources. These activities were planned carefully according to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principles. As a result, the actual occupational exposures experienced during the work were within the planned levels. Disposal of the pool water required addressing environmental concerns, since the planned method was to discharge the slightly contaminated water to the BNL sewage treatment plant. After the BNL evaluation procedure for discharge to the sewage treatment plant was revised and reviewed by regulators and BNL's Community Advisory Council, the pool water was discharged to the Building 830 sanitary system. Because the sources were sealed and the pool water contamination levels were low, most of the remaining equipment was not contaminated; therefore disposal was straightforward, as scrap metal and construction debris.

  4. Remediation and decommissioning of radioactive waste facilities in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnik, H.; Realo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The nuclear training facility at Paldiski was constructed in the early 1960's by the former USSR Navy. The hull sections of Delta and Echo class submarines each housing a full-sized ship reactor were installed in the main building of the site for training of navy personnel in safe operation of the submarine nuclear reactor systems. The first reactor was commissioned in 1968 and the second in 1982, while both was shut down in 1989. After Estonia's reproclamation of independence in 1991 the responsibility for the clean up and decommissioning of the Paldiski site became a subject of negotiations between Russia and Estonia. As the result Estonia took the ownership and control of the site in September 1995. Before the take over the Russian authorities defuelled the reactors and transported the spent fuel to Russia, dismantled the hull sections not related with reactor systems, seal-welded the hull sections housing the reactor vessels with their primary circuitry and enclosed those in reinforced concrete sarcophagi. The auxiliary facilities and radioactive waste were left intact. Main goals of the Conceptual Decommissioning Plan for the Paldiski facilities, developed under the auspices of the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (Pier, a group established at the request of the Estonian government to advise local authorities to maintain the decommissioning and waste management at Paldiski) were defined as following: Establishing the waste management system and a long term monitored interim storage, corresponding to internationally accepted safety standards and capable to condition, receive and store all the waste generated during decommissioning of the facility; Reductions of the extent of radiologically controlled areas as much as possible, in order to minimise maintenance requirements. To achieve these goals the following main tasks were addressed in the short and medium term site management action plans: Rearrangement of site for the needs of

  5. Cutting techniques for facilities dismantling in decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cycle related activities were accomplished in IPEN-CNEN/SP in laboratory and pilot plant scale and most facilities were built in the 70-80 years. Nevertheless, radical changes of the Brazilian nuclear policy in the beginning of 90's determined the interruption of several fuel cycle activities and facilities shutdown. Some laboratory and pilot plant decommissioning activities have been performed in IPEN in the last years. During the operational activities in the decommissioning of old nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the personnel involved in the task had to face several problems. In old facilities, the need of large components dismantling and material removal use to present some difficulties, such as lack of available and near electricity supply. Besides this, the spread out of the superficial contamination in the form of dust or aerosols and the exposure of workers should be as much as possible avoided. Then, the selection and availability of suitable tools for the task, mainly those employed for cutting and segmentation of different materials is of significant importance. Slight hand tools, mainly those powered by rechargeable batteries, facilitate the work, especially in areas where the access is difficult. Based on the experience in the dismantling of some old nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP, some tools that would have facilitated the operations were identified and their availability could have improved the quality and efficiency of different individual tasks. In this paper different cutting problems and techniques, as well as some available commercial hand tools, are presented as suggestion for future activities. (author)

  6. Decommissioning of a nuclear facility: the Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Regina M.; Deppe, Alzira L.; Nunes, Marcos E.C.; Cardoso, Eliezer M.; Nouailhetas, Y.; Mouco, Charles; Ferreira, Paulo R.; Matta, Luiz E.da

    1996-01-01

    The first decommissioning process of a nuclear facility in Brazil, has being taken place in Usina de Santo Amaro (USAM), located in Sao Paulo whose physical and chemical milling activities of the monazitic sands were interrupted in June 1992. Nowadays, materials and equipment generated from Minerals Physical Treatment and Rare Earths Separation Sectors, classified as low level radiation areas, are in final phase of dismantling, monitoring and release to the internal backyard of the facility or segregation in controlled areas. This decommissioning phase is considered as pilot for the verification of procedures, follow up of pieces and application of suitable radioprotection measures for the future dismantling of the Chemical Treatment of Monazite Sector, which will involve higher risks regarding radioprotection and safety aspects. The criteria of discharge of areas and equipment established by CNEN are conservative enough to assure that the contamination is not released to the environment. CNEN's activities conducted at the surveillance of works involving the dismantling and decontamination of materials and equipment verifying that they are in accordance with the requirements established by the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  7. Development of decommissioning management system for nuclear fuel cycle facilities (DECMAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Ken-ichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    In making a plan of decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, it is important to optimize the plan on the standpoint of a few viewpoints, that is, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost (they are called evaluation indexes). In the midst of decommissioning, the decommissioning plan would be modified suitably to optimize the evaluation indexes adjusting to progress of the decommissioning. The decommissioning management code (DECMAN), that is support system on computer, has been developed to assist the decommissioning planning. The system calculates the evaluation indexes quantitatively. The system consists of three fundamental codes, facility information database code, technical know-how database code and index evaluation code, they are composed using Oracle' database and 'G2' expert system. The functions of the system are as follows. (1) Facility information database code. Information of decommissioning facility and its rooms, machines and pipes in the code. (2) Technical know-how database code. Technical Information of tools to use in decommissioning work, cutting, dose measure, and decontamination are there. (3) Index evaluation code. User build decommissioning program using above two database codes. The code evaluates five indexes, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost, on planning decommissioning program. Results of calculation are shown in table, chart, and etc. (author)

  8. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities by the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLozier, M.F.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Field Office of the United States Department of Energy is projecting one of the largest decommissioning efforts in the nation during the next ten to twenty years. The nuclear facilities are varied with respect to the types of contaminants and types of structures and equipment involved. The facilities planned for decommissioning include 26 ORNL facilities (e.g., OGR, HRE, MSRE), 70 facilities at Oak Ridge K25 site, and the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge. Innovative technologies are required to decommission the facilities and dispose of the waste generated. (R.P.)

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Europe and the experience of TUV SUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, Lothar; Kim, Duill; Ha, Taegun; Yang, Kyunghwa

    2012-01-01

    Many commercial nuclear facilities of the first generation will be taken out of operation in the near future. As of January 2012, total 19 prototype and commercial nuclear reactors have been decommissioned or are under dismantling in Germany. Most of decommissioning projects were successfully performed and a great deal of experience has been accumulated. Selecting a decommissioning strategy is a very important step at the beginning of the decision making process. According to IAEA requirements immediate dismantling is chosen as a preferred option in many countries today. It is associated with less uncertainty, positive political and social effect, and it can make use of existing operational experience and know-how. The availability of funds and final repository is of high importance for a decommissioning strategy selection. The time frame for the dismantling of nuclear facilities depends on the type, size and complexity of the individual project. TUV SUD, which is supervising most of nuclear power plants in Germany, has accumulated lots of experience by taking parts in decommissioning projects. It direct dismantling is chosen, actual light water reactor in Germany decommissioned to green field in approx. 10 years. The activities of TUV SUD cover from establishing the decommissioning concept to the clearance of the sites. This provides an overview of decommissioning projects of nuclear facilities in Europe, including a detail illustration of the German situation. Finally, some recommendations are suggested for the first decommissioning project based on the lessons and experiences derived from many decommissioning works in Europe

  10. Accidental safety analysis methodology development in decommission of the nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. H.; Hwang, J. H.; Jae, M. S.; Seong, J. H.; Shin, S. H.; Cheong, S. J.; Pae, J. H.; Ang, G. R.; Lee, J. U. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of a nuclear reactor cost about 20% of construction expense and production of nuclear wastes during decommissioning makes environmental issues. Decommissioning of a nuclear reactor in Korea is in a just beginning stage, lacking clear standards and regulations for decommissioning. This work accident safety analysis in decommissioning of the nuclear facility can be a solid ground for the standards and regulations. For source term analysis for Kori-1 reactor vessel, MCNP/ORIGEN calculation methodology was applied. The activity of each important nuclide in the vessel was estimated at a time after 2008, the year Kori-1 plant is supposed to be decommissioned. And a methodology for risk analysis assessment in decommissioning was developed.

  11. Decommissioning of Medical, Industrial and Research Facilities. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities where radioactive materials and sources are produced, received, used and stored. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations, particularly to those in developing countries (as such facilities are predominant in these countries), for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such facilities. The Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants meetings and a Technical Committee meeting

  12. Decommissioning of Phosphoric Acid Purification Facility, PT Petrokimia Gresik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainus Salimin; Nanang TS; Zaid, Ach.; Chotimah; Karyono

    2008-01-01

    Decommissioning of phosporic acid purification facility was the administrative and technical actions taken to allow the removal of some or all of the regulatory control from that facility exploit the phosphoric acid containing uranium. The site location of facility was cleaned up as the clean previous site (green land) for another site project utilization. Decommissioning activities covers the draining of solution or solid powder of remaining process on the equipment, decontamination of site location and equipment wall, dismantling of equipment, decontamination of equipment after dismantling, and decontamination of concrete floor and wall. Uranium contaminated liquid waste and organic solution was treated by bio-oxidation process using bacteria. Remaining solid powder from process (28 drums), contaminated material and equipment after decontamination (60 drums of fire brick, 31 pieces of equipment cut, 2 drums of ashes, 10 drums of active sludge from bio-oxidation process) and concrete splinter of 10 drums of 200 l volume per drum are the radioactive waste that must be sent to Radioactive Waste Technology Centre for its treatment. The non contaminated material and equipment (908 ton) can be reused for reprocessing, some of non contaminated sludge (14.4 m 3 ) and all of non contaminated filtrate water (353 m 3 ) from bio-oxidation process with toxic matters qualification which comply to the its limit values are released on the effluent release drain system of the plant. Clearance level utilizing for filtering contaminated material or equipment was an activity concentration of 1 Bq/g, surface contamination of 1 Bq/cm 2 , effective dose on the 50 cm distance from surface of contaminated material of 0.5 μSv/h (BAPETEN Regulation Letter No. 1459A/P101/PIBN/2008). Limit values for toxic matter are pH 6-9, COD 100 ppm and BOD 50 ppm (Gov. Regulation of East Java No. 45 year of 2002). (author)

  13. Decommissioning an uranium and thorium facility: a radiation protection approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feijo Vasques, Francisco Mario; Saburo Todo, Alberto; Mestre, Paulo Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Decommissioning means actions taken at the end of the useful life of a facility in retiring it from service with adequate regard for the health and safety of workers and members of the public. In the present work, we introduce a radiation protection approach for the removal of radioactive material to the extent that the facility or site becomes available for use without restriction. The facility to be decommissioned is a fuel cycle pilot plant that operated with natural uranium and thorium for almost two decades and then, kept inactive for about 10 years at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN. Even after this long period of inactivity, it has presented significant levels of radiation and contamination spread over the floor, walls, windows, doors and ceiling. The fuel cycle pilot plant was completely dismantled, remaining only the walls and the concrete structures. In this work we present the job done to restore the area. According to each step of dismantling a continuous monitoring of the contaminated surfaces was carried out including the survey of the deep material from the floor and walls. The material identified as radioactive waste was stored into appropriated metal drums. A radiation protection team guided this stage of the work, prescribing the tasks, and the amount of material that should be removed from floors, windows and ceiling. For this, repetitive surveys had to be done. The results of monitoring and contamination levels were analysed, thus guiding the next steps of the job. In this way radiation protection team took over the tasks, running the work with the purpose of achieving acceptable levels of radiation, restoring the area for unrestricted use. (author)

  14. Decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities where radioactive materials and sources are produced, received, used and stored. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations, particularly to those in developing countries (as such facilities are predominant in these countries), for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such facilities. The Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants meetings and a Technical Committee meeting

  15. General principles underlying the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    Previous statements on the use of the term 'decommissioning' by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board, and the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety are reviewed, culminating in a particular definition for its use in this paper. Three decommissioning phases are identified and discussed, leading to eight general principles governing decommissioning including one related to financing

  16. Financial precautions for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, R.; Salje, P.; Feldmann, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the fact that the disposal of nuclear-technical plants requires considerable means, the article asks if the financial guarantee for decommissioning and disposal should be requested before giving the licence. He shows the possibilities to ensure financial provisions and to describe their advantages and disadvantages. Planned decommissioning is dealt with separately from unplanned, decommissioning. (UN) [de

  17. Pt. 1: Decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Pt. 2: Methods of decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkilberg, W.

    1982-01-01

    In the present paper the different steps of dismantlement of nuclear facilities are dealt with. First the planning principles for decomminconing are discussed and then the planning of the reactorblock dismantlement in the FR2 research reactor is described. (RW)

  18. A study on the decommissioning methods of nuclear facilities of North Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, U. S.; Park, J. H.; Park, S. K.; Hong, S. B.; Lee, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    For Korea, it is essential to participate in the decommissioning of North Korean nuclear facilities for Pu-based weapon program and to lead the project for the protection of the environments from the possible spread of nuclear contamination. Before, the studies for the verification of the North Korea nuclear facilities and for the technical preparation of the decommissioning of north Korea were conducted but the depth of the studies was not reached to the evaluation of the decommissioning project by the documentation of a decommissioning plan to the provision of the technical information to the policy decision makers. It is very helpful for understanding the characteristics of the decommissioning projects to formulate a possible dismantling scenario and to make a decommissioning plan. The cost and the periods estimated on the base of this scenario is more exact and the analysis for the selection of different policies will be possible

  19. On Younger Stakeholders and Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyszkiewicz, Bogumila; Labor, Bea

    2009-08-15

    In modern democratic countries, information sharing and effective and open communication concerning dismantling and decommissioning of of nuclear facilities as well as the management of nuclear waste are essential for the task to build the confidence required for any further development of nuclear energy. At the same time, it is often perceived that all decision making processes about nuclear energy policies are probably increasingly influenced by public opinion. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role in this regard to provide unbiased information on any health and safety related issues. In order to meet this need, it is necessary for Authorities and others to understand the values and opinions of the citizens, and especially the younger ones. They hold the key to the future at the same time as their perspective on these issues is the least understood. The need of greater public participation in decision making is becoming increasingly recognised the scientific as well as the political community. Many activities are carried out in order to stimulate to higher levels of public involvement in decision making in this active research area. Younger citizens is a stakeholder group that is often excluded in decision- making processes. The existence of large gaps between the involvement of older and younger stakeholders in decision making processes needs to be addressed, since such imbalances might otherwise lead to unequal opportunities between generations and limit the future consumption level of the coming generations. Another demanding task for the present generation is to assure that appropriate financial resources are injected into the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund. It will thereby be possible for coming generations to undertake efficient measures in the decommissioning and dismantling of older nuclear facilities. To undertake such measures in line with the environmental and health codex is essential. An appropriate balance in this regard must be

  20. On Younger Stakeholders and Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyszkiewicz, Bogumila; Labor, Bea

    2009-08-01

    In modern democratic countries, information sharing and effective and open communication concerning dismantling and decommissioning of of nuclear facilities as well as the management of nuclear waste are essential for the task to build the confidence required for any further development of nuclear energy. At the same time, it is often perceived that all decision making processes about nuclear energy policies are probably increasingly influenced by public opinion. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role in this regard to provide unbiased information on any health and safety related issues. In order to meet this need, it is necessary for Authorities and others to understand the values and opinions of the citizens, and especially the younger ones. They hold the key to the future at the same time as their perspective on these issues is the least understood. The need of greater public participation in decision making is becoming increasingly recognised the scientific as well as the political community. Many activities are carried out in order to stimulate to higher levels of public involvement in decision making in this active research area. Younger citizens is a stakeholder group that is often excluded in decision- making processes. The existence of large gaps between the involvement of older and younger stakeholders in decision making processes needs to be addressed, since such imbalances might otherwise lead to unequal opportunities between generations and limit the future consumption level of the coming generations. Another demanding task for the present generation is to assure that appropriate financial resources are injected into the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund. It will thereby be possible for coming generations to undertake efficient measures in the decommissioning and dismantling of older nuclear facilities. To undertake such measures in line with the environmental and health codex is essential. An appropriate balance in this regard must be

  1. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, I.; Backe, S.; Cato, A.; Lindskog, S.; Efraimsson, H.; Iversen, Klaus; Salmenhaara, S.; Sjoeblom, R.

    2008-07-01

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility (planning, building and operation), but it was only in the nineteen seventies that the waste issue really surface. Actually, the IAEA guidelines on decommissioning have been issued as recently as over the last ten years, and international advice on finance of decommissioning is even younger. No general international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological prerequisites. Consequently, any cost estimates based mainly on the particulars of the building structures and installations are likely to be gross underestimations. The present study has come about on initiative by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and is based on a common need in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The content of the report may be briefly summarised as follows. The background covers design and operation prerequisites as well as an overview of the various nuclear research facilities in the four participating countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The purpose of the work has been to identify, compile and exchange information on facilities and on methodologies for cost calculation with the aim of achieving an 80 % level of confidence. The scope has been as follows: 1) to establish a Nordic network 2) to compile dedicated guidance documents on radiological surveying, technical planning and financial risk identification and assessment 3) to compile and describe techniques for precise cost calculations at early stages 4) to compile plant and other relevant data A separate section is devoted in the report to good practice for the specific purpose of early but precise cost calculations for research facilities, and a separate section is devoted to techniques for assessment of cost

  2. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I. (Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden)); Backe, S. (Institute for Energy Technology (Norway)); Cato, A.; Lindskog, S. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden)); Efraimsson, H. (Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (Sweden)); Iversen, Klaus (Danish Decommissioning (Denmark)); Salmenhaara, S. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)); Sjoeblom, R. (Tekedo AB, (Sweden))

    2008-07-15

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility (planning, building and operation), but it was only in the nineteen seventies that the waste issue really surface. Actually, the IAEA guidelines on decommissioning have been issued as recently as over the last ten years, and international advice on finance of decommissioning is even younger. No general international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological prerequisites. Consequently, any cost estimates based mainly on the particulars of the building structures and installations are likely to be gross underestimations. The present study has come about on initiative by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and is based on a common need in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The content of the report may be briefly summarised as follows. The background covers design and operation prerequisites as well as an overview of the various nuclear research facilities in the four participating countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The purpose of the work has been to identify, compile and exchange information on facilities and on methodologies for cost calculation with the aim of achieving an 80 % level of confidence. The scope has been as follows: 1) to establish a Nordic network 2) to compile dedicated guidance documents on radiological surveying, technical planning and financial risk identification and assessment 3) to compile and describe techniques for precise cost calculations at early stages 4) to compile plant and other relevant data A separate section is devoted in the report to good practice for the specific purpose of early but precise cost calculations for research facilities, and a separate section is devoted to techniques for assessment of cost

  3. The Reuse of Decommissioned Facilities and Sites as an Emerging Means to Alleviate the Decommissioning Burden and its Potential Applications within IAEA's International Decommissioning Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2009-01-01

    Around the world, but particularly in developing Member States, there are disused nuclear facilities or those approaching the end of their useful lives, for which appropriate decommissioning steps have not been taken, primarily due to limited technical and financial resources or competing priorities. One way of alleviating the financial and social burden associated with the final shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is the redevelopment of decommissioned facilities and sites for new, productive uses, either nuclear or non-nuclear. Sustainable development implies economic development with maintenance of social and community integrity. This objective can best be served by the sensitive redevelopment of sites to provide continuity of employment and new productive activity. Finally, experience to date with redevelopment both inside and outside the nuclear field suggests that successful engagement of the stakeholders can be a key success factor in promoting outcomes which are both profitable for the operator and recognised as responsible and worthwhile by the wider community. Following a generic discussion on factors and issues inherent to the re-development of decommissioned sites, this paper expands on several examples. It is noted that experience from the non-nuclear industrial sector is much more extensive than from the nuclear sector, and lessons from this sector should not be neglected. Many of world's nuclear facilities are small and widely distributed geographically, e.g. ∼300 aging or shut-down research reactors. Requests for assistance to address this issue from Member States exceed the capability of IAEA (and others) to deliver. However, integrating individual initiative into a designed-for-purpose network may compensate for these limitations. A new IAEA initiative amongst organizations from both potential 'donor' and 'recipient' Member States has taken the form of an 'International Decommissioning Network (IDN)'. The objectives of the IDN are

  4. Recycling of rare metals from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, Frank; Dabruck, Jan Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The German Government decided in 2011 to phase out nuclear power. Thus, 17 power reactors will be shut down within the next 11 years and to be decommissioned. An interesting question is, in which extent rare metals of strategic economic importance can be recycled within the scope of decommissioning. To be named are valuable bulk metals like copper, aluminium and lead, but also rare metals like indium, niobium, vanadium, cobalt, or tin and rare earth metals. Due to high requirements in terms of material technology, materials found in nuclear reactor components are of particular importance when it comes to recycling. These include components of the primary cooling system (RPV-internals, control rods and grid-structures) components for process control systems and components from the non-nuclear part of reactors (pumps, valves, heat exchangers or boilers). Especially the radiologically controlled melt-down of metals is used as an alternative to free release or disposal. This process has some serious disadvantages, thus it seems to be appropriate optimizing the decommissioning process regarding recycling of valuable metals. The work schedule for pre-investigation is outlined for 18 months and can be summarized as follows: - Requesting design, operational and material data, - Data from a sample facility: detailed specification of used components, substances contained and data from related activation calculations, fluence-values and contamination, - Setting up a database to assign non-ferrous metals and components with additional data like activation and decay time possibly needed, concentration, distribution, total mass, aggregate state, state of chemical bonding and recyclability, - Determining the activation distribution to evaluate if a components is recyclable at all, thus: preparation of an MCNP-model, simulation of n-fluence and application of variance-reduction methods to optimize activation calculations, - Classification of recyclability considering the following

  5. Decommissioning of facilities for mining and milling or radioactive ores and closeout of residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to Member States in order to assist in planning and implementing the decommissioning/closeout of uranium mine/mill facilities, mines, tailings impoundments, mining debris piles, leach residues and unprocessed ore stockpiles. The report presents an overview of the factors involved in planning and implementing the decommissioning/closeout of uranium mine/mill facilities. The information applies to mines, mills, tailings piles, mining debris piles and leach residues that are present as operational, mothballed or abandoned projects, as well as to future mining and milling projects. The report identifies the major factors that need to be considered in the decommissioning/closeout activities, including regulatory considerations; decommissioning of the mine/mill buildings, structures and facilities; decommissioning/closeout of open pit and underground mines; decommissioning/closeout of tailings impoundments; decommissioning/closeout of mining debris piles, unprocessed ore and other contaminated material such as heap leach piles, in situe leach facilities and contaminated soils; restoration of the site, vicinity properties and groundwater; radiation protection and health and safety considerations; and an assessment of costs and post-decommissioning or post-closeout maintenance and monitoring needs. 55 refs, figs and tabs

  6. Plan for reevaluation of NRC policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The present decommissioning regulations contained in Sections 50.33(f) and 50.82 of 10 CFR part 50 require applicants for power reactor operating licenses to demonstrate that they can obtain the funds needed to meet both operating costs and estimated costs of shutdown and decommissioning. The development of detailed, specific decommissioning plans for nuclear power plants is not currently required until the licensee seeks to terminate his operating license. Recognizing that the current generation of large commercial reactors and supporting nuclear facilities would substantially increase the need for future decommissionings, the NRC staff began an in-depth review and reevaluation of NRC's regulatory approach to decommissioning in 1975. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is now considering development of a more explicit overall policy for nuclear facility decommissioning and amending its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 50, and 70 to include more specific guidance on decommissioning criteria for production and utilization facility licensees and byproduct, source, and special nuclear material licensees. In response to comments from the public and states, and to information gained during the initial stage of execution of the plan, several modifications of the plan are now required. The revised overall report sets forth in detail the current NRC staff plan for the development of an overall NRC policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  7. Use of full recovery hydrolasing equipment for facility decommissioning - 16325

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Scott A.; Adams, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    The removal of surface contamination is a major challenge for nearly all nuclear facilities undergoing, or awaiting, decommissioning. Conventional means of surface decontamination can expose workers to unnecessary hazards, and are often not fit-for-purpose due to size constraints or weight restrictions. Additionally, conventional methods are not always easily deployed remotely due to their complexity or required services. The use of ultra high pressure water for surface decontamination, known as hydrolasing, is recognized as a technology which can be used in various applications requiring surface removal. Hydrolasing is an advantageous technology for many reasons including its versatility, overall simplicity and relative ease of remote deployment. For the nuclear industry, one of the largest challenges with regards to the use of hydrolasing is the requirement for the full recovery of the injected water and removed solids. For nonnuclear applications, there is often no requirement for recovery of the liquid and solid waste, which has led to few system designs which will recover the waste in full. S.A. Robotics' experience with the deployment of ultra high pressure water systems for nuclear applications has shown that full recovery of injected water and removed solids is achievable in both underwater and in-air applications. Innovative equipment and system design have allowed S.A. Robotics' hydrolasing systems to achieve near 100% solid and liquid recovery during concrete hydrolasing. This technology has been deployed for Fluor Hanford at Hanford's K-Basins, as well as for UKAEA as part of the Windscale Piles decommissioning project. The purpose of this paper is to provide a short description of the hydrolasing process and the associated waste issues, describe the unique design features of S.A. Robotics' hydrolasing systems which combat these issues, and provide an overview of two of the hydrolasing projects that S.A. Robotics has completed. (authors)

  8. The scenario-based system of workers training to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Choi, ByungSeon; Moon, JeiKwon; Hyun, DongJun; Lee, JongHwan; Kim, IkJune; Kim, GeunHo; Seo, JaeSeok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper is meant to develop the training system to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. • Requirements of the system were suggested. • Data management modules of the system were designed. • The system was developed on virtual reality environment. - Abstract: This paper is meant to develop the training system to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Requirements of the system were suggested. Data management modules of the system were designed. The system was developed on virtual reality environment. The performance test of the system was proved to be appropriate to decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  9. Status of the support researches for the regulation of nuclear facilities decommissioning in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yusuke; Iguchi, Yukihiro; Kawasaki, Satoru; Kato, Masami

    2011-01-01

    In Japan, 4 nuclear power stations are under decommissioning and some nuclear fuel cycle facilities are expected to be decommissioned in the future. On the other hand, the safety regulation of decommissioning of nuclear facilities was changed by amending act in 2005. An approval system after review process of decommissioning plan was adopted and applied to the power stations above. In this situation, based on the experiences of the new regulatory system, the system should be well established and moreover, it should be improved and enhanced in the future. Nuclear Industry and Safety Agency (NISA) is in charge of regulation of commercial nuclear facilities in Japan and decommissioning of them is included. Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) is in charge of technical supports for NISA as a TSO (Technical Support Organization) also in this field. As for decommissioning, based on regulatory needs, JNES has been continuing research activities from October 2003, when JNES has been established. Considering the 'Prioritized Nuclear Safety Research Plan (August 2009)' of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and the situation of operators facilities, 'Regulatory Support Research Plan between FY 2010-2014' was established in November 2009, which shows the present regulatory needs and a research program. This program consists of researches for 1. review process of decommissioning plan of power reactors, 2. review process of decommissioning plan of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, 3. termination of license at the end of decommissioning and 4. management of decommissioning waste. For the item 1, JNES studied safety assessment methods of dismantling, e.g. obtaining data and analysis of behavior of dust diffusion and risk assessment during decommissioning, which are useful findings for the review process. For the item 2, safety requirements for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities was compiled, which will be used in the future review. For the item 3

  10. Use of data processing tools in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasch, P.; Lukacs, G.

    1995-01-01

    With the present level of electronic data processing technology, no project of the scale of nuclear reactor decommissioning could be carried out without the use of data processing systems. On the contrary, a reactor decommissioning project requires essential support not only for the technical but also the economic side through the use of proper data processing programs, and not only general applications in the area of personal computers such as MS-EXCEL or MS Project, but also special data processing systems designed for the reactor decommissioning tasks. Various data processing supports are required depending upon the progress of a reactor decommissioning project. (orig./DG) [de

  11. Development of training system to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwanseong; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Byungseon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ikjune; Kim, Geunho; Seo, Jaeseok

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning workers need familiarization with working environments because working environment is under high radioactivity and work difficulty during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On-the-job training of decommissioning works could effectively train decommissioning workers but this training approach could consume much costs and poor modifications of scenarios. The efficiency of virtual training system could be much better than that of physical training system. This paper was intended to develop the training system to prevent accidents for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The requirements for the training system were drawn. The data management modules for the training system were designed. The training system of decommissioning workers was developed on the basis of virtual reality which is flexibly modified. The visualization and measurement in the training system were real-time done according as changes of the decommissioning scenario. It can be concluded that this training system enables the subject to improve his familiarization about working environments and to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  12. Development of training system to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwanseong; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Byungseon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ikjune; Kim, Geunho; Seo, Jaeseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Decommissioning workers need familiarization with working environments because working environment is under high radioactivity and work difficulty during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On-the-job training of decommissioning works could effectively train decommissioning workers but this training approach could consume much costs and poor modifications of scenarios. The efficiency of virtual training system could be much better than that of physical training system. This paper was intended to develop the training system to prevent accidents for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The requirements for the training system were drawn. The data management modules for the training system were designed. The training system of decommissioning workers was developed on the basis of virtual reality which is flexibly modified. The visualization and measurement in the training system were real-time done according as changes of the decommissioning scenario. It can be concluded that this training system enables the subject to improve his familiarization about working environments and to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities.

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  14. Decommissioning of the Nuclear Licensed Facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Piketty, Laurence; Mandard, Lionel; Pedron, Guy; Boissonneau, Jean Francois; Fouquereau, Alain; Pichereau, Eric; Lethuaire, Nathalie; Estivie, David; Binet, Cedric; Meden, Igor

    2008-01-01

    This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA's facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is that it is located in a built-up area. Taking into account the particularities of the various buildings and the levels of radioactivity in them, it was possible to devise a coherent, optimized program for the CEA-FAR licensed nuclear facility decommissioning operations

  15. Risk assessment on hazards for decommissioning safety of a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan-Seong; Lee, Kune-Woo; Lim, Hyeon-Kyo

    2010-01-01

    A decommissioning plan should be followed by a qualitative and quantitative safety assessment of it. The safety assessment of a decommissioning plan is applied to identify the potential (radiological and non-radiological) hazards and risks. Radiological and non-radiological hazards arise during decommissioning activities. The non-radiological or industrial hazards to which workers are subjected during a decommissioning and dismantling process may be greater than those experienced during an operational lifetime of a facility. Workers need to be protected by eliminating or reducing the radiological and non-radiological hazards that may arise during routine decommissioning activities and as well as during accidents. The risk assessment method was developed by using risk matrix and fuzzy inference logic, on the basis of the radiological and non-radiological hazards for a decommissioning safety of a nuclear facility. Fuzzy inference of radiological and non-radiological hazards performs a mapping from radiological and non-radiological hazards to risk matrix. Defuzzification of radiological and non-radiological hazards is the conversion of risk matrix and priorities to the maximum criterion method and the mean criterion method. In the end, a composite risk assessment methodology, to rank the risk level on radiological and non-radiological hazards of the decommissioning tasks and to prioritize on the risk level of the decommissioning tasks, by simultaneously combining radiological and non-radiological hazards, was developed.

  16. Decontamination/decommissioning of the Princeton Pennsylvania Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Princeton Pennsylvania Accelerator Facility was a 3 GeV proton synchrotron operated jointly by Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania from 1962 to 1972 on Princeton University's Forrestal Campus. During synchrotron operations, certain portions of the PPA central accelerator chamber and structural members became neutron activated. Upon termination of accelerator operations due to funding problems, Princeton desired to utilize the PPA site for other purposes, and commissioned a study to investigate Decommissioning and Decontamination options and methodologies. The study investigated several methods for in-place, surgically removing the neutron activated from the uncontaminated concrete. Since each technique produced different volumes of removed concrete all methods investigated were studied from the total economics of the problem and the cost of limiting and clean-up of secondary contamination. The decontamination method selected used a diamond wire cutting technique to sever in-place, the activated concrete from the uncontaminated. Large, intact, activated structural segments were cut and removed from the central accelerator chamber's floor, outer walls, internal columns and ceiling. Nonactivated portions of the structure, and the remainder of the central chamber were subsequently razed by conventional demolition methods. The paper describes the decontamination methodology, its effectiveness, disposal economics and radiological safety problems related thereto

  17. Radiation protection planning for decommissioning of research reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Roger; Harman, Neil; Craig, David; Fecitt, Lorna; Lobach, Yuri; Gorlinskij, Juri; Kolyadin, Vyacheslav; Pavlenko, Vytali

    2008-01-01

    The MR reactor at the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (RRCKI), Moscow was a 50 MW multipurpose material testing and research reactor equipped with nine experimental loop facilities to test prototype fuel for various nuclear power reactors being developed. The reactor was shut down in 1993 and de-fuelled. The experimental loops are located in basement rooms around the reactor. The nature of the research into the characteristics of fuel design and coolant chemistry resulted in fission products and activation products in the test loop equipment. Decommissioning of the loops therefore presents a number of challenges. In addition the city of Moscow has expanded such that the RRC KI is now surrounded by housing which had to be taken into account in the radiological protection planning. This paper describes the techniques proposed to undertake the dismantling operations in order to minimise the radiation exposure to workers and members of the public. Estimates have been made of the worker doses which could be incurred during the dismantling process and the environmental impacts which could occur. These are demonstrated to be as low as reasonably achievable. The work was funded by the UK Department of Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (DBERR) (formerly the Department of Trade and Industry) under the Nuclear Safety Programme (NSP) set up to address nuclear safety issues in the Former Soviet Union. (author)

  18. Challenges in the management of decommission waste of nuclear facilities in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, E.T.; Fletcher, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    It is inevitable that every nuclear facility must one day be safely decommissioned. When considering decommissioning, large amounts of radioactive and non-radioactive waste have to be taken into account. Disposal of such materials can have large economic impact on the overall decommissioning cost. In developing countries like Ghana, the perception of environmental protection through waste management, is often not very high as compared to many other pressing needs. Therefore limited resources are allocated for environmental problems. Ghana operates a tank-in- pool type research reactor, 30kW output for research in neutron activation analysis, radioisotope preparation, education and training, a radiotherapy unit that utilizes a 185TBq Co-60 radioactive sources for the treatment of cancer and a gamma irradiation facility which utilizes 1.85PBq Co-60 radioactive source for the irradiation of various materials. All these facilities are operating without designed decommissioning in mind, an inadequate waste management infrastructure as well as a lack of a repository to handling the resulting waste. It is today's beneficials of the nuclear facility that has to deal with the legacies of the future decommissioning activities. The paper outlines some of the challenges and issues to be expected in the management of waste from future decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Ghana with the absence of a waste management infrastructure and inadequate financial resources. The paper puts forth a concept to perform meaningful and significant plans whilst the facilities are still operating. (author)

  19. Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects of the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-08-01

    Many old reactors and other nuclear facilities worldwide are being actively dismantled or are candidates for decommissioning in the near term. A significant number of these facilities are located in Member States having little experience or expertise in planning and implementing state of the art decommissioning projects. Planning, management and organization are critical for the success of such projects. The main objective of IAEA technical activities related to decommissioning is to promote the exchange of lessons learned, thereby contributing to successful planning and implementation of decommissioning projects. Imperative for success is a better understanding of the decision making process, the comparison and selection of decommissioning plans and organizational provisions, and relevant issues affecting the entire decommissioning process. Topics addressed in this publication include details on development of the decommissioning plan, structuring of key project tasks, organizing the project management team, identifying key staffing positions and determining required workforce skills, and managing the transition from an operational phase to the decommissioning phase. It is expected that this project, and in particular the papers collected in this publication, will draw Member States' attention to the practicality and achievability of timely planning and smooth management of decommissioning projects, especially for smaller projects. Concluding reports summarizing the work undertaken under the aegis of a coordinated research project (CRP) on planning, management and organizational aspects in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and presented at the third and final research coordination meeting (RCM) held in Da Lat, Vietnam, 5-9 September 2011, are included in this publication. Operating experience and lessons learned during full scale applications, as well as national programmes and plans, are among the most significant achievements of the CRP and have been

  20. Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects of the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Many old reactors and other nuclear facilities worldwide are being actively dismantled or are candidates for decommissioning in the near term. A significant number of these facilities are located in Member States having little experience or expertise in planning and implementing state of the art decommissioning projects. Planning, management and organization are critical for the success of such projects. The main objective of IAEA technical activities related to decommissioning is to promote the exchange of lessons learned, thereby contributing to successful planning and implementation of decommissioning projects. Imperative for success is a better understanding of the decision making process, the comparison and selection of decommissioning plans and organizational provisions, and relevant issues affecting the entire decommissioning process. Topics addressed in this publication include details on development of the decommissioning plan, structuring of key project tasks, organizing the project management team, identifying key staffing positions and determining required workforce skills, and managing the transition from an operational phase to the decommissioning phase. It is expected that this project, and in particular the papers collected in this publication, will draw Member States' attention to the practicality and achievability of timely planning and smooth management of decommissioning projects, especially for smaller projects. Concluding reports summarizing the work undertaken under the aegis of a coordinated research project (CRP) on planning, management and organizational aspects in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and presented at the third and final research coordination meeting (RCM) held in Da Lat, Vietnam, 5-9 September 2011, are included in this publication. Operating experience and lessons learned during full scale applications, as well as national programmes and plans, are among the most significant achievements of the CRP and have been

  1. R and D and Innovation Needs for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farr, Harvey; LaGuardia, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear decommissioning activities can greatly benefit from research and development (R and D) projects. This report examines applicable emergent technologies, current research efforts and innovation needs to build a base of knowledge regarding the status of decommissioning technology and R and D. This base knowledge can be used to obtain consensus on future R and D that is worth funding. It can also assist in deciding how to collaborate and optimise the limited pool of financial resources available among NEA member countries for nuclear decommissioning R and D. (authors)

  2. Decommissioning and decontamination of licensed reactor facilities and demonstration nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.; Erickson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    Decommissioning of licensed reactors and demonstration nuclear power plants has been accomplished by mothballing (protective storage), entombment, and dismantling or a combination of these three. The alternative selected by a licensee seems to be primarily based on cost. A licensee must, however, show that the decommissioning process provides adequate protection of the health and safety of the public and no adverse impact on the environment. To date the NRC has approved each of the alternatives in the decommissioning of different facilities. The decommissioning of small research reactors has been accomplished primarily by dismantling. Licensed nuclear power plants, however, have been decommissioned primarily by being placed in a mothballed state in which they continue to retain a reactor license and the associated licensee responsibilities

  3. An analysis of decommissioning costs for the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsbacka, Matt

    1990-01-01

    A decommissioning cost analysis for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility was made. AFRRI is not at this time suggesting that the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility be decommissioned. This report was prepared to be in compliance with paragraph 50.33 of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations which requires the assurance of availability of future decommissioning funding. The planned method of decommissioning is the immediate decontamination of the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor site to allow for restoration of the site to full public access - this is called DECON. The cost of DECON for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility in 1990 dollars is estimated to be $3,200,000. The anticipated ancillary costs of facility site demobilization and spent fuel shipment is an additional $600,000. Thus the total cost of terminating reactor operations at AFRRI will be about $3,800,000. The primary basis for this cost estimate is a study of the decommissioning costs of a similar reactor facility that was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as provided in USNRC publication NUREG/CR-1756. The data in this study were adapted to reflect the decommissioning requirements of the AFRRI TRIGA. (author)

  4. The planning of decommissioning activities within nuclear facilities - Generating a Baseline Decommissioning Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meek, N.C.; Ingram, S.; Page, J.

    2003-01-01

    BNFL Environmental Services has developed planning tools to meet the emerging need for nuclear liabilities management and decommissioning engineering both in the UK and globally. It can provide a comprehensive baseline planning service primarily aimed at nuclear power stations and nuclear plant. The paper develops the following issues: Decommissioning planning; The baseline decommissioning plan;The process; Work package; Compiling the information; Deliverables summary; Customer Benefits; - Planning tool for nuclear liability life-cycle management; - Robust and reliable plans based upon 'real' experience; - Advanced financial planning; - Ascertaining risk; - Strategy and business planning. The following Deliverables are mentioned:1. Site Work Breakdown Structure; 2. Development of site implementation strategy from the high level decommissioning strategy; 3. An end point definition for the site; 4. Buildings, operational systems and plant surveys; 5. A schedule of condition for the site; 6. Development of technical approach for decommissioning for each work package; 7. Cost estimate to WBS level 5 for each work package; 8. Estimate of decommissioning waste arisings for each work package; 9. Preparation of complete decommissioning programme in planning software to suit client; 10. Risk modelling of work package and overall project levels; 11. Roll up of costs into an overall cost model; 12. Cash flow, waste profiling and resource profiling against the decommissioning programme; 13. Preparation and issue of Final Report. Finally The BDP process is represented by a flowchart listing the following stages: [Power Station project assigned] → [Review project and conduct Characterisation review of power station] → [Identify work packages] → [Set up WBS to level 3] → [Assign work packages] → [Update WBS to level 4] →[Develop cost model] → [Develop logic network] → [Develop risk management procedure] ] → [Develop project strategy document]→ [Work package

  5. ATLAS facility fabrication and assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Ballard, E O; Davis, H A; Nielsen, K E; Parker, G V; Parsons, W M

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given. Atlas is a pulsed-power facility recently completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to drive hydrodynamic experiments. This new generation pulsed-power machine consists of a radial array of 24, 240-kV Marx modules and transmission lines supplying current to the load region at the machine center. The transmission lines, powered by the Marx modules, consist of cable headers, load protection switches and tri-plates interfacing to the center transition section through detachable current joints. A conical power-flow-channel attaches to the transition section providing an elevated interface to attach the experimental loads for diagnostic access. Fabrication and assembly of all components for the Atlas machine was completed in August 2000. The machine has also progressed through a test phase where the Marx module/transmission line units were fired, individually, into a test load. Progression continued with eight and sixteen lines being fired. Subsequently, an overall machine test was condu...

  6. The ALARA assessment system based on virtual concurrent environment for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kang, ShinYoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper is intended to suggest the method and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities, it is necessary that assessment system is developed. This system has been successfully developed so that exposure dose to workers could be real-time measured and assessed in virtual decommissioning environments. It can be concluded that this system could be protected from accidents and enable workers to improve his familiarization about working environments. It is expected that this system can reduce human errors because workers are able to improve the proficiency of hazardous working environments due to virtual training like real decommissioning situations.

  7. The ALARA assessment system based on virtual concurrent environment for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kang, ShinYoung

    2016-01-01

    This paper is intended to suggest the method and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities, it is necessary that assessment system is developed. This system has been successfully developed so that exposure dose to workers could be real-time measured and assessed in virtual decommissioning environments. It can be concluded that this system could be protected from accidents and enable workers to improve his familiarization about working environments. It is expected that this system can reduce human errors because workers are able to improve the proficiency of hazardous working environments due to virtual training like real decommissioning situations

  8. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Volume 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C. E.; Murphy, E. S.; Schneider, K J

    1979-01-01

    Detailed technology, safety and cost information are presented for the conceptual decommissioning of a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Alternate methods of decommissioning are described including immediate dismantlement, safe storage for a period of time followed by dismantlement and entombment. Safety analyses, both occupational and public, and cost evaluations were conducted for each mode.

  9. New requirements to collect operational data that are essential for facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristofova, K.; Valcuha, P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the features of the first nuclear regulatory safety guide to be released by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in field of decommissioning. This safety guide specifies requirements to collect those nuclear facility operational data that are essential for its decommissioning. Recommendations of international organisations as well as experience in selected countries are provided. The following operational data types necessary for decommissioning process are identified and analysed: design documentation including modifications and changes during operation, photo-documentation, operational events and material and radiological inventory of the nuclear facility. The guide establishes requirements for collection of the operational data that can be recorded in interconnected database modules. In addition, a structure of decommissioning database is proposed, representing material and radiological inventory of a nuclear facility. This inventory database forms a basis for planning of the decommissioning process. At last, the guide summarises recommendations for data collection, archiving and maintenance of database records and also their applications in safety documentation necessary for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Slovakia. (authors)

  10. Methods for reducing occupational exposures during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older facilities which have been or soon will be retired from service. This report is a review of the current state of knowledge concerning methods for reducing occupational exposures during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. This report focuses on water cooled nuclear power plants but, in addition, other major nuclear facilities are briefly discussed to determine how they differ from nuclear power plants in this regard. The information presented should be useful to those responsible for or interested in designing or constructing nuclear facilities or in the planning or implementing of the decommissioning of such installations. 59 refs, 1 tab

  11. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.K.

    1994-12-01

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ''Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities'' (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning

  12. Implementation of decommissioning criteria in the conceptual design of the MRS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.L.; Wilcox, A.D.; Huang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Ralph M. Parsons Company (RMP) to prepare the conceptual design of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility. The purpose of this facility is to consolidate and temporarily store spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants. In addition, it will overpack, handle, and store high-level radioactive waste from non-defense related sources. The Functional Design Criteria (FDC) prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratories, as well as 10 CFR 72, requires the facility to be designed for decommissioning, with provisions to facilitate decontamination of structures and equipment to minimize the volume of radioactive wastes and contaminated equipment at the time of decommissioning. Many problems associated with decommissioning a nuclear facility have been identified in recent years and the design for the MRS Facility presents a unique opportunity for RMP to implement decommissioning criteria into the conceptual design of a major nuclear facility. The provisions made in the design to facilitate decommissioning include good housekeeping during operations, controlled personnel access, access for equipment removal, equipment design, installed radiation monitors, adequate work space, installed decontamination systems and areas, control of all effluents, and operational documentation. These topics will be the major points of discussion for this paper

  13. Lessons learned from decontaminating and decommissioning fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Jean-Claude; Dalcorso, J. P.; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy

    2000-01-01

    This paper draws on 20 years of experience and lessons learned by COGEMA and the CEA during the decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) of its nuclear fuel cycle facilities. COGEMA and the CEA have developed a wealth of knowledge on issues such as assessing decommissioning alternatives, selecting appropriate technical procedures on the basis of thorough site characterization, and developing waste management and disposal procedures. (author)

  14. Contaminated Land Remediation on decommissioned nuclear facilities: an optimized approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    The site of the Monts d'Arree located in Brennilis in the area of Brittany in France is a former 70 MWe heavy water reactor. EDF is now in charge of its decommissioning. The effluent treatment facility (STE) is currently being dismantled. As the future use of the site will exclude any nuclear activity, EDF is taking site release into consideration. Therefore a land management strategy for the land and soil is needed. An optimized approach is being proposed for the STE, to the French Regulator. In France, there is no specific regulation related to contaminated land (either radiologically contaminated or chemically contaminated). The French Nuclear Safety Authority's doctrine for radioactively contaminated land is a reference approach which involves complete clean-up, removing any trace of artificial radioactivity in the ground. If technical difficulties are encountered or the quantity of radioactive waste produced is too voluminous, an optimised clean-up can be implemented. EDF has been engaged since 2008 in drawing up a common guideline with other French nuclear operators (CEA and AREVA). The operators' guideline proposed the first steps to define how to optimise nuclear waste and to carry out a cost-benefits analysis. This is in accordance with the IAEA's prescriptions. Historically, various incidents involving effluent drum spills caused radiological contamination in the building platform and the underlying soil. While conducting the decontamination works in 2004/2005, it was impossible to remove all contamination (that went deeper than expected). A large characterization campaign was carried out in order to map the contamination. For the site investigation, 34 boreholes were drilled from 2 to 5 m under the building platform and 98 samples were analyzed to search for gamma, beta and alpha emitters. With the results, the contamination was mapped using a geostatistical approach developed by Geovariances TM . Main results were: - Soils are

  15. Implementation of stage 3 decommissioning and optimization of radioactive waste generation, Triton facility, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The CEA centre of Fontenay-aux-Roses was created in 1946, when the French nuclear energy programme started. Two generations of facilities have been built and operated. The first generation remained operational for 15 years and was dismantled in the late 1950s. It was replaced by a new generation of facilities, as part of the French electronuclear programme, and these included the Triton and Nereide research reactors (hereafter called the Triton facility). In accordance with the CEA strategy and taking into account its urban location, in 1998 the CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses centre decided to launch an extensive cleanup programme to be implemented from 2010 onwards. This included the Stage 3 decommissioning of the Triton facility. In the frame of this decommissioning project, a decommissioning strategy was developed making it possible to optimize the volume of radioactive waste generated

  16. Survey of technology for decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 8. Remote handling and cutting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-03-01

    In nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning and refurbishment, the remote handling techniques such as dismantling, waste handling and decontamination are needed to reduce personnel radiation exposure. The survey research for the status of R and D activities on remote handling tools suitable for nuclear facilities in the world and domestic existing commercial cutting tools applicable to decommissioning of the facilities was conducted. In addition, the drive mechanism, sensing element and control system applicable to the remote handling devices were also surveyed. This report presents brief surveyed summaries. (H. Itami)

  17. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.S.

    1995-01-01

    Decommissioning Buildings 3 and 4 South at Technical Area 21, Los Alamos National Laboratory, involves the decontamination, dismantlement, and demolition of two enriched-uranium processing buildings containing process equipment and ductwork holdup. The Laboratory has adopted two successful management strategies to implement this project: Rather than characterize an entire site, upfront, investigators use the ''observational approach,'' in which they collect only enough data to begin decommissioning activities and then determine appropriate procedures for further characterization as the work progresses. Project leaders augment work packages with task hazard analyses to fully define specific tasks and inform workers of hazards; all daily work activities are governed by specific work procedures and hazard analyses

  18. Conference on decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meservey, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A brief history of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented as an introduction to the status of current projects. Details are then presented as an introduction to the status of current projects. Details are then presented on a project to remove sodium from some major components of the Hallam reactor and on the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) decommissioning project. Cost, schedule, waste volume, and other technical data from these projects are presented. In addition, a brief summary of the future INEL D and D program is presented

  19. Decommissioning of a brachytherapy facility at the Oncology Hospital in Havana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, J.C.; Salgado, M.; Madrazo, S.; Castillo, R.; Marcos, J.; Flores, J.

    2001-01-01

    In the past the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology (INOR) used 226 Ra sealed sources for brachytherapy service. For technical obsolescence and safety considerations the brachytherapy facility was shutdown. Most 226 Ra sources were collected from the hospital in 1996, but for different reasons, not all radium sources could be evacuated by this time. Some of them were leaking which caused contamination of the place. In May 1997 the Direction of the Hospital requested the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) to evaluate the radiological situation in the contaminated areas and to carry out the decontamination of the rooms and the decommissioning of the brachytherapy facility for unrestricted use. Contamination surveys conducted during this year confirmed the contamination of the facility. Once all necessary conditions were in place the decontamination of rooms and the decommissioning of this facility took place as in June 1999. In order to perform such a work the Hospital received the authorization from the National Centre for Nuclear Safety (Cuban's Regulatory Body) as a License for Decommissioning. The decommissioning process greatly benefited from early planning. This included an assessment of available documentation and operational history of the brachytherapy facility, the definition of responsibilities for each activity, technical seminars with personnel from the hospital and specialist from CPHR in charge of the decommissioning activities, safety assessment of the radiological and non-radiological hazards, the evaluation of available waste management provisions, the availability of financial resources as well as the review of lessons learned from previous projects. The characterization of the facility was a very important task in the selection of decommissioning alternative. During decommissioning operations, radiation monitoring of workers was carried out. In order to evaluate the radiological situation in the contaminated rooms

  20. Final decommissioning report for the 183-C Filter Building/Pumproom facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marske, S.G.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the decommissioning and demolition (D ampersand D) of the 183-C Filter Building/Pumproom facility (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). The 183-C Facility D ampersand D involved the performance of characterization to support the development of a project plan and final hazard classification

  1. Development of the scenario-based training system to reduce hazards and prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Choi, Jong-Won; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kim, GeunHo; Kang, ShinYoung

    2015-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities has to be accomplished by assuring the safety of workers. Decommissioning workers need familiarization with working environments because working environment is under high radioactivity and work difficulty during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On-the-job training of decommissioning works could effectively train decommissioning workers but this training approach could consume much costs and poor modifications of scenarios. The efficiency of virtual training system could be much better than that of physical training system. This paper was intended to develop the training system to prevent accidents for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The requirements for the training system were drawn. The data management modules for the training system were designed. The training system of decommissioning workers was developed on the basis of virtual reality which is flexibly modified. The visualization and measurement in the training system were real-time done according as changes of the decommissioning scenario. It can be concluded that this training system enables the subject to improve his familiarization about working environments and to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. In the end, the safety during decommissioning of nuclear facilities will be guaranteed under the principle of ALARA

  2. Development of the scenario-based training system to reduce hazards and prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Choi, Jong-Won; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kim, GeunHo; Kang, ShinYoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities has to be accomplished by assuring the safety of workers. Decommissioning workers need familiarization with working environments because working environment is under high radioactivity and work difficulty during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On-the-job training of decommissioning works could effectively train decommissioning workers but this training approach could consume much costs and poor modifications of scenarios. The efficiency of virtual training system could be much better than that of physical training system. This paper was intended to develop the training system to prevent accidents for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The requirements for the training system were drawn. The data management modules for the training system were designed. The training system of decommissioning workers was developed on the basis of virtual reality which is flexibly modified. The visualization and measurement in the training system were real-time done according as changes of the decommissioning scenario. It can be concluded that this training system enables the subject to improve his familiarization about working environments and to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. In the end, the safety during decommissioning of nuclear facilities will be guaranteed under the principle of ALARA.

  3. Deregulation in the field of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, A.

    1994-05-01

    The report comprises two articles covering current topics of the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. In the first article written by Kurz, the legal standards are listed together with conclusions and proposals regarding their implementation for the further development of this field of law. The article by Baumgaertel is aimed at evaluating the regulations governing nuclear technology as regards their applicability to the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. These articles shall contribute to the discussions taking place in this field at the moment. As a result, an appropriate and project-specific application of the legal provisions and not legally binding (technical) regulations in the field of nuclear technology (deregulation) in the licensing procedures required for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities is requested by the authors. (orig.) [de

  4. ECED 2013: Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning. International Conference on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities. Conference Guide and Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Conference included the following sessions: (I) Opening session (2 contributions); (II) Managerial and Funding Aspects of Decommissioning (5 contributions); (III) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning I (6 contributions); (IV) Experience with Present Decommissioning Projects (4 contributions); (V) Poster Session (14 contributions); (VI) Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning - Panel Discussion; (VII) Release of Materials, Waste Management and Spent Fuel Management (6 contributions); (VIII) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning II (5 contributions).

  5. Decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities: a review and analysis of current regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, A.H.; Lippek, H.E.; Tegeler, P.D.; Easterling, J.D.

    1979-08-01

    This report describes and analyzes the regulatory requirements and guidelines applicable to the decommissioning of commercial light water reactors, other commercial nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and byproduct utilization facilities, as contained principally in the United States Code, the United States Code of Federal Regulations, and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guides. State requirements are discussed where appropriate. The report provides general background informaion to license applicants and to other interested parties. Included is an outline of procedural steps required of an applicant to comply with decommissioning regulatory requiremets

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-12-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel.

  8. Study concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities overseen by the IAEA in the United States and major European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Shikazoh

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to know generally on the activities of decommissioning nuclear facilities in the IAEA, and to compare the regulation and finance concerning reactor decommissioning in European countries and the United States together with the decommissioning policy and the status of research and development. Recently also in Japan, attention has been paid to reactor decommissioning after the termination of operation, and the report by the Decommissioning Countermeasures Committee was published in March, 1981. In the IAEA, the investigation of Reactor decommissioning has been performed since 1973, and the meetings of the technical committee in 1975 and 1977, the international symposium in 1978, and the publication of ''Various factors concerning the decommissioning of inland nuclear facilities'' in 1980 were held. The regulation and finance concerning the decommissioning have been performed differently in each country, and the features of the main policy of decommissioning are indicated. In foreign countries, the measures of account for the decommissioning expenses have been already taken. In Japan, it is desirable to establish the technical standard for the decommissioning including legislation and finance. (Kako, I.)

  9. Workshop on decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.

    2005-12-01

    A Nordic workshop on decommissioning of nuclear facilities was held at Risoe in Denmark September 13-15, 2005. The workshop was arranged by NKS in cooperation with the company Danish Decommissioning, DD, responsible for decommissioning of nuclear facilities at Risoe. Oral presentations were made within the following areas: International and national recommendations and requirements concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities Authority experiences of decommissioning cases Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Denmark Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Sweden Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Norway Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Finland Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in German and the UK Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the former Soviet Union Results from research and development A list with proposals for future work within NKS has been prepared based on results from group-work and discussions. The list contains strategic, economical and political issues, technical issues and issues regarding competence and communication. (au)

  10. Planning, managing and organizing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    This publication is intended to encourage the development and improvement of decommissioning planning and management techniques, with the focus on organizational aspects, reduce the duplication of efforts by different parties by transfer of experience and know-how, and provide useful results for those Member States planning or implementing decommissioning projects. In general it can be stated that any decommissioning project can be completed without any deleterious effects on the safety of the workforce and the public or any identifiable impact on the environment. However, timeliness and cost-effectiveness are not always optimal. It has been noted on several occasions that the major weakness in decommissioning projects (as well as in other industrial projects) is often not the lack of technologies, but rather poor planning and management. This publication intends to stimulate awareness of the need for early and efficient planning and to foster developments in management and organization in association with planned or ongoing decommissioning projects. A companion report on Organization and Management for Decommissioning of Large Nuclear Facilities was published by the IAEA in 2000 (Technical Report Series (TRS) No. 399). That TRS provides generic guidance on organizational and management aspects. This TECDOC is complementary to the existing report in that it highlights practical experience - in particular, typical issues, evidence of poor management, undue delays, and lack of timely funding - and distils lessons learned from this experience

  11. Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

  12. Life time estimation of SSCs for decommissioning safety of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan-Seong; Lee, Kune-Woo; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Jeong, Seong-Young; Lee, Jung-Jun; Kim, Geun-Ho; Choi, Byung-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper suggests the expectation algorithm of SSCs life time for decommissioning safety of nuclear facilities. ► The life time of SSCs can be estimated by using fuzzy theory. ► The estimated results depend on the membership functions and performance characteristic functions. - Abstract: This paper suggests the estimation algorithm for life time of structure, system and components (SSCs) for decommissioning safety of nuclear facilities using the performance data of linguistic languages and fuzzy theory. The fuzzy estimation algorithm of life time can be easily applicable but the estimated results depend on the relevant membership functions and performance characteristic functions. This method will be expected to be very useful for maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear facilities’ SSCs as a safety assessment tool.

  13. The state-of-the-art report on management of the decommissioning waste generated from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Il Sik; Lee, K. M.; Chung, K. H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, K. J.

    1998-03-01

    As a result of this research on management methodologies of decommissioning waste from nuclear facilities, the state of the art of decommissioning status, plan, and management field on decommissioning waste in foreign countries as well as in Korea is evaluated. Radioactive waste for final disposal according to reusing non-radioactive waste by clear guideline on classification criteria of decommissioning waste by clear guideline on classification criteria of decommissioning waste will be reduced and metal through melting decontamination may be reused. Also, the relevant regulations on acceptance criteria of disposal site for decommissioning waste should be introduced to manage decommissioning waste effectively. It is necessary that large transport containers which satisfy relevant regulations should be designed and manufactured to transport of large waste. (author). 49 refs., 24 tabs., 30 figs

  14. Decontamination and demolition of concrete and metal structures during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this report is to give a concise technical description of the techniques and equipment being used or developed for the decontamination and demolition of nuclear facilities in sufficient detail to assist Member States to plan decommissioning operations and make preliminary evaluations of techniques and equipment. This report also reviews new and/or different aspects which have not been well covered previously in readily available review documents or IAEA publications. This report is an up to date review of techniques and equipment being used or developed for decontamination or dismantling work during the decommissioning of all types of nuclear facility except mining and milling sites. Although the information presented is aimed at countries initiating decommissioning programmes, it should also be useful to others who are responsible for or interested in the planning and implementation of decommissioning tasks. This report describes the relevant techniques and equipment, their areas of application and degree of development and the conditions in which they are used, when these details are known. However, this publication should be used in conjunction with other published technical information on these topics, experience gained as a result of previous decommissioning operations and the assistance of experts in the appropriate areas are required. 64 refs, 33 figs, 5 tabs

  15. Monitoring programmes for unrestricted release related to decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities usually results in a large volume of radioactive and non-radioactive materials. All these materials will have to be segregated as radioactive, non-radioactive and exempt from regulatory control, and then disposed of, reused or recycled. As more and more facilities approach decommissioning, controlling these wastes and setting release criteria and limits for these materials will represent a major task for the regulatory body and the licensee. Efforts are, therefore, under way at the IAEA to help achieve international consensus on the release criteria for decommissioning and a monitoring programme to verify compliance with these criteria. Within the above context, the present report was conceived as a technical document to provide an overview of all the factors to be considered in the development, planning and implementation of a monitoring programme to assure regulatory compliance with criteria for unrestricted release of materials, buildings and sites from decommissioning. The report is intended as a planning document for the owners, operators and regulatory bodies involved in decommissioning. 41 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Approaches relating to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report arises from the fifth series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Approaches relating to decommissioning of nuclear facilities'. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in three peer group discussions during 1996-1997. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the nominating organizations, nor the IAEA. In many Member States nuclear facilities such as power and research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities and various industrial and medical facilities have reached the end of their useful life or will reach it in the near future. These facilities need to be safely decommissioned without causing any undue radiological, chemical or other risks to workers, the public and the environment. Today, there is a growing consensus that decommissioning needs to be given consideration from the design phase of a new facility and that planning for decommissioning is to be carried out during the entire life of the nuclear facility. In most Member States, there is no comprehensive set of requirements, be it on a legal or technical level, available to plan, assess, approve and carry out decommissioning operations. Since most of the facilities to be decommissioned in the near future are demonstration or prototype facilities, case by case specific and prescriptive requirements will have to be developed. However, such case by case requirements need to be based on existing applicable regulations as well as on generally accepted principles. In order to assist Member States in ensuring safe decommissioning operations, the IAEA has convened the fifth series of peer discussions on 'Approaches relating to decommissioning of nuclear facilities'. The results and findings of these discussions are summarized in this report, concentrating on recommendations and established good

  17. Approaches relating to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This report arises from the fifth series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Approaches relating to decommissioning of nuclear facilities'. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in three peer group discussions during 1996-1997. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the nominating organizations, nor the IAEA. In many Member States nuclear facilities such as power and research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities and various industrial and medical facilities have reached the end of their useful life or will reach it in the near future. These facilities need to be safely decommissioned without causing any undue radiological, chemical or other risks to workers, the public and the environment. Today, there is a growing consensus that decommissioning needs to be given consideration from the design phase of a new facility and that planning for decommissioning is to be carried out during the entire life of the nuclear facility. In most Member States, there is no comprehensive set of requirements, be it on a legal or technical level, available to plan, assess, approve and carry out decommissioning operations. Since most of the facilities to be decommissioned in the near future are demonstration or prototype facilities, case by case specific and prescriptive requirements will have to be developed. However, such case by case requirements need to be based on existing applicable regulations as well as on generally accepted principles. In order to assist Member States in ensuring safe decommissioning operations, the IAEA has convened the fifth series of peer discussions on 'Approaches relating to decommissioning of nuclear facilities'. The results and findings of these discussions are summarized in this report, concentrating on recommendations and established good

  18. TRU waste-assay instrumentation and application in nuclear-facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbarger, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Los Alamos TRU waste assay program is developing measurement techniques for TRU and other radioactive waste materials generated by the nuclear industry, including decommissioning programs. Systems are now being fielded for test and evaluation purposes at DOE TRU waste generators. The transfer of this technology to other facilities and the commercial instrumentation sector is well in progress. 6 figures

  19. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Bong Shick; Kim, Y. S.; Lee, C. Y. and others

    1999-03-01

    The principal contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop in HANARO for nuclear technology development. Procurement and fabrication of main equipment, licensing and technical review for fuel test loop have been performed during 2 years(1997, 1998) for this project. Following contents are described in the report. - Procurement and fabrication of the equipment, piping for OPS - IPS manufacture - License - Technical review and evaluation of the FTL facility. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and review ofHANARO interface have been performed respectively. (author)

  20. Research on decommissioning of nuclear facilities (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibahara, Yuji; Morishita, Yoshitsugu; Ishigami, Tsutomu; Yanagihara, Satoshi; Arita, Yuji

    2011-07-01

    To implement a decommissioning project reasonably, it is necessary and important to beforehand evaluate project management data as well as to select an optimum dismantling scenario among various scenarios postulated. Little study on the subject of selecting an optimum scenario has been carried out, and it is one of the most important subjects in terms of decision making. In FY 2009, Japan Atomic Energy Agency and University of Fukui launched the joint research of a decision making method which is important to determine a decommissioning plan. The purpose of the research is to construct a methodology for selecting an optimum dismantling scenario among various scenarios postulated based on calculated results of project management data for FUGEN. Project management data for several dismantling scenarios postulated at FUGEN were evaluated based on actual dismantling work for feed water heater at FUGEN, and an optimum scenario was discussed using the SMART, one of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Method. This report describes the results of the joint research in FY 2009. (author)

  1. Financial Planning as a Tool for Efficient and Timely Decommissioning of Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cato, Anna; Lindskog, Staffan; Sjoeblom, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    It is generally recognized in the technical and economical literature that reliable cost evaluations with adequate estimates also of the errors and uncertainties involved are necessary in order for rational and appropriate management decisions to be made on any major plant investment. Such estimates are required for the selection of technologies to be applied and for selection to be made between alternative technologies and designs as well as for the overall financing issues including the one of whether to go ahead with the project. Inadequacies in the cost calculations typically lead to suboptimal decisions and ultimately substantial overruns and/or needs for retrofits. Actually, a very strict discipline has to be applied with adaptation of the approach used with regard to the stage of the planning. Deviations from the expected tend to raise the estimated cost much more frequently than they lower it. The same rationale applies to planning and cost calculations for decommissioning of nuclear research facilities. There are, however, many reasons why such estimations may be very treacherous to carry out. This will be dealt with in the following. The knowledge base underlying the present paper has been developed and accumulated as a result of the research that the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) has carried out in support of its regulatory oversight over the Swedish system of finance. The findings are, however, equally applicable and appropriate for implementers in their planning, decision, monitoring and evaluation activities. In the nineteen fifties and sixties, Sweden had a comprehensive program for utilization of nuclear power including uranium mining, fuel fabrication, reprocessing and domestically developed heavy water reactors. Examples of facilities are presented in Figures 1-5. Eventually, the development work lead to the present nuclear program with ten modern light water reactors in operation at present. According to Swedish law, those who benefit

  2. Problems and concerns in radiation safety management related with decommissioning of tritium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2005-01-01

    The tritium facility at the National Institute for Fusion Science has been closed in 2002 after decommissioning procedure. A number of works have been completed including technical measures and administrative documentations to be reported to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology. All the operations were carried out in three successive terms; 1) survey and preparations, 2) actual decommissioning works, and 3) report of all procedures to the Minister. A valuable experience we had during this project has been summarized, and some problems have also been pointed out from a viewpoint of radiation safety management. (author)

  3. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris

    2006-07-01

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO 2 - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and Dismantlement

  4. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO{sub 2} - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and

  5. Planning and management for the decommissioning of research reactors and other small nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Many research reactors and other small nuclear facilities throughout the world date from the original nuclear research programmes in the Member States. Consequently, a large number of these plants have either been retired from service or will soon reach the end of their useful lives and are likely to become significant decommissioning tasks for those Members States. In recognition of this situation and in response to considerable interest shown by Member States, the IAEA has produced this document on planning and management for the decommissioning of research reactors and other small nuclear facilities. While not directed specifically at large nuclear installations, it is likely that much of the information presented will also be of interest to those involved in the decommissioning of such facilities. Current views, information and experience on the planning and management of decommissioning projects in Member States were collected and assessed during a Technical Committee Meeting held by the IAEA in Vienna from 29 July to 2 August 1991. It was attended by 22 participants from 14 Member States and one international organization. 28 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Methodologies for and Results of Planning later Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, I.; Paul, R.; Petrasch, P.

    1996-01-01

    Cost and success of decommissioning and dismantling nuclear power plants or other nuclear facilities are very much related to the chosen strategy and their implementation in practice. The strategy to be developed depends on the specific boundary conditions in a certain country and plant. Inadequate planning and equipment considered too late cause delays in the project performance and improvisations with financial and radiological consequences. For the development of a decommissioning strategy for a nuclear power plant broad experience from past D and D-projects is very important. That experience is very helpful in assessing the importance of the many factors which determine the success or failure of strategic decisions Tools for the systematic recording and investigation of the needed measures and expenditures are available, eg. the decommissioning cost program STILLKO-2, which has been established as standard tool. (author)

  7. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2001-02-01

    The report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. (au)

  8. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment[Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt [ed.

    2001-02-01

    The report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. (au)

  9. Automated methodology for estimating waste streams generated from decommissioning contaminated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.J.; King, D.A.; Humphreys, K.K.; Haffner, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), a viable way to determine aggregate waste volumes, cost, and direct labor hours for decommissioning and decontaminating facilities is required. In this paper, a methodology is provided for determining waste streams, cost and direct labor hours from remediation of contaminated facilities. The method is developed utilizing U.S. facility remediation data and information from several decommissioning programs, including reactor decommissioning projects. The method provides for rapid, consistent analysis for many facility types. Three remediation scenarios are considered for facility D ampersand D: unrestricted land use, semi-restricted land use, and restricted land use. Unrestricted land use involves removing radioactive components, decontaminating the building surfaces, and demolishing the remaining structure. Semi-restricted land use involves removing transuranic contamination and immobilizing the contamination on-site. Restricted land use involves removing the transuranic contamination and leaving the building standing. In both semi-restricted and restricted land use scenarios, verification of containment with environmental monitoring is required. To use the methodology, facilities are placed in a building category depending upon the level of contamination, construction design, and function of the building. Unit volume and unit area waste generation factors are used to calculate waste volumes and estimate the amount of waste generated in each of the following classifications: low-level, transuranic, and hazardous waste. Unit factors for cost and labor hours are also applied to the result to estimate D ampersand D cost and labor hours

  10. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denahm, D. H.; Barnes, M. G.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.; Gilbert, R. O.; Hoenes, G. R.; Jamison, J. D.; McMurray, B. J.; Watson, E. C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations.

  11. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denahm, D.H.; Barnes, M.G.; Jaquish, R.E.; Corley, J.P.; Gilbert, R.O.; Hoenes, G.R.; Jamison, J.D.; McMurray, B.J.; Watson, E.C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations

  12. Factor analysis on hazards for safety assessment in decommissioning workplace of nuclear facilities using a semantic differential method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwan-Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ksjeongl@kaeri.re.kr; Lim, Hyeon-Kyo [Chungbuk National University, 410 Sungbong-ro, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities must be accomplished according to its structural conditions and radiological characteristics. An effective risk analysis requires basic knowledge about possible risks, characteristics of potential hazards, and comprehensive understanding of the associated cause-effect relationships within a decommissioning for nuclear facilities. The hazards associated with a decommissioning plan are important not only because they may be a direct cause of harm to workers but also because their occurrence may, indirectly, result in increased radiological and non-radiological hazards. Workers need to be protected by eliminating or reducing the radiological and non-radiological hazards that may arise during routine decommissioning activities as well as during accidents. Therefore, to prepare the safety assessment for decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the radiological and non-radiological hazards should be systematically identified and classified. With a semantic differential method of screening factor and risk perception factor, the radiological and non-radiological hazards are screened and identified.

  13. 30 CFR 285.902 - What are the general requirements for decommissioning for facilities authorized under my SAP, COP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... decommissioning for facilities authorized under my SAP, COP, or GAP? 285.902 Section 285.902 Mineral Resources... SAP, COP, or GAP? (a) Except as otherwise authorized by MMS under § 285.909, within 2 years following... under your SAP, COP, or GAP, you must submit a decommissioning application and receive approval from the...

  14. Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  16. Study on scenario evaluation methodology for decommissioning nuclear facilities using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Kazuya; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Since there are many scenarios of the process from start to completion of a decommissioning project, it is important to study scenarios of decommissioning by evaluating such properties as safety, cost, and technology. An optimum scenario with the highest feasibility in accordance with the facility and environmental conditions should be selected on the basis of the results of the study. For analyzing a scenario of decommissioning, we prepared structured work packages by using the work breakdown structures (WBS) method together with qualitative evaluation of the technologies being applied to work packages located at the bottom (the third level) of the WBS. A calculation model was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of a scenario where fuzzy logic is applied to derive a score of technology performance and TOPSIS is applied for getting a feasibility grade of the scenario from technical performance scoring. As a case study, the model was applied to the debris removal scenario of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to confirm its applicability. Two scenarios, underwater and in-air debris removal cases, were characterized by extracting the work packages with the lowest feasibility and by obtaining total average scores of the scenarios. It is confirmed that the methodology developed is useful for the scenario evaluation of decommissioning nuclear facilities. (author)

  17. The potential benefits and drawbacks of deferring the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, R.; Pomfret, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    The need to decommission redundant plants or sites at the end of operations is accepted throughout the industry, by the timing of such work requires careful consideration. In a world where political issues dominate, safety and business drivers are often only two of the inputs, and it is therefore imperative that industry is clear in its understanding of the different drivers that affect this issue. Issues are; 1. The formal positions adopted by governments and regulators are often directed at specifically to water reactors. Should other types of facilities be constrained by the same policies? 2. Political drivers can be dominated by short to medium term considerations. Can we encourage long term strategic planning, and ? 3. The failings of the industry (especially accidents) and fear of nuclear weapons can often dominate public perception. Can industry counter these adverse associations? The key benefits relate to better risk management (especially if the radiological inventory was minimised at plant closure). Extending the decommissioning programme does allow dose reductions to take place, especially if short-lived isotopes are involved. Other benefits include more time is allowed for optioneering and planning of the decommissioning processes. This time frame also gives opportunity to develop new or better technologies. With proper control, political strategies can be developed and financial planning can take place. The concern of 'Will there be enough money to fund decommissioning' can become 'A little funding set aside early, and properly managed, can pay for decommissioning in the future'. Savings in dose, impact on the environment, and money can be achieved through a well-managed deferred programme. An extended programme of decommissioning demands the political will and the infrastructure to remain in place over a long period. Tied in to this is the need to keep money available for a long time, and to be able to retain and recover the relevant knowledge

  18. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities in Switzerland: lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibundgut, Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Paul Scherrer Institute is the largest research institute for natural and engineering science in Switzerland. It operated various nuclear facilities from 1960 to 2011: Research reactors DIORIT, SAPHIR and PROTEUS, and an incineration plant for low and medium level radioactive waste. Concerning SAPHIR research reactor: in operation from 1958 to 1993, planning of decommissioning from 1998 to 2000. Decommissioning work started in 2004. Finishing is planned for 2019. Concerning DIORIT research reactor: operation as DIORIT I (20 MWth) from 1960 to 1967, then reconstruction to DIORIT II (30 MWth) and operation from 1970 until 1977. Planning of decommissioning from 1992 to 1994. Decommissioning work started in 1994 and was finished in 2012. Concerning PROTEUS research reactor: in operation from 1966 to 2011. Planning of decommissioning from 2013 to 2014. Starting of decommissioning work is planned for 2017, finishing is planned for the end of 2018 Incineration plant: In operation from 1974 to 2002. Planning of decommissioning from 2011 to 2012. Starting of decommissioning work in 2016. Finishing planned for end of 2019. Treatment of various material categories from dismantling: Concerning aluminum: because of the production of H_2 during solidification in concrete, it was necessary to minimize the surface area. When dismantling research reactors, the aluminum removed was melted in an induction furnace and poured into a 4.5 m"3 concrete container to solidify. Cutting the metal and handling it was largely accomplished remote control, using conventional technology. Concerning Steel/Cast-iron: the storage containers to be filled determined the method used for reducing the size of these materials, and the technique used for handling them. The goal was to optimize the packing density to reduce repository costs. The selected method of reducing the size of components is to cut them up using diamond-tipped tools, like saw blades. Concerning Graphite: for graphite, grinding was the

  19. Decommissioning and Decontamination Program: Battelle Plutonium Facility, Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This assessment describes the decontamination of Battelle-Columbus Plutonium Facility and removal from the site of all material contamination which was associated with or produced by the Plutonium Facility. Useable uncontaminated material will be disposed of by procedures normally employed in scrap declaration and transfer. Contaminated waste will be transported to approved radioactive waste storage sites. 5 refs., 1 fig

  20. Methodology for determining acceptable residual radioactive contamination levels at decommissioned nuclear facilities/sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.C.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hoenes, G.R.; Waite, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The ultimate disposition of decommissioned nuclear facilities and their surrrounding sites depends upon the degree and type of residual contamination. Examination of existing guidelines and regulations has led to the conclusion that there is a need for a general method to derive residual radioactive contamination levels that are acceptable for public use of any decommissioned nuclear facility or site. This paper describes a methodology for determining acceptable residual radioactive contamination levels based on the concept of limiting the annual dose to members of the public. It is not the purpose of this paper to recommend or even propose dose limits for the exposure of the public to residual radioactive contamination left at decommissioned nuclear facilities or sites. Unrestricted release of facilities and/or land is based on the premise that the potential annual dose to any member of the public using this property from all possible exposure pathways will not exceed appropriate limits as may be defined by Federal regulatory agencies. For decommissioned land areas, consideration should be given to people living directly on previously contaminated areas, growing crops, grazing food animals and using well water. Mixtures of radionuclides in the residual contamination representative of fuel reprocessing plants, light water reactors and their respective sites are presented. These mixtures are then used to demonstrate the methodology. Example acceptable residual radioactive contamination levels, based on an assumed maximum annual dose of one millirem, are calculated for several selected times following shutdown of a facility. It is concluded that the methodology presented in this paper results in defensible acceptable residual contamination levels that are directly relatable to risk assessment with the proviso that an acceptable limit to the maximum annual dose will be established. (author)

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 1. A selected bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, R.A.; Fore, C.S.; Knox, N.P.

    1980-09-01

    This bibliography of 633 references represents the first in a series to be produced by the Remedial Actions Program Information Center (RAPIC) containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Major chapters selected for this bibliography are Facility Decommissioning, Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup, Contaminated Site Restoration, and Criteria and Standards. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. When the author is not given, the corporate affiliation appears first. If these two levels of authorship are not given, the title of the document is used as the identifying level. Indexes are provided for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) title, (4) technology development, and (5) publication description. An appendix of 123 entries lists recently acquired references relevant to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These references are also arranged according to one of the four subject categories and followed by author, title, and publication description indexes. The bibliography was compiled from a specialized data base established and maintained by RAPIC to provide information support for the Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program, under the cosponsorship of its three major components: Surplus Facilities Management Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program, and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actions Program. RAPIC is part of the Ecological Sciences Information Center within the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 1. A selected bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, R.A.; Fore, C.S.; Knox, N.P.

    1980-09-01

    This bibliography of 633 references represents the first in a series to be produced by the Remedial Actions Program Information Center (RAPIC) containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Major chapters selected for this bibliography are Facility Decommissioning, Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup, Contaminated Site Restoration, and Criteria and Standards. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. When the author is not given, the corporate affiliation appears first. If these two levels of authorship are not given, the title of the document is used as the identifying level. Indexes are provided for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) title, (4) technology development, and (5) publication description. An appendix of 123 entries lists recently acquired references relevant to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These references are also arranged according to one of the four subject categories and followed by author, title, and publication description indexes. The bibliography was compiled from a specialized data base established and maintained by RAPIC to provide information support for the Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program, under the cosponsorship of its three major components: Surplus Facilities Management Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program, and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actions Program. RAPIC is part of the Ecological Sciences Information Center within the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  3. An evaluation on the scenarios of work trajectory during installation of dismantling equipment for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Choi, ByungSeon; Moon, JeiKwon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kim, GeunHo; Kang, ShinYoung; Choi, JongWon; Jeong, SeongYoung; Ahn, SangMyeon; Lee, JungJun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An evaluation on the scenarios of work trajectory. • An evaluation using the virtual decommissioning environments. • An evaluation on work movement under radiation environments. - Abstract: This study is intended to suggest an ergonomic evaluation on the working postural comfort. This study issued for the first time a methodology in view of combination between visual field and comfort. Especially, the ergonomic evaluation using the virtual decommissioning environments is user-friendly because setup of physical mock-up environments is difficult. This study verified the front and standing postures are best working postures during movement under radiation environments of nuclear facilities. It is expected that this methodology will make it possible to establish the ergonomic plan for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety of decommissioning will be improved and also decommissioning costs also can be reduced.

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions modeling : a tool for federal facility decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facility inventory is constantly changing as newer systems supplant older infrastructure in response to technological advances. Transformational change embodied by the FAAs Next Generation Air Transportati...

  5. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities

  6. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

  7. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  8. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  9. A facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Shuliang; Wang, Chengyu; Li, Jian

    2012-11-01

    A facile and novel method for fabricating superhydrophobic cotton fabrics is described in the present work. The superhydrophobic surface has been prepared by utilizing cationic poly (dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) and silica particles together with subsequent modification of (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetradecyl) trimethoxysilane. The size distribution of silica particles was measured by Particle Size Analyzer. The cotton textiles before and after treatment were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wetting behavior of cotton samples was investigated by water contact angle measurement. Moreover, the superhydrophobic durability of coated cotton textiles has been evaluated by exposure, immersion and washing tests. The results show that the treated cotton fabrics exhibited excellent chemical stability and outstanding non-wettability with the WCA of 155 ± 2°, which offers an opportunity to accelerate the large-scale production of superhydrophobic textiles materials for new industrial applications.

  10. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Inga; Backe, S.; Iversen, Klaus; Lindskog, S; Salmenhaara, S.; Sjoeblom, R.

    2006-11-01

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility. However, no actual international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. Intuitively, it might be tempting to regard costs for decommissioning of a nuclear facility as similar to those of any other plant. However, the presence of radionuclide contamination may imply that the cost is one or more orders of magnitude higher as compared to a corresponding inactive situation, the actual ratio being highly dependent on the level of contamination as well as design features and use of the facility in question. Moreover, the variations in such prerequisites are much larger than for nuclear power plants. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological and other prerequisites. Application of inadequate methodologies especially at early stages has often lead to large underestimations. The goals of the project and the achievements described in the report are as follows: 1) Advice on good practice with regard to: 1a) Strategy and planning; 1b) Methodology selection; 1c) Radiological surveying; 1d) Uncertainty analysis; 2) Techniques for assessment of costs: 2a) Cost structuring; 2b) Cost estimation methodologies; 3) Compilation of data for plants, state of planning, organisations, etc.; 3a) General descriptions of relevant features of the nuclear research facilities; 3b) General plant specific data; 3c) Example of the decommissioning of the R1 research reactor in Sweden; 3d) Example of the decommissioning of the DR1 research reactor in Denmark. In addition, but not described in the present report, is the establishment of a Nordic network in the area including an internet based expert system. It should be noted that the project is planned to exist for at least three years and that the present report is an interim one

  11. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment. Danish summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2001-02-01

    The report gives a brief description of relevant aspects of the decommissioning of all nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory, including the necessary operations to be performed and the associated costs. Together with a more detailed report, written in English, this report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe in the summer of 2000. The English report has undergone an international review, the results of which are summarised in the present report. (au)

  12. Information base for waste repository design. Volume 5. Decommissioning of underground facilities. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffre, M.S.; Plum, R.L.; Koplik, C.M.; Talbot, R.

    1979-03-01

    This report is Volume 5 of a seven volume document on nuclear waste repository design issues. This report discusses the requirements for decommissioning a deep underground facility for the disposal of radioactive waste. The techniques for sealing the mined excavations are presented and an information base on potential backfill materials is provided. Possible requirements for monitoring the site are discussed. The performance requirements for backfill materials are outlined. The advantages and disadvantages of each sealing method are stated

  13. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Inga [StudsvikNuclear AB (Sweden); Backe, S. [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway); Iversen, Klaus [Danish Decommissioning (Denmark); Lindskog, S [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden); Salmenhaara, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Sjoeblom, R. [Tekedo AB (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility. However, no actual international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. Intuitively, it might be tempting to regard costs for decommissioning of a nuclear facility as similar to those of any other plant. However, the presence of radionuclide contamination may imply that the cost is one or more orders of magnitude higher as compared to a corresponding inactive situation, the actual ratio being highly dependent on the level of contamination as well as design features and use of the facility in question. Moreover, the variations in such prerequisites are much larger than for nuclear power plants. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological and other prerequisites. Application of inadequate methodologies especially at early stages has often lead to large underestimations. The goals of the project and the achievements described in the report are as follows: 1) Advice on good practice with regard to: 1a) Strategy and planning; 1b) Methodology selection; 1c) Radiological surveying; 1d) Uncertainty analysis; 2) Techniques for assessment of costs: 2a) Cost structuring; 2b) Cost estimation methodologies; 3) Compilation of data for plants, state of planning, organisations, etc.; 3a) General descriptions of relevant features of the nuclear research facilities; 3b) General plant specific data; 3c) Example of the decommissioning of the R1 research reactor in Sweden; 3d) Example of the decommissioning of the DR1 research reactor in Denmark. In addition, but not described in the present report, is the establishment of a Nordic network in the area including an internet based expert system. It should be noted that the project is planned to exist for at least three years and that the present report is an interim one

  14. Guide for International Peer Reviews of Decommissioning Cost Studies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, Thomas S.; Pescatore, Claudio; )

    2014-01-01

    Peer reviews are a standard co-operative OECD working tool that offer member countries a framework to compare experiences and examine best practices in a host of areas. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has developed a proven methodology for conducting peer reviews in radioactive waste management and nuclear R and D. Using this methodology, the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee's Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) developed the present guide as a framework for decommissioning cost reviewers and reviewees to prepare for and conduct international peer reviews of decommissioning cost estimate studies for nuclear facilities. It includes checklists that will help national programmes or relevant organisations to assess and improve decommissioning cost estimate practices in the future. This guide will act as the NEA reference for conducting such international peer reviews. The remainder of this guide is divided into eight chapters. Chapter 2 describes gathering the cost estimate study and underpinning documents, reviewing the study and writing a final report. Chapter 3 provides a detailed checklist approach for the review of the cost study report. Chapter 4 provides checklists to assist in reviewing benchmarked information. Chapter 5 provides comments on the approach and recommendations for use of this guide. Chapters 6 and 7 provide the background material used in developing this guide and Chapter 8 provides a list of the abbreviations and acronyms used in this guide

  15. The specificity of decommissioning waste for disposal and from different facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.; Hilden, W.; Pla Campana, E.; )

    2005-01-01

    Full text: During the decommissioning of nuclear installations significant waste quantities arise, the bulk being material which qualifies for free release or exemption. Only minor quantities have to be submitted to regulatory control and have either to be disposed or can be released, recycled or reused under certain conditions defined by the regulatory body. Actually, it is almost impossible to derive at meaningful data for the expected waste quantities by a simple propagation of the experiences made in other installations. Rather, the quantities and categorisation are significantly installation specific and are determined by a variety of factors such as the plant construction and operation history, the thoroughness of facility characterisation in preparation for decommissioning, the timing of the decommissioning exercise, the kind and scope of the applied waste treatment and conditioning techniques, the possibility for recycling or reusing irradiated or contaminated materials as well as the applicable national legislation. Further international co-operation aiming at the development of waste estimation techniques is required. Moreover, a harmonisation of national legislation might help to compare waste arisings under the various decommissioning exercises

  16. Approaches of Knowledge Management System for the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Y.; Yanagihara, S.; Kato, Y.; Tezuka, M.; Koda, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The decommissioning of a nuclear facility is a long term project, handling information beginning with design, construction and operation. Moreover, the decommissioning project is likely to be extended because of the lack of the waste disposal site. In this situation, as the transfer of knowledge to the next generation is a crucial issue, approaches of knowledge management (KM) are necessary. For this purpose, the total system of decommissioning knowledge management system (KMS) is proposed. In this system, we should arrange, organize and systematize the data and information of the plant design, maintenance history, trouble events, waste management records etc. The collected data, information and records should be organized by computer support systems. It becomes a base of the explicit knowledge. Moreover, measures of extracting tacit knowledge from retiring employees are necessary. The experience of the retirees should be documented as much as possible through effective questionnaire or interview process. In this way, various KM approaches become an integrated KMS as a whole. The system should be used for daily accumulation of knowledge thorough the planning, implementation and evaluation of decommissioning activities and it will contribute to the transfer of knowledge. (author

  17. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P. T.; Webb, J. R.; Knox, N. P.; Goins, L. F.; Harrell, R. E.; Mallory, P. K.; Cravens, C. D.

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  20. The decommissioning concept for nuclear facilities in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaroslavtsev, G.F.; Korchagin, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    The basic task of the conception is a formulation of the basic directions and priorities, terms of schedules and plans, calculation of costs of works on endurance, preservations, dismantlement of nuclear facilities and returning of territories in the unlimited usage. Independent of the development rate of nuclear energy in Ukraine, this problem must now be solved. (author)

  1. Innovative and adaptive technologies in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Final report of a coordinated research project 2004-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    There are dozens of old reactors and other nuclear facilities worldwide that are either being actively dismantled or are candidates for decommissioning in the near term. A significant proportion of these facilities are situated in Member States or institutions that do not have adequate expertise and technologies for planning and implementing state of the art decommissioning projects. The technology selection process is critical in that regard. The main objective of the IAEA technical activities on decommissioning is to promote the exchange of lessons learned in order to improve the technologies, thereby contributing to successful planning and implementation of decommissioning. This should be achieved through a better understanding of the decision making process in technology comparison and selection and relevant issues affecting the entire decommissioning process. The specific objectives of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Innovative and Adaptive Technologies in Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities include the following general aspects: (a) To establish methodologies and data needs for developing concepts and approaches relevant to technology comparison and selection in decommissioning; (b) To improve and expand the database on applications and performance of various types of decommissioning technologies; (c) To address specific issues for individual decommissioning technologies and generate data relevant to their comparison and selection. It is also expected that this project, and in particular the papers collected in this TECDOC, will draw Member States' attention to the practicality and achievability of timely planning and implementation of decommissioning, especially for many smaller projects. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final research coordination meeting held in Rez, Czech Republic, 3-7 December 2007, and collected in this technical publication. Operating

  2. Facility safeguards at an LEU fuel fabrication facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroi, H.; Osabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    A facility description of a Japanese LEU BWR-type fuel fabrication plant focusing on safeguards viewpoints is presented. Procedures and practices of MC and A plan, measurement program, inventory taking, and the report and record system are described. Procedures and practices of safeguards inspection are discussed and lessons learned from past experiences are reviewed

  3. Decommissioning Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Decommissioning Handbook is a technical guide for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the removal of the radioactive and, for practical reasons, hazardous materials to enable the facility to be released and not represent a further risk to human health and the environment. This handbook identifies and technologies and techniques that will accomplish these objectives. The emphasis in this handbook is on characterization; waste treatment; decontamination; dismantling, segmenting, demolition; and remote technologies. Other aspects that are discussed in some detail include the regulations governing decommissioning, worker and environmental protection, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials. The handbook describes in general terms the overall decommissioning project, including planning, cost estimating, and operating practices that would ease preparation of the Decommissioning Plan and the decommissioning itself. The reader is referred to other documents for more detailed information. This Decommissioning Handbook has been prepared by Enserch Environmental Corporation for the US Department of Energy and is a complete restructuring of the original handbook developed in 1980 by Nuclear Energy Services. The significant changes between the two documents are the addition of current and the deletion of obsolete technologies and the addition of chapters on project planning and the Decommissioning Plan, regulatory requirements, characterization, remote technology, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials.

  4. Real-time assessment of exposure dose to workers in radiological environments during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Choi, ByungSeon; Moon, JeiKwon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kim, GeunHo; Seo, JaeSeok; Jeong, SeongYoung; Lee, JungJun; Song, HaeSang; Lee, SangWha; Son, BongKi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The method of exposure dose assessment to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. • The environments of simulation were designed under a virtual reality. • To assess exposure dose to workers, human model was developed within a virtual reality. - Abstract: This objective of this paper is to develop a method to simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. To simulate several scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed using virtual reality. To assess exposure dose to workers, a human model was also developed using virtual reality. The exposure dose was measured and assessed under the principle of ALARA in accordance with radiological environmental change. This method will make it possible to plan for the exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  5. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D and D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D and D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C

  6. Design of the MOX fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.V.; Brabazon, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    A consortium of Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., COGEMA, Inc. and Stone and Webster (DCS) are designing a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility (MFFF) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to convert surplus plutonium to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel to be irradiated in commercial nuclear power plants based on the proven European technology of COGEMA and BELGONUCLEAIRE. This paper describes the MFFF processes, and how the proven MOX fuel fabrication technology is being adapted as required to comply with U.S. requirements. (author)

  7. Design of the MOX fuel fabrication facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.V. [MFFF Technical Manager, U.S. dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Brabazon, E.J. [MFFF Engineering Manager, Duke Cogema Stone and Webster, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A consortium of Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., COGEMA, Inc. and Stone and Webster (DCS) are designing a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility (MFFF) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to convert surplus plutonium to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel to be irradiated in commercial nuclear power plants based on the proven European technology of COGEMA and BELGONUCLEAIRE. This paper describes the MFFF processes, and how the proven MOX fuel fabrication technology is being adapted as required to comply with U.S. requirements. (author)

  8. Factors relevant to the recycling or reuse of components arising from the decommissioning and refurbishment of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. To assist in the development of the required decommissioning expertise, the IAEA is developing reports and recommendations which will eventually form an integrated information base covering in a systematic way the wide range of topics associated with decommissioning. This information is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. One area which warrants more detailed analyses is an assessment of the factors important to the recycling or reuse of components arising from the refurbishment or decommissioning of nuclear plants, the topic of the present report. The document provides an up to date review of the engineering, social, scientific and administrative factors relevant to the safe recycling or reuse of components arising from decommissioning or refurbishment of nuclear facilities. This report should be of interest to owners, operators, policy makers and regulators involved with nuclear facilities, especially those in developing countries. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA's hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R ampersand D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required

  10. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhara, Fumiyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Makoto; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Toyoda, Akihiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning criteria for use in design of new plutonium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschall, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) criteria were assembled for use in designing new plutonium facilities. These criteria were gathered from literature searches and visits to many plutonium facilities around the country. The recommendations of reports and experienced personnel were used. Since total D and D costs can be millions of dollars, improved designs to facilitate D and D will result in considerable savings in cost and time and will help to leave the site for unrestricted future use after D and D. Finally, better design will reduce hazards and improve safety during the D and D effort

  12. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  13. Autonomous underwater handling system for service, measurement and cutting tasks for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, M.; Haferkamp, H.; Bach, W.; Rose, N.

    1992-01-01

    For about 10 years the Institute for Material Science at the Hanover University has worked on projects of underwater cutting and welding. Increasing tasks to be done in nuclear facilities led to the development of special handling systems to support and handle the cutting tools. Also sensors and computers for extensive and complex tasks were integrated. A small sized freediving handling system, equipped with 2 video cameras, ultrasonic and radiation sensors and a plasma cutting torch for inspection and decommissioning tasks in nuclear facilities is described in this paper. (Author)

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning of Plant 7 at the Fernald Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, G.P.; Borgman, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), is a Department of Energy (DOE) site which produced high-quality uranium for military defense beginning in 1951. Production at the FEMP was halted in July 1989. Later that year, the facility was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The DOE is currently conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) and other response actions under the Amended Consent Agreement between the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the DOE

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  16. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word

  17. Radiological protection and radioactive waste management aspects of the decommissioning of redundant nuclear facilities at the Rosyth Dockyard, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, Robert W.; Murdo Murray; Hunter Common

    2008-01-01

    The Rosyth Dockyard is located near the city of Edinburgh in Scotland. The dockyard's nuclear activities centred around the refuelling and refitting of submarines, as well as some submarine decommissioning. In 1993, submarine refitting work was transferred to Devonport in Southern England. This meant that there were a number of facilities at the Rosyth Dockyard that were now redundant. In accordance with UK government policy a programme of works was instigated to allow for the decommissioning of these nuclear liabilities. This paper provides a brief overview of work activities performed to allow physical decommissioning to take place. Topics covered include radiological characterisation activities, development of monitoring protocols for decommissioning, obtaining relevant environmental authorisations, developing a decommissioning safety case, gaining the UK's Nuclear Installations Inspectorate approval to proceed with decommissioning and an overview of some of the post operative clean out (POCO) activities performed. Edmund Nuttall Ltd were contracted to perform the physical decommissioning of the redundant nuclear facilities, that have been subject to POCO, and this work commenced in February 2006. As part of this contract they were to provide a radiological protection infrastructure including dosimetry and health physics monitoring. This paper discusses the radiological protection infrastructure established by the decommissioning contractor, the radiological protection aspects of the decommissioning work, some of the tools and techniques utilised to date during the nuclear decommissioning, and the radioactive waste management processes established for the project. All activities are referenced to relevant aspects of UK nuclear industry best practice and to the Scottish, UK and European regulatory framework. The progress to date is discussed and lessons that have been learnt are highlighted. (author)

  18. Characterization of Iraq's remote nuclear facilities for decommissioning and waste management - 59167

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Musawi, Fouad; Jarjies, Adnan; Miller, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    The Government of Iraq (GOI) has undertaken efforts to decommission and dismantle former nuclear facilities. The GOI has only preliminary information on some of the former nuclear facilities. This paper will highlight the challenges involved in conducting inspections of the outlying former nuclear facilities in Iraq and present a brief summary of the results of those inspections. The facilities discussed in this paper are located at various sites throughout Iraq, from locations close to Baghdad to those in the north and far western desert areas. Some of the facilities, such as those at the Al Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center have been visited and characterized. Other facilities, including the following, have not been visited or thoroughly characterized. - Al Jesira, Uranium feed stock production facility; - Adaya, Burial location for contaminated equipment; - Djerf al Naddah, Spent fuel storage facility; - Rashdiya, Centrifuge development center; - Al Qa'im, Uranium (yellowcake) production facility. The visits were conducted to develop an inventory of the buildings/structures that need to be included in decommissioning/dismantlement efforts. The number of buildings, type of construction, size and general condition of the buildings were noted. In addition, attempts were made to determine contamination levels on surfaces, equipment, rubble, etc. This information will be used to support the Iraqi decommissioning and dismantlement project. Because the facilities are scattered throughout the country of Iraq, significant planning and coordination was required to ensure personnel security. Teams consisting of individuals from the Iraqi Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST) and Americans were under military escort when traveling to and visiting the sites. Because of the security issues, time on the ground at each site was limited. This paper will highlight the challenges involved in conducting the inspections of the outlying former nuclear facilities In Iraq and

  19. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R, Kruzic

    2008-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  20. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  1. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Chi, D. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, B. C.; Park, C.; Lee, C. T.; Cho, S. W.; Kwak, K. K.; Suk, H. C. [and others

    1997-07-01

    The principle contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule in HANARO for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1999, the basic and detail design, safety analysis, and procurement of main equipment for fuel test loop have been performed and also the piping in gallery and the support for IPS piping in reactor pool have been installed in 1994. In the area of non-instrumented capsule for material irradiation test, the fabrication of capsule has been completed. Procurement, fabrication and installation of the fuel test loop will be implemented continuously till 1999. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and safety analysis report has been submitted to KINS to get a license and review of HANARO interface have been performed respectively. (author). 39 refs., 28 tabs., 21 figs.

  2. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Chi, D. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, B. C.; Park, C.; Lee, C. T.; Cho, S. W.; Kwak, K. K.; Suk, H. C.

    1997-07-01

    The principle contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule in HANARO for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1999, the basic and detail design, safety analysis, and procurement of main equipment for fuel test loop have been performed and also the piping in gallery and the support for IPS piping in reactor pool have been installed in 1994. In the area of non-instrumented capsule for material irradiation test, the fabrication of capsule has been completed. Procurement, fabrication and installation of the fuel test loop will be implemented continuously till 1999. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and safety analysis report has been submitted to KINS to get a license and review of HANARO interface have been performed respectively. (author). 39 refs., 28 tabs., 21 figs

  3. SuperCDMS Underground Detector Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, M.; Mahapatra, R.; Bunker, Raymond A.; Orrell, John L.

    2018-03-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB dark matter experiment processes Ge and Si crystals into fully tested phonon and ionization detectors at surface fabrication and test facilities. If not mitigated, it is anticipated that trace-level production of radioisotopes in the crystals due to exposure to cosmic rays at (or above) sea level will result in the dominant source of background events in future dark matter searches using the current SuperCDMS detector technology. Fabrication and testing of detectors in underground facilities shielded from cosmic radiation is one way to directly reduce production of trace levels of radioisotopes, thereby improving experimental sensitivity for the discovery of dark matter beyond the level of the current experiment. In this report, we investigate the cost and feasibility to establish a complete detector fabrication processing chain in an underground location to mitigate cosmogenic activation of the Ge and Si detector substrates. For a specific and concrete evaluation, we explore options for such a facility located at SNOLAB, an underground laboratory in Sudbury, Canada hosting the current and future experimental phases of SuperCDMS.

  4. Lessons learned from application of the Swedish regulations for decommissioning of nuclear facilities - The regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efraimsson, Henrik; Amft, Martin; Leisvik, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the Swedish regulations for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It describes some of the experiences that the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority has gained from the application of these regulations. The focus of the present paper lies on administrative aspects of the care and maintenance operation and on the safety related documentation that has to be prepared before dismantling commences. Lessons learned during recent years will be considered when revising the regulations for decommissioning. Also these lessons learned will help to streamline the administration of the large NPP decommissioning projects that are anticipated to commence in Sweden in the near future. (authors)

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning of the initial engine test facility and the IET two-inch hot-waste line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, F.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Initial Engine Test Decommissioning Project is described in this report. The Initial Engine Test facility was constructed and operated at the National Reactor Testing Station, now known as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, to support the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program and the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power Transient test program, circa 1950 through 1960s. Due to the severe nature of these nuclear test programs, a significant amount of radioactive contamination was deposited in various portions of the Initial Engine Test Facility. Characterizations, decision analyses, and plans for decontamination and decommissioning were prepared from 1982 through 1985. Decontamination and decommissioning activities were performed in such a way that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory remains. These decontamination and decommissioning activities began in 1985 and were completed in 1987. 13 figs

  6. Allowable residual-contamination levels for decommissioning facilities in the 100 areas of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

    1983-07-01

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for five generic categories of facilities in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide ARCL data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. The information on ARCL values for restricted and controlled use provided by this report is intended to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. ARCL results are presented both for surface contamination remaining in facilities (in dpm/100 cm 2 ), and for unconfined surface and confined subsurface soil conditions (in pCi/g). Two confined soil conditions are considered: contamination at depths between 1 and 4 m, and contamination at depths greater than or equal to 5 m. A set of worksheets are presented in an appendix for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations, to consider the impacts of radioactive decay, and to predict instrument responses. Finally, a comparison is made between the unrestricted release ARCL values for the 100 Area facilities and existing decommissioning and land disposal regulations. For surface contamination, the comparison shows good agreement. For soil contamination, the comparison shows good agreement if reasonable modification factors are applied to account for the differences in modeling soil contamination and licensed low-level waste

  7. Safeguards considerations related to the decontamination and decommissioning of former nuclear weapons facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, D.

    1995-01-01

    In response to the post-Cold War environment and the changes in the U. S. Department of Energy defense mission, many former nuclear operations are being permanently shut down. These operations include facilities where nuclear materials production, processing, and weapons manufacturing have occurred in support of the nation's defense industry. Since defense-related operations have ceased, many of the classification and sensitive information concerns do not exist. However, nuclear materials found at these sites are of interest to the DOE from environmental, safety and health, and materials management perspectives. Since these facilities played a role in defense activities, the nuclear materials found at these facilities are considered special nuclear materials, primarily highly enriched uranium and/or plutonium. Consequently, these materials pose significant diversion, theft, and sabotage threats, and significant nuclear security issues exist that must be addressed. This paper focuses on the nuclear materials protection issues associated with facility decommissioning and decontamination, primarily safeguards

  8. A State-of-the-Art Report on Technologies of a Safety Assessment and a Radioactivity Exposure Assessment for the Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-09-01

    This report is to provide the reference contents of research and development for technologies of radioactivity exposure and safety assessment for development of the decommissioning technology for nuclear facilities. This report consists of as follows: - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a radioactivity exposure assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a safety assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities

  9. A State-of-the-Art Report on Technologies of a Safety Assessment and a Radioactivity Exposure Assessment for the Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-09-15

    This report is to provide the reference contents of research and development for technologies of radioactivity exposure and safety assessment for development of the decommissioning technology for nuclear facilities. This report consists of as follows: - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a radioactivity exposure assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a safety assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities.

  10. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.; Fowler, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    The 644 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the seventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. References are arranged alphabetically by leading author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations

  11. Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Fielden, J.M.; Knox, N.P.; Trotter, ES.

    1981-10-01

    This bibliography of 643 references represents the second in a series on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions to be produced by the Radiation Effects Information Center (REIC) within the Information Center Complex, Information Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information pertaining to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: Surplus Facilities Management Program; Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by title. Indexes are provided for: (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. The bibliography was compiled from a specialized data base established and maintained by REIC to provide information support for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program, under the cosponsorship of its four major components: Surplus Facilities Management Program; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; and the Grand Junction Remedial Action Program

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1985-09-01

    This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1987-09-01

    The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1985-09-01

    This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1987-09-01

    The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations

  16. Development of 3D Visualization Technology for Medium-and Large-sized Radioactive Metal Wastes from Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A Rim; Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun [Dongguk Univ., Gyongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The most important point of decommissioning nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants is to spend less money and do this process safely. In order to perform a better decommissioning nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants, a data base of radioactive waste from decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities should be constructed. This data base is described herein, from the radioactive nuclide to the shape of component of nuclear facilities, and representative results of the status and analysis are presented. With the increase in number of nuclear facilities at the end of their useful life, the demand of decommissioning technologies will continue to grow for years to come. This analysis of medium-and large-sized radioactive metal wastes and 3D visualization technology of the radioactive metal wastes using the 3D-SCAN are planned to be used for constructing data bases. The data bases are expected to be used on development of the basic technologies for decommissioning nuclear facilities 4 session.

  17. Integration of knowledge management system for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The decommissioning of a nuclear facility is a long term project, handling information which begins from the design, construction and operation. Moreover, the decommissioning project is likely to be extended because of the lack of the waste disposal site especially in Japan. In this situation, because the transfer of knowledge and education to the next generation is a crucial issue, integration and implementation of a system for knowledge management is necessary in order to solve it. For this purpose, the total system of decommissioning knowledge management system (KMS) is proposed. In this system, we have to arrange, organize and systematize the data and information of the plant design, maintenance history, trouble events, waste management records etc. The collected data, information and records should be organized by computer support system e.g. data base system. It becomes a base of the explicit knowledge. Moreover, measures of extracting tacit knowledge from retiring employees are necessary. The experience of the retirees should be documented as much as possible through effective questionnaire or interview process. The integrated knowledge mentioned above should be used for the planning, implementation of dismantlement or education for the future generation. (author)

  18. Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects of the Decommissioning of a Hot Cell Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strufe, N. [Danish Decommissioning, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-08-15

    This CRP project document ''Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects in Decommissioning of a Hot Cell Facility'' aims to describe the establishment of a management organization that ensures that the DD Hot Cell Project is properly and safely conducted and that staff members, who are seconded to the project, have a strong feeling of ownership and being an integral part of the project. The objectives of the decommissioning project of the hot cell facility is to decontaminate the facility and to remove items that cannot be decontaminated on site, in order for the entire hot cell building to become useable for other purposes without any radiological restrictions. The project requires proper communication and coordination with all stakeholders on-site, comprehensive work plans and strict control of the individual working areas and operations. A project of this type obviously requires a strong and well managed and coordinated project organization. DD has established a management system - KMS. The purposes of the KMS are twofold. The system aims to secure the fulfilment of the conditions and requirements of quality set by the nuclear authorities. The system also aims to provide the basis for a rational and economically feasible operation with a high level of safety. One of the main lessons learned in this project is clear that is to ensure that the necessary resources are available and the required expertise is allocated timely for the performance of the project(s) a strong coordination and great flexibility within the DD organization is required. This document describes the approach and considerations from the project management point of view. The document initially gives an introduction to the hot cell decommissioning project followed by issues of the general considerations and planning of the project within the DD, including aspects on organisation, quality assurance and coordination. (author)

  19. Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec

    2013-09-30

    This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or

  20. Safety assessment and surveillance of decommissioning operations at DOE's nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Prochnow, D.; Worthington, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    A description is provided of a systematic approach currently being developed and deployed at the Department of Energy to obtain assurance that post-operational activities at nuclear facilities will be conducted in a safe manner. Using this approach, personnel will have available a formalized set of safety principles and associated question sets to assist them in the conducting of safety assessments and surveillance. Information gathered through this means will also be analyzed to determine if there are any generic complex-wide strengths or deficiencies associated with decommissioning activities and to which attention should be drawn

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, H.K.

    1986-05-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. Most of the wastes from the MOX plant (exclusive of the lagoon wastes) will require interim storage (11% Class A 49 m 3 ; 89% interim storage, 383 m 3 ). The MOX plant lagoon wastes are Class A waste (2930 m 3 ). All of the wastes from the U-Fab and UF 6 plants are designated as Class A waste (U-Fab 1090 m 3 , UF 6 1259 m 3 )

  2. Development of a prototype gamma camera (Aladin) for use in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbard, G.; Carcreff, H.

    1995-01-01

    Mapping the gamma activity of irradiating zones is often an important prerequisite in dismantling nuclear facilities. This operation is necessary to define a suitable decommissioning strategy before any work begins; it is also required during the procedure to measure the residual activity wherever dose rates are too high to allow human intervention. This paper summarizes the work carried out develop a prototype imaging system designed to display radioactive sources superimposed in real time over a visible light image on a video monitor. This project was developed from an earlier off-line system. (authors). 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms

  4. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory East Area radioactively contaminated surplus facilities: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, W.H.; Fassnacht, G.F.; Moe, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    ANL has decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) seven radiologically contaminated surplus facilities at its Illinois site: a ''Hot'' Machine Shop (Building 17) and support facilities; Fan House No. 1 (Building 37), Fan House No. 2 (Building 38), the Pangborn Dust Collector (Building 41), and the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (Building 34) for exhaust air from machining of radioactive materials. Also included were a Nuclear Materials Storage Vault (Building 16F) and a Nuclear Research Laboratory (Building 22). The D and D work involved dismantling of all process equipment and associated plumbing, ductwork, drain lines, etc. After radiation surveys, floor and wall coverings, suspended ceilings, room partitions, pipe, conduit and electrical gear were taken down as necessary. In addition, underground sewers were excavated. The grounds around each facility were also thoroughly surveyed. Contaminated materials and soil were packaged and shipped to a low-level waste burial site, while nonactive debris was buried in the ANL landfill. Clean, reusable items were saved, and clean metal scrap was sold for salvage. After the decommissioning work, each building was torn down and the site relandscaped. The project was completed in 1985, ahead of schedule, with substantial savings

  5. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

  6. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release

  7. ASTM STANDARD GUIDE FOR EVALUATING DISPOSAL OPTIONS FOR REUSE OF CONCRETE FROM NUCLEAR FACILITY DECOMMISSIONING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Ann Marie; Meservey, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Within the nuclear industry, many contaminated facilities that require decommissioning contain huge volumes of concrete. This concrete is generally disposed of as low-level waste at a high cost. Much of the concrete is lightly contaminated and could be reused as roadbed, fill material, or aggregate for new concrete, thus saving millions of dollars. However, because of the possibility of volumetric contamination and the lack of a method to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete, reuse is rarely considered. To address this problem, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory teamed to write a ''concrete protocol'' to help evaluate the ramifications of reusing concrete within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document, titled the Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Site (1) is based on ANL-E's previously developed scrap metal recycle protocols; on the 10-step method outlined in DOE's draft handbook, Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material (2); and on DOE Order 4500.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (3). The DOE concrete protocol was the basis for the ASTM Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning, which was written to make the information available to a wider audience outside DOE. The resulting ASTM Standard Guide is a more concise version that can be used by the nuclear industry worldwide to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. The bulk of the ASTM Standard Guide focuses on evaluating the dose and cost for each disposal option. The user calculates these from the detailed formulas and tabulated data provided, then compares the dose and cost for each disposal option to select the best option that meets regulatory requirements. With this information

  8. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment facility (OMRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) facility performed from October 1977 through September 1979. This D and D project included removal of all the facilities and as much contaminated soil and rock as practical. Removal of the reactor pressure vessel was an unusually difficult problem, and an extraordinary, unexpected amount of activated rock and soil was removed. After removal of all significantly contaminated material, the site consisted of a 20-ft deep excavation surrounded by backfill material. Before this excavation was backfilled, it and the backfill material were radiologically surveyed and detailed records made of these surveys. After the excavation was backfilled and graded, the site surface was surveyed again and found to be essentially uncontaminated

  9. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D ampersand D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D ampersand D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D ampersand D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D ampersand D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain

  10. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, L.N.

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

  12. Stabilization of uranium hexafluoride by hydrolysis method for decommissioning of safeguard laboratory facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagawa, Jun; Hotoku, Shinobu; Oda, Tetsuzo; Aoyagi, Noboru; Magara, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    In safeguard laboratory (SGL) facility of Nuclear Science Research Institute of JAEA , uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) of enriched uranium of various enrichment was used for research and development of a spectrometric method for the determination of the enrichment of uranium in April 1983 through March 1993. After completion of this R and D, the UF{sub 6} has been stored in SGL facility. It was decided that the UF{sub 6} is carried to out of the facility, because the SGL facility will be decommissioning until March 2015. To transport and store in safety after transportation, it is necessary that the UF{sub 6} should be converted to stable chemical form. Hydrolysis of UF{sub 6} to uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) and evaporation to solid state were selected for the stabilization method. The equipment for hydrolysis and evaporation was installed in the SGL facility. Stabilization was operated in this equipment, and all of the UF{sub 6} in the SGL facility was converted to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solid state in October 2012 through August 2013. In this report, results of examination and operation for stabilization of UF{sub 6} were reported. (author)

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568

  15. Decommissioning Lines-of-Inquiry for Design Review of New Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    An independent review of the design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at Savannah River included a requirement to address the ability to decommission the facility. This paper addresses the lines of inquiry (that were developed for the review and their use in future for reviews of other projects, referred to herein as 'DDLOI'. Decommissioning activities for almost any type of facility are well within the technological state-of-the-art. The major impacts for complications resulting from insufficient consideration during design of a new facility that involves radioactive processes and/or material is the cost of: a) gaining access to high radiation areas and b) dealing with high levels of contamination. For this reason, the DDLOI were developed as a way of raising the awareness of designers and design reviewers to design features that can impede or facilitate ultimate decommissioning. The intent is that this report can be used not only for review, but also by engineers in the early stages of design development when requirements are being assembled. The focus for the DDLOI is on types of facilities that contain nuclear and/or radioactive processes and materials. The level of detail is more specific than would be found in decommissioning plans prepared for regulatory purposes. In commencing this review, the author's could find no precedent for a systematic review of design for decommissioning that included results of a review. Therefore, it was decided to create a report that would provide detailed lines of inquiry along with the rationale for each. The resulting DDLOI report included 21 topical areas for design review. The DDLOI combined the authors' experience in developing baselines for facilities to be deactivated or demolished with prior publications by the U.S. Army and the International Atomic Energy Agency. These two references were found via an Internet search and were the only ones judged to be useful at a field application level. Most others

  16. Safety Assessment for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities - From Methodology to the Use of Results in Decision Making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.; Ferch, R.; Joubert, A.; Kaulard, J.; Manson, P.; Percival, K.; Thierfeldt, St.

    2008-01-01

    The safety assessment of operational facilities in the nuclear industry is well understood and methodologies have been developed and refined over several decades. Similarly safety assessment methodologies for near surface disposal facilities have been harmonized internationally during the last few years. There is however relatively less widespread and documented experience of safety assessment for decommissioning among Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and consequently there is less commonalty of approaches internationally. The importance of safety during decommissioning was further emphasized at the first review meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, and the Berlin Conference 'Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities' (14-18 October 2002). As a consequence during its June 2004 meeting the IAEA Board of Governors approved an Action Plan on Decommissioning of nuclear Facilities that requested the Secretariat to 'establish a forum for the sharing and exchange of national information and experience on the application of safety assessment in the context of decommissioning and provide a means to convey this information to other interested parties, also drawing on the work of other international organizations in this area'. In response the IAEA launched the International Project Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (DeSa) in November 2004 with the following objectives: - To develop a harmonized approach to safety assessment and define the elements of safety assessment for decommissioning; - To investigate the practical applicability of the methodology and performance of safety assessments for the decommissioning of various types of facilities through a selected number of test cases; - To investigate approaches for review of safety assessments for decommissioning activities and the development of a regulatory

  17. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Project summary report, Elk River Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Adams, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Elk River Reactor. Decommissioning data from available documents were input into a computerized data-handling system in a manner that permits specific information to be readily retrieved. The information is in a form that assists the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in its assessment of decommissioning alternatives and ALARA methods for future decommissionings projects. Samples of computer reports are included in the report. Decommissioning of other reactors, including NRC reference decommissioning studies, will be described in similar reports

  18. Uranium Determination in Samples from Decommissioning of Nuclear facilities Related to the First Stage of Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.; Correa, E.; Navarro, N.; Sancho, C.; Angeles, A.

    2000-01-01

    An adequate workplace monitoring must be carried out during the decommissioning activities, to ensure the protection of workers involved in these tasks. In addition, a large amount of waste materials are generated during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Clearance levels are established by regulatory authorities and are normally quite low. The determination of those activity concentration levels become more difficult when it is necessary to quantify alpha emitters such as uranium, especially when complex matrices are involved. Several methods for uranium determination in samples obtained during the decommissioning of a facility related to the first stage of the nuclear fuel cycle are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out by laboratory techniques. In situ gamma spectrometry was also used to perform measurements on site. A comparison among the different techniques was also done by analysing the results obtained in some practical applications. (Author)

  19. Waste from decommissioning of research reactors and other small nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Small nuclear facilities were often built for research or pilot purposes. It includes the research reactors of various types and various aims (physics research, nuclear research, nuclear weapons development, materials testing reactor, isotope production, pilot plant, etc.) as well as laboratories, hot cells and accelerators used for a broad spectrum of research or production purposes. These installations are characterized not only by their size (reduced footprint) but also, and even mostly, by the very diversified type of materials, products and isotopes handled within these facilities. This large variety can sometimes enhance the difficulties encountered for the dismantling of such facilities. The presence of materials like beryllium, graphite, lead, PCBs, sodium, sometimes in relatively large quantities, are also challenges to be faced by the dismantlers of such facilities, because these types of waste are either toxic or no solutions are readily available for their conditioning or long term disposal. The paper will review what is currently done in different small nuclear facilities, and what are the remaining problems and challenges for future dismantling and waste management. The question of whether Research and Development for waste handling methods and processes is needed is still pending. Even for the dismantling operation itself, important improvements can be brought in the fields of characterization, decontamination, remote handling, etc. by further developments and innovative systems. The way of funding such facilities decommissioning will be reviewed as well as the very difficult cost estimation for such facilities, often one-of-a-kind. The aspects of radioprotection optimization (ALARA principle) and classical operators safety will also be highlighted, as well as the potential solutions or improvements. In fact, small nuclear facilities encounter often, when dismantling, the same problems as the large nuclear power plants, but have in

  20. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Faust, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography of 657 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fourth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic documents of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been references in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; and (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author, or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. Appendix A lists 264 bibliographic references to literature identified during this reporting period but not abstracted due to time constraints. Title and publication description indexes are given for this appendix. Appendix B defines frequently used acronyms, and Appendix C lists the recipients of this report according to their corporate affiliation

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Faust, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography of 657 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fourth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic documents of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been references in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; and (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author, or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. Appendix A lists 264 bibliographic references to literature identified during this reporting period but not abstracted due to time constraints. Title and publication description indexes are given for this appendix. Appendix B defines frequently used acronyms, and Appendix C lists the recipients of this report according to their corporate affiliation.

  2. Aerosols from metal cutting techniques typical of decommissioning nuclear facilities - experimental system for collection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.; Wong, B.A.; Ritter, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Decommissioning of radioactively contaminated sites has the potential for creating radioactive and other potentially toxic aerosols. We describe an experimental system to collect and characterize aerosols from metal cutting activities typical of those used in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. A special enclosure was designed for the experiment and consisted of a 2-in. x 4-in. stud frame with double walls of flame retardant polyethylene film. Large plexiglass windows allowed the cutting operations to be directed and filmed. Ventilation was 8500 L/min (300 CFM) exhausted through HEPA filters. Seven cutting techniques were evaluated: pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. Two grinding tools were also evaluated. Materials cut were 2-, 3- and 4-in. dia schedule 40, 80 and 180 type 304L stainless steel pipe. Basic studies were done on uncontaminated pipe. Four-inch-diameter sections of schedule 180 type 304L stainless steel pipe with radioactively contaminated internal surfaces were also cut. The experiments controlled important variables including tools, cutting technique, and type and thickness of material. 15 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  3. Possibility of applying large-scale point cloud/mixed reality technology in decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Kimiaki

    2017-01-01

    After the accident at Tokyo Electric Company's Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, decommissioning projects of nuclear power plants exceeding 40 years since the start of operation began to move in full swing. And four nuclear power plants have already been under decommissioning. Several decommissioning engineering systems (ES) have been developed according to these decommissioning projects. Various problems were clarified and many findings were obtained by these efforts. On the other, advanced information technologies and products such as three-dimensional CAD, CG, 3D laser measurement, computer aided engineering (CAE) and mixed reality (MR) are progressing rapidly. By combining these technologies and products, it has become possible not only to enhance the usefulness of existing 3D CAD data but also to enable high-level digital study that combines reality and virtual models. Furthermore, it can be applied to a wide range of fields such as demolition simulation for dismantling works of nuclear facilities, which is expected to increase in future, human resource development and skill transfer. In this paper, focusing on a video see-through method capable of displaying a virtual object at a correct position of a real image accurately reflecting the positional relationship between the real image and the virtual object, we introduce items that should contribute to the feasibility and usefulness of application to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. (author)

  4. Evolution and development of laws, regulations, criteria and human resources to ensure the safe decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinmeesuke, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Research Reactor, TRR-1 (renamed TRR-1/M1 after core replacement) in Thailand has been operated for more than 43 years. This ageing reactor will be facing shutdown in the near future. Laws and Regulations have been continually developed to assure the safe operation of nuclear facilities, particularly of the research reactor, and to ensure the safe decommissioning of the reactor after its operational life. However, the Thai nuclear legislation is still not applicable to a number of areas. Office of Atoms for Peace is working toward development of a new consolidated Act. In addition, the licensing steps for modification and decommissioning are added to the new Ministerial Regulation and to the new guidance documents on the licensing process for research reactors. Regulations, guidance and criteria for approval of decommissioning are being developed using the IAEA Safety Standards Series as the main basis for drafting. Human resource development is considered as one of the key important factor to ensure safe decommissioning of the installation. Staffing and training of the operating organization and the regulatory body personnel have been addressed to ensure the achievement of competency level. Simple methods and technologies are the best means for implementation while learning from experience of others will help and support us in our attempt to be the 'second First'. IAEA advice and assistance on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in countries with limited resources is desirable. (author)

  5. Recycling and Reuse of Materials Arising from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities. A Report by the NEA Co-operative Program on Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooms, Bart; Verwaest, Isi; Legee, Frederic; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy; Pieraccini, Michel; Poncet, Philippe; Franzen, Nicole; Vignaroli, Tiziano; Herschend, Bjoern; Benest, Terry; Loudon, David; Favret, Derek; Weber, Inge; )

    2017-01-01

    Large quantities of materials arising from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are non-radioactive per se. An additional, significant share of materials is of very low-level or low-level radioactivity and can, after having undergone treatment and a clearance process, be recycled and reused in a restricted or unrestricted way. Recycle and reuse options today provide valuable solutions to minimise radioactive waste from decommissioning and at the same time maximise the recovery of valuable materials. The NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning (CPD) prepared this overview on the various approaches being undertaken by international and national organisations for the management of slightly contaminated material resulting from activities in the nuclear sector. The report draws on CPD member organisations' experiences and practices related to recycling and reuse, which were gathered through an international survey. It provides information on improvements and changes in technologies, methodologies and regulations since the 1996 report on this subject, with the conclusions and recommendations taking into account 20 years of additional experience that will be useful for current and future practitioners. Case studies are provided to illustrate significant points of interest, for example in relation to scrap metals, concrete and soil

  6. Setting up decommissioning funds for nuclear facilities - a competence problem for EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danwitz, Th. von

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear package presented by the European Commission in the autumn of 2002 has added considerable practical significance to the problem of the vertical limits of competence between the Community and its member states within the framework of the Euratom Treaty. The question most important to Germany is the authority of the European Atomic Energy Community to oblige its member states to set up funds for financing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. As the Euratom Treaty contains no explicit competences of Euratom for regulations of this type, the article examines the content and range of Art. 30 ff. of the Euratom Treaty, the unwritten authority resulting from factual connections and the nature of the problems involved, looks at the importance of international agreements as far as legal competences are implied, and deals with a possible competence based on the right to amend the Treaty under Art. 203, Euratom Treaty. (orig.) [de

  7. Application of SAFRAN Tool for Knowledge Management at the Decommissioning Stage of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetnik, A.; Potapov, V.; Kapralov, E.; Murlis, D.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: As a result of the work performed by specialists of FSUE VO “Safety” under the scope of the CRAFT Project, the IAEA methodology and SAFRAN tool were used for safety assessment of radioactive waste removal from historical near-surface storage of the radon type. SAFRAN tool can be considered as an effective tool for record keeping, safety assessment and knowledge management at the stage of decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Main advantages of SAFRAN: • it uses methodologies agreed upon at the international level, namely, by IAEA standards; • several experts can work more effectively when performing the same safety assessment. SAFRAN makes it easier to exchange experience through sharing projects and data bases; • it is helpful for systematic and structured safety assessment as per safety standards; • it manages information and data in the same software environment. (author

  8. Waste management facility remediation and decommissioning at a national nuclear research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D.J.; Dolinar, G.M.; Killey, R.W.D.

    1994-01-01

    Historic waste management practices at eight locations on AECL's Chalk River site have resulted in the formation of contaminated groundwater plumes, some of which have surfaced and contaminated surface materials. A priority setting process has been used to establish a plan of attack that will lead to the eventual decommissioning of these facilities. In general terms, the preferred approach is to install impermeable covers to prevent further leaching of waste sources and to prevent escape of leachate to the biosphere, followed by cleanup of surface contamination and remediation of aquifers. Final disposal of the waste sources would be delayed for perhaps 20 years. Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of contaminated groundwater, with one field installation in place and another under development. This paper describes how the prioritization task was tackled to produce a long term plan of action and describes initial interventions that have been attempted and their results. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  9. Enhancing Efficiency of Safeguards at Facilities that are Shutdown or Closed-Down, including those being Decommissioned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stern, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Colley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marzo, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards involves verification activities at a wide range of facilities in a variety of operational phases (e.g., under construction, start-up, operating, shutdown, closed-down, and decommissioned). Safeguards optimization for each different facility type and operational phase is essential for the effectiveness of safeguards implementation. The IAEA’s current guidance regarding safeguards for the different facility types in the various lifecycle phases is provided in its Design Information Examination (DIE) and Verification (DIV) procedure. 1 Greater efficiency in safeguarding facilities that are shut down or closed down, including those being decommissioned, could allow the IAEA to use a greater portion of its effort to conduct other verification activities. Consequently, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of International Nuclear Safeguards sponsored this study to evaluate whether there is an opportunity to optimize safeguards approaches for facilities that are shutdown or closed-down. The purpose of this paper is to examine existing safeguards approaches for shutdown and closed-down facilities, including facilities being decommissioned, and to seek to identify whether they may be optimized.

  10. Decommissioning and deactivation of nuclear facilities; Desmantelamiento y clausura de instalaciones nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anasco, Roberto; Harriague, Santiago; Hey, Alfredo M [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Gerencia de Tecnologia y Medio Ambiente; Fabbri, Silvio [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes; Garonis, Omar H [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Gestion de Calidad

    2003-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for the decommissioning and deactivation of all relevant nuclear facilities in Argentina. A D and D Subprogram was created in 2000, within Technology Branch of the CNEA, in order to fulfill this responsibility. The D and D Subprogram has organized its activities in four fields: Planning; Technology development; Human resources development and training; International cooperation. The paper describes the work already done in those 4 areas, as well as the nuclear facilities existing in the country. Planning is being developed for the decommissioning of research reactors, beginning with RA-1, as well as for the Atucha I nuclear power station. An integral Management System has been developed, compatibilizing requirements from ISO 9001, ISO 14001, the national norm for Safety and Occupational Health (equivalent to BS 8800), and IAEA 50-SG Q series. Technology development is for the time being concentrated on mechanical decontamination and concrete demolition. A review has been made of technologies already developed both by CNEA and Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (the nuclear power utility) in areas of chemical and electrochemical decontamination, cutting techniques and robotics. Human resources development has been based on training abroad in the areas of decontamination, cutting techniques, quality assurance and planning, as well as on specific courses, seminars and workshops. An IAEA regional training course on D and D has been given on April 2002 at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center, with the assistance of 22 university graduates from 13 countries in the Latin American and Caribbean Region, and 11 from Argentina. CNEA has also given fellowships for PhD and Master thesis on the subject. International cooperation has been intense, and based on: - IAEA Technical Cooperation Project and experts missions; - Cooperation agreement with the US Department of Energy; - Cooperation agreement with Germany

  11. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D ampersand D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

  13. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission regulatory process for decommissioning a uranium mining facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scissons, K.; Schryer, D.M.; Goulden, W.; Natomagan, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates uranium mining in Canada. The CNSC regulatory process requires that a licence applicant plan for and commit to future decommissioning before irrevocable decisions are made, and throughout the life of a uranium mine. These requirements include conceptual decommissioning plans and the provision of financial assurances to ensure the availability of funds for decommissioning activities. When an application for decommissioning is submitted to the CNSC, an environmental assessment is required prior to initiating the licensing process. A case study is presented for COGEMA Resources Inc. (COGEMA), who is entering the decommissioning phase with the CNSC for the Cluff Lake uranium mine. As part of the licensing process, CNSC multidisciplinary staff assesses the decommissioning plan, associated costs, and the environmental assessment. When the CNSC is satisfied that all of its requirements are met, a decommissioning licence may be issued. (author)

  14. Safety assesment necessary in selecting the technologies for partial decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Application to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculae, O.; Stan, C.; Vladescu, G.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this work is identification and evaluation of safety indicators - quantities used in monitoring the safety assurance during decommissioning processes in nuclear facilities identification of safety indicators is made on basis of qualitative and quantitative analysis, effected for both normal decommissioning, as well as in case of foreseen event occurrence. The safety indicators form an integrated system which can be represented by a pyramidal structural with the following levels (in increasing complexity order): specific indicators, strategic indicators, overall indicators, safety closure. This work suggests that evaluation of safety assurance level during the conduct of a decommissioning process to be based on the overall analysis of the set of indicators emphasizing not only the evaluation of individual safety indicators but also the interdependencies between them. The evaluation method is based on the 'step-by-step' principle. The evaluation was carried-out either directly or by means of dedicated evaluation forms which cover both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the analysis. At the some time identified are the adequate protection measures for the personnel implied in decommissioning, as well as for population and environment. The paper present also technologies adequate in the decommissioning. (authors)

  15. International conference on lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the safe termination of nuclear activities. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in cooperation with the European Commission (EC), Nuclear Energy Agency to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA), and the World Nuclear Association (WNA), organized an International Conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities from 11 to 15 December 2006 in Athens, Greece. This Book of Contributed Papers contains technical papers and posters contributed by experts from operating organisations, regulatory bodies, technical support organisations, and other institutions on issues falling within the scope of the Conference. The following main topics were covered: Evolution of national and international policies and criteria for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safe termination of nuclear activities; Review of lessons learned from ongoing or completed activities associated with decommissioning; Improvement of safety and efficiency through the use of new and innovative technologies; Practical aspects in the management of material, waste and sites resulting from decommissioning, including the management of waste in the absence of repositories and waste acceptance requirements; Procedures for demonstrating compliance with clearance criteria; Experience from radiological assessments associated with decommissioning; Involvement of the local communities and the impact that decommissioning activities has on them. The presented papers and posters were reviewed and accepted following the guidelines established by the Conference Programme Committee for consideration at the Conference. The material compiled in this Book of Contributed Papers has not undergone rigorous editing by the editorial staff of the IAEA. However, certain modifications were made: a unified format was adopted for all papers; and minor corrections were made in the text where required. Each paper and poster has been indexed

  16. International conference on lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the safe termination of nuclear activities. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in cooperation with the European Commission (EC), Nuclear Energy Agency to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA), and the World Nuclear Association (WNA), organized an International Conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities from 11 to 15 December 2006 in Athens, Greece. This Book of Contributed Papers contains technical papers and posters contributed by experts from operating organisations, regulatory bodies, technical support organisations, and other institutions on issues falling within the scope of the Conference. The following main topics were covered: Evolution of national and international policies and criteria for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safe termination of nuclear activities; Review of lessons learned from ongoing or completed activities associated with decommissioning; Improvement of safety and efficiency through the use of new and innovative technologies; Practical aspects in the management of material, waste and sites resulting from decommissioning, including the management of waste in the absence of repositories and waste acceptance requirements; Procedures for demonstrating compliance with clearance criteria; Experience from radiological assessments associated with decommissioning; Involvement of the local communities and the impact that decommissioning activities has on them. The presented papers and posters were reviewed and accepted following the guidelines established by the Conference Programme Committee for consideration at the Conference. The material compiled in this Book of Contributed Papers has not undergone rigorous editing by the editorial staff of the IAEA. However, certain modifications were made: a unified format was adopted for all papers; and minor corrections were made in the text where required. Each paper and poster has been indexed

  17. Minor Actinide Laboratory at JRC-ITU: Fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Minor Actinide Laboratory (MA-lab) of the Institute for Transuranium Elements is a unique facility for the fabrication of fuels and targets containing minor actinides (MA). It is of key importance for research on Partitioning and Transmutation in Europe, as it is one of the only dedicated facilities for the fabrication of MA containing materials, either for property measurements or for the production of test pins for irradiation experiments. In this paper a detailed description of the MA-Lab facility and the fabrication processes developed to fabricate fuels and samples containing high content of minor actinides is given. In addition, experience gained and improvements are also outlined. (authors)

  18. TRIGA International, a new TRIGA fuel fabrication facility at CERCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbonnier, G.

    1997-01-01

    At the time when General Atomics expressed its intention to cease fuel fabrication on its site of San Diego, CERCA has been chosen to carry on the fabrication of TRIGA fuel. After negotiations in 1994 and 1995, a partnership 50%/50% was decided and on July 1995, a new company was founded, with the name TRIGA INTERNATIONAL SAS, head office in Paris and fuel fabrication facility at CERCA in Romans. The intent of this presentation is, after a short reminder about TRIGA fuel design and fabrication to describe the new facility with special emphasis on the safety features associated with the modification of existing fabrication buildings. (author)

  19. Abbreviated sampling and analysis plan for planning decontamination and decommissioning at Test Reactor Area (TRA) facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The objective is to sample and analyze for the presence of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents within certain areas of the Test Reactor Area (TRA), prior to D and D activities. The TRA is composed of three major reactor facilities and three smaller reactors built in support of programs studying the performance of reactor materials and components under high neutron flux conditions. The Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facilities are currently pending D/D. Work consists of pre-D and D sampling of designated TRA (primarily ETR) process areas. This report addresses only a limited subset of the samples which will eventually be required to characterize MTR and ETR and plan their D and D. Sampling which is addressed in this document is intended to support planned D and D work which is funded at the present time. Biased samples, based on process knowledge and plant configuration, are to be performed. The multiple process areas which may be potentially sampled will be initially characterized by obtaining data for upstream source areas which, based on facility configuration, would affect downstream and as yet unsampled, process areas. Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the level of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents present in designated areas within buildings TRA-612, 642, 643, 644, 645, 647, 648, 663; and in the soils surrounding Facility TRA-611. These data will be used to plan the D and D and help determine disposition of material by D and D personnel. Both MTR and ETR facilities will eventually be decommissioned by total dismantlement so that the area can be restored to its original condition

  20. Workshop on decommissioning; Seminarium om avveckling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, K. (ed.)

    2005-12-15

    A Nordic workshop on decommissioning of nuclear facilities was held at Risoe in Denmark September 13-15, 2005. The workshop was arranged by NKS in cooperation with the company Danish Decommissioning, DD, responsible for decommissioning of nuclear facilities at Risoe. Oral presentations were made within the following areas: International and national recommendations and requirements concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities Authority experiences of decommissioning cases Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Denmark Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Sweden Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Norway Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Finland Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in German and the UK Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the former Soviet Union Results from research and development A list with proposals for future work within NKS has been prepared based on results from group-work and discussions. The list contains strategic, economical and political issues, technical issues and issues regarding competence and communication. (au)

  1. Environmental assessment as a planning tool for the decommissioning of a nuclear research facility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klukas, M.H.; Grondin, D.J.; Helbrecht, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories, a nuclear research facility operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), have provided research facilities for the Canadian Nuclear Industry since the early 1960's. In 1997, AECL made a business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at the laboratories. Shortly thereafter the decision was made in agreement with the Federal Government of Canada to decommission the laboratories. In compliance with its own policy and to meet the requirements of the Canadian Legislation, AECL assessed the potential environmental effects of the project. The Environmental Assessment included studies to evaluate he feasibility of leaving two major project components in place; low-level radioactive waste in trenches located at the Whiteshell Laboratories site and river sediments contaminated from operational effluent releases. For both project components, it was determined that managing the wastes in the existing location was environmentally sound. An extensive follow-up program, comprising of additional monitoring and analysis to verify these findings will be implemented. As a result of these assessments and the assessments for other project components it was concluded that the project was not likely to cause significant adverse effects. The assessment decision was accepted by the Minister of the Environment in 2002 April. (author)

  2. Applicability of water-jet cutting technology to nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tadashi; Nisizaki, Tadashi; Matumura, Hiroyuki; Ikemoto, Yosikazu; Simizu, Hideki

    1991-01-01

    In nuclear facilities there exist, besides relatively simple components, such as vessels and piping, numerous complex components including the multilayered plate with water layer in between, a bunch of thin tubes and composite lamination of dissimilar materials like metal/non-metal. In conventional development of reactor dismantling technology, the technology development has been made mainly for remote cutting of thick-walled structures like the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor internals. These techniques, however, are not always suitable in cutting the above-mentioned structures. As means of cutting such structures efficiently, these is available the abrasion water-jet cutting technology. This technology is now drawing attention for cutting or shaping new materials like composite material and ceramics in high precision and high efficiency. In the present report by way of its feasibility in nuclear facilities decommissioning the following are described. Principle and features of the water-jet cutting technology, system con-figuration, cutting or shaping performance, and some examples of the cutting and shaping. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the Symposium on Recycling of Metals arising from Operation and Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    The Symposium for the Recycling of Metals Arising from Operation and decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities was held in April 2014 at Studsvik's facility in Nykoeping, Sweden. The Symposium, hosted by Studsvik in conjunction with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), covered a wide range of topics concerning current practice, experiences and innovations within the management of contaminated metallic radioactive material. The primary objective was to understand the differing approaches to clearance and recycling of materials from the nuclear industry across Europe in order to appreciate the issues faced from recovering resources once the material meets a country's clearance requirements. The outcome of the symposium has provided some interesting reflections for national and international bodies to consider when developing waste management guidance and policies. Over the three days of the symposium, presentations split into six topical sessions and posters regarding the recycling of contaminated metals were viewed by more than 150 people from 19 different countries. A series of group discussions were also held following each session to promote learning about current practices, highlight strategic issues related to metals recycling and develop professional networks across the industry. To stimulate discussion, a series of questions were posed at each group and the outcomes captured for inclusion within this report

  4. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m 2 . In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  5. Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects of the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, A. S.; Begum, A.; Pal, D. [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission Agargaon, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-08-15

    This report summarizes the main results obtained by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in the decommissioning of spent {sup 60}Co gamma irradiator at GammaTech Limited, Chittagong, and preparation of decommissioning plan of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor in Bangladesh. (author)

  6. Appendix 4. Documentation of sufficient capacity facility for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management and its compliance with the decommissioning strategy and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter the documentation of sufficient capacity facility for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management and its compliance with the decommissioning strategy and schedule of the NPP A-1 are presented.

  7. Use of Cementitious Materials for SRS Reactor Facility In-Situ Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Serrato, M.G.; Blankenship, J.K.; Griffin, W.G.; Long, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD project requires approximately 250000 cubic yards of cementitious materials to fill the below-grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Funding is being provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (A) Below-grade massive voids / rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for: (A.1) Bulk filling; (A.2) Restricted placement and (A.3) Underwater placement. (B) Special below-grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: (B.1) Cellular portland cement lightweight fill. (C) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels (C.1) Blended calcium aluminate - calcium sulfate based flowable fill; (C.2) Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (D) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: (D.1) Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured

  8. Preliminary dismantling for the decommissioning of nuclear licensed facilities at the CEA Centre in Fontenay aux Roses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estivie, D.; Bohar, M.P.; Jeanjacques, M.; Binet, C.

    2008-01-01

    Under the perimeter modification programme for the Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLFs) of the French Atomic Energy Commission centre at Fontenay aux Roses (CEN-FAR), preliminary dismantling work proved necessary to decommission the buildings outside the nuclear perimeter and create interim storage areas for waste packages. This summary describes the dismantling of Buildings 07, 53 and 91/54, which are the most representative of the preliminary dismantling work. (author)

  9. Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    -time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

  10. Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K.; Adams, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

  11. Allowable residual contamination levels for decommissioning the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

    1983-07-01

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. Information on restricted and controlled use is provided to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. Procedures are presented for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations and to determine instrument responses for various mixtures of radionuclides. Finally, a comparison is made between existing decommissioning guidance and the ARCL values calculated for unrestricted release of the 115-F and 117-F facilities. The comparison shows a good agreement

  12. Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide defines the process for developing a strategy for dispositioning concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. It outlines a 10-step method to evaluate disposal options for radioactively contaminated concrete. One of the steps is to complete a detailed analysis of the cost and dose to nonradiation workers (the public); the methodology and supporting data to perform this analysis are detailed in the appendices. The resulting data can be used to balance dose and cost and select the best disposal option. These data, which establish a technical basis to apply to release the concrete, can be used in several ways: (1) to show that the release meets existing release criteria, (2) to establish a basis to request release of the concrete on a case-by-case basis, (3) to develop a basis for establishing release criteria where none exists. 1.2 This standard guide is based on the “Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Sites,” (1) from ...

  13. A dose assessment method for arbitrary geometries with virtual reality in the nuclear facilities decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Nan; Liu, Yong-kuo; Xia, Hong; Ayodeji, Abiodun; Bai, Lu

    2018-03-01

    During the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, a large number of cutting and demolition activities are performed, which results in a frequent change in the structure and produce many irregular objects. In order to assess dose rates during the cutting and demolition process, a flexible dose assessment method for arbitrary geometries and radiation sources was proposed based on virtual reality technology and Point-Kernel method. The initial geometry is designed with the three-dimensional computer-aided design tools. An approximate model is built automatically in the process of geometric modeling via three procedures namely: space division, rough modeling of the body and fine modeling of the surface, all in combination with collision detection of virtual reality technology. Then point kernels are generated by sampling within the approximate model, and when the material and radiometric attributes are inputted, dose rates can be calculated with the Point-Kernel method. To account for radiation scattering effects, buildup factors are calculated with the Geometric-Progression formula in the fitting function. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method was verified by means of simulations using different geometries and the dose rate results were compared with that derived from CIDEC code, MCNP code and experimental measurements.

  14. Virtual reality based adaptive dose assessment method for arbitrary geometries in nuclear facility decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Kuo; Chao, Nan; Xia, Hong; Peng, Min-Jun; Ayodeji, Abiodun

    2018-05-17

    This paper presents an improved and efficient virtual reality-based adaptive dose assessment method (VRBAM) applicable to the cutting and dismantling tasks in nuclear facility decommissioning. The method combines the modeling strength of virtual reality with the flexibility of adaptive technology. The initial geometry is designed with the three-dimensional computer-aided design tools, and a hybrid model composed of cuboids and a point-cloud is generated automatically according to the virtual model of the object. In order to improve the efficiency of dose calculation while retaining accuracy, the hybrid model is converted to a weighted point-cloud model, and the point kernels are generated by adaptively simplifying the weighted point-cloud model according to the detector position, an approach that is suitable for arbitrary geometries. The dose rates are calculated with the Point-Kernel method. To account for radiation scattering effects, buildup factors are calculated with the Geometric-Progression formula in the fitting function. The geometric modeling capability of VRBAM was verified by simulating basic geometries, which included a convex surface, a concave surface, a flat surface and their combination. The simulation results show that the VRBAM is more flexible and superior to other approaches in modeling complex geometries. In this paper, the computation time and dose rate results obtained from the proposed method were also compared with those obtained using the MCNP code and an earlier virtual reality-based method (VRBM) developed by the same authors. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Use Of Cementitious Materials For SRS Reactor Facility In-Situ Decommissioning - 11620

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Waymer, J.; Matheny, D.; Singh, D.

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD requires about 250,000 cubic yards of grout to fill the below grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (1) Below grade massive voids/rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for - Bulk filling, Restricted placement and Underwater placement. (2) Special below grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: Cellular portland cement lightweight fill (3) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels: Calcium sulfoaluminate flowable fill, and Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (4) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured properties. The 105-P and 105-R ISD projects are currently in progress and are expected to be complete in 2012. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) grout mixes

  16. USE OF CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS FOR SRS REACTOR FACILITY IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING - 11620

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Waymer, J.; Matheny, D.; Singh, D.

    2010-12-07

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD requires about 250,000 cubic yards of grout to fill the below grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (1) Below grade massive voids/rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for - Bulk filling, Restricted placement and Underwater placement. (2) Special below grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: Cellular portland cement lightweight fill (3) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels: Calcium sulfoaluminate flowable fill, and Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (4) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured properties. The 105-P and 105-R ISD projects are currently in progress and are expected to be complete in 2012. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) grout mixes

  17. Fiber Fabrication Facility for Non-Oxide and Specialty Glasses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Unique facility for the research, development, and fabrication of non-oxide and specialty glasses and fibers in support of Navy/DoD programs.DESCRIPTION:...

  18. Decommissioning standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crofford, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    EPA has agreed to establish a series of environmental standards for the safe disposal of radioactive waste through participation in the Interagency Review Group on Nuclear Waste Management (IRG). One of the standards required under the IRG is the standard for decommissioning of radioactive contaminated sites, facilities, and materials. This standard is to be proposed by December 1980 and promulgated by December 1981. Several considerations are important in establishing these standards. This study includes discussions of some of these considerations and attempts to evaluate their relative importance. Items covered include: the form of the standards, timing for decommissioning, occupational radiation protection, costs and financial provisions. 4 refs

  19. Impact of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and radioactive waste trafficking in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abukabar, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    Africa is the world's second largest and the most populated continent after Asia, it has a total population of approximately 800 million people. It comprises of 54 sovereign nations out of which 36 are coastal countries and blessed with over 100 Seaports. Apart from Nigeria, South Africa, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia and Libya, all the other remaining African countries are extremely poor and unviable. As a result of this, Africa has been experiencing a lot of civil unrest since the 1960s when most of the African countries gained their independence from their former colonial masters, the civil unrest in countries like Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda, Mozambique, Liberia, Sierra Leon and recently in Cote D'Ivoire, are good examples. In addition to abject poverty of less than 1$ per person per day makes trafficking in drugs, arms, humans and weaponry trade on the continent becomes much more rampant. Today the continent is experiencing the coming of a new evil deal called 'Trade in radioactive waste'; which involves the transporting of materials from existing or decommissioned nuclear plants ranging from fairly used Trucks, laboratory equipment s, office facilities, clothing materials like booths and raincoats, roofing sheets and even toxic waste from the developed countries to it's waste bin in Africa, where it is unsafely disposed after collecting millions of dollars from It's original owners (UN report, 2001). Recent statistics have revealed that most of the people involved in the evil businesses of trafficking in drugs, human, arms and trading in weaponry, are diverting in to the so called new evil business of 'Trade in Radioactive waste' because this new evil business financially exceeds the rest of the above listed evil businesses. This is clearly proved by the recent toxic waste disposed in Abidjan Cot Devoir in August 2006. The materials from the decommissioned nuclear plant sites can be hazardous if for example a roofing sheet

  20. Ecological and political issues surrounding decommissioning of offshore oil facilities in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Donna M.; Love, Milton S.

    2004-01-01

    To aid legislators, resource managers, and the general public, this paper summarizes and clarifies some of the issues and options that the federal government and the state of California face in decommissioning offshore oil and gas production platforms, particularly as these relate to platform ecology. Both local marine ecology and political climate play a role in decommissioning offshore oil production platforms. Compared to the relatively supportive political climate in the Gulf of Mexico for “rigs-to-reefs” programs, conflicting social values among stakeholders in Southern California increases the need for understanding ecological impacts of various decommissioning alternatives (which range from total removal to allowing some or all of platform structure to remain in the ocean). Additional scientific needs in the decommissioning process include further assessment of platform habitat quality, estimation of regional impacts of decommissioning alternatives to marine populations, and determination of biological effects of any residual contaminants. The principal management need is a ranking of environmental priorities (e.g. species-of-interest and marine habitats). Because considerable numbers of economically important species reside near oil platforms, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries should consider the consequences of decommissioning alternatives in their overall management plans. Management strategies could include designating reefed platforms as marine protected areas. The overarching conclusion from both ecological and political perspectives is that decommissioning decisions should be made on a case-by-case basis.

  1. Radiological, technical and financial planning for decommissioning of small nuclear facilities in Sweden - 16177

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskog, Staffan; Sjoeblom, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    ,00 MSEK (about keuros 96 and k$ 135). It is found that the 'general advice' that must be used by smaller companies lacks proper instructions on how to account for environmental liability whilst at the same time it prohibits the use of e.g. the international reporting standards IFRS/IAS. It is also found that the 'general advice' prohibits distribution of costs for research and development over time. This might be incompatible with a fund system where considerable research may be necessary at the early stages of the work and often many years before the actual decommissioning is to take place. The rules in the penal code require that an annual report presents an 'essentially correct financial situation'. One of the interpretations to this statement is that a deviance of at most 30 % might be tolerated. Although previous work has indicated that the error in cost estimates need not be higher than about 15 %, even for research facilities, concealed cost raisers may from time to time lead to much larger errors, even when best practices are being used. It is therefore essential that decommissioning planning and cost predictions are made in accordance with state of the art, and that the estimating methods as well as the results are properly documented. (authors)

  2. Parameters of Dismantling Techniques Related to Costs for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwanseong; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Byungseon

    2012-01-01

    Reliable cost estimating is one of the most important elements of decommissioning operation. Reliable cost estimating is one of the most important elements of decommissioning planning. Alternative technologies may be evaluated and compared on their efficiency and effectiveness, and measured against a baseline cost as to the feasibility and benefit derived from the technology. This principle ensures that the cost consideration is economically sound and practical for funding. This paper provides a list with basic review of cutting and dismantling techniques, including some typical characteristics if available, as well as aspects of implementation, parameters of cutting and dismantling techniques in decommissioning costing. This paper gives an overview of the principles of the unit factor approach and its implementation in costing in relation to dismantling activities. In general, proper evaluation of decommissioning costs is important for following issues and relevant measures for achieving the listed aspects are: · Selection of a decommissioning strategy and activities: several decommissioning options should be evaluated: · Support to a cost-benefit analysis to ensure that the principle of optimization and reasonably practicable measures are applied: the extent of evaluated decommissioning options should cover all possible scenarios for dismantling activities; · Estimate of required financial resources for the selected strategy: the selected option should involve the dismantling activities in a structure and extent relevant to real procedure of dismantling activities; · Preparation of the project schedule, workforce requirements and phased funding needs: dismantling activities should be structured according to the tasks of the decommissioning schedule; · Definition of measures for proper management and maintenance of resources for safe and timely decommissioning: the time distribution and safety related parameters of dismantling activities should be known

  3. Use of urethane foam in preparing for decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Portable urethane foam generating equipment has been in use for 15 to 20 years for a large number of applications, such as roof systems, tank insulation, and building insulation. Still another industrial application is its use in the decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive facilities at Mound Facility. The major problems encountered with urethane foams were with the packaging and stabilization procedures. The operation for spraying the foam on interior surfaces and equipment involved getting the gun inside without opening up the interior to the outside environment. A Gusmer FF proportioner and Model D spray gun was used for this operation. The gun was modified so that the trigger could be remotely located to facilitate its entry through a glovebox gloveport opening. The Model D gun has an air cap to blow foam off the tip of the gun. This cap was used to hold a plastic bag in place around the gun. The plastic bag is then put on a glove port and fastened securely. Urethane spray is applied on all exposed surfaces. This assures that all residual material is fixed for shipment. This simplifies cleaning operations as there is no need to remove the last trace of plutonium and results in a considerable shortening of the time required to prepare the gloveboxes. With the interior foamed, the gloveboxes are moved to the loading and packaging areas. Urethane foams are used to fill in the voids in our final shipping container. Radioactive waste materials are segregated according to the level of radioactive material present. One category is low level or low specific activity (LSA) and the other high level or Transuranic (TRU). Foam is used in TRU packages as packaging material to stabilize the loads and to help cushion against shock in transit on truck or railcar

  4. Training for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzold, A.

    2009-01-01

    Plants entering decommissioning face many challenges One of the most important is the challenge of training for decommissioning This is important because: The facility operators and management have spent many years successfully operating the facility; The facility management arrangements are geared to operation; Decommissioning will include non-nuclear specialists and other stakeholders; Other skills are needed to decommission successfully. UKAEA has decommissioned many facilities at its sites in Dounreay, Windscale, Harwell and Winfrith in the UK. We have faced all of the challenges previously described and have developed many training methods for ensuring the challenges are met safely and effectively. We have developed courses for specialised skills such as safety cases which can be deployed to support any decommissioning. (author)

  5. AERIAL DELIVERY DESIGN AND FABRICATION FACILITY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Skilled personnel are equipped to design and develop various prototype airdrop items. This facility has all classes of sewing machines, ranging from lightweight to...

  6. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, K.

    2001-01-01

    and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing forthe longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely....... Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to betransferred to a Danish repository. For a revision of the cost estimate for the decommissioning of the research Reactor DR 3 please consult...

  7. Cost evaluation of a commercial-scale DUPIC fuel fabrication facility (Part I) -Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hang Bok; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    A conceptual design of a commercial scale DUPIC fuel fabrication facility was initiated to provide some insights into the costs associated with construction, operation, and decommissioning. The primary conclusion of this report is that it is feasible to design, license, construct, test, and operate a facility that will process 400 MTHE/yr of spent PWR fuel and reconfigure the fuel into CANDU fuel bundles at a reasonable unit cost of the fuel material. Although DUPIC fuel fabrication by vibropacking method is clearly cheaper than that of the pellet method, the feasibility of vibropac technology for DUPIC fuel fabrication and use of vibroac fuel in CANDU reactors may has to be studied in depth in order to use as an alternative to the conventional pellet fuel method. Especially, there are some questions on meeting the CANDU requirements in thermal and mechanical terms as well as density of fuel. Wherever possible, this report used representative costs of currently available technologies as the bases for cost estimation. It should also be noted that the conceptual design and cost information contained in this report was extracted from the public domain and general open literature. Later studies have to focus on other important areas of concern such as safety, security, safeguards, process optimization etc. 7 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  8. Nuclear and non-nuclear safety aspects in nuclear facilities dismantling. The example of a PWR pilot decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.; Deboodt, P.; Dadoumont, J.; Valenduc, P.; Denissen, L.

    2002-01-01

    The dismantling of nuclear facilities, and in particular of nuclear power plants, involves new challenges for the nuclear industry. Although the dismantling of various activated and contaminated components is nowadays considered as almost industrial practice, the safety aspects of decommissioning bring some specific features which are not always taken into account in the operation of the plants. Moreover, most of the plants and facilities currently decommissioned are rather old and were never foreseen to be decommissioned. The operations involved in dismantling and decontamination, often imply new or unforeseen situations. On the nuclear, or radiological side, the radioprotection optimisation of the operations involved often requires to model the environment and to analyse different scenarios to tackle the operation. Recent 3-D software (like the Visiplan software) allowing representation of the actual environment and the influence of the various sources present, is really needed to be able to minimise the radiological impact on the operators. The risk of contamination spread, by opening loops and components or by the dismantling process itself, is also an important aspect of the radiological protection study. Nevertheless, the radiological aspects of the safety approach are not the only ones to be dealt with when decommissioning nuclear facilities. Indeed, classical industrial safety aspects are also important: the dismantling can bring handling and transporting risk (heavy loads, difficult ways, uneasy access, etc.) but also the handling of toxic or hazardous materials. For instance, the removal of asbestos in contaminated areas can lead to additional hazard; the presence of alkali metals (like Na or NaK), of toxic metals (like e.g. Beryllium) or of corrosive fluids (acid,...) have to be tackled often in unstructured environment, and sometimes with limited knowledge of the actual situation. This leads to approach the operations following the ASARA principle (As

  9. Decommissioning handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-11-01

    This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained.

  10. Decommissioning handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-11-01

    This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained

  11. Planning for decommissioning of nuclear facilities - Nuclear as a semi-sustainable energy source, the views of younger stakeholders - 59222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskog, Staffan; Labor, Bea

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: It is planned that many nuclear facilities will be decommissioned in the near future. This challenge includes certified repositories for LLW and ILW, procedures for classification and free release, systems for transportation, planning activities, and liaison with the public. The last item can have a substantial impact on the efficiency of decommissioning projects. Insufficient dialogue with various stakeholder groups can be a factor that drives costs, whilst appropriate programs, means and environments for communication and knowledge transfer may facilitate the establishment of contemporary and comprehensive bases for decisions and thereby also enhance the possibility for consensus and thereby achieve feasible and sustainable solutions. The programs thus decided for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the management of the nuclear waste must then be communicated openly and constitute an integral part of the stakeholder related activities. The nuclear renaissance implies as well as calls for newer platforms for communications with the stakeholders. This communication must include how compliance with the Polluter Pays Principle (PPP) (and also preferably the Extended Polluter Responsibility, EPR) is to be achieved

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  13. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O' Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  14. Decommissioning of a Facility that Produced Incandescent Mantles in Berlin, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The facility which manufactured incandescent mantles was operating from about the 1960s up to 2005. Production was stopped because there was no longer a market for incandescent mantles as they had been superseded by electrical street lighting. The facility was licensed by the radiation protection regulator in the end of the 1970s. Prior to this time, no license was needed and the facility was registered as a chemical manufacturer. After the legislation changed and the radiation protection legislation was issued, the company had to obtain a license and establish radiation protection rules. Thorium was not used for its radioactive properties in the production of incandescent mantles. The production of gas mantles included their impregnation with naturally occurring thorium, which contains 232 Th as the radioactive isotope of interest. The thorium impregnation was essential to prevent the gas mantles from burning out too soon and to increase their light efficiency. This solution as Th (NO 3 ) 4 was delivered by a company which dealt with several minerals and chemicals. This solution was stored in plastic tanks and contained a high specific radioactivity in Bq/g and dose rates up to several hundreds of μSv/hr. Before seeking bids for the decommissioning of the facility (the company must obtain three bids from different decommissioning companies) it was decided to characterize the site to get a detailed overview about the used equipment, the secondary equipment like exhaust fumes and the radiological inventory. The characterization of the site was estimated to require five workers over two days, including one external specialist knowledgeable in free release of material. Boundary conditions and requirements for characterization are described in the following: (1) The owner of the facility planned to sell most of the equipment for reuse at an Indian facility. This necessitated thorough decontamination. Production of secondary radioactive waste was a problem. Equipment

  15. Ecological aspects of decommissioning and decontamination of facilities on the Hanford Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, W.H.; Klepper, E.L.

    1976-06-01

    The Hanford environment and biota are described in relation to decommissioning of obsolescent facilities contaminated with low-levels of radioactive materials. The aridity at Hanford limits both the productivity and diversity of biota. Both productivity and diversity are increased when water is added, as for example on the margins of ponds. Certain plants, especially Salsola kali (Russian thistle or tumbleweed), are avid accumulators of minerals and will accumulate radioactive materials if their roots come into contact with contaminated soils. Data on concentration ratios (pCi per gDW of plant/pCi per gDW soil) are given for several native plants for long-lived radionuclides. Plants are generally more resistant than animals to ionizing radiation so that impacts of high-level radiation sources would be expected to occur primarily in the animals. Mammals and birds are discussed along with information on where they are to be found on the Reservation and what role they may play in the long-term management of radioactive wastes. Food habits of animals are discussed and plants which are palatable to common herbivores are listed. Food chains leading to man are shown to be very limited, including a soil-plant-mule deer-man path for terrestrial sites and a pond-waterfowl-man pathway for pond sites. Retention basins are discussed as an example of how an ecologically sound decommissioningprogram might be planned. Finally, burial of large volumes of low-level wastes can probably be done if barriers to biological invasion are provided

  16. Ecological aspects of decommissioning and decontamination of facilities on the Hanford Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickard, W.H.; Klepper, E.L.

    1976-06-01

    The Hanford environment and biota are described in relation to decommissioning of obsolescent facilities contaminated with low-levels of radioactive materials. The aridity at Hanford limits both the productivity and diversity of biota. Both productivity and diversity are increased when water is added, as for example on the margins of ponds. Certain plants, especially Salsola kali (Russian thistle or tumbleweed), are avid accumulators of minerals and will accumulate radioactive materials if their roots come into contact with contaminated soils. Data on concentration ratios (pCi per gDW of plant/pCi per gDW soil) are given for several native plants for long-lived radionuclides. Plants are generally more resistant than animals to ionizing radiation so that impacts of high-level radiation sources would be expected to occur primarily in the animals. Mammals and birds are discussed along with information on where they are to be found on the Reservation and what role they may play in the long-term management of radioactive wastes. Food habits of animals are discussed and plants which are palatable to common herbivores are listed. Food chains leading to man are shown to be very limited, including a soil-plant-mule deer-man path for terrestrial sites and a pond-waterfowl-man pathway for pond sites. Retention basins are discussed as an example of how an ecologically sound decommissioningprogram might be planned. Finally, burial of large volumes of low-level wastes can probably be done if barriers to biological invasion are provided.

  17. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  18. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Map Tube Facility 317 Area Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    The Map Tube Facility (MTF) was a large concrete block structure constructed in 1952 at the Argonne National Laboratory site in the United States, for the purpose of storing radioactive waste. The block contained 129 storage tubes that were positioned vertically in the block during construction. From 1952 though the early 1980s, the MTF was used to store containers of highly radioactive materials. The items stored included: - Nuclear fuel elements, - Nuclear reactor components, - Materials samples, - Irradiated metal objects (bolts, wire, rods, etc), - Concrete-encased objects. After MTF operations were discontinued in the early 1980s, most of the materials were removed from most of the tubes. Decontamination and decommissioning of the MTF tool place in 1994. The objective was to eliminate the radiological and chemical materials within the MTF tubes to prevent ground water and soil contamination. Once these materials were removed, the block would no longer be a source of contamination (chemical or radioactive) and could then remain in place without risk to the environment. The decontamination scope included the following actions. 1. Mechanically clean each tube (wire brush), 2. Dewater each tube, 3. Remove the debris and sludge from the bottom of each tube, 4. Fill each tube with concrete, 5. Remove the tubes using a core drilling technique. Project constraints precluded the use of excavation around the facility and sectioning of the MTF block or simple demolition, which led to the use of the core drilling technique. The cost of decommissioning the MTF was approximately $2.6 million (1994 money values). Escalating this at 2.5 percent per year to January 2005 and converting to Swedish currency at the current exchange rate (July 2005 approximately 7.6 SEK/$) gives an equivalent cost today of MSEK 25. The AT facility in Studsvik is considerably larger than the MTF facility in Argonne, between six and seven times in terms of volume but with storage tube depth somewhat

  19. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Map Tube Facility 317 Area Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The Map Tube Facility (MTF) was a large concrete block structure constructed in 1952 at the Argonne National Laboratory site in the United States, for the purpose of storing radioactive waste. The block contained 129 storage tubes that were positioned vertically in the block during construction. From 1952 though the early 1980s, the MTF was used to store containers of highly radioactive materials. The items stored included: - Nuclear fuel elements, - Nuclear reactor components, - Materials samples, - Irradiated metal objects (bolts, wire, rods, etc), - Concrete-encased objects. After MTF operations were discontinued in the early 1980s, most of the materials were removed from most of the tubes. Decontamination and decommissioning of the MTF tool place in 1994. The objective was to eliminate the radiological and chemical materials within the MTF tubes to prevent ground water and soil contamination. Once these materials were removed, the block would no longer be a source of contamination (chemical or radioactive) and could then remain in place without risk to the environment. The decontamination scope included the following actions. 1. Mechanically clean each tube (wire brush), 2. Dewater each tube, 3. Remove the debris and sludge from the bottom of each tube, 4. Fill each tube with concrete, 5. Remove the tubes using a core drilling technique. Project constraints precluded the use of excavation around the facility and sectioning of the MTF block or simple demolition, which led to the use of the core drilling technique. The cost of decommissioning the MTF was approximately $2.6 million (1994 money values). Escalating this at 2.5 percent per year to January 2005 and converting to Swedish currency at the current exchange rate (July 2005 approximately 7.6 SEK/$) gives an equivalent cost today of MSEK 25. The AT facility in Studsvik is considerably larger than the MTF facility in Argonne, between six and seven times in terms of volume but with storage tube depth somewhat

  20. Current significant challenges in the decommissioning and environmental remediation of radioactive facilities: A perspective from outside the nuclear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cerezo, V; Domínguez-Vilches, E; González-Barrios, A J

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of implementing an extrajudicial environmental mediation procedure in the socioenvironmental conflict associated with routine operation of the El Cabril Disposal Facility for low- and medium- activity radioactive waste (Spain). We analyse the socio-ethical perspective of this facility's operation with regard to its nearby residents, detailing the structure and development of the environmental mediation procedure through the participation of society and interested parties who are or may become involved in such a conflict. The research, action, and participation method was used to apply the environmental mediation procedure. This experience provides lessons that could help improve decision-making processes in nuclear or radioactive facility decommissioning projects or in environmental remediation projects dealing with ageing facilities or with those in which nuclear or radioactive accidents/incidents may have occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fabrication of Separator Demonstration Facility process vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberst, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    The process vessel system is the central element in the Separator Development Facility (SDF). It houses the two major process components, i.e., the laser-beam folding optics and the separators pods. This major subsystem is the critical-path procurement for the SDF project. Details of the vaious parts of the process vessel are given

  2. Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment

  3. THE DEACTIVATION, DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT, A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE'S HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington,; DC--and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (DandD) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP DandD effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent

  4. Development of the international Chornobyl center in Slavutych its role in nuclear facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.

    2002-01-01

    ChNPP site should be actively used for development and realizing the efforts on RBMK reactors decommissioning technologies, as well as Unit 'Shelter' transformation into ecologically safe system. Those technologies and methods will be required in future both in Ukraine and abroad. So, it is wise to employ another direction of ChNPP site utilization as a polygon for development and implementing new technologies associated with decommissioning. Besides, it could be used for exercising the methods and technologies of large-scale man-caused accidents elimination

  5. Design, Fabrication, and Initial Operation of a Reusable Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heatherly, D.W.; Thoms, K.R.; Siman-Tov, I.I.; Hurst, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    A Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program project, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop reusable materials irradiation facilities in which metallurgical specimens of reactor pressure vessel steels could be irradiated. As a consequence, two new, identical, reusable materials irradiation facilities have been designed, fabricated, installed, and are now operating at the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan. The facilities are referred to as the HSSI-IAR facilities with the individual facilities being designated as IAR-1 and IAR-2. This new and unique facility design requires no cutting or grinding operations to retrieve irradiated specimens, all capsule hardware is totally reusable, and materials transported from site to site are limited to specimens only. At the time of this letter report, the facilities have operated successfully for approximately 2500 effective full-power hours

  6. A survey of strippable and tie-down coatings for use in the decommissioning of alpha-active facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Worrall, G.; Dalton, J.T.

    1987-04-01

    The paper concerns temporary coatings for use in decommissioning operations of alpha-active facilities. The various temporary coating options are described with respect to: decontamination by removal of a previously applied protective coating, and the in-situ application of a coating for tie-down or decontamination duties. The specifications for coating systems to be used in active areas are defined in general terms. A survey of currently available temporary coating material is given, as well as the suitability of commercially available coating systems. (U.K.)

  7. Final Environmental Statement related to the decommissioning of the Rare Earths Facility, West Chicago, Illinois. Docket No. 40-2061

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This Final Environmental Statement is issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to the plan proposed by Kerr-McGee Chemical Corporation for the decommissioning of their Rare Earths Facility located in West Chicago, Illinois. The statement considers the Kerr-McGee preferred plan and various alternatives to that plan. The action proposed by the Commission is the renewal of the Kerr-McGee license to allow stabilization of wastes onsite and for possession of the wastes under license for an indeterminate time. The license could be terminated at a later date if certain specified requirements were met

  8. DECOMMISSIONING OF SHIELDED FACILITIES AT WINFRITH USED FOR POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF NUCLEAR FUELS and OTHER ACTIVE ITEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.D.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the approaches used in the clearing, cleaning, decontamination and decommissioning of a very large suite of seven concrete shielded caves and other facilities used by UKAEA at Winfrith Technology Centre, England over a period of about 30 years for the postirradiation examination (PIE) of a wide range of nuclear fuels and other very active components. The basic construction of the facilities will first be described, setting the scene for the major challenges that 1970s' thinking posed for decommissioning engineers. The tendency then to use large and heavy items of equipment supported upon massive steel bench structures produced a series of major problems that had to be overcome. The means of solving these problems by utilization of relatively simple and inexpensive equipment will be described. Later, a further set of challenges was experienced to decontaminate the interior surfaces to allow man entries to be undertaken at acceptable dose rates. The paper will describe the types of tooling used and the range of complementary techniques that were employed to steadily reduce the dose rates down to acceptable levels. Some explanations will also be given for the creation of realistic dose budgets and the methods of recording and continuously assessing the progress against these budgets throughout the project. Some final considerations are given to the commercial approaches to be adopted throughout this major project by the decommissioning engineers. Particular emphasis will be given to the selection of equipment and techniques that are effective so that the whole process can be carried out in a cost-effective and timely manner. The paper also provides brief complementary information obtained during the decommissioning of a plutonium-contaminated facility used for a range of semi-experimental purposes in the late 1970s. The main objective here was to remove the alpha contamination in such a manner that the volume of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (P

  9. Decommissioning of a tritium-contaminated laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

    1982-01-01

    A tritium laboratory facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned in 1979. The project involved dismantling the laboratory equipment and disposing of the equipment and debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. The laboratory, constructed in 1953, was in service for tritium research and fabrication of lithium tritide components until 1974. The major features of the laboratory included 25 meters of gloveboxes and hoods, associated vacuum lines, utility lines, exhaust ducts, electrodryers, blowers, and laboratory benches. This report presents details on the decommissioning, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation

  10. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  11. A facile fabrication of multifunctional knit polyester fabric based on chitosan and polyaniline polymer nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiaoning [College of Textiles, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Tian, Mingwei [College of Textiles, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fibers, Materials and Textiles of Shandong Province, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Qu, Lijun, E-mail: lijunqu@126.com [College of Textiles, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fibers, Materials and Textiles of Shandong Province, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Zhu, Shifeng [College of Textiles, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Guo, Xiaoqing [College of Textiles, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fibers, Materials and Textiles of Shandong Province, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Han, Guangting [Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fibers, Materials and Textiles of Shandong Province, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); and others

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Multifunctional knit polyester fabric was facile fabricated by the combination of pad-dry-cure process and in situ chemical polymerization route. • High electrical conductivity and efficient water-repellent properties were endowed to the polymer nanocomposite coated fabric. • The polymer nanocomposite coated fabric also performed efficient and durable photocatalytic activities under the illumination of ultraviolet light. - Abstract: Knit polyester fabric was successively modified and decorated with chitosan layer and polyaniline polymer nanocomposite layer in this paper. The fabric was firstly treated with chitosan to form a stable layer through the pad-dry-cure process, and then the polyaniline polymer nanocomposite layer was established on the outer layer by in situ chemical polymerization method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant and chlorhydric acid as dopant. The surface morphology of coated fabric was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the co-existence of chitosan layer and granular polyaniline polymer nanocomposite was confirmed and well dispersed on the fabric surface. The resultant fabric was endowed with remarkable electrical conductivity properties and efficient water-repellent capability, which also have been found stable after water laundering. In addition, the photocatalytic decomposition activity for reactive red dye was observed when the multifunctional knit polyester fabric was exposed to the illumination of ultraviolet lamp. These results indicated that chitosan and polyaniline polymer nanocomposite could form ideal multifunctional coatings on the surface of knit polyester fabric.

  12. A facile fabrication of multifunctional knit polyester fabric based on chitosan and polyaniline polymer nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xiaoning; Tian, Mingwei; Qu, Lijun; Zhu, Shifeng; Guo, Xiaoqing; Han, Guangting

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multifunctional knit polyester fabric was facile fabricated by the combination of pad-dry-cure process and in situ chemical polymerization route. • High electrical conductivity and efficient water-repellent properties were endowed to the polymer nanocomposite coated fabric. • The polymer nanocomposite coated fabric also performed efficient and durable photocatalytic activities under the illumination of ultraviolet light. - Abstract: Knit polyester fabric was successively modified and decorated with chitosan layer and polyaniline polymer nanocomposite layer in this paper. The fabric was firstly treated with chitosan to form a stable layer through the pad-dry-cure process, and then the polyaniline polymer nanocomposite layer was established on the outer layer by in situ chemical polymerization method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant and chlorhydric acid as dopant. The surface morphology of coated fabric was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the co-existence of chitosan layer and granular polyaniline polymer nanocomposite was confirmed and well dispersed on the fabric surface. The resultant fabric was endowed with remarkable electrical conductivity properties and efficient water-repellent capability, which also have been found stable after water laundering. In addition, the photocatalytic decomposition activity for reactive red dye was observed when the multifunctional knit polyester fabric was exposed to the illumination of ultraviolet lamp. These results indicated that chitosan and polyaniline polymer nanocomposite could form ideal multifunctional coatings on the surface of knit polyester fabric

  13. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 1 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 1 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath and adjacent to the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  14. Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D ampersand D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS

  15. Strategy for decommissioning of the glove-boxes in the Belgonucleaire Dessel MOX fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergheynst, Alain; Cuchet, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: BELGONUCLEAIRE has been operating the Dessel plant from the mid-80's at industrial scale. In this period, over 35 metric tons of plutonium (HM) was processed into almost 100 reloads of MOX fuel for commercial West-European Light Water Reactors. In late 2005, the decision was made to stop the production because of the shortage of MOX fuel market remaining accessible to BELGONUCLEAIRE after the successive capacity increases of the MELOX plant (France) and the commissioning of the SMP plant (UK). As a significant part of the decommissioning project of this Dessel plant, about 170 medium-sized glove-boxes are planned for dismantling. In this paper, after having reviewed the different specifications of ±-contaminated waste in Belgium, the authors introduce the different options considered for cleaning, size reduction and packaging of the glove-boxes, and the main decision criteria (process, α-containment, mechanization and radiation protection, safety aspects, generation of secondary waste, etc) are analyzed. The selected strategy consists in using cold cutting techniques and manual operation in shielded disposable glove-tents, and packaging α-waste in 200-liter drums for off-site conditioning and intermediate disposal. (authors)

  16. Role of the statistician in the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory and other nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1980-12-01

    This report examines what the statistician can contribute to decommissioning operations, with particular emphasis on the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) currently scheduled for decommissioning beginning in FY81. In the opinion of the author, a professional statistician should be a full member of the planning team directing decommissioning operations at the New Brunswick Laboratory. This opinion is based in part on the familiarity with the valuable contributions made by statisticians toward the cleanup of transuranics in soil on the Enewetak Atoll. More generally, however, the professional statistician can help plan the decommissioning effort to help ensure that representative data are obtained, analyzed and, interpreted in appropriate ways so that RA decisions can be made with the required confidence. The statistician's contributions at the NBL could include providing guidance on the number and location of samples and in-situ measurements, analyzing and interpreting these data, designing a data management and documentation system, interfacing with the certification contractor's statistician, and assisting in writing documentation and final reports. In all cases, the statistician should work closely with the professional health physicist and others on the planning team in a closely coordinated effort of planning and data analysis

  17. Information base for waste repository design. Volume 5. Decommissioning of underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiffre, M.S.; Plum, R.L.; Koplick, C.M.; Talbot, R.

    1979-01-01

    This report discusses the requirements for decommissioning a deep underground facilitiy for the disposal of radioactive waste. The techniques for sealing the mined excavations are presented and an information base on potential backfill materials is provided. Possible requirements for monitoring the site are discussed. The performance requirements for backfill materials are outlined. The advantages and disadvantages of each sealing method are stated

  18. Background as a residual radioactivity criterion for decommissioning: Appendix A to the Generic Environmental Impact Statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for decommissioning of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffert, A.M.; Meck, R.A.; Miller, K.M.

    1994-08-01

    This report was originally published as an appendix to the draft U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) document entitled, open-quotes Generic Environmental Impact Statement in Support of Rulemaking on Radiological Criteria for Decommissioning of NRC-Licensed Nuclear Facilities.close quotes Because of the great interest in this report by members of the public, citizen and environmental organizations, academicians, licensees, and regulators, the NRC staff is publishing this report separately, so that it can be readily available to a diverse audience. This report was created to assist both the NRC staff and interested members of the public in evaluating background radiation (background) as a decommissioning criterion, by serving as a primer on background and providing information on the existing applications of background in regulatory criteria and standards. This report also discusses some of the methods available to measure and distinguish between the very low radiation levels associated with background and man-made sources of radiation. Two approaches are considered for applying background as a decommissioning criterion; these are the use of background dose rates and background radionuclide concentrations. This report concludes that the temporal and spatial variability of background produces a wide range of doses to United States residents, which prevents the application of background dose rates as a decommissioning criterion. Instead, this report recommends that local background radionuclide concentrations serve as a benchmark for decommissioning criteria, while taking into account the concept of reducing residual radioactivity to a level as low as is reasonably achievable

  19. Calculating Program for Decommissioning Work Productivity based on Decommissioning Activity Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Seung-Kook; Park, Hee-Seong; Moon, Jei-kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    KAERI is performing research to calculate a coefficient for decommissioning work unit productivity to calculate the estimated time decommissioning work and estimated cost based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2. KAERI used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage decommissioning activity experience data through systems such as the decommissioning information management system (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), decommissioning work-unit productivity calculation system (DEWOCS). In particular, KAERI used to based data for calculating the decommissioning cost with the form of a code work breakdown structure (WBS) based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2.. Defined WBS code used to each system for calculate decommissioning cost. In this paper, we developed a program that can calculate the decommissioning cost using the decommissioning experience of KRR-2, UCP, and other countries through the mapping of a similar target facility between NPP and KRR-2. This paper is organized as follows. Chapter 2 discusses the decommissioning work productivity calculation method, and the mapping method of the decommissioning target facility will be described in the calculating program for decommissioning work productivity. At KAERI, research on various decommissioning methodologies of domestic NPPs will be conducted in the near future. In particular, It is difficult to determine the cost of decommissioning because such as NPP facility have the number of variables, such as the material of the target facility decommissioning, size, radiographic conditions exist.

  20. Calculating Program for Decommissioning Work Productivity based on Decommissioning Activity Experience Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Seung-Kook; Park, Hee-Seong; Moon, Jei-kwon

    2014-01-01

    KAERI is performing research to calculate a coefficient for decommissioning work unit productivity to calculate the estimated time decommissioning work and estimated cost based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2. KAERI used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage decommissioning activity experience data through systems such as the decommissioning information management system (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), decommissioning work-unit productivity calculation system (DEWOCS). In particular, KAERI used to based data for calculating the decommissioning cost with the form of a code work breakdown structure (WBS) based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2.. Defined WBS code used to each system for calculate decommissioning cost. In this paper, we developed a program that can calculate the decommissioning cost using the decommissioning experience of KRR-2, UCP, and other countries through the mapping of a similar target facility between NPP and KRR-2. This paper is organized as follows. Chapter 2 discusses the decommissioning work productivity calculation method, and the mapping method of the decommissioning target facility will be described in the calculating program for decommissioning work productivity. At KAERI, research on various decommissioning methodologies of domestic NPPs will be conducted in the near future. In particular, It is difficult to determine the cost of decommissioning because such as NPP facility have the number of variables, such as the material of the target facility decommissioning, size, radiographic conditions exist

  1. Environmental survey near a decommissioning nuclear facility: example of tritium monitoring in the terrestrial environment of Creys-Malville - Environmental survey near a nuclear facility undergoing decommissioning: example of tritium monitoring in the terrestrial environment of Creys-Malville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, C.; Gontier, G.; Chauveau, J.L. [EDF CIDEN, Division Environnement, 154 Avenue Thiers, 69458 Lyon (France); Pourcelot, L.; Roussel-Debet, S.; Cossonnet, P.C. [IRSN, LERCM Cadarache and LMRE Orsay (France); Jean-Baptiste, P. [LSCE, UMR 1572-CEA/CNRS/UVQS, 91198 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-07-01

    and adapts it to the specific radionuclides generated by the decommissioning phase. Some results from the terrestrial monitoring of the decommissioning site of Creys-Malville are presented here. Data highlight the very weak influence of gaseous discharges during all the operating phases and the decommissioning of the facility. Since the beginning (1985) to the end of plant operation (1998), tritium detected in the terrestrial environment near the Creys-Malville site (some Bq.L{sup -1} to a few tens of Bq.L{sup -1}) is almost exclusively linked to the global fall-out of nuclear bomb tests. During decommissioning operations, most of the observed environmental values remain very close to the ambient levels measured in zones not influenced by radioactive releases from nuclear activities i.e. 1 to 10 Bq.L{sup -1} (depending on the nature of the samples analyzed). In connection with the specific decommissioning operations, a slight influence of discharges had been briefly observed in the terrestrial environment; the measured concentrations were from 1 to 18 Bq.L{sup -1} for free water tritium, and from 1 to 11 Bq.L{sup -1} for organically bound tritium. (authors)

  2. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for

  3. Decommissioning of surface facilities associated with repositories for the deep geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-11-01

    A methodology is presented in this paper to evaluate the decommissioning of the surface facilities associated with repositories for the deep geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. A cost/risk index (figure of merit), expressed as $/manrem, is proposed as an evaluation criteria. On the basis of this cost/risk index, we gain insight into the advisability of adapting certain decontamination design options into the original facility. Three modes are considered: protective storage, entombment, and dismantlement. Cost estimates are made for the direct labor involved in each of the alternative modes for a baseline design case. Similarly, occupational radiation exposures are estimated, with a larger degree of uncertainty, for each of the modes. Combination of these estimates produces the cost/risk index. To illustrate the methodology, an example using a preliminary baseline repository design is discussed

  4. The use of modern engineered polymer coatings and products in decommissioning of nuclear facilities and plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, K.; Harris, C.W.; Morris, O.P.; Atkinson, P.

    2014-01-01

    During decommissioning of nuclear plant, problems can arise whereby leaks and cracks appear which may require repair or remediation. Following clean-up processes radionuclides may be exposed in concrete or structures such ponds which require sealing to prevent atmospheric release and to obtain a reduction in operator dose. There are a number of polymer based products on the market which with care and skillful selection can be utilised to aid decommissioning and to add reassurance to regulators that radionuclide release cannot occur. Choosing between them is difficult due to the fact that the standard coating tests cannot reliably distinguish between the various products since these modern polymers are all significantly tougher than previous generations of coating technologies. There is therefore a need to develop new bespoke tests which replicate the likely failure modes of the plant and which demonstrate which products are likely to perform well in real life situations. (authors)

  5. Reasons for immediate decommissioning of all nuclear facilities put forward by union members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, J.

    1988-01-01

    The author presents his arguments against the use of nuclear energy from the health hazard point of view, describing the damaging effects of radioactive radiation as a result of increasing environmental radioactivity due to the operation of nuclear installations, or as a consequence of nuclear accidents. The economic problems resulting from an immediate decommissioning of nuclear power plants - development of electricity demand and costs - are judged to be solvable, and decommissioning, the author says, would create new jobs. Another immediate response to the latest irregularities disclosed in the nuclear waste management industry should be to establish public supervisory bodies consisting of non-biased experts who can be found in ecologic research institutes or in other independent monitoring and measuring institutions. (HSCH) [de

  6. Summary of some Recent Work on Financial Planning for Decommissioning of Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindskog, Staffan (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); Sjoeblom, Rolf (Tekedo AB, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    The new European Union Environmental Liability Directive (ELD) together with the new standard and the increased awareness of the implications of the statements on Environmental liabilities in the IFRS/IA high-light the need for appropriate planning for decommissioning including cost estimations and waste fund management. These new regulations and standards are in some respects more stringent than the strictly nuclear rules. Consequently, The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate has sought communication with non-nuclear actors in the area, including the participation in the recent meeting Environmental Economics and Investment Assessment 11, 27-30 May, 2008, Cadiz, Spain. The present compilation of publications on decommissioning and associated cost calculations in Sweden was prompted by these contacts. The compilation comprises 14 reports published during the last four years

  7. Decommissioning: A critical component of the design for uranium tailings management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, W.A.; Barsi, R.G.; Misfeldt, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in the Beaverlodge area of northern Saskatchewan in 1934 with the first major mill beginning operation in 1953. Little attention was paid to tailings quality or tailings management practices. With the onset of the modem uranium operations beginning in the late 1970's, it was repeatedly evident, that the public had significant concerns, particularly with respect to tailings management, that must be addressed if the developments were to be allowed to proceed. Primary considerations related to environmental protection, public safety and an assurance of the ongoing sustainable development of the region. Integrating the decommissioning of a mine/mill site into development planning from the very outset has proven to be a critical component that has contributed to the ongoing success of the Saskatchewan uranium operations. This paper will provide a case study of the evolution of the uranium tailings management technology utilized in Saskatchewan. It documents the evolution of tailings management processes and the characteristics of tailings produced by successive mines in northern Saskatchewan. It also discusses the evolution of technologies applied to management of uranium mill tailings and demonstrates how progressively increasing levels of environmental protection have been achieved during the last 47 years of uranium mill operation. The paper also shows that the planned and progressive decommissioning of an operational site is the key to: Minimizing environmental impacts; Satisfying public and regulatory concerns; Minimizing operational and decommissioning costs; Minimizing corporate liability; and Shifting public resistance to public support. (author)

  8. Requirement Management between Regulatory Framework and Dismantling Activities for Decommissioning of a Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.S.; Jin, H.G.; Hong, Y.J.; Choi, J.W.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The decommissioning and environmental remediation (D&ER) projects require stepwise long-term research and development (R&D) such as a shutdown, transition, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities, radioactive waste management, and site restoration. During each step of the D&ER projects, a significant amount of information and knowledge such as experimental data, databases, design drawings, technical reports, guidelines, operation manuals, and modeling and simulation reports are produced. Knowledge based on experiences by staff members participating in each step of the D&ER project are also very important. Such knowledge based on experiences may disappear with the retirement of staff members if there are no effective and systematic approaches for its acquisition and storage. Therefore, to perform the D&ER project successfully, it is necessary to preserve written theses and experiences systematically. The integrated knowledge management system (KMS) for the D&ER projects have never been developed. Therefore, the establishment of an integrated KMS is necessary for the effective performance of D&ER projects. This study introduces a decommissioning procedure requirement management system as a part of the KMS related to the D&ER projects. (author

  9. Decommissioning: A critical component of the design for uranium tailings management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, A.W.; Barsi, R.G.; Misfeldt, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in the Beaverlodge area of northern Saskatchewan in 1934 with the first major mill beginning operation in 1953. Little attention was paid to tailings quality or tailings management practices. With the onset of the modern uranium operations beginning in the late 1970's, it was repeatedly evident, that the public had significant concerns, particularly with respect to tailings management, that must be addressed if the developments were to be allowed to proceed. Primary considerations related to environmental protection, public safety and an assurance of the ongoing sustainable development of the region. Integrating the decommissioning of a mine/mill site into development planning from the very outset has proven to be a critical component that has contributed to the ongoing success of the Saskatchewan uranium operations. This paper will provide a case study of the evolution of the uranium tailings management technology utilized in Saskatchewan. It documents the evolution of tailings management processes and the characteristics of tailings produced by successive mines in northern Saskatchewan. It also discusses the evolution of technologies applied to management of uranium mill tailings and demonstrates how progressively increasing levels of environmental protection have been achieved during the last 47 years of uranium mill operation. The paper also shows that the planned and progressive decommissioning of an operational site is the key to: Minimizing environmental impacts; Satisfying public and regulatory concerns; Minimizing operational and decommissioning costs; Minimizing corporate liability; and Shifting public resistance to public support. (author)

  10. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumentation and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. A general discussion is given of instrumentation and measurement techniques which are presently used being considered for fuel fabrication facilities. Those aspects which are most significant from the point of view of satisfying regulatory constraints have been emphasized. Sensors and measurement devices have been discussed, together with their interfacing into a computerized system designed to permit real-time data collection and analysis. Estimates of accuracy and precision of measurement techniques have been given, and, where applicable, estimates of associated costs have been presented. A general description of material control and accounting is also included. In this section, the general principles of nuclear material accounting have been reviewed first (closure of material balance). After a discussion of the most current techniques used to calculate the limit of error on inventory difference, a number of advanced statistical techniques are reviewed. The rest of the section deals with some regulatory aspects of data collection and analysis, for accountability purposes, and with the overall effectiveness of accountability in detecting diversion attempts in fuel fabrication facilities. A specific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility is given. The effect of random and systematic errors on the total material uncertainty has been discussed, together with the effect on uncertainty of the length of the accounting period

  11. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumentation and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. A general discussion is given of instrumentation and measurement techniques which are presently used being considered for fuel fabrication facilities. Those aspects which are most significant from the point of view of satisfying regulatory constraints have been emphasized. Sensors and measurement devices have been discussed, together with their interfacing into a computerized system designed to permit real-time data collection and analysis. Estimates of accuracy and precision of measurement techniques have been given, and, where applicable, estimates of associated costs have been presented. A general description of material control and accounting is also included. In this section, the general principles of nuclear material accounting have been reviewed first (closure of material balance). After a discussion of the most current techniques used to calculate the limit of error on inventory difference, a number of advanced statistical techniques are reviewed. The rest of the section deals with some regulatory aspects of data collection and analysis, for accountability purposes, and with the overall effectiveness of accountability in detecting diversion attempts in fuel fabrication facilities. A specific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility is given. The effect of random and systematic errors on the total material uncertainty has been discussed, together with the effect on uncertainty of the length of the accounting period.

  12. Decommissioning of the nuclear licensed facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center; cleanup of nuclear licensed facility 57 and monitoring of operations and operating feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estivie, D.; Bohar, M.P.; Jeanjacques, M.; Binet, C.; Bremond, M.P.; Poyau, C.; Mandard, L.; Boissonneau, J.F.; Fouquereau, A.; Pichereau, E.

    2008-01-01

    This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA Licensed Nuclear Facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is now it is located in a built-up area. It is presented like example the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. It was developed a method applied to establish the multi-annual budget, monitor the progress of operations and integrate, as work continues, the operating feedback. (author)

  13. Stakeholder issues and involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities. Lessons learnt from WPDD and FSC activities and documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, Claudio; Vari, Anna; Mays, C.; O'Sullivan, P.

    2007-01-01

    The expectation that significant numbers of nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives in the coming decade or so, or will be shut down for economic or other reasons, is resulting in increasing emphasis being given in member countries to the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. Although the need for public involvement during the siting process for a new nuclear facility is well established - given the potential for community disruption in terms of population changes and construction nuisance - the role of stakeholders during the shutdown and decommissioning phases is perhaps less well understood. The decision to shut down a nuclear facility before the end of its design lifetime is usually taken for economic, safety or political reasons. In general, there is no requirement in legislation to involve stakeholders directly in this decision; though there can be substantial consequences for local communities in terms of decreasing employment rate and an eventual reduction of revenues for the host municipality. On the other hand, stakeholders do generally have the legal right to be involved in the consequential decision about the strategy for decommissioning the shutdown plant - i.e. the actions taken to facilitate the end of regulatory oversight of the facility - typically through participation in an environmental impact assessment process. In this document, the arguments advanced in favour of stakeholder involvement, and the fostering of relationships with affected communities that are based on trust, are generally applicable to both the above decisions. Although those likely to be most affected by a decision to shut down a nuclear facility are those living nearby, it needs to be remembered that such decisions will sometimes have wider consequences, perhaps even at a national level, e.g. in the event that alternative sources of electricity need to be found to replace that from the shutdown plant. In these situations

  14. Simulation of facility operations and materials accounting for a combined reprocessing/MOX fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, C.A.; Whiteson, R.; Zardecki, A.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a computer model of facility operations and nuclear materials accounting for a facility that reprocesses spent fuel and fabricates mixed oxide (MOX) fuel rods and assemblies from the recovered uranium and plutonium. The model will be used to determine the effectiveness of various materials measurement strategies for the facility and, ultimately, of other facility safeguards functions as well. This portion of the facility consists of a spent fuel storage pond, fuel shear, dissolver, clarifier, three solvent-extraction stages with uranium-plutonium separation after the first stage, and product concentrators. In this facility area mixed oxide is formed into pellets, the pellets are loaded into fuel rods, and the fuel rods are fabricated into fuel assemblies. These two facility sections are connected by a MOX conversion line in which the uranium and plutonium solutions from reprocessing are converted to mixed oxide. The model of the intermediate MOX conversion line used in the model is based on a design provided by Mike Ehinger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (private communication). An initial version of the simulation model has been developed for the entire MOX conversion and fuel fabrication sections of the reprocessing/MOX fuel fabrication facility, and this model has been used to obtain inventory difference variance estimates for those sections of the facility. A significant fraction of the data files for the fuel reprocessing section have been developed, but these data files are not yet complete enough to permit simulation of reprocessing operations in the facility. Accordingly, the discussion in the following sections is restricted to the MOX conversion and fuel fabrication lines. 3 tabs

  15. Decommissioning funding: ethics, implementation, uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This status report on Decommissioning Funding: Ethics, Implementation, Uncertainties also draws on the experience of the NEA Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD). The report offers, in a concise form, an overview of relevant considerations on decommissioning funding mechanisms with regard to ethics, implementation and uncertainties. Underlying ethical principles found in international agreements are identified, and factors influencing the accumulation and management of funds for decommissioning nuclear facilities are discussed together with the main sources of uncertainties of funding systems. (authors)

  16. On tentative decommissioning cost analysis with specific authentic cost calculations with the application of the Omega code on a case linked to the Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter; Kristofova, Kristina; Tatransky, Peter; Zachar, Matej [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    The presented report is focused on tentative calculations of basic decommissioning parameters such as costs, manpower and exposure of personnel for activities of older nuclear facility decommissioning in Sweden represented by Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Studsvik, by means of calculation code OMEGA. This report continuously follows up two previous projects, which described methodology of cost estimates of decommissioning with an emphasis to derive cost functions for alpha contaminated material and implementation of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology for Intermediate Storage facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. The main purpose of the presented study is to demonstrate the trial application of the advanced costing methodology using OMEGA code for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. Basic work packages presented in report are as follows: 1. Analysis and validation input data on Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel and assemble a database suitable for standardised decommissioning cost calculations including radiological parameters, 2. Proposal of range of decommissioning calculations and define an extent of decommissioning activities, 3. Defining waste management scenarios for particular material waste streams from Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel, 4. Developing standardised cost calculation structure applied for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel decommissioning calculation and 5. Performing tentative decommissioning calculations for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel by OMEGA code. Calculated parameters of decommissioning are presented in structure according to Proposed Standardized List of Items for Costing Purposes. All parameters are documented and summed up in both table and graphic forms in text and Annexes. The presented report documents availability and applicability of methodology for evaluation of costs and other parameters of decommissioning in a form implemented

  17. On tentative decommissioning cost analysis with specific authentic cost calculations with the application of the Omega code on a case linked to the Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter; Kristofova, Kristina; Tatransky, Peter; Zachar, Matej; Lindskog, Staffan

    2007-03-01

    The presented report is focused on tentative calculations of basic decommissioning parameters such as costs, manpower and exposure of personnel for activities of older nuclear facility decommissioning in Sweden represented by Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Studsvik, by means of calculation code OMEGA. This report continuously follows up two previous projects, which described methodology of cost estimates of decommissioning with an emphasis to derive cost functions for alpha contaminated material and implementation of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology for Intermediate Storage facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. The main purpose of the presented study is to demonstrate the trial application of the advanced costing methodology using OMEGA code for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. Basic work packages presented in report are as follows: 1. Analysis and validation input data on Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel and assemble a database suitable for standardised decommissioning cost calculations including radiological parameters, 2. Proposal of range of decommissioning calculations and define an extent of decommissioning activities, 3. Defining waste management scenarios for particular material waste streams from Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel, 4. Developing standardised cost calculation structure applied for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel decommissioning calculation and 5. Performing tentative decommissioning calculations for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel by OMEGA code. Calculated parameters of decommissioning are presented in structure according to Proposed Standardized List of Items for Costing Purposes. All parameters are documented and summed up in both table and graphic forms in text and Annexes. The presented report documents availability and applicability of methodology for evaluation of costs and other parameters of decommissioning in a form implemented

  18. The calculation and estimation of wastes generated by decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Tokai works and Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayame, Y.; Tanabe, T.; Takahashi, K.; Takeda, S.

    2001-07-01

    This investigation was conducted as a part of planning the low-level radioactive waste management program (LLW management program). The aim of this investigation was contributed to compile the radioactive waste database of JNC's LLW management program. All nuclear facilities of the Tokai works and Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center were investigated in this work. The wastes generated by the decommissioning of each nuclear facility were classified into radioactive waste and others (exempt waste and non-radioactive waste), and the amount of the wastes was estimated. The estimated amounts of radioactive wastes generated by decommissioning of the nuclear facilities are as follows. (1) Tokai works: The amount of waste generated by decommissioning of nuclear facilities of the Tokai works is about 1,079,100 ton. The amount of radioactive waste is about 15,400 ton. The amount of exempt waste and non-radioactive waste is about 1,063,700 ton. (2) Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center: The amount of waste generated by decommissioning of nuclear facilities of Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center is about 112,500 ton. The amount of radioactive waste is about 7,800 ton. The amount of exempt waste and non-radioactive waste is about 104,700 ton. (author)

  19. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  20. Summary of feasibility studies on in situ disposal as a decommissioning option for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbrecht, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A scoping study was conducted over the period 1998-2000 to consider the feasibility of in situ disposal as a decommissioning option for AECL's Nuclear Power Demonstration Reactor located at Rolphton, Ontario. The results of a detailed assessment are summarized and the study concludes that in situ disposal appears feasible. Additional work required to confirm the results is also identified. A second in situ component, contaminated Winnipeg River sediments at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratory located in Manitoba, was also evaluated. That study concluded that in situ abandonment would have no adverse impact on aquatic life, humans and the environment. A summary of the study is presented as an appendix to the report. (author)

  1. Advanced accounting techniques in automated fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.L.; DeMerschman, A.W.; Engel, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    The accountability system being designed for automated fuel fabrication facilities will provide real-time information on all Special Nuclear Material (SNM) located in the facility. It will utilize a distributed network of microprocessors and minicomputers to monitor material movement and obtain nuclear materials measurements directly from remote, in-line Nondestructive Assay instrumentation. As SNM crosses an accounting boundary, the accountability computer will update the master files and generate audit trail records. Mass balance accounting techniques will be used around each unit process step, while item control will be used to account for encapsulated material, and SNM in transit

  2. Summary, analysis, and response to public comments on proposed amendments to 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 50, 51, 70, and 72: Decommissioning criteria for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    On February 11, 1985, the NRC issued for public comment proposed rules on decommissioning of nuclear facilities (50 FR 5600). Comment letters were received from 143 organizations and individuals. This report provides a summary and analysis and response to the public comments received

  3. Decommissioning plan - decommissioning project for KRR 1 and 2 (revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, K. J.; Paik, S. T.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Lee, B. J.

    2000-10-01

    This report is the revised Decommissioning Plan for the license of TRIGA research reactor decommissioning project according to Atomic Energy Act No. 31 and No. 36. The decommissioning plan includes the TRIGA reactor facilities, project management, decommissioning method, decontamination and dismantling activity, treatment, packaging, transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. the report also explained the radiation protection plan and radiation safety management during the decommissioning period, and expressed the quality assurance system during the period and the site restoration after decommissioning. The first decommissioning plan was made by Hyundai Engineering Co, who is the design service company, was submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology, and then was reviewed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety. The first decommissioning plan was revised including answers for the questions arising from review process

  4. Decommissioning plan - decommissioning project for KRR 1 and 2 (revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, K. J.; Paik, S. T.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Lee, B. J

    2000-10-01

    This report is the revised Decommissioning Plan for the license of TRIGA research reactor decommissioning project according to Atomic Energy Act No. 31 and No. 36. The decommissioning plan includes the TRIGA reactor facilities, project management, decommissioning method, decontamination and dismantling activity, treatment, packaging, transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. the report also explained the radiation protection plan and radiation safety management during the decommissioning period, and expressed the quality assurance system during the period and the site restoration after decommissioning. The first decommissioning plan was made by Hyundai Engineering Co, who is the design service company, was submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology, and then was reviewed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety. The first decommissioning plan was revised including answers for the questions arising from review process.

  5. Application of the New Decommissioning Regulation to the Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Nuclear Center (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauret, Josiane; Piketty, Laurence; Jeanjacques, Michel

    2008-01-01

    This abstract describes the application of the new decommissioning regulation on all Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF is to say INB in French) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center (CEA/FAR). The decommissioning process has been applied in six buildings which are out of the new nuclear perimeter proposed (buildings no 7, no 40, no 94, no 39, no 52/1 and no 32) and three buildings have been reorganized (no 54, no 91 and no 53 instead of no 40 and no 94) in order to increase the space for temporary nuclear waste disposal and to reduce the internal transports of nuclear waste on the site. The advantages are the safety and radioprotection improvements and a lower operating cost. A global safety file was written in 2002 and 2003 and was sent to the French Nuclear Authority on November 2003. The list of documents required is given in the paragraph I of this paper. The main goals were two ministerial decrees (one decree for each NLF) getting the authorization to modify the NLF perimeter and to carry out cleaning and dismantling activities leading to the whole decommissioning of all NLF. Some specific authorizations were necessary to carry out the dismantling program during the decommissioning procedure. They were delivered by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (FNSA) or with limited delegation by the General Executive Director (GED) on the CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center, called internal authorization. Some partial dismantling or decontamination examples are given below: - evaporator for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53): FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2002/2003. - disposal tanks for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53) FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2004, - incinerator for the radioactive solid waste treatment station (building no 07): FNSA authorization: operation realised in 2004, - research equipments in the building no. 54 and building no. 91: internal authorization ; realised in 2005, - sample

  6. NPP Krsko decommissioning concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novsak, M.; Fink, K.; Spiler, J.

    1996-01-01

    At the end of the operational lifetime of a nuclear power plant (NPP) it is necessary to take measures for the decommissioning as stated in different international regulations and also in the national Slovenian law. Based on these requirements Slovenian authorities requested the development of a site specific decommissioning plan for the NPP KRSKO. In September 1995, the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) developed a site specific scope and content for decommissioning plan including the assumptions for determination of the decommissioning costs. The NEK Decommissioning Plan contains sufficient information to fulfill decommissioning requirements identified by NRC, IAEA and OECD - NEA regulations. In this paper the activities and the results of development of NEK Decommissioning Plan consisting of the development of three decommissioning strategies for the NPP Krsko and selection of the most suitable strategy based on site specific, social, technical, radiological and economical aspects, cost estimates for the strategies including the costs for construction of final disposal facilities for fuel/high level waste (fuel/HLW) and low/intermediate level waste (LLW/ILW) and scheduling all activities necessary for the decommissioning of the NPP KRSKO are presented. (author)

  7. NPP Krsko decommissioning concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novsak, M.; Fink, K.; Spiler, J.

    1996-01-01

    At the end of the operational lifetime of a nuclear power plant (NPP) it is necessary to take measures for the decommissioning as stated in different international regulations and also in the national Slovenian law. Based on these requirements Slovenian authorities requested the development of a site specific decommissioning plan for the NPP Krsko. In September 1995, the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) developed a site specific scope and content for a decommissioning plan including the assumptions for determination of the decommissioning costs. The NEK Decommissioning Plan contains sufficient information to fulfill the decommissioning requirements identified by NRC, IAEA and OECD - NEA regulations. In this paper the activities and results of development of NEK Decommissioning Plan consisting of the development of three decommissioning strategies for the NPP Krsko and selection of the most suitable strategy based on site specific, social, technical, radiological and economic aspects, cost estimates for the strategies including the costs for construction of final disposal facilities for fuel/high level waste (fuel/HLW) and low/intermediate level waste (LLW/ILW) and scheduling of all activities necessary for the decommissioning of the NPP Krsko are presented. (author)

  8. The estimation of the amount of radioactive waste from decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Oarai Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Kenichi; Aihara, Nagafumi; Imai, Katutomo; Tobita, Kazunori; Nemoto, Masaaki; Imahori, Shinji; Noguchi, Kouichi; Hasegawa, Makoto

    1998-11-01

    The estimation of the amount of radioactive waste produced from nuclear facilities in Oarai Engineering Center was performed for the purpose of using it for countermeasure of decommissioning planning. The conditions and the result of the estimation are as follows; (1) The total amount of occurrence of radioactive waste is 18,820 tons. As the items of the amount in radioactive level, the amount of 1 GBq/t and over is 820 tons and that of under 1 GBq/t is 18,000 tons. (2) The amount of metal waste is 5,820 tons and the amount of concrete is 13,000 tons. (3) Above calculation was based on related specifications, complete drawings, and visual observation. (4) To dismantle facilities, if must exfoliate the surface of wall. As for the polluted zone and the zone with possibility of pollution, it decided to exfoliate 5 cm in thickness from the surface of the wall. And, as for the zone that fundamentally pollution was not there, it decided to exfoliate surface 1 cm in thickness from the surface of the wall. (5) Using the suitable decontamination technology and exfoliation technology can reduce the amount of radioactive waste. (6) In the facilities dealing with sealed source judging from the past record of operation, there is no contact with the radioactive material, etc. Therefore, it can be disposed of all the waste that comes out from the facilities as non-radioactive waste. (author)

  9. Criticality Safety Lessons Learned in a Deactivation and Decommissioning Environment [A Guide for Facility and Project Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nirider, L. Tom

    2003-08-06

    This document was designed as a reference and a primer for facility and project managers responsible for Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) processes in facilities containing significant inventories of fissionable materials. The document contains lessons learned and guidance for the development and management of criticality safety programs. It also contains information gleaned from occurrence reports, assessment reports, facility operations and management, NDA program reviews, criticality safety experts, and criticality safety evaluations. This information is designed to assist in the planning process and operational activities. Sufficient details are provided to allow the reader to understand the events, the lessons learned, and how to apply the information to present or planned D&D processes. Information is also provided on general lessons learned including criticality safety evaluations and criticality safety program requirements during D&D activities. The document also explores recent and past criticality accidents in operating facilities, and it extracts lessons learned pertinent to D&D activities. A reference section is included to provide additional information. This document does not address D&D lessons learned that are not pertinent to criticality safety.

  10. Criticality Safety Lessons Learned in a Deactivation and Decommissioning Environment [A Guide for Facility and Project Managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIRIDER, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    This document was designed as a reference and a primer for facility and project managers responsible for Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) processes in facilities containing significant inventories of fissionable materials. The document contains lessons learned and guidance for the development and management of criticality safety programs. It also contains information gleaned from occurrence reports, assessment reports, facility operations and management, NDA program reviews, criticality safety experts, and criticality safety evaluations. This information is designed to assist in the planning process and operational activities. Sufficient details are provided to allow the reader to understand the events, the lessons learned, and how to apply the information to present or planned D and D processes. Information is also provided on general lessons learned including criticality safety evaluations and criticality safety program requirements during D and D activities. The document also explores recent and past criticality accidents in operating facilities, and it extracts lessons learned pertinent to D and D activities. A reference section is included to provide additional information. This document does not address D and D lessons learned that are not pertinent to criticality safety

  11. Study on the state-of-the-arts technologies and policy trends for the decommissioning of nuclear installations and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, G. J.; Park, J. H.; Jeong, U. S. and others

    2005-12-01

    D and D project of the nuclear facilities is now the one of the biggest projects among the nuclear ones in the world. The nuclear facilities have their unique characteristics so making preparations about technical research in advance is very important in economic side and worker's protection side. Especially, because workers have a high possibility to contact radioactive material directly, an automation technology and shielding technology for worker's protection as well as a system development which can perform D and D work efficiently are necessary for D and D project. The waste reduction technology development, D and D equipment development, container development, and the study related the establishment of the level of the release regulation for radioactive waste are also important. The purpose of this research is to grasp of the national and internal D and D status for the nuclear facilities and to estimate them so we expect to prevent the possibility of a tremendous economical loss as the initiative of the nuclear D and D market is lost due to not understand the situation about the status of the related technologies. And we also expect to practical use the accumulated experience to decommissioning facilities in North

  12. Final report of the decontamination and decommission of Building 31 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 31 and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This area was addressed in the summary final report of the remediation of the exterior areas of the GJPO facility. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  13. UK reactor decommissioning strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollam, P.B.

    2004-01-01

    With the cessation of electricity generation, nuclear power stations move into the next stage of the overall life cycle of the facility: decommissioning. Decommissioning is defined as the process whereby a nuclear facility, at the end of its economic life, is taken permanently out of service and its site made available for other purposes. This involves the implementation of a structured and safe programme for dismantling and clearing the site and making it available for alternative use in the future. In practical terms, 'decommissioning' means the systematic and progressive reduction of hazards to the point where the site could eventually be de-licensed. (author)

  14. Research on decommissioning of nuclear facilities 2. Study on optimum scenario using the AHP (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibahara, Yuji; Morishita, Yoshitsugu; Ishigami, Tsutomu; Yanagihara, Satoshi; Arita, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    To implement a decommissioning project reasonably, it is necessary and important to calculate project management data beforehand as well as to select an optimum dismantling scenario among various scenarios postulated. Little study on the subject of selecting an optimum scenario has been carried out, and it is one of the most important issues in terms of decision making. In FY 2009, Japan Atomic Energy Agency and University of Fukui launched the joint research of a decision making method which is important to determine a decommissioning plan. The purpose of this research is to formulate a methodology for selecting an optimum dismantling scenario among various scenarios postulated based on calculated results of project management data for FUGEN. Project management data for several dismantling scenarios postulated at FUGEN were evaluated based on actual dismantling work for feedwater heater at FUGEN, and an optimum scenario was discussed using the AHP, one of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Methods. This report describes the results of the joint research in FY 2010. (author)

  15. Russian conceptions of plant life management and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugaenko, S.E.; Butorin, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    Plant life management (PLIM) of nuclear power plant is the concept and practice to provide profitability of safe operation of nuclear electricity-generating installations. Therefore, application of the PLIM technology is a unique possibility for the nuclear power not only to preserve its presence at the generated electricity market but also to enlarge it there at the first quarter of the third millennium. PLIM is considered as the concept and procedure covering the whole life cycle of NPP, consisting of three main phases: pre-operation, operation, post-operation. When considering the list of the main standard works for PLIM, one can notice that the structure of a full volume of works can be presented as the sum of two constituents: specific for a particular power unit and universal one. A specific constituent implies realising the PLIM process at a particular power unit, and universal one implies development scientific-methodological, technological and normative basis supporting PLIM process. The concept of decommissioning NPP power units was developed and adopted in 1991, and nowadays is renewed. Its main principles and provisions correspond to a general approach to decommissioning nuclear power plants which was adopted in international practice and recommended in the IAEA documents. Elimination of NPP power unit is adopted in it as the basic option

  16. The management of financial resources intended for radioactive waste and decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in the european union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatar, F.; Dima, A.; Glodeanu, F.; Miller, B.; Mosmonea, R.

    2015-01-01

    The European Commission has developed policies and made recommendations on how financial resources should be established and managed by Member States for the purpose of radioactive waste management. The manner in which these recommendations have been accepted, and are applied, varies between European countries. To some extent, this variation reflects the maturity of the nuclear programs in each country and whether or not nuclear facilities are largely state or privately owned and operated. This paper reviews the European Commission.s policy on financial resourcing for radioactive waste management and decommissioning and evaluates how financial resources are practically established and managed by Member States. The findings from the review are then used to benchmark the situation in Romania. (authors)

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of a luminous dial painting facility: radiological characterization, segregation and disposal of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ed, D.; Chu, L.; Chepulis, P.; Hamel, M.

    1986-01-01

    The State of Illinois, Department of Nuclear Safety, has decontaminated and decommissioned the defunct Luminous Processes, Inc. facility located in Ottawa, Illinois. The state's overall experience throughout the project is generally described, with particular emphasis given to the radiological characterization (Ra-226+progeny and H-3) and subsequent segregation and disposal of building materials as either radioactive or non-radioactive. Experiences involving direct application of health physics principles (criteria selection, sampling schemes, analytical techniques, data reduction, quality assurance) are discussed. Experiences involving other health physics regimens (personnel protection and dosimetry, environmental monitoring) as well as social sciences and economic considerations (public perception, media relations, political involvement, contractor interactions, fiscal management) are discussed only insofar as they affect the radiological characterization, segregation and disposal processes

  18. The study of the container types used for transport and final disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postelnicu, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to select from a variety of package forms and capacities some containers which will be used for transport and disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from decommissioning of nuclear facilities into the National Repository for Radioactive Waste - Baita, Bihor county. Taken into account the possibilities of railway and / or road transport and waste disposal in our country, detailed container classification was given in order to use them for radioactive waste transport and final disposal from decommissioning of IFIN-HH Research Reactor. (author)

  19. Needs for R and D and innovations to address challenges of nuclear facility decommissioning after its normal shutdown versus advanced approaches required for Fukushima Daiichi NPS decommissioning. Needs and emergency technologies for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, G.

    2017-01-01

    Taking into account several attempts to address variety of needs for R and D related to the decommissioning challenges such as: - Characterisation and survey prior to dismantling, - Technologies for dismantling, - Decontamination and on-site remediation, - Material and waste management, - Site characterisation and environmental monitoring. This presentation will give an update of approaches in several countries for R and D to aim at more efficient and effective decommissioning and, above all, to reduce current labour intensive needs to implement this kind of work. The evidence of the particular needs to coordinate efforts both for 'normal decommissioning' and accident cases like Fukushima Daiichi will be offered by demonstrating that, for a large part, that needs might be considered as similar. Some examples of particular interest will be given and it will be emphasized the need to adapt existing and/or new technologies from 'non-nuclear' areas to use them for nuclear decommissioning. The global interest to evaluate and to coordinate R and D efforts will be demonstrated. Consequently there might be a large international interest to increase the consensus where R and D can be better directed. The more comprehensive coordination should support improvement of the overview of future decommissioning needs to implement the decommissioning activities more effectively in terms of time and finance, not compromising safety. (author)

  20. Safety Assessment for Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    In the past few decades, international guidance has been developed on methods for assessing the safety of predisposal and disposal facilities for radioactive waste. More recently, it has been recognized that there is also a need for specific guidance on safety assessment in the context of decommissioning nuclear facilities. The importance of safety during decommissioning was highlighted at the International Conference on Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities held in Berlin in 2002 and at the First Review Meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management in 2003. At its June 2004 meeting, the Board of Governors of the IAEA approved the International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (GOV/2004/40), which called on the IAEA to: ''establish a forum for the sharing and exchange of national information and experience on the application of safety assessment in the context of decommissioning and provide a means to convey this information to other interested parties, also drawing on the work of other international organizations in this area''. In response, in November 2004, t