WorldWideScience

Sample records for fabric reinforced cement

  1. Tensile and Flexural Properties of Cement Composites Reinforced with Flax Nonwoven Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Claramunt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop a process to produce high-performance cement-based composites reinforced with flax nonwoven fabrics, analyzing the influence of the fabric structure—thickness and entanglement—on mechanical behavior under flexural and tensile loadings. For this purpose, composite with flax nonwoven fabrics with different thicknesses were first prepared and their cement infiltration was evaluated with backscattered electron (BSE images. The nonwoven fabrics with the optimized thickness were then subjected to a water treatment to improve their stability to humid environments and the fiber-matrix adhesion. For a fixed thickness, the effect of the nonwoven entanglement on the mechanical behavior was evaluated under flexural and direct tension tests. The obtained results indicate that the flax nonwoven fabric reinforcement leads to cement composites with substantial enhancement of ductility.

  2. Axial compression behaviour of reinforced wallettes fabricated using wood-wool cement panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, M. S. Md; Kamarudin, A. F.; Mokhatar, S. N.; Jaudin, A. R.; Ahmad, Z.; Ibrahim, A.; Muhamad, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Wood-wool cement composite panel (WWCP) is one of wood based composite material that produced in a stable panel form and suitable to be used as building wall system to replace non-ecofriendly material such as brick and other masonry element. Heavy construction material such as brick requires more manpower and consume a lot of time to build the wall panel. WWCP is a lightweight material with a density range from 300 kg/m3 to 500 kg/m3 and also capable to support an imposed load from the building. This study reported on the axial compression behaviour of prefabricated reinforced wallettes constructed with wood-wool cement panel. A total of six specimens were fabricated using two layers of cross laminated WWCP bonded with normal mortar paste (Portland cement) at a mix ratio of 1:3 (cement : sand). As part of lifting mechanism, the wallettes were equipped with three steel reinforcement (T12) that embedded inside the core of wallettes. Three replicates of wallettes specimens with dimension 600 mm width and 600 mm length were fabricated without surface plaster and with 16 mm thickness of surface plaster. The wallettes were tested under axial compression load after 28 days of fabrication until failure. The result indicated that, the application of surface plaster significantly increases the loading capacity about 35 % and different orientation of the panels improve the bonding strength of the wall.

  3. Thermal and mechanical properties of NaOH treated hemp fabric and calcined nanoclay-reinforced cement nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakamy, A.; Shaikh, F.U.A.; Low, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of nanoclay and hemp fabric-reinforced cement composites. • The optimum nanoclay and hemp fabric content is 1.0 and 6.9 wt.% respectively. • Surface-treated hemp fabric-reinforced cement composites demonstrated better mechanical properties. • Surface modification of hemp fabric was effective in improving the hemp fabric-cement matrix adhesion. - Abstract: Cement nanocomposites reinforced with hemp fabrics and calcined nanoclay (CNC) have been fabricated and investigated. CNC is prepared by heating nanoclay (Cloisite 30B) at 900 °C for 2 h. The influences of CNC dispersion on the mechanical properties and thermal properties of these composites have been characterized in terms of porosity, density, water absorption, flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength and thermal stability. The microstructure is investigated using Quantitative X-ray Diffraction Analysis (QXDA) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The effects of alkali (NaOH) treatment of hemp fabric on the mechanical properties of hemp fabric-reinforced cement composites with different fabric contents of 4.5, 5.7, 6.9 and 8.1 wt% are also investigated. Results show that the optimum hemp fabric content is 6.9 wt% (i.e. 6 fabric layers). Results also indicated that physical, mechanical and thermal properties were enhanced due to the addition of CNC into the cement matrix and the optimum content of CNC was 1 wt%. The treated hemp fabric-reinforced nanocomposites containing 1 wt% CNC exhibited the highest flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength and thermal stability by virtue of good fibre–matrix interface. This environmentally friendly nanocomposite can be used for various construction applications such as ceilings and roofs

  4. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  5. Stability of reinforced cemented backfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.J.; Stone, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mining with backfill has been the subject of several international meetings in recent years and a considerable research effort is being applied to improve both mining economics and ore recovery by using backfill for ground support. Classified mill tailings sands are the most commonly used backfill material but these fine sands must be stabilized before full ore pillar recovery can be achieved. Normal portland cement is generally used for stabilization but the high cost of cement prohibits high cement usage. This paper considers the use of reinforcements in cemented fill to reduce the cement usage. It is concluded that strong cemented layers at typical spacings of about 3 meters in a low cement content bulk fill can reinforce the fill and reduce the overall cement usage. Fibre reinforcements introduced into strong layers or into bulk fills are also known to be effective in reducing cement usage. Some development work is needed to produce the ideal type of anchored fibre in order to realize economic gains from fibre-reinforced fills

  6. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fujiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the effect of the fibers on the fracture toughness of the material. The results obtained indicate that, while fiber reinforcement leads to a decrease in compressive strength, J-integral calculations at maximum load for the different notch root radii have indicated, particularly for the case of long fibers, a significant superiority of the reinforced material in comparison with the plain cement mortar, in consistence with the impact test data.

  7. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    OpenAIRE

    R. Fujiyama; F. Darwish; M.V. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the eff...

  8. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported

  9. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-07-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating "smart" electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  10. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  11. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  12. Sisal organosolv pulp as reinforcement for cement based composites

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim, Ana Paula; Tonoli, Gustavo Henrique Denzin; Santos, Sérgio Francisco Dos; Savastano Junior, Holmer

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes non-conventional sisal (Agave sisalana) chemical (organosolv) pulp from residues of cordage as reinforcement to cement based materials. Sisal organosolv pulp was produced in a 1:1 ethanol/water mixture and post chemically and physically characterized in order to compare its properties with sisal kraft pulp. Cement based composites reinforced with organosolv or kraft pulps and combined with polypropylene (PP) fibres were produced by the slurry de-watering and pressin...

  13. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2011-01-01

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  14. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  15. Enhanced impact properties of cementitious composites reinforced with pultruded flax/polymeric matrix fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdi El-Messiry

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced concrete (FRC has become increasingly applied in civil engineering in the last decades. Natural fiber fabric reinforced cement composites are considered to prevent damage resulting from an impact loading on the cementite plate. Flax woven fabric that has a high energy absorption capability was chosen. To increase the interfacial shear properties, the fabric was pultruded with different matrix properties that affect the strength and toughness of the pultruded fabric. In this study, three fabric structures are used to increase the anchoring of the cement in the fabric. The compressive strength and the impact energy were measured. The results revealed that pultruded fabric reinforced cement composite (PFRC absorbs much more impact energy. PFRC under impact loading has more micro cracks, while plain cement specimen shows brittle failure. The compressive test results of PFRC indicate that flax fiber fabric polymer enhanced compressive strength remarkably. Fiber reinforcement is a very effective in improving the impact resistance of PFRC. The study defines the influence factors that control the energy dissipation of the composite, which are the hardness of the polymer and the fabric cover factor. Significant correlation between impact energy and compressive strength was proved.

  16. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications.

  17. Surface treatment of reinforced cement concrete mixtures of hpcm type

    OpenAIRE

    Vyrozhemsky, V.; Krayushkina, K.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most perspective ways of pavement roughness and durability improvement is the arrangement of thin cement concrete layer surface treatment reinforced with different types of fiber. The name of this material is known abroad as HPCM (High Performance Cementious Materials) durable thin layer concrete pavement in a thickness of 1 cm, dispersion-like reinforced with metal or polymer fibers. To enhance bind properties the stone material grade 3 7mm is applied on the top of concrete surfac...

  18. Reinforcing graphene oxide/cement composite with NH2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reinforcing graphene oxide/cement composite with NH2 functionalizing group. M EBRAHIMIZADEH ABRISHAMI1,∗ and V ZAHABI2. 1Materials and Electroceramics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad. 9177948974, Iran. 2Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University, ...

  19. Collaboration of polymer composite reinforcement and cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozin, V. G.; Gizdatullin, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental study of bond strength of cement concrete of different types with fiber reinforcing polymer (FRP) bars are reported. The reinforcing bars were manufactured of glass fibers and had a rebar with different types of the surface relief formed by winding a thin strip impregnated with a binder or by “sanding”. The pullout tests were carried out simultaneously for the steel reinforcing ribbed bars A400. The impact of friction, adhesion and mechanical bond on the strength of bonds between FRP and concrete was studied. The influence of the concrete strength and different operation factors on the bond strength of concrete was evaluated.

  20. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  1. Radiographic control of mineral fibre-reinforced cement plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.; Moeller Jensen, L.

    1980-03-01

    The usefulnes of the radiographic technique in the examination of Spinrock fibres reinforced cement plates was investigated with soft X-rays. A preliminary investigation has shown that soft X-rays are most suitable for radiography of cement plates, and therefore a 50 kV X-ray machine with a 0.5 mm focus and beryllium window X-ray tube was used througout the investigation. X-ray films of different speed and graininess were used, and it was proved that a relatively fast Kodak Industrex D film can produce radiographs of adequate quality. An Agfa-Gevaert Structurix IC paper can also be used. (author)

  2. Influence of sulfates on chloride diffusion and chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion in limestone cement materials at low temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Rakanta, E.; Mitzithra, M. E.; Batis, G.; Tsivilis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 04017060. ISSN 0899-1561 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : limestone cement * chloride diffusion * reinforcement corrosion * sulfate attack * low temperature Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 1.644, year: 2016 http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29MT.1943-5533.0001895

  3. Sisal organosolv pulp as reinforcement for cement based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Joaquim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes non-conventional sisal (Agave sisalana chemical (organosolv pulp from residues of cordage as reinforcement to cement based materials. Sisal organosolv pulp was produced in a 1:1 ethanol/water mixture and post chemically and physically characterized in order to compare its properties with sisal kraft pulp. Cement based composites reinforced with organosolv or kraft pulps and combined with polypropylene (PP fibres were produced by the slurry de-watering and pressing method as a crude simulation of the Hatschek process. Composites were evaluated at 28 days of age, after exposition to accelerated carbonation and after 100 soak/dry cycles. Composites containing organosolv pulp presented lower mechanical strength, water absorption and apparent porosity than composites reinforced with kraft pulp. The best mechanical performance after ageing was also achieved by samples reinforced with kraft pulp. The addition of PP fibres favoured the maintenance of toughness after ageing. Accelerated carbonation promoted the densification of the composites reinforced with sisal organosolv + PP fibres.

  4. Increased corrosion resistance of basalt reinforced cement compositions with nanosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URKHANOVA Larisa Alekseevna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Disperse fiber reinforcement is used to improve deformation and shrinkage characteristics, flexural strength of concrete. Basalt roving and thin staple fiber are often used as mineral fibers. The paper considers the problems of using thin basalt fiber produced by centrifugal-blow method. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of basalt fiber as part of the cement matrix was performed. Nanodispersed silica produced by electron beam accelerator was used to increase corrosion resistance of basalt fiber.

  5. Increased corrosion resistance of basalt reinforced cement compositions with nanosilica

    OpenAIRE

    URKHANOVA Larisa Alekseevna; LKHASARANOV Solbon Aleksandrovich; ROZINA Victoria Yevgenievna; BUYANTUEV Sergey Lubsanovich; BARDAKHANOV Sergey Prokopievich

    2014-01-01

    Disperse fiber reinforcement is used to improve deformation and shrinkage characteristics, flexural strength of concrete. Basalt roving and thin staple fiber are often used as mineral fibers. The paper considers the problems of using thin basalt fiber produced by centrifugal-blow method. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of basalt fiber as part of the cement matrix was performed. Nanodispersed silica produced by electron beam accelerator was used to increase corrosion resistance of ba...

  6. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  7. Production of a textile reinforced concrete protective layers with non-woven polypropylene fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žák, J.; Štemberk, P.; Vodička, J.

    2017-09-01

    Textile concrete with nonwoven polypropylene fabric can be used for protective layers of reinforced concrete structures, reducing the thickness of the cover layer or reducing the water penetration rate into the structure. The material consists of cement matrix with finegrained aggregate and nonwoven textile reinforcement. The maximum grain size of the mixture suitable for the nonwoven textile infiltration is 0.25 mm. The interlayer contains larger aggregates and short fibers. Tensile loading causes a large amount of microcracks in the material. The material can withstand strain over 25% without collapsing. Increased quality and water-cement ratio reduction was achieved using the plasticizers and distribution of the mixture into a fabric using a vibrating trowel. It is possible to make flat plates and even curved structures from this material. Larger curvatures of structures should be solved by cutting and overlapping the fabric. Small curvatures can be solved within the deformability of the fabric. Proper infiltration of the cement mixture into the fabric is the most important task in producing this material.

  8. Nanoscaled Mechanical Properties of Cement Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Barbhuiya, Salim; Chow, PengLoy

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on nanoscaled mechanical properties of cement composites. CNFs were added to cement composites at the filler loading of 0.2 wt % (by wt. of cement). Micrographs based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that CNFs are capable of forming strong interfacial bonding with cement matrices. Experimental results using nanoindentation reveal that the addition of CNFs in cement composites increases the proportions of high-density calcium...

  9. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  10. Physical and thermal behavior of cement composites reinforced with recycled waste paper fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarova, Viola; Stevulova, Nadezda; Vaclavik, Vojtech; Dvorsky, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    In this study, three types of recycled waste paper fibers were used to manufacture cement composites reinforced with recycled cellulosic fibers. Waste cellulosic fibers in quantity of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 wt.% were added to cement mixtures. Physical properties such as density, water capillarity, water absorbability and thermal conductivity of fiber cement composites were studied after 28 days of hardening. However, durability of composites was tested after their water storage up to 90 days. Final results of tested properties of fiber cement composites were compared with cement reference sample without cellulosic fibers.

  11. NANOFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE (NFC AS A POTENTIAL REINFORCEMENT FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE CEMENT MORTAR COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mònica Ardanuy,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC has been evaluated as a potential reinforcement for cement mortar composites. Two types of vegetable fibres with different composition and properties (cellulose content and microfibrillar angle, sisal, and cotton linters pulps, were initially characterised in order to assess their reinforcing capability. Sisal pulp was found to be most suitable as reinforcement for the brittle cementitious matrix. Nanofibrillated cellulose was produced by the application of a high intensity refining process of the sisal pulp. It was found that 6 hours of refining time was required to obtain the desired nanofibrillation of the fibers. Cement mortar composites reinforced with both the sisal fibres and the nanofibrillated cellulose were prepared, and the mechanical properties were determined under flexural tests. The cement mortar composites reinforced with the nanofibrillated cellulose exhibited enhanced flexural properties, but lower values of fracture energy, than the ones reinforced with the conventional sisal fibres.

  12. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Tolêdo Filho,Romildo Dias; Joseph,Kuruvilla; Ghavami,Khosrow; England,George Leslie

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical prop...

  13. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romildo Dias Tolêdo Filho

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical properties, physical performance and durability of cement based matrices reinforced with naturally occurring fibres including sisal, coconut, jute, bamboo and wood fibres. These fibres have always been considered promising as reinforcement of cement based matrices because of their availability, low cost and low consumption of energy. In this review, the general properties of the composites are described in relation to fibre content, length, strength and stiffness. A chronological development of sisal fibre reinforced, cement based matrices is reported and experimental data are provided to illustrate the performance of sisal fibre reinforced cement composites. A brief description on the use of these composite materials as building products has been included. The influence of sisal fibres on the development of plastic shrinkage in the pre-hardened state, on tensile, compressive and bending strength in the hardened state of mortar mixes is discussed. Creep and drying shrinkage of the composites and the durability of natural fibres in cement based matrices are of particular interest and are also highlighted. The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute asbestos-cement composite, which is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The

  14. The Integration of EIS parameters and bulk matrix characterization in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g.

  15. The integration of eis parameters and bulk matrix characteristics in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g.

  16. Influence of reinforcement and cemented parts on quality of radiological shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablewicz, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Results of studies of the influence of reinforcement density and shape of cemented parts on quality of radiological shields are presented. The studies were carried out on built shields and on experimental blocks. The experimental studies were aimed at determination of filling degree under cemented parts of different shapes using two kinds of cement normal and heavy one and at determination of filling degree of space with dense reinforcement as well as space near boarding. The influence of reinforcement density was studied using different spacing between bars and rows of bars. In the case of difficulties with good filling under the cemented parts so called ''beard'' and more liquid mixtures were used with success. (Z.M.)

  17. Effect of sepiolite on the flocculation of suspensions of fibre-reinforced cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarabo, Rocio; Fuente, Elena; Moral, Ana; Blanco, Angeles; Izquierdo, Laura; Negro, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Sepiolite is used to increase thixotropy of cement slurries for easier processing, to prevent sagging and to provide a better final quality in the manufacture of fibre-reinforced cement products. However, the effect of sepiolite on flocculation and its interactions with the components of fibre cement are yet unknown. The aim of this research is to study the effects of sepiolite on the flocculation of different fibre-reinforced cement slurries induced by anionic polyacrylamides (A-PAMs). Flocculation and floc properties were studied by monitoring the chord size distribution in real time employing a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) probe. The results show that sepiolite increases floc size and floc stability in fibre-cement suspensions. Sepiolite competes with fibres and clay for A-PAMs adsorption and its interaction with A-PAM improves flocculation of mineral particles.

  18. Strength and Deformability of Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste on the Basis of Basalt Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Barabanshchikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research object of the paper is cement paste with the particulate reinforcement of basalt fiber. Regardless of fibers’ length at the same fiber cement mix workability and cement consumption equality compressive solidity of the specimens is reduced with increasing fiber content. This is due to the necessity to increase the water-cement ratio to obtain a given workability. The flexural stability of the specimens with increasing fiber content increments in the same conditions. There is an optimum value of the fibers’ dosage. That is why stability has a maximum when crooking. The basaltic fiber particulate reinforcement usage can abruptly increase the cement paste level limiting extensibility, which is extremely important in terms of crack resistance.

  19. Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) as a potential reinforcement for high performance cement mortar composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ardanuy Raso, Mònica; Claramunt Blanes, Josep; Arévalo Peces, Raquel; Parés Sabatés, Ferran; Aracri, Elisabetta; Vidal Lluciá, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    In this work, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) has been evaluated as a potential reinforcement for cement mortar composites. Two types of vegetable fibres with different composition and properties (cellulose content and microfibrillar angle), sisal, and cotton linters pulps, were initially characterized in order to assess their reinforcement capability. Sisal pulp was found to be most suitable as reinforcement for their brittle cementitious matrix. Nanofibrillated cellulose was produced by th...

  20. A comparative evaluation of compressive strength of Portland cement with zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-reinforced cement: an in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasam, S; Bharadwaj, Prakasam; Loganathan, S C; Prasanth, B Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ultimate compressive strength of 50% and 25% Portland cement mixed with Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol and zinc oxide eugenol cement after 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days. One hundred and eighty samples were selected. The samples were made cylindrical of size 6 × 8 mm and were divided into six groups as follows with each group consisting of 10 samples. Group 1: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with 50% Portland cement (PMZNPC 50%) Group 2: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with 25% Portland cement (PMZNPC 25%) Group 3: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with 0% Portland cement (PMZNPC 0%) Group 4: Zinc oxide eugenol with 50% Portland cement (ZNPC 50%) Group 5: Zinc oxide eugenol with 25% Portland cement (ZNPC 25%) Group 6: Zinc oxide eugenol with 0% Portland cement (ZNPC 0%) These samples were further subdivided based on time interval and were tested at 1 hour, 24 hours and at 7 th day. After each period of time all the specimens were tested by vertical CVR loaded frame with capacity of 5 tones/0473-10kan National Physical laboratory, New Delhi and the results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffe test. Polymer-reinforced cement with 50% Portland cement, Zinc oxide with 50% Portland cement, Polymer-reinforced cement with 25% Portland cement and Zinc oxide with 25% Portland cement exhibited higher compressive strength when compared to Zinc oxide with 0% Portland cement and Polymer-reinforced cement with 0% Portland cement, at different periods of time. The difference between these two groups were statistically significant (P Portland cement in Zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-modified zinc oxide cement can be used as core build up material and permanent filling material. It is concluded that 50% and 25% Portland cement in zinc oxide eugenol and polymer-modified zinc oxide eugenol results in higher compressive strength and hence can be used as permanent filling material and core built

  1. Fique Fabric: A Promising Reinforcement for Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A relatively unknown natural fiber extracted from the leaves of the fique plant, native of the South American Andes, has recently shown potential as reinforcement of polymer composites for engineering applications. Preliminary investigations indicated a promising substitute for synthetic fibers, competing with other well-known natural fibers. The fabric made from fique fibers have not yet been investigated as possible composite reinforcement. Therefore, in the present work a more thorough characterization of fique fabric as a reinforcement of composites with a polyester matrix was performed. Thermal mechanical properties of fique fabric composites were determined by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The ballistic performance of plain woven fique fabric-reinforced polyester matrix composites was investigated as a second layer in a multilayered armor system (MAS. The results revealed a sensible improvement in thermal dynamic mechanical behavior. Both viscoelastic stiffness and glass transition temperature were increased with the amount of incorporated fique fabric. In terms of ballistic results, the fique fabric composites present a performance similar to that of the much stronger KevlarTM as an MAS second layer with the same thickness. A cost analysis indicated that armor vests with fique fabric composites as an MAS second layer would be 13 times less expensive than a similar creation made with Kevlar™.

  2. Micromechanical performance of interfacial transition zone in fiber-reinforced cement matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharda, V.; Němeček, J.; Štemberk, P.

    2017-09-01

    The paper investigates microstructure, chemical composition and micromechanical behavior of an interfacial transition zone (ITZ) in steel fiber reinforced cement matrix. For this goal, a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nanoindentation and elastic homogenization theory are used. The investigated sample of cement paste with dispersed reinforcement consists of cement CEM I 42,5R and a steel fiber TriTreg 50 mm. The microscopy revealed smaller portion of clinkers and larger porosity in the ITZ. Nanoindentation delivered decreased elastic modulus in comparison with cement bulk (67%) and the width of ITZ (∼ 40 μm). The measured properties served as input parameters for a simple two-scale model for elastic properties of the composite. Although, no major influence of ITZ properties on the composite elastic behavior was found, the findings about the ITZ reduced properties and its size can serve as input to other microstructural fracture based models.

  3. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  4. Development of technology for fabrication of lithium CPS on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibayeva, Irina; Baklanov, Viktor; Ponkratov, Yuriy; Abdullin, Khabibulla; Kulsartov, Timur; Gordienko, Yuriy; Zaurbekova, Zhanna; Lyublinski, Igor; Vertkov, Alexey; Skakov, Mazhyn

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Preliminary study of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium is presented. • Preliminary studies of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium consist in carrying out of experiments at temperatures 673,773 and 873 К in vacuum during long time. • A scheme of experimental device for manufacturing of lithium CPS and matrix filling procedure with liquid lithium are presented. • The concept of lithium limiter with CPS on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric is proposed. - Abstract: The paper describes the analysis of liquid lithium interaction with materials based on carbon, the manufacture technology of capillary-porous system (CPS) matrix on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric. Preliminary study of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium is presented. The development of technology includes: microstructural studies of carboxylic fabric before its CNT-reinforcing; validation of CNT-reinforcing technology; mode validation of CVD-method for CNT synthesize; study of synthesized carbon structures. Preliminary studies of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium consist in carrying out of experiments at temperatures 673, 773 and 873 К in vacuum during long time. The scheme of experimental device for manufacturing of lithium CPS and matrix filling procedure with liquid lithium are presented. The concept of lithium limiter with CPS on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric is proposed.

  5. Development of technology for fabrication of lithium CPS on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazhibayeva, Irina, E-mail: tazhibayeva@ntsc.kz [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Baklanov, Viktor; Ponkratov, Yuriy [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Abdullin, Khabibulla [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics of Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kulsartov, Timur; Gordienko, Yuriy; Zaurbekova, Zhanna [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Lyublinski, Igor [JSC «Red Star», Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU «MEPhI», Moscow (Russian Federation); Vertkov, Alexey [JSC «Red Star», Moscow (Russian Federation); Skakov, Mazhyn [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Preliminary study of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium is presented. • Preliminary studies of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium consist in carrying out of experiments at temperatures 673,773 and 873 К in vacuum during long time. • A scheme of experimental device for manufacturing of lithium CPS and matrix filling procedure with liquid lithium are presented. • The concept of lithium limiter with CPS on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric is proposed. - Abstract: The paper describes the analysis of liquid lithium interaction with materials based on carbon, the manufacture technology of capillary-porous system (CPS) matrix on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric. Preliminary study of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium is presented. The development of technology includes: microstructural studies of carboxylic fabric before its CNT-reinforcing; validation of CNT-reinforcing technology; mode validation of CVD-method for CNT synthesize; study of synthesized carbon structures. Preliminary studies of carboxylic fabric wettability with liquid lithium consist in carrying out of experiments at temperatures 673, 773 and 873 К in vacuum during long time. The scheme of experimental device for manufacturing of lithium CPS and matrix filling procedure with liquid lithium are presented. The concept of lithium limiter with CPS on basis of CNT-reinforced carboxylic fabric is proposed.

  6. Mechanical Behaviour of Sisal Fibre Reinforced Cement Composites

    OpenAIRE

    M. Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis on the advancement of new materials and technology has been there for the past few decades. The global development towards using cheap and durable materials from renewable resources contributes to sustainable development. An experimental investigation of mechanical behaviour of sisal fibre-reinforced concrete is reported for making a suitable building material in terms of reinforcement. Fibre reinforced Composite is one such material, which has reformed the concept of high strength. ...

  7. Potential of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Composites as Concrete Repair Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Manzur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are a virtually ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. It is evident from contemporary research that utilization of CNT in producing new cement-based composite materials has a great potential. Consequently, possible practical application of CNT reinforced cementitious composites has immense prospect in the field of applied nanotechnology within construction industry. Several repair, retrofit, and strengthening techniques are currently available to enhance the integrity and durability of concrete structures with cracks and spalling, but applicability and/or reliability is/are often limited. Therefore, there is always a need for innovative high performing concrete repair materials with good mechanical, rheological, and durability properties. Considering the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and the test results of CNT reinforced cement composites, it is apparent that such composites could be used conveniently as concrete repair material. With this end in view, the applicability of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT reinforced cement composites as concrete repair material has been evaluated in this study in terms of setting time, bleeding, and bonding strength (slant shear tests. It has been found that MWNT reinforced cement mortar has good prospective as concrete repair material since such composites exhibited desirable behavior in setting time, bleeding, and slant shear.

  8. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rafael M.; Pereira, Fabiano V.; Mota, Felipe A.P.; Watanabe, Evandro; Soares, Suelleng M.C.S.; Santos, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength, modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material. - Highlights: • Cellulose microfibers (CmF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were prepared. • The CmF and CNC were incorporated in commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). • Small amount of CNC improved significantly all the mechanical properties evaluated. • Modified GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  9. Chairside fabricated fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufyan Garoushi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in the materials and techniques for adhesive dentistry have allowed the development of non-invasive or minimally invasive approaches for replacing a missing tooth in those clinical situations when conservation of adjacent teeth is needed. Good mechanical and cosmetic/aesthetic properties of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC, with good bonding properties with composite resin cement and veneering composite are needed in FRC devices. Some recent studies have shown that adhesives of composite resins and luting cements allow diffusion of the adhesives to the FRC framework of the bridges. By this so-called interdiffusion bonding is formed [1]. FRC bridges can be made in dental laboratories or chairside. This article describes a clinical case of chairside (directly made FRC Bridge, which was used according to the principles of minimal invasive approach. Treatment was performed by Professor Vallittu from the University of Turku, Finland.

  10. Use of Fiber-Reinforced Cements in Masonry Construction and Structural Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Erdogmus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforcement in traditional concrete mixes has been extensively studied and has been slowly finding its regular use in practice. In contrast, opportunities for the use of fibers in masonry applications and structural rehabilitation projects (masonry and concrete structures have not been as deeply investigated, where the base matrix may be a weaker cementitious mixture. This paper will summarize the findings of the author’s research over the past 10 years in these particular applications of fiber reinforced cements (FRC. For masonry, considering both mortar and mortar-unit bond characteristics, a 0.5% volume fraction of micro fibers in type N Portland cement lime mortar appear to be a viable recipe for most masonry joint applications both for clay and concrete units. In general, clay units perform better with high water content fiber reinforced mortar (FRM while concrete masonry units (CMUs perform better with drier mixtures, so 130% and 110% flow rates should be targeted, respectively. For earth block masonry applications, fibers’ benefits are observed in improving local damage and water pressure resistance. The FRC retrofit technique proposed for the rehabilitation of reinforced concrete two-way slabs has exceeded expectations in terms of capacity increase for a relatively low cost in comparison to the common but expensive fiber reinforced polymer applications. For all of these applications of fiber-reinforced cements, further research with larger data pools would lead to further optimization of fiber type, size, and amount.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of S. cilliare fibre reinforced

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the recent times, there has been an ever-increasing interest in green composite materials for its applications in the field of industries, aerospace, sports, household etc and in many other fields. In this paper, fabrication of Saccharum cilliare fibre reinforced green polymer composites using resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) as ...

  12. The Immobilisation of Krom and Stronsium Waste Using Natural Fiber Reinforced Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susetyo Haria Putero; Nunung Prabaningrum; Widya Rosita

    2007-01-01

    Cementation of hazardous liquid waste is one of the methods to minimize its detrimental effect on the environmental quality and human health. This research purpose was to study the effect of natural fiber composition and temperature on quality of the cement block reinforced by coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber and bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) fiber. This research was pursued by adsorbing stronsium waste and krom using zeolite. Thirteen percent volume of zeolite was mixed with 0.3 of water/cement ratio. Composition of natural fiber was varied by 0.00v/o, 0.05v/o, 0.10v/o, 0.25v/o, 0.50v/o, 0.75v/o and 1.00v/o. The cement blocks produced were heated at 0℃, 50℃, 100℃, 150℃, 200℃ and 250℃ for 10 minutes and then determined their compressive strength and leaching rate. The optimum composition of natural fiber causing increasing of mechanical strength has been founded at 0.50% v/o of fiber. On that composition the axial force resistance of fiber is higher than the radial one. The hydration reaction completely works when cement block is heated until certain temperature that results in the increasing of its compressive strength. However, the compressive strength of cement block heated up to 250℃ is still beyond the standard. Based on its compressive strength, the bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) fiber is more feasible than coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber for reinforcing cement block. Heating just influences on the physics properties of cement block. But, the ability of block cement to immobilize a matter is affected by properties of matters. (author)

  13. Influence of Portland Cement Class on the Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement in Cement Mortar Caused by Penetrating Chloride and Sulfate from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of portland cement class on the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar caused by penetrating chloride or sulfate from the environment in already hardened cement mortar is investigated in this paper. Three classes of portland cement have been used for the tests, PC 35, PC 45 and PC 55. Cylindrical samples of cement mortar with steel reinfor- cement in the middle were treated 6 months at room temperature in the following solutions: w(SO42- = 2.1 % and w(Cl- = 5 %. Two techniques have been used for testing corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar: Tafel extrapolation technique and potentiodynamic polarization technique. Investigations were conducted by potentiostat/galvanostat Princeton Applied Research 263A-2 with the software PowerCORR®. The results of both techniques indi-cate the most active corrosion of steel reinforcement in the samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both treated solutions, while the lowest corrosion of the steel reinforcement was observed in cement samples prepared from cement PC 55. This conclusion was drawn by analyzing the results shown in Figs. 1–4. Comparing corrosion current density of samples, working electrodes, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2, the results show the most stable corrosion of steel reinforcement in samples prepared from cement PC 55, and the most active corrosion in samples prepared from ce- ment PC 35. The most active corrosion in samples prepared from cement PC 35 is evident from the positions of the open circuit potentials whose values are less for samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both the treated solution, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2. Comparison of the anodic polarization curves of the working electrodes in both the treated solutions, Figs. 3 and 4, also shows that the intensity of corrosion is the largest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 35 and the smallest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 55. Investigation results should be

  14. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  15. Static and Dynamic Strain Monitoring of Reinforced Concrete Components through Embedded Carbon Nanotube Cement-Based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella D’Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the use of cement-based sensors doped with carbon nanotubes as embedded smart sensors for static and dynamic strain monitoring of reinforced concrete (RC elements. Such novel sensors can be used for the monitoring of civil infrastructures. Because they are fabricated from a structural material and are easy to utilize, these sensors can be integrated into structural elements for monitoring of different types of constructions during their service life. Despite the scientific attention that such sensors have received in recent years, further research is needed to understand (i the repeatability and accuracy of sensors’ behavior over a meaningful number of sensors, (ii testing configurations and calibration methods, and (iii the sensors’ ability to provide static and dynamic strain measurements when actually embedded in RC elements. To address these research needs, this paper presents a preliminary characterization of the self-sensing capabilities and the dynamic properties of a meaningful number of cement-based sensors and studies their application as embedded sensors in a full-scale RC beam. Results from electrical and electromechanical tests conducted on small and full-scale specimens using different electrical measurement methods confirm that smart cement-based sensors show promise for both static and vibration-based structural health monitoring applications of concrete elements but that calibration of each sensor seems to be necessary.

  16. Effect of the Type of Surface Treatment and Cement on the Chloride Induced Corrosion of Galvanized Reinforcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Mobili, Alessandra; Vicerè, Anna Maria; Roventi, Gabriella; Bellezze, Tiziano

    2017-10-01

    The effect of a new passivation treatment, obtained by immersion of the galvanized reinforcements in a trivalent chromium salts based solution, on the chlorides induced corrosion has been investigated. To investigate also the effect of cement alkalinity on corrosion behaviour of reinforcements, concretes manufactured with three different European cements were compared. The obtained results show that the alternative treatment based on hexavalent chromium-free baths forms effective protection layers on the galvanized rebar surfaces. The higher corrosion rates of zinc coating in concrete manufactured with Portland cement compared to those recorded for bars in concrete manufactured with pozzolanic cement depends strongly on the higher chloride content at the steel concrete interface.

  17. Micromechanics of the Interface in Fibre-Reinforced Cement Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Shah, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    In fibre reinforced brittle matrix composites the mechanicalbehaviour of the interface between the fibres and the matrix has avery significant influence on the overall mechanical behaviour ofthe composite material. Since brittle matrix composites are designed primarilywith the aim of improving th...

  18. Elastic behavior and onset of cracking in cement composite plates reinforced by perforated thin steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronchik, V.

    1996-03-01

    Thin cement mortar plates reinforced by perforated thin steel sheets have been tested in four-point flexure loading. Six kinds of sheet reinforcement and to additional ones (for control) were used. Perforated sheets of the Daugavpils Factory of Machinery Chains differed by their thickness (0.6-1.8 mm), shape (round, rectangular, oval, "dumbbell"), and mark of steel (St. 08, 50, 70). Dimensions of plantes were 100×20×2 cm. Cements-sand mortar with a 1∶2 ratio of cement PZ35 and river sand of 3 mm grains was used as a matrix. Control specimens of similar dimensions and matrix were reinforced by wire cages and meshes (ferrocement). The testing was performed using an UMM-5 testing machine. Maximum deflection (at the midspan), tension, and shear strains were recorded. The expeimental data are presented in tables and graphs. The testing results showed that the elasticity modulus of material was in good agreement with the "admixture rule;" an onset of cracking for all types (excluding one) practically did not differ from reference samples; the mode of fracture in typical cases included an adhesion failure and significant shear strains. In one case the limit of the tension strength of the reinforcement was achieved.

  19. Mechano-Physical Properties and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Paste after Thermal Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeląg, Maciej

    2017-09-11

    The article presents the results obtained in the course of a study on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the modification of a cement matrix. Carbon nanotubes were introduced into a cement paste in the form of an aqueous dispersion in the presence of a surfactant (SDS-sodium dodecyl sulfate), which was sonicated. The selected physical and mechanical parameters were examined, and the correlations between these parameters were determined. An analysis of the local microstructure of the modified cement pastes has been carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis (EDS). In addition, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the change in characteristics of the cementitious material exposed to the sudden, short-term thermal load, was determined. The obtained material was characterized by a much lower density than a traditional cement matrix because the phenomenon of foaming occurred. The material was also characterized by reduced durability, higher shrinkage, and higher resistance to the effect of elevated temperature. Further research on the carbon nanotube reinforced cement paste, with SDS, may contribute to the development of a modified cement binder for the production of a lightweight or an aerated concrete.

  20. Mechano-Physical Properties and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Paste after Thermal Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results obtained in the course of a study on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the modification of a cement matrix. Carbon nanotubes were introduced into a cement paste in the form of an aqueous dispersion in the presence of a surfactant (SDS—sodium dodecyl sulfate), which was sonicated. The selected physical and mechanical parameters were examined, and the correlations between these parameters were determined. An analysis of the local microstructure of the modified cement pastes has been carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis (EDS). In addition, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the change in characteristics of the cementitious material exposed to the sudden, short-term thermal load, was determined. The obtained material was characterized by a much lower density than a traditional cement matrix because the phenomenon of foaming occurred. The material was also characterized by reduced durability, higher shrinkage, and higher resistance to the effect of elevated temperature. Further research on the carbon nanotube reinforced cement paste, with SDS, may contribute to the development of a modified cement binder for the production of a lightweight or an aerated concrete. PMID:28891976

  1. Stainless and Galvanized Steel, Hydrophobic Admixture and Flexible Polymer-Cement Coating Compared in Increasing Durability of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Mobili, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The use of stainless or galvanized steel reinforcements, a hydrophobic admixture or a flexible polymer-cement coating were compared as methods to improve the corrosion resistance of sound or cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride rich solutions. The results show that in full immersion condition, negligible corrosion rates were detected in all cracked specimens, except those treated with the flexible polymer-cement mortar as preventive method against corrosion and the hydrophobic concrete specimens. High corrosion rates were measured in all cracked specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles, except for those reinforced with stainless steel, those treated with the flexible polymer-cement coating as restorative method against reinforcement corrosion and for hydrophobic concrete specimens reinforced with galvanized steel reinforcements.

  2. Fabrication of a biocomposite reinforced with hydrophilic eggshell proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, GeunHyung; Min, Taijin; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Koh, Young Ho

    2007-01-01

    Soluble eggshell proteins were used as a reinforcing material of electrospun micro/nanofibers for tissue engineering. A biocomposite composed of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) micro/nanofibers and soluble eggshell protein was fabricated with a two-step fabrication method, which is an electrospinning process followed by an air-spraying process. To achieve a stable electrospinning process, we used an auxiliary cylindrical electrode connected with a spinning nozzle. PCL biocomposite was characterized in water contact angle and mechanical properties as well as cell proliferation for its application as a tissue engineering material. It showed an improved hydrophilic characteristic compared with that of a micro/nanofiber web generated from a pure PCL solution using a typical electrospinning process. Moreover, the fabricated biocomposite had good mechanical properties compared to a typical electrospun micro/nanofiber mat. The fabricated biocomposite made human dermal fibroblasts grow better than pure PCL. From the results, the reinforced polymeric micro/nanofiber scaffold can be easily achieved with these modified processes

  3. Construction Technology and Mechanical Properties of a Cement-Soil Mixing Pile Reinforced by Basalt Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Hong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of cement-soil mixing pile reinforced by basalt fibre is proposed for increasing the bearing capacity of cement-soil mixing piles. This work primarily consists of three parts. First, the process of construction technology is proposed, which could allow uniform mixing of the basalt fibre in cement-soil. Second, the optimal proportions of the compound mixtures and the mechanical properties of the pile material are obtained from unconfined compression strength test, tensile splitting strength test, and triaxial shear test under different conditions. Third, the reliability of the construction technology, optimal proportions, and mechanical properties are verified by testing the mechanical properties of the drilling core sample on site.

  4. Fracture resistance of metal-free composite crowns-effects of fiber reinforcement, thermal cycling, and cementation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The improved mechanical properties of contemporary composites have resulted in their extensive use for the restoration of posterior teeth. However, the influence of fiber reinforcement, cementation technique, and physical stress on the fracture resistance of metal-free crowns is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of fiber reinforcement, physical stress, and cementation methods on the fracture resistance of posterior metal-free Sinfony crowns. Ninety-six extracted human third molars received a standardized tooth preparation: 0.5-mm chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 1.3 to 1.5 mm. Sinfony (nonreinforced crowns, n=48) and Sinfony-Vectris (reinforced crowns, n=48) crowns restoring original tooth contour were prepared. Twenty-four specimens of each crown type were cemented, using either glass ionomer cement (GIC) or resin cement. Thirty-two crowns (one third) were stored in humidity for 48 hours. Another third was exposed to 10,000 thermal cycles (TC) between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The remaining third was treated with thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML), consisting of 1.2 million axial loads of 50 N. The artificial crowns were then vertically loaded with a steel sphere until failure occurred. Significant differences in fracture resistance (N) between experimental groups were assessed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha=.05). Fifty percent of the Sinfony and Sinfony-Vectris crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement loosened after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in a significant reduction in the mean fracture resistance for Sinfony crowns cemented with GIC, from 2037 N to 1282 N (P=.004). Additional fatigue produced no further effects. Fiber reinforcement significantly increased fracture resistance, from 1555 N to 2326 N (P=.001). The minimal fracture resistance was above 600 N for all combinations of material, cement and loading. Fracture resistance of metal-free Sinfony crowns was significantly increased by

  5. Jordanian silica sand and cement as a reinforcement material for polystyrene matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalham, S. I.

    1999-01-01

    The behaviour of polystyrene matrix composites with different percentages of Jordaanian Silica Sand as a Reinforcement Materials (0, 5, 25, 50, and 75 wt%) and different mean grain sizes of sand particles (60, 75, 85, and 300μ m) and with cement as a boning materials in the amount fo 1/6 wt% of the wt% of silica sand were manufactured and tested under compression loading in the Industrial Engineering Department as the Uninersity of Jordan as a part of large study on local materials. The main conclusions of this investigation are: a long-term, durable structure of the polystyrene composite reinforced by silica sand and cement was achieved by mixing the constituents with water; the higher the volume fraction of the reinforcement, the higher the volume fraction of reinforcement, the higher the strength while for 75% of reinforcement, the strength dropped to an amount less than that of the matrix; the higher the grain size, the higher the strength; longitudinal brittle fracture was observed for the composites, and a homogeneous distribution of the sand particles helped in increasing the strength of the composite by playing an important role in distributing the applied load. (author). 11 refs., 6 tabs, 2 figs

  6. Selected Bibliography on Fiber-Reinforced Cement and Concrete. Supplement Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    Building Industry," L’Industria Italiana del Cemento , Vol 50, No. 12, Dec 1980, pp 1135-1144. 19. Bartos, P., "Pullout Failure of Fibres Embedded in Cement...Vol 43, No. 11, Nov 1977, pp 561-564. 21. Bassan, M., "Model of Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concretes Under Impact Stresses," il Cemento , Vol 74, No...Pastes," il Cemento , Vol 75, No. 3, Jul-Sep 1978, pp 277-284. 210. Mills, R. H., "Age-Embrittlement of Glass-Reinforced Concrete Containing Blastfurance

  7. Optimum processing parameters for the fabrication of twill flax fabric-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhudi, Nurul Zuhairah Mahmud; Minhat, Mulia; Shamsuddin, Mohd Hafizi; Isa, Mohd Dali; Nur, Nurhayati Mohd

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, natural fabric thermoplastic composites such as flax have received much attention due to its attractive capabilities for structural applications. It is crucial to study the processing of flax fabric materials in order to achieve good quality and cost-effectiveness in fibre reinforced composites. Though flax fabric has been widely utilized for several years in composite applications due to its high strength and abundance in nature, much work has been concentrated on short flax fibre and very little work focused on using flax fabric. The effectiveness of the flax fabric is expected to give higher strength performance due to its structure but the processing needs to be optimised. Flax fabric composites were fabricated using compression moulding due to its simplicity, gives good surface finish and relatively low cost in terms of labour and production. Further, the impregnation of the polymer into the fabric is easier in this process. As the fabric weave structure contributes to the impregnation quality which leads to the overall performance, the processing parameters of consolidation i.e. pressure, time, and weight fraction of fabric were optimized using the Taguchi method. This optimization enhances the consolidation quality of the composite by improving the composite mechanical properties, three main tests were conducted i.e. tensile, flexural and impact test. It is observed that the processing parameter significantly affected the consolidation and quality of composite.

  8. Carbon fiber reinforced hierarchical orthogrid stiffened cylinder: Fabrication and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Lai, Changlian; Sun, Fangfang; Li, Ming; Ji, Bin; Wei, Weiyi; Liu, Debo; Zhang, Xi; Fan, Hualin

    2018-04-01

    To get strong, stiff and light cylindrical shell, carbon fiber reinforced hierarchical orthogrid stiffened cylinders are designed and fabricated. The cylinder is stiffened by two-scale orthogrid. The primary orthogrid has thick and high ribs and contains several sub-orthogrid cells whose rib is much thinner and lower. The primary orthogrid stiffens the bending rigidity of the cylinder to resist the global instability while the sub-orthogrid stiffens the bending rigidity of the skin enclosed by the primary orthogrid to resist local buckling. The cylinder is fabricated by filament winding method based on a silicone rubber mandrel with hierarchical grooves. Axial compression tests are performed to reveal the failure modes. With hierarchical stiffeners, the cylinder fails at skin fracture and has high specific strength. The cylinder will fail at end crushing if the end of the cylinder is not thickened. Global instability and local buckling are well restricted by the hierarchical stiffeners.

  9. A comparative evaluation of compressive strength of Portland cement with zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-reinforced cement: An in vitro analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S Prakasam; Prakasam Bharadwaj; S C Loganathan; B Krishna Prasanth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ultimate compressive strength of 50% and 25% Portland cement mixed with Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol and zinc oxide eugenol cement after 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty samples were selected. The samples were made cylindrical of size 6 × 8 mm and were divided into six groups as follows with each group consisting of 10 samples. Group 1: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with...

  10. Constitutive modeling of fiber-reinforced cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulfiza, Mohamed

    The role of fibers in the enhancement of the inherently low tensile stress and strain capacities of fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRC) has been addressed through both the phenomenological, using concepts of continuum damage mechanics, and micro-mechanical approaches leading to the development of a closing pressure that could be used in a cohesive crack analysis. The observed enhancements in the matrix behavior is assumed to be related to the ability of the material to transfer stress across cracks. In the micromechanics approach, this is modeled by the introduction of a nonlinear closing pressure at the crack lips. Due to the different nature of cracking in the pre-peak and post peak regimes, two different micro-mechanical models of the cohesive pressure have been proposed, one for the strain hardening stage and another for the strain softening regime. This cohesive pressure is subsequently incorporated into a finite element code so that a nonlinear fracture analysis can be carried out. On top of the fact that a direct fracture analysis has been performed to predict the response of some FRC structural elements, a numerical procedure for the homogenization of FRC materials has been proposed. In this latter approach, a link is established between the cracking taking place at the meso-scale and its mechanical characteristics as represented by the Young's modulus. A parametric study has been carried out to investigate the effect of crack patterning and fiber volume fractions on the overall Young's modulus and the thermodynamic force associated with the tensorial damage variable. After showing the usefulness and power of phenomenological continuum damage mechanics (PCDM) in the prediction of ERC materials' response to a stimuli (loading), a combined PCDM-NLFMsp1 approach is proposed to model (predict, forecast) the complete response of the composite up to failure. Based on experimental observations, this approach assumes that damage mechanics which predicts

  11. Fabrication and properties of carbon network reinforced composite fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umer, Malik Adeel; Mistarihi, Qusai Mahmoud; Kim, Joon Hui; Hong, Soon Hyung; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2014-01-01

    Zirconium dioxide composites reinforced with 3D glassy carbon foam was fabricated using Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) with a heating rate of 100degC/min and a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa at 1500degC, 1600degC, and 1700degC, respectively. The effect of carbon foam on the thermal properties of the ZrO 2 composites was investigated. In addition, the effect of the sintering temperature on the densification of the composites was also investigated and the optimized sintering temperature was identified. The microstructures of 3D carbon foam reinforced ZrO 2 composites showed that the 3D shape of carbon foam was retained after the sintering process, and the ZrO 2 was homogeneously distributed within the 3D carbon foam. At the interfaces between the 3D carbon foam and ZrO 2 , neither a chemical reaction nor a new phase formation was detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffractometry (XRD). The thermal diffusivity of carbon foam reinforced ZrO 2 composites measured at 1100degC was increased by 47% and reached to 0.66 mm 2 s -1 and the thermal conductivity was increased by 50% and reached to 2.428 W/m-K. (author)

  12. Degradation of normal portland and slag cement concrete under load, due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Feldman, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The corrosion of reinforcement is one of the major degradation mechanisms of reinforced concrete elements. The majority of studies published on concrete-steel corrosion have been conducted on unstressed specimens. Structural concrete, however, is subjected to substantial strain near the steel reinforcing bars that resist tensile loads, which results in a system of microcracks. This report presents the initial results of an investigation to determine the effect of applied load and microcracking on the rate of ingress of chloride ion and corrosion of steel in concrete. Simply-supported concrete beam specimens were loaded to give a maximum strain of about 600 με on the tension face. Chloride ion ingress on cores taken from loaded specimens was monitored using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. Corrosion current and rate measurements using linear polarization electrochemical techniques were also obtained on the same loaded specimens. Variables investigated included two concrete types, two steel cover-depths, three applied load levels, bonded and unbonded rebars and the exposure of tension and compression beam faces to chloride solution. One concrete mixture was made with type 10 Portland cement, the other with 75% blast furnace slag, 22% type 50 cement and 3% silica fume. The rate of chloride ion ingress into reinforced concrete, and hence the time for chloride ion to reach the reinforcing steel, is shown to be dependent on applied load and the concrete quality. The dependence of corrosion process descriptors - passive layer formation, initiation period and propagation period - on the level of applied load is discussed. (Author) (6 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.)

  13. Physico-Chemical studies on irradiated polymer-reinforcement cement mortar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The reinforced concrete suffers from corrosion by several salts, acids or alkalies and physico-mechanical properties are greatly affected. This leads to reduce the life of reinforced concrete structure. The present investigation deals with a comparison of corrosion presentation efficiency and passivity retention of reinforcement steel coated with methylethyl and propyl inhibitors which are prepared by using γ radiation and non-coated steel embedded in γ -induced polyester cement mortar composites. From the results of these studies several conclusions could be derived and these are summarized as follows: 1- The time required to reach passivation for coated steel embedded in the mortar after soaking in tap water for 28 days lies within the range 5-15 minutes; whereas, the time required to reach passivation for steel embedded in the polyester cement mortar composites is very short (1 minute). This result is related to the presence of copolymerized polyester in the pore system of the specimens. 2- The time required to reach passivation for steel coated by inhibitors in the mortar specimens after curing in tap water for 6 months is lower than that of non -coated steel embedded in the mortar specimens cured at the same conditions. 3- A relatively high degree of corrosion inhibition was obtained for the steel embedded in polyester-cement mortar composites after curing in sea water for 28 days, the time required to reach passivation is considered as moderate in the case of methyl and ethyl inhibitors the time to passivation (T.T.P.) = 9 minutes and the degree of inhibition of steel coated with the propyl inhibitor is comparatively low (T.T.P.=21 minutes)

  14. Microwave detection of delaminations between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite and hardened cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D.; Kazemi, M.; Marler, K.; Zoughi, R.; Myers, J.; Nanni, A.

    2002-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used for the rehabilitation of concrete structures. Detection and characterization of delaminations between an FRP composite and a concrete surface are of paramount importance. Consequently, the development of a one sided, non-contact, real time and rapid nondestructive testing (NDT) technique for this purpose is of great interest. Near-field microwave NDT techniques, using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes, have shown great potential for detecting delaminations in layered composite structures such as these. The results of some theoretical and experimental investigations on a specially prepared cement paste specimen are presented here.

  15. Sisal fibre pull-out behaviour as a guide to matrix selection for the production of sisal fibre reinforced cement matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapiravana, Joe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibre reinforced cement composites are promising potential materials for use in panelised construction. The structural properties of these composite materials are yet to be fully understood. As the role of the natural fibre is to reinforce...

  16. The influence of stiffeners on axial crushing of glass-fabric-reinforced epoxy composite shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vasanthanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A generic static and impact experimental procedure has been developed in this work aimed at improving the stability of glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell structures by bonding with axial stiffeners. Crashworthy structures fabricated from composite laminate with stiffeners would offer energy absorption superior to metallic structures under compressive loading situations. An experimental material characterisation of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite under uni-axial tension has been carried out in this study. This work provides a numerical simulation procedure to describe the static and dynamic response of unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (without stiffeners and stiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (with axial stiffeners under static and impact loading using the Finite Element Method. The finite element calculation for the present study was made with ANSYS®-LS-DYNA® software. Based upon the experimental and numerical investigations, it has been asserted that glass fabric reinforced epoxy shells stiffened with GFRP stiffeners are better than unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell and glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell stiffened with aluminium stiffeners. The failure surfaces of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell structures tested under impact were examined by SEM.

  17. Thermal conductivity of cement stabilized earth bricks reinforced with date palm fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrehail, Tahar; Zemmouri, Noureddine; Agoudjil, Boudjemaa

    2018-05-01

    Recently, some cheap materials are available and adaptable to climate seem to meet current requirements. This paper investigates the thermal and mechanical properties of cement stabilized earth bricks(CSEB) reinforced with date palm fibers (DPF). The main goal is to develop and expand the field of use of these materials in the construction sector, and investigate the possibility of new bio composite as renewable, insulating building material with low cost, made of earth and reinforced with palm wood waste. In this study, a particular interest is brought to the thermal and mechanical characteristics, which constitute a decisive character for the choice of a building material. A series of earthen samples stabilized at 5% and reinforced with DPF of various fiber weight fractions, (5%, 10%), were manufactured and compacted applying two levels compacting, (5MPa and 10MPa). Compressive strength and thermal conductivity were experimentally studied; heating capacity and diffusivity were indirectly calculated. It was found that the fibrous reinforcement proved thermal conductivity and compressive strength. it also enhanced thermal performances. Thus, the results found allow us to investigate hygrothermal behaviour and its impact on occupants comfort.

  18. Flax fabric reinforced arylated soy protein composites: A brittle-matrix behaviour

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biocomposites were successfully prepared by the reinforcement of soy protein isolate (SPI) with different weight fractions of woven flax fabric. The flax-fabric-reinforced SPI-based composites were then arylated with 2,2-diphenyl-2-hydroxyethanoic...

  19. Improved Mechanical Properties of Various Fabric-Reinforced Geocomposite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha; Phan Thanh, Nhan; Petríková, Iva; Marvalová, Bohadana

    2015-07-01

    This article signifies the improved performance of the various types of fabric reinforcement of geopolymer as a function of physical, thermal, mechanical, and heat-resistant properties at elevated temperatures. Geopolymer mixed with designed Si:Al ratios of 15.6 were synthesized using three different types of fabric reinforcement such as carbon, E-glass, and basalt fibers. Heat testing was conducted on 3-mm-thick panels with 15 × 90 mm surface exposure region. The strength of carbon-based geocomposite increased toward a higher temperature. The basalt-reinforced geocomposite strength decreased due to the catastrophic failure in matrix region. The poor bridging effect and dissolution of fabric was observed in the E-glass-reinforced geocomposite. At an elevated temperature, fiber bridging was observed in carbon fabric-reinforced geopolymer matrix. Among all the fabrics, carbon proved to be suitable candidate for the high-temperature applications in thermal barrier coatings and fire-resistant panels.

  20. Ballistic Performance of Mallow and Jute Natural Fabrics Reinforced Epoxy Composites in Multilayered Armor

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Marçal, Rubens Lincoln Santana Blazutti; Lima Júnior, Édio Pereira; Margem, Jean Igor

    2017-01-01

    Natural fiber reinforced polymer composites have recently been investigated as a component of multilayered armor system (MAS). These composites were found to present advantages when replacing conventional high strength synthetic aramid fabric laminate composite (KevlarTM, with same thickness, as MAS second layer. Continuous and loose natural fibers were up to now mostly used to reinforce these ballistic composites. Only two natural fabrics reinforced polymer composite were so far used with sa...

  1. Fabrication and characterization of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, E. de; Motisuke, M.; Bertran, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    In Tissue Engineering, the need for scaffolds which are capable of guiding the organization, differentiation and growth of cells leading to the formation of new tissues is highly relevant. For the development of new scaffolds focused on bone tissue therapy, calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have great potential, because besides their resorbability, they present morphology and chemical composition similar to the bone mineral phase. Moreover, there are several processing techniques to produce ceramic scaffolds: polymeric sponge replication, incorporation of organic material into the ceramic powder, gelcasting, emulsion, among others. The aim of this work was to obtain CPCs scaffolds by using two techniques, emulsion and gelcasting. The scaffolds were characterized by their physical and mechanical properties and the crystalline phases formed after the setting reaction of cement were determined by X-ray diffraction. The samples obtained by both methods presented porosity between 61-65% and the microstructure consists of nearly spherical pores (d5o = 50-100 μm). The mechanical strength of the samples ranged from 5.5 to 1.5 MPa. The crystalline phases found were monetite (CaHPO 4 ) and brushite (CaHPO 4 2H 2 O). (author)

  2. Microleakage of Glass Ionomer-based Provisional Cement in CAD/CAM-Fabricated Interim Crowns: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ra'fat I; Al-Harethi, Naji

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the marginal microleakage of glass ionomer-based provisional cement with resin-based provisional cement and zinc oxide non-eugenol (ZONE) provisional cement in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated interim restorations. Fifteen intact human premolars were prepared in a standardized manner for complete coverage of crown restorations. Interim crowns for the prepared teeth were then fabricated using CAD/CAM, and the specimens were randomized into three groups of provisional cementing agents (n = 5 each): Glass ionomer-based provisional cement (GC Fuji TEMP LT™), bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/ triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin-based cement (UltraTemp® REZ), and ZONE cement (TempBond NE). After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled and then stored again for 24 hours in distilled water at room temperature. Next, the specimens were placed in freshly prepared 2% aqueous methylene blue dye for 24 hours and then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks and sectioned in buccolingual and mesiodistal directions to assess dye penetration using a stereomicroscope. The results were statistically analyzed using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Dunn's post hoc test with a Bonferroni correction test was used to compute multiple pairwise comparisons that identified differences among groups; the level of significance was set at p provisional cement demonstrated the lowest microleakage scores, which were statistically different from those of the glass ionomer-based provisional cement and the ZONE cement. The provisional cementing agents exhibited different sealing abilities. The Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin-based provisional cement exhibited the most effective favorable sealing properties against dye penetration compared with the glass ionomer-based provisional cement and conventional ZONE cement. Newly introduced glass

  3. The effect of two types of modified Mg-Al hydrotalcites on reinforcement corrosion in cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Polder, R.; Mol, J.M.C.; Andrade, C.

    2017-01-01

    Two modified Mg-Al hydrotalcites (MHTs), (MHT-pAB and MHT-NO2) were incorporated into mortar (with different w/c ratios) in two different ways: (1) as one of the mixing components in bulk mortar; (2) as part of cement paste coating of the reinforcing steel. Accelerated chloride migration, cyclic

  4. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  5. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  6. Flexural Behavior of RC Slabs Strengthened in Flexure with Basalt Fabric-Reinforced Cementitious Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugyu Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents both experimental and analytical research results for predicting the flexural capacity of reinforced concrete (RC slabs strengthened in flexure with basalt fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM. A total of 13 specimens were fabricated to evaluate the flexural behavior of RC slabs strengthened with basalt FRCM composite and were tested under four-point loading. The fiber type, tensile reinforcement ratio, and the number of fabric layers were chosen as experimental variables. The maximum load of FRCM-strengthened specimens increased from 11.2% to 98.2% relative to the reference specimens. The energy ratio and ductility of the FRCM-strengthened specimens decreased with the higher amount of fabric and tensile reinforcement. The effective stress level of FRCM fabric can be accurately predicted by a bond strength of ACI 549 and Jung’s model.

  7. Effect of sewage wastes on the physico-mechanical properties of cement and reinforced steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy A. Abd El-Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aggressive chemical attack due to salt water is one of many factors affecting the concrete deterioration. This effect includes corrosion of concrete and steel due to the exposure to the aggressive natural or artificial chemicals such as ammonia and ammonium salts. Ammonia is one of the compounds substantially in each of the remnants of sanitation plants, industrial or service of some units within building industrial waste. This work aims to study the effect of different concentrations of ammonia in the popular image on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of different types of cement such as SRC; OPC and HSC. The electrochemical measurement (linear polarization systems as well as infrared spectroscopy (IR were used in this study. The behaviour of reinforced steel embedded in SRC; OPC and HSC with (5 wt.% ammonium sulphate solution were determined. The results show that ammonia gets a harmful effect on OPC and SRC mortars but HSC shows high resistivity. Also, the reinforced steel is greatly affected in the aggressive medium containing ammonium solution.

  8. Viscoelastic and thermal properties of woven sisal fabric reinforced natural rubber biocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the dynamic mechanical behavior of woven sisal fabric reinforced natural rubber composites. The influence of chemical modification on the viscoelastic properties has also been determined. Moreover, the effect of frequency...

  9. Experimental Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Hemp/E-Glass Fabric Reinforced Polyester Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R SANJAY

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research work has been focusing on Hemp fibers has an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites due to its eco-friendly and biodegradable characteristics. This work has been carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of hemp/E-glass fabrics reinforced polyester hybrid composites. Vacuum bagging method was used for the preparation of six different kinds of hemp/glass fabrics reinforced polyester composite laminates as per layering sequences. The tensile, flexural, impact and water absorption tests of these hybrid composites were carried out experimentally according to ASTM standards. It reveals that an addition of E-glass fabrics with hemp fabrics can increase the mechanical properties of composites and decrease the water absorption of the hybrid composites.

  10. Environmental controls for the precipitation of different fibrous calcite cement fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Ann-Christine; Wiethoff, Felix; Neuser, Rolf D.; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Abiogenic calcite cements are widely used as climate archives. They can yield information on environmental change and climate dynamics at the time when the sediment was lithified in a (marine) diagenetic environment. Radiaxial-fibrous (RFC) and fascicular-optic fibrous (FOFC) calcite cements are two very common and similar pore-filling cement fabrics in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic carbonate rocks (Richter et al., 2011) and in Holocene Mg-calcitic speleothems (Richter et al., 2015). Both fabrics are characterised by distinct crystallographic properties. Current research has shown that these fabrics are often underexplored and that a careful combination of conservative and innovative proxies allows for a better applicability of these carbonate archives to paleoenvironmental reconstructions (Ritter et al., 2015). A main uncertainty in this context is that it is still poorly understood which parameters lead to the formation of either RFC or FOFC and if differential crystallographic parameters affect proxy data from these fabrics. This study aims at a better understanding of the environmental factors that may control either RFC or FOFC precipitation. Therefore, suitable samples (a stalagmite and a Triassic marine cement succession), each with clearly differentiable layers of RFC and FOFC, were identified and analysed in high detail using a multi-proxy approach. Detailed thin section and cathodoluminescence analysis of the samples allowed for a precise identification of layers consisting solely of either RFC or FOFC. Isotopic (δ13C, δ18O) as well as trace elemental compositions have been determined and the comparison of data obtained from these different carbonate archives sheds light on changes in environmental parameters during RFC or FOFC precipitation. References: Richter, D.K., et al., 2011. Radiaxial-fibrous calcites: A new look at an old problem. Sedimentary Geology, 239, 26-36 Richter, D.K., et al., 2015. Radiaxial-fibrous and fascicular-optic Mg-calcitic cave

  11. The mechanical study of acrylic bone cement reinforced with carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nien, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chiao-li

    2010-01-01

    Bone cement is used as filler between prosthesis and bone for fixation and force distribution. The major composition of bone cement is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Some disadvantages of PMMA bone cement are found such as significant poor mechanical properties which may cause failure of the cement. In this paper, we exploited carbon nanotube to enhance the mechanical properties of bone cement. The mechanical properties of the bone cement were characterized using tensile and compressive analysis as well as dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The result shows that carbon nanotube is able to enhance the mechanical properties of the modified bone cement.

  12. The mechanical study of acrylic bone cement reinforced with carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nien, Yu-Hsun, E-mail: nienyh@yuntech.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chiao-li [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-25

    Bone cement is used as filler between prosthesis and bone for fixation and force distribution. The major composition of bone cement is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Some disadvantages of PMMA bone cement are found such as significant poor mechanical properties which may cause failure of the cement. In this paper, we exploited carbon nanotube to enhance the mechanical properties of bone cement. The mechanical properties of the bone cement were characterized using tensile and compressive analysis as well as dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The result shows that carbon nanotube is able to enhance the mechanical properties of the modified bone cement.

  13. Effect of fabrication pressure on the fatigue performance of Cemex XL acrylic bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gladius; Janna, S I

    2004-01-01

    During a cemented arthroplasty, the prepared polymerizing dough of acrylic bone cement is subjected to pressurization in a number of ways; first, during delivery into the freshly prepared bone bed, second, during packing in that bed (either digitally or with the aid of a mechanical device), and, third, during the insertion of the prosthesis. Only a few studies have reported on the influence of the level of pressurization experienced during these events (which, depending on the cementing technique used, has been put at between 8 and 273 kPa) on various properties of the cement. That was the focus of the present study, in which the fully reversed tension-compression (+/-15 MPa; 5 Hz) fatigue lives (expressed as number of cycles to fracture, N(f)) of rectangular cross-sectioned "dog-bone" specimens (Type V, per ASTM D 638) fabricated from Cemex XL cement, at pressure applied continuously to the cement dough during curing in the specimen mold, p=75,150, and 300 kPa, were determined. The N(f) results were analyzed using the linearized transformation of the three-parameter Weibull relationship to obtain estimates of the Weibull mean, N(WM), which was taken to be the index of fatigue performance of the specimen set. Over the range of p studied, N(WM) increased as p increased (for example, from 329,118 cycles when p was 75 kPa to 388,496 cycles when p was 300 kPa); however, the increase was not significant over any pair of p increment steps (Mann-Whitney U-test; alpha<0.05).

  14. Effect of Addition of A Marble Dust on Drying Shrinkage Cracks of Cement Mortar Reinforced with Various Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Thabit Al-Khafaji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is conducted to study the effect of addition of marble powder (marble dust and different fibers on drying shrinkage cracks and some properties of fibers reinforcment cement mortar. Steel molds having a trapezoidal section, and the end restrained at square shape with( 2.7 meter at length are used to study restrained drying shrinkage of cement mortar. Specimens of ( compressive .flextural. splitting strength were cast. The admixture (marble dust was used to replacie weight of cement with three levels of (4%, 8% and 16% and the fiber hemp and sisal fiber were added for all mixes with proportion by volum of cement . All specimens were cured for (14 days. Average of three results was taken for any test of compressive, tensil and flextural strength. The experimental results showed that the adding of this admixture(marble dust cause adelay in a formation of cracks predicted from a drying shrinkage ,decreases of its width , and hence increases of (compressive, splitting tensil and flextural strength at levels of (4%, and 8%. Thus there is a the positive effect when fiberes added for all mixes of cement mortar with addition of (marble dust. All The admixtures (marble dust and fibers have the obvious visible effect in the delay of the information of shrinkage cracks and the decrease of its width as Compared to the cement mortar mixes when marble dust added a alone.

  15. Assessment the potential of using Carbon nanotubes reinforcements for improving the tensile/flexural strength and fracture toughness of Portland cement paste for damage resistant concrete transportation infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The focus of this study was on exploring the use of nanotechnology-based nano-filaments, such as carbon : nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs), as reinforcement in improving the mechanical properties of Portland : cement paste as a construction mat...

  16. Fabrication of a silicon oxide stamp by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of a stamp reinforced with silicon nitride is presented for its use in nanoimprint lithography. The fabrication process is based on edge lithography using conventional optical lithography and wet anisotropic etching of 110 silicon wafers. SiO2 nano-ridges of 20 nm in width were

  17. Use of hyghly reactive rice husk ash in the production of cement matrix reinforced with Green coconut fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, C.L.; Savastano, H. Jr; Paya Bernabeu, Jorge Juan; Santos, S. F.; Borrachero Rosado, María Victoria; Monzó Balbuena, José Mª; Soriano Martinez, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of partial replacement of Portland cement by rice husk ash (RHA) to enable the use of green coconut husk fiber as reinforcement for cementitious matrix. The use of highly reactive pozzolanic ash contributes for decreasing the alkaline attack on the vegetable fiber, originated from waste materials. The slurry dewatering technique was used for dispersion of the raw materials in aqueous solution, followed by vacuum drainage of water and pressing for the product...

  18. STRESS-STRAIN STATE OF ROCKFILL DAM DOUBLE-LAYER FACE MADE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE AND SOIL-CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainov Mikhail Petrovich

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the stress-strain state of 215 m high rockfill dam where the seepage-control element is presented by a reinforced concrete face of soil-cement concrete placed on the under-face zone. Calculations were carried out for two possible variants of deformability of rock outline taking into account the non-linearity of its deformative properties. It was obtained that the reinforced concrete face and the soil-cement concrete under-face zone work jointly as a single construction - a double-layer face. As the face assembly resting on rock is made with a sliding joint the scheme of its static operation is similar to the that of the beam operation on the elastic foundation. At that, the upstream surface of the double-layer face is in the compressed zone and lower one is in the tensile zone. This protects the face against cracking on the upstream surface but threatens with structural failure of soil-cement concrete. In order to avoid appearance of cracks in soil-cement concrete part due to tension it is necessary to achieve proper compaction of rockfill and arrange transverse joints in the double-layer face.

  19. Effect of Polysiloxanes on Roughness and Durability of Basalt Fibres–Reinforced Cement Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Barnat-Hunek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of roughness and the way it affects the adhesion properties and surface free energy (SFE of polysiloxanes hydrophobised basalt fibres–reinforced cement mortars were determined in this article. The physical properties of mortars were investigated in the experimental part, which also explored the impact of hydrophobisation and basalt fibres (BF addition on SFE, frost resistance, contact angle (CA, and roughness. A device capable of calculating all parameters was used to indicate the surface roughness and 3D topography. Prior to and after conducting surface and weight hydrophobisation, the contact angle of mortars was specified. Subsequently, it was used for carrying out SFE calculation by means of Neumann’s method, enabling us to characterize the adhesion properties and wettability of mortars. The research indicated that the surface roughness was substantially decreased, in turn raising the frost resistance. The corrosion resistance drops when the surface roughness, water absorption, and number of fibres in the mortar increase. The SEM images presenting the structure of polysiloxane coating and mortars were provided.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of high impact hybrid matrix composites from thermoset resin and dyneema-glass fabric reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Pansuriya, T.; Malgani, E. V.; Sevkani, V.

    2018-05-01

    Hybrid composites have been fabricated by hand lay-up technique with epoxy resin and diethylene tri amine as a hardener for high impact energy absorption with sandwich stacking of different reinforcements of dyneema and glass fabric. High impact grade composites are nowadays gaining a lot of importance in the field of high mechanical load bearing applications, ballistics and bulletproofing. The present work emphases on the fabrication and mechanical properties of the hybrid composites of cut resistant dyneema fabric along with glass fabric reinforced in the thermosetting resin. i.e. epoxy. The prime importance while fabricating such materials have been given to the processing along with selection of the raw materials. High impact resistive materials with low density and henceforth low weight have been manufactured and characterized by IZOD impact tester, UTM, Archimedes density meter and SEM. Throughout the work, satisfactory results have been obtained. Impact resistance was observed to be boosted three times as that of the reference sample of glass fabric and epoxy. The density of the hybrid composite is observed to be 25% as that of the reference sample.

  1. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fabrication of a reinforced polymer microstructure using femtosecond laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alubaidy, M; Venkatakrishnan, K; Tan, B

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the formation of microfeatures with reinforced polymer using femtosecond laser material processing. The femtosecond laser was used for the generation of a three-dimensional interweaved nanofiber and the construction of microfeatures, such as microchannels and voxels, through two-photon polymerization of a nanofiber-dispersed polymer resin. This new method has the potential of direct fabrication of reinforced micro/nanostructures.

  3. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  4. Towards reinforcement solutions for urban fibre/fabric waste using bio-based biodegradable resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Pramod; Hermes, Alina; Bapeer, Solaf; Luiken, Anton; Bouwhuis, Gerrit; Brinks, Ger

    2017-10-01

    The main research question is how to systematically define and characterize urban textile waste and how to effectively utilise it to produce reinforcement(s) with selected bio-based biodegradable resin(s). Several composite samples have been produced utilising predominantly natural and predominantly synthetic fibres by combining loose fibres with PLA, nonwoven fabric with PLA, woven fabric with PLA, two-layer composite & four-layer composite samples. Physio-chemical characterisations according to the established standards have been conducted. The present work is a step toward the circular economy and closing the loop in textile value chain.

  5. Studies on fabrication of glass fiber reinforced composites using polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Kachhia, P. H.; Patel, S. N.; Rathod, S. T.; Valand, J. K.

    2018-05-01

    Glass fiber reinforced PVC/NBR composites have been fabricated via hot compression moulding process. PVC is brittle in nature and thus lower thermal stability. Therefore, to improve the toughness of PVC, NBR was incorporated in certain proportions. As both are polar and thus they are compatible. To improve the strength property further, these blends were used to fabricate glass fiber reinforced composites. SEM micrograph shows good wettability of the blend with glass fibers resulting in proper bonding which increase the strength of the composites.

  6. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori; Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO 4 ) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09 ± 1.85 MPa to 21.56 ± 2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials. - Highlights: • A monetite bone cement for orthopedic applications is reported. • Incorporation of MWCNTs into monetite bone cement is discussed. • Surface functionalized MWCNTs can improve the mechanical strength of monetite cement. • MWCNTs have no impacts on the cytocompatibility of monetite cements

  7. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Zhou, Huan, E-mail: Huan.Zhou@Rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO{sub 4}) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09 ± 1.85 MPa to 21.56 ± 2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials. - Highlights: • A monetite bone cement for orthopedic applications is reported. • Incorporation of MWCNTs into monetite bone cement is discussed. • Surface functionalized MWCNTs can improve the mechanical strength of monetite cement. • MWCNTs have no impacts on the cytocompatibility of monetite cements.

  8. Fabrication of ceramic dispersoid reinforcement by using mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Soon; Kim, Jin Chun

    2010-07-01

    For fabrication of ceramic dispersoid with good wettability, disreputably and homogeneity to metal melt by Mechanical Surface Activation method the followings have been investigated: (1) Processing optimization for surface activation of ceramic dispersoids by mechanical activation (mechanical alloying) (2) Wetting behavior of mechanically-activated ceramic dispersoids (3) Effect of second element on the improvement of wettability and dispersibility

  9. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  10. Performance of Plain Woven Jute Fabric-Reinforced Polyester Matrix Composite in Multilayered Ballistic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ballistic performance of plain woven jute fabric-reinforced polyester matrix composites was investigated as the second layer in a multilayered armor system (MAS. Volume fractions of jute fabric, up to 30 vol %, were mixed with orthophthalic polyester to fabricate laminate composites. Ballistic tests were conducted using high velocity 7.62 mm ammunition. The depth of penetration caused by the bullet in a block of clay witness, simulating a human body, was used to evaluate the MAS ballistic performance according to the international standard. The fractured materials after tests were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results indicated that jute fabric composites present a performance similar to that of the much stronger Kevlar™, which is an aramid fabric laminate, as MAS second layer with the same thickness. The mechanism of this similar ballistic behavior as well as the comparative advantages of the jute fabric composites over the Kevlar™ are discussed.

  11. Effect of gamma radiation on the performance of jute fabrics-reinforced polypropylene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydaruzzaman [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Khan, Ruhul A. [Radiation and Polymer Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, G. P.O. Box 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Khan, Mubarak A. [Radiation and Polymer Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, G. P.O. Box 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: makhan.inst@gmail.com; Khan, A.H.; Hossain, M.A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2009-11-15

    Jute fabrics-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites (50% fiber) were prepared by compression molding. Composites were fabricated with non-irradiated jute fabrics/non-irradiated PP (C-0), non-irradiated jute fabrics/irradiated PP (C-1), irradiated jute fabrics/non-irradiated PP (C-2) and irradiated jute fabrics/irradiated PP (C-3). It was found that C-3 composite performed the best mechanical properties over other composites. Total radiation dose varied from 250-1000 krad and composites made of using 500 krad showed the best results. The optimized values (C-3 composites) for tensile strength (TS), bending strength (BS) and impact strength (IS) were found to be 63 MPa, 73 MPa and 2.93 kJ/m{sup 2}, respectively.

  12. The Effect of Pre-Tension on Deformation Behaviour of Natural Fabric Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulė BEKAMPIENĖ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the fiber-reinforced composites industry together with the promotion of environmental friendly production, synthetic materials are attempted to be replaced by renewable, biodegradable and recyclable materials. The most important challenge is to improve strength and durability of these materials. Matrix that supports the fiber-reinforcement in composite generally is brittle and deformation causes fragmentation of the matrix. Pre-tension of reinforcement is a well-known method to increase tensile strength of woven material. The current study develops the idea to use pre-tension of woven fabric in order to improve quality and strength properties of the obtained composite. Natural (cotton fiber and synthetic (glass fiber woven fabrics were investigated. The pressure forming operation was carried out in order to study clamping imposed strain variation across the surface of woven fabric. The uniaxial tension test of single-layer composite specimens with and without pre-tension was performed to study the effect of pre-tension on strength properties of composite. The results have shown that pre-tension imposed by clamping is an effective method to improve the quality of shaped composite parts (more smoothed contour is obtained and to increase the strength properties of composite reinforced by woven natural fabric. After pre-tension the tensile strength at break increased in 12 % in warp direction, in 58 % in weft direction and in 39 % in bias direction.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.250

  13. Micro-stereotactic frame utilizing bone cement for individual fabrication: an initial investigation of its accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Thomas S.; Lexow, G. Jakob; Blume, Denise; Kluge, Marcel; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid

    2017-03-01

    A new method for template-guided cochlear implantation surgery is proposed which has been developed to create a minimally invasive access to the inner ear. A first design of the surgical template was drafted, built, and finally tested regarding its accuracy. For individual finalization of the micro-stereotactic frame bone cement is utilized as this well-known and well-established material suggests ease of use as well as high clinical acceptance and enables both sterile and rapid handling. The new concept includes an alignment device, based on a passive hexapod with manually adjustable legs for temporary fixation of the separate parts in the patient-specific pose until the bone cement is spread and finally cured. Additionally, a corresponding evaluation method was developed to determine the accuracy of the microstereotactic frame in some initial experiments. In total 18 samples of the surgical template were fabricated based on previously planned trajectories. The mean positioning error at the target point was 0.30 mm with a standard deviation of 0.25 mm.

  14. Fabrication and properties of graphene reinforced silicon nitride composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yaping; Li, Bin, E-mail: libin@nudt.edu.cn; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Liu, Kun; Yang, Bei

    2015-09-17

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene platelets (GPLs) were prepared by hot pressed sintering and pressureless sintering respectively. Adequate intermixing of the GPLs and the ceramic powders was achieved in nmethyl-pyrrolidone (NMP) under ultrasonic vibration followed by ball-milling. The microstructure and phases of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic composites were investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of GPLs on the composites' mechanical properties were analyzed. The results showed that GPLs were well dispersed in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic matrix. β-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4,} O′-sialon and GPLs were present in the hot-pressed composites while pressureless sintered composites contain β-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Si, SiC and GPLs. Graphene has the potential to improve the mechanical properties of both the hot pressed and pressureless sintered composites. Toughening effect of GPLs on the pressureless sintered composites appeared more effective than that on the hot pressed composites. Toughening mechanisms, such as pull-out, crack bridging and crack deflection induced by GPLs were observed in the composites prepared by the two methods.

  15. Fabrication and properties of graphene reinforced silicon nitride composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yaping; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Liu, Kun; Yang, Bei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene platelets (GPLs) were prepared by hot pressed sintering and pressureless sintering respectively. Adequate intermixing of the GPLs and the ceramic powders was achieved in nmethyl-pyrrolidone (NMP) under ultrasonic vibration followed by ball-milling. The microstructure and phases of the Si 3 N 4 ceramic composites were investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of GPLs on the composites' mechanical properties were analyzed. The results showed that GPLs were well dispersed in the Si 3 N 4 ceramic matrix. β-Si 3 N 4, O′-sialon and GPLs were present in the hot-pressed composites while pressureless sintered composites contain β-Si 3 N 4 , Si, SiC and GPLs. Graphene has the potential to improve the mechanical properties of both the hot pressed and pressureless sintered composites. Toughening effect of GPLs on the pressureless sintered composites appeared more effective than that on the hot pressed composites. Toughening mechanisms, such as pull-out, crack bridging and crack deflection induced by GPLs were observed in the composites prepared by the two methods

  16. Fabrication and tribological properties of Al reinforced with carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrems Amestoy, Manuel

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work studies the manufacturing process of Al reinforced with Carbon Fibres (CF by "Squeeze Casting", establishing the variables for obtaining an acceptable product with little Al4C3 at the interface. Friction and wear tests are performed and the necessary conditions for the formation of a tribofilm are established. The tests show an increasing resistance to abrasion due to their own wear mechanism. Certain design criteria for those components subjected to friction are recommended in order to maximise the mechanical performance of the tribological system.

    Este trabajo estudia el proceso de fabricación de composites Al reforzado con fibras de carbono mediante la técnica ''Squeeze Casting'', estableciendo las variables para obtener un producto aceptable que tenga poca cantidad de Al4C3 en la interfase. Se han realizado ensayos de fricción y desgaste y se han establecido las condiciones necesarias para la formación de la tribocapa. Se muestra la alta capacidad de resistencia a la abrasión de las piezas producidas debido a su propio mecanismo de desgaste y se recomiendan ciertos criterios de diseño para componentes mecánicos con el fin de optimizar las prestaciones mecánicas en un sistema tribológico.

  17. Method of adhering bone to a rigid substrate using a graphite fiber reinforced bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, A. C.; Maxwell, H. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for adhering bone to the surface of a rigid substrate such as a metal or resin prosthesis using an improved surgical bone cement. The bone cement has mechanical properties more nearly matched to those of animal bone and thermal curing characteristics which result in less traumatization of body tissues and comprises a dispersion of short high modulus graphite fibers within a bonder composition including polymer dissolved in reactive monomer such as polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in methylmethacrylate monomer.

  18. Study on an Improved Phosphate Cement Binder for the Development of Fiber-Reinforced Inorganic Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Ding

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC has been proven to be a very good repair material for deteriorated concrete structures. It has excellent adhesion performance, leading to high bonding strength with old concrete substrates. This paper presents an experimental study into the properties of MPC binder as the matrix of carbon fiber sheets to form fiber-reinforced inorganic polymer (FRIP composites. The physical and mechanical performance of the fresh mixed and the hardened MPC paste, the bond strength of carbon fiber sheets in the MPC matrix, the tensile strength of the carbon FRIP composites and the microstructure of the MPC matrix and fiber-reinforced MPC composites were investigated. The test results showed that the improved MPC binder is well suited for developing FRIP composites, which can be a promising alternative to externally-bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP composites for the strengthening of concrete structures. Through the present study, an in-depth understanding of the behavior of fiber-reinforced inorganic MPC composites has been achieved.

  19. Analysis of the mechanical resistance and porosity of a composite cement with EVA and reinforced with piacava fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.M.; Dominguez, D.S.; Alvim, R.C.; Iglesias, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, a lot of solid waste material is discarded into the environment. One of these residues is the EVA (Ethyl Vinyl Acetate) which has the footwear industry, as its main consumer. Studies are focused on the reusing of these materials, particularly in the civil construction, where is used as an aggregate in the production of light mortars. Due to the specific characteristics of lightweight concrete, is necessary to reinforce these materials. The palm Attalea Funifera Martius, known as piacava, may be an excellent alternative as a reinforcement element in light cement mixes. In this work, it's verified the mechanical strength of a composite lightweight cementitious with EVA and reinforced with Piacava fibers, also, the porosity of the new material was measured. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this new material was made mechanical tests and verified the importance of vegetal fibers as the material reinforcing. For the compound porosity evaluation, samples were studied using microcomputer tomography (μTC). With images processing techniques we identify and quantify the pores. The processing digital images through μTC showed up as a non-destructive method for efficient and acceptable results. (author)

  20. Shape Effect of Electrochemical Chloride Extraction in Structural Reinforced Concrete Elements Using a New Cement-Based Anodic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Carmona

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the research carried out by the authors focused on how the shape of structural reinforced concrete elements treated with electrochemical chloride extraction can affect the efficiency of this process. Assuming the current use of different anode systems, the present study considers the comparison of results between conventional anodes based on Ti-RuO2 wire mesh and a cement-based anodic system such as a paste of graphite-cement. Reinforced concrete elements of a meter length were molded to serve as laboratory specimens, to closely represent authentic structural supports, with circular and rectangular sections. Results confirm almost equal performances for both types of anode systems when electrochemical chloride extraction is applied to isotropic structural elements. In the case of anisotropic ones, such as rectangular sections with no uniformly distributed rebar, differences in electrical flow density were detected during the treatment. Those differences were more extreme for Ti-RuO2 mesh anode system. This particular shape effect is evidenced by obtaining the efficiencies of electrochemical chloride extraction in different points of specimens.

  1. Shape Effect of Electrochemical Chloride Extraction in Structural Reinforced Concrete Elements Using a New Cement-Based Anodic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Jesús; Climent, Miguel-Ángel; Antón, Carlos; de Vera, Guillem; Garcés, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    This article shows the research carried out by the authors focused on how the shape of structural reinforced concrete elements treated with electrochemical chloride extraction can affect the efficiency of this process. Assuming the current use of different anode systems, the present study considers the comparison of results between conventional anodes based on Ti-RuO2 wire mesh and a cement-based anodic system such as a paste of graphite-cement. Reinforced concrete elements of a meter length were molded to serve as laboratory specimens, to closely represent authentic structural supports, with circular and rectangular sections. Results confirm almost equal performances for both types of anode systems when electrochemical chloride extraction is applied to isotropic structural elements. In the case of anisotropic ones, such as rectangular sections with no uniformly distributed rebar, differences in electrical flow density were detected during the treatment. Those differences were more extreme for Ti-RuO2 mesh anode system. This particular shape effect is evidenced by obtaining the efficiencies of electrochemical chloride extraction in different points of specimens.

  2. Fabrication and mechanical testing of fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufail, M.

    2005-01-01

    Polymer based composites are produced using less expensive moulds and quick fabrication techniques. The overall processing cost for such materials is much lesser than metallic materials. Usually monolithic parts are produced out of composite materials which further decreases the processing time needed for joining sub- , assemblies as in the case of metallic parts. Any defects encountered due to sub-assemblies are also eliminated. Thermoset based composites have been used for long time to produce parts for automotive, aerospace, marine, and sports industries. The properties thus obtained by using thermoset as matrix are very well in comparison with metals but certain draw backs a.e there with this kind of matrix. Thermoset based composites are processed in untidy environment and once the object is produced can not be reshaped. In contrary to that thermoplastic materials are processed in a clean environment and the material can be recycled. The component once produced can easily be reshaped if required as no chemical reaction does take place during the process. Although the high melt viscosity of thermoplastic has limited its application as due to its high viscosity, its processing would be very difficult. Various methods have been developed to resolve this issue. In this study, a commingled material has been used to produce thermoplastic based composite tubes. The method developed for making such tubes is defined along with the method adopted to measure some of the mechanical properties of these tubes. (author)

  3. Admixtures in Cement-Matrix Composites for Mechanical Reinforcement, Sustainability, and Smart Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Guillermo; Patiño-Barbeito, Faustino; Patiño-Cambeiro, Faustino; Armesto, Julia

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, several inclusions have been mixed with Portland cement—nowadays the most-consumed construction material worldwide—to improve both the strength and durability required for construction. The present paper describes the different families of inclusions that can be combined with cement matrix and reviews the achievements reported to date regarding mechanical performance, as well as two other innovative functionalities of growing importance: reducing the high carbon footprint of Portland cement, and obtaining new smart features. Nanomaterials stand out in the production of such advanced features, allowing the construction of smart or multi-functional structures by means of thermal- and strain-sensing, and photocatalytic properties. The first self-cleaning concretes (photocatalytic) have reached the markets. In this sense, it is expected that smart concretes will be commercialized to address specialized needs in construction and architecture. Conversely, other inclusions that enhance strength or reduce the environmental impact remain in the research stage, in spite of the promising results reported in these issues. Despite the fact that such functionalities are especially profitable in the case of massive cement consumption, the shift from the deeply established Portland cement to green cements still has to overcome economic, institutional, and technical barriers. PMID:28774091

  4. Mechanical properties of weft knitted fabric reinforced composites. Iamimono kyoka fukugo zairyo no rikigakuteki tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W.; Inoda, M.; Kotaki, M.; Goto, A.; Fujita, A.; Hamada, H.; Maekawa, Z. (Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Textile Science)

    1993-09-15

    Mechanical properties and failure behavior of weft knitted fabric reinforced composites were studied. Aramid fiber was used as reinforcement (knitting fiber), and epoxy resin as matrix. Different tensions were applied to the weft knitted fabric in a course or wale direction to prepare 5 kinds of fiber reinforced composites with different densities of the knitted fabric, and tensile test pieces were thus provided by cutting each composite in a course or wale direction. As a result, the weft knitted fabric reinforced composite offered a dynamical anisotropy, and the tensile strength of the test pieces was higher in wale direction than course one. Fracture in a course direction occurred at the section with extreme low fiber content, while fracture in a wale direction occurred at a loop interlocking region due to stress concentration. The tensile strength was constant or increased in a course or wale direction by stretching the knitted fabric before molding, respectively. 21 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Repair of Impact-Damaged Prestressed Bridge Girders Using Strand Splices and Fabric Reinforced Cementitious Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Mark Stevens

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the repair of impact-damaged prestressed concrete bridge girders with strand splices and fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix systems, specifically for repair of structural damage to the underside of an overpass bridge girder due to an overheight vehicle collision. Collision damage to bridges can range from minor to catastrophic, potentially requiring repair or replacement of a bridge girder. This thesis investigates the performance of two different types of repair...

  6. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of jute fabrics reinforced polypropylene-based composites: effects of ionizing radiation and disaccharide (sucrose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahadat Hossain, Md.; Uddin, Muhammad B.; Razzak, Md.; Sarwaruddin Chowdhury, A. M.; Khan, Ruhul A.

    2017-12-01

    Composites were prepared successfully by compression molding technique using jute fabrics (reinforcing agent) and polypropylene (matrix). Jute fabrics were treated with disaccharide (sucrose) solution and composites were fabricated with the treated fabric and polypropylene. The fiber content of the prepared composites was 40% by weight. It was found that the sucrose (2% solution) decreased the tensile strength (TS) and elongation at break about 6% and 37%, respectively, but tensile modulus and impact strength improved about 27% and 32%, respectively. When gamma radiation was applied through the untreated and treated composites the mechanical properties were improved much higher in non-treated Jute/PP-based composites than that of sucrose treated composites. For 5.0 kGy gamma dose the highest mechanical properties were observed for non-treated composites. At 5.0 kGy gamma dose the improvement of TS was 14% and 2% for non-treated and sucrose treated composites, respectively. The water uptake property of the sucrose treated composites was performed up to 10 days and composites absorbed 18% water. The functional groups of the both composites were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy machine. The scanning electron microscopic images of the both composites were taken for the surface and fiber adhesion analysis.

  8. Mechanical Characterization of High-Performance Steel-Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites with Self-Healing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Kang, Seok Hee; Ahn, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The crack self-healing behavior of high-performance steel-fiber reinforced cement composites (HPSFRCs) was investigated. High-strength deformed steel fibers were employed in a high strength mortar with very fine silica sand to decreasing the crack width by generating higher interfacial bond strength. The width of micro-cracks, strongly affected by the type of fiber and sand, clearly produced the effects on the self-healing behavior. The use of fine silica sand in HPSFRCs with high strength deformed steel fibers successfully led to rapid healing owing to very fine cracks with width less than 20 μm. The use of very fine silica sand instead of normal sand produced 17%–19% higher tensile strength and 51%–58% smaller width of micro-cracks. PMID:28788471

  9. Effect of carbon fiber dispersion on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced cement-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuang; Li Kezhi; Li Hejun; Jiao Gengsheng; Lu Jinhua; Hou Dangshe

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of carbon fiber-reinforced cement-based composites involved two-step dispersions of carbon fibers. Both steps affected greatly the mechanical properties of the composites. With the aid of ultrasonic wave, a new dispersant hydroxyethyl cellulose was used to help fiber dispersion in the first step. The fracture surface of the composites was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The distribution of major elements was analyzed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy and the composition was analyzed through X-ray diffraction. The flexural strength, tensile strength, modulus, and compression strength were measured. Results showed that the distribution of major elements varied with the variation of the fiber dispersion status. The compressive strength increased by 20%, the tensile strength was 2.4 times that of the material without carbon fibers, the modulus increased by 26.8%, whereas the flexure stress decreased by 12.9%

  10. Study of the Microstructure Evolution of Low-pH Cements Based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC by Mid- and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Their Influence on Corrosion of Steel Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan García Olmo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-pH cements are designed to be used in underground repositories for high level waste. When they are based on Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC, high mineral admixture contents must be used which significantly modify their microstructure properties and performance. This paper evaluates the microstructure evolution of low-pH cement pastes based on OPC plus silica fume and/or fly ashes, using Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared spectroscopy to detect cement pastes mainly composed of high polymerized C-A-S-H gels with low C/S ratios. In addition, the lower pore solution pH of these special cementitious materials have been monitored with embedded metallic sensors. Besides, as the use of reinforced concrete can be required in underground repositories, the influence of low-pH cementitious materials on steel reinforcement corrosion was analysed. Due to their lower pore solution pH and their different pore solution chemical composition a clear influence on steel reinforcement corrosion was detected.

  11. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Jian Long

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation on the effect of uniformly dispersed graphene oxide (GO nanosheets on dynamic mechanical properties of cement based composites prepared with recycled fine aggregate (RFA. Three different amounts of GO, 0.05%, 0.10%, and 0.20% in mass of cement, were used in the experiments. The visual inspections of GO nanosheets were also carried out after ultrasonication by transmission electron microscope (TEM atomic force microscope (AFM, and Raman to characterize the dispersion effect of graphite oxide. Dynamic mechanical analyzer test showed that the maximum increased amount of loss factor and storage modulus, energy absorption was 125%, 53%, and 200% when compared to the control sample, respectively. The flexural and compressive strengths of GO-mortar increased up to 22% to 41.3% and 16.2% to 16.4% with 0.20 wt % GO at 14 and 28 days, respectively. However the workability decreased by 7.5% to 18.8% with 0.05% and 0.2% GO addition. Microstructural analysis with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM/backscattered mode (BSEM showed that the GO-cement composites had a much denser structure and better crystallized hydration products, meanwhile mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP testing and image analysis demonstrated that the incorporation of GO in the composites can help in refining capillary pore structure and reducing the air voids content.

  12. Microstructural changes and residual properties of fiber reinforced cement composites exposed to elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keppert, M.; Vejmelková, E.; Švarcová, Silvie; Bezdička, Petr; Černý, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2012), s. 77-89 ISSN 1425-8129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : fiber reinforced cementcomposites * high temperatures * mineralodical composition * microstructure * residual strength * apparent moisture diffusivity Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.385, year: 2012

  13. Mechanical Properties of Natural Jute Fabric/Jute Mat Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed A. Elbadry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycled needle punched jute fiber mats as a first natural fiber reinforcement system and these jute mats used as a core needle punched with recycled jute fabric cloths as skin layers as a second natural fiber reinforcement system were used for unsaturated polyester matrix composites via modifying the hand lay-up technique with resin preimpregnation into the jute fiber in vacuum. The effect of skin jute fabric on the tensile and bending properties of jute mat composites was investigated for different fiber weight contents. Moreover, the notch sensitivity of these composites was also compared by using the characteristic distance do calculated by Finite Element Method (FEM. The results showed that the tensile and flexural properties of jute mat composites increased by increasing the fiber weight content and by adding the jute fabric as skin layers. On the other hand, by adding the skins, the characteristic distance decreased and, therefore, the notch sensitivity of the composites increased. The fracture behavior investigated by SEM showed that extensive fiber pull-out mechanism was revealed at the tension side of jute mat composites under the bending load and by adding the jute cloth, the failure mode of jute mat was changed to fiber bridge mechanism.

  14. Green Composites Reinforced with Plant-Based Fabrics: Cost and Eco-Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Koronis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study considers a green composite under a twofold assessment; evaluating its process-based cost and environmental footprint profile. The initial objective was to project the manufacturing cost and allow for an additional material comparison of alternative scenarios in the resin transfer molding processes. The additional aim is to have an intermediate environmental assessment to assist in selecting materials and adjust manufacturing parameters which would minimize the energy spent and the CO2 emissions. As it has been noted in numerous applications, the incorporation of natural fiber fabrics, as opposed to glass fabrics, bring together weight savings and consequently cost savings. However, the economic analysis suggests that a glass reinforced composite is marginally cheaper at the production volume of 300 parts (1.9% lower cost in contrast to a possible green solution (ramie. Considering jute instead of ramie as a reinforcement, the cost gets immediately lower, and further decreases with proposed improvements to the manufacturing process. Additional reduction of up to 10% in the production cost can be achieved by process upgrade. As indicated by the Eco-Audit analysis, 36% less energy and 44% CO2 per kilo will be generated, respectively when swapping from glass to ramie fabrics in the production of the automotive hood.

  15. Mechanical and morphological characterizations of carbon fiber fabric reinforced epoxy composites used in aeronautical field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maria Faulstich de Paiva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRC have been used in aeronautical industry in the manufacture of different aircraft components that must attend tight mechanical requirements. This paper shows a study involving mechanical (flexural, shear, tensile and compressive tests and morphological characterizations of four different laminates based on 2 epoxy resin systems (8552TM and F584TM and 2 carbon fiber fabric reinforcements (Plain Weave (PW and Eight Harness Satin (8HS. All laminates were obtained by handing lay-up of prepregs plies (0º/90º and consolidation in an autoclave following an appropriate curing cycle with vacuum and pressure. The results show that the F584-epoxy matrix laminates present better mechanical properties in the tensile and compressive tests than 8552 composites. It is also observed that PW laminates for both matrices show better flexural and interlaminar shear properties.

  16. Waste Cellulose from Tetra Pak Packages as Reinforcement of Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Martínez-Barrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the packaging industry has promoted indiscriminately the use of disposable packing as Tetra Pak, which after a very short useful life turns into garbage, helping to spoil the environment. One of the known processes that can be used for achievement of the compatibility between waste materials and the environment is the gamma radiation, which had proved to be a good tool for modification of physicochemical properties of materials. The aim of this work is to study the effects of waste cellulose from Tetra Pak packing and gamma radiation on the mechanical properties of cement concrete. Concrete specimens were elaborated with waste cellulose at concentrations of 3, 5, and 7 wt% and irradiated at 200, 250, and 300 kGy of gamma dose. The results show highest improvement on the mechanical properties for concrete with 3 wt% of waste cellulose and irradiated at 300 kGy; such improvements were related with the surface morphology of fracture zones of cement concrete observed by SEM microscopy.

  17. Design and fabrication of the PDX poloidal field solenoid utilizing fiberglass reinforced epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.S.C.

    1975-11-01

    This paper discusses the basic design of the Poloidal Field Solenoid Coil. It will be mainly concerned with the more unique features of the Solenoid such as the copper coil windings and the design of the epoxy-glass structural support mandrels. The center solenoid coil of the PDX machine consists of five different coil systems (OH No. 8, No. 9; NF No. 11; DF No. 7; EF Solenoid and CF No. 9). Three concentric fiberglass reinforced epoxy cylinders fabricated in-house will act as mandrels to support and to house the coils that will result as an integral unit

  18. TiB2 reinforced aluminum based in situ composites fabricated by stir casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fei; Chen, Zongning; Mao, Feng; Wang, Tongmin; Cao, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new technique involving mechanical stirring at the salts/aluminum interface was developed to fabricate TiB 2 particulate reinforced aluminum based in situ composites with improved particle distribution. Processing parameters in terms of stirring intensity, stirring duration and stirring start time were optimized according to the microstructure and mechanical properties evaluation. The results show that, the first and last 15 min of the entire 60 min holding are of prime importance to the particle distribution of the final composites. When applying 180 rpm (revolutions per minute) stirring at the salts/aluminum interface in these two intervals, a more uniform microstructure can be achieved and the Al-4 wt% TiB 2 composite thus produced exhibits superior mechanical performance. Synchrotron radiation X-ray computed tomography (SR-CT) was used to give a full-scale imaging of the particle distribution. From the SR-CT results, the in situ Al–xTiB 2 composites (x=1, 4 and 7, all in wt%) fabricated by the present technique are characterized by fine and clean TiB 2 particles distributed uniformly throughout the Al matrix. These composites not only have higher yield strength (σ 0.2 ) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS), but also exhibit superior ductility, with respect to the Al–TiB 2 composites fabricated by the conventional process. The σ 0.2 and UTS of the Al–7TiB 2 composite in the present work, are 260% and 180% higher than those of the matrix. A combined mechanism was also presented to interpret the improvements in yield strength of the composites as influenced by their microstructures and processing history. The predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental results, strongly supporting the strengthening mechanism we proposed. Fractography reveals that the composites thus fabricated, follow ductile fracture mechanism in spite of the presence of stiff reinforcements

  19. Non-conventional cement-based composites reinforced with vegetable fibers: A review of strategies to improve durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, S. F.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review shows the state-of-art on the approachs about improving the processing, physical- mechanical performance and durability of non-conventional fiber-cement composites. The objective of this review is to show some of these strategies to mitigate the degradation of the vegetable fibers used as reinforcement in cost-effective and non-conventional fiber-cement and, consequently, to improve their mechanical and durability properties for applications in the housing construction. Beyond the introduction about vegetable fibers, the content of this review is divided in the following sections: (i surface modification of the fibers; (ii improving fiber-to-cement interface; (iii natural pozzolans; (iv accelerated carbonation; (v applications of nanoscience; and (vi principles of functionally graded materials and extrusion process were briefly discussed with focus on future research needs.La presente revisión explora la actualidad en el campo de los compuestos de fibrocemento no convencionales en relación a mejoras en el proceso productivo, el rendimiento físico-mecánico y la durabilidad. El objetivo de esta revisión es exponer algunas estrategias para mitigar la degradación de las fibras vegetales utilizadas como refuerzo en fibrocementos no convencionales y rentables, obteniendo en consecuencia una mejoría en el rendimiento de sus propiedades mecánicas y durabilidad para su aplicación en el área de la construcción de viviendas. Además de la introducción en relación a las fibras vegetales, el contenido de esta revisión se divide en las siguientes secciones: (i modificación de la superficie de las fibras; (ii mejoramiento de la interfaz fibra-cemento; (iii puzolanas naturales; (iv carbonatación acelerada; (v aplicaciones de la nanociencia; y (vi principios de los materiales funcionalmente graduados y el proceso de extrusión fueron discutidos brevemente con un enfoque a investigaciones futuras.

  20. Studies on the mechanical properties of woven jute fabric reinforced poly(l-lactic acid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Arifuzzaman Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of ecofriendly biocomposites to replace non-biodegradable synthetic fiber composites is the main objective of this study. To highlight the biocomposites as a perfect replacement, the plain woven jute fabric (WJF reinforced poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA composites were prepared by the hot press molding method. The influence of woven structure and direction on the mechanical properties i.e. tensile, flexural and impact properties was investigated. The average tensile strength (TS, tensile modulus (TM, flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, and impact strength (IS of untreated woven jute composite (in warp direction were improved about 103%, 211%, 95.2%, 42.4% and 85.9%, respectively and strain at maximum tensile stress for composite samples was enhanced by 11.7%. It was also found that the strengths and modulus of composites in warp direction are higher than those in weft direction. WJF composites in warp and weft directions presented superior mechanical properties than non-woven jute fabric (NWJF composites. Chemical treatment of jute fabric through benzoylation showed a positive effect on the properties of composites. Morphological studies by SEM demonstrated that better adhesion between the treated fabric and PLLA was achieved.

  1. Comparison of tensile strength of different carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maria Faulstich de Paiva

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fabric/epoxy composites are materials used in aeronautical industry to manufacture several components as flaps, aileron, landing-gear doors and others. To evaluate these materials become important to know their mechanical properties, for example, the tensile strength. Tensile tests are usually performed in aeronautical industry to determinate tensile property data for material specifications, quality assurance and structural analysis. For this work, it was manufactured four different laminate families (F155/PW, F155/HS, F584/PW and F584/HS using pre-impregnated materials (prepregs based on F155TM and F584TM epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fiber fabric styles Plain Weave (PW and Eight Harness Satin (8HS. The matrix F155TM code is an epoxy resin type DGEBA (diglycidil ether of bisphenol A that contains a curing agent and the F584TM code is a modified epoxy resin type. The laminates were obtained by handing lay-up process following an appropriate curing cycle in autoclave. The samples were evaluated by tensile tests according to the ASTM D3039. The F584/PW laminates presented the highest values of tensile strength. However, the highest modulus results were determined for the 8HS composite laminates. The correlation of these results emphasizes the importance of the adequate combination of the polymeric matrix and the reinforcement arrangement in the structural composite manufacture. The microscopic analyses of the tested specimens show valid failure modes for composites used in aeronautical industry.

  2. Green Route Fabrication of Graphene Oxide Reinforced Polymer Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahendran, R.; Sridharan, D.; Santhakumar, K.; Gnanasekaran, G.

    2016-01-01

    A facile and “Green” route has been applied to fabricate graphene oxide (GO) reinforced polymer composites utilizing “deionized water” as solvent. The GO was reinforced into water soluble poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (PAMPS) matrix by ultrasonication followed by mechanical stirring. The incorporation and dispersion of the GO in the polymer matrix were analyzed by XRD, FE-SEM, AFM, FT-IR, and TGA. Further, the FE-SEM and AFM images revealed that the surface roughness and agglomeration of the GO in the polymer matrix increased by increasing its concentration. Ionic exchange capacity, proton conductivity, and tensile texture results showed that the reinforcement of GO in the polymer matrix enhances the physicochemical properties of the host polymer. These PVA/PAMPS/GO nano composites showed improved mechanical stability compared to the pristine polymer, because of strong interfacial interactions within the components and homogeneous dispersion of the GO sheets in the PVA/PAMPS matrix.

  3. Effect of nanoclay on durability and mechanical properties of flax fabric reinforced geopolymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Assaedi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main concern of using natural fibres as reinforcement in geopolymer composites is the durability of the fibres. Geopolymers are alkaline in nature because of the alkaline solution that is required for activating the geopolymer reaction. The alkalinity of the matrix, however, is the key reason of the degradation of natural fibres. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of nanoclay (NC loading on the mechanical properties and durability of flax fabric (FF reinforced geopolymer composites. The durability of composites after 4 and 32 weeks at ambient temperature is presented. The microstructure of geopolymer matrices was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that the incorporation of NC has a positive impact on the physical properties, mechanical performance, and durability of FF reinforced geopolymer composites. The presence of NC has a positive impact through accelerating the geopolymerization, reducing the alkalinity of the system and increasing the geopolymer gel.

  4. Study of large size fiber reinforced cement containers for solid wastes from dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.

    1990-01-01

    The production of large-sized metallic waste by dismantling operations, and the evolution of the specifications of the waste to be stored in the different European countries will create a need for large standard containers for the transport and final disposal of the corresponding waste. The research conducted during the 1984-1988 programme, supported by the Commission of European Communities, and based on a comparative study of high-grade concrete materials, reinforced with organic or metallic fibres, led to the development of a high performance container meeting international transport recommendations as well as French requirements for shallow-ground disposal. The material selected, consisting of high-performance mortar with metal fibre reinforcement, was the subject of an intensive programme of characterization tests conducted in close cooperation with LAFARGE Company, demonstrating the achievement of mechanical and physical properties comfortably above the regulatory requirements. The construction of an industrial prototype and the subsequent economic analysis served to guarantee the industrial feasibility and cost of this system, in which attempts were made to optimize the finished package product, including its closure system

  5. Fabrication and physical properties of glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for non-metal-clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Manamu; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2017-11-01

    Recently, non-metal-clasp dentures (NMCDs) made from thermoplastic resins such as polyamide, polyester, polycarbonate, and polypropylene have been used as removable partial dentures (RPDs). However, the use of such RPDs can seriously affect various tissues because of their low rigidity. In this study, we fabricated high-rigidity glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTPs) for use in RPDs, and examined their physical properties such as apparent density, dynamic hardness, and flexural properties. GFRTPs made from E-glass fibers and polypropylene were fabricated using an injection-molding. The effects of the fiber content on the GFRTP properties were examined using glass-fiber contents of 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mass%. Commercially available denture base materials and NMCD materials were used as controls. The experimental densities of GFRTPs with various fiber contents agreed with the theoretical densities. Dynamic micro-indentation tests confirmed that the fiber content does not affect the GFRTP surface properties such as dynamic hardness and elastic modulus, because most of the reinforcing glass fibers are embedded in the polypropylene. The flexural strength increased from 55.8 to 217.6 MPa with increasing glass-fiber content from 0 to 50 mass%. The flexural modulus increased from 1.75 to 7.42 GPa with increasing glass-fiber content from 0 to 50 mass%, that is, the flexural strength and modulus of GFRTP with a fiber content of 50 mass% were 3.9 and 4.2 times, respectively, those of unreinforced polypropylene. These results suggest that fiber reinforcement has beneficial effects, and GFRTPs can be used in NMCDs because their physical properties are better than those of controls. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2254-2260, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  7. Fabrication of magnesium based composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes having superior mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki, E-mail: fukkun-fukuda@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kondoh, Katsuyoshi; Umeda, Junko [Joining and Welding Research Institution, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Fugetsu, Bunshi [Hokkaido University, Niow5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Using the IPA based solution, the oxide-free pure Mg/CNTs composite powders could be prepared. {yields} The mechanical strength of the pure Mg composite reinforced with CNTs was not improved though the elongation was enhanced due to the elimination of MgO and less residual strain in the composite. {yields} The mechanical strength of the AZ61Mg alloy composite reinforced with CNTs was improved with maintaining adequate ductility due to the interfacial strengthening of Al{sub 2}MgC{sub 2} ternary carbide. {yields} The CNT addition was not influenced on the microstructure and grain orientations of the AZ61 Mg alloy matrix. - Abstract: Magnesium (Mg) composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having superior mechanical properties was fabricated using both pure Mg and AZ61 Mg alloy matrix in this study. The composites were produced via powder metallurgy route containing wet process using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) based zwitterionic surfactant solution with unbundled CNTs. The produced composites were evaluated with tensile test and Vickers hardness test and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). As a result, only with AZ61 Mg alloy matrix, tensile strength of the composite was improved. In situ formed Al{sub 2}MgC{sub 2} compounds at the interface between Mg matrix and CNTs effectively reinforced the interfacial bonding and enabled tensile loading transfer from the Mg matrix to nanotubes. Furthermore, it was clarified that the microstructures and grain orientations of the composite matrix were not significantly influenced by CNT addition.

  8. A novel phase-change cement composite for thermal energy storage: Fabrication, thermal and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, He; Xing, Feng; Cui, Hong-Zhi; Chen, Da-Zhu; Ouyang, Xing; Xu, Su-Zhen; Wang, Jia-Xin; Huang, Yi-Tian; Zuo, Jian-Dong; Tang, Jiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel flaky graphite-doped phase-change microcapsule (FGD-MPCM) was prepared. • FGD-MPCM has substantial latent heat storage capacity (135.8 J/g). • FGD-MPCMs/cement composite is capable of reducing indoor temperature fluctuation. • Compressive strength of cement composite with 30% FGD-MPCMs can reach to 14.2 MPa. - Abstract: Facing upon the increasingly severe energy crisis, one of the key issues for reducing the building energy consumption is to pursue high-performance thermal energy storage technologies based on phase-change materials. In this study, a novel cement composite incorporated with flaky graphite-doped microencapsulated phase-change materials (FGD-MPCMs) was developed. Various techniques, such as field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to analyse the composite structure and thermal performances. The results indicate that the spherical microcapsules are well dispersed in the cement matrix. When combined within the cement, the thermal stability of the microcapsules was highly improved, and the inclusion of greater amounts of FGD-MPCMs further increased the latent heat of the composite. The mechanical properties of the cement composites were affected with the increase of FGD-MPCMs dosage and the porosity of the composites. In spite of this, the compressive strength and flexural strength of the cement composite with 30% FGD-MPCM could still reach to as high as 14.2 MPa and 4.1 MPa, respectively. Results from the infrared thermography and the model room test suggested that the composite filled with FGD-MPCMs is capable of reducing indoor temperature fluctuation and exhibits good potential for application in buildings to enhance energy savings and thermal comfort.

  9. Parametric characterization of a mesomechanic kinematic caused by ondulation in fabric reinforced composites: analytical and numerical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Romano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A parametric characterization of a mesomechanic kinematic caused by ondulation in fabric reinforced composites is investigated by analytical and numerical investigations. Due to the definition of plain representative sequences of balanced plain-weave fabric reinforced single layers based on sines the variable geometric parameters are the amplitude and the length of the ondulation. The mesomechanic kinematic can be observed in both the analytic model and the FE-analyses. The analytic model yields hyperbolic correlations due to the strongly simplifying presumptions that neglect elasticity. In contrast the FE-analyses yield linear correlations in much smaller amounts due to the consideration of elastic parts, yet distinctly.

  10. Optimization of compressive strength in admixture-reinforced cement-based grouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Zaimoglu, A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Taguchi method was used in this study to optimize the unconfined (7-, 14- and 28-day compressive strength of cement-based grouts with bentonite, fly ash and silica fume admixtures. The experiments were designed using an L16 orthogonal array in which the three factors considered were bentonite (0%, 0.5%, 1.0% and 3%, fly ash (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% and silica fume (0%, 5%, 10% and 20% content. The experimental results, which were analyzed by ANOVA and the Taguchi method, showed that fly ash and silica fume content play a significant role in unconfined compressive strength. The optimum conditions were found to be: 0% bentonite, 10% fly ash, 20% silica fume and 28 days of curing time. The maximum unconfined compressive strength reached under the above optimum conditions was 17.1 MPa.En el presente trabajo se ha intentado optimizar, mediante el método de Taguchi, las resistencias a compresión (a las edades de 7, 14 y 28 días de lechadas de cemento reforzadas con bentonita, cenizas volantes y humo de sílice. Se diseñaron los experimentos de acuerdo con un arreglo ortogonal tipo L16 en el que se contemplaban tres factores: la bentonita (0, 0,5, 1 y 3%, las cenizas volantes (10, 20, 30 y 40% y el humo de sílice (0, 5, 10 y 20% (porcentajes en peso del sólido. Los datos obtenidos se analizaron con mediante ANOVA y el método de Taguchi. De acuerdo con los resultados experimentales, el contenido tanto de cenizas volantes como de humo de sílice desempeña un papel significativo en la resistencia a compresión. Por otra parte, las condiciones óptimas que se han identificado son: 0% bentonita, 10% cenizas volantes, 20% humo de sílice y 28 días de tiempo de curado. La resistencia a compresión máxima conseguida en las anteriores condiciones era de 17,1 MPa.

  11. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Shifeng, Huang; Banerjee, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer

  12. Wet-Lay Process - A Novel Approach to Scalable Fabrication of Tissue Scaffolds and Reinforcement Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Andrew

    Fibrous materials received a great deal of interest in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine due to the beneficial cell-interactions and tunable properties for various biomedical applications. These materials are highly advantageous as they provide a large surface area for cellular attachment, proliferation, high porosity values for cellular in-growth, and the ability to modify the membrane to achieve desired responses to both mechanical loading as well as environmental stimuli. A prominent method currently used to fabricate such membranes is electrospinning which uses electrostatic forces to produce fibers on the range of nanometers giving them high morphological saliency to the native extra cellular matrix (ECM). These fibers are also advantageous mechanically with strength and flexibility due to their larger aspect ratio when compared to larger diameter micro/macro fibers. While this spinning technique has many advantages and has seen the most quantity of research in recent years, it does have its own set of drawbacks. Among them is the use cytotoxic solvents during processing which must be fully removed before implantation. In addition, since the fiber produced have smaller diameters, the resulting average pore-size of the scaffold is decreased which in turn hinders cellular penetration into the bulk scaffold. In this work, we have proposed and characterized a novel method called wet-lay process for the rapid fabrication of fibrous membranes for tissue scaffolds. Wet-laying is a method common to textiles and paper industry but unexplored for tissue scaffolds. Short fibers are first suspended in an aqueous bath and homogeneously dispersed using shear force. After draining away the aqueous solution, a nonwoven fibro-porous membrane is deposited onto the draining screen. The implementation of wet-laid membranes into weak hydrogel matrices has shown a reinforcement effect for the composite. Further analyses were carried out to determine the

  13. AlN nanoparticle-reinforced nanocrystalline Al matrix composites: Fabrication and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Q.; Cong, H.T.; Wang, W.; Sun, C.H.; Cheng, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    To improve the specific strength and stiffness of Al-based composites, AlN/Al nanoparticles were in-situ synthesized by arc plasma evaporation of Al in nitrogen atmosphere and consolidated by hot-pressing to fabricate AlN nanoparticle-reinforced nanocrystalline Al composites (0-39 vol.% AlN). Microstructure characterization shows that AlN nanoparticles homogeneously distribute in the matrix of Al nanocrystalline, which forms atomically bonded interfaces of AlN/Al. The hardness and the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite have been improved dramatically, up to 3.48 GPa and 142 GPa, respectively. Such improvement is believed to result from the grain refinement strengthening and the interface strengthening (load transfer) between the Al matrix and AlN nanoparticles

  14. Fabrication of α-chitin whisker-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposite nanofibres by electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkasem, Jirawut; Rujiravanit, Ratana; Supaphol, Pitt

    2006-01-01

    The present contribution reports, for the first time, the successful fabrication of α-chitin whisker-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite nanofibres by electrospinning. The α-chitin whiskers were prepared from α-chitin flakes from shrimp shells by acid hydrolysis. The as-prepared chitin whiskers exhibited lengths in the range 231-969 nm and widths in the range 12-65 nm, with the average length and width being about 549 and 31 nm, respectively. Successful incorporation of the chitin whiskers within the as-spun PVA/chitin whisker nanocomposite nanofibres was verified by infrared spectroscopic and thermogravimetric methods. The incorporation of chitin whiskers within the as-spun nanocomposite fibre mats increased the Young's modulus by about 4-8 times over that of the neat as-spun PVA fibre mat

  15. Fabrication, mechanical characterization of pineapple leaf fiber (PALF) reinforced vinylester hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogesh, M.; Rao, A. N. Hari

    2018-04-01

    Natural fibre based composites are under intensive study due to their eco friendly nature and peculiar properties. The advantage of natural fibres is their continuous supply, easy and safe handling, and biodegradable nature. Although natural fibres exhibit admirable physical and mechanical properties, it varies with the plant source, species, geography, and so forth. Pineapple leave fibre (PALF) is one of the abundantly available waste materials in India and has not been studied yet. The work has been carried out to fabrication and study the mechanical characterization of Pineapple Leaf fiber reinforced Vinylester composites filled with different particulate fillers. These results are compared with those of a similar set of glass fiber reinforced Vinylester composites filled with same particulate fillers. It is evident that the density values for Pineapple leaf fiber (PALF) - Vinylester composites increase with the particulate filler content and void fractions in these composites also increase. The test results show that with the presence of particulate fillers, micro hardness of the PALF-Vinylester composites has improved. Among all the composites under this investigation, the maximum hardness value is recorded for PALF-Vinylester composite filled with 20 wt% alumina. In this investigation the maximum value of ILSS has been recorded for the PALF-Vinylester composite with 20 wt% of Flyash.

  16. Investigation of different carbon nanotube reinforcements for fabricating bulk AlMg5 matrix nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallip, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar.kallip@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Leparoux, Marc [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); AlOgab, Khaled A. [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), National Centers for Advanced Materials, P O Box 6086, Riyadh, 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Clerc, Steve; Deguilhem, Guillaume [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Arroyo, Yadira [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Electron Microscopy Center, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Kwon, Hansang [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Pukyong National University, Department of Materials System Engineering, 365 Sinseon-ro, Busan 608-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    AlMg5-based metal matrix composites were successfully fabricated using high energy planetary ball-milling and hot pressing. The influence of 6 types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different properties was investigated for reinforcement. Over 3 fold increase in hardness and ultimate tensile strength was achieved with maximum values of 200 HV{sub 20} and 720 MPa respectively by varying CNT content from 0.5 to 5 vol%. The state, the dispersion as well as the reactivity of the different CNTs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction and microscopy. The CNTs were considered to be dispersed homogeneously, but were shortened due to high energy milling. No significant differences in mechanical performances could be observed depending either on the nature or on the agglomeration initial state of the investigated CNTs. The milling time has to be however adjusted to the CNT content as higher concentrations require a longer milling time for achieving dispersion of the nano-reinforcement. - Highlights: • CNTs sustained the milling process and became homogeneously dispersed. • 3 times strengthening over unreinforced alloy achieved. • Flexible processing route for dispersing wide range of nanoparticulate materials.

  17. Results of the freeze resistance test, swelling index and coefficient of permeability of finegrained mining waste reinforced with cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Justyna

    2018-04-01

    The article presents the result of laboratory tests for mining waste with grain size of 0 to 2 mm stabilized with cement. Used for stabilization of cement CEM I 42.5 R and blast furnace cement CEM III / A 42.5N - LH / HSR / NA and a plasticizer sealant. Cement was added to the mining waste test in the proportions of 5 - 8% in relation to the skeleton's weight. For the cemented samples, the freeze resistance test, swelling index, coefficient of permeability and pH of water leachate were tested. The addition of a cement binder resulted in diminishing the water permeability of mining waste and limiting the leaching of fine particles from the material.

  18. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treutenaere S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  19. Fatigue damage characterization in plain-wave carbon-carbon fabric reinforced plastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.; Al-sulaiman, F.S.; Farooqi, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper fatigue damage mechanisms in 8 ply Carbon-Carbon Fabric reinforced Plastic Laminates obtained from polyester resin-prepreg plain weave carbon-carbon fabric layers have been investigated. Enhanced dye penetrant, X-ray radiography, optical microscopy, edge replication, and scanning electron fractography have been employed to examine the fatigue damage in three classes of laminates having the unidirectional (O)/sub delta/, the angle-plied (0,0,45,-45)/sub s/ fiber orientations. It is shown the laminates that have off axis plies, i.e.,0,0,45,-45), and (45,-45,0,0) /sub s/, the fatigue damage is initiated through matrix cracking. This matrix cracking induces fiber fracture in adjacent plies near the matrix crack tip. This event is followed by the man damage event of delamination of the stacked plies. It is shown that the delamination was the major damage mode, which caused the eventual fatigue failure in the angle-plied composites. The unidirectional composite (O)/sub delta/ laminates failed predominantly by lateral fracture instead of delamination. Fiber fracture was observed in the prime damage mode in unidirectional (O)/sub delta/ composite laminates. (author)

  20. A self-healing 3D woven fabric reinforced shape memory polymer composite for impact mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nji, Jones; Li, Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) woven fabric reinforced shape memory polymer composite for impact mitigation was proposed, fabricated, programmed using a three-step strain-controlled thermomechanical cycle at a pre-strain level of 5% and machined to two groups of specimens (G1 and G2) with dimensions 152.4 mm × 101.6 mm × 12.7 mm. The specimens were impact tested, transversely, centrally and repeatedly with 32 and 42 J of energy. G1 specimens were healed after each impact until perforation occurred. G2 specimens were not healed after each impact and served as controls. At 32 J impact energy, G2 specimens were perforated at the 9th impact while G1 specimens lasted until the 15th impact; at 42 J impact energy, G2 specimens were perforated at the 5th impact while G1 specimens were perforated at the 7th impact. Visual inspection, C-scan, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to evaluate damage, failure modes, and healing efficiency

  1. A cement based syntactic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Muthyala, Venkata D.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cement based syntactic foam core was proposed and experimentally investigated for composite sandwich structures. This was a multi-phase composite material with microballoon dispersed in a rubber latex toughened cement paste matrix. A trace amount of microfiber was also incorporated to increase the number of mechanisms for energy absorption and a small amount of nanoclay was added to improve the crystal structure of the hydrates. Three groups of cement based syntactic foams with varying cement content were investigated. A fourth group of specimens containing pure cement paste were also prepared as control. Each group contained 24 beam specimens. The total number of beam specimens was 96. The dimension of each beam was 30.5 cm x 5.1 cm x 1.5 cm. Twelve foam specimens from each group were wrapped with plain woven 7715 style glass fabric reinforced epoxy to prepare sandwich beams. Twelve cubic foam specimens, three from each group, with a side length of 5.1 cm, were also prepared. Three types of testing, low velocity impact test and four-point bending test on the beam specimens and compression test on the cubic specimens, were conducted to evaluate the impact energy dissipation, stress-strain behavior, and residual strength. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also used to examine the energy dissipation mechanisms in the micro-length scale. It was found that the cement based syntactic foam has a higher capacity for dissipating impact energy with an insignificant reduction in strength as compared to the control cement paste core. When compared to a polymer based foam core having similar compositions, it was found that the cement based foam has a comparable energy dissipation capacity. The developed cement based syntactic foam would be a viable alternative for core materials in impact-tolerant composite sandwich structures

  2. Fracture strengths of chair‑side‑generated veneers cemented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-09

    Jun 9, 2014 ... Group 1), CAD/CAM‑fabricated veneers cemented with a glass fiber ... specimens were tested with a universal testing machine after thermal cycling treatment. ... The purpose of the current in vitro study is to determine the ..... fracture resistance of fiber reinforced cups‑replacing composite restorations.

  3. Investigations on mechanical and two-body abrasive wear behaviour of glass/carbon fabric reinforced vinyl ester composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresha, B.; Kumar, Kunigal N. Shiva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research article is to study the mechanical and two-body abrasive wear behaviour of glass/carbon fabric reinforced vinyl ester composites. The measured wear volume loss increases with increase in abrading distance/abrasive particle size. However, the specific wear rate decreases with increase in abrading distance and decrease in abrasive particle size. The results showed that the highest specific wear rate is for glass fabric reinforced vinyl ester composite with a value of 10.89 x 10 -11 m 3 /Nm and the lowest wear rate is for carbon fabric reinforced vinyl ester composite with a value of 4.02 x 10 -11 m 3 /Nm. Mechanical properties were evaluated and obtained values are compared with the wear behaviour. The worn surface features have been examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Photomicrographs of the worn surfaces revealed higher percentage of broken glass fiber as compared to carbon fiber. Also better interfacial adhesion between carbon and vinyl ester in carbon reinforced vinyl ester composite was observed.

  4. Stress-strain effects in alumina-Cu reinforced Nb3Sn wires fabricated by the tube process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Satoru; Nakayama, Shigeo; Masegi, Tamaki; Koyanagi, Kei; Nomura, Shunji; Shiga, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Norio; Watanabe, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    In order to fabricate a large-bore, high-field magnet which achieves a low coil weight and volume, a high strength compound superconducting wire is required. For those demands we have developed the reinforced Nb 3 Sn wire using alumina dispersion strengthened copper (alumina-Cu) as a reinforcement material and the tube process of the Nb 3 Sn wire fabrication. The ductility study of the composites which consisted of the reinforcement, Nb tube, Cu, and Cu clad Sn brought a 1 km long alumina-Cu reinforced Nb 3 Sn wire successfully. Using fabricated wires measurements and evaluations of critical current density as parameters of magnetic field, tensile stress, tensile strain, and transverse compressive stress, and those of stress-strain curves at 4.2 K were performed. They showed superior performance such as high 0.3% proof stress (240 MPa at 0.3% strain) and high maximum tolerance stress (320 MPa) which were two times as large as those of conventional Cu matrix Nb 3 Sn wire. The strain sensitivity parameters were obtained for the reinforced Nb 3 Sn wire and the Cu matrix one using the scaling law. Residual stress of the component materials caused by cooling down to 4.2 K from heat-treatment temperature was calculated using equivalent Young's modulus, equivalent yield strength, thermal expansion coefficient and other mechanical parameters. Calculated stress-strain curves at 4.2 K for the reinforced Nb 3 Sn wire and the Cu matrix one based on calculation of residual stress, had good agreement with the experimental values. (author)

  5. Fabrication and characterization of laminated SiC composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira dos Santos Tonello, Karolina, E-mail: karolina.pereira@polito.it; Padovano, Elisa; Badini, Claudio; Biamino, Sara; Pavese, Matteo; Fino, Paolo

    2016-04-06

    Nanosized allotropes of carbon have been attracting a lot of attention recently, but despite the steady growth of the number of scientific works on materials based on graphene family, there is still much to be explored. These two-dimensional carbon materials, such as graphene nanoplatelets, multilayer graphene or few layer graphene have emerged as a possible second phase for reinforcing ceramics, resulting in remarkable properties of these composites. Typically, graphene ceramic matrix composites are prepared by a colloidal or a powder route followed by pressure assisted sintering. Recently other traditional ceramic processes, such as tape casting, were also successfully studied. The aim of this research is to fabricate α-SiC multi-layer composites containing 2, 4 and 8 vol% of graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) by tape casting and study the effect of these additions on the mechanical behavior of the composites. In order to achieve this purpose, samples were pressureless sintered and tested for density and mechanical properties. The elastic modulus was measured by the impulse excitation of vibration method, the hardness by Vickers indentation and fracture toughness using micro Vickers indentation and by three-point bending applying the pre-cracked beam approach. Results showed that up to 4 vol%, the density and mechanical properties were directly proportional to the amount of GNP added but showed a dramatic decrease for 8 vol% of GNP. Composites with 4 vol% of GNP had a 23% increment elastic modulus, while the fracture toughness had a 34% increment compared to SiC tapes fabricated under the same conditions. Higher amounts of GNP induces porosity in the samples, thus decreasing the mechanical properties. This study, therefore, indicates that 4% is an optimal amount of GNP and suggests that excessive amounts of GNP are rather detrimental to the mechanical properties of silicon carbide ceramic materials prepared by tape casting.

  6. Effect of sewage sludge ash (SSA on the mechanical performance and corrosion levels of reinforced Portland cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andión, L. G.ª

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a study conducted to determinecorrosion in reinforcement embedded in Portland cement(PC mortars with different percentages of sewage sludgeash (SSA admixtures. The polarization resistancetechnique was used to determine the steel corrosion rate(Icorr in the test specimens. The samples were subjectedto different environmental conditions and aggressiveagents: 100% relative humidity (RH, accelerated carbonationat 70% RH and seawater immersion. Portlandcement was partially substituted for SSA in the mixes atrates of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 60% (by mass to make thedifferent mortars. The results show that where cementwas replaced by SSA at rates of up to 10% by mass,mortar corrosion performance was comparable to thebehaviour observed in SSA-free mortars (control mortar:0% SSA. Data for higher rates are also shown. From themechanical standpoint, SSA exhibited moderate pozzolanicactivity and the best performance when SSA wasadded at a rate of 10% to mixes with a water/(binder:PC + SSA (w/b ratio of 0.5.Se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosion que presentan lasarmaduras embebidas en morteros fabricados con cementoPortland (CP con diferentes porcentajes de sustitucion deceniza de lodo de depuradora (CLD. Se ha utilizado la tecnicade la Resistencia a la Polarizacion para determinar lavelocidad de corrosion del acero embebido en las muestrasestudiadas. Las muestras se han sometido a diferentes condicionesambientales y agentes agresivos: 100% de humedadrelativa (HR, carbonatacion acelerada al 70% HR einmersion en agua de mar. Para la fabricacion de los distintosmorteros, el cemento Portland ha sido parcialmente sustituidopor CLD en los siguientes porcentajes en masa: 0,10, 20, 30 y 60%. Los resultados muestran que sustitucionesde cemento por CLD de hasta el 10% en masa no alteranel comportamiento frente a la corrosion de los morterosal compararlos con los morteros libres de CLD (morteroscontrol: 0% de sustitucion de cemento por CLD. Se

  7. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  8. Strength and fracture mechanism of iron reinforced tricalcium phosphate cermet fabricated by spark plasma sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Serhii; Horynová, Miroslava; Casas-Luna, Mariano; Diaz-de-la-Torre, Sebastian; Dvořák, Karel; Celko, Ladislav; Kaiser, Jozef; Montufar, Edgar B

    2018-05-01

    The present work studies the microstructure and mechanical performance of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) based cermet toughened by iron particles. A novelty arises by the employment of spark plasma sintering for fabrication of the cermet. Results showed partial transformation of initial alpha TCP matrix to beta phase and the absence of oxidation of iron particles, as well as a lack of chemical reaction between TCP and iron components during sintering. The values of compressive and tensile strength of TCP/Fe cermet were 3.2 and 2.5 times, respectively, greater than those of monolithic TCP. Fracture analysis revealed the simultaneous action of crack-bridging and crack-deflection microstructural toughening mechanisms under compression. In contrast, under tension the reinforcing mechanism was only crack-bridging, being the reason for smaller increment of strength. Elastic properties of the cermet better matched values reported for human cortical bone. Thereby the new TCP/Fe cermet has potential for eventual use as a material for bone fractures fixation under load-bearing conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  10. Fabrication, nanomechanical characterization, and cytocompatibility of gold-reinforced chitosan bio-nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Nimitt G.; Kumar, Ajeet; Jayawardana, Veroni N.; Woodworth, Craig D.; Yuya, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally derived polymer represents one of the most technologically important classes of active materials with applications in a variety of industrial and biomedical fields. Gold nanoparticles (∼ 32 nm) were synthesized via a citrate reduction method from chloroauric acid and incorporated in Chitosan matrix. Bio-nanocomposite films with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles were prepared through solution casting process. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles was achieved throughout the chitosan matrix and was confirmed with SEM. Synthesis outcomes and prepared nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, TEM, EDX, SAED, UV–vis, XRD, DLS, and Zeta potential for their physical, morphological and structural properties. Nanoscale properties of materials under the influence of temperature were characterized through nanoindentation techniques. From quasi-static nanoindentation, it was observed that hardness and reduced modulus of the nanocomposites were increased significantly in direct proportion to the gold nanoparticle concentration. Gold nanoparticle concentration also showed positive impact on storage modulus and thermal stability of the material. The obtained films were confirmed to be biocompatible by their ability to support growth of human cells in vitro. In summary, the results show enhanced mechanical properties with increasing gold nanoparticle concentration, and provide better understanding of the structure–property relationships of such biocompatible materials for potential biomedical applications. - Highlights: • We fabricated gold reinforced chitosan nanocomposite for biomedical applications. • Gold nanoparticles significantly enhanced nanomechanical properties of chitosan. • Nanocomposite films supported growth of human cells in vitro. • Gold nanoparticles significantly improved cell proliferation on chitosan films

  11. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Magnesium Matrix Composites Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Jin; Kim, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    A combination of accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and high-energy ball milling was used to fabricate carbon nano tube (CNT)-reinforced Mg composites in sheet form. CNT-Al composite powders synthesized using the high-energy ball-milling process, were coated on the surface of Mg sheets using either spraying or dipping methods. The coated sheets were stacked and then subjected to ARB. Formation of CNT-intermetallic compounds through inter-diffusion between Al and Mg, fragmentation of the CNTintermetallic compounds, and their dispersion into the matrix by plastic flow; as well as dissolution of the intermetallic compound particles into the matrix while leaving CNTs in the matrix, occurred in sequence during the ARB process. This eventually resulted in the uniform distribution of nano-sized CNT particles in the Mg matrix. As the thickness of the Mg sheet and of the coating layer of Al-CNT powder on the surface of the Mg sheet were similar, the dispersion of CNTs into the Mg matrix occurred more uniformly and the strengthening effect of adding CNTs was greater. The strengthening gained by adding CNTs was attributed to Orowan strengthening and dislocation-density increase due to a thermal mismatch between the matrix and the CNTs.

  12. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  13. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  14. Effects of Reinforcing Fiber and Microsilica on the Mechanical and Chloride Ion Penetration Properties of Latex-Modified Fiber-Reinforced Rapid-Set Cement Concrete for Pavement Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of reinforcement fiber type and microsilica content on the performance of latex-modified fiber-reinforced roller-compacted rapid-hardening cement concrete (LMFRCRSC for a concrete pavement emergency repair. Experimental variables were the microsilica substitution ratio (1, 2, 3, and 4%, and the reinforcement fiber (jute versus macrosynthetic fiber. In the tests, compressive, flexural, and splitting tensile strength; chloride ion penetration resistance; and abrasion resistance were assessed. From the compressive and flexural strength tests with microsilica substitution, the 4-hour curing strength decreased as the microsilica substitution ratio increased. From the chloride ion penetration test, as the microsilica substitution ratio increased, chloride ion penetration decreased. The abrasion resistances increased with the substitution ratio of microsilica increase. Based on these test results, microsilica at a substitution ratio of 3% or less and macrosynthetic fiber as the reinforcement improved the performance of LMFRCRSC for a concrete pavement emergency repair and satisfied all of the target strength requirements.

  15. Design and fabrication hazard stakes golf course polymeric foam material empty bunch (EFB) fiber reinforced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfahmi; Syam, B.; Wirjosentono, B.

    2018-02-01

    A golf course with obstacles in the forms of water obstacle and lateral water obstacle marked with the stakes which are called golf course obstacle stake in this study. This study focused on the design and fabrication of the golf course obstacle stake with a solid cylindrical geometry using EFB fiber-reinforced polimeric foam composite materials. To obtain the EFB fiber which is free from fat content and other elements, EFB is soaked in the water with 1% (of the watre total volume) NaOH. The model of the mould designed is permanent mould that can be used for the further refabrication process. The mould was designed based on resin-compound paste materials with talc powder plus E-glass fiber to make the mould strong. The composition of polimeric foam materials comprised unsaturated resin Bqtn-Ex 157 (70%), blowing agent (10%), fiber (10%), and catalyst (10%). The process of casting the polimeric foam composit materials into the mould cavity should be at vertical casting position, accurate interval time of material stirring, and periodical casting. To find out the strength value of the golf course obstacle stake product, a model was made and simulated by using the software of Ansys workbench 14.0, an impact loading was given at the height of 400 mm and 460 mm with the variation of golf ball speed (USGA standard) v = 18 m/s, v = 35 m/s, v = 66.2 m/s, v = 70 m/s, and v = 78.2 m/s. The clarification showed that the biggest dynamic explicit loading impact of Fmax = 142.5 N at the height of 460 mm with the maximum golf ball speed of 78.2 m/s did not experience the hysteresis effect and inertia effect. The largest deformation area occurred at the golf ball speed v = 66.2 mm/s, that is 18.029 mm (time: 2.5514e-004) was only concentrated around the sectional area of contact point of impact, meaning that the golf course obstacle stakes made of EFB fiber-reinforced polymeric foam materials have the geometric functional strength that are able to absorb the energy of golf ball

  16. Fabrication and mechanical characterization of graphene oxide-reinforced poly (acrylic acid)/gelatin composite hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Shahab; Gheysour, Mahsa; Karimi, Alireza; Salarian, Reza

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels have found many practical uses in drug release, wound dressing, and tissue engineering. However, their applications are restricted due to their weak mechanical properties. The role of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS) as reinforcement agent in poly (acrylic acid) (PAA)/Gelatin (Gel) composite hydrogels is investigated. Composite hydrogels are synthesized by thermal initiated redox polymerization method. Samples are then prepared with 20 and 40 wt. % of PAA, an increasing amount of GONS (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 wt. %), and a constant amount of Gel. Subsequently, cylindrical hydrogel samples are subjected to a series of compression tests in order to measure their elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The results exhibit that the addition of GONS increases the Young's modulus and maximum stress of hydrogels significantly as compared with control (0.0 wt. % GONS). The highest Young's modulus is observed for hydrogel with GO (0.2 wt. %)/PAA (20 wt. %), whereas the highest maximum stress is detected for GO (0.2 wt. %)/PAA (40 wt. %) specimen. The addition of higher amounts of GONS leads to a decrease in the maximum stress of the hydrogel GO (0.3 wt. %)/PAA (40 wt. %). No significant differences are detected for the maximum strain among the hydrogel samples, as the amount of GONS increased. These results suggest that the application of GONS could be used to improve mechanical properties of hydrogel materials. This study may provide an alternative for the fabrication of low-cost graphene/polymer composites with enhanced mechanical properties beneficial for tissue engineering applications.

  17. Fabrication of Novel Biodegradable α-Tricalcium Phosphate Cement Set by Chelating Capability of Inositol Phosphate and Its Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiisa Konishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP cement based on the chelate-setting mechanism of inositol phosphate (IP6 was developed. This paper examined the effect of the milling time of α-TCP powder on the material properties of the cement. In addition, biocompatibility of the result cement in vitro using osteoblasts and in vivo using rabbit models will be studied as well. The α-TCP powders were ballmilled using ZrO2 beads in pure water for various durations up to 270 minutes, with a single-phase α-TCP obtained at ballmilling for 120 minutes. The resulting cement was mostly composed of α-TCP phase, and the compressive strength of the cement was 8.5±1.1 MPa, which suggested that the cements set with keeping the crystallite phase of starting cement powder. The cell-culture test indicated that the resulting cements were biocompatible materials. In vivo studies showed that the newly formed bones increased with milling time at a slight distance from the cement specimens and grew mature at 24 weeks, and the surface of the cement was resorbed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-(TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells until 24 weeks of implantation. The present α-TCP cement is promising for application as a novel paste-like artificial bone with biodegradability and osteoconductivity.

  18. Flexible high-loading particle-reinforced polyurethane magnetic nanocomposite fabrication through particle-surface-initiated polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhanhu; Park, Sung; Wei Suying; Pereira, Tony; Moldovan, Monica; Karki, Amar B; Young, David P; Hahn, H Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Flexible high-loading nanoparticle-reinforced polyurethane magnetic nanocomposites fabricated by the surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) method are reported. Extensive field emission scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) observations revealed a uniform particle distribution within the polymer matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed a strong chemical bonding between the nanoparticles and the polymer matrix. The elongation of the SIP nanocomposite under tensile test was about four times greater than that of the composite fabricated by a conventional direct mixing fabrication method. The nanocomposite shows particle-loading-dependent magnetic properties, with an increase of coercive force after the magnetic nanoparticles were embedded into the polymer matrix, arising from the increased interparticle distance and the introduced polymer-particle interactions

  19. Mechanical properties and fabrication of small boat using woven glass/sugar palm fibres reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misri, S; Leman, Z; Sapuan, S M; Ishak, M R

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, sugar palm fibre has been found to have great potential to be used as fibre reinforcement in polymer matrix composites. This research investigates the mechanical properties of woven glass/sugar palm fibres reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composite. The composite specimens made of different layer of fibres such as strand mat, natural and hand woven of sugar palm fibres. The composites were fabricated using a compression moulding technique. The tensile and impact test was carried out in accordance to ASTM 5083 and ASTM D256 standard. The fibre glass boat is a familiar material used in boat industry. A lot of research on fabrication process such as lay-up, vacuum infusion mould and resin transfer mould has been conducted. Hybrid material of sugar palm fibre and fibre glass was used in fabricating the boat. This research investigates the method selection for fabrication of small boat application of natural fibre composites. The composite specimens made of different layer of fibres; woven glass fibre, strand mat, natural and hand woven of woven sugar palm fibres were prepared. The small boat were fabricated using a compression moulding and lay up technique. The results of the experiment showed that the tensile strength, tensile modulus, elongation at break value and impact strength were higher than the natural woven sugar palm fibre. The best method for fabricating the small boat was compression moulding technique. As a general conclusion, the usage of glass fibre had improved the tensile properties sugar palm fibre composites and compression moulding technique is suitable to be used in making a small boat application of natural fibre composites.

  20. Three-dimensional fabric reinforced concrete finds first use in reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akihama, S.; Nakagava, H.

    1989-01-01

    It is reported about creation of concrete reinforced with synthetic fibers by Japanese firm Kadzima. Synthetic material with three-dimensional orientation of fibers is produced of roving impreganted with synthetic resin. The reinforcement produced is submerged into the concrete matrix. The compression strength of such a material makes up 58 MPa. The new material is used for constructing the nuclear reactor shielding containers

  1. Reinforcement of calcium phosphate cement with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and bovine serum albumin for injectable bone substitute applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, K.K.; Low, K.L.; Zein, S.H.S.; McPhail, D.; Gerhardt, L.C.; Roether, J.A.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of novel alternative injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composites for orthopaedic applications. The new CPC composites comprise ß-tri-calcium phosphate (ß-TCP) and di-calcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) mixed with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and incorporated

  2. Static and dynamic experimental study of strengthened reinforced short concrete corbel by using carbon fabrics, crack path in shear zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ivanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental analysis of tracking the path of the cracks and crack growth in strengthened or repair reinforced concrete short corbels bonded by carbon fiber fabrics under static and dynamic loads. The reinforced short concrete corbel is a used precast element, for industrial buildings and structures. In fact, their functioning interestingly unconventional is compared to classical beam type elements. Then the effects of bending and shearing are combined in this case. The horizontal reinforced steel is localized to resist to tensile strength induced in bending top and a transversal strength-absorbing contribution. The introduction of carbon fiber composite in the field of Civil Engineering allows to strengthen or repair reinforced concrete structures using adhesive. So the carbon fiber material has many advantages as its low weight, flexibility, easier handling and also interesting physicochemical properties. However maintenance of civil engineering works is to protect them by ensuring better sealing or limiting corrosion. Then strengthening is to repair structures by using bonding technique to compensate their rigidity loss and limit the cracking. This allows to improve their performance and durability. Bonding of composite material in tensile zone of corbel retrieves most tensile stress and allows the structure to extend their load-bearing capacity. The local behavior of the structure is measured by means of the extensometer technique based on electrical strain gauges. This technique allowed to measure strains of steel, carbon fiber fabrics and concrete. The results of this investigation showed that strengthened reinforced concrete corbel bonded by carbon fiber fabrics can improve the ultimate load to twice and stiffens less than a third. The ultimate load, strain and displacement of the specimen are compared to reference experimental model of monotonic and cyclic applied loads. The success of strengthening depends strongly

  3. A Fully Contained Resin Infusion Process for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Fabrication and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Figures iv  Acknowledgments v  1.  Introduction 1  2.  Experimental 2  2.1  Composite Laminate Fabrication...2 Figure 2. Image of fiberglass composite being fabricated using VARTM processing. 2. Experimental 2.1 Composite Laminate Fabrication...style 5 × 5 plain 5 weave prepreg S-2 fiberglass fabric and a honeycomb core cured in an autoclave, much like the composite parts fielded in

  4. Silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp fabrication by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp employing edge lithography in combination with silicon nitride deposition is presented. The fabrication process is based on conventional photolithography an weg etching methods. Nanoridges with width dimension of sub-20 nm were fabricated by edge

  5. Flax fiber reinforced PLA composites: studies on types of PLA and different methods of fabrication

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are used as reinforcement material for number of thermoplastic/thermoset polymers. The interest in using polylactic acid (PLA) as thermoplastic matrix to produce composites completely from 100% renewable resources has increased...

  6. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Singh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs carbon fiber (CF fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  7. Improved Sectional Image Analysis Technique for Evaluating Fiber Orientations in Fiber-Reinforced Cement-Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bang Yeon; Kang, Su-Tae; Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-01-12

    The distribution of fiber orientation is an important factor in determining the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete. This study proposes a new image analysis technique for improving the evaluation accuracy of fiber orientation distribution in the sectional image of fiber-reinforced concrete. A series of tests on the accuracy of fiber detection and the estimation performance of fiber orientation was performed on artificial fiber images to assess the validity of the proposed technique. The validation test results showed that the proposed technique estimates the distribution of fiber orientation more accurately than the direct measurement of fiber orientation by image analysis.

  8. Strengthening mechanism in graphene nanoplatelets reinforced aluminum composite fabricated through spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisht, Ankita [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Srivastava, Mukul [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Nanomaterials and Applications Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Kumar, R. Manoj [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Lahiri, Indranil [Nanomaterials and Applications Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Lahiri, Debrupa, E-mail: dlahifmt@iitr.ac.in [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India)

    2017-05-17

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) reinforced aluminum matrix composites, with ≤5 wt% GNP content, were synthesized by spark plasma sintering (SPS). GNPs were found to withstand severe conditions of high pressure and temperature during processing. Strength of composite was observed to be depending on the content and uniform dispersion of GNP in aluminum matrix, as verified by scanning electron micrographs. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that no reaction products exist at Al-GNP interface in significant amount. Instrumented indentation studies revealed improvement in hardness by 21.4% with 1 wt% GNP. This is due to the presence of stronger reinforcement, which provides high resistance to matrix against deformation. Improvement in yield strength and tensile strength was 84.5% and 54.8%, respectively, with 1 wt% GNP reinforcement. Properties deteriorated at higher concentration due to agglomeration of GNP. Reinforcing effect of GNPs, in terms of strengthening of composite, is found to be dominated by Orowan strengthening mechanism. Pinning of grains boundaries by GNPs led to uniform grain size distribution in the composites structure. Overall, graphene reinforcement has offered 86% improvement in specific strength of aluminum matrix.

  9. TiB2/Al2O3 ceramic particle reinforced aluminum fabricated by spray deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Yang Chengxiao; Guan Leding; Yan Biao

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum matrix ceramic particle reinforced composites (AMCs) is a kind of composite with great importance. Aluminum matrix composite reinforced with TiB 2 /Al 2 O 3 ceramic particles was successfully in situ synthesized in Al-TiO 2 -B 2 O 3 system in this paper, using spray deposition with hot-press treatment technique. Five groups of composites with different reinforcement volume contents were prepared and the comparisons of porosity, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), elongation and Brinell hardness (BH) between the composites with and without hot-press treating were carried out. The composite with 21.0% reinforcement volume content was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDS). The results revealed the formation and uniform distribution of fine reinforcements in the matrix after hot-press treating, while a new intermetallic phase Al 3 Ti was found besides TiB 2 /Al 2 O 3 ceramic phase

  10. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  11. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  12. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  13. Disposal Options of Bamboo Fabric-Reinforced Poly(Lactic Acid Composites for Sustainable Packaging: Biodegradability and Recyclability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Nurul Fazita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the recyclability and biodegradability of bamboo fabric-reinforced poly(lactic acid (BF-PLA composites for sustainable packaging. BF-PLA composite was recycled through the granulation, extrusion, pelletization and injection processes. Subsequently, mechanical properties (tensile, flexural and impact strength, thermal stability and the morphological appearance of recycled BF-PLA composites were determined and compared to BF-PLA composite (initial materials and virgin PLA. It was observed that the BF-PLA composites had the adequate mechanical rigidity and thermal stability to be recycled and reused. Moreover, the biodegradability of BF-PLA composite was evaluated in controlled and real composting conditions, and the rate of biodegradability of BF-PLA composites was compared to the virgin PLA. Morphological and thermal characteristics of the biodegradable BF-PLA and virgin PLA were obtained by using environment scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, respectively. The first order decay rate was found to be 0.0278 and 0.0151 day−1 in a controlled composting condition and 0.0008 and 0.0009 day−1 in real composting conditions for virgin PLA and BF-PLA composite, respectively. Results indicate that the reinforcement of bamboo fabric in PLA matrix minimizes the degradation rate of BF-PLA composite. Thus, BF-PLA composite has the potential to be used in product packaging for providing sustainable packaging.

  14. Effect of tool plunge depth on reinforcement particles distribution in surface composite fabrication via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Rathee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix surface composites are gaining alluring role especially in aerospace, defence, and marine industries. Friction stir processing (FSP is a promising novel solid state technique for surface composites fabrication. In this study, AA6061/SiC surface composites were fabricated and the effect of tool plunge depth on pattern of reinforcement particles dispersion in metal matrix was investigated. Six varying tool plunge depths were chosen at constant levels of shoulder diameter and tool tilt angle to observe the exclusive effect of plunge variation. Process parameters chosen for the experimentation are speed of rotation, travel speed and tool tilt angle which were taken as 1400 rpm, 40 mm/min, and 2.5°respectively. Macro and the microstructural study were performed using stereo zoom and optical microscope respectively. Results reflected that lower plunge depth levels lead to insufficient heat generation and cavity formation towards the stir zone center. On the other hand, higher levels of plunge depth result in ejection of reinforcement particles and even sticking of material to tool shoulder. Thus, an optimal plunge depth is needed in developing defect free surface composites.

  15. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  16. Experimental characterisation of recycled (glass/tpu woven fabric) flake reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul Rasheed, Mohammed Iqbal; Rietman, Bert; Visser, Roy; Akkerman, Remko; Hoa, S.V.; Hubert, P.

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of continuously reinforced thermoplastic composites (TPC) has a substantial prospect at present and in future due to its increasing availability and rapidly growing application regime. This study focusses on the first steps in using TPC process scrap on a scale in which its maximum

  17. Fabrication of BN Nanosheet Reinforced ZrO{sub 2} Composite Pellets for Inert Matrix Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukeir, Malik; Umer, Malik; Lee, Bin; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Plutonium also can be resulted from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons. This will result in the increase of the stockpile of plutonium. For that purpose many organizations are focusing their R-D work on the concept of Inert Matrix Fuel IMF, where a U-free matrix is used to eliminate the U-Pu conversion. R-D work was standardized around Zirconiabased IMF as a result of many screening and ranking studies performed on various candidates. Regardless of its outstanding radiation resistance, chemical stability and its high melting point, it has a very low thermal conductivity, which could be detrimental for the fuel matrix especially in case of accidents. A reinforcement phase could be used for the enhancement of the thermomechanical properties. Among many possible reinforcements, 2D structured nanosheets have emerged as an excellent candidate to enhance the thermal properties and mechanical properties simultaneously. In this approach Boron Nitride Nanosheets BNNS are used for that purpose. BNNS have a very low density, very high thermal conductivity, very high mechanical properties and high neutron absorption cross-section for Boron which is used frequently as a burnable poison. They have properties similar to graphene but they exhibit superior thermal stability in the oxide structure. Despite all the studies on other reinforcements, BNNS reinforced ZrO{sub 2} has not yet been reported. In this study, pure ZrO{sub 2} and partially stabilized Zirconia PSZ (using Yttria) ceramics are mixed with different volume fractions of BNNS.

  18. Fabrication and mechanical properties of self-reinforced poly(ethylene terephthalate composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-reinforced poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET composites prepared by using a modified film-stacking technique were examined in this study. The starting materials included a high tenacity PET yarn (reinforcement and a low melting temperature biodegradable polyester resin (matrix, both of which differ in their melting temperatures with a value of 56°C. This experiment produced composite sheets at three consolidation temperatures (Tc: 215, 225, and 235°C at a constant holding time (th: 6.5 min, and three holding times (3, 6.5 and 10 min at a constant consolidation temperature of 225°C. This study observed a significant improvement in the mechanical properties obtained in self-reinforced PET composites compared to the pure polyester resin. The results of tensile, flexural, and Izod impact tests proved that optimal conditions are low consolidation temperature and short holding time. The absorbed impact energy of the best self-reinforced PET composite material was 854.0 J/m, which is 63 times that of pure polyester resin.

  19. Mechanical properties of uniaxial natural fabric Grewia tilifolia reinforced epoxy based composites: Effects of chemical treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical treatment on the mechanical, morphological, and chemical resistance properties of uniaxial natural fabrics, Grewia tilifolia/epoxy composites, were studied. In order to enhance the interfacial bonding between the epoxy matrix...

  20. Fabrication of Al5083 surface composites reinforced by CNTs and cerium oxide nano particles via friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, S.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, Khalil, E-mail: k_ranjbar@scu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehmolaei, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirani, A.R. [12th Ghaem Street, Bld. Hashemzadeh, Shahrak Golestan, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Using friction stir processing, an effect of CNTs and CeO{sub 2} reinforcements on mechanical and corrosion properties of Al5083 alloy is reported. • The strength of Al5083 was increased by 42%, its matrix grain size reduced five times, and hardness was doubled by the incorporation of CNTs-CeO{sub 2} mixture in the volume ratio of 75-25 respectively. • Unlike the CNTs, incorporation of nanosized CeO{sub 2} particles resulted in remarkable increase in pitting resistance of the alloy. - Abstract: In the present investigation, friction stir processing (FSP) was utilized to incorporate Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) and nanosized cerium oxide particles into the matrix of Al5083 alloy to form surface reinforced composites. The effect of these nanosized reinforcements either separately or in the combined form, on microstructural modification, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of FSPed Al5083 surface composites was studied. A threaded cylindrical hardened steel tool was used with the rotation speeds of 600 and 800 rpm and travel speeds of 35 and 45 mm/min and a tilt angle of 5°. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of FSPed samples were evaluated and compared with the base alloy. The maximum tensile strength and hardness value were achieved for the hybrid composite containing a mixture of CNTs and cerium oxide in the volume ratio of 75-25, respectively, whereas a significant increase in pitting resistance of the base alloy was obtained when cerium oxide alone was incorporated. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization tests and assessed in term of pitting potential and passivation range. Microstructural analysis carried out by using optical and electron microscopes showed that reinforcements are well dispersed inside the nugget zone (NZ), and remarkable grain refinement is gained. The study was aimed to fabricate surface composites with improved mechanical properties and

  1. Development and Evaluation of Cement-Based Materials for Repair of Corrosion-Damaged Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rongtang; Olek, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the results of an extensive laboratory investigation conducted to evaluate the properties of concrete mixes used as patching materials to repair reinforced concrete slabs damaged by corrosion are reported. Seven special concrete mixes containing various combinations of chemical or mineral admixtures were developed and used as a patching material to improve the durability of the repaired slabs. Physical and mechanical properties of these mixes, such as compressive strength, stat...

  2. Fabrication and characterization of nanocomposites reinforced by carbon nanotubes - (1) synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hseuh Hsiangming; Tai Nyanhwa; Perng Tongping [Dept. of Material Science, National Tsing-Hwa Univ., TW (China); Chyou Sander [Taiwan Power Research Inst., Taiwan Power Co., Taipei (China)

    2003-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by floating catalyst method were used for reinforcing material in polymeric nanocomposites. Five different kinds of carbon sources (benzene, toluene, xylene, cyclo-hexane, n-hexane) were used as precursors in the thermal chemical vapor deposition process. The products were collected and examined by Raman, HRTEM, and FESEM. The differences in microstructure and morphologies among these products are analyzed and discussed. (orig.)

  3. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot recreational yachts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave (Dae-Wook Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composite materials offer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP composites is presented. Fabrication techniques investigated during this study are hand lay-up (HL, vacuum infusion (VI, and hybrid (HL + VI processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results.

  4. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot) recreational yachts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dave (dea-wook); Hennigan, Daniel John; Beavers, Kevin Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Polymer composite materialsoffer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet) in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with a lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic(GFRP) composites is presented. Fabrication techniques used in this study are hand lay-up (HL), vacuum infusion (VI), and hybrid (HL+VI) processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results

  5. The mechanical and thermal characteristics of phenolic foam reinforced with kaolin powder and glass fiber fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenya; Huang, Zhixiong; Ding, Jie

    2017-12-01

    In this work, kaolin powder and glass fiber fabric were added to PF in order to improve its thermal stability and mechanical property. Micro-structures of carbonized PF with kaolin powder were inspected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to demonstrate the filler’s pinning effect. SEM results illustrated modified PF had well morphology after high-temperature heat treatment. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) test was carried out and found that kaolin powder only physically dispersed in PF. The compression test and thermal weight loss test were done on two groups of modified PF (Group A: add powder and fabric; Group B: add powder only). Results showed that all modified PF were better than pure PF, while foams with powder and fabric showed better mechanical characteristic and thermal stability compared with foams with powder only.

  6. A two-step sealing-and-reinforcement SU8 bonding paradigm for the fabrication of shallow microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehboudi, Aryan; Yeom, Junghoon

    2018-03-01

    Adhesive bonding is a key technique to create microfluidic devices when two separate substrates are used to form microchannels. Among many adhesives explored in microchannel fabrication, SU8 has been widely used as an adhesive layer for sealing the microchannel sidewalls. The majority of the available SU8-based bonding methods, however, suffer from the difficulties associated with sealing of two important types of the microchannel architecture: (1) shallow microchannels with small patterns on a large area, and (2) microchannels with ultra-low aspect ratios (e.g. 6 mm in width and 2~μ m in height). In this paper, a new bonding paradigm based upon the low-temperature and low-pressure SU8 bonding, consisting of two steps of sealing using a thin-SU8-coated PET film and bonding reinforcement using a SU8-coated glass slide, is proposed to resolve the aforementioned difficulties. Since it does not need complicated instruments such as a wafer bonding machine and a lamination device, the developed bonding paradigm is convenient and economical. We successfully demonstrate the compatibility of the proposed bonding paradigm with the two microchannel fabrication approaches based on the glass wet etching and the SU8 photo-lithography, where small microchannels with the innermost surfaces fully made of SU8 are obtained. A theoretical model is employed to better investigate the flow characteristics and the structural behavior of the microchannel including the PET film deformation, strain and von Mises stress distributions, bonding strength, etc. Moreover, we demonstrate the fabrication of the multi-height deep-shallow microchannel sidewalls and their sealing using the SU8-coated PET film. Finally, as a proof-of-concept device, a microfluidic filter consisting of the double-height deep-shallow microchannel is fabricated for separation of 3 µm and 10 µm particles.

  7. Fabrication of Unidirectional Fiber Reinforced 6061 Aluminum Alloy Using High Pressure Squeeze Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    cegracation cf grapnite f cers in a~umnum was stuciea by Kohara arC Muto [201. reir stucv snowed a cecrease of 10 to 500, In ,n7e strenat cf cracn::e...eact:on procucts were identified by Kohara and MuLto (20] As an ,ustratLon one of the fibers from ,heir investigation is sin n -. 23. :2 t7elr -7...with puoishea worK. Kohara and Muto [20] suggested that the reaction procuct was A14C 3. 5.2 Mechanical Property Characterization of Fiber Reinforced

  8. Effect of montmorillonite clay on flax fabric reinforced poly lactic acid composites with amphiphilic additives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 5083263; fax: +27 41 5832325. Composites: Part A xxx (2010) xxx–xxx Contents lists availabl tes ev E-mail address: krrakesh72@gmail.com (R. Kumar). strength and stiffness, dimensional stability, and thermal proper- ties [1]. But finite nature.... Chemical treatments of natural fiber for use in natural fiber-reinforced composites: a review. J Polym Environ 2007;15:25–33. [15] Pothan LA, Thomas S, Groeninckx G. The role of fibre/matrix interactions on the dynamic mechanical properties...

  9. Diagnostics of glass fiber reinforced polymers and comparative analysis of their fabrication techniques with the use of acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkov, O. V.; Bryansky, A. A.; Panin, S. V.; Zaikov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    Strength properties of the glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) fabricated by vacuum and vacuum autoclave molding techniques were analyzed. Measurements of porosity of the GFRP parts manufactured by various molding techniques were conducted with the help of optical microscopy. On the basis of experimental data obtained by means of acoustic emission hardware/software setup, the technique for running diagnostics and forecasting the bearing capacity of polymeric composite materials based on the result of three-point bending tests has been developed. The operation principle of the technique is underlined by the evaluation of the power function index change which takes place on the dependence of the total acoustic emission counts versus the loading stress.

  10. Multi-Scaled Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Tubular Composites Reinforced with Innovated 3D Weft Knitted Spacer Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Elahe; Hasani, Hossein; Dibajian, Sayed Houssain

    2018-02-01

    Textile composites of 3D integrated spacer configurations have been recently focused by several researchers all over the world. In the present study, newly-designed tubular composites reinforced with 3D spacer weft knitted fabrics were considered and the effects of their structural parameters on some applicable mechanical properties were investigated. For this purpose, two different samples of 3D spacer weft knitted textile types in tubular form were produced on an electronic flat knitting machine, using glass/nylon hybrid yarns. Thermoset tubular-shaped composite parts were manufactured via vacuum infusion molding process using epoxy resin. The mechanical properties of the produced knitted composites in term of external static and internal hydrostatic pressures were evaluated. Resistance of the produced composites against the external static and internal hydrostatic pressures was numerically simulated using multi-scale modeling method. The finding revealed that there is acceptable correlation between experimental and theoretical results.

  11. Hybrid composite laminates reinforced with Kevlar/carbon/glass woven fabrics for ballistic impact testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randjbaran, Elias; Zahari, Rizal; Jalil, Nawal Aswan Abdul; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  12. Hybrid Composite Laminates Reinforced with Kevlar/Carbon/Glass Woven Fabrics for Ballistic Impact Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Randjbaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  13. LOSS FACTOR AND DYNAMIC YOUNG MODULUS DETERMINATION FOR COMPOSITE SANDWICH BARS REINFORCED WITH STEEL FABRIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin-Mihai MIRIŢOIU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have build some composite sandwich bars. For these bars I have determined the dynamic response by recording their free vibrations. These bars have the core made of polypropylene honeycomb with upper and lower layers reinforced with steel wire mesh. For these bars I have determined the the eigenfrequency of the first eigenmode in this way: the bar was embedded at one end and free at the other where there was placed an accelerometer at 10 mm distance from the edge and I applied an initial force at the free end. I have determined the eigenfrequency because I will use its values for the loss factor and dynamic Young modulus determination.

  14. Mechanical properties of banana/kenaf fiber-reinforced hybrid polyester composites: Effect of woven fabric and random orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavudeen, A.; Rajini, N.; Karthikeyan, S.; Thiruchitrambalam, M.; Venkateshwaren, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper is presents the fabrications of kenaf/banana fiber hybrid composites. • Effect of weaving pattern and random orientation on mechanical properties was studied. • Role of interfacial adhesion due to chemical modifications were analyzed with the aid of SEM. • Hybridization of kenaf and banana fibers in plain woven composites exhibits maximum mechanical strength. - Abstract: The present work deals with the effect of weaving patterns and random orientatation on the mechanical properties of banana, kenaf and banana/kenaf fiber-reinforced hybrid polyester composites. Composites were prepared using the hand lay-up method with two different weaving patterns, namely, plain and twill type. Of the two weaving patterns, the plain type showed improved tensile properties compared to the twill type in all the fabricated composites. Furthermore, the maximum increase in mechanical strength was observed in the plain woven hybrid composites rather than in randomly oriented composites. This indicates minimum stress development at the interface of composites due to the distribution of load transfer along the fiber direction. Moreover, alkali (NaOH) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) treatments appear to provide an additional improvement in mechanical strength through enhanced interfacial bonding. Morphological studies of fractured mechanical testing samples were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the de-bonding of fiber/matrix adhesion

  15. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Drive Shaft for All Terrain Vehicle using Filament Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeshwant Nayak Suhas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Filament winding is a composite material fabrication technique that is used to manufacture concentric hollow components. In this study Carbon/Epoxy composite drive shafts were fabricated using filament winding process with a fiber orientation of [852/±452/252]s. Carbon in the form of multifilament fibers of Tairyfil TC-33 having 3000 filaments/strand was used as reinforcement with low viscosity epoxy resin as the matrix material. The driveshaft is designed to be used in SAE Baja All Terrain Vehicle (ATV that makes use of a fully floating axle in its rear wheel drive system. The torsional strength of the shaft was tested and compared to that of an OEM steel shaft that was previously used in the ATV. Results show that the composite shaft had 8.5% higher torsional strength in comparison to the OEM steel shaft and was also lighter by 60%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs were studied to investigate the probable failure mechanism. Delamination, matrix agglomeration, fiber pull-out and matrix cracking were the prominent failure mechanisms identified.

  16. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  17. Fatigue damage propagation in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites made of a non-crimp fabric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Brøndsted, Povl; Gillespie Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    bundles. A simple stiffness spring model validates the stiffness loss observed. A fatigue damage scheme is presented, which suggests that damage initiates due to failure of the backing bundle causing a stress concentration in the axial load carrying fibres. This stress concentration, along with fretting...... fatigue, gives rise to axial fibre fractures and a loss of stiffness, eventually leading to final failure. The uniqueness of the present work is identification of the mechanisms associated with tension fatigue failure of unidirectional non-crimp fabrics used for wind turbine blades. The observed damage...

  18. Fabrication and properties of CNTs reinforced polymeric matrix nanocomposites for sports applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, A.; Khalid, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    The polymeric matrix composites have found extensive applications in sports because of high strength to weight ratio, ease of processing, and longer life. This work was carried out to study the properties of different sections of composite field hockey sticks and the influence of carbon nanotubes on their properties. The samples were fabricated by compression molding process. The increase in mechanical properties by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes is correlated with the process parameters to consider enhancement in the overall performance of the stick sections. (author)

  19. Fabrication and properties of CNTs reinforced polymeric matrix nanocomposites for sports applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, A; Khalid, F A

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric matrix composites have found extensive applications in sports because of high strength to weight ratio, ease of processing, and longer life. This work was carried out to study the properties of different sections of composite field hockey sticks and the influence of carbon nanotubes on their properties. The samples were fabricated by compression molding process. The increase in mechanical properties by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes is correlated with the process parameters to consider enhancement in the overall performance of the stick sections

  20. Fabrication and mechanical properties of quasicrystal-reinforced Al-Mn-Mm alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Woon-Jae

    2007-01-01

    Microstructures and room temperature mechanical properties of quasicrystal-reinforced Al 94-x Mn 6 Mm x (Mm: misch metal, x = 0-6 at.%) alloys have been studied systematically. Cylindrical rod samples with 3 mm in diameter were synthesized by injection-casting into a Cu mould and analyzed by means of X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Mechanical properties of the cylindrical rods were measured at room temperature by compression tests. The Al 94 Mn 6 alloy contains hexagonal-shape particles and long needle-shape Al 6 Mn precipitates surrounded by α-Al matrix. An addition of Mm into the Al 94 Mn 6 alloy generates icosahedral quasicrystalline phase (IQC) with an extinction of hexagonal and Al 6 Mn phases, and the fraction of IQC increases continuously with an increase in Mm content. Compressive yield strength (σ cys ) and ultimate compressive strength (σ ucs ) of the Al-Mn-Mm alloys are improved with Mm content up to 4%, whereas elongation is steeply deteriorated by the Mm addition. The Al 90 Mn 6 Mm 4 alloy exhibits the highest 570 and 783 MPa of σ cys and σ ucs , respectively, both of which are comparable to those of Al 90 Mn 6 Ce 4 alloy

  1. Fabrication of in-situ grown graphene reinforced Cu matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yakun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; Shi, Chunsheng; Li, Jiajun; Nash, Philip; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-01-01

    Graphene/Cu composites were fabricated through a graphene in-situ grown approach, which involved ball-milling of Cu powders with PMMA as solid carbon source, in-situ growth of graphene on flaky Cu powders and vacuum hot-press sintering. SEM and TEM characterization results indicated that graphene in-situ grown on Cu powders guaranteed a homogeneous dispersion and a good combination between graphene and Cu matrix, as well as the intact structure of graphene, which was beneficial to its strengthening effect. The yield strength of 244 MPa and tensile strength of 274 MPa were achieved in the composite with 0.95 wt.% graphene, which were separately 177% and 27.4% enhancement over pure Cu. Strengthening effect of in-situ grown graphene in the matrix was contributed to load transfer and dislocation strengthening. PMID:26763313

  2. Damage analysis of CF/AF hybrid fabric reinforced plastic laminated composites with scanned image microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Kasano, Hideaki; Shull, Peter J.

    2004-07-01

    The article presents an experimental study that has been conducted to evaluate the impact loading damage within hybrid fabric laminates-carbon and Aramid fibers. The experiments have been undertaken on a series of interply hybrid specimens with different preprags stacking sequences. Impact damage was created using an air-gun like impact device propelling spherical steel balls with diameters of 5.0mm and 10.0mm and having velocities of 113m/s and 40m/s respectively. The resulting specimen surface and internal damage (e.g., micro-cracking and debonding) was visualized nondestructively by a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) while further interrogation of specific internal damage was visualized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on cross-sectioned panels.

  3. Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L J

    2003-01-01

    This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R and D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities

  4. Experimental study on mix proportion of fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Zhao, Renda; Liao, Ping; Li, Fuhai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Shuang

    2017-10-01

    To study the mechanical property of fiber reinforced cementations composites influenced by the fiber length, quartz sand diameter, matrix of water cement ratio, volume fraction of fiber and magnesium acrylate solution. Several 40×40×160 mm standard test specimens, "8" specimens and long "8" specimens and 21 groups of fiber concrete specimens were fabricated. The flexural, compressive and uniaxial tensile strength were tested by using the bending resistance, compression resistance and electronic universal testing machine. The results show that flexural and compressive strength of fiber reinforced cementations composites increases along with the increase of quartz sand diameter, with the growth of the PVA fiber length increases; When the water-binder ratio is 0.25 and powder-binder ratio is 0.3, the PVA fiber content is 1.5% of the mass of cementations materials, there is a phenomenon of strain hardening; The addition of magnesium acrylate solution reduces the tensile strength of PVA fiber reinforced cementations composites, the tensile strength of the specimens in the curing age of 7d is decreased by about 21% and the specimens in curing age of 28d is decreased by more than 50%.

  5. Stress State Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Masonry Columns Reinforced with FRP under Concentric Compressive Load

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Witzany; Radek Zigler

    2016-01-01

    The strengthening and stabilization of damaged compressed masonry columns with composites based on fabrics of high-strength fibers and epoxy resin, or polymer-modified cement mixtures, belongs to novel, partially non-invasive and reversible progressive methods. The stabilizing and reinforcing effect of these fabrics significantly applies to masonry structures under concentric compressive loading whose failure mechanism is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cra...

  6. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  7. Functionalized carbon nanotube reinforced scaffolds for bone regenerative engineering: fabrication, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikael, Paiyz E; Amini, Ami R; Laurencin, Cato T; Nukavarapu, Syam P; Basu, Joysurya; Josefina Arellano-Jimenez, M; Barry Carter, C; Sanders, Mary M

    2014-01-01

    Designing biodegradable scaffolds with bone-compatible mechanical properties has been a significant challenge in the field of bone tissue engineering and regenerative engineering. The objective of this work is to improve the polymeric scaffold's mechanical strength by compositing it with mechanically superior carbon nanotubes. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microsphere scaffolds exhibit mechanical properties in the range of human cancellous bone. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes have outstanding mechanical properties. The aim of this study is to improve further the mechanical strength of PLGA scaffolds such that they may be applicable for a wide range of load-bearing repair and regeneration applications. We have formed composite microspheres of PLGA containing pristine and modified (with hydroxyl (OH), carboxylic acid (COOH)) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and fabricated them into three-dimensional porous scaffolds. Results show that by adding only 3% MWCNTs, the compressive strength and modulus was significantly increased (35 MPa, 510.99 MPa) compared to pure PLGA scaffolds (19 MPa and 166.38 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy images showed excellent cell adhesion and proliferation. In vitro studies exhibited good cell viability, proliferation and mineralization. The in vivo study, however, indicated differences in inflammatory response throughout the 12 weeks of implantation, with OH-modified MWCNTs having the least response, followed by unmodified and COOH-modified exhibiting a more pronounced response. Overall, our results show that PLGA scaffolds containing water-dispersible MWCNTs are mechanically stronger and display good cellular and tissue compatibility, and hence are potential candidates for load-bearing bone tissue engineering. (paper)

  8. Fabrication and characterization of aluminium hybrid composites reinforced with fly ash and silicon carbide through powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal Naim Shaikh, Mohd; Arif, Sajjad; Arif Siddiqui, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of aluminium hybrid composites (AMCs) reinforced with commonly available and inexpensive fly ash (FA, 0, 5, 10 and 15 wt.%) particles along silicon carbide (SiC) using powder metallurgy process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed for microstructural characterization and phase identification respectively. Wear behaviour were investigated using pin-on-disc wear tester for the different combinations of wear parameters like load (10, 20 and 30 N), sliding speed (1.5, 2 and 2.5 m s‑1) and sliding distance (300, 600 and 900 m). SEM confirms the uniform distribution of FA and SiC in aluminium matrix. The hardness of Al/SiC/FA is increased by 20%–25% while wear rate decreased by 15%–40%. From wear analysis, sliding distance was the least significant parameter influencing the wear loss followed by applied load and sliding speed. To identify the mechanism of wear, worn out surface were also analysed by SEM.

  9. Crack and wear behavior of SiC particulate reinforced aluminium based metal matrix composite fabricated by direct metal laser sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Partha

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, crack density and wear performance of SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) fabricated by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process have been studied. Mainly, size and volume fraction of SiCp have been varied to analyze the crack and wear behavior of the composite. The study has suggested that crack density increases significantly after 15 volume percentage (vol.%) of SiCp. The paper has also suggested that when size (mesh) of reinforcement increases, wear resistance of the composite drops. Three hundred mesh of SiCp offers better wear resistance; above 300 mesh the specific wear rate increases significantly. Similarly, there has been no improvement of wear resistance after 20 vol.% of reinforcement. The scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces have revealed that during the wear test SiCp fragments into small pieces which act as abrasives to result in abrasive wear in the specimen.

  10. Self-Shrinkage Behaviors of Waste Paper Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste considering Its Self-Curing Effect at Early-Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study how the early-age self-shrinkage behavior of cement paste is affected by the addition of the waste paper fibers under sealed conditions. Although the primary focus was to determine whether the waste paper fibers are suitable to mitigate self-shrinkage as an internal curing agent under different adding ways, evaluating their strength, pore structure, and hydration properties provided further insight into the self-cured behavior of cement paste. Under the wet mixing condition, the waste paper fibers could mitigate the self-shrinkage of cement paste and, at additions of 0.2% by mass of cement, the waste paper fibers were found to show significant self-shrinkage cracking control while providing some internal curing. In addition, the self-curing efficiency results were analyzed based on the strength and the self-shrinkage behaviors of cement paste. Results indicated that, under a low water cement ratio, an optimal dosage and adding ways of the waste paper fibers could enhance the self-curing efficiency of cement paste.

  11. Using in situ dynamic cultures to rapidly biofabricate fabric-reinforced composites of chitosan/bacterial nanocellulose for antibacterial wound dressings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eZhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial nano-cellulose (BNC is considered to possess incredible potential in biomedical applications due to its innate unrivalled nano-fibrillar structure and versatile properties. However its use is largely restricted by inefficient production and by insufficient strength when it is in a highly swollen state. In this study, a fabric skeleton reinforced chitosan (CS/BNC hydrogel with high mechanical reliability and antibacterial activity was fabricated by using an efficient dynamic culture that could reserve the nano-fibrillar structure. By adding CS in culture media to 0.25-0.75% (w/v during bacterial cultivation, the CS/BNC composite hydrogel was biosynthesized in situ on a rotating drum composed of fabrics. With the proposed method, BNC biosynthesis became less sensitive to the adverse antibacterial effects of CS and the production time of the composite hydrogel with desirable thickness could be halved from 10 days to 5 days as compared to the conventional static cultures. Although its concentration was low in the medium, CS accounted for more than 38% of the CS/BNC dry weight. FE-SEM observation confirmed conservation of the nano-fibrillar networks and covering of CS on BNC. ATR-FTIR showed a decrease in the degree of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding and water absorption capacity was improved after compositing with CS. The fabric-reinforced CS/BNC composite exhibited bacteriostatic properties against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and significantly improved mechanical properties as compared to the BNC sheets from static culture. In summary, the fabric-reinforced CS/BNC composite constitutes a desired candidate for advanced wound dressings. From another perspective, coating of BNC or CS/BNC could upgrade the conventional wound dressings made of cotton gauze to reduce pain during wound healing, especially for burn patients.

  12. Analysis of the mechanical resistance and porosity of a composite cement with EVA and reinforced with piacava fibers; Analise da resistencia mecanica e porosidade de um composito cimenticio leve com EVA e reforcado com fibras de piacava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.M.; Dominguez, D.S.; Alvim, R.C.; Iglesias, S.M., E-mail: regilan@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, a lot of solid waste material is discarded into the environment. One of these residues is the EVA (Ethyl Vinyl Acetate) which has the footwear industry, as its main consumer. Studies are focused on the reusing of these materials, particularly in the civil construction, where is used as an aggregate in the production of light mortars. Due to the specific characteristics of lightweight concrete, is necessary to reinforce these materials. The palm Attalea Funifera Martius, known as piacava, may be an excellent alternative as a reinforcement element in light cement mixes. In this work, it's verified the mechanical strength of a composite lightweight cementitious with EVA and reinforced with Piacava fibers, also, the porosity of the new material was measured. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this new material was made mechanical tests and verified the importance of vegetal fibers as the material reinforcing. For the compound porosity evaluation, samples were studied using microcomputer tomography (μTC). With images processing techniques we identify and quantify the pores. The processing digital images through μTC showed up as a non-destructive method for efficient and acceptable results. (author)

  13. Effect of UV and water spraying on the mechanical properties of flax fabric reinforced polymer composites used for civil engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Libo; Chouw, Nawawi; Jayaraman, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • UV weathering degraded mechanical properties of flax/epoxy composites. • SEM confirmed degradation in fibre/matrix interfacial bonding. • UV weathering caused discolouration, matrix erosion, microcracking. - Abstract: The lack of data related to durability is one major challenge that needed to be addressed prior to the widespread acceptance of natural fibre reinforced polymer composites for engineering applications. In this work, the combined effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and water spraying on the mechanical properties of flax fabric reinforced epoxy composite was investigated to assess the durability performance of this composite used for civil engineering applications. Specimens fabricated by hand lay-up process were exposed in an accelerated weathering chamber for 1500 h. Tensile and three-point bending tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyse the microstructures of the composites. In addition, the durability performance of flax/epoxy composite was compared with synthetic (glass and carbon) and hybrid fibre reinforced composites. The test results show that the tensile strength/modulus of the weathered composites decreased 29.9% and 34.9%, respectively. The flexural strength/modulus reduced 10.0% and 10.2%, respectively. SEM study confirmed the degradation in fibre/matrix interfacial bonding after exposure. Comparisons with other composites implies that flax fabric/epoxy composite has potential to be used for civil engineering applications when taking its structural and durability performance into account. Proper treatments to enhance its durability performance will make it more comparable to synthetic fibre reinforced composites when considering as construction building materials

  14. Cermet cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  15. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Wang; Oh, Sung-Rok; Choi, Byung-Keol

    2017-01-01

    We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite m...

  16. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, L.; Appavou, M.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2017), s. 402-417 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : zinc phosphate cements * small angle neutron scattering * X-ray micro-computed tomography * X-ray powder diffraction * zinc oxide * acid-base cements Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0109564116305127

  17. Periapical tissue response after use of intermediate restorative material, gutta-percha, reinforced zinc oxide cement, and mineral trioxide aggregate as retrograde root-end filling materials: a histologic study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Dan-Åke; Abrahamsson, Peter; Isaksson, Sten; Salata, Luiz Antonio; Sennerby, Lars; Dahlin, Christer

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the periapical tissue response of 4 different retrograde root-filling materials, ie, intermediate restorative material, thermoplasticized gutta-percha, reinforced zinc oxide cement (Super-EBA), and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), in conjunction with an ultrasonic root-end preparation technique in an animal model. Vital roots of the third and fourth right mandibular premolars in 6 healthy mongrel dogs were apicectomized and sealed with 1 of the materials using a standardized surgical procedure. After 120 days, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens were analyzed radiologically, histologically, and scanning electron microscopically. The Fisher exact test was performed on the 2 outcome values. Twenty-three sections were analyzed histologically. Evaluation showed better re-establishment of the periapical tissues and generally lower inflammatory infiltration in the sections from teeth treated with the intermediate restorative material and the MTA. New root cement on the resected dentin surfaces was seen on all sections regardless of the used material. New hard tissue formation, directly on the surface of the material, was seen only in the MTA sections. There was no statistical difference in outcome among the tested materials. The results from this dog model favor the intermediate restorative material and MTA as retrograde fillings when evaluating the bone defect regeneration. MTA has the most favorable periapical tissue response when comparing the biocompatibility of the materials tested. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Design, fabrication, and properties of a continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide gamma ray/neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Tang, Xiaobin; Chai, Hao; Chen, Da; Qiu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sm_2O_3 is used for neutron absorber instead of B_4C, and Sm_2O_3 has a good photon-shielding effect. • Carbon-fiber cloth and polyimide were used to enhance shielding materials’ mechanical behavior and thermal behavior. • Both Monte Carlo method and shielding test were used to evaluate shielding performance of the novel shielding material. - Abstract: The design and fabrication of shielding materials with good heat-resistance and mechanical properties is a major problem in the radiation shielding field. In this paper, based on gamma ray and neutron shielding theory, a continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide gamma ray/neutron shielding material was fabricated by hot-pressing method. The material's application behavior was subsequently evaluated using neutron shielding, photon shielding, mechanical tensile, and thermogravimetric analysis–differential scanning calorimetry tests. The results show that the tensile strength of the novel shielding material exceeds 200 MPa, which makes it of similar strength to aluminum alloy. The material does not undergo crosslinking and decomposition reactions at 300 °C and it can be used in such environments for long periods of time. The continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide material has a good shielding performance with respect to gamma rays and neutrons. The material thus has good prospects for use in fusion reactor system and nuclear waste disposal applications.

  19. Characterization and mechanical testing of alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, K.E.; Jiang, D.; Yao, W.; Ritchie, R.O.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) were fabricated by advanced powder processing techniques and consolidated by spark plasma sintering. Raman spectroscopy revealed that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) begin to break down at sintering temperatures >1150 °C. Nuclear magnetic resonance showed that, although thermodynamically unlikely, no Al 4 C 3 formed in the CNT–alumina nanocomposites, such that the nanocomposite can be considered as purely a physical mixture with no chemical bond formed between the nanotubes and ceramic matrix. In addition, in situ single-edge notched bend tests were conducted on niobium and/or CNT-reinforced alumina nanocomposites to assess their toughness. Despite the absence of subcritical crack growth, average fracture toughness values of 6.1 and 3.3 MPa m 1/2 were measured for 10 vol.% Nb and 10 vol.% Nb–5 vol.% SWCNT–alumina, respectively. Corresponding tests for the alumina nanocomposites containing 5 vol.% SWCNT, 10 vol.% SWCNT, 5 vol.% double-walled-CNT and 10 vol.% Nb yielded average fracture toughnesses of 3.0, 2.8, 3.3 and 4.0 MPa m 1/2 , respectively. It appears that the reason for not observing improvement in fracture toughness of CNT-reinforced samples is because of either damage to CNTs or possibly non-optimal interfacial bonding between CNT-alumina.

  20. Bonding Characteristics of Macrosynthetic Fiber in Latex-Modified Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites as a Function of Carbon Nanotube Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hong Jean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of carbon nanotube content (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% of the cement weight on the bonding properties of macrosynthetic fiber in latex-modified hybrid fiber cement-based composites (LMHFRCCs was evaluated. The slump value, compressive strength, and bonding strength were measured for each LMHFRCC. As the carbon nanotube content increased to 1.5%, the bonding properties of the macrosynthetic fiber improved. However, the bonding performance deteriorated at a carbon nanotube content of 2.0%. A decrease in the fluidity of the mix negatively affected the dispersion of the nanotubes in the LMHFRCCs. The addition of carbon nanotubes also affected the relative bonding strength independently of the improvement in compressive strength. Microscopic analysis of the macrosynthetic fiber surfaces was used to understand changes in the bonding behavior.

  1. Study on the friction and wear properties of carbon fabric composites reinforced with micro- and nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhaozhu; Su Fenghua; Wang Kun; Jiang Wei; Men Xuehu; Liu Weimin

    2005-01-01

    The carbon fabric composites filled with the particulates of polyfluo-150 wax (PFW), nano-particles of ZnO (nano-ZnO), and nano-particles of SiC (nano-SiC), respectively, were prepared by dip-coating of the carbon fabric in a phenolic resin containing the particulates to be incorporated and the successive curing. The friction and wear behaviors of the carbon fabric composites sliding against AISI-1045 steel in a pin-on-disk configuration are evaluated on a Xuanwu-III high-temperature friction and wear tester. The morphologies of the worn surfaces of the filled carbon fabric composites and the counterpart steel pins are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the fillers on the adhesion strength of the adhesive is evaluated using a DY35 universal materials tester. It is found that the fillers PFW, nano-ZnO, and nano-SiC contribute to significantly increasing anti-wear abilities of the carbon fabric composites, however, nano-SiC increase the friction coefficient of the carbon fabric composites. The wear rates of the composites at elevated temperature above 180 deg. C are much larger than that below 180 deg. C, which attribute to the degradation and decomposition of the adhesive resin at an excessively elevated temperature. That the interface bonding strength among the carbon fabric, the adhesive, and the particles is significantly increased after solidification and with the transferred film of the varied features largely account for the increased wear-resistance of the filled carbon fabric composites as compared with the unfilled one

  2. Fabrication of GO/Cement Composites by Incorporation of Few-Layered GO Nanosheets and Characterization of Their Crystal/Chemical Structure and Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shenghua; Hu, Haoyan; Zhang, Jia; Luo, Xiaoqian; Lei, Ying; Sun, Li

    2017-12-18

    Original graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared using the Hummers method and found to easily aggregate in aqueous and cement composites. Using carboxymethyl chitosan (CCS) as a dispersant, few-layered GO nanosheets (1-2 layers) were obtained by forming CCS/GO intercalation composites. The testing results indicated that the few-layered GO nanosheets could uniformly spread, both in aqueous and cement composites. The cement composites were prepared with GO dosages of 0.03%, 0.05% and 0.07% and we found that they had a compact microstructure in the whole volume. A special feature was determined, namely that the microstructures consisted of regular-shaped crystals created by self-crosslinking. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that there was a higher number of cement hydration crystals in GO/cement composites. Meanwhile, we also found that partially-amorphous Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (C-S-H) gel turned into monoclinic crystals. At 28 days, the GO/cement composites reached the maximum compressive and flexural strengths at a 0.05% dosage. These strengths were 176.64 and 31.67 MPa and, compared with control samples, their increased ratios were 64.87% and 149.73%, respectively. Durability parameters, such as penetration, freeze-thaw, carbonation, drying-shrinkage value and pore structure, showed marked improvement. The results indicated that it is possible to obtain cement composites with a compact microstructure and with high performances by introducing CCS/GO intercalation composites.

  3. Caractérisation microstructurale et mécanique d’un composite cimentaire renforcé par des fibres de lin Characterizations mechanical and microstructural of flax fibre cement composite reinforced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutouil M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dans la perspective de valorisation des fibres de lin dans les matériaux de construction, la présente étude s’intéresse à la caractérisation microstructurale et mécanique d’un composite cimentaire renforcé par des fibres de lin. Les analyses microstructurales au MEB ont été menées pour évaluer l’homogénéité de la distribution des fibres, la qualité de l’interaction fibre/matrice et l’influence de leur présence sur les défauts microstructuraux. Le comportement mécanique en flexion du mortier renforcé par les fibres de lin est étudié en fonction de la longueur et la teneur en fibres. Les résultats indiquent une bonne adhésion entre les fibres et la matrice à l’état frais. Mais les fibres étant hydrophiles, elles gonflent pendant la prise du ciment et le retrait lors du séchage engendre alors des déchaussements. Les résultats de caractérisation mécanique sont encourageants. Tout d’abord, la fissuration du mortier due au retrait au jeune âge est fortement réduite du fait de la présence des fibres. Ensuite, la rupture brutale de la matrice en monolithe laisse place à un comportement quasi-ductile quand la teneur ou la longueur de fibre augmente. Ce changement de comportement, analysé en termes d’indice de ténacité, illustre la capacité remarquable des fibres de lin à renforcer les matrices cimentaires du fait de leurs bonnes propriétés mécaniques. With the purpose of the flax fibre valuing in construction materials, this study focuses on the characterizations mechanical and microstructural of flax fibre cement composite reinforced. The mechanical strength was studied as the function of fibre volume ratio and length. Meanwhile, the microstructural analysis investigated the homogeneity of fibre scattering, the interaction fibre/cement matrix and the influence of flax fibres on the defects microstructures. The results show the interesting mechanical properties of flax fibre in comparison with

  4. Electrically and Thermally Conductive Carbon Fibre Fabric Reinforced Polymer Composites Based on Nanocarbons and an In-situ Polymerizable Cyclic Oligoester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji-Un; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Hun Su; Khil, Myung-Seob; Kim, Seong Yun

    2018-05-16

    There is growing interest in carbon fibre fabric reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites based on a thermoplastic matrix, which is easy to rapidly produce, repair or recycle. To expand the applications of thermoplastic CFRP composites, we propose a process for fabricating conductive CFRP composites with improved electrical and thermal conductivities using an in-situ polymerizable and thermoplastic cyclic butylene terephthalate oligomer matrix, which can induce good impregnation of carbon fibres and a high dispersion of nanocarbon fillers. Under optimal processing conditions, the surface resistivity below the order of 10 +10 Ω/sq, which can enable electrostatic powder painting application for automotive outer panels, can be induced with a low nanofiller content of 1 wt%. Furthermore, CFRP composites containing 20 wt% graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were found to exhibit an excellent thermal conductivity of 13.7 W/m·K. Incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotubes into CFRP composites is more advantageous for improving electrical conductivity, whereas incorporating GNPs is more beneficial for enhancing thermal conductivity. It is possible to fabricate the developed thermoplastic CFRP composites within 2 min. The proposed composites have sufficient potential for use in automotive outer panels, engine blocks and other mechanical components that require conductive characteristics.

  5. Accelerated testing for studying pavement design and performance (FY 2000) : effectiveness of fiber reinforced and plain, ultra-thin concrete overlays on Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (PCCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    The objective of the research was to compare the performance of fiber reinforced and plain PCC concrete overlay when used as a thin non-dowelled overlay on top of a rubblized, distressed concrete pavement. The experiment was conducted at the Accelera...

  6. Composition and Morphology of Product Layers in the Steel/Cement Paste Interface in Conditions of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Fraaij, A.L.A.; Boshkov, N.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP). Of particular interest was to investigate if the introduced pulse CP (as

  7. Fatigue damage assessment of uni-directional non-crimp fabric reinforced polyester composite using X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Zangenberg Hansen, Jens; Lowe, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the progression of tension-tension fatigue (R=0.1) damage in a unidirectional (UD) composite made from a non-crimp glass fibre fabric used for wind turbine blades is investigated using multi-scale 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT). Initially, a representative volume is examined at ...

  8. Uncovering the fatigue damage initiation and progression in uni-directional non-crimp fabric reinforced polyester composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Glud, Jens A.; Zangenberg, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The current work studies the fatigue damage initiation and progression in a quasi-unidirectional non-crimp fabric based fibre composite used for wind turbine blades. This is done by combining in situ transilluminated white light imagining (TWLI) with ex-situ X-ray computed tomography (CT) experim...

  9. Microstructure and wear property of the Ti5Si3/TiC reinforced Co-based coatings fabricated by laser cladding on Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Fei; Yu, Huijun; Liu, Jianli; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dai, Jingjie; Zhao, Zhihuan

    2017-07-01

    Ti5Si3/TiC reinforced Co-based composite coatings were fabricated on Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy by laser cladding with Co42 and SiC mixture. Microstructure and wear property of the cladding coatings with different content of SiC were investigated. During the cladding process, the original SiC dissolved and reacted with Ti forming Ti5Si3 and TiC. The complex in situ formed phases were found beneficial to the improvement of the coating property. Results indicated that the microhardness of the composite coatings was enhanced to over 3 times the substrate. The wear resistance of the coatings also showed distinct improvement (18.4-57.4 times). More SiC gave rise to better wear resistance within certain limits. However, too much SiC (20 wt%) was not good for the further improvement of the wear property.

  10. Design and fabrication of carbon fibers with needle-like nano-HA coating to reinforce granular nano-HA composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Xueni; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wanying; Zhang, Jing; He, Fuzhen; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) with needle-like nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) coating were first used as reinforcing materials named nHA-CFs to improve the mechanical properties of pure HA. A powder mixture containing nHA-CFs and granular nano-HA (gHA) was directly sintered by hot pressing at appropriate sintering pressure and temperature. A three-phase nHA-CFs/gHA composite was designed, fabricated, and used as an artificial bone. Results show that the bending strengths of the nHA-CFs/gHA composite are approximately 41.1% and 59.2% higher than those of CFs/gHA composite and pure HA, respectively. The possible reinforcing mechanism of nHA-CFs in the composite is also proposed at the end. When nHA-CFs are applied for preparation of nHA-CFs/gHA composites, the internal stress on its phase boundary with gHA matrix generated during cooling of sintered is significantly reduced due to the presence of the nHA coatings. It infers that nHA coatings on CFs might act as a bridge to control the forming of interfacial gaps between the gHA matrix and the CFs effectively. Our work provides additional insights into the feasibility of nHA-CFs/gHA composites as load-bearing implant materials in clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Caracterização mecânica de laminados cimentíceos esbeltos reforçados com fibras de sisal Mechanical characterization of cement-based thin-walled laminates reinforced with sisal fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R. L. Lima

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Com a proibição progressiva do uso de fibras de asbesto na fabricação de laminados à base de cimento, novos produtos têm sido desenvolvidos para suprir esta demanda do setor construtivo. A utilização de fibras de sisal como substituto ao asbesto, além de ser uma proposta ecológica tem grande importância socioeconômica, pois agregará valor a um produto cultivado com sucesso no semi-árido nordestino. Produziram-se, neste trabalho, placas laminadas com matriz de argamassa reforçadas com fibras longas de sisal. Ensaios de flexão em três pontos foram realizados com o objetivo de se estudar a influência da adição de fibras (3%, do número de camadas (2 e 3, da orientação das camadas (0 e 90° e da pressão de moldagem (0 e 2 MPa sobre o comportamento à flexão dos laminados. Os resultados indicam que a adição de fibras de sisal aumentou, para todos os casos estudados, a capacidade de absorver energia, a resistência à flexão pós-fissuração e a deflexão última do material. Os laminados reforçados com 3% de fibras de sisal, distribuídas em três camadas ortogonais à direção do carregamento e submetidos à pressão de moldagem de 2 MPa, apresentaram o melhor comportamento mecânico.Because of hazards to human and animal health, the use of asbestos and its products is being prohibited all around the world and academic institutions and fibre cement producers have been engaged in intensive research to find asbestos-free cement products. The application of natural fibres such as sisal to replace asbestos fibres can bring economical and ecological benefits due to their availability, low cost, low consumption of energy and suitability to the semi-arid area of the Northeast of Brazil (where not many plants can grow. In this paper, cement-based laminates reinforced with continuous sisal fibre were produced. Three point bending tests were carried out to evaluate the influence of addition of fibre (3%, number of layers of

  12. Hydrophilicity Reinforced Adhesion of Anodic Alumina Oxide Template Films to Conducting Substrates for Facile Fabrication of Highly Ordered Nanorod Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanju; Wang, Guiqiang; Yang, Rui; Sun, Xiangyu; Ma, Hui; Sun, Shuqing

    2017-01-17

    Arrays of ordered nanorods are of special interest in many fields. However, it remains challenging to obtain such arrays on conducting substrates in a facile manner. In this article, we report the fabrication of highly ordered and vertically standing nanorod arrays of both metals and semiconductors on Au films and indium tin oxide glass substrates without an additional layering. In this approach, following the simple hydrophilic treatment of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane and conducting substrates, the AAO membrane was transferred onto the modified substrates with excellent adhesion. Subsequently, nanorod arrays of various materials were electrodeposited on the conducting substrates directly. This method avoids any expensive and tedious lithographic and ion milling process, which provides a simple yet robust route to the fabrication of arrays of 1D materials with high aspect ratio on conducting substrates, which shall pave the way for many practical applications in a range of fields.

  13. A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    5 Figure 5. (a) (Left) Results showing optimal compaction of an E-glass (similar compaction to S-Glass) laminate at approximately 350...repeatability and a lack in dimensional tolerances versus prepreg composites fabricated in an autoclave. However, recent advancements in process understanding...structure, and while high fvf composite laminates are attainable in autoclave processing, these techniques may not be cost effective (10–15). The out

  14. Braided reinforced composite rods for the internal reinforcement of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonilho Pereira, C.; Fangueiro, R.; Jalali, S.; Araujo, M.; Marques, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on the development of braided reinforced composite rods as a substitute for the steel reinforcement in concrete. The research work aims at understanding the mechanical behaviour of core-reinforced braided fabrics and braided reinforced composite rods, namely concerning the influence of the braiding angle, the type of core reinforcement fibre, and preloading and postloading conditions. The core-reinforced braided fabrics were made from polyester fibres for producing braided structures, and E-glass, carbon, HT polyethylene, and sisal fibres were used for the core reinforcement. The braided reinforced composite rods were obtained by impregnating the core-reinforced braided fabric with a vinyl ester resin. The preloading of the core-reinforced braided fabrics and the postloading of the braided reinforced composite rods were performed in three and two stages, respectively. The results of tensile tests carried out on different samples of core-reinforced braided fabrics are presented and discussed. The tensile and bending properties of the braided reinforced composite rods have been evaluated, and the results obtained are presented, discussed, and compared with those of conventional materials, such as steel.

  15. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  16. Effect of disaccharide, gamma radiation and temperature on the physico-mechanical properties of jute fabrics reinforced unsaturated polyester resin-based composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahadat Hossain, Md.; Chowdhury, A. M. Sarwaruddin; Khan, Ruhul A.

    2017-06-01

    The jute fabrics reinforced unsaturated polyester resin (jute/UPR)-based composites were prepared successfully by the hand-lay-up technique. The percentage of jute fabrics was kept constant at 40% fiber (by weight). The disaccharide percentage was also kept constant at 2% (by weight), but at this percentage the mechanical properties were lower than the untreated composites. Gamma radiation dose was varied at 0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5 kGy for jute/UPR-based composites. At 5.0 kGy gamma dose highest TS, TM and Eb were obtained. The jute/UPR-based composites were treated under 30°C, 50°C and -18°C for the measurement of mechanical properties. At low temperature (-18°C), the highest mechanical properties were observed. The water uptake properties were measured for disaccharide-treated and disaccharide-untreated composites up to 10 days, but no water was absorbed by the composites. The soil degradation test was carried out under 12 inch soil containing at least 25% water, but no significant decrease was observed for untreated and sucrose-treated composites. For the functional group analysis, FT-IR was carried out. For the fiber matrix adhesion analysis, the scanning electron microscopic image was taken.

  17. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable.

  18. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  19. simulation models for presiction of structrual fibre-reinforced come

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    showed increasing flexural strength up to the optimum fibre volume fraction while the ... the analysis and design of palmnut fibre-reinforced cement composites. ..... Nilson, L. “Reinforcement of Concrete with Sisal and other Vegetable Fibres”.

  20. GLASS-FIBRE REINFORCED COMPOSITES: THE EFFECT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    mechanical and corrosion wear behaviour of any reinforced composites. In other ..... physical properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin and the following .... waste in concrete and cement composites," Journal of Cleaner Production, vol.

  1. Fabrication and evaluation of thin layer PVDF composites using MWCNT reinforcement: Mechanical, electrical and enhanced electromagnetic interference shielding properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Bhaskara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radar X-band electromagnetic interference shielding (EMS is one of the prime requirements for any air vehicle coating; with limitations on the balance between strength and thickness of the EMS material. Nanocomposite of multiwalled-carbon-nanotubes (MWCNT has been homogeneously integrated (0 – 9 wt% with polymer, poly (vinylidene fluoride, PVDF to yield 300 micron film. The PVDF + 9 wt% MWCNT sample of density 1.41 g/cm3 show specific shielding effectiveness (SSE of 17.7 dB/(g/cm3 (99.6% EMS, with maintained hardness and improved conductivity. With multilayer stacking (900 microns of these films of density 1.37 g/cm3, the sample showed increase in SSE to 23.3 dB/(g/cm3 (99.93% EMS. Uniform dispersion of MWCNTs in the PVDF matrix gives rise to increased conductivity in the sample beyond 5 wt% MWCNT reinforcement. The results are correlated to the hardness, reflection loss, absorption loss, percolation threshold, permittivity and the conductivity data. An extremely thin film with maximum EMS property is hence proposed.

  2. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  3. Fabrication and Evaluation of Graphite Fiber-Reinforced Polyimide Composite Tube Forms Using Modified Resin Transfer Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exum, Daniel B.; Ilias, S.; Avva, V. S.; Sadler, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The techniques necessary for the fabrication of a complex three-dimensional tubular form using a PMR-type resin have been developed to allow for the construction of several tubes with good physical and mechanical properties. Employing established resin transfer molding practices, the relatively non-hazardous AMB-21 in acetone formulation was used to successfully impregnate four layers of AS4 braided graphite fiber preform previously loaded around an aluminum cylindrical core in an enclosed mold cavity. Using heat and vacuum, the solvent was evaporated to form a prepreg followed by a partial imidization and removal of condensation products. The aluminum core was replaced by a silicone rubber bladder and the cure cycle continued to the final stage of 550 F with a bladder internal pressure of 200 lbs/sq in while simultaneously applying a strong vacuum to the prepreg for removal of any additional imidization products. A combination of several modifications to the standard resin transfer molding methodology enabled the mold to 'breathe', allowing the imidization products a pathway for escape. AMB-21 resin was chosen because of the carcinogenic nature of the primary commercial polyimide PMR-15. The AMB-21 resin was formulated using commercially available monomers or monomer precursors and dissolved in a mixture of methyl alcohol and acetone. The viscosity of the resulting monomer solution was checked by use of a Brookfield rheometer and adjusted by adding acetone to an easily pumpable viscosity of about 600 cP. In addition, several types of chromatographic and thermal analyses were of the braids, and excess handling of the preforms broke some of the microscopic fibers, needlessly decreasing the strength of the finished part. In addition, three dimensional braided preforms with fibers along the length of the tube will be significantly stronger in tension than the braided preforms used in this study.

  4. Fabrication of Multiple-Layered Hydrogel Scaffolds with Elaborate Structure and Good Mechanical Properties via 3D Printing and Ionic Reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotong; Wei, Changzheng; Cao, Bin; Jiang, Lixia; Hou, Yongtai; Chang, Jiang

    2018-05-30

    A major challenge in three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogels is the fabrication of stable constructs with high precision and good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Existing methods typically feature complicated reinforcement steps or use potentially toxic components, such as photocuring polymers and crosslinking reagents. In this study, we used a thermally sensitive hydrogel, hydroxybutyl chitosan (HBC), for 3D-printing applications. For the first time, we demonstrated that this modified polysaccharide is affected by the specific ion effect. As the salt concentration was increased and stronger kosmotropic anions were used, the lower critical solution temperature of the HBC decreased and the storage modulus was improved, indicating a more hydrophobic structure and stronger molecular chain interactions. On the basis of the thermosensitivity and the ion effects of HBC, a 25-layered hydrogel scaffold with strong mechanical properties and an elaborate structure was prepared via a 3D-printing method and one-step ionic post-treatment. In particular, the scaffold treated with 10% NaCl solution exhibited a tunable elastic modulus of 73.2 kPa to 40 MPa and excellent elastic recovery, as well as biodegradability and cytocompatibility, suggesting the potential for its applications to cartilage tissue repair. By simply controlling the temperature and salt concentrations, this novel approach provides a convenient and green route to improving the structural accuracy and regulating the properties of 3D-printed hydrogel constructs.

  5. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  6. Aluminum powder size and microstructure effects on properties of boron nitride reinforced aluminum matrix composites fabricated by semi-solid powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cunguang; Guo, Leichen; Luo, Ji; Hao, Junjie; Guo, Zhimeng; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2015-01-01

    Al matrix composite reinforced by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with nearly full densification was successfully fabricated by the semi-solid powder metallurgy technique. The h-BN/Al composites were synthesized with elemental pure Al powder size of d_5_0=35, 12 and 2 μm. The powder morphology and the structural characteristics of the composites were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The density, Brinell hardness and compressive behavior of the samples were characterized. Density measurement of the Al composites revealed that the composite densification can be effectively promoted by plenty of embedded liquid phase under pressure. Composites prepared using Al powder with varying granularity showed different grain characteristics, and in situ recrystallization occurred inside the original grains with 35 μm Al powder. A sharp interface consisting of Al/Al_2O_3/h-BN was present in the composites. Both the compressive strength and the fracture strain of the investigated composites increased with the decrease of the Al powder size, along with the Brinell hardness. The composite with 2 μm Al powder exhibited the highest relative density (99.3%), Brinell harness (HB 128), compressive strength (763 MPa) and fracture strain (0.299).

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of MWCNTs Reinforced A356 Aluminum Alloys Cast Nanocomposites Fabricated by Using a Combination of Rheocasting and Squeeze Casting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Bakr Elshalakany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A356 hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys matrix composites reinforced by different contents of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were fabricated using a combination of rheocasting and squeeze casting techniques. A novel approach by adding MWCNTs into A356 aluminum alloy matrix with CNTs has been performed. This method is significant in debundling and preventing flotation of the CNTs within the molten alloy. The microstructures of nanocomposites and the interface between the aluminum alloy matrix and the MWCNTs were examined by using an optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. This method remarkably facilitated a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within A356 aluminum alloy matrix as well as a refinement of grain size. In addition, the effects of weight fraction (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt% of the CNT-blended matrix on mechanical properties were evaluated. The results have indicated that a significant improvement in ultimate tensile strength and elongation percentage of nanocomposite occurred at the optimal amount of 1.5 wt% MWCNTs which represents an increase in their values by a ratio of about 50% and 280%, respectively, compared to their corresponding values of monolithic alloy. Hardness of the samples was also significantly increased by the addition of CNTs.

  8. Modification of carbon fabrics by radio-frequency capacitive discharge at low pressure to regulate mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics based on it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garifullin, A R; Krasina, I V; Skidchenko, E A; Shaekhov, M F; Tikhonova, N V

    2017-01-01

    To increase the values of mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF) composite materials used in sports equipment production the method of radio-frequency capacitive (RFC) low-pressure plasma treatment in air was proposed. Previously it was found that this type of modification allows to effectively regulate the surface properties of fibers of different nature. This treatment method differs from the traditional ones by efficiency and environmental friendliness as it does not require the use of aggressive, environmentally hazardous chemicals. In this paper it was established that RFC low-pressure air plasma treatment of carbon fabrics enhances the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). As a result of experimental studies of CF by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method it was proved that after radio-frequency capacitive plasma treatment at low pressure in air the oxygen-containing functional groups is grafted on the surface. These groups improve adhesion at the interface “matrix-fiber”. (paper)

  9. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  10. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  11. Fundamental study on the same kind/different morphology composite material using knitted fabrics for a reinforcing pattern. Amimono wo kyoka keitai to shita doshu ikeitai fukugo zairyo no kisoteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K.; Hamada, Y. (Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan))

    1998-05-21

    An experimental study was performed on a polyethylene composite material using knitted fabrics for a reinforcing pattern. The experiment used ultra polymeric polyethylene as a reinforcing material, and low-density polyethylene as a matrix. The reinforcing pattern used flat-knitted fabrics, fabricated by using a knitting machine. Formation temperature, which took melting points of both materials of 147 and 120 degC into account, was set to 145 degC with expectation on bonding of both materials. The tensile test was performed under displacement control of 10.0 mm/min, and after the test, SEM observation was conducted on fracture faces. The following findings were obtained as a result of the experiment: regardless of test piece cutting-out directions and the number of lamination, the fracture was observed in three stages; with two-layer test pieces, stress increased further from fracture strain at about 30%, and the test pieces ended up in final fracture while repeating increase and decrease in the stress; two-layer course test pieces showed tensile strength of 33 MPa, which is an enhancement by 51% of the strength of the matrix polyethylene; and fracture strain showed as high values as 70 to 90% in the two-layer test pieces. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Flexural Behavior of High-Volume Steel Fiber Cementitious Composite Externally Reinforced with Basalt FRP Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by unique tensile strain hardening and multiple microcracking behaviors. The HPFRCC, which demonstrates remarkable properties such as strength, ductility, toughness, durability, stiffness, and thermal resistance, is a class of fiber cement composite with fine aggregates. It can withstand tensile stresses by forming distributed microcracks owing to the embedded fibers in the concrete, which improve the energy absorption capacity and apparent ductility. This high energy absorbing capacity can be enhanced further by an external stiff fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. Basalt fabric is externally bonded as a sheet on concrete materials to enhance the durability and resistance to fire and other environmental attacks. This study investigates the flexural performance of an HPFRCC that is externally reinforced with multiple layers of basalt FRP. The HPFRCC considered in the study contains steel fibers at a volume fraction of 8%.

  13. Deflection hardening of sustainable fiber–cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, P. R. L.; Santos, D. O. J.; Fontes, C. M. A.; Barros, Joaquim A. O.; Toledo Filho, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study sisal fiber–cement composites reinforced with 4% and 6% of short fibers were developed and their physical–mechanical behavior was characterized. To ensure the composite sustainability and durability, the ordinary Portland cement matrix was modified by adding fly ash and metakaolin, and the natural aggregate was substituted by 10% and 20% of recycled concrete aggregate. Flat sheets were cast in a self-compacted cement matrix and bending tests were performed ...

  14. Expansive cements for the manufacture of the concrete protective bandages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymechko, Yaroslav; Voloshynets, Vladyslav

    2017-12-01

    One of the promising directions of the use of expansive cements is making the protective bandages for the maintenance of pipelines. Bandages expansive application of the compositions of the pipeline reinforce the damaged area and reduce stress due to compressive stress in the cylindrical area. Such requirements are best suited for expansive compositions obtained from portland cement and modified quicklime. The article presents the results of expansive cements based on quick lime in order to implement protective bandages pipelines.

  15. TECHNOLOGY AND EFFICIENCY OF PEAT ASH USAGE IN CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Liakhevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main ways to improve physical and mechanical properties of cement concrete is an introduction of ash obtained due to burning of fossil fuels into concrete mix. The concrete mixes with ash are characterized by high cohesion, less water gain and disintegration. At the same time the concrete has high strength, density, water resistance, resistance to sulfate corrosion. The aim of this paper is to explore the possibility to use peat ash and slag of peat enterprises of the Republic of Belarus in the concrete for improvement of its physical and mechanical properties and characteristics of peat ash, slag, micro-silica, cement, superplasticizing agent. Compositions and technology for preparation of concrete mixes have been developed and concrete samples have been have been fabricated and tested in the paper. It has been shown that the concrete containing ash, slag obtained due to burning of peat in the industrial installations of the Usiazhsky and Lidsky Peat Briquette Plants and also MK-85-grade micro-silica NSPKSAUsF-1-grade superplasticizing agent have concrete tensile strength within 78–134 MPa under axial compression and 53 MPa – for the control composition. This index is 1.5–2.5 times more than for the sample containing no additives.The usage of peat ash, slag together with MK-85-grade micro-silica and NSPKSAUsF-1-grade superplasticizing agent for fabrication of concrete and reinforced bridge and tunnel structures will provide the following advantages: reduction of cross-sectional area of structures while maintaining their bearing capacity due to higher value of tensile strength in case of axial compression; higher density, waterand gas tightness due to low water cement ratio; high resistance to aggressive environment due to lower content of capillary pores that ensures bridge structure longevity; achievement of environmental and social impacts.

  16. Effect of saccharides on the hydration of ordinary Portland cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochova, K.; Schollbach, K.; Gauvin, F.; Brouwers, H. J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the use of natural fibres as a sustainable alternative for reinforcements in cement-based materials has increased significantly. However, these lignocellulose fibres containing saccharides can have important retarding effects on cement hydration. The objective of this study is to

  17. Building materials for a sustainable future – cement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapiravana, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available in South Africa follow the order: 1. cement and reinforced concrete (35%), of which 50% is cement, 2. plain carbon steel products (structural steel, tiles, flat and profiled sheets, door frames, window frames and garage doors) (23%), 3. bricks and blocks...

  18. Compósitos à base de cimento reforçados com polpa celulósica de bambu. Parte I: Determinação do teor de reforço ótimo Cement-based composite reinforced with bamboo pulp. Part I: Determination of optimum reinforcement percentage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. S. dos Anjos

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta os resultados experimentais de um estudo em que se procurou desenvolver compósitos de matriz cimentícia reforçada com polpa de bambu. Foram usados dois tipos de polpa: refinada e sem refino. Fez-se variar o teor de fibras de 0 a 16% em massa de cimento e se desenvolveu um processo com sucção, moldagem e prensagem para fabricação dos compósitos. As relações constitutivas dos compósitos foram definidas através de ensaio a compressão e tração de corpos-de-prova cilíndricos de 5x10 cm e do ensaio de flexão em três pontos. A partir delas, foi obtida a capacidade de absorção de energia. Determinaram-se, também, algumas propriedades físicas, como absorção, porosidade aparente, densidade seca e úmida dos compósitos. Os resultados mostraram melhor performance dos compósitos com fibras refinadas em relação àquelas com fibras sem refino e também indicaram que o teor ótimo de fibras refinadas se situou em torno de 8%, quando promoveram notáveis melhoramentos das propriedades mecânicas dos compósitos em relação à matriz plena.This work presents the experimental results of a study which intended to develop a composite with cementations matrix reinforced with bamboo pulp. Two types of pulps were used: refined and unrefined pulps. The fibre content varied between 0 and 16% cement (weight basis. After the preparation of fresh composite mix the experimental specimens were prepared applying a specially developed process based on Hastshek method using suction then moulding and pressing. The compression, tension and the flexural behavior and their constitutive relations were established using 5 cm diameter by 10 cm high cylindrical specimens and three point bending tests at respectively. The energy absorbing capacity of the new composites was also established. Physical properties such as water absorption, apparent porosity, dry and humid density were also obtained. The results showed a better performance

  19. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  20. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars; Evaluacion del comportamiento estructural y de resistencia a la corrosion de armaduras de acero inoxidable austenitico AISI 304 y duplex AISI 2304 embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  1. Fabrication of steel matrix composites locally reinforced with different ratios of TiC/TiB2 particulates using SHS reactions of Ni-Ti-B4C and Ni-Ti-B4C-C systems during casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yafeng; Wang Huiyuan; Liang Yunhong; Zhao Ruyi; Jiang Qichuan

    2007-01-01

    Steel matrix composites locally reinforced with different molar ratios of in situ TiC/TiB 2 particulates (2:1, 1:1 and 1:2, respectively) have been fabricated successfully utilizing the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reactions of Ni-Ti-B 4 C and Ni-Ti-B 4 C-C systems during casting. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that the exothermic reactions of the Ni-Ti-B 4 C and Ni-Ti-B 4 C-C systems proceed in such a way that Ni initially reacts with B 4 C and Ti to form Ni 2 B and Ti 2 Ni compounds, respectively, with heat evolution at 1037 deg. C; Subsequently, the external heat and the evolved heat from these exothermic reactions promote the reactions forming TiC and TiB 2 at 1133 deg. C. In the composites reinforced with 1:2 molar ratio of TiC/TiB 2 , almost all TiB 2 grains have clubbed structures, while TiC grains exhibit near-spherical morphologies. Furthermore, TiB 2 grain sizes decrease, with the increase of TiC content. In particular, in the composites reinforced with 2:1 molar ratio of TiC/TiB 2 , it is difficult to find the clubbed TiB 2 grains. Macro-pores and blowholes are absent in the local reinforcing region of the composites reinforced with 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratios of TiC/TiB 2 , while a few macro-pores can be observed in the composite reinforced with 2:1 molar ratio of TiC/TiB 2 . Moreover, the densities of the composites reinforced with 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratios of TiC/TiB 2 are higher than that of the composite reinforced with 2:1 molar ratio of TiC/TiB 2 . The composite reinforced with 1:2 molar ratio of TiC/TiB 2 has the highest hardness and the best wear resistance

  2. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  3. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  4. Characteristics of Cement Solidification of Metal Hydroxide Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Seo Koo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To perform the permanent disposal of metal hydroxide waste from electro-kinetic decontamination, it is necessary to secure the technology for its solidification. The integrity tests on the fabricated solidification should also meet the criteria of the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency. We carried out the solidification of metal hydroxide waste using cement solidification. The integrity tests such as the compressive strength, immersion, leach, and irradiation tests on the fabricated cement solidifications were performed. It was also confirmed that these requirements of the criteria of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency on these cement solidifications were met. The microstructures of all the cement solidifications were analyzed and discussed.

  5. Characteristics of cement solidification of metal hydroxide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Sung, Hyun Hee; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Gye Nam; Choi, Jong Won [Dept. of Decontemination Decommission Technology Development, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    To perform the permanent disposal of metal hydroxide waste from electro-kinetic decontamination, it is necessary to secure the technology for its solidification. The integrity tests on the fabricated solidification should also meet the criteria of the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency. We carried out the solidification of metal hydroxide waste using cement solidification. The integrity tests such as the compressive strength, immersion, leach, and irradiation tests on the fabricated cement solidifications were performed. It was also confirmed that these requirements of the criteria of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency on these cement solidifications were met. The microstructures of all the cement solidifications were analyzed and discussed.

  6. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Susan; Kromhout, Hans; Thomassen, Yngvar; Fechter-Rink, Edeltraud

    2009-01-01

    A case study was carried out in 2006-2007 to assess the actual cement dust exposure among construction workers involved in a full-scale construction project and as a comparison among workers involved in various stages of cement and concrete production. Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed for several job types. Inhalable dust and cement dust (based on analysis of elemental calcium) concentrations were determined. Inhalable dust exposures at the construction site ranged from 0.05 to 34 mg/m3, with a mean concentration of 1.0 mg/m3. For inhalable cement dust mean exposure was 0.3 mg/m3 (range 0.02-17 mg/m3). Reinforcement and pouring workers had the lowest average concentrations. Inhalable dust levels in the ready-mix and pre-cast concrete plants were, on average, below 0.5 mg/m3 for inhalable dust and below 0.2 mg/m3 for inhalable cement dust. Highest dust concentrations were measured in cement production, particularly during cleaning tasks (inhalable dust GM=55 mg/m3; inhalable cement dust GM=33 mg/m3) at which point the workers wore personal protective equipment. Elemental measurements showed highest but very variable cement percentages in the cement plant and very low percentages of cement during reinforcement work and pouring.

  7. Characterization of Reinforced Structural Composites with Carbon Nanotubes Grown Directly on the Fibers/Fabrics Using the PopTube Approach

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An ideal candidate to accomplish the reinforcement of the matrix and interphase zone of FRPs is carbon nanotubes (CNTs), because of their superior mechanical...

  8. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  9. Is the quality of cement a contributing factor for building collapse in Ghana?

    OpenAIRE

    Danso, Humphrey; Boateng, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Sub-standard (poor quality) materials have been mentioned as one of the major causes of building collapse worldwide. The main materials mostly identified as sub-standard are cement, reinforcement bars, timber and aggregate. This Paper assesses whether the quality of Type I Portland cement use in Ghana - contribute to the recent building collapse in Accra and Kumasi. This was achieved through experimental study by comparing the properties of Ghana cement with that of UK cement. The study found...

  10. Properties of natural fabric Polyalthia cerasoides

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available of this fabric were compared with those of two natural fabrics reported in the literature. This uniaxial fabric has sufficient tensile modulus and can be used as reinforcement in the development of green composites....

  11. Radiopacity of portland cement associated with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Oliveira El Kadre, Guâniara D'arc; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of Portland cement associated with the following radiopacifying agents: bismuth oxide, zinc oxide, lead oxide, bismuth subnitrate, bismuth carbonate, barium sulfate, iodoform, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide. A ratio of 20% radiopacifier and 80% white Portland cement by weight was used for analysis. Pure Portland cement and dentin served as controls. Cement/radiopacifier and dentin disc-shaped specimens were fabricated, and radiopacity testing was performed according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard for dental root sealing materials. Using Insight occlusal films, the specimens were radiographed near to a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized and radiopacity compared with the aluminum stepwedge using Digora software (Orion Corporation Soredex, Helsinki, Finland). The radiographic density data were converted into mmAl and analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (alpha = 0.05). The radiopacity of pure Portland cement was significantly lower (p cement/radiopacifier mixtures were significantly more radiopaque than dentin and Portland cement alone (p cement/bismuth oxide and Portland cement/lead oxide presented the highest radiopacity values and differed significantly from the other materials (p cement/zinc oxide presented the lowest radiopacity values of all mixtures (p cement as radiopacifying agents. However, the possible interference of the radiopacifiers with the setting chemistry, biocompatibility, and physical properties of the Portland cement should be further investigated before any clinical recommendation can be done.

  12. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  13. Performance evaluation of corrosion-affected reinforced concrete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B Anoop

    Abstract. A methodology for performance evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge girders in corrosive ... concrete (RC) members of infrastructural systems, espe- ... bility will be useful for making engineering decisions for ...... Water-cement ratio.

  14. A Study of Array Direction HDPE Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsuwan, Trithos

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the effect of array direction HDPE fiber using as the reinforced material in cement mortar. The experimental data were created reference to the efficiency of using HDPE fiber reinforced on the tensile properties of cement mortar with different high drawn ratio of HDPE fibers. The fiber with the different drawn ratio 25x (d25 with E xx), and 35x (d35 with E xx) fiber volume fraction (0%, 1.0%, 1.5%) and fiber length 20 mm. were used to compare between random direction and array direction of HDPE fibers and the stress - strain displacement relationship behavior of HDPE short fiber reinforced cement mortar were investigated. It was found that the array direction with HDPE fibers show more improved in tensile strength and toughness when reinforced in cement mortar.

  15. Stress State Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Masonry Columns Reinforced with FRP under Concentric Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Witzany

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strengthening and stabilization of damaged compressed masonry columns with composites based on fabrics of high-strength fibers and epoxy resin, or polymer-modified cement mixtures, belongs to novel, partially non-invasive and reversible progressive methods. The stabilizing and reinforcing effect of these fabrics significantly applies to masonry structures under concentric compressive loading whose failure mechanism is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cracks accompanied by an increase in horizontal masonry strain. During the appearance of micro and hairline cracks (10−3 to 10−1 mm, the effect of non-pre-stressed wrapping composite is very small. The favorable effect of passive wrapping is only intensively manifested after the appearance of cracks (10−1 mm and bigger at higher loading levels. In the case of “optimum” reinforcement of a masonry column, the experimental research showed an increase in vertical displacements δy (up to 247%, horizontal displacements δx (up to 742% and ultimate load-bearing capacity (up to 136% compared to the values reached in unreinforced masonry columns. In the case of masonry structures in which no intensive “bed joint filler–masonry unit” interaction occurs, e.g., in regular coursed masonry with little differences in the mechanical characteristics of masonry units and the binder, the reinforcing effect of the fabric applies only partially.

  16. Finite element analysis and experimental verification of Polymer reinforced CRC improved for close-in detonation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Georgakis, Christos; Stang, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Compact Reinforced Composite, CRC, is a high-strength cement-based composite that holds an enormous flexural and energy-absorbing capacity due to the close-spaced high strength steel reinforcement and a high-strength cement-based fiber DSP matrix. The material has been used in various constructions...

  17. Non-woven PET fabric reinforced and enhanced the performance of ultrafiltration membranes composed of PVDF blended with PVDF-g-PEGMA for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Li, Tong; Chen, Chen; Chen, Sheng; Liu, Baicang; Crittenden, John

    2018-03-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes composed of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) blended with poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PVDF-g-PEGMA) can present high flux and excellent foulant removal efficiencies under suitable preparation conditions. However, these PVDF/PVDF-g-PEGMA blended membranes cannot be applied industrially because of the insufficient mechanical strength (strength-to-break value of 8.4 ± 0.6 MPa). We incorporated two types of non-woven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics (thin hydrophobic and thick hydrophilic fabrics) as support layers to improve the mechanical properties of the blended membranes. The thin and thick PET fabrics were able to significantly improve the tensile strength to 23.3 ± 3.7 MPa and 30.1 ± 1.4 MPa, respectively. The PET fabrics had a limited impact on the separation-related membrane performance such as hydrophilicity, foulant rejection, whereas the mechanical strength and pure water flux was improved several folds. The enhanced flux was attributed to the higher surface porosity and wider finger-like voids in the cross-section. The thin PET fabric with larger porosity was able to maintain a consistent toughness simultaneously; thus it is recommended as a support material for this blended membrane.

  18. Producing cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  19. The differences between soil grouting with cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingting; Sui, Haitong; Yang, Honglu

    2018-01-01

    Cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry are the most widely applied for soil grouting reinforcement project. The viscosity change of cement slurry is negligible during grouting period and presumed to be time-independent while the viscosity of cement-water glass slurry increases with time quickly and is presumed to be time-dependent. Due to the significantly rheology differences between them, the grouting quality and the increasing characteristics of grouting parameters may be different, such as grouting pressure, grouting surrounding rock pressure, i.e., the change of surrounding rock pressure deduced by grouting pressure. Those are main factors for grouting design. In this paper, a large-scale 3D grouting simulation device was developed to simulate the surrounding curtain grouting for a tunnel. Two series of surrounding curtain grouting experiments under different geo-stress of 100 kPa, 150 kPa and 200 kPa were performed. The overload test on tunnel was performed to evaluate grouting effect of all surrounding curtain grouting experiments. In the present results, before 240 seconds, the grouting pressure increases slowly for both slurries; after 240 seconds the increase rate of grouting pressure for cement-water glass slurry increases quickly while that for cement slurry remains roughly constant. The increasing trend of grouting pressure for cement-water glass is similar to its viscosity. The setting time of cement-water glass slurry obtained from laboratory test is less than that in practical grouting where grout slurry solidifies in soil. The grouting effect of cement-water glass slurry is better than that of cement slurry and the grouting quality decreases with initial pressure.

  20. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Takuro; Matsuo, Toyofumi; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    When we evaluate the soundness of reinforced concrete structures, it is important to assess the chloride induced deterioration. We conducted the reinforcing steel corrosion tests of reinforced concrete specimens under simulated tidal environment of sea. Parameters of the tests were water cement ratio, cement type and crack width of concrete. Periods of the tests were eighty month. The obtained results were summarized at follows: (a) The chloride ion concentration at the initiation of reinforcing steel corrosion was about 3.0 kg/m 3 in case of reinforcing steel in non-crack concrete used ordinary cement. (b) The corrosion rate of reinforcing steels was almost constant at any cement type specimens after causing crack by reinforcing steel corrosion. (c) The corrosion rate of reinforcing steels in specimens, which caused cracks by bending load, increased as crack width. In the same type specimens, the corrosion rate of reinforcing steels in fly ash cement specimens was larger than that of ordinary cement specimens. In this case, the corrosion rate of reinforcing steels was evaluated about 0.18 mm/year. (author)

  1. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P provisional crowns cemented with three different luting cements along the axial walls of

  2. A facile one-pot fabrication of polyphosphazene microsphere/carbon fiber hybrid reinforcement and its effect on the interfacial adhesion of epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Ningbo Dahongying University, Ningbo 315175 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Haibing, E-mail: xuhaibing@nimte.ac.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); Liu, Dong; Yan, Chun [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Yingdan, E-mail: y.zhu@nimte.ac.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbon fiber was successfully functionalized with a layer of coating and poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres (PZSMS) by in situ polymerization. The enhancement of surface roughness can improve obviously the interfacial properties through providing more contact points and increasing mechanical interlocking between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix. Moreover, the cyclomatrix-type polyphosphazene coating and PZSMS distributed on the fibers surface can heal the surface defects to some extent and assist in holding back or absorbing excessive stress, resulting in the improvement of tensile strength. - Highlights: • Polyphosphazene microspheres/CF hybrid reinforcements were prepared via a novel and facile one-pot in situ polymerization. • Plenty of poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres were introduced onto the CF surfaces. • The multi-scale hybrid CF reinforcement enhanced the interfacial adhesion of CF/epoxy composites obviously. • The tensile strength of multi-scale hybrid CF also showed an obvious increase. - Abstract: Introducing nanoscale reinforcements into the interface between carbon fiber (CF) and resin is an effective approach to improve the interfacial adhesion of CF composites. In this paper, a facile one-pot polymerization process provides a rapid and efficient method for preparing polyphosphazene microspheres/CF hybrid reinforcement using hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) sulfone (BPS) as monomers. By the in situ polymerization modification, HCCP and BPS were successfully cross-linked and deposited on the CF surface. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images show that poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres were introduced onto the CF surfaces and the surface roughness of fibers is enhanced obviously. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm that the

  3. A facile one-pot fabrication of polyphosphazene microsphere/carbon fiber hybrid reinforcement and its effect on the interfacial adhesion of epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang; Xu, Haibing; Liu, Dong; Yan, Chun; Zhu, Yingdan

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Carbon fiber was successfully functionalized with a layer of coating and poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres (PZSMS) by in situ polymerization. The enhancement of surface roughness can improve obviously the interfacial properties through providing more contact points and increasing mechanical interlocking between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix. Moreover, the cyclomatrix-type polyphosphazene coating and PZSMS distributed on the fibers surface can heal the surface defects to some extent and assist in holding back or absorbing excessive stress, resulting in the improvement of tensile strength. - Highlights: • Polyphosphazene microspheres/CF hybrid reinforcements were prepared via a novel and facile one-pot in situ polymerization. • Plenty of poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres were introduced onto the CF surfaces. • The multi-scale hybrid CF reinforcement enhanced the interfacial adhesion of CF/epoxy composites obviously. • The tensile strength of multi-scale hybrid CF also showed an obvious increase. - Abstract: Introducing nanoscale reinforcements into the interface between carbon fiber (CF) and resin is an effective approach to improve the interfacial adhesion of CF composites. In this paper, a facile one-pot polymerization process provides a rapid and efficient method for preparing polyphosphazene microspheres/CF hybrid reinforcement using hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) sulfone (BPS) as monomers. By the in situ polymerization modification, HCCP and BPS were successfully cross-linked and deposited on the CF surface. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images show that poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres were introduced onto the CF surfaces and the surface roughness of fibers is enhanced obviously. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm that the

  4. Research on A3 steel corrosion behavior of basic magnesium sulfate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Sainan; Wu, Chengyou; Yu, Hongfa; Jiang, Ningshan; Zhang, Wuyu

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, Tafel polarization technique is used to study the corrosion behavior of A3 steel basic magnesium sulfate, and then analyzing the ratio of raw materials cement, nitrites rust inhibitor and wet-dry cycle of basic magnesium sulfate corrosion of reinforced influence, and the steel corrosion behavior of basic magnesium sulfate compared with magnesium oxychloride cement and Portland cement. The results show that: the higher MgO/MgSO4 mole ratio will reduce the corrosion rate of steel; Too high and too low H2O/MgSO4 mole ratio may speed up the reinforcement corrosion effect; Adding a small amount of nitrite rust and corrosion inhibitor, not only can obviously reduce the alkali type magnesium sulfate in the early hydration of cement steel bar corrosion rate, but also can significantly reduce dry-wet circulation under the action of alkali type magnesium sulfate cement corrosion of reinforcement effect. Basic magnesium sulfate cement has excellent ability to protect reinforced, its long-term corrosion of reinforcement effect and was equal to that of Portland cement. Basic magnesium sulfate corrosion of reinforced is far below the level in the MOC in the case.

  5. Fabrication, interfacial characterization and mechanical properties of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic fiber reinforced Ti/Al{sub 3}Ti metal-intermetallic laminated (CCFR-MIL) composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuqiang; Lin, Chunfa; Han, Xiaoxiao; Chang, Yunpeng; Guo, Chunhuan, E-mail: guochunhuan@hrbeu.edu.cn; Jiang, Fengchun, E-mail: fengchunjiang@hrbeu.edu.cn

    2017-03-14

    Continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic fiber reinforced Ti/Al{sub 3}Ti metal-intermetallic laminated (CCFR-MIL) composite was fabricated using a vacuum hot pressing (VHP) sintering method and followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The microstructure characteristics of the interfaces between Ti and Al{sub 3}Ti, as well as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber and Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental distribution in the interfacial reaction zones were quantitatively examined by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The phases in the composite were identified by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of the CCFR-MIL composite were measured using compression and tensile tests under quasi-static strain rate. The experimental results indicated that the residual Al was found in Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic layer of CCFR-MIL composite. The interfacial reactions occurred during HIP and the reaction products were determined to be Al{sub 2}Ti, TiSi{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} phases. Compared to Ti/Al{sub 3}Ti MIL composite without fiber reinforcement, both the strength and failure strain of CCFR-MIL composite under both compressive and tensile stress states increased due to the contribution of the continuous ceramic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber.

  6. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  7. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  8. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  9. Transportation of ions through cement based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterji, S.

    1994-01-01

    Transportation of ions, both anions and cations, through cement based materials is one of the important processes in their durability and as such has been studied very extensively. It has been studied from the point of view of the reinforcement corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack on cement and concrete, as well as in the context of the use of the cement based materials in the disposal of nuclear waste. In this paper the fundamental equations of diffusion, i.e. Fick's two equations, Nernst and Nernst-Planck equations have been collected. Attention has been drawn to the fact that Fick's two equations are valid for non-ionic diffusants and that for ions the relevant equations are those of Nernst and Nernst-Planck. The basic measurement techniques have also been commented upon

  10. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  11. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  12. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  13. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  14. Effect of natural fibers on mechanical properties of green cement mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Zubaidi, Aseel B.

    2018-05-01

    Natural fibers of banana, reed, palm and coconut were used to reinforce cement composite. Optical microscopy showed that the prepared fibers are different in size and morphology. Nearly equiaxed, ribbon-like and nearly cylindrical morphologies were observed. Each of the utilized natural fibers was incorporated in the cement matrix at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 wt% and cured for 28 days. The scanning electron micrographs for the 1.0 wt% -reinforced composite showed differences in porosity, grain size and shape. Each of the utilized fibers has different effect on the microstructure of the cement composite that depends on the fiber size and morphology. Water absorption, thermal conductivity, bending strength, hardness and compression strengths were measured for the reinforced cement composite. It is found that the final physical and mechanical properties of the set cement composite depend on the fiber content and fiber type through the differences in their sizes and morphologies.

  15. Pullout behavior of steel fibers from cement-based composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M. Jamal; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental program on pullout tests of steel fibers from cement based matrices is described. A specially designed single fiber pullout apparatus was used to provide a quantitative determination of interfacial properties that are relevant to toughening brittle materials through...... fiber reinforcement. The parameters investigated included a specially designed high strength cement based matrix called Densified Small Particles system (DSP), a conventional mortar matrix, fiber embeddment length, and the fiber volume fraction. The mediums from which the fiber was pulled included...... fraction in the cement matrix increase the peak pullout load and the pullout work. (3) The major bond mechanism in both systems is frictional sliding. ...

  16. Core reilforced braided composite armour as a substitute to steel in concrete reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Fangueiro, Raúl; Sousa, Guilherme José Miranda de; Araújo, Mário Duarte de; Pereira, C. Gonilho; Jalali, Said

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the work that is being done at the University of Minho concerning the development of brainded rods concrete reinforcement. Several samples of core reinforced braided fabrics have been produced varying the type of braided fabric (core reinforced and hybrid), the linear density of the core reinforcing yarns and the type of braiding structure (with or without ribs). The tensile properties of braided fabrics has also been analysed. Core reinforced braided composites rods were ...

  17. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  18. Self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The project 'self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete (SCFRC)' is part of the Dutch STW/PPM program - 'cement-bonded materials' - DCT.4010. Subproject III to which the project ,SCFRC' belongs deals with the development of new high performance concretes. The project 'SCFRC' aims at investigating the

  19. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite materials because they are protected from moisture by the wall material. Therefore, the untreated cement is present in the form of a capsule within the cement composite, and hydration can be induced by moisture penetrating the crack surface in the event of cracking. In the process of granulating the cement, it is important to obtain a suitable consistency through the kneading agent and to maintain the moisture barrier performance of the wall material. We can utilize the results of this study as a basis for advanced self-healing capsule technology for cement composites.

  20. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Fechter-Rink, Edeltraud; Kromhout, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Objective- A case study was carried out to assess cement dust exposure and its determinants among construction workers and for comparison among workers in cement and concrete production.Methods- Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed and samples were analysed for inhalable dust and its cement content. Exposure variability was modelled with linear mixed models.Results- Inhalable dust concentrations at the construction site ranged from 0.05 to 34 mg/m(3), with a mean of 1.0 mg/m(3). Average concentration for inhalable cement dust was 0.3 mg/m(3) (GM; range 0.02-17 mg/m(3)). Levels in the ready-mix and pre-cast concrete plants were on average 0.5 mg/m(3) (GM) for inhalable dust and 0.2 mg/m(3) (GM) for inhalable cement dust. Highest concentrations were measured in cement production, particularly during cleaning tasks (inhalable dust GM = 55 mg/m(3); inhalable cement dust GM = 33 mg/m(3)) at which point the workers wore personal protective equipment. Elemental measurements showed highest but very variable cement percentages in the cement plant and very low percentages during reinforcement work and pouring. Most likely other sources were contributing to dust concentrations, particularly at the construction site. Within job groups, temporal variability in exposure concentrations generally outweighed differences in average concentrations between workers. 'Using a broom', 'outdoor wind speed' and 'presence of rain' were overall the most influential factors affecting inhalable (cement) dust exposure.Conclusion- Job type appeared to be the main predictor of exposure to inhalable (cement) dust at the construction site. Inhalable dust concentrations in cement production plants, especially during cleaning tasks, are usually considerably higher than at the construction site.

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  3. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Behaviour of In-Situ TiC-Reinforced Composite Surface Layers Fabricated on Ductile Cast Iron by Laser Alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian

    2018-01-05

    TiC-reinforced composite surface layers (TRLs) on a ductile cast iron EN-GJS-700-2 grade (DCI) substrate were synthesized using a diode laser surface alloying with a direct injection of titanium powder into the molten pool. The experimental results were compared with thermodynamic calculations. The TRLs having a uniform distribution of the TiC particles and their fraction up to 15.4 vol % were achieved. With increasing titanium concentration in the molten pool, fractions of TiC and retained austenite increase and the shape of TiC particles changes from cubic to dendritic form. At the same time, the cementite fraction decreases, lowering the overall hardness of the TRL. A good agreement between experimental and calculated results was achieved. Comparative dry sliding wear tests between the as-received DCI, the TRLs and also laser surface melted layers (SMLs) have been performed following the ASTM G 99 standard test method under contact pressures of 2.12 and 4.25 MPa. For both the as-received DCI and the SMLs, the wear rates increased with increasing contact pressure. The TRLs exhibited a significantly higher wear resistance than the others, which was found to be load independent.

  4. Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass-ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    reinforcement if the enamel is broken  Embedded cement grains hydrate if enamel is cracked to self-heal with the formation of calcium silicate hydrate Goal...Reinforced Concrete Pavement The 600% volume change in the iron to iron oxide formation put the concrete in tension and it cracks an spalls BUILDING...corrodes prematurely and delaminates the pavement  Moisture and chlorides can move through the natural porosity of concrete and the cracks in the

  5. Development and characterization of ceramic composites alumina-titania based reinforced with lanthanum oxide for fabrication of inert coatings for metallic tanks of the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, J.M.; Yadava, Y.P.; Silva, N.D.G.; Ferreira, R.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Crude petroleum is highly corrosive causing superficial degradation in metallic tanks used for storage and transportation of this material, which causes a serious problem in the oil industry. An alternative to solve this problem is to use some kind of coating that is inert to this kind of corrosion. Alumina and titania are interesting materials for several engineering applications because, when compared with other ceramic materials, they present superior mechanical properties, e.g. high mechanical strength, good chemical stability and high fracture toughness combined with good wear resistance and a coefficient of thermal expansion close to the iron's, which makes them fit to use in ceramic hardening process and coating. In this paper, alumina-titania ceramic composites with 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% of titania (TiO2) and reinforced with 2% of lanthanum oxide of were produced by thermo-mechanical processing and sintering techniques at 1350 deg C. In these composites, microstructure and mechanical properties were analyzed using X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers hardness in order to evaluate their applicability. X-ray spectroscopy showed the formation of composite without the presence of other phases. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed a homogeneous microstructure in terms of particle size and distribution. Vickers hardness test showed a gradual decrease in hardness with the addition of titania. The composite with 5% of titania and 2% of lanthanum oxide is the best choice for structural applications. The composites were submerged in crude petroleum for 30 days to study their stability in such environment. Through the analysis of X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy and Vickers hardness before and after the submersion in crude petroleum, it was not observed structural or microstructural degradation nether alterations in mechanical properties. This way, it was concluded that these composites have good

  6. Microstructures and Tensile Properties of Al–Cu Matrix Composites Reinforced with Nano-Sized SiCp Fabricated by Semisolid Stirring Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The nano-sized SiCp/Al–Cu composites were successfully fabricated by combining semisolid stirring with ball milling technology. Microstructures were examined by an olympus optical microscope (OM, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Tensile properties were studied at room temperature. The results show that the α-Al dendrites of the composites were strongly refined, especially in the composite with 3 wt. % nano-sized SiCp, of which the morphology of the α-Al changes from 200 μm dendritic crystal to 90 μm much finer equiaxial grain. The strength and ductility of the composites are improved synchronously with the addition of nano-sized SiCp particles. The as-cast 3 wt. % nano-sized SiCp/Al–Cu composite displays the best tensile properties, i.e., the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and fracture strain increase from 175 MPa, 310 MPa and 4.1% of the as-cast Al–Cu alloy to 220 MPa, 410 MPa and 6.3%, respectively. The significant improvement in the tensile properties of the composites is mainly due to the refinement of the α-Al dendrites, nano-sized SiCp strengthening, and good interface combination between the SiCp and Al–Cu alloys.

  7. Prediction of the Fiber Orientation State and the Resulting Structural and Thermal Properties of Fiber Reinforced Additive Manufactured Composites Fabricated Using the Big Area Additive Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Russell

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF include large material deposition rates and the addition of chopped carbon fibers to the filament feedstock. During processing, the flow field within the polymer melt orients the fiber suspension, which is important to quantify as the underlying fiber orientation influences the mechanical and thermal properties. This paper investigates the correlation between processing conditions and the resulting locally varying thermal-structural properties that dictate both the final part performance and part dimensionality. The flow domain includes both the confined and unconfined flow indicative of the extruder nozzle within the FFF deposition process. The resulting orientation is obtained through two different isotropic rotary diffusion models, the model by Folgar and Tucker and that of Wang et al., and a comparison is made to demonstrate the sensitivity of the deposited bead’s spatially varying orientation as well as the final processed part’s thermal-structural performance. The results indicate the sensitivity of the final part behavior is quite sensitive to the choice of the slowness parameter in the Wang et al. model. Results also show the need, albeit less than that of the choice of fiber interaction model, to include the extrudate swell and deposition within the flow domain.

  8. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) oxidation resistant material samples - Baseline coated, and baseline coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced carbon-carbon material specimens were machined from 19 and 33 ply flat panels which were fabricated and processed in accordance with the specifications and procedures accepted for the fabrication and processing of the leading edge structural subsystem (LESS) elements for the space shuttle orbiter. The specimens were then baseline coated and tetraethyl orthosilicate impregnated, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the appropriate LESS production specifications. Three heater bars were ATJ graphite silicon carbide coated with the Vought 'pack cementation' coating process, and three were stackpole grade 2020 graphite silicon carbide coated with the chemical vapor deposition process utilized by Vought in coating the LESS shell development program entry heater elements. Nondestructive test results are reported.

  9. Mechanics of fiber reinforced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiyu

    This dissertation is dedicated to mechanics of fiber reinforced materials and the woven reinforcement and composed of four parts of research: analytical characterization of the interfaces in laminated composites; micromechanics of braided composites; shear deformation, and Poisson's ratios of woven fabric reinforcements. A new approach to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of interfaces between composite laminae based on a modified laminate theory is proposed. By including an interface as a special lamina termed the "bonding-layer" in the analysis, the mechanical properties of the interfaces are obtained. A numerical illustration is given. For micro-mechanical properties of three-dimensionally braided composite materials, a new method via homogenization theory and incompatible multivariable FEM is developed. Results from the hybrid stress element approach compare more favorably with the experimental data than other existing numerical methods widely used. To evaluate the shearing properties for woven fabrics, a new mechanical model is proposed during the initial slip region. Analytical results show that this model provides better agreement with the experiments for both the initial shear modulus and the slipping angle than the existing models. Finally, another mechanical model for a woven fabric made of extensible yarns is employed to calculate the fabric Poisson's ratios. Theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data. A thorough examination on the influences of various mechanical properties of yarns and structural parameters of fabrics on the Poisson's ratios of a woven fabric is given at the end.

  10. Compressive and flexural strength of cement mortar stabilized with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mortar is a material with wide range of applications in the construction industry. However, plain mortar matrices are usually brittle and often cracks and fails more suddenly than reinforced mortars. In this study, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement mortar stabilized with Raffia Palm Fruit Peel (RPFP) as fibre were ...

  11. The asbestos cement container and its characterization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, C.; Oliver, J.; Jaouen, C.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of packing container is designed in France, by SGN, for the reprocessing wastes conditioning: the asbestos cement container (CAC) made by the industrial process for pipes fabrication. Two types of CAC are studied, differing from each other by their wall thickness. The technology of which SGN is in charge is presented. A characterization program is operated by CEA in view of satisfying to regulatory requirements. Emphasis is placed upon the radionuclides migration study, through different asbestos cement samples

  12. A novel plastification agent for cemented carbides extrusion molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng Zhou; Bai-Yun Huang

    2001-01-01

    A type of novel plastification agent for plasticizing powder extrusion molding of cemented carbides has been developed. By optimizing their formulation and fabrication method, the novel plastification agent, with excellent properties and uniform distribution characters, were manufactured. The thermal debinding mechanism has been studied, the extruding rheological characteristics and debinding behaviors have been investigated. Using the newly developed plastification agent, the cemented carbides extrusion rods, with diameter up to 25 mm, have been manufactured. (author)

  13. Mechanical, electrical and microstructural properties of cement-based materials in conditions of current flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Copuroglu, O.; Van Beek, C.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete structures is not only induced by the penetration of aggressive substances (e.g. chlorides and/or CO2) but also influenced by stray currents. Further, the degradation mechanisms in reinforced cement-based systems due to the combined effect of stray current and

  14. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and...

  15. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  16. Preparation of hydraulic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-08-28

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cement by the use of oil-shale residues is characterized in that the oil-shale refuse is mixed with granular basic blast-furnace slag and a small amount of portland cement and ground together.

  17. Low force cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P R

    1996-07-01

    The marginal adaptation of full coverage restorations is adversely affected by the introduction of luting agents of various minimum film thicknesses during the cementation process. The increase in the marginal opening may have long-term detrimental effects on the health of both pulpal and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying seating forces (2.5, 12.5, 25 N), venting, and cement types on post-cementation marginal elevation in cast crowns. A standardized cement space of 40 microns was provided between a machined gold crown and a stainless steel die. An occlusal vent was placed that could be opened or closed. The post-cementation crown elevation was measured, following the use of two commercially available capsulated dental cements (Phosphacap, and Ketac-cem Applicap). The results indicate that only the combination of Ketac-Cem Applicap and crown venting produced post-cementation crown elevation of less than 20 microns when 12.5 N seating force was used. Higher forces (25 N) and venting were required for comparable seating when using Phosphacap (19 microns). The amount of force required to allow maximum seating of cast crowns appears to be cement specific, and is reduced by effective venting procedures.

  18. Cementation process study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Ahn, S.J.; Choi, K.S.; Lee, M.W.; Ryu, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the cementation process study, in 1984, design of the waste treatment simulator was finished for the first step. We can experience not only the operation of solidification system but the design and construction of comming large scale plant through the design of cementation process. (Author)

  19. Calcium phosphate cement scaffolds with PLGA fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Letícia Araújo; dos Santos, Luís Alberto

    2013-04-01

    The use of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials has revolutionized current orthopedics and dentistry in repairing damaged parts of the skeletal system. Among those biomaterials, the cement made of hydraulic grip calcium phosphate has attracted great interest due to its biocompatibility and hardening "in situ". However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared with the bones of the human body. In the present work, we have studied the attainment of calcium phosphate cement powders and their addition to poly (co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibers to increase mechanical properties of those cements. We have used a new method that obtains fibers by dripping different reagents. PLGA fibers were frozen after lyophilized. With this new method, which was patented, it was possible to obtain fibers and reinforcing matrix which furthered the increase of mechanical properties, thus allowing the attainment of more resistant materials. The obtained materials were used in the construction of composites and scaffolds for tissue growth, keeping a higher mechanical integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Titanium dioxide nanotubes addition to self-adhesive resin cement: Effect on physical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Tonello, Carla M; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N; Arruda, Larisa B; Tokuhara, Cintia K; Oliveira, Rodrigo C; Furuse, Adilson Y; Rubo, José H; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2017-07-01

    This study has investigated the influence of Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO 2 -nt) addition to self-adhesive resin cement on the degree of conversion, water sorption, and water solubility, mechanical and biological properties. A commercially available auto-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200™, 3M ESPE) was reinforced with varying amounts of nanotubes (0.3, 0.6, 0.9wt%) and evaluated at different curing modes (self- and dual cure). The DC in different times (3, 6, 9, 12 and 15min), water sorption (Ws) and solubility (Sl), 3-point flexural strength (σf), elastic modulus (E), Knoop microhardness (H) and viability of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts were performed to characterize the resin cement. Reinforced self-adhesive resin cement, regardless of concentration, increased the DC for the self- and dual-curing modes at all times studied. The concentration of the TiO 2 -nt and the curing mode did not influence the Ws and Sl. Regarding σf, concentrations of both 0.3 and 0.9wt% for self-curing mode resulted in data similar to that of dual-curing unreinforced cement. The E increased with the addition of 0.9wt% for self-cure mode and H increased with 0.6 and 0.9wt% for both curing modes. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that reinforced cements were biocompatible. TiO 2 -nt reinforced self-adhesive resin cement are promising materials for use in indirect dental restorations. Taken together, self-adhesive resin cement reinforced with TiO 2 -nt exhibited physicochemical and mechanical properties superior to those of unreinforced cements, without compromising their cellular viability. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Review of Japanese recommendations on design and construction of different classes of fiber reinforced concrete and application examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchida, Yuichi; Fischer, Gregor; Hishiki, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The development of concrete and cementitious composites with fiber reinforcement to improve the tensile load-deformation behavior has resulted in three distinct classes of materials. These include conventional Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) with tension softening response, High Performance Fiber...... Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) with strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior, and Ultra High-strength Fiber Reinforced concrete (UFC) with increased tensile strength. The recommendations on the design, production, and application of these classes of fiber reinforced concrete have been...

  2. Possibilities of utilization of water hyacinth for making water hyacinth-cement boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Portland cement when casted in the form of thin sheets, alone is too brittle and rigid to develop enough serviceable value. An additional fibrous material reinforces such a cement product and improves its tensile strength. The fibrous material forms a continuos phase in a cement base. The use of fibres as a reinforcing material has been known to man from the days of ancient civilisation when he first started making sunbaked mud bricks. It was found that if the mix contained fibrous material, the bricks became stronger on drying. Asbestos fibre is predominantly used in various asbestos cement products as a reinforcing material since it is fibrous, non-combustible and has sufficient tensile strength. When mixed with 10-20% asbestos fibres, the cement gives a strong material which is commonly available as corrugated or plain sheets used for building and other purposes. As a part of the project on utilization of water hyacinth, RRL, Jorhat, undertook investigations on the possibilities of making water hyacinth-cement sheets similar to asbestos-cement sheets. Another objective of this investigation was to develop a technology for making boards from water hyacinth and cement for rural housing and other purposes in a scale appropriate to the rural sector. Water hyacinth fibre has certain similarities with asbestos fibre. For example, both are polymers as well as fibrous. However, asbestos fibre is non-combustible whilst water hyacinth fibre is combustible. This of course does not pose any difficulty since the fibres remain in a cement matrix in the form of a sheet which is almost completely impervious. For the same reason the decomposition due to weathering and microbial action is also arrested. Crysotile asbestos, which is primarily used for making asbestos-cement sheets, makes fibres very rapidly in water as does pulp from water hyacinth. This characteristic of water hyacinth pulp is definitely a disadvantage in paper making in modern high speed machines but may be of

  3. Evaluation of the fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing monolithic crowns prepared in different cement thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagsoz, N Polat; Yanıkoglu, N

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns that are prepared with different cement thickness. For this investigation, a human maxillary premolar tooth was selected. Master model preparation was performed with a demand bur under water spray. Master die was taken to fabricate 105 epoxy resin replicas. The crowns were milled using a CEREC 4 CAD/CAM system (Software Version, 4.2.0.57192). CAD/CAM crowns were made using resin nanoceramic, feldspathic glass ceramic, lithium disilicate, and leucite-reinforced ceramics. Each group was subdivided into three groups in accordance with three different cement thicknesses (30, 90, and 150 μm). Crowns milled out. Then RelyX ™ U200 was used as a luting agent to bond the crowns to the prepared samples. After one hour cementations, the specimens were stored in water bath at 37°C for 1 week before testing. Seven unprepared and unrestored teeth were kept and tested as a control group. A universal test machine was used to assume the fracture resistance of all specimens. The compressive load (N) that caused fracture was recorded for each specimen. Fracture resistance data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and two-factor interaction modeling test (α = 0.001). There are statistically significant differences between fracture resistances of CAD/CAM monolithic crown materials (P cement thickness is not statistically significant for fracture resistance of CAD/CAM monolithic crowns (P > 0.001). CAD/CAM monolithic crown materials affected fracture resistance. Cement thickness (30, 90, and 150 μm) was not effective on fracture resistance of CAD/CAM monolithic crowns.

  4. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  5. Radioactive waste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  6. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  7. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  8. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture

  9. Fiber-reinforced neutron shielding mortar concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Keisuke; Okazaki, Masaki; Ohigashi, Toshihide; Mayahara, Mitsuro.

    1989-01-01

    To improve the moldability, durability and economicity by adding cement curing promotors and reinforcing fibers to cement and boron compound which has been considered difficult so far, thereby enabling to add a great amount of the boron compound. The boron compound is added by from 5 to 200% by weight of powder of colemanite or borocarcite as natural ores or boric acid, borax or titanium boride, etc. as synthesis products and lithium hydroxide. calcium aluminate, etc. is added by more than 0.1% x boron compound blending ration (%) as the curing promoter. 0.3 to 5% by weight of polyvinyl alcohol type synthetic fibers, polyacrilonitrile type synthetic fibers or carbon fibers, etc. are added as the reinforcing fibers. This can prevent instantaneous coagulation, curing delay, etc. due to sulfur ions, enable easy application and molding and improve the durability and economicity. (T.M.)

  10. On the weld strength of in situ tape placed reinforcements on weave reinforced structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Warnet, Laurent; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced thermoplastic tapes were welded onto woven fabric reinforced laminates using a laser assisted tape placement process. A mandrel peel setup was used to quantify the interfacial fracture toughness between the tape and the laminate as a measure for weld strength. The tape

  11. the Danish cement industry

    OpenAIRE

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Møllgård, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We test econometrically whether the sole Danish producer of cement holds a dominant position in the Danish market for (grey) cement. In import penetration tests, we find that its pricing and quantity decisions are independent of import price and quantity, implying that it can act to a considerable extent independently of its competitors. We also test whether it can act independently of its customers and find that its demand is inelastic with respect to its price. It thus holds a dominant posi...

  12. Microscopía electrónica para el estudio del Na2Si0(4 en la durabilidad de un compuesto a base de cemento portlánd y refuerzo de caoba Analysis of Na2Si0(4 effect on durability of a portlánd cement matrix and mahogany reinforcement composite through electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inocente Bojórque

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Con la ayuda de la microscopía electrónica, se logra apreciar el trabajo desarrollado por el silicato de sodio como agente mineraüzador de las fibras orgánicas en compuestos polifásicos con matriz de cemento Portland Tipo I. El objetivo de este trabajo fue el estudio de la acción del agente en la durabilidad del material, debido a la incompatibilidad química entre el hidróxido de calcio Ca(OH2 y el refuerzo a base de fibras procedentes de la caoba (Swietenia Macrophylla, en compuestos con características semejantes pero de tres diferentes edades y en compuestos de la misma edad pero elaborados con dos diferentes fracciones volumétricas del ingrediente orgánico. Los ensayos se realizaron en tres diferentes zonas: matriz, refuerzo y transición, empleando un Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido (MEB mientras que la composición química se hizo con un Analizador de Rayos "X" (EDS; a través del primer equipo se observó el contraste entre las diversas fases del compuesto por la diferencia entre los números atómicos; con el segundo, se analizó la composición química de las zonas de interés. Los resultados mostraron las bondades del agente en la durabilidad del material y, los beneficios del uso de la microscopía electrónica para visualizar el comportamiento microestructuralNa2Si0(4 behavior as a mineralizer agent on organic fibers composites with Type I Portland Cement matrix is possible to observe it through a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The purpose of this research was to study the role of this agent on this material's durability due to the chemical incompatibility between calcium hydroxide Ca(OH2 and the fiber reinforcement from the mahogany (Swietenia Macrophylla, from composites of three different ages and two different fiber volumetric fraction as well. The tests were made in three different zones: matrix, reinforcement and transition zone, using a SEM, whereas the chemical composition was scanned out with an Energy

  13. Quantitative sensing of corroded steel rebar embedded in cement mortar specimens using ultrasonic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Le, Viet; Tang, Qixiang; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcing bars (rebars) is the primary cause for the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Traditional corrosion monitoring methods such as half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance can only detect the presence of corrosion but cannot quantify it. This study presents an experimental investigation of quantifying degree of corrosion of steel rebar inside cement mortar specimens using ultrasonic testing (UT). A UT device with two 54 kHz transducers was used to measure ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of cement mortar, uncorroded and corroded reinforced cement mortar specimens, utilizing the direct transmission method. The results obtained from the study show that UPV decreases linearly with increase in degree of corrosion and corrosion-induced cracks (surface cracks). With respect to quantifying the degree of corrosion, a model was developed by simultaneously fitting UPV and surface crack width measurements to a two-parameter linear model. The proposed model can be used for predicting the degree of corrosion of steel rebar embedded in cement mortar under similar conditions used in this study up to 3.03%. Furthermore, the modeling approach can be applied to corroded reinforced concrete specimens with additional modification. The findings from this study show that UT has the potential of quantifying the degree of corrosion inside reinforced cement mortar specimens.

  14. The influence of cement type and admixture on life span of reinforced concrete utility poles subjected to the high salinity environment of Northeastern Brazil, studied by corrosion potential testing A influência do tipo de cimento e adição na vida útil de postes de concreto armado submetidos ao ambiente de alta salinidade do Nordeste do Brasil, estudada pela técnica de potencial de corrosão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Joukoski

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures installed in coastal zones have constantly been threatened by environmental damaging elements. The chloride ion is known as one of the most aggressive of these elements, causing, among other damages, corrosion of the steel reinforcement and then degradation of the concrete matrix. The goal of this work was to determine the influence of cement type on the resistance and durability of reinforced concrete samples with 25 mm cover thickness, when submitted to aging in a 3.4% sodium chloride aqueous solution and in a high salinity marine environment. Reinforced concrete light poles were cast following the same batching procedures, and after the curing period, they were exposed to atmosphere in a corrosion station near Aracaju, Sergipe State, Northeastern Brazil's coast. Two concrete mixtures were made using CPII-F 32 (filler-modified Portland cement: a mix with no admixture and a mix with addition of 8% silica fume swapping fine aggregates. Another mixture was batched with CPV-ARI RS (high-early-strength Portland cement, with sulfur resistance. All the three mixtures were designed with cement content of about 350 kg/m³. The performance of the structures was evaluated from the results of physicochemical, mechanical and electrochemical testing, after over a year of natural aging. Corrosion potentials of the reinforced concrete samples and of the cast utility poles were measured in terms of the aging time at the natural environment and under chloride ion accelerated aging at laboratory. The half-cell potential measurements showed that the best results were obtained from the mixture containing CPII-F 32 cement and silica fume, followed by the concrete made with CPV-ARI RS cement. The mixture batched with CPII-F 32 cement without admixture presented the worst durability performance.Estruturas de concreto armado instaladas em zonas costeiras têm sido constantemente ameaçadas por elementos ambientais nocivos. O íon cloreto

  15. Experimental study and field application of calcium sulfoaluminate cement for rapid repair of concrete pavements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhua GUAN; Ying GAO; Renjuan SUN; Moon C.WON; Zhi GE

    2017-01-01

    The fast-track repair of deteriorated concrete pavement requires materials that can be placed,cured,and opened to the traffic in a short period.Type Ⅲ cement and Calcium Sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement are the most commonly used fast-setting hydraulic cement (FSHC).In this study,the properties of Type Ⅲ and CSA cement concrete,including compressive strength,coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and shrinkage were evaluated.The test results indicate that compressive strength of FSHC concrete increased rapidly at the early age.CSA cement concrete had higher early-age and long term strength.The shrinkage of CSA cement concrete was lower than that of Type Ⅲ cement concrete.Both CSA and Type Ⅲ cement concrete had similar CTE values.Based on the laboratory results,the CSA cement was selected as the partial-depth rapid repair material for a distressed continuously reinforced concrete pavement.The data collected during and after the repair show that the CSA cement concrete had good short-term and long-term performances and,therefore,was suitable for the rapid repair of concrete pavement.

  16. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  17. Feasibility of backfilling mines using cement kiln dust, fly ash, and cement blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltagui H.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement kiln dust (CKD is an industrial by-product of the cement manufacturing process, the composition of which can vary widely. Recent years of using alternative fuels have resulted in higher chloride and alkali contents within CKDs; as such, this limits the applications in which CKDs can be utilised. Using a CKD containing a high free lime content of 29.5%, it is shown that this CKD is capable of activating pulverized fuel ash (PFA due to its high alkalinity, which can be utilised in low strength un-reinforced applications. One potential application involves the backfill of mines, reducing the need for continuous maintenance of the mine. This study focuses on the compressive strength achieved by various blends of CKD, PFA, and cement. Samples were hand mixed and compacted in 100 mm x 50 mm diameter cylinders, and unconfined compressive strength measurements taken at 28 and 56 days. The hydration products were assessed through the use of x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. Aiming to maximise the use of CKD at a water to binder (w/b ratio of 0.2, it was found that the maximum CKD content possible to achieve the required strength was 90% CKD blended with 10% cement.

  18. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  19. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  1. REINFORCED COMPOSITE PANEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A composite panel having front and back faces, the panel comprising facing reinforcement, backing reinforcement and matrix material binding to the facing and backing reinforcements, the facing and backing reinforcements each independently comprising one or more reinforcing sheets, the facing rein...... by matrix material, the facing and backing reinforcements being interconnected to resist out-of-plane relative movement. The reinforced composite panel is useful as a barrier element for shielding structures, equipment and personnel from blast and/or ballistic impact damage....

  2. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  3. Experimental and numerical analysis of short sisal fiber-cement composites produced with recycled matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Paulo Roberto Lopes; Barros, Joaquim A. O.; Santos, Daniele Justo; Fontes, Cintia Maria; Lima, José Mário F.; Toledo Filho, Romildo

    2016-01-01

    "Published online: 02 Jan 2017" The proper use of renewable or recycled source materials can contribute significantly to reducing the environmental impact of construction industry. In this work, cement based composites reinforced with natural fibers were developed and their mechanical behavior was characterized. To ensure the composite sustainability and durability, the ordinary Portland cement matrix was modified by adding metakaolin and the natural aggregate was substitute...

  4. Thermal performance of sisal fiber-cement roofing tiles for rural constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Tonoli,Gustavo Henrique Denzin; Santos,Sérgio Francisco dos; Rabi,José Antonio; Santos,Wilson Nunes dos; Savastano Junior,Holmer

    2011-01-01

    Roofing provides the main protection against direct solar radiation in animal housing. Appropriate thermal properties of roofing materials tend to improve the thermal comfort in the inner ambient. Nonasbestos fiber-cement roofing components reinforced with cellulose pulp from sisal (Agave sisalana) were produced by slurry and dewatering techniques, with an optional addition of polypropylene fibers. Nonasbestos tiles were evaluated and compared with commercially available asbestos-cement sheet...

  5. Interfacial morphology and domain configurations in 0-3 PZT-Portland cement composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaitanong, N.; Zeng, H.R.; Li, G.R.; Yin, Q.R.; Vittayakorn, W.C.; Yimnirun, R.; Chaipanich, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cement-based piezoelectric composites have attracted great attention recently due to their promising applications as sensors in smart structures. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and Portland cement (PC) composite were fabricated using 60% of PZT by volume. Scanning Electron Microscope and piezoresponse force microscope were used to investigate the morphology and domain configurations at the interfacial zone of PZT-Portland cement composites. Angular PZT ceramic grains were found to bind well with the cement matrix. The submicro-scale domains were clearly observed by piezoresponse force microscope at the interfacial regions between the piezoelectric PZT phase and Portland cement phase, and are clearer than the images obtained for pure PZT. This is thought to be due to the applied internal stress of cement to the PZT ceramic particle which resulted to clearer images.

  6. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV, coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive and Minimally Invasive Dentistry and the new preservative techniques recommended. Objective: The objective of the present article was to carry out a literature review study, to determine the characteristics of CIV that has a prominent role in the Minimally Invasive Dentistry profile. Results: The dentist surgeon must be aware of the classification, according to its composition and physical-chemical nature: conventional ionomers; ionomers reinforced by metals; high viscosity and various types of resin modified glass ionomers to correctly choose the CIV that will be used in their clinical interventions, which should occur based on the properties of the material and its clinical indication. Conclusion: It was concluded that the implementation of preventive techniques with CIV in public health care, tend to minimize curative treatments, concurrently valuing the low complexity dental procedures performed in Primary Care, avoiding referrals for treatment of cases of greater complexity at the level Secondary and tertiary care, saving resources.

  7. Device for two-stage cementing of casing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudimov, D A; Goncharevskiy, Ye N; Luneva, L G; Shchelochkov, S N; Shil' nikova, L N; Tereshchenko, V G; Vasiliev, V A; Volkova, V V; Zhdokov, K I

    1981-01-01

    A device is claimed for two-stage cementing of casing. It consists of a body with lateral plugging vents, upper and lower movable sleeves, a check valve with axial channels that's situated in the lower sleeve, and a displacement limiting device for the lower sleeve. To improve the cementing process of the casing by preventing overflow of cementing fluids from the annular space into the first stage casing, the limiter is equipped with a spring rod that is capable of covering the axial channels of the check valve while it's in an operating mode. In addition, the rod in the upper part is equipped with a reinforced area under the axial channels of the check valve.

  8. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  9. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  10. Mechanical interaction between concrete and structural reinforcement in the tension stiffening process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    as Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), have been combined with steel and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) reinforcement to contrast the effects of brittle and ductile cement matrices as well as elastic/plastic and elastic reinforcement on the tension stiffening process. Particular focus...... investigated using an image-based deformation measurement and analysis system. This allowed for detailed view of surface deformations and the implications on the resulting response of the member in tension. In this study, conventional concrete and a ductile, strain hardening cement composite, known...

  11. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  12. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  13. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  14. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  15. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  16. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Raashid, M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Garwan, M.A.; Maslehuddin, M.; Nagadi, M.M.; Al-Amoudi, O.S.B.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman,; Raashid, M.

    2009-01-01

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  19. FOAM CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT BY BASALT FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate that the foam concrete performance can be improved by dispersed reinforcement, including methods that involve basalt fibres. They address the results of the foam concrete modeling technology and assess the importance of technology-related parameters. Reinforcement efficiency criteria are also provided in the article. Dispersed reinforcement improves the plasticity of the concrete mix and reduces the settlement crack formation rate. Conventional reinforcement that involves metal laths and rods demonstrates its limited application in the production of concrete used for thermal insulation and structural purposes. Dispersed reinforcement is preferable. This technology contemplates the infusion of fibres into porous mixes. Metal, polymeric, basalt and glass fibres are used as reinforcing components. It has been identified that products reinforced by polypropylene fibres demonstrate substantial abradability and deformability rates even under the influence of minor tensile stresses due to the low adhesion strength of polypropylene in the cement matrix. The objective of the research was to develop the type of polypropylene of D500 grade that would demonstrate the operating properties similar to those of Hebel and Ytong polypropylenes. Dispersed reinforcement was performed by the basalt fibre. This project contemplates an autoclave-free technology to optimize the consumption of electricity. Dispersed reinforcement is aimed at the reduction of the block settlement in the course of hardening at early stages of their operation, the improvement of their strength and other operating properties. Reduction in the humidity rate of the mix is based on the plasticizing properties of fibres, as well as the application of the dry mineralization method. Selection of optimal parameters of the process-related technology was performed with the help of G-BAT-2011 Software, developed at Moscow State University of Civil Engineering. The authors also

  20. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  1. The influence of blast furnace slag, fly ash and silica fume on corrosion of reinforced concrete in marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Chloride penetration from sea water may cause corrosion of reinforcement in concrete structures. Adding reactive inorganic materials such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or silica fume to the cement matrix improves the resistance against chloride penetration as compared to Portland cement concrete. A

  2. Laminate mechanics for balanced woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko

    2006-01-01

    Laminate mechanics equations are presented for composites with balanced woven fabric reinforcements. It is shown that mimicking these textile composites with equivalent transversely isotropic (‘unidirectional’) layers requires disputable manipulations. Various micromechanics predictions of textile

  3. Dispersion and Reinforcement of Nanotubes in High Temperature Polymers for Ultrahigh Strength and Thermally Conductive Nanocomposites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Arnold C

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental approaches for controlled dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in polymers and the molecular reinforcement in their nanocomposites were studied to design and fabricate well-dispersed...

  4. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    David R Lloyd; David R Lloyd; Douglas J Medina; Larry W Hawk; Whitney D Fosco; Jerry B Richards

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We ar...

  5. Flexural reinforced concrete member with FRP reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Putzolu, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    One of the most problematic point in construction is the durability of the concrete especially related to corrosion of the steel reinforcement. Due to this problem the construction sector, introduced the use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer, the main fibers used in construction are Glass, Carbon and Aramid. In this study, the author aim to analyse the flexural behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with FRP. This aim is achieved by the analysis of specimens reinforced with GFRP bars, with theoreti...

  6. Quantitative analysis of the microstructure of interfaces in steel reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, A.T.; Richardson, I.G.; Brydson, R.M.D.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the results of a backscattered electron imaging study of the microstructure of the steel- and aggregate-cement paste interfaces in concrete containing 9 mm ribbed reinforcing bars. The water to cement (w/c) ratio, hydration age, steel orientation, and surface finish were varied. For vertically cast bars, there was more calcium hydroxide (CH) and porosity and less unreacted cement at both the steel- and aggregate-cement paste interfaces when compared to the bulk cement paste. As the hydration age increased, the porosity near the interfaces decreased, and the CH increased with more CH close to the steel than to the aggregate. Horizontal bars had more porosity and less CH under them than above. An increase in the w/c ratio produced interfaces of higher porosity and lower levels of CH. Wire-brush cleaned bars had higher levels of CH at the steel-cement paste interface at 365 days when compared to uncleaned bars

  7. Finite element modelling of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid fiber reinforced bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smring, Santa binti; Salleh, Norhafizah; Hamid, NoorAzlina Abdul; Majid, Masni A.

    2017-11-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous composite material made up of cement, sand, coarse aggregate and water mixed in a desired proportion to obtain the required strength. Plain concrete does not with stand tension as compared to compression. In order to compensate this drawback steel reinforcement are provided in concrete. Now a day, for improving the properties of concrete and also to take up tension combination of steel and glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars promises favourable strength, serviceability, and durability. To verify its promise and support design concrete structures with hybrid type of reinforcement, this study have investigated the load-deflection behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid GFRP and steel bars by using ATENA software. Fourteen beams, including six control beams reinforced with only steel or only GFRP bars, were analysed. The ratio and the ordinate of GFRP to steel were the main parameters investigated. The behaviour of these beams was investigated via the load-deflection characteristics, cracking behaviour and mode of failure. Hybrid GFRP-Steel reinforced concrete beam showed the improvement in both ultimate capacity and deflection concomitant to the steel reinforced concrete beam. On the other hand, finite element (FE) modelling which is ATENA were validated with previous experiment and promising the good result to be used for further analyses and development in the field of present study.

  8. Bamboo Fibre Reinforced Cement Used as a Roofing Sheet | Alade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bamboo fibre roofing sheet was able to withstand an average load of 51Kg, which is above the minimum required strength of 50kg. Comparatively, Asbestos roofing sheets and coconut fibre roofing sheets of similar dimensions had failure loads of 104.65Kg and 79Kg respectively. When immersed in water, bamboo fibre ...

  9. Application of Glass Fiber Reinforced Cement in Exhibition Decoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao

    2018-02-01

    Through the study of GRC material and its application field, the aesthetic characteristics and functional characteristics of GRC materials are demonstrated. The decorative application and technology of GRC material in an art exhibition center are highlighted. The design, application and construction technology of GRC curtain wall and ceiling board in the interior and exterior decoration of art exhibition hall are discussed in detail. The unique advantages of GRC materials in exhibition engineering decoration are fully reflected. In practical design application, the application principle and method are summarized, and an application procedure is formed. The research proves that GRC materials in the art of building decoration engineering has an underrated advantage.

  10. The effect of different surfactants/plastisizers on the electrical behavior of CNT nano-modified cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, P. T.; Alafogianni, P.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dassios, K.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Cement-based materials have in general low electrical conductivity. Electrical conductivity is the measure of the ability of the material to resist the passage of electrical current. The addition of a conductive admixture such as Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a cement-based material increases the conductivity of the structure. This research aims to characterize nano-modified cement mortars with MWCNT reinforcements. Such nano-composites would possess smartness and multi-functionality. Multifunctional properties include electrical, thermal and piezo-electric characteristics. One of these properties, the electrical conductivity, was measured using a custom made apparatus that allows application of known D.C. voltage on the nano-composite. In this study, the influence of different surfactants/plasticizers on CNT nano-modified cement mortar specimens with various concentrations of CNTs (0.2% wt. cement CNTs - 0.8% wt. cement CNTs) on the electrical conductivity is assessed.

  11. In vitro shear bond strength of cementing agents to fixed prosthodontic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Sorensen, John A

    2004-09-01

    Durable bonding to fixed prosthodontic restorations is desirable; however, little information is available on the strength of the bond between different cements and fixed prosthodontic restorative materials. This study determined the shear-bond strength of cementing agents to high-gold-content alloy castings and different dental ceramics: high-strength aluminum oxide (Procera AllCeram), leucite-reinforced (IPS Empress), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS Empress 2). Prepolymerized resin composite cylinders (5.5 mm internal diameter, n=20) were bonded to the pretreated surfaces of prosthodontic materials. High-gold-content alloy and high-strength aluminum oxide surfaces were airborne-particle-abraded, and pressable ceramics were hydrofluoric acid-etched and silanized prior to cementing. The cementing agents tested were a zinc-phosphate cement (Fleck's zinc cement), glass ionomer cements (Fuji I, Ketac-Cem), resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus, Fuji Cem, RelyX Luting), resin cements (RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Variolink II, Compolute), and a self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem). Half the specimens (n=10) were tested after 30 minutes; the other half (n=10) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 14 days and then thermal cycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear-bond strength tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by multifactorial analysis of variance taking interactions between effects into account. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey method was used (alpha=.05). In a 3-way ANOVA model, the main factors substrate, cement, time, and all corresponding interactions were statistically significant (all P <.0001). In subsequent separate 1-way or 2-way ANOVA models for each substrate type, significant differences between cement types and polymerizing modes were found (all P <.001). None of the

  12. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  13. Continuous Natural Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Fiber Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharat Wongsriraksa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials are expected to replace inorganic fiber reinforced thermosetting materials. However, in the process of fabricating the composite, it is difficult to impregnate the thermoplastic resin into reinforcement fiber because of the high melt viscosity. Therefore, intermediate material, which allows high impregnation during molding, has been investigated for fabricating continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite by aligning resin fiber alongside reinforcing fiber with braiding technique. This intermediate material has been called “microbraid yarn (MBY.” Moreover, it is well known that the interfacial properties between natural fiber and resin are low; therefore, surface treatment on continuous natural fiber was performed by using polyurethane (PU and flexible epoxy (FLEX to improve the interfacial properties. The effect of surface treatment on the mechanical properties of continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was examined. From these results, it was suggested that surface treatment by PU with low content could produce composites with better mechanical properties.

  14. Yemen watched from cement plant construction work. Cement plant koji wo toshite mita Yemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, M [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-06-25

    Construction of a cement plant was planned at southern part of Yemen. This is a cement plant with annual production 500,000 tons. The term of work was from January, 1990 to February, 1993. The present paper describes an outline the construction of this Cement Plant, the nationality and living environment in Yemen, and construction equipment which was used. The construction work consisted of 113,000m[sup 3] of digging, 82,000m[sup 3] of backfilling, 66,100m[sup 3] of concreting, and 29,285m[sup 3] of asphalt pavement. Reinforcing steel weighing 6,400 tons and steel frame weighing 3,600 tons were totally used. Equipment weighing 7,912 tons and electric devices weighing 1,299 tons were totally installed. For this construction work, two crawler cranes, six hydraulic cranes, aggregate plant, concrete mixers, and construction equipment, such as bulldozers, shovels, and dumpers, were brought from Japan. 5 figs.

  15. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Hybrid fiber and nanopowder reinforced composites for wind turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz M. Chikhradze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation into the production of wind turbine blades manufactured using polymer composites reinforced by hybrid (carbon, basalt, glass fibers and strengthened by various nanopowders (oxides, carbides, borides are presented. The hybrid fiber-reinforced composites (HFRC were manufactured with prepreg technology by molding pre-saturated epoxy-strengthened matrix-reinforced fabric. Performance of the manufactured composites was estimated with values of the coefficient of operating condition (COC at a moderate and elevated temperature.

  17. Reinforced sulphur concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced sulphur concrete wherein one or more metal reinforcing members are in contact with sulphur concrete is disclosed. The reinforced sulphur concrete comprises an adhesion promoter that enhances the interaction between the sulphur and the one or more metal reinforcing members.

  18. Chemical environment in cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  19. Influence of Resin Cements on Color Stability of Different Ceramic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Renata Borges; Lima, Erick de; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Soares, Carlos José; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Novais, Veridiana Resende

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate color stability of two dental ceramics cemented with two resin cements, assessing the color difference (ΔE00) by the measurement of L*, a*, b*, c* and h* of transmittance. The combination of two ceramic system (feldspathic and lithium disilicate) and two resin cements - color A3 (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) resulted in 4 groups (n=5). Ten disks-shaped specimens were fabricated for each ceramic system (10x1.5 mm), etched with hydrofluoric acid (10%) and silanized prior to cementation. The color analysis was performed 24 h after cementation of the samples and after 6 months of storage in relative humidity by means of spectrophotometry. The ΔE00 values were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey test (p<0.05). One-way ANOVA were calculated for the means of individual color coordinates (L*, a*, b*, c* and h*). Two-way ANOVA showed that only the ceramic factor was significant (p=0.003), but there was no difference for the cement factor (p=0.275) nor for the ceramic/cement interaction (p=0.161). The feldspathic ceramic showed the highest values of ΔE00. Variations in L*, a*, b*, c* and h* were more significant for feldspathic ceramic. In conclusion, storage alters similarly the optical properties of the resin cements and feldspathic porcelain was more susceptible to cement color change after aging.

  20. Resistance against bacterial leakage of four luting agents used for cementation of complete cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Hernández, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    To assess the sealing properties of four luting materials used for cementation of full cast crowns. 40 human premolars were prepared with a chamfer finish line. Stone dies were fabricated and copings were waxed, invested and cast in gold. Ten samples (n = 10) were randomly assigned to four groups. In two groups, resin modified glass-ionomer cements were used, ACTIVA BioACTIVE-CEMENT/BASE/LINER and FujiCem2; the third group received the self-adhesive resin cement Embrace WetBond, while the fourth group served as control with a zinc phosphate cement. After cementation, excess cement was removed followed by bench-set for 10 minutes. All samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C and subjected to thermal cycling (x2000 between 5 and 55 degrees C). Subsequently the occlusal surface was reduced exposing the dentin. After sterilization the specimens were subjected to bacterial microleakage with E. faecalis in a dual chamber apparatus for a period of 60 days. Bacterial leakage was checked daily. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meyer survival test. Significant pairwise differences were analyzed using the Log Rank test and the Fishers' exact test at P < 0.05. ACTIVA BioACTIVE-CEMENT/BASE/LINER, FujiCem2 and Embrace WetBond showed the lowest microleakage scores and differed statistically significantly (P < 0.05) from zinc phosphate cement.

  1. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  2. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  3. Neutron imaging of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P.; Wittmann, F.H.; Zhao, T.; Lehmann, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Service life and durability of reinforced concrete structures have become a crucial issue because of the economical and ecological implications. Service life of reinforced concrete structures is often limited by penetration of water and chemical compounds dissolved in water into the porous cement-based material. By now it is well-known that cracks in reinforced concrete are preferential paths for ingress of aggressive substances. Neutron radiography was successfully applied to study the process of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete. In addition, the effectiveness of integral water repellent concrete to prevent ingress of water and salt solutions was investigated. Results are described in detail in this contribution. It will be shown that neutron radiography is a powerful method to visualize the process of water penetration into cracked and uncracked cement-based materials. On the basis of the obtained experimental data, it is possible to quantify the time-dependent water distributions in concrete with high accuracy and spatial resolution. It is of particular interest that penetration of water and salt solutions into damaged interfaces between concrete and steel can be visualized by means of neutron radiography. Deteriorating processes in cracked reinforced concrete structures can be studied in a completely new way. This advanced technology will help and find adequate ways to improve durability and service life of reinforced concrete structures. This will mean at the same time an essential contribution to improved sustainability.

  4. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group) was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group) the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20). The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20). Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) between intact abutments (4.90±0.37) and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25) using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23) compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027). Conclusion: The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal. PMID:25628660

  5. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Farzin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations.Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20. The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20. Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05.There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R between intact abutments (4.90±0.37 and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25 using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23 compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027.The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  6. A self-sensing carbon nanotube/cement composite for traffic monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Baoguo; Yu Xun; Kwon, Eil

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a self-sensing carbon nanotube (CNT)/cement composite is investigated for traffic monitoring. The cement composite is filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes whose piezoresistive properties enable the detection of mechanical stresses induced by traffic flow. The sensing capability of the self-sensing CNT/cement composite is explored in laboratory tests and road tests. Experimental results show that the fabricated self-sensing CNT/cement composite presents sensitive and stable responses to repeated compressive loadings and impulsive loadings, and has remarkable responses to vehicular loadings. These findings indicate that the self-sensing CNT/cement composite has great potential for traffic monitoring use, such as in traffic flow detection, weigh-in-motion measurement and vehicle speed detection.

  7. Solidification of low-level radioactive liquid waste using a cement-silicate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandlund, R.W.; Hayes, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive use has been made of silicate and Portland cement for the solidification of industrial waste and recently this method has been successfully used to solidify a variety of low level radioactive wastes. The types of wastes processed to date include fuel fabrication sludges, power reactor waste, decontamination solution, and university laboratory waste. The cement-silicate process produces a stable solid with a minimal increase in volume and the chemicals are relatively inexpensive and readily available. The method is adaptable to either batch or continuous processing and the equipment is simple. The solid has leaching characteristics similar to or better than plain Portland cement mixtures and the leaching can be further reduced by the use of ion-exchange additives. The cement-silicate process has been used to solidify waste containing high levels of boric acid, oils, and organic solvents. The experience of handling the various types of liquid waste with a cement-silicate system is described

  8. Innovation based on tradition : Blast furnace slag cement for durable concrete structures in Norway?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Nijland, T.; De Rooij, M.; Larsen, C.K.; Pedersen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) has been used to build reinforced concrete structures in marine and road environment in The Netherlands for nearly a century. The experience is good and structures with long service lives can be obtained, as has been shown by several field studies. This is caused by

  9. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The morphology of the corrosion of steel in cement paste was studied in situ. • During galvanostatic corrosion, carbon steel reinforcement corroded homogeneously. • On ferritic stainless steel, deep corrosion pits formed and caused wider cracks. • The measured rate of steel loss correlated well with Faraday’s law of electrolysis. - Abstract: In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover

  10. Using dehydrated cement paste as new type of cement additive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.; Dong, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study, including evaluation and modification, on using dehydrated cement paste (DCP) as a new type of cement additive. After a series of processes, normal DCP (N-DCP) was produced as before and a modified form of DCP (M-DCP) was produced as well. The cementitious

  11. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  12. Use of wet concrete spraying in building technology of reinforced-concrete fiber slabs according to «Monofant» system

    OpenAIRE

    BUGAYEVSKIY S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology of cementation of reinforced-concrete slabs with non-extractable-liners for the «Monofant» system, using wet concrete spraying is implemented. A compression test for obtained columns made of fiber concrete is carried out.

  13. Method of cement-solidification of radioactive liquid wastes containing surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Yusa, H

    1979-04-10

    Purpose: To provide the subject method comprising the steps of adjusting the concentration of the surfactant to a value less than the predetermined value even when the concentration of the surfactant is high, and rendering the uniaxial compression strength of the cement-solidification body into more than the defined fabrication reference value. Method: To radioactive liquid wastes there are applied means for boiling and heating liquid wastes by addition of sulfuric acid, means for cracking surfactants by the addition of oxidants and means for precipitating and arresting surfactants. After suppressing the hindrance of the cement hydration reaction by surfactants, the radioactive liquid wastes are cement-solidified. (Nakamura, S.).

  14. Biomass for green cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, R. [Lafarge Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Lafarge examined the use of waste biomass products in its building materials and provided background information on its operations. Cement kiln infrastructure was described in terms of providing access to shipping, rail and highways; conveying and off-loading equipment; having large storage facilities; and, offering continuous monitoring and stack testing. The presentation identified the advantages and disadvantages of a few different biomass cases such as coal; scrap tires; non-recyclable household waste; and processed biomass. A chart representing landfill diversion rates was presented and the presentation concluded with a discussion of energy recovery and recycling. 1 tab., figs.

  15. Effect of surface treatment and type of cement on push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almufleh, Balqees S; Aleisa, Khalil I; Morgano, Steven M

    2014-10-01

    The effect of the surface treatment of zirconium oxide posts on their push-out bond strength is controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconium oxide posts cemented with different cements and to assess the failure mode. Seventy extracted human teeth were divided into 7 groups (n=10). Custom zirconium oxide posts (Cercon; Degudent) were fabricated for 6 groups. Posts in 3 groups were airborne-particle abraded (A). Posts in the other 3 groups were tribochemical silica coated (T). Three cements were used. Zinc phosphate cement was used to cement the zirconium oxide posts in groups AZ and TZ, RelyX ARC cement was used in groups ARA and TRA, and RelyX Unicem cement was used in groups ARU and TRU. Group C contained custom metal posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement. Specimens were horizontally sectioned into 3 sections and subjected to a push-out test. A mixed model analysis of variance, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey multiple comparison tests were used for statistical analysis. The highest push-out bond strength was recorded for Group ARU (21.03 MPa), and the lowest was recorded for Group ARA (7.57 MPa). No significant difference in push-out bond strength was found among the different surface treatments and root regions (P>.05). The type of cement had a significant effect on the push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts (P=.049). RelyX Unicem cement recorded (19.57 ±8.83 MPa) significantly higher push-out bond strength compared with zinc phosphate (9.95 ±6.31 MPa) and RelyX ARC cements (9.39 ±5.45 MPa). Adhesive failure at the post-cement interface was recorded for 75% of the posts cemented with zinc phosphate and RelyX ARC cements, while mixed failure was recorded for 75% of the posts cemented with RelyX Unicem cement. The type of cement used resulted in a statistically significant difference in the push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts, while both the surface treatment

  16. Process of preparing hydraulic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1919-12-11

    A process of preparing hydraulic cement from oil shale or shale coke is characterized in that the oil shale or shale coke after the distillation is burned long and hot to liberate the usual amount of carbonic acid and then is fine ground to obtain a slow hardening hydraulic cement.

  17. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  18. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  19. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  20. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  1. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  2. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  3. Cermet reinforcement of a weakened endodontically treated root: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, J L

    1992-08-01

    Many clinical applications have been recommended for glass-cermet cement because of its improved properties compared to the original glass-ionomer cements. It has also been accepted as a dentinal substitute that can strengthen teeth. In this paper, an additional clinical application for glass-cermet cement, the reinforcement of weakened endodontically treated roots, is suggested. This technique is in keeping with the trends of tooth conservation and the use of an adhesive restorative material in the restoration of severely damaged teeth by a conservative approach.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF NANO-ADDITIVES ON THE PHYSICO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Евгений Петрович Матус

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the current state of research of the effect of nanodispersed additives on the properties of fiber reinforced portland cement composites. The results of tests on the strength and viscosity of solutions and samples of fine-grained concrete based on cement binder and cement steel and basalt fiber, carbon nanotubes, silicates, nanosized powder of CaО and degidrol. The effect of methods of introduction of the mixture of nano-additives on the clutch fibers with the matrix. Analysis of experimental data showed the absence of a systematic positive effect of increasing the mechanical strength of the composites due to the introduction of carbon nanotubes.

  5. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  6. Fracture resistance of aluminium oxide and lithium disilicate-based crowns using different luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, Ahed M; Hussey, David L; Grey, Nicholas; Hatamleh, Muhanad M

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture resistance of two types of ceramic crowns cemented with two different cements. Forty premolar crowns were fabricated using lithium-disilicate (IPS Empress-2) and glass-infiltrated aluminium-oxide (In-Ceram) ceramic systems. The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10) with Group 1 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 2 (In-Ceram) cemented with glass ionomer cement. Group 3 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 4 (In-Ceram) were cemented with resin cement. Crowns were tested in a universal testing machine at a compressive-load speed of 10 mm/min. Fracture modes were grouped into five categories. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-hoc tests were used to detect statistical significances (p0.05) on fracture resistance within each ceramic system tested. In-Ceram crowns cemented with either glass ionomer or resin cements exhibited a statistically significantly higher fracture-resistance than IPS Empress-2 crowns (pEmpress-2 and In-Ceram crowns was not affected by the type of cement used for luting. Both In-Ceram and IPS Empress-2 crowns can be successfully luted with the cements tested with In-Ceram exhibiting higher fracture resistance than IPS Empress-2.

  7. Influence of Cellulosic Fibres on the Physical Properties of Fibre Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarova, V.; Stevulova, N.; Vaclavik, V.; Dvorsky, T.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, there are new approaches directing to processing of non-conventional fibre-cement composites for application in the housing construction. Vegetable cellulosic fibres coming from natural resources used as reinforcement in cost-effective and environmental friendly building products are in the spotlight. The applying of natural fibres in cement based composites is narrowly linked to the ecological building sector, where a choice of materials is based on components including recyclable, renewable raw materials and low-resource manufacture techniques. In this paper, two types of cellulosic fibres coming from wood pulp and recycled waste paper with 0.2%; 0.3% and 0.5% of fibre addition into cement mixtures were used. Differences in the physical characteristics (flowability, density, coefficient of thermal conductivity and water absorbability) of 28 days hardened fibre-cement composites are investigated. Addition of cellulosic fibres to cement mixture caused worsening the workability of fresh mixture as well as absorbability of hardened composites due to hydrophilic nature of biomaterial, whereas density and thermal conductivity of manufactured cement based fibre plaster are enhanced. The physical properties of cement plasters based on cellulosic fibres depend on structural, physical characteristics of cellulosic fibres, their nature and processing.

  8. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. In vitro evaluation of marginal adaptation in five ceramic restoration fabricating techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Cağri; Burgaz, Yavuz; Saraç, Duygu

    2010-01-01

    To compare in vitro the marginal adaptation of crowns manufactured using ceramic restoration fabricating techniques. Fifty standardized master steel dies simulating molars were produced and divided into five groups, each containing 10 specimens. Test specimens were fabricated with CAD/CAM, heat-press, glass-infiltration, and conventional lost-wax techniques according to manufacturer instructions. Marginal adaptation of the test specimens was measured vertically before and after cementation using SEM. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA with Tukey HSD tests (a = .05). Marginal adaptation of ceramic crowns was affected by fabrication technique and cementation process (P cementation (P cementation. Marginal adaptation values obtained in the compared systems were within clinically acceptable limits. Cementation causes a significant increase in the vertical marginal discrepancies of the test specimens.

  11. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironova, M.; Ivanova, M.; Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-10-01

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro - fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  12. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironova, M.; Ivanova, M.; Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro – fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete

  13. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironova, M., E-mail: mirona@imbm.bas.bg; Ivanova, M., E-mail: magdalena.ivanova@imbm.bas.bg; Naidenov, V., E-mail: valna53@mail.bg [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 4, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Georgiev, I., E-mail: ivan.georgiev@parallel.bas.bg [Institute of Information and Communication Technologies & Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stary, J., E-mail: stary@ugn.cas.cz [Institute of Geonics Czech Academy of Sciences, Studentska str., Ostrava 1768 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-28

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro – fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  14. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  15. Sustainability assessment of concrete structure durability under reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    In the present paper a parametric study is conducted based on an existing finite element based model. The influence of cover layer, reinforcement diameter and water-to-cement ratio is compared to a possible scatter in the results due to insufficient knowledge about the distribution of the corrosion...... current density along the circumference of the reinforcement. Simulations show that the scatter has a greater influence on the results than changing the parameters wherefore it is concluded that further investigation of the non-uniform deposition of corrosion products is essential to better understand...

  16. Use of Solid Waste (Foundry Slag) Mortar and Bamboo Reinforcement in Seismic Analysis for Single Storey Masonry Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Husain, A.; Ghani, F.; Alam, M. N.

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of large amount of solid waste (foundry slag) into alternate source of building material will contribute not only as a solution to growing waste problem, but also it will conserve the natural resources of other building material and thereby reduce the cost of construction. The present work makes an effort to safe and economic use of recycle mortar (1:6) as a supplementary material. Conventional and recycled twelve prisms were casted with varying percentage of solid waste (foundry slag) added (0, 10, 20, 30 %) replacing cement by weight and tested under compression testing machine. As the replacement is increasing, the strength is decreasing. 10 % replacement curve is very closed to 0 % whereas 20 % is farther and 30 % is farthest. 20 % replacement was chosen for dynamic testing as its strength is within permissible limit as per IS code. A 1:4 scale single storey brick model with half size brick was fabricated on shake table in the lab for dynamic testing using pure friction isolation system (coarse sand as friction material µ = 0.34). Pure friction isolation technique can be adopted economically in developing countries where low-rise building prevails due to their low cost. The superstructure was separated from the foundation at plinth level, so as to permit sliding of superstructure during severe earthquake. The observed values of acceleration and displacement responses compare fairly with the analytical values of the analytical model. It also concluded that 20 % replacement of cement by solid waste (foundry slag) could be safely adopted without endangering the safety of the masonry structures under seismic load.To have an idea that how much energy is dissipated through this isolation, the same model with fixed base was tested and results were compared with the isolated free sliding model and it has been observed that more than 60 % energy is dissipated through this pure friction isolation technique. In case of base isolation, no visible cracks

  17. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  18. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  19. Adapting without reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, Aaron; Gallistel, C Randy

    2012-11-01

    Our data rule out a broad class of behavioral models in which behavioral change is guided by differential reinforcement. To demonstrate this, we showed that the number of reinforcers missed before the subject shifted its behavior was not sufficient to drive behavioral change. What's more, many subjects shifted their behavior to a more optimal strategy even when they had not yet missed a single reinforcer. Naturally, differential reinforcement cannot be said to drive a process that shifts to accommodate to new conditions so adeptly that it doesn't miss a single reinforcer: it would have no input on which to base this shift.

  20. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  1. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  2. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  3. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  4. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, F. P. [University of Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  5. Genomic Signatures of Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin G. Garner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement is the process by which selection against hybridization increases reproductive isolation between taxa. Much research has focused on demonstrating the existence of reinforcement, yet relatively little is known about the genetic basis of reinforcement or the evolutionary conditions under which reinforcement can occur. Inspired by reinforcement’s characteristic phenotypic pattern of reproductive trait divergence in sympatry but not in allopatry, we discuss whether reinforcement also leaves a distinct genomic pattern. First, we describe three patterns of genetic variation we expect as a consequence of reinforcement. Then, we discuss a set of alternative processes and complicating factors that may make the identification of reinforcement at the genomic level difficult. Finally, we consider how genomic analyses can be leveraged to inform if and to what extent reinforcement evolved in the face of gene flow between sympatric lineages and between allopatric and sympatric populations of the same lineage. Our major goals are to understand if genome scans for particular patterns of genetic variation could identify reinforcement, isolate the genetic basis of reinforcement, or infer the conditions under which reinforcement evolved.

  6. Genomic Signatures of Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Benjamin E.

    2018-01-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which selection against hybridization increases reproductive isolation between taxa. Much research has focused on demonstrating the existence of reinforcement, yet relatively little is known about the genetic basis of reinforcement or the evolutionary conditions under which reinforcement can occur. Inspired by reinforcement’s characteristic phenotypic pattern of reproductive trait divergence in sympatry but not in allopatry, we discuss whether reinforcement also leaves a distinct genomic pattern. First, we describe three patterns of genetic variation we expect as a consequence of reinforcement. Then, we discuss a set of alternative processes and complicating factors that may make the identification of reinforcement at the genomic level difficult. Finally, we consider how genomic analyses can be leveraged to inform if and to what extent reinforcement evolved in the face of gene flow between sympatric lineages and between allopatric and sympatric populations of the same lineage. Our major goals are to understand if genome scans for particular patterns of genetic variation could identify reinforcement, isolate the genetic basis of reinforcement, or infer the conditions under which reinforcement evolved. PMID:29614048

  7. NERVA turbopump bearing retainer fabrication on nonmetallic retainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The need for a low-wear, lightweight, high strength bearing retainer material with a radiation degradation threshold of 10 to the 9th power rads (C) prompted development of nonmetallic reinforced polymers of the following types: (1) polybenzimidazole, (2) polyimide, and (3) polyquinoxaline. Retainers were machined from tubular laminates (billets), including reinforcement by either glass or graphite fabric or filament. Fabrication of billets involves hot preimpregnation of the reinforcement fabric or filament with polymer followed by wrapping this prepreg over a heated mandrel to form a tube with the required thickness and length.

  8. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  9. Does cement mantle thickness really matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Caruana, J.

    2008-01-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of differing thicknesses. This thesis is concerned with variability in cement thickness around the Stanmore Hip, due to surgical approach, broach size and stem orientation, and its effects on stress and cracking in the cement. The extent to which cement mantle thi...

  10. Antibiotic-impregnated articulating cement spacer for infected total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Standard treatment of chronic infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a two-stage revision, the first step being placement of an antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer. Here we describe the results of a new technique (modification of the Goldstien′s technique for intraoperative manufacture of a customized articulating spacer at minimal cost and with relatively good conformity and longevity. Materials and Methods : Thirty-six infected knees underwent this procedure from June 2002 to May 2007. The technique consists of using the freshened femur and tibia interface as molds wrapped in a tin foil for manufacturing the two components of the spacer with antibiotic-impregnated methyl methycrylate cement. We used the spacer and the femoral component of the trial set of a TKA system to mold them to perfect articulation. We also reinforced the spacer with a K-wire scaffold to prevent fracture of the cement mantle in the last 21 cases. Results : All 36 knees showed excellent results in terms of infection control, mobility, and stability. There was significant improvement in the WOMAC and Knee Society Scores (20 and 39 points respectively. There were two fractures of the spacers in the initial 15 cases that did not have K-wire scaffolding but none in the last 21 that had reinforcement. Conclusion : This technique provides a more conforming spacer, with good range of motion and stability. The reinforcement helps in preventing the fracture of the cement mantle and is cost effective.

  11. Nano-Inclusions Applied in Cement-Matrix Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bastos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on cement-based materials is trying to exploit the synergies that nanomaterials can provide. This paper describes the findings reported in the last decade on the improvement of these materials regarding, on the one hand, their mechanical performance and, on the other hand, the new properties they provide. These features are mainly based on the electrical and chemical characteristics of nanomaterials, thus allowing cement-based elements to acquire “smart” functions. In this paper, we provide a quantitative approach to the reinforcements achieved to date. The fundamental concepts of nanoscience are introduced and the need of both sophisticated devices to identify nanostructures and techniques to disperse nanomaterials in the cement paste are also highlighted. Promising results have been obtained, but, in order to turn these advances into commercial products, technical, social and standardisation barriers should be overcome. From the results collected, it can be deduced that nanomaterials are able to reduce the consumption of cement because of their reinforcing effect, as well as to convert cement-based products into electric/thermal sensors or crack repairing materials. The main obstacle to foster the implementation of such applications worldwide is the high cost of their synthesis and dispersion techniques, especially for carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide.

  12. Chloride adsorption by calcined layered double hydroxides in hardened Portland cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seyoon; Moon, Juhyuk; Bae, Sungchul; Duan, Xiaonan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Monteiro, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using calcined layered double hydroxides (CLDHs) to prevent chloride-induced deterioration in reinforced concrete. CLDHs not only adsorbed chloride ions in aqueous solution with a memory effect but also had a much higher binding capacity than the original layered double hydroxides (LDHs) in the cement matrix. We investigated this adsorption in hardened cement paste in batch cultures to determine adsorption isotherms. The measured and theoretical binding capacities (153 mg g −1 and 257 mg g −1 , respectively) of the CLDHs were comparable to the theoretical capacity of Friedel's salt (2 mol mol −1 or 121 mg g −1 ), which belongs to the LDH family among cementitious phases. We simulated chloride adsorption by CLDHs through the cement matrix using the Fickian model and compared the simulation result to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) chlorine map. Based on our results, it is proposed that the adsorption process is governed by the chloride transport through the cement matrix; this process differs from that in an aqueous solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the CLDH rebuilds the layered structure in a cementitious environment, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of applying CLDHs to the cement and concrete industries. - Highlights: • We examine the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of CLDH in the hydrated cement. • CLDH capacity to bind chloride ions in the hydrated cement paste is determined. • We model chloride adsorption by CLDH through the cement matrix. • CLDH reforms the layered structure with ion adsorption in the cement matrix

  13. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  14. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  15. Study on tribological behavior and cutting performance of CVD diamond and DLC films on Co-cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongcan; Shen Bin; Sun Fanghong

    2010-01-01

    The tribological behaviors of diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films play a major role on their machining and mechanical applications. In this study, diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on the cobalt cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate respectively adopting the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique and the vacuum arc discharge with a graphite cathode, and their friction properties are evaluated on a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer with counterfaces of silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic, cemented tungsten carbide (WC) and ball-bearing steel materials, under the ambient air without lubricating condition. Moreover, to evaluate their cutting performance, comparative turning tests are conducted using the uncoated WC-Co and as-fabricated CVD diamond and DLC coated inserts, with glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) composite materials as the workpiece. The as-deposited HFCVD diamond and DLC films are characterized with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry. Furthermore, Rocwell C indentation tests are conducted to evaluate the adhesion of HFCVD diamond and DLC films grown onto WC-Co substrates. SEM and 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry are also used to investigate the worn region on the surfaces of diamond and DLC films. The friction tests suggest that the obtained friction coefficient curves that of various contacts exhibit similar evolution tendency. For a given counterface, DLC films present lower stable friction coefficients than HFCVD diamond films under the same sliding conditions. The cutting tests results indicate that flank wear of the HFCVD diamond coated insert is lower than that of DLC coated insert before diamond films peeling off.

  16. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  17. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David R; Medina, Douglas J; Hawk, Larry W; Fosco, Whitney D; Richards, Jerry B

    2014-01-09

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect "accelerated-HRE." Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  18. Theoretical and numerical analysis of reinforced concrete beams with confinement reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Delalibera

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the use of confinement in over-reinforced concrete beams. This reinforcement consists of square stirrups, placed in the compression zone of the beam cross-section, in order to improve its ductility. A parametric numerical study is initially performed, using a finite element computational program that considers the material nonlinearities and the confinement effect. To investigate the influence of the transverse reinforcing ratio on the beam ductility, an experimental program was also conducted. Four over-reinforced beams were tested; three beam specimens with additional transverse reinforcement to confine the beams, and one without it. All specimens were fabricated with a concrete designed for a compressive strength of 25 MPa. The experimental results show that the post-peak ductility factor is proportional to the confining reinforcement ratio, however the same is not observed for the pre-peak ductility factor, which varied randomly with changes in the confining reinforcement ratio. It was also observed from the experiments that the confinement effect tends to be smaller close to the beam neutral axis.

  19. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of effectiveness of cement removal from implant-retained crowns using a proposed circular crisscross flossing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Shafter, Mohamed Amer; Jain, Vinay; Wicks, Russel Anthony; Linder, Erno; Ledo, Carlos Alberto da Silva

    2018-02-13

    Extruded cement during dental implant crown cementation may cause peri-implant diseases if not removed adequately. Evaluate the efficiency of removal of cement after cementation of implant crowns using an experimental "circular crisscross flossing technique (CCCFT) flossing technique, compared to the conventional "C" shape flossing technique (CSFT). Twenty-four patients rendered 29 experimental and 29 control crowns. Prefabricated abutments were secured to the implant with the margins at least 1 mm subgingivally. The abutments were scanned using CADCAM technology and Emax crowns were fabricated in duplicates. Each crown was cemented separately and excess cement was removed using the CSFT and the CCFT techniques. After completion of cementation was completed, the screw access holes were accessed and the crown was unscrewed along with the abutment. The samples were disinfected using 70% ethanol for 10 minutes. Crowns were divided into 4 parts using a marker in order to facilitate measurement data collection. Vertical and horizontal measurements were made for extruded cement for each control and experimental groups by means of a digital microscope. One-hundred and seventeen measurements were made for each group. Mann-Whitney test was applied to verify statistical significance between the groups. The CCFT showed a highly statistically significant result (104.8 ± 13.66, pcrowns cementation when compared with the CSFT.

  1. Waiting Time for Coronal Preparation and the Influence of Different Cements on Tensile Strength of Metal Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilione Kruschewsky Costa Sousa Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of post-cementation waiting time for core preparation of cemented cast posts and cores had on retention in the root canal, using two different luting materials. Sixty extracted human canines were sectioned 16 mm from the root apex. After cast nickel-chromium metal posts and cores were fabricated and luted with zinc phosphate (ZP cement or resin cement (RC, the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 10 according to the waiting time for core preparation: no preparation (control, 15 minutes, or 1 week after the core cementation. At the appropriate time, the specimens were subjected to a tensile load test (0.5 mm/min until failure. Two-way ANOVA (time versus cement and the Tukey tests (P < 0.05 showed significantly higher (P < 0.05 tensile strength values for the ZP cement groups than for the RC groups. Core preparation and post-cementation waiting time for core recontouring did not influence the retention strength. ZP was the best material for intraradicular metal post cementation.

  2. Prediction of crack due to corrosion of reinforcing bar in low alkali concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Nobufumi; Iriya, Keishiro; Hitomi, Takashi; Konishi, Kazuhiro; Kurihara, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Steel-reinforced low alkaline concrete containing pozzolan has been examined for application in high level radioactive waste disposal. Marine exposure examinations a period of six years were performed for concrete with 30% water-cement ratio, and the reduction in its compressive strength, the intrusion depth of chloride ions, and the corrosion of the reinforcing bar were investigated. On the basis of these results, the progress of corrosion of the reinforcing bar and the outbreak time of a corrosion crack in the reinforcing bar were predicted. The following results are obtained. 1) There was no decrease in the compressive strength of the test pieces during the marine exposure examinations. 2) There was little penetration of the chloride ions in comparison with ordinary Portland cement. 3) Although the corrosion of the reinforcing bar commenced at an early stage with a little quantity of chloride ion intrusion, the progress over the period of six years was extremely small. 4) The corrosion rate of the reinforcing bar in groundwater including sea water was estimated as 0.30-0.55 mg/(cm 2 ·year). In the case of a reinforcing bar with a thickness of 100 mm and diameter of 22 mm, the outbreak time of the reinforcing corrosion crack was predicted as 50-100 years after construction. (author)

  3. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  4. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  5. Development of cement material using inorganic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, Masumitsu; Satou, Tatsuaki; Wada, Mikio; Ishii, Tomoharu; Matsuo, Kazuaki.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic admixtures to enhance the fluidity of cement material was developed. These admixtures turned into easy to immobilize the miscellaneous radioactive waste using cement material. It was found that the ζ potential of cement particles was directly proportional to the content of the inorganic admixtures in cement paste and the particles of cement were dispersed at the high ζ potential. The condensed sodium phosphate, which was the main component of the inorganic admixtures, retarded the dissolution of Ca 2+ ion from the cement, and generated the colloids by incorporating dissolved Ca 2+ ion. The cement material containing the inorganic admixtures was found to have the same mechanical strength and adsorption potential of radionuclides in comparison to normal cement materials. It was confirmed that the cement material containing the inorganic admixture was effectively filled gaps of miscellaneous radioactive waste. (author)

  6. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  7. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Renata M.; Rahbar, Nima; Soboyejo, Wole

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from ∼ 1.5 to 3.2 J/m 2 when the loading angle increases from ∼ 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  8. Nano-modified cement composites and its applicability as concrete repair material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, Tanvir

    Nanotechnology or Nano-science, considered the forth industrial revolution, has received considerable attention in the past decade. The physical properties of a nano-scaled material are entirely different than that of bulk materials. With the emerging nanotechnology, one can build material block atom by atom. Therefore, through nanotechnology it is possible to enhance and control the physical properties of materials to a great extent. Composites such as concrete materials have very high strength and Young's modulus but relatively low toughness and ductility due to their covalent bonding between atoms and lacking of slip systems in the crystal structures. However, the strength and life of concrete structures are determined by the microstructure and mass transfer at nano scale. Cementitious composites are amenable to manipulation through nanotechnology due to the physical behavior and size of hydration products. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are nearly ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. So there is a great potential to utilize CNT in producing new cement based composite materials. It is evident from the review of past literature that mechanical properties of nanotubes reinforced cementitious composites have been highly variable. Some researches yielded improvement in performance of CNT-cement composites as compared to plain cement samples, while other resulted in inconsequential changes in mechanical properties. Even in some cases considerable less strengths and modulus were obtained. Another major difficulty of producing CNT reinforced cementitious composites is the attainment of homogeneous dispersion of nanotubes into cement but no standard procedures to mix CNT within the cement is available. CNT attract more water to adhere to their surface due to their high aspect ratio which eventually results in less workability of the cement mix. Therefore, it is extremely important to develop a suitable mixing technique and an

  9. Extruded bar reinforced structure and manufacturing procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truchet, J.M.; Bozetto, P.

    1989-01-01

    A cooling tower has horizontal hoops connected by two inclined sets of bars to form a trellis of equilateral triangle anchored in the ground. The bars and hoops are connected at the corners of the triangle. A skin stretched over the trellis defines the tower. The bars are made with thermosetting resin reinforced by fibres. The fabrication of such tower is cheep and simple it can be used for every type of electrical power station, nuclear or not [fr

  10. A new method for fabrication of thin plates and thin-walled cylinder made of fiber reinforced metal (FRM) and its application for the rotating drum of the nuclear fuel centrifugal separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Tatsuya

    1978-01-01

    The composite materials using resins as the base materials show the defect that the characteristics deteriorate rapidly at elevated temperature. Therefore the FRMs using relatively ductile metals as the base materials combined with reinforcing fibers have been considered. The result of study on the combination of base materials and fibers and the manufacturing method is rarely reported in Japan. In FRMs, direct contact of fibers mutually must be avoided, especially making nodes lowers the strength extremely. The fibers must be long monofilaments of 0.1 to 0.2 mm diameter. High precision wire winding machines are required for making uniform FRMs. For the diffusion joining of preformed materials, in which fibers are put in order on metallic foils, pressure and heat are applied. The author succeeded to develop the technique for making thin-walled cylinders of FRMs, including the method of winding brittle filaments and the method of pressurizing and heating based on the difference of thermal expansion of dies. The mechanical properties of thin plates and thin-walled cylinders made of monofilaments of B, SiC and SUS and aluminum alloy foils were obtained, and rotation test of the cylinders was carried out. It was clarified that the FRMs of B-Al and SiC-Al groups are very excellent materials, and most suitable for the rotary drums of super-high speed centrifuges. (Kako, I.)

  11. A study on the practicability of highly containing fly ash and silica fume cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Hitoshi; Mihara, Morihiro; Iriya, Keishiro; Matsui, Jun

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious materials have been planed to be used for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste and TRU waste. Degrading of host rock and buffer material induced by high pH leachate, however, is pointed out as one of technical issues. The authors have been developing a low alkalinity cement (the pH of the leachate of this cement is about 11) as an enhanced material to reduce the effect of the high pH problem. In this study, the applicability of low alkalinity cement developed to solve this problem was evaluated. The fluidity of the mortar was sufficient to fill the aperture in a structure filled with coarse aggregate. The concrete using the low alkalinity cement was also enough to fill a structure with the reinforcing steel. The compressive strength of a test-piece produced by the JIS method and of a core collected from the trial structure were over 60 MPa. These evaluation results show that developed low alkalinity cement had higher performances in mechanical properties and execution characteristics than JIS ordinary Portland cement. (author)

  12. Tough ceramic coatings: Carbon nanotube reinforced silica sol-gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. J.; Rico, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Rams, J.

    2010-08-01

    Silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes were produced via sol-gel route using two mixing techniques of the sol-gel precursors, mechanical and ultrasonic mixing, and dip-coating as deposition process on magnesium alloy substrates. Effective incorporation and distribution of 0.1 wt.% of carbon nanotubes in the amorphous silica matrix of the coatings were achieved using both techniques. Fabrication procedure determines the morphological aspects of the coating. Only mechanical mixing process produced coatings dense and free of defects. Nanoindentation technique was used to examine the influence of the fabrication process in the mechanical features of the final coatings, i.e. indentation fracture toughness, Young's modulus and hardness. A maximum toughening effect of about 24% was achieved in silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes produced by the mechanical mixing route. Scanning electron microscopy investigation revealed that the toughening of these reinforced coatings was mainly due to bridging effect of the reinforcement.

  13. Reinforced magnesium composites by metallic particles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahid, Alireza; Hodgson, Peter [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Li, Yuncang, E-mail: yuncang.li@rmit.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2017-02-08

    Pure magnesium (Mg) implants have unsatisfactory mechanical properties, particularly in loadbearing applications. Particulate-reinforced Mg composites are known as promising materials to provide higher strength implants compared to unreinforced metals. In the current work biocompatible niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) particles are selected as reinforcement, and Mg-Nb and Mg-Ta composites fabricated via a powder metallurgy process associated with the ball milling technique. The effect of Nb and Ta contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg matrix was investigated. There was a uniform distribution of reinforcements in the Mg matrix with reasonable integrity and no intermetallic formation. The compressive mechanical properties of composites vary with reinforcement contents. The optimal parameters to fabricate biocompatible Mg composites and the optimal composition with appropriate strength, hardness and ductility are recommended.

  14. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  15. Fracture strengths of chair-side-generated veneers cemented with glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaslan, S; Bagis, B; Akan, E; Mutluay, M M; Vallittu, P K

    2015-01-01

    CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) systems have refreshed the idea of chair-side production of restorations, but the fracture of ceramic veneers remains a problem. Cementation with glass fibers may improve the fracture strengths and affect the failure modes of CAD/CAM-generated ceramic veneers. Therefore, this study compared the fracture strengths of ceramic veneers produced at chair side and cemented with or without glass fibers with those of composite veneers. Thirty intact mandibular incisors were randomly divided into three groups ( n = 10) and treated with CAD/CAM-fabricated veneers cemented with dual-cure composite resin luting cement (CRLC; Group 1), CAD/CAM-fabricated veneers cemented with a glass fiber network (GFN) and dual-cure CRLC (Group 2), and a direct particulate filler composite veneer constructed utilizing fiber and a restorative composite resin (Group 3). The specimens were tested with a universal testing machine after thermal cycling treatment. The loads at the start of fracture were the lowest for traditionally fabricated composite veneers and higher for CAD/CAM-generated. Veneers cemented either without or with the GFN. The failure initiation loads (N) for the veneers were 798.92 for Group 1, 836.27 for Group 2, and 585.93 for Group 3. The predominant failure mode is adhesive failure between the laminates and teeth for Group 1, cohesive failure in the luting layer for Group 2, and cohesive laminate failure for Group 3, which showed chipping and small fractures. Ceramic material is a reliable alternative for veneer construction at chair side. Fibers at the cementation interface may improve the clinical longevity and provide higher fracture strength values.

  16. Resin Infusion Fabrication of nanostructured PMC, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymer reinforced composite parts required for heavy lift launch vehicles are currently fabricated by hand lay-up or automated tape lay-up followed by curing using...

  17. Hysteretic evaluation of seismic performance of normal and fiber reinforced concrete shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Hahm, Dae Gi

    2012-01-01

    The use of fibers in concrete or cement composites can enhance the performance of structural elements. Fibers have been used for a cement mixture to increase the toughness and tensile strength, and to improve the cracking and deformation characteristics. The addition of fibers into concrete can improve the ductility and increase the seismic resistance of concrete structures. The application of fibers to earthquake-resistant concrete structures has a major research topic. A recent study shows that an excellent seismic performance can be obtained in shear critical members constructed with high performance fiber reinforced cement composites. To increase the seismic performance of safety related concrete structures in nuclear power plants, fibers can be used. This study investigated the effect of fibers on the hysteretic behavior of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall by cyclic tests

  18. Hysteretic evaluation of seismic performance of normal and fiber reinforced concrete shear walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Hahm, Dae Gi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The use of fibers in concrete or cement composites can enhance the performance of structural elements. Fibers have been used for a cement mixture to increase the toughness and tensile strength, and to improve the cracking and deformation characteristics. The addition of fibers into concrete can improve the ductility and increase the seismic resistance of concrete structures. The application of fibers to earthquake-resistant concrete structures has a major research topic. A recent study shows that an excellent seismic performance can be obtained in shear critical members constructed with high performance fiber reinforced cement composites. To increase the seismic performance of safety related concrete structures in nuclear power plants, fibers can be used. This study investigated the effect of fibers on the hysteretic behavior of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall by cyclic tests.

  19. Influence of reinforcement on strains within maxillary implant overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of reinforcement of an embedded cast on the strains within maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants placed bilaterally in the canine positions, dome-shaped copings, and experimental overdentures was fabricated. Rosette-type strain gauges were attached in the canine positions and at three points along the midline of the polished surface of the denture and connected to the sensor interface controlled by a personal computer. Experimental dentures with five different reinforcements were tested: without reinforcement; with a cast cobalt-chrome reinforcement over the residual ridge and the tops of the copings; with the same reinforcement from first molar to first molar, over the residual ridge and the tops of the copings; with the same reinforcement over the residual ridge and the sides of the copings; and with the same reinforcement from first molar to first molar, over the residual ridge and the sides of the copings. A vertical occlusal load of 49 N was applied to the first premolar and then to the first molar, and the strains were measured and compared by analysis of variance. In both loading situations, significantly less strain was recorded in dentures with reinforcement than in those without reinforcement. When the first premolar was loaded on dentures with and without palatal reinforcement at the first premolars, the strains on the denture with reinforcement over the tops of the copings were significantly lower than on the denture with reinforcement over the sides of the copings at the canine position. Cast reinforcement over the residual ridge and the top of copings embedded in an acrylic base reduced the strain from occlusal stress on maxillary implant overdentures.

  20. Rigid Polyurethane Foam Reinforced Coconut Coir Fiber Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Azham Azmi

    2012-01-01

    This research work studied the properties of composite foam panels. Coconut coir fibers were used as reinforcement in polyurethane (PU) foam in order to increase the properties of foam. This composite foam panels were fabricated by using polyurethane molded method. The polyurethane foam panels reinforced from 5 to 20wt% coconut coir were produced to investigate the physical and mechanical test via density test and three point bending test respectively. It was found that the density test resul...

  1. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ananda Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral load reviews are also presented. This review paper is prepared to find out the performance of basalt fibre reinforced polymer BFRP composite retrofitted reinforced cement concrete single end bearing piles.

  2. Effect of elevated temperatures on the mechanical behavior of basalt textile reinforced refractory concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, Dimas Alan Strauss; Andrade Silva, Flávio de; Toledo Filho, Romildo Dias; Fonseca Martins Gomes, Otávio da

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermo-mechanical behavior of basalt TRC is investigated. • The fiber polymer coating can become a deterministic factor in the TRC response. • Pre-heating the TRC at 150 °C leads to a matrix–polymer interlocking mechanism. • Above 400 °C a sudden drop in the TRC tensile response is observed. - Abstract: The work in hand presents the results of an experimental investigation on the thermo-mechanical properties of a textile refractory composite reinforced with polymer coated basalt fibers under tensile loading. The composites were produced as a laminate material using basalt bi-directional fabric layers as reinforcement. A high alumina cement matrix was used in the matrix composition which was designed using the compressible packing method. A series of uniaxial tensile tests was performed under temperatures ranging from 25 to 1000 °C. The cracking mechanisms were discussed and compared to that obtained at room temperature. Thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to study the deterioration/phase changes as a function of the studied temperatures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the damage processes in the fiber–matrix interfaces after exposure to high temperatures. The obtained results indicated that the presence and the type of coating can become a deterministic factor in the tensile response of the composite submitted to elevated temperatures. A sudden drop in the serviceability limit state of the composite was observed above 400 °C, caused by the degradation of the polymer used as a fiber surface coating, the degradation of the basalt fiber and by the dehydration process of the refractory matrix

  3. Influence of polymer fibers on rheological properties of cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaszkiewicz Dorota

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The reinforcing effect of fibers in cement composites often results in the improvement of the brittle nature of cementitious materials. But the decrease in the workability of fresh concrete is often the disadvantage of fibers addition. Conventional single-point workability tests cannot characterize workability of concrete in terms of fundamental rheological parameters. To this end, this paper describes an investigation of the influence of synthetic fiber additions (fiber length in the range 12–50 mm and volume fraction in the range 0–4% on the rheological properties of fiber reinforced fresh mortar (FRFM and development of these properties over time. The rheometer Viskomat XL was used in this study. Within the limitations of the instrument and testing procedure it is shown that FRFMs conform to the Bingham model. Natural postglacial sand 0/4 mm was used as a fine aggregate and cement CEMI 42.5 R was used as a binder. Three commercial synthetic fibers were selected for these examinations. Rheological properties were expressed in terms of Bingham model parameters g (yield value and h (plastic viscosity. Based on the test results it was found out that the fiber type and volume fraction affected both the yield stress and plastic viscosity.

  4. Influence of polymer fibers on rheological properties of cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaszkiewicz, Dorota

    2017-10-01

    The reinforcing effect of fibers in cement composites often results in the improvement of the brittle nature of cementitious materials. But the decrease in the workability of fresh concrete is often the disadvantage of fibers addition. Conventional single-point workability tests cannot characterize workability of concrete in terms of fundamental rheological parameters. To this end, this paper describes an investigation of the influence of synthetic fiber additions (fiber length in the range 12-50 mm and volume fraction in the range 0-4%) on the rheological properties of fiber reinforced fresh mortar (FRFM) and development of these properties over time. The rheometer Viskomat XL was used in this study. Within the limitations of the instrument and testing procedure it is shown that FRFMs conform to the Bingham model. Natural postglacial sand 0/4 mm was used as a fine aggregate and cement CEMI 42.5 R was used as a binder. Three commercial synthetic fibers were selected for these examinations. Rheological properties were expressed in terms of Bingham model parameters g (yield value ) and h (plastic viscosity). Based on the test results it was found out that the fiber type and volume fraction affected both the yield stress and plastic viscosity.

  5. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  6. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...

  7. Highly permeable, cement-bounded backfilling mortars for SMA repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, F.; Mayer, G.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1994-03-01

    In low- and intermediate-level waste repositories, gas is produced due e.g. to corrosion. This gas must be able to escape from the repository in order to prevent damage to the repository structure. A cement-based backfill should take over this function. For this purpose, the composition of cement-based materials was varied to study their influence on porosity and permeability. In parallel to this study the behaviour of fresh concrete, the liberation of the heat of hydration and the hardened concrete properties were investigated. To characterize the permeability of cement-based materials the following parameters are important: 1) composition of the material (pore fabric), 2) storage conditions (degree of saturation), 3) degree of hydration (age), 4) measuring fluid. A change in the composition of cement-based materials can vary the permeability by ten orders of magnitude. It is shown that, by using dense aggregates, the transport of the fluid takes place through the matrix and along the aggregate/matrix interface. By using porous aggregates the permeability can be increased by two orders of magnitude. In the case of a dense matrix, porous aggregates do not alter the permeability. Increasing the matrix content or interface content increases permeability. Hence light weight mortars are an obvious choice. Like-grained mixes showed higher permeabilities in combination with better mechanical properties but, in comparison to normal mixes, they showed worse flow properties. With the composition cement-: water-: aggregate content 1:0.4:5.33 the likegrained mix with aggregates ranging from 2 to 3 mm proved to be a suitable material. With a low compaction after 28 days this mix reaches a permeability of 4.10 -12 m 2 and an uniaxial cylinder compressive strength of 16 N/mm 2 . (author) 58 figs., 23 tabs., refs

  8. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO 2 . (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  9. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  10. Digital fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 3) issue of the Nexus Network Journal features seven original papers dedicated to the theme “Digital Fabrication”. Digital fabrication is changing architecture in fundamental ways in every phase, from concept to artifact. Projects growing out of research in digital fabrication are dependent on software that is entirely surface-oriented in its underlying mathematics. Decisions made during design, prototyping, fabrication and assembly rely on codes, scripts, parameters, operating systems and software, creating the need for teams with multidisciplinary expertise and different skills, from IT to architecture, design, material engineering, and mathematics, among others The papers grew out of a Lisbon symposium hosted by the ISCTE-Instituto Universitario de Lisboa entitled “Digital Fabrication – A State of the Art”. The issue is completed with four other research papers which address different mathematical instruments applied to architecture, including geometric tracing system...

  11. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... and Cement Clinker from Japan: Investigation No. 731- TA-461 (Third Review). By order of the...

  12. Fiber-Reinforced Origamic Robotic Actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juan; Chen, Xiaojiao; Song, Chaoyang; Wang, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    A novel pneumatic soft linear actuator Fiber-reinforced Origamic Robotic Actuator (FORA) is proposed with significant improvements on the popular McKibben-type actuators, offering nearly doubled motion range, substantially improved force profile, and significantly lower actuation pressure. The desirable feature set is made possible by a novel soft origamic chamber that expands radially while contracts axially when pressurized. Combining this new origamic chamber with a reinforcing fiber mesh, FORA generates very high traction force (over 150N) and very large contractile motion (over 50%) at very low input pressure (100 kPa). We developed quasi-static analytical models both to characterize the motion and forces and as guidelines for actuator design. Fabrication of FORA mostly involves consumer-grade three-dimensional (3D) printing. We provide a detailed list of materials and dimensions. Fabricated FORAs were tested on a dedicated platform against commercially available pneumatic artificial muscles from Shadow and Festo to showcase its superior performances and validate the analytical models with very good agreements. Finally, a robotic joint was developed driven by two antagonistic FORAs, to showcase the benefits of the performance improvements. With its simple structure, fully characterized mechanism, easy fabrication procedure, and highly desirable performance, FORA could be easily customized to application requirements and fabricated by anyone with access to a 3D printer. This will pave the way to the wider adaptation and application of soft robotic systems.

  13. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  14. Effects of Cement, Abutment Surface Pretreatment, and Artificial Aging on the Force Required to Detach Cantilever Fixed Dental Prostheses from Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Chepura, Taras; Schmitter, Marc; Rammelsberg, Peter; Rues, Stefan

    To examine the in vitro effects of different cements, abutment surface preconditioning, and artificial aging on the maximum tensile force needed to detach cantilever fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) from dental implants with titanium abutments. A total of 32 tissue-level implants were combined with standardized titanium abutments. For each test group, eight cantilever FDPs were fabricated using selective laser melting (cobalt-chromium [CoCr] alloy). The inner surfaces of the cantilever FDPs and half of the abutments were sandblasted and then joined by use of four different cements (two permanent and two semi-permanent) in two different amounts per cement. Subgroups were tested after either artificial aging (thermocycling and chewing simulation) or 3 days of water storage. Finally, axial pull off-tests were performed for each abutment separately. Cement type and surface pretreatment significantly affected decementation behavior. The highest retention forces (approximately 1,200 N) were associated with sandblasted abutments and permanent cements. With unconditioned abutments, temporary cements (Fu cement (Fu ≈ 100 N), resulted in rather low retention forces. Zinc phosphate cement guaranteed high retention forces. After aging, retention was sufficient only for cementation with zinc phosphate cement and for the combination of sandblasted abutments and glass-ionomer cement. When glass-ionomer cement is used to fix cantilever FDPs on implants, sandblasting of standard titanium abutments may help prevent loss of retention. Retention forces were still high for FDPs fixed with zinc phosphate cement, even when the abutments were not pretreated. Use of permanent cements only, however, is recommended to prevent unwanted loosening of cantilever FDPs.

  15. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; James, J.M.; Lee, D.J.; Smith, D.L.; Walker, A.T.

    1982-03-01

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm 3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  16. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  17. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  18. Nano clay-enhanced calcium phosphate cements and hydrogels for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    Biomaterials are used as templates for drug delivery, scaffolds in tissue engineering, grafts in surgeries, and support for tissue regeneration. Novel biomaterial composites are needed to meet multifaceted requirements of compatibility, ease of fabrication and controlled drug delivery. Currently used biomaterials in orthopedics surgeries suffer limitations in toxicity and preventing infections. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) used as bone cement suffers from limitations of thermal necrosis and monomer toxicity calls for development of better cementing biomaterials. A biodegradable/bioresorbable cement with good mechanical properties is needed to address this short coming. Metal implants used in fixing fractures or total joint replacement needs improvements in preventing biofilm formation and better tissue integration. This research addressed the above mentioned research gaps by formulating novel biomaterial composites. Calcium phosphate cements are the alternative bone cements that are bioresorbable and promote tissue integration. These cements lack sufficient mechanical strengths to be used in load bearing sites. The addition of nanoparticles is hypothesized to improve the mechanical properties without inducing toxicity to the tissue. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating compression and flexural strengths in addition to cytocompatibility tests. Results indicate that addition of nano-clay particles (halloysites nanotubes) improved the compressive strength and osteoinductive properties of calcium phosphate cements. To address the research need of preventing implant failure due to infection and aseptic loosening, novel coatings are needed. Hydrogels are well establish for their ability to mimic in vivo environment, promote cell viability and as drug delivery vehicles. Use of composites of hydrogels and drug-loaded nanoparticles to prevent infection was evaluated. Cytocompatibility results indicate good cell viability. Antibacterial results show sustained release

  19. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  20. Influence of space size of abutment screw access channel on the amount of extruded excess cement and marginal accuracy of cement-retained single implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Mohammad D; Al-Johany, Sulieman S; Al-Qarni, Mohammed N; Al-Bakri, Ahmed S; Al-Maflehi, Nassr S; Abualsaud, Haythem S

    2018-02-01

    The detrimental effect of extruded excess cement on peri-implant tissue has been well documented. Although several techniques have been proposed to reduce this effect by decreasing the amount of extruded cement, how the space size of the abutment screw access channel (SAC) affects the amount of extruded cement and marginal accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the size of the unfilled space of the abutment SAC on the amount of extruded excess cement and the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings. Twelve implant replicas and corresponding standard abutments were attached and embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) zirconia copings with a uniform 30-μm cement space were fabricated by 1 dental technician using the standard method. The copings were temporarily cemented 3 times at different sizes of the left space of the SAC as follows: the nonspaced group (NS), in which the entire SAC was completely filled, the 1-mm-spaced group (1MMS), and the 2-mm-spaced group (2MMS). Abutments and crowns were ultrasonically cleaned, steam cleaned, and air-dried. The excess cement was collected and weighed. To measure the marginal accuracy, 20 measurements were made every 18 degrees along the coping margin at ×300 magnification and compared with the pre-cementation readings. One-way ANOVA was calculated to determine whether the amount of extruded excess cement differed among the 3 groups, and the Tukey test was applied for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The mean weights (mg) of extruded excess cement were NS (33.53 ±1.5), 1MMS (22.97 ±5.4), and 2MMS (15.17 ±5.9). Multiple comparisons showed significant differences in the amount of extruded excess cement among the 3 test groups (Pcemented group (29.5 ±8.2) was significantly different (Pcement by 55% in comparison with the nonspaced abutments. However, no effect was found on the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings