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Sample records for f9 embryonic carcinoma

  1. Expression of chicken vinculin complements the adhesion-defective phenotype of a mutant mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cell

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    A mutant cell line, derived from the mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line F9, is defective in cell-cell adhesion (compaction) and in cell- substrate adhesion. We have previously shown that neither uvomorulin (E- cadherin) nor integrins are responsible for the mutant phenotype (Calogero, A., M. Samuels, T. Darland, S. A. Edwards, R. Kemler, and E. D. Adamson. 1991. Dev. Biol. 146:499-508). Several cytoskeleton proteins were assayed and only vinculin was found to be absent in mutant (5.51) cells...

  2. Expression of chicken vinculin complements the adhesion-defective phenotype of a mutant mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, M; Ezzell, R M; Cardozo, T J; Critchley, D R; Coll, J L; Adamson, E D

    1993-05-01

    A mutant cell line, derived from the mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line F9, is defective in cell-cell adhesion (compaction) and in cell-substrate adhesion. We have previously shown that neither uvomorulin (E-cadherin) nor integrins are responsible for the mutant phenotype (Calogero, A., M. Samuels, T. Darland, S. A. Edwards, R. Kemler, and E. D. Adamson. 1991. Dev. Biol. 146:499-508). Several cytoskeleton proteins were assayed and only vinculin was found to be absent in mutant (5.51) cells. A chicken vinculin expression vector was transfected into the 5.51 cells together with a neomycin-resistance vector. Clones that were adherent to the substrate were selected in medium containing G418. Two clones, 5.51Vin3 and Vin4, were analyzed by Nomarski differential interference contrast and laser confocal microscopy as well as by biochemical and molecular biological techniques. Both clones adhered well to substrates and both exhibited F-actin stress fibers with vinculin localized at stress fiber tips in focal contacts. This was in marked contrast to 5.51 parental cells, which had no stress fibers and no vinculin. The mutant and complemented F9 cell lines will be useful models for examining the complex interactions between cytoskeletal and cell adhesion proteins.

  3. Mapping the stem cell state: eight novel human embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cell antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, A; Andrews, N; Bardsley, K

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic profile of human embryonic stem (ES) and embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells has served as a key element of their characterization, with a common panel of surface and intracellular markers now widely used. Such markers have been used to identify cells within the 'undifferentiated state...

  4. Plasma membrane proteomics of human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormeyer, W.; van Hoof, D.; Braam, S.R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are of immense interest in regenerative medicine as they can self-renew indefinitely and can give rise to any adult cell type. Human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) are the malignant counterparts of hESCs found in testis tumors. hESCs that have acquired chromosom

  5. A comparison of surface proteins in embryonal carcinoma cells and their differentiated derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil-Dlouha, V; Paulin, D; Bagilet, L K; Keil, B

    1980-03-27

    Surface proteins from five cell lines (three embryonal carcinoma cell lines (F9, PCC4 and PCC3), teratocarcinoma-derived endodermal cells (PYS) and fibroblasts (line 3/A/1-D-3 differentiated from PCC3) were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after selective iodination with 125I in the presence of lactoperoxidase. The labeled proteins were solubilized either in Nonidet P40/urea/ampholyte/mercaptoethanol solution or in Nonidet P40 only. In total, about thirty major 125I-labeled surface proteins were identified by their isoelectric point and molecular weight. 14 proteins are present in all five cell types, although their quantity or accessibility for labeling differs between differentiated and undifferentiated cells. Three proteins (200, 160 and 150 kilodaltons) are present in undifferentiated cells only. Two of them (160 and 150 kilodaltons) were solubilized by Nonidet P40/urea/ampholyte/mercaptoethanol, but not by Nonidet P40. One protein (50 kilodaltons) was found in nullipotent F9 cells only. About 14--15 proteins (including fibronectin) were released by Nonidet P40/urea/ampholyte/mercaptoethanol but not by Nonidet P40. They are presumably bound to submembrane or cytoskeleton structures by non-covalent bonds.

  6. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-04-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells.

  7. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  8. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  9. CIS-DIAMMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM(II) RESISTANCE IN-VITRO AND IN-VIVO IN HUMAN EMBRYONAL CARCINOMA-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; TIMMER, A; MEIJER, C; DEVRIES, EGE; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; MULDER, NH

    1993-01-01

    In the embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera and its 3.7-fold cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP)-resistant subline. Tera-CP, parameters were studied that might have changed in relation to induction of CDDP resistance. Phenotypes of both lines were embryonal carcinoma. Karyotypes were related with

  10. A practical guide for the identification of membrane and plasma membrane proteins in human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormeyer, W.; van Hoof, D.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.; Heck, A.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of (plasma) membrane proteins in cells can provide valuable insights into the regulation of their biological processes. Pluripotent cells such as human embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and share many of the biological

  11. Second Intron of Mouse Nestin Gene Directs its Expression in Pluripotent Embryonic Carcinoma Cells through POU Factor Binding Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang JIN; Li LIU; Hua ZHONG; Ke-Jing ZHANG; Yong-Feng CHEN; Wei BIAN; Le-Ping CHENG; Nai-He JING

    2006-01-01

    Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is expressed in the neural stem cells of the developing central nervous system. This tissue-specific expression is driven by the neural stem cell-specific enhancer in the second intron of the nestin gene. In this study, we showed that the mouse nestin gene was expressed in pluripotent embryonic carcinoma (EC) P19 and F9 cells, not in the differentiated cell types. This cell typespecific expression was conferred by the enhancer in the second intron. Mutation of the conserved POU factor-binding site in the enhancer abolished the reporter gene expression in EC cells. Oct4, a Class V POU factor, was found to be coexpressed with nestin in EC cells. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and supershift assays showed that a unique protein-DNA complex was formed specifically with nuclear extracts of EC cells, and Oct4 protein was included. Together, these results suggest the functional relevance between the conserved POU factor-binding site and the expression of the nestin gene in pluripotent EC cells.

  12. Embryonic stem cell-like features of testicular carcinoma in situ revealed by genome-wide gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Wirkner, Ute

    2004-01-01

    in their stoichiometry on progression into embryonic carcinoma. We compared the CIS expression profile with patterns reported in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which revealed a substantial overlap that may be as high as 50%. We also demonstrated an over-representation of expressed genes in regions of 17q and 12, reported...

  13. miR-27 negatively regulates pluripotency-associated genes in human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Fuchs

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells have been studied extensively with respect to the transcription factors (OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG, epigenetic modulators and associated signalling pathways that either promote self-renewal or induce differentiation in these cells. The ACTIVIN/NODAL axis (SMAD2/3 of the TGFß signalling pathway coupled with FGF signalling maintains self-renewal in these cells, whilst the BMP (SMAD1,5,8 axis promotes differentiation. Here we show that miR-27, a somatic-enriched miRNA, is activated upon RNAi-mediated suppression of OCT4 function in human embryonic stem cells. We further demonstrate that miR-27 negatively regulates the expression of the pluripotency-associated ACTIVIN/NODAL axis (SMAD2/3 of the TGFß signalling pathway by targeting ACVR2A, TGFßR1 and SMAD2. Additionally, we have identified a number of pluripotency-associated genes such as NANOG, LIN28, POLR3G and NR5A2 as novel miR-27 targets. Transcriptome analysis revealed that miR-27 over-expression in human embryonal carcinoma cells leads indeed to a significant up-regulation of genes involved in developmental pathways such as TGFß- and WNT-signalling.

  14. Autocrine glutamatergic transmission for the regulation of embryonal carcinoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lin; Lei, Hui-Min; Sun, Fan; An, Shi-Min; Tang, Ya-Bin; Meng, Shuang; Wang, Cong-Hui; Shen, Ying; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhu, Liang

    2016-08-02

    Glutamate behaves as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system and recently demonstrates intercellular signaling activities in periphery cancer cells. How the glutamatergic transmission is organized and operated in cancer stem cells remains undefined. We have identified a glutamatergic transmission circuit in embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The circuit is organized and operated in an autocrine mechanism and suppresses the cell proliferation and motility. Biological analyses determined a repertoire of glutamatergic transmission components, glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter, glutamate NMDA receptor, and cell membrane excitatory amino-acid transporter, for glutamate biosynthesis, package for secretion, reaction, and reuptake in mouse and human embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The glutamatergic components were also identified in mouse transplanted teratocarcinoma and in human primary teratocarcinoma tissues. Released glutamate acting as the signal was directly quantified by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Genetic and pharmacological abolishment of the endogenously released glutamate-induced tonic activation of the NMDA receptors increased the cell proliferation and motility. The finding suggests that embryonal carcinoma stem cells can be actively regulated by establishing a glutamatergic autocrine/paracrine niche via releasing and responding to the transmitter.

  15. Expression of Wnt and Notch pathway genes in a pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cell line and embryonic stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James; Andrews, Peter W

    2003-01-01

    Embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, the pluripotent stem cells of teratocarcinomas, show many similar-ities to embryonic stem (ES) cells. Since EC cells are malignant but their terminally differentiated derivatives are not, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate their differentiation maybe of value for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We have examined the expression of multiple components of two developmentally important cell-cell signalling pathways, Wnt and Notch, in the pluripotent human EC cell line, NTERA2, and the human ES cell line, H7. Both pathways have well-documented roles in controlling neurogenesis, a process that occurs largely in response to retinoicacid (RA) treatment of NTERA2 cultures and spontaneously in H7 cultures. In NTERA2, many ofthe genes tested showed altered transcriptional regulation following treatment with RA. These include members of the frizzled gene family (FZDI, FZD3, FZD4, FZD5, FZD6), encoding receptors forWnt proteins, the Frizzled Related Protein family (SFRPI, SFRP2, FRZB, SFRP4), encoding solubleWnt antagonists and also ligands and receptors of the Notch pathway (Dlkl, Jaggedl; Notchl, Notch2, Notch3). Few differences were found in the repertoire of Wnt and Notch pathway genes expressed by NTERA2 EC cells and H7 ES cells. We present a model in which interactions between and regulation of Wnt and Notch signalling are important in maintaining EC/ES stem cells and also controlling their differentiation.

  16. A data integration approach to mapping OCT4 gene regulatory networks operative in embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Jung

    Full Text Available It is essential to understand the network of transcription factors controlling self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs and human embryonal carcinoma cells (ECs if we are to exploit these cells in regenerative medicine regimes. Correlating gene expression levels after RNAi-based ablation of OCT4 function with its downstream targets enables a better prediction of motif-specific driven expression modules pertinent for self-renewal and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.We initially identified putative direct downstream targets of OCT4 by employing CHIP-on-chip analysis. A comparison of three peak analysis programs revealed a refined list of OCT4 targets in the human EC cell line NCCIT, this list was then compared to previously published OCT4 CHIP-on-chip datasets derived from both ES and EC cells. We have verified an enriched POU-motif, discovered by a de novo approach, thus enabling us to define six distinct modules of OCT4 binding and regulation of its target genes.A selection of these targets has been validated, like NANOG, which harbours the evolutionarily conserved OCT4-SOX2 binding motif within its proximal promoter. Other validated targets, which do not harbour the classical HMG motif are USP44 and GADD45G, a key regulator of the cell cycle. Over-expression of GADD45G in NCCIT cells resulted in an enrichment and up-regulation of genes associated with the cell cycle (CDKN1B, CDKN1C, CDK6 and MAPK4 and developmental processes (BMP4, HAND1, EOMES, ID2, GATA4, GATA5, ISL1 and MSX1. A comparison of positively regulated OCT4 targets common to EC and ES cells identified genes such as NANOG, PHC1, USP44, SOX2, PHF17 and OCT4, thus further confirming their universal role in maintaining self-renewal in both cell types. Finally we have created a user-friendly database (http://biit.cs.ut.ee/escd/, integrating all OCT4 and stem cell related datasets in both human and mouse ES and EC cells.In the current

  17. Nicotine induces mitochondrial fission through mitofusin degradation in human multipotent embryonic carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Naoya; Yamada, Shigeru [Division of Pharmacology, National Institute of Health Sciences (Japan); Asanagi, Miki [Division of Pharmacology, National Institute of Health Sciences (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yokohama National University (Japan); Sekino, Yuko [Division of Pharmacology, National Institute of Health Sciences (Japan); Kanda, Yasunari, E-mail: kanda@nihs.go.jp [Division of Pharmacology, National Institute of Health Sciences (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Nicotine is considered to contribute to the health risks associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine exerts its cellular functions by acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and adversely affects normal embryonic development. However, nicotine toxicity has not been elucidated in human embryonic stage. In the present study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of nicotine in human multipotent embryonal carcinoma cell line NT2/D1. We found that exposure to 10 μM nicotine decreased intracellular ATP levels and inhibited proliferation of NT2/D1 cells. Because nicotine suppressed energy production, which is a critical mitochondrial function, we further assessed the effects of nicotine on mitochondrial dynamics. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that 10 μM nicotine induced mitochondrial fragmentation. The levels of the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusins 1 and 2, were also reduced in cells exposed to nicotine. These nicotine effects were blocked by treatment with mecamylamine, a nonselective nAChR antagonist. These data suggest that nicotine degrades mitofusin in NT2/D1 cells and thus induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell growth inhibition in a nAChR-dependent manner. Thus, mitochondrial function in embryonic cells could be used to assess the developmental toxicity of chemicals.

  18. Real case of primitive embryonal duodenal carcinoma in a young man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieux, Julien; Memeo, Riccardo; De Blasi, Vito; Suciu, Sebastian; Faucher, Vanina; Averous, Gerlinde; Roy, Catherine; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We report here the case of a young man suffering from a rare germ cell tumour. The patient was a 25-year-old man who was referred to our centre for asthenia, stinging epigastric pain, and an iron deficiency anaemia. Gastroscopy revealed a circumferential vegetating lesion on the second portion of the duodenum. The lesion was indurated at the third portion of the duodenum, responsible for a tight stenosis. A computerized tomography-scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, and a pancreatic MRI showed a circumferential lesion with a bi-ductal dilatation (i.e., of the common bile duct and Wirsung’s duct) without metastatic localisation. The patient underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection including all cellular adipose tissues of the hepatic pedicle from the hepatic common artery and of the retroportal lamina. Histological findings were suggestive of a duodenal embryonal carcinoma with pancreatic infiltration. This is the second published case highlighting the duodenal primitive localisation of an embryonal carcinoma with pancreatic infiltration. PMID:28216981

  19. HLA class I homologous transcripts in the human embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke de Wit, T F; Struyk, L; Vloemans, S; Glazebrook, J; Boyle, J M; Stern, P L; van den Elsen, P J

    1990-01-01

    We have used the human teratocarcinoma-derived embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera-2 cl. 13 to explore the putative expression of novel HLA class I(-like) genes. Serological analyses revealed that Tera-2 cells do not express polymorphic HLA class I (-A, -B, -C) specificities, but do express HLA class I-like antigens. These phenotypic properties parallel those of certain mouse embryonal carcinoma cells. To study the expression of HLA class I(-like) genes in the Tera-2 cells two different approaches were used. Screening of a Tera-2 cDNA library with a full-length HLA class I cDNA probe under conditions that would allow for the identification of relatively distinct HLA class I-like sequences yielded 27 positive clones, all of which were of the regular HLA-A, -B, -C type. Reverse northern hybridizations of the restriction enzyme-digested Tlab region comprising cosmids with Tera-2 cDNA as the probe resulted in the identification of several putative human genes whose equivalents map within the mouse Tla region. However, none of these genes appeared to be structurally related to HLA class I. A putative H3.3 histone gene was identified in the proximal Tla region of the C57BL/10 mouse. It is concluded that no structural homologues of mouse Qa/Tla genes are expressed in the human developmental cell line Tera-2.

  20. Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II)-producing mediastinal embryonal carcinoma with features of hepatoid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuyuki; Tomita, Katsuyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Shigeoka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Masanari; Yamasaki, Akira; Shimizu, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    The case of a 48-year-old man with primary nonseminomatous embryonal carcinoma at the posterior mediastinum is described. The patient displayed extremely high plasma levels of Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) (4040 mAU/ml). Ultrasonography and dynamic computed tomography ruled out hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastasis. After preoperative systemic chemotherapy, total tumor resection was performed. Postoperatively, the plasma levels of PIVKA-II returned to within the normal range (24 mAU/ml). An immnohistochemical study using anti-PIVKA-II monoclonal antibody revealed the cytoplasmic expression of PIVK4-II in the carcinoma cells. These results indicate that tumor cells, which are manifested as hepatoid differentiation, may produce PIVKA-II. This case seems to be the first case reported in which PIVKA-II was produced by nonseminomatous mediastinal embryonal carcinoma without HCC or liver metastasis.

  1. Increased expression of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 in differentiating Tera 2 human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienari, J; Pertovaara, L; Saksela, O; Lehtonen, E; Vartio, T

    1994-01-15

    Secretion of proteolytic enzymes by cells has been implicated in tissue remodeling during embryonic development as well as in invasive neoplastic diseases. We studied the regulation of type-IV-collagenase activity in Tera 2 human embryonal carcinoma cells, which in the undifferentiated state proliferate rapidly and are tumorigenic. The undifferentiated cells produced relatively low levels of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. This activity was not markedly affected by exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), even though the plasminogen activator activity of the cells was increased by these agents. Tera 2 cells can be induced by retinoic acid to differentiate into quiescent cells, of which many express neuronal characteristics. The type-IV-collagenase activity of the cells increased markedly during the differentiation. This increase was mainly due to increased expression of MMP-2. Expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) was not markedly affected by the differentiation of Tera 2 cells. The results show that in the Tera 2 cell system, increased expression of MMP-2 is characteristic of the differentiated derivatives. This is in contrast with many other model systems, where increased type-IV-collagenase activity is associated with the malignant phenotype. This pattern of regulation may reflect the facts that Tera 2 cells resemble early embryonic cells and that their differentiation mimics related cell-differentiation processes in the developing embryo.

  2. Allelotyping analysis suggesting a consecutive progression from intratubular germ cell neoplasia to seminoma and then to embryonal carcinoma of the adult testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyai, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Sohei; Iwaya, Keiichi; Asano, Tomohiko; Tamai, Seiichi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Matsubara, Osamu

    2013-10-01

    Among adult testicular germ cell tumors, the pathogenesis of embryonal carcinoma remains a matter of debate. Some studies suggest a single consecutive progression from intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified (IGCNU), to seminoma and then to embryonal carcinoma; others suggest that seminoma and embryonal carcinoma derive independently from IGCNU. This allelotyping study aimed to clarify the genetic relationship between embryonal carcinoma components and coexisting seminoma and/or IGCNU components. From a cohort of 18 patients with embryonal carcinoma, 11 coexisting seminoma components and 14 coexisting IGCNUs were identified. DNA isolated from each laser-microdissected tissue was subjected to polymerase chain reaction and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, using 20 polymorphic markers located on 12 chromosome arms (3q, 5q, 6p, 9p, 10q, 11p, 12p, 12q, 13q, 17p, 17q, and 18q). The concordance rate for allelic patterns was 82% between IGCNU and the coexisting seminoma components, 71% between IGCNU and the coexisting embryonal carcinoma components, and 80% between seminoma components and the coexisting embryonal carcinoma components. Estimation of probability indicated that these events were very unlikely to have occurred by chance. The total frequency of LOH increased progressively from IGCNU to seminoma and then to embryonal carcinoma, with statistically significant differences. In 7 cases with 3 histologic components, 28 chromosomal loci that showed LOH in the seminoma and embryonal carcinoma components were identified, and 15 (54%) retained heterozygosity in the coexisting IGCNUs. These findings suggest that a consecutive progression from IGCNU to seminoma, and ultimately, to embryonal carcinoma mainly occurred in the testicular germ cell tumor cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of embryonal marker TRA-1-60 in carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors of the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Alexander; Andrews, P W; Jørgensen, N

    1993-01-01

    Testicular cancer is preceded by the noninvasive stage of carcinoma in situ (CIS). According to a recent hypothesis, testicular CIA cells are germ cells transformed in fetal life. The idea of an embryonal origin of testicular germ cell neoplasia would be strengthened by the finding of antigenic s...

  4. The cell cycle, cell death, and cell morphology during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mummery, C.L.; Brink, C.E. van den; Saag, P.T. van der; Laat, S.W. de

    1984-01-01

    Abstract Time-lapse films were made of PC13 embryonal carcinoma cells, synchronized by mitotic shake off, in the absence and presence of retinoic acid. Using a method based on the transition probability model, cell cycle parameters were determined during the first five generations following synchron

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of embryonal marker TRA-1-60 in carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors of the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Alexander; Andrews, P W; Jørgensen, N;

    1993-01-01

    Testicular cancer is preceded by the noninvasive stage of carcinoma in situ (CIS). According to a recent hypothesis, testicular CIA cells are germ cells transformed in fetal life. The idea of an embryonal origin of testicular germ cell neoplasia would be strengthened by the finding of antigenic...

  6. Phase resolved and coherence gated en face reflection imaging of multilayered embryonal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Fukami, Tadashi; Iwai, Hidenao; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2012-03-01

    Embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, which are cell lines derived from teratocarcinomas, have characteristics in common with stem cells and differentiate into many kinds of functional cells. Similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, undifferentiated EC cells form multi-layered spheroids. In order to visualize the three-dimensional structure of multilayered EC cells without labeling, we employed full-field interference microscopy with the aid of a low-coherence quantitative phase microscope, which is a reflection-type interference microscope employing the digital holographic technique with a low-coherent light source. Owing to the low-coherency of the light-source (halogen lamp), only the light reflected from reflective surface at a specific sectioning height generates an interference image on the CCD camera. P19CL6 EC cells, derived from mouse teratocarcinomas, formed spheroids that are about 50 to 200 micrometers in diameter. Since the height of each cell is around 10 micrometers, it is assumed that each spheroid has 5 to 20 cell layers. The P19CL6 spheroids were imaged in an upright configuration and the horizontally sectioned reflection images of the sample were obtained by sequentially and vertically scanning the zero-path-length height. Our results show the threedimensional structure of the spheroids, in which plasma and nuclear membranes were distinguishably imaged. The results imply that our technique is further capable of imaging induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for the assessment of cell properties including their pluripotency.

  7. Anticancer effect and immunologic response to xenogeneic embryonic proteins in mice bearing Ehrlich solid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symchych, T V; Fedosova, N I; Karaman, О М; Yevstratieva, L M; Potebnia, H P

    2017-03-01

    To investigate anticancer and immunologic effects of chicken embryonic proteins (CEP) in mice bearing Ehrlich solid carcinoma. The study was carried out on male Balb/c mice bearing Ehrlich solid carcinoma. The immunizations were performed after the tumor transplantation. The immune status was assessed on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after the tumor challenge. Cytotoxic activity (CAT) of macrophages (Mph), natural killer cells (NK), cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) and blood serum, as well as the influence of the blood serum on immune cells activity was checked in MTT-assay; Mph's cytochemical activity was tested in NBT-assay; Ehrlich antigen-specific or CEP-specific antibodies were detected in ELISA-assay; medium size circulating immune complexes (CIC) were detected in reaction of 4.5% polyethylene glycol precipitation. The immunization resulted in tumor growth suppression and significant 25.64% prolongation of the survival time. In both control and immunized mice with transplanted tumors antibodies specific to Ehrlich carcinoma antigens and to CEP were detected, but antibody response was more balanced in the treatment group. In the treatment group both cytochemical and CAT of Mph was moderately activated and well preserved until late stages of tumor development; CAT of NK and CTL remained in the range of the intact mice until day 28 after the tumor transplantation. The immunized mice were well protected from accumulation of CIC and suppressive activity of autologous blood serum. Collectively, our data indicate that CEP can elicit immunomodulating and immunoprotecting effects sufficient to provide tumor growth inhibition. The further elaboration of a xenogeneic anticancer vaccine based on CEP is warranted.

  8. Pluripotent embryonal carcinoma clones derived from the human teratocarcinoma cell line Tera-2. Differentiation in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, P W; Damjanov, I; Simon, D; Banting, G S; Carlin, C; Dracopoli, N C; Føgh, J

    1984-02-01

    We have derived and characterized single cell clones from a xenograft tumor of the teratocarcinoma cell line Tera-2. Isozyme and chromosomal analyses confirmed their common origin. When cultures of the clones were maintained at a high cell density, many cells exhibited a morphology and cell surface antigen phenotype typical of human embryonal carcinoma cells. These features included a high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, and the expression of the globoseries glycolipid antigen SSEA-3. In addition, other cells, in many respects resembling these typical embryonal carcinoma cells, were distinguished by a marked tendency to accumulate cytoplasmic glycogen. Similar cells, together with more differentiated cells, were seen in low passage cultures of Tera-2 itself. When the clones were grown at a low cell density many cells assumed a larger, flatter shape, a few with multiple nucleoli. Also, the fucosylated lactosamine antigen SSEA-1 appeared on some cells, whereas expression of SSEA-3 and HLA-A,B,C tended to be reduced. Often the synthesis of fibronectin was increased. However, no obvious cytoplasmic differentiation was seen upon ultrastructural examination, and synthesis of human chorionic gonadotropin, alpha-fetoprotein, and laminin was not detected. In contrast to the limited spontaneous changes seen in culture, marked differentiation occurred in tumors obtained following injection of the cells into athymic (nu/nu) mice. In additional to embryonal carcinoma cells, these tumors contained a variety of somatic tissues that included glandular structures, possibly related to the primitive gut, and neural elements. These cell lines derived from Tera-2 constitute the first example of clonal human embryonal carcinoma cells, adapted to growth in vitro, that have retained the capacity for differentiation into diverse somatic tissues.

  9. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy) in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Popova, Dina; Forsblad, Andréas; Hashemian, Sanaz; Jacobsson, Stig O. P.

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differen...

  10. A 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, increases differentiation and proliferation of embryonal carcinoma cell-derived-neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Sharif, Shiva; Verdi, Javad

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell biology have resulted in identifying new agents to differentiate stem cell-derived-neural cells. Different stem cell types have been shown to differentiate into neural cells. It has been shown that P19 line of embryonal carcinoma cells develops into neurons and astroglia after exposure to some hormones such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Steroid 5α-reductase is a key enzyme in the conversion of several Δ4-3 keto steroids, such as testosterone into their respective 5α-reductase derivatives. Finasteride is a 5α-reductase inhibitor that inhibits conversion of testosterone to the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Reduction in DHT and sustaining testosterone levels has an important impact on differentiation and proliferation of embryonal carcinoma cells to neural cells. We hypothesize that finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor, will be differentiate embryonal carcinoma cell to the neural cell and increase their proliferation due to the elevation levels of testosterone, a neuroprotective neurosteroid. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase as a novel target of tributyltin in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2014-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is known to cause developmental defects as endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs). At nanomoler concentrations, TBT actions were mediated by genomic pathways via PPAR/RXR. However, non-genomic target of TBT has not been elucidated. To investigate non-genomic TBT targets, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses using human embryonic carcinoma NT2/D1 cells. We found that 100 nM TBT reduced the amounts of α-ketoglutarate, succinate and malate. We further found that TBT decreased the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the TCA cycle. In addition, TBT inhibited cell growth and enhanced neuronal differentiation through NAD-IDH inhibition. Furthermore, studies using bacterially expressed human NAD-IDH and in silico simulations suggest that TBT inhibits NAD-IDH due to a possible interaction. These results suggest that NAD-IDH is a novel non-genomic target of TBT at nanomolar levels. Thus, a metabolomic approach may provide new insights into the mechanism of EDC action.

  12. The Expression of Embryonic Liver Development Genes in Hepatitis C Induced Cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Martha, E-mail: mbehnke@mcvh-vcu.edu [Transplant Program Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, 1200 E. Broad St., Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Reimers, Mark [Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 800 E Leigh St., Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Fisher, Robert [Department of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1200 E. Broad St., Richmond, VA 23298 (United States)

    2012-09-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a difficult disease to study even after a decade of genomic analysis. Patient and disease heterogeneity, differences in statistical methods and multiple testing issues have resulted in a fragmented understanding of the molecular basis of tumor biology. Some researchers have suggested that HCC appears to share pathways with embryonic development. Therefore we generated targeted hypotheses regarding changes in developmental genes specific to the liver in HCV-cirrhosis and HCV-HCC. We obtained microarray studies from 30 patients with HCV-cirrhosis and 49 patients with HCV-HCC and compared to 12 normal livers. Genes specific to non-liver development have known associations with other cancer types but none were expressed in either adult liver or tumor tissue, while 98 of 179 (55%) genes specific to liver development had differential expression between normal and cirrhotic or HCC samples. We found genes from each developmental stage dysregulated in tumors compared to normal and cirrhotic samples. Although there was no single tumor marker, we identified a set of genes (Bone Morphogenetic Protein inhibitors GPC3, GREM1, FSTL3, and FST) in which at least one gene was over-expressed in 100% of the tumor samples. Only five genes were differentially expressed exclusively in late-stage tumors, indicating that while developmental genes appear to play a profound role in cirrhosis and malignant transformation, they play a limited role in late-stage HCC.

  13. Epigenetic silencing of engineered L1 retrotransposition events in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Perez, Jose L.; Morell, Maria; Scheys, Joshua O.; Kulpa, Deanna A.; Morell, Santiago; Carter, Christoph C.; Hammer, Gary D.; Collins, Kathleen L.; O’Shea, K. Sue; Menendez, Pablo; Moran, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition continues to impact human genome evolution1,2. L1s can retrotranspose in the germline, during early development, and in select somatic cells3,4,5,6,7,8; however, the host response to L1 retrotransposition remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that reporter genes introduced into the genome of various human embryonic carcinoma-derived cell lines (ECs) by L1 retrotransposition are rapidly and efficiently silenced either during or immediately after their integration. Treating ECs with histone deacetylase inhibitors (IHDACs) rapidly reverses this silencing, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments revealed that reactivation of the reporter gene was correlated with changes in chromatin status at the L1 integration site. Under our assay conditions, rapid silencing also was observed when reporter genes were delivered into ECs by mouse L1s and a zebrafish LINE-2 element, but not when similar reporter genes were delivered into ECs by Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), suggesting these integration events are silenced by distinct mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that subjecting ECs to culture conditions that promote differentiation attenuates the silencing of reporter genes delivered by L1 retrotransposition, but that differentiation, per se, is not sufficient to reactivate previously silenced reporter genes. Thus, our data suggest that ECs differ from many differentiated cells in their ability to silence reporter genes delivered by L1 retrotransposition. PMID:20686575

  14. Quercetin and lithium chloride modulate Wnt signaling in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma NT2/D1 cells

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    Mojsin Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signaling functions in numerous cellular activities such as cell fate determination, patterning, and migration in embryogenesis, apoptosis, etc. In this study, we used quercetin and lithium chloride to investigate modulations of the Wnt signaling pathway in human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma NT2/D1 cell line. First, we optimized conditions for NT2/D1 cell treatments with quercetin and lithium chloride and assessed their cytotoxic effects on the cells, cell viability and proliferation rate. Our results showed that induction of cell death by quercetin and LiCl is p53-dependent in NT2/D cells. We also examined the degree of Wnt signaling modulations by analyzing the expression of c-myc, a wellknown Wnt signaling target gene. Since the retinoic acid induction of NT2/D1 cells is good in an in vitro model system for human neural differentiation, studying Wnt signaling modulation in NT2/D1 would contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in neural stem cell maintenance and human neural development. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173051

  15. GADD45β Determines Chemoresistance and Invasive Growth of Side Population Cells of Human Embryonic Carcinoma

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    Toshihiko Inowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Side population (SP cells are an enriched population of stem, and the existence of SP cells has been reported in human cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed an SP analysis using 11 human cancer cell lines and confirmed the presence of SP cells in an embryonic carcinoma cell line, NEC8. NEC8 SP cells showed characteristics of cancer stem cells, such as high growth rate, chemoresistance and high invasiveness. To further characterize the NEC8 SP cells, we used DNA microarrays. Among 38,500 genes, we identified 12 genes that were over-expressed in SP cells and 1 gene that was over-expressed in non-SP cells. Among these 13 genes, we focused on GADD45b. GADD45b was over-expressed in non-SP cells, but the inhibition of GADD45b had no effect on non-SP cells. Paradoxically, the inhibition of GADD45b significantly reduced the viability of NEC8 SP cells. The inhibition of ABCG2, which determines the SP phenotype, had no effect on the invasiveness of NEC8 SP cells, but the inhibition of GADD45b significantly reduced invasiveness. These results suggest that GADD45b, but not ABCG2, might determine the cancer stem cell-like phenotype, such as chemoresistance and the high invasiveness of NEC8 SP cells, and might be a good therapeutic target.

  16. A transcriptional response to Wnt protein in human embryonic carcinoma cells

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    Pollack Jonathan R

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wnt signaling is implicated in many developmental decisions, including stem cell control, as well as in cancer. There are relatively few target genes known of the Wnt pathway. Results We have identified target genes of Wnt signaling using microarray technology and human embryonic carcinoma cells stimulated with active Wnt protein. The ~50 genes upregulated early after Wnt addition include the previously known Wnt targets Cyclin D1, MYC, ID2 and βTRCP. The newly identified targets, which include MSX1, MSX2, Nucleophosmin, Follistatin, TLE/Groucho, Ubc4/5E2, CBP/P300, Frizzled and REST/NRSF, have important implications for understanding the roles of Wnts in development and cancer. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide blocks induction by Wnt, consistent with a requirement for newly synthesized β-catenin protein prior to target gene activation. The promoters of nearly all the target genes we identified have putative TCF binding sites, and we show that the TCF binding site is required for induction of Follistatin. Several of the target genes have a cooperative response to a combination of Wnt and BMP. Conclusions Wnt signaling activates genes that promote stem cell fate and inhibit cellular differentiation and regulates a remarkable number of genes involved in its own signaling system.

  17. Expression of the fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF-4) gene is regulated by serum in Tera-2 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, J; Knobloch, T; Lang, J

    1996-02-01

    Expression of the fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF-4) gene is tightly regulated during mammalian development. Dysregulation of FGF-4 gene expression results in cell transformation and tumorigenesis. It is therefore pertinent to investigate the regulatory mechanisms which control expression of FGF-4. In an initial attempt to identify exogenous factors other than retinoic acid which might control FGF-4 expression, we have investigated the response of endogenous FGF-4 to serum in a number of embryonal carcinoma and embryonic stem cell lines. We have identified a human embryonal carcinoma cell line (Tera-2) in which the FGF-4 gene can be induced by serum. In Tera-2 cells made quiescent by serum deprivation, expression of the FGF-4 gene is repressed. Subsequent addition of serum reactivates FGF-LC expression and further addition of cycloheximide results in superinduction of mRNA suggesting that FGF-4 may be classified as an early response gene. It is suggested that this observation may be explained, at least in part, by the stage of differentiation of the Tera-2 cells.

  18. In vitro induction of human embryonal carcinoma differentiation by a crude extract of Rhazya stricta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagrafi, Faisal S; Alawad, Abdullah O; Abutaha, Nael M; Nasr, Fahd A; Alhazzaa, Othman A; Alharbi, Sultan N; Alkhrayef, Mohammad N; Hammad, Mohamed; Alhamdan, Ziyad A; Alenazi, Abdullah D; Wadaan, Mohammad A

    2017-06-29

    Rhazya stricta Decne. is a medicinal plant that is widespread in Saudi Arabia and desert areas of the Arabian Peninsula. Its extract contains alkaloids, tannins, and flavonoids that are involved in different biological activities. The study aim was to evaluate the effects of Rhazya stricta plant extracts on the proliferation and differentiation of NTERA-2 (NT2) pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. Soxhlet extraction was carried out using different solvents to extract stems, leaves and fruit parts of this plant. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by an MTS cell viability assay. The ability of the plant extract to induce cell differentiation was examined phenotypically using an inverted light microscope. The expression of pluripotency markers was investigated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry. Phytochemical screening of chloroform stem extracts was carried out and a chromatographic fingerprint was generated using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chloroform stem extract induced differentiation of NT2 cells at 5 μg/ml, and the differentiated cells exhibited neurite formation. Following induction of differentiation, there was significant down-regulation of the pluripotency marker genes Oct4 and Sox2. In addition, the surface antigen pluripotency marker, TRA-1-60, was strongly down-regulated. Phytochemical analysis of the extract showed the presence of alkaloids and saponins. The chromatogram revealed the presence of fifteen compounds with different retention times. Our results demonstrate for the first time that chloroform stem extract of R. stricta can induce neuronal differentiation of stem cells at an early stage and may contain potential therapeutic agent that can be used in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. TRA-1-60(+), SSEA-4(+), Oct4A(+), Nanog(+) Clones of Pluripotent Stem Cells in the Embryonal Carcinomas of the Ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki, Marek; Anderson, Mark; Beauchaine, Michael; Seo, Songwon; Tombokan, Xenia; Malecki, Raf

    2012-11-18

    Embryonal carcinoma of the ovary (ECO), pure or admixed to other tumors, is the deadly gynecological cancer. The specific aim of this work was identification, isolation, clonal expansion, and molecular profiling of the pluripotent cells in the embryonal carcinomas of the ovaries. The samples were acquired from the patients, who were clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with the advanced, pure embryonal carcinomas of the ovaries. The cell surface display of the TRA-1-60 and SSEA-4 was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM), immunoblotting (IB), multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy (MPFS), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS), and total reflection x-ray spectroscopy (TRXFS). The transcripts of the Oct4A and Nanog were analyzed by qRTPCR and MPFS and the products by MPFS. The human pluripotent, embryonic stem cells (ESC), human pluripotent, embryonal carcinoma of the testes (ECT), healthy tissues of the ovary (HTO), healthy tissue of testes (HTT), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) served as the controls. The studied embryonal carcinomas of the ovaries (ECOs) contained the cells with the strong surface display of the TRA-1-60 and SSEA-4, which was similar to the pluripotent ESC and ECT. Their morphology was consistent with the histopathological diagnosis. Moreover, these cells showed strong expression of the Oct4A and Nanog, which was similar to the pluripotent ESC and ECT. The ECO cells formed embryoid bodies, which differentiated into ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These cells were induced to differentiate into muscles, epithelia, and neurons. Herein, we revealed presence and identified molecular profiles of the clones of the pluripotent stem cells in the embryonal carcinomas of the ovaries. These results should help us with refining molecular diagnoses of these deadly neoplasms and design biomarker-targeted, patient-centered, personalized therapy.

  20. Binding of insulin-like growth factors to Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J F; Sledge, G W; Benenati, S V; Frolik, C A; Roth, B J; Hirsch, K S

    1991-08-15

    Differentiation of Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells by exposure to 2.1 mM alpha-difluoromethylornithine resulted in changes in morphology, a decrease in growth rate, and changes in the expression of SSEA-1 differentiation antigen. While the binding of 125I-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) remained relatively constant during differentiation, binding of 125I-IGF-II increased 2-3-fold. Further, the binding of IGF-II was 87 times greater than IGF-I in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Undifferentiated Tera-2 cells exhibited a single class of binding sites for both IGF-I (KD = 1.2 nM, 7.0 x 10(3) sites/cell) and IGF-II (KD = 8.3 nM, 3.4 x 10(5) sites/cell). Following differentiation, IGF-I continued to bind to a single class of binding sites (KD 1.0 nM, 6.7 x 10(3) sites/cell) whereas IGF-II bound to both high-affinity sites (KDH 0.3 nM, 2.2 x 10(5) sites/cell) and low-affinity sites (KDL 15.1 nM, 1.6 x 10(7) sites/cell). The binding of iodinated IGF-II was blocked by unlabeled IGF-II but not IGF-I. In contrast, 125I-IGF-I binding was prevented by either IGF-I or IGF-II. Affinity cross-linking experiments demonstrated the presence of both type I and type II IGF receptors along with a number of IGF binding proteins. IGF-I failed to stimulate the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Although IGF-II caused a significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation in both undifferentiated and differentiated Tera-2 cells, the magnitude of the response and the sensitivity of the cells to IGF-II stimulation was diminished following differentiation. The observed changes in IGF-II binding, which occur in conjunction with cellular differentiation, may be an important feature of the expression of the differentiated phenotype by human germ cell tumors.

  1. Differential expression of ETS family transcription factors in NCCIT human embryonic carcinoma cells upon retinoic acid-induced differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Ha, Woo Tae; Han, Mi-Hee; Song, Hyuk; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Chung, Hak-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors play important roles in normal and tumorigenic processes during development, differentiation, homeostasis, proliferation, and apoptosis. To identify critical ETS factor(s) in germ cell-derived cancer cells, we examined the expression patterns of the 27 ETS transcription factors in naive and differentiated NCCIT human embryonic carcinoma cells, which exhibit both pluripotent and tumorigenic characteristics. Overall, expression of ETS factors was relatively low in NCCIT cells. Among the 27 ETS factors, polyomavirus enhancer activator 3 (PEA3) and epithelium-specific ETS transcription factor-1 (ESE-1) exhibited the most significant changes in their expression levels. Western blot analysis confirmed these patterns, revealing reduced levels of PEA3 protein and elevated levels of ESE-1 protein in differentiated cells. PEA3 increased the proportion of cells in S-phase and promoted cell growth, whereas ESE-1 reduced proliferation potential. These data suggest that PEA3 and ESE-1 may play important roles in pluripotent and tumorigenic embryonic carcinoma cells. These findings contribute to our understanding of the functions of oncogenic ETS factors in germ cell-derived stem cells during processes related to tumorigenesis and pluripotency.

  2. Bilobalide induces neuronal differentiation of P19 embryonic carcinoma cells via activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Guo, Jingjing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao; Liao, Hong

    2014-08-01

    Bilobalide, a natural product extracted from Ginkgo biloba leaf, is known to exhibit a number of pharmacological activities. So far, whether it could affect embryonic stem cell differentiation is still unknown. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bilobalide on P19 embryonic carcinoma cells differentiation and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that bilobalide induced P19 cells differentiation into neurons in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. We also found that bilobalide promoted neuronal differentiation through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Exposure to bilobalide increased inactive GSK-3β phosphorylation, further induced the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, and also up-regulated the expression of Wnt ligands Wnt1 and Wnt7a. Neuronal differentiation induced by bilobalide was totally abolished by XAV939, an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. These results revealed a novel role of bilobalide in neuronal differentiation from P19 embryonic cells acting through Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which would provide a better insight into the beneficial effects of bilobalide in brain diseases.

  3. The TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 human pluripotent stem cell markers are expressed on podocalyxin in embryonal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopperle, William M; DeWolf, William C

    2007-03-01

    We have previously identified the cell adhesion protein podocalyxin expressed in a human pluripotent stem cell, embryonal carcinoma (EC), which is a malignant germ cell. Podocalyxin is a heavily glycosylated membrane protein with amino acid sequence homology to the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34. Since the initial discovery of podocalyxin in a cancerous stem cell, numerous new studies have identified podocalyxin in many different human cancers and in embryonic stem cells lines (ES) derived from human embryos. Embryonal carcinoma, as do all human pluripotent stem cells, expresses TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 antigens, and although their molecular identities are unknown, they are commonly used as markers of undifferentiated pluripotent human stem cells. We report here that purified podocalyxin from embryonal carcinoma has binding activity with the TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 antibodies. Embryonal carcinoma cells treated with retinoic acid undergo differentiation and lose the TRA-1-60/TRA-1-81 markers from their plasma membrane surface. We show that podocalyxin is modified in the retinoic acid-treated cells and has an apparent molecular mass of 170 kDa on protein blots as compared with the apparent 200-kDa molecular weight form of podocalyxin expressed in untreated cells. Furthermore, the modified form of podocalyxin no longer reacts with the TRA-1-60/TRA-1-81 antibodies. Thus, embryonal carcinoma expresses two distinct forms of podocalyxin, and the larger version is a molecular carrier of the human stem cell-defining antigens TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81.

  4. Tributyltin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanagi, Miki; Yamada, Shigeru; Hirata, Naoya; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-04-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We have recently reported that TBT induces growth arrest in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 at nanomolar levels by inhibiting NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the irreversible conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we examined whether TBT at nanomolar levels affects cell cycle progression in NT2/D1 cells. Propidium iodide staining revealed that TBT reduced the ratio of cells in the G1 phase and increased the ratio of cells in the G2/M phase. TBT also reduced cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and cyclin B1, which are key regulators of G2/M progression. Furthermore, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. The G2/M arrest induced by TBT was abolished by NAD-IDHα knockdown. Treatment with a cell-permeable α-ketoglutarate analogue recovered the effect of TBT, suggesting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Taken together, our data suggest that TBT at nanomolar levels induced G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, cell cycle analysis in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with nanomolar level exposure of EDCs.

  5. TRA-1-60(+), SSEA-4(+), POU5F1(+), SOX2(+), NANOG(+) Clones of Pluripotent Stem Cells in the Embryonal Carcinomas of the Testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki, Marek; Tombokan, Xenia; Anderson, Mark; Malecki, Raf; Beauchaine, Michael

    2013-04-02

    Cancer of the testes is currently the most frequent neoplasm and a leading cause of morbidity in men 15-35 years of age. Its incidence is increasing. Embryonal carcinoma is its most malignant form, which either may be resistant or may develop resistance to therapies, which results in relapses. Cancer stem cells are hypothesized to be drivers of these phenomena. The specific aim of this work was identification and isolation of spectra of single, living cancer stem cells, which were acquired directly from the patients' biopsies, followed by testing of their pluripotency. Biopsies were obtained from the patients with the clinical and histological diagnoses of the primary, pure embryonal carcinomas of the testes. The magnetic and fluorescent antibodies were genetically engineered. The SSEA-4 and TRA-1-60 cell surface display was analyzed by multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy (MPFS), flow cytometry (FCM), immunoblotting (IB), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and total reflection x-ray spectroscopy (TRXFS). The single, living cells were isolated by magnetic or fluorescent sorting followed by their clonal expansion. The OCT4A, SOX2, and NANOG genes' transcripts were analyzed by qRTPCR and the products by IB and MPFS. The clones of cells, with the strong surface display of TRA-1-60 and SSEA-4, were identified and isolated directly from the biopsies acquired from the patients diagnosed with the pure embryonal carcinomas of the testes. These cells demonstrated high levels of transcription and translation of the pluripotency genes: OCT4A, SOX2, and NANOG. They formed embryoid bodies, which differentiated into ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. In the pure embryonal carcinomas of the testes, acquired directly from the patients, we identified, isolated with high viability and selectivity, and profiled the clones of the pluripotent stem cells. These results may help in explaining therapy-resistance and relapses of

  6. Human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma NTERA2 cl.D1 cells maintain their typical morphology in an angiomyogenic medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Teresa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent embryonal carcinomas are good potential models, to study, "in vitro," the mechanisms that control differentiation during embryogenesis. The NTERA2cl.D1 (NT2/D1 cell line is a well known system of ectodermal differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA induces a dorsal pattern of differentiation (essentially neurons and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP or hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA induces a more ventral (epidermal pattern of differentiation. However, whether these human cells could give rise to mesoderm derivatives as their counterpart in mouse remained elusive. We analyzed the morphological characteristics and transcriptional activation of genes pertinent in cardiac muscle and endothelium differentiation, during the growth of NT2/D1 cells in an inductive angiomyogenic medium with or without Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2. Results Our experiments showed that NT2/D1 maintains their typical actin organization in angiomyogenic medium. Although the beta myosin heavy chain gene was never detected, all the other 15 genes analyzed maintained their expression throughout the time course of the experiment. Among them were early and late cardiac, endothelial, neuronal and teratocarcinoma genes. Conclusion Our results suggest that despite the NT2/D1 cells natural tendency to differentiate into neuroectodermal lineages, they can activate genes of mesodermal lineages. Therefore, we believe that these pluripotent cells might still be a good model to study biological development of mesodermal derivatives, provided the right culture conditions are met.

  7. Clinicopathologic assessment of pancreatic ductal carcinoma located at the head of the pancreas, in relation to embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Yukiyasu; Fujii, Tsutomu; Kanzaki, Akiyuki; Yamada, Suguru; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Takeda, Shin; Nakao, Akimasa

    2012-05-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is performed for pancreatic head cancer that originated from the dorsal or ventral primordium. Although the extent of lymph node (LN) dissection is the same irrespective of the origin, the lymphatic continuities may differ between the 2 primordia. Between March 2003 and September 2010, 152 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. One hundred six patients were assigned into 2 groups according to tumor location on preoperative computed tomography, and their clinical and pathological features were retrospectively analyzed in view of the embryonic development of the pancreas. Sixty of 106 patients were classified with tumors that were derived from the dorsal pancreas (D group) and 46 from the ventral pancreas (V group). The frequency of LN involvement around the middle colic artery (LN 15) in the D group was higher than in the V group (P = 0.008). The rate of additional resection of the pancreas tended to be higher in the D group (P = 0.067). The present study showed the detailed pattern of spread of pancreatic ductal carcinoma to the LNs and provided important information for determining the optimal surgical strategy.

  8. Fluoxetine-induced regulation of heat shock protein 90 and 14-3-3ε in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Daeyoung; Choi, Mi Ran; Han, Dal Mu Ri; Chai, Young Gyu; Choi, Joonho

    2014-12-03

    Fluoxetine, a serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, exerts antidepressant and antianxiety effects on major depressive and anxiety disorders. Previous studies suggest that treatment with fluoxetine influences the expression of various proteins that are involved in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in the neuronal cells of the brain. However, many aspects of the molecular pathways that modulate antidepressant action are not well understood. Here, with the aim of identifying proteins involved in antidepressant action, we examined the protein expression profile of human embryonic carcinoma (NCCIT) cells in response to fluoxetine treatment using proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We found several upregulated and downregulated proteins in fluoxetine-treated NCCIT cells, and then biochemically confirmed the increased expression of heat shock protein 90 and 14-3-3ε, which play an essential role in many cellular mechanisms including cell cycle control and other signaling pathways. Our data suggest that the regulated expression of heat shock protein 90, 14-3-3ε, and other identified proteins may be associated with the therapeutic action of fluoxetine.

  9. Regional differentiation of retinoic acid-induced human pluripotent embryonic carcinoma stem cell neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis E Coyle

    Full Text Available The NTERA2 cl D1 (NT2 cell line, derived from human teratocarcinoma, exhibits similar properties as embryonic stem (ES cells or very early neuroepithelial progenitors. NT2 cells can be induced to become postmitotic central nervous system neurons (NT2N with retinoic acid. Although neurons derived from pluripotent cells, such as NT2N, have been characterized for their neurotransmitter phenotypes, their potential suitability as a donor source for neural transplantation also depends on their ability to respond to localized environmental cues from a specific region of the CNS. Therefore, our study aimed to characterize the regional transcription factors that define the rostocaudal and dorsoventral identity of NT2N derived from a monolayer differentiation paradigm using quantitative PCR (qPCR. Purified NT2N mainly expressed both GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes and were electrically active but did not form functional synapses. The presence of immature astrocytes and possible radial glial cells was noted. The NT2N expressed a regional transcription factor code consistent with forebrain, hindbrain and spinal cord neural progenitors but showed minimal expression of midbrain phenotypes. In the dorsoventral plane NT2N expressed both dorsal and ventral neural progenitors. Of major interest was that even under the influence of retinoic acid, a known caudalization factor, the NT2N population maintained a rostral phenotype subpopulation which expressed cortical regional transcription factors. It is proposed that understanding the regional differentiation bias of neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells will facilitate their successful integration into existing neuronal networks within the CNS.

  10. Alterations in tumorigenicity of embryonal carcinoma cells by IGF-I triple-helix induced changes in immunogenicity and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, A; Francois, J C; Upegui-Gonzalez, L C; Swiercz, B; Bedel, C; Duc, H T; Bout, D; Trojan, J

    2000-12-08

    IGF-I antisense gene therapy has been applied successfully to animal models of glioma, hepatoma and teratocarcinoma. The antisense strategy has shown that tumor cells transfected with vectors encoding IGF-I antisense RNA lose tumorigenicity, become immunogenic and are associated with tumor specific immune response involving CD8+ lymphocytes. An IGF-I triple helix approach to gene therapy for glioma was recently described. The approach we have taken is to establish parameters of change using the IGF-I triple helix strategy. PCC-3 embryonal carcinoma cells derived from murine teratocarcinoma which express IGF-I were used as a model. The cells were transfected with vector which encodes an oligoribonucleotide that forms RNA-IGF-I DNA triple-helix structure. The triple-helix stops the production of IGF-I. Cells transfected in this manner underwent changes in phenotype and an increase in MHC-I and B-7 cell surface molecules. They also showed enhancement in the production of apoptotic cells (60-70%). The "triple helix" transfected cells lost the ability to induce tumor when injected subcutaneously in syngeneic 129 Sv mice. When co-transfected in vitro with expression vectors encoding both MHC-I and B-7 cDNA in antisense orientation, the "triple-helix" transfected cells were down-regulated in expression of MHC-I and B-7 and the number of apoptotic cells was significantly decreased. Injection of the doubly co-transfected cells into 129 Sv mice was associated with induction of teratocarcinoma. Comparison between antisense and triple-helix transfected cells strategies showed similar immunogenic and apoptotic changes. The findings suggest that triple-helix technology may offer a new clinical approach to treatement of tumors expressing IGF-I.

  11. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy) in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Dina; Forsblad, Andréas; Hashemian, Sanaz; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differentiated P19 neurons, as measured by intracellular MTT reduction and extracellular LDH activity assays. The P19-derived neurons express both the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), that is functionally active, and the serotonin metabolizing enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). The involvement of these proteins in the MDMA-induced toxicity was investigated by a pharmacological approach. The MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl, and the SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, per se or in combination, were not able to mimic the toxic effects of MDMA in the P19-derived neurons or block the MDMA-induced cell toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but pre-treatment with the antioxidants α-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine did not reveal any protective effects in the P19 neurons. Involvement of mitochondria in the MDMA-induced cytotoxicity was also examined, but MDMA did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in the P19 neurons. We conclude that MDMA produce a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent neurotoxicity and our results suggest that the mechanism behind MDMA-induced toxicity in mouse-derived neurons do not involve the serotonergic system, oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. Inhibition of Rho kinase regulates specification of early differentiation events in P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells.

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    Roman J Krawetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Rho kinase pathway plays a key role in many early cell/tissue determination events that take place in embryogenesis. Rho and its downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK play pivotal roles in cell migration, apoptosis (membrane blebbing, cell proliferation/cell cycle, cell-cell adhesion and gene regulation. We and others have previously demonstrated that inhibition of ROCK blocks endoderm differentiation in embryonal carcinoma stem cells, however, the effect of ROCK inhibition on mesoderm and ectoderm specification has not been fully examined. In this study, the role of ROCK within the specification and differentiation of all three germ layers was examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P19 cells were treated with the specific ROCK inhibitor Y-27623, and increase in differentiation efficiency into neuro-ectodermal and mesodermal lineages was observed. However, as expected a dramatic decrease in early endodermal markers was observed when ROCK was inhibited. Interestingly, within these ROCK-inhibited RA treated cultures, increased levels of mesodermal or ectodermal markers were not observed, instead it was found that the pluripotent markers SSEA-1 and Oct-4 remained up-regulated similar to that seen in undifferentiated cultures. Using standard and widely accepted methods for reproducible P19 differentiation into all three germ layers, an enhancement of mesoderm and ectoderm differentiation with a concurrent loss of endoderm lineage specification was observed with Y-27632 treatment. Evidence would suggest that this effect is in part mediated through TGF-β and SMAD signaling as ROCK-inhibited cells displayed aberrant SMAD activation and did not return to a 'ground' state after the inhibition had been removed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given this data and the fact that only a partial rescue of normal differentiation capacity occurred when ROCK inhibition was alleviated, the effect of ROCK inhibition on the differentiation capacity of

  13. Identification of ERβ1 and ERβ2 in human seminoma, in embryonal carcinoma and in their adjacent intratubular germ cell neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Vittoria; Romeo, Francesco; Giordano, Francesca; Ferraro, Aurora; Andò, Sebastiano; Carpino, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogens exert a role on germ cell physiology of normal human testis through the mediation of the estrogen receptor (ER) beta subtypes. Epidemiological studies evidenced an increased incidence of testicular germ cell cancer after elevated pre-natal estrogen exposure but the expression of estrogen receptors in these testicular neoplasms has not been well elucidated. Methods Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the expression of three distinct ER isoforms, ERalpha, ERbeta1, and ERbeta2 in paraffin-embedded tissues from seminomas and embryonal carcinomas, which are the most common testicular germ cell tumours. Results Neoplastic cells of all specimens revealed a positive ERbeta1 and ERbeta2 immunoreactivity, while the ERalpha signal was undetectable. A similar pattern of estrogen receptor immunostaining was also observed in the malignant germ cells of intratubular germ cell neoplasia, adjacent to testicular cancers. Western blot analysis of tumour extracts revealed two immunoreactive bands, a 59 kDa band for ERbeta1 and a 53 kDa band for ERbeta2. Conclusion A variable ERbeta expression was previously reported in testicular germ cell tumours and, particularly, an ERbeta down-regulation was evidenced in seminoma and embryonal carcinoma. Conversely, the current study has clearly identified ERbeta1 and ERbeta2 in the neoplastic cells of seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, as well as in the malignant cells of their common pre-invasive precursor, intratubular germ cell neoplasia. Therefore, our findings suggest that ERbeta1, together with a possible ERbeta2 contribute, can mediate estrogen action in both early and late neoplastic testicular germ cells, not confirming the previously hypothesized antiproliferative effect of ERbeta on male gonadal cells. PMID:19493328

  14. Selective repression of retinoic acid target genes by RIP140 during induced tumor cell differentiation of pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells

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    Tomlinson Craig R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of retinoids as anti-cancer agents has been limited due to resistance and low efficacy. The dynamics of nuclear receptor coregulation are incompletely understood. Cell-and context-specific activities of nuclear receptors may be in part due to distinct coregulator complexes recruited to distinct subsets of target genes. RIP140 (also called NRIP1 is a ligand-dependent corepressor that is inducible with retinoic acid (RA. We had previously shown that RIP140 limits RA induced tumor cell differentiation of embryonal carcinoma; the pluriopotent stem cells of testicular germ cell tumors. This implies that RIP140 represses key genes required for RA-mediated tumor cell differentiation. Identification of these genes would be of considerable interest. Results To begin to address this issue, microarray technology was employed to elucidate in a de novo fashion the global role of RIP140 in RA target gene regulation of embryonal carcinoma. Subclasses of genes were affected by RIP140 in distinct manners. Interestingly, approximately half of the RA-dependent genes were unaffected by RIP140. Hence, RIP140 appears to discriminate between different classes of RA target genes. In general, RIP140-dependent gene expression was consistent with RIP140 functioning to limit RA signaling and tumor cell differentiation. Few if any genes were regulated in a manner to support a role for RIP140 in "active repression". We also demonstrated that RIP140 silencing sensitizes embryonal carcinoma cells to low doses of RA. Conclusion Together the data demonstrates that RIP140 has profound effects on RA-mediated gene expression in this cancer stem cell model. The RIP140-dependent RA target genes identified here may be particularly important in mediating RA-induced tumor cell differentiation and the findings suggest that RIP140 may be an attractive target to sensitize tumor cells to retinoid-based differentiation therapy. We discuss these data in the context

  15. Subtractive cDNA cloning using oligo(dT)30-latex and PCR: isolation of cDNA clones specific to undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The human embryonal carcinoma cell line NEC14 can be induced to differentiate by the addition of 10(-2)M N,N'-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA). A subtractive cDNA library specific to undifferentiated NEC14 cells was constructed using oligo(dT)30-Latex and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method was designed to improve the efficiency of subtraction and the enrichment of cDNA clones corresponding to low abundance mRNAs. The single strand of cDNA was made from mRNA prepared from the HMBA-t...

  16. Photodynamic inhibitory effects of three perylenequinones on human colorectal carcinoma cell line and primate embryonic stem cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Ma; Hong Tai; Cong Li; Yu Zhang; Ze-Hua Wang; Wei-Zhi Ji

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the photodynamic inhibitory effects of Elsinochrome A (EA), Hypocrellin A (HA) and Hypocrellin B (HB) on human colorectal carcinoma Hce-8693 cells and rhesus monkey embryonic stem R366.4 cells, via inducing apoptosis.METHODS: EA, HA and HB were extracted from metabolites of Hypomyces (Fr) Tul.Sp. R366.4 cells or Hce8693 cells were cultured with different concentrations of EA, HA or HB respectively, irradiated and incubated with fresh medium for 2 h. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry (FCM). Data were expressed as means ±SD and analysis of variance and Student' t-test for individual comparisons.RESULTS: The photodynamic bioactivity of EA was first reported in this study. After irradiation for 5 min, 6 min, 10 min or 20 min, photoactivated EA at lower concentrations,which were 10-7 Mol/L, 10-6 Mol/L, 10-5 Mol/L respectively,had no cytotoxic effects on R366.4 ES ceils. Whereas, all of the three perylenequinones could induce apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner when Hce-8693 cells were incubated with photoactivated EA, HA and HB respectively. When Hce-8693 cells were incubated with EA at 10-6 Mol/L and irradiated 5 lin, 6 min, 10 min and 20 min respectively,the rates of EA-induced apoptosis were 0, 0, 13.4 % and 40.5 %. While the rates of HA-induced apoptosis were 29.5 %, 32.0 %, 40.2 % and 22.6 %. And the rates of HBinduced apoptosis were 0, 0, 0 and 13.7 % respectively.Meanwhile, after 10-5 Mol/L treatment, the rates of EA-induced apoptosis were 32.7 %, 19.3 %, 26.4 % and 52.7 %, the rates of HA-induced apoptosis were 47.2 %, 39.1%, 45.2% and 56.6 %, and the rates of HB-induced apoptosis were 0, 0, 20.0 % and 13.9 % respectively.CONCLUSION: EA, HA and HB have significant anti-cancer activity. The order of photodynamic inhibitory effects on tumor cells would be approximately HA>EA>HB. The molecular mechanisms of apoptosis may not be induced by reactive oxygen species and are worth further investigation.

  17. Transcription factors Sp1 and p73 control the expression of the proapoptotic protein NOXA in the response of testicular embryonal carcinoma cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Lara; Bretones, Gabriel; Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Garrido-Martin, Eva M; Hernandez, Teresa; Fraile, Susana; Botella, Luisa; de Alava, Enrique; Vidal, August; Garcia del Muro, Xavier; Villanueva, Alberto; Delgado, M Dolores; Fernandez-Luna, Jose L

    2012-08-03

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are highly responsive to and curable by cisplatin-based chemotherapy even in advanced stages. We have studied the molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of apoptosis in response to cisplatin, and found that proapoptotic Noxa is transcriptionally up-regulated following cisplatin exposure, even in the absence of p53, in NTERA2 cisplatin-sensitive cells but not in 1411HP-resistant cells. Blockade of Noxa reduced the apoptotic response of embryonal carcinoma (EC) NTERA2 cells to cisplatin. A detailed analysis of the Noxa promoter revealed that p73 and Sp1-like factors, Sp1 and KLF6, played key roles in the transcriptional control of this gene. Overexpression of TAp73 induced Noxa whereas the dominant negative isoform ΔNp73, reduced the levels of Noxa after cisplatin exposure in NTERA2 and 2102EP. Interestingly, down-regulation of Sp1 increased Noxa expression in response to cisplatin. However, blockade of KLF6 decreased cisplatin-induced up-regulation of Noxa in EC cell lines. In addition, tissue microarray analyses of TGCTs revealed that expression of Noxa correlates with good clinical prognosis in patients with embryonal carcinoma. Thus, our data show the transcriptional network that regulates Noxa in EC cells, which is key for their apoptotic response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and propose Noxa as a predictive factor of therapeutic response.

  18. Different patterns of glycolipid antigens are expressed following differentiation of TERA-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells induced by retinoic acid, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) or bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, P W; Nudelman, E; Hakomori, S; Fenderson, B A

    1990-04-01

    NTERA-2 cl.D1 human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells were induced to differentiate by either bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) or hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), and also by retinoic acid. Following exposure to each of these inducers, the globoseries glycolipid antigens stage-specific embryonic antigens -3 and -4 (SSEA-3 and -4) and the glycoprotein antigen TRA-1-60, all characteristic of the human EC cell surface, underwent a marked reduction in expression within about 7 days. At the same time, the lactoseries glycolipid antigen SSEA-1, and ganglioseries antigens A2B5 (GT3) and ME311 (9-0-acetyl GD3) were induced in BUdR- and retinoic acid-treated cells. However, these antigens did not appear during the first 7-14 days of HMBA-induced differentiation. The observations of cell surface antigen expression were paralleled by analysis of glycolipids isolated from the cells by thin-layer chromatography. This analysis, in which the new monoclonal antibodies VINIS-56 and VIN-2PB-22 were included, also revealed expression of gangliosides GD3 and GD2 in all differentiated cultures, albeit at much lower levels following HMBA exposure than following retinoic acid or BUdR-exposure. Further, disialylparagloboside was detected in retinoic acid and BUdR-induced, but not HMBA-induced, cultures. Taken with morphological observations, the results suggest that HMBA induces differentiation of NTERA-2 cl.D1 EC cells along a pathway distinct from the pathway(s) induced by retinoic acid and BUdR.

  19. SOX2 is essential for in vivo reprogramming of seminoma-like TCam-2 cells to an embryonal carcinoma-like fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettersheim, Daniel; Heimsoeth, Alena; Jostes, Sina; Schneider, Simon; Fellermeyer, Martin; Hofmann, Andrea; Schorle, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Type II germ cell cancers (GCC) are divided into seminomas, which are highly similar to primordial germ cells and embryonal carcinomas (EC), often described as malignant counterparts to embryonic stem cells. Previously, we demonstrated that the development of GCCs is a highly plastic process and strongly influenced by the microenvironment. While orthotopic transplantation into the testis promotes seminomatous growth of the seminoma-like cell line TCam-2, ectopic xenotransplantation into the flank initiates reprogramming into an EC-like fate. During this reprogramming, BMP signaling is inhibited, leading to induction of NODAL signaling, upregulation of pluripotency factors and downregulation of seminoma markers, like SOX17. The pluripotency factor and EC-marker SOX2 is strongly induced. Here, we adressed the molecular role of SOX2 in this reprogramming. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome-editing, we established SOX2-deficient TCam-2 cells. Xenografting of SOX2-deficient cells into the flank of nude mice resulted in maintenance of a seminoma-like fate, indicated by the histology and expression of OCT3/4, SOX17, TFAP2C, PRDM1 and PRAME. In SOX2-deficient cells, BMP signaling is inhibited, but NODAL signaling is not activated. Thus, SOX2 appears to be downstream of BMP signaling but upstream of NODAL activation. So, SOX2 is an essential factor in acquiring an EC-like cell fate from seminomas. A small population of differentiated cells was identified resembling a mixed non-seminoma. Analyses of these cells revealed downregulation of the pluripotency and seminoma markers OCT3/4, SOX17, PRDM1 and TFAP2C. In contrast, the pioneer factor FOXA2 and its target genes were upregulated, suggesting that FOXA2 might play an important role in induction of non-seminomatous differentiation. PMID:27283990

  20. Glycolipid core structure switching from globo- to lacto- and ganglio-series during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of TERA-2-derived human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenderson, B A; Andrews, P W; Nudelman, E; Clausen, H; Hakomori, S

    1987-07-01

    We have analyzed the glycolipid markers of a recently cloned human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line, NTERA-2, which differentiates extensively into a variety of somatic cell types when exposed to retinoic acid. These tumor cells provide a model system that can be used to study the ontogeny of glycolipid diversity during human embryonic development. Glycolipid antigens were identified by cell surface immunofluorescence and thin-layer chromatography immunostaining using a comprehensive set of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies. Undifferentiated NTERA-2 cells were found to express predominantly globo-series glycolipids, including Gb3, Gb5 (IV3GalGb4), globo-ganglioside (IV3NeuAc alpha 2----3GalGb4), globo-H (IV3Fuc alpha 1----2GalGb4), and globo-A (IV3GalNAc alpha 1----3[Fuc alpha 1----2]GalGb4). When NTERA-2 cells were induced to differentiate by culturing in the presence of 10(-5) M retinoic acid, a remarkable shift of cellular glycolipids from globo-series to lacto- and ganglio-series was observed: Globo-series structures declined, particularly during the period 7-20 days after first exposure to retinoic acid, while lacto-series structures, including fucosyl alpha 1----3 type 2 chain (Lex) and sialosyl type 2 chain, and ganglio-series structures, including GM3, GD3, 9-O-acetyl-GD3, GM2, GD2, and GT3, increased. The presence of globo-A and globo-H as the major ABH blood group antigens in undifferentiated NTERA-2 cells suggests that globo-series blood group antigens are embryonic antigens, synthesis of which switches to lacto-series during human development. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis indicated preferential expression of several ganglio- and lacto-series antigens on different subsets of differentiated cells and permitted the relationship of these subsets to the development of neurons in NTERA-2 cultures to be determined. The results suggest that glycosyltransferase, particularly those involved in controlling glycoconjugate core structure assembly

  1. Differentiation of TERA-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells into neurons and HCMV permissive cells. Induction by agents other than retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, P W; Gönczöl, E; Plotkin, S A; Dignazio, M; Oosterhuis, J W

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid induces the differentiation of NTERA-2 cl. D1 human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells into neurons, cells permissive for the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and other cell types that cannot as yet be classified but are distinguishable from the stem cells. We tested several additional agents for their ability to induce the differentiation of these EC cells. No differentiation was induced by butyrate, cyclic AMP, cytosine arabinoside, the tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), or the chemotherapeutic agent cis-diaminedichloroplatinum, although morphological changes were detected at the highest concentrations of these agents that permitted cell survival. However, retinal, retinol, 5-bromouracil 2'deoxyribose (BUdR), 5-iodouracil 2'deoxyribose (IUdR), hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), dimethylacetamide (DMA), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) all induced some neuronal differentiation, but to a lesser extent than retinoic acid. Also, BUdR, IUdR, HMBA, and DMA induced the appearance of many cells permissive for the replication of HCMV. Differentiation was, in all cases, accompanied by the loss of SSEA-3, a globoseries glycolipid antigen characteristically expressed by human EC cells. However, another glycolipid antigen, A2B5, which appears in 60%-80% of differentiated cells 7 days following retinoic acid induction, was detected in less than 20% of the cells induced by the other agents studied. This implies that the HCMV-permissive cells induced by retinoic acid are not identical to those induced by BUdR, IUdR, and DMA.

  2. Regulation of microRNA biosynthesis and expression in 2102Ep embryonal carcinoma stem cells is mirrored in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Michael F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumours with high proportions of differentiated cells are considered to be of a lower grade to those containing high proportions of undifferentiated cells. This property may be linked to the differentiation properties of stem cell-like populations within malignancies. We aim to identify molecular mechanism associated with the generation of tumours with differing grades from malignant stem cell populations with different differentiation potentials. In this study we assessed microRNA (miRNA regulation in two populations of malignant Embryonal Carcinoma (EC stem cell, which differentiate (NTera2 or remain undifferentiated (2102Ep during tumourigenesis, and compared this to miRNA regulation in ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC patient samples. Methods miRNA expression was assessed in NTera2 and 2102Ep cells in the undifferentiated and differentiated states and compared to that of OSC samples using miRNA qPCR. Results Our analysis reveals a substantial overlap between miRNA regulation in 2102Ep cells and OSC samples in terms of miRNA biosynthesis and expression of mature miRNAs, particularly those of the miR-17/92 family and clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19. In the undifferentiated state 2102Ep cells expressed mature miRNAs at up to 15,000 fold increased levels despite decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes Drosha and Dicer. 2102Ep cells avoid differentiation, which we show is associated with consistent levels of expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes and mature miRNAs while expression of miRNAs clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19 is deemphasised. OSC patient samples displayed decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes, decreased expression of mature miRNAs and prominent clustering to chromosome 14 but not 19. This indicates that miRNA biosynthesis and levels of miRNA expression, particularly from chromosome 14, are tightly regulated both in progenitor cells and in tumour samples. Conclusion miRNA biosynthesis and

  3. Simultaneous determination of the repertoire of classical neurotransmitters released from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ya-Bin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Sun, Fan [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Teng, Lin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Cardiology and Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, The First College of Clinical Medical Sciences, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443000, Hubei (China); Li, Wen-Bin; An, Shi-Min [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xin-Jie; Lv, Hao-Yu; Ding, Xu-Ping [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhu, Liang, E-mail: zhuliang17@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); and others

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • An online MD-HILIC–MS/MS method for simultaneously measuring the repertoire of classical transmitters was developed and validated. • Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was successfully employed to online system. • Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. • The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg for dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, and glycine). - Abstract: Dynamic, continuous, and simultaneous multi-analysis of transmitters is important for the delineation of the complex interactions between the neuronal and intercellular communications. But the analysis of the whole repertoire of classical transmitters of diverse structure is challenging due to their different physico-chemical properties and to their high polarity feature which leads to poor retention in traditional reversed-phase columns during LC–MS analysis. Here, an online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (online MD-HILIC–MS/MS) detection method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of the repertoire of classical transmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, GABA, and glycine). Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. The method was successfully employed to reveal the characteristics of transmitter release from embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg

  4. Embryonic stem cells markers SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog expression and their correlations with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiren Luo

    Full Text Available Expression of embryonic stem cells (ESCs markers (SOX2, OCT4, Nanog and Nestin is crucial for progression of various human malignancies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic impact of these molecules in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In the present study, we found that the expression levels of SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog were highly expressed in NPC compared with the non-tumorous tissues. Furthermore, these proteins correlated significantly with several clinicalpathological factors and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-associated indicators (E-cadherin/N-cadherin and Snail. In multivariate analyses, high expression of OCT4 (P = 0.013 and Nanog (P = 0.040, but not that of SOX2, was associated with worse survival and had strongly independent prognostic effects. Of note, OCT4 and Nanog were more frequently located at the invasive front of tumors, and correlated significantly with various aggressive behaviors including T classification, N classification, M classification and clinical stage. Furthermore, patients with co-expression of OCT4 and Nanog in the invasive front had significantly worse survival (P = 0.005. Interestingly, at the invasive front, these molecules correlated significantly with Nestin expression in endothelial cells (P<0.001. These findings provide evidence that ESCs biomarkers OCT4 and Nanog serves as independent prognostic factors for NPC. Additionally, cancer cells in the invasive front of NPC acquiring ESCs-like features should be maintained by vascular niches.

  5. Regulation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis of retinoic acid-induced P19 embryonal carcinoma cells by P2X2 and P2X7 receptors studied by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuahasi, Katia K; Demasi, Marcos A; Tamajusuku, Alessandra S K; Lenz, Guido; Sogayar, Mari C; Fornazari, Maynara; Lameu, Claudiana; Nascimento, Isis C; Glaser, Talita; Schwindt, Telma T; Negraes, Priscilla D; Ulrich, Henning

    2012-04-01

    Embryonic carcinoma cells are widely used models for studying the mechanisms of proliferation and differentiation occurring during early embryogenesis. We have now investigated how down-regulation of P2X2 and P2X7 receptor expression by RNA interference (RNAi) affects neural differentiation and phenotype specification of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells. Wild-type P19 embryonal carcinoma cells or cells stably expressing shRNAs targeting P2X2 or P2X7 receptor expression were induced to differentiate into neurons and glial cells in the presence of retinoic acid. Silencing of P2X2 receptor expression along differentiation promoted cell proliferation and an increase in the percentage of cells expressing glial-specific GFAP, while the presence of beta-3 tubulin-positive cells diminished at the same time. Proliferation induction in the presence of stable anti-P2X2 receptor RNAi points at a mechanism where glial proliferation is favored over growth arrest of progenitor cells which would allow neuronal maturation. Differently from the P2X2 receptor, inhibition of P2X7 receptor expression during neural differentiation of P19 cells resulted in a decrease in cell proliferation and GFAP expression, suggesting the need of functional P2X7 receptors for the progress of gliogenesis. The results obtained in this study indicate the importance of purinergic signaling for cell fate determination during neural differentiation, with P2X2 and P2X7 receptors promoting neurogenesis and gliogenesis, respectively. The shRNAs down-regulating P2X2 or P2X7 receptor gene expression, developed during this work, present useful tools for studying mechanisms of neural differentiation in other stem cell models.

  6. File list: Oth.ALL.20.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell ce10 TFs and others W03F9.2 All cell types SRX06563...3,SRX065632 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.ALL.50.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell ce10 TFs and others W03F9.2 All cell types SRX06563...3,SRX065632 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.ALL.05.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell ce10 TFs and others W03F9.2 All cell types SRX06563...2,SRX065633 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.W03F9PERIOD2.AllCell.bed ...

  9. 基于减轮KASUMI的f9算法单密钥攻击

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    徐款龙 韩文报

    2013-01-01

    该文对4轮KASUMI的f9算法进行了单密钥攻击。把中间相遇攻击的思想用到f9算法攻击中,选取了基础密钥集与穷举密钥集,利用蚝与明文之间的线性关系对f9算法进行了中间相遇攻击,同时利用碰撞与查表技术减少了计算复杂度。最后恢复所有128bit密钥需要数据复杂度是2^32,优化后的计算复杂度是2^125,85,存储复杂度是...

  10. 白腐真菌F-9的产酶研究%Characterization of Ligninolytic Enzymes Production of a White-rot Fungus F-9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴珅; 林书欣; 刘洪涛; 索凡; 朱启忠; 张小葵

    2009-01-01

    白腐真菌F-9是新分离得到的一株白腐真菌,分别采用PDA固体培养基、液体天然培养基和液体人工培养基对它进行培养,并对它的产酶情况进行研究.研究结果表明:F-9在PDA培养基中的生长速率较快,可达到8 mm/d;在液体天然培养基中的生长速率和产酶情况也比较理想,LiP酶活力可达到341 U/L,MnP可达到264 U/L;在液体人工培养基中LiP和MnP活性达到最大的时间比在天然培养基中晚2~3 d,但酶的活力都有很大提高,LiP酶活力可达到619 U/L,MnP酶活力可达到443 U/L.

  11. Possibility of using strain F9 (Serratia marcescens) as a bio-collector for hema-tite flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-fen Yang; Tian Li; Yan-hong Chang; Hui Luo; Qiong-yao Tang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we characterized strain F9 and evaluated the interaction between strain F9 and hematite by scanning electron micros-copy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), zeta potential, flotation, and other methods. The results showed that strain F9 belongs to Serratia marcescens. This brevibacterium had CH2, CH3, and hydroxyl groups on its cell wall, which imparted a strong hy-drophobic and negative charge. Adsorption of strain F9 reduced the zeta potential of the hematite surface and increased the hydrophobicity of the hematite surface, thereby generating hydrophobic hematite agglomerates. At least four groups on strain F9 interacted with the hematite surface, which contributed to chemical interactions of carboxylic groups and hydrophobic association among hydrophobic hematite particles. The possible use of strain F9 as a bio-collector for hematite flotation was proved.

  12. Acute hypersensitivity of pluripotent testicular cancer-derived embryonal carcinoma to low-dose 5-aza deoxycytidine is associated with global DNA Damage-associated p53 activation, anti-pluripotency and DNA demethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijesh K Biswal

    Full Text Available Human embryonal carcinoma (EC cells are the stem cells of nonseminoma testicular germ cells tumors (TGCTs and share remarkable similarities to human embryonic stem (ES cells. In prior work we found that EC cells are hypersensitive to low nanomolar doses of 5-aza deoxycytidine (5-aza and that this hypersensitivity partially depended on unusually high levels of the DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B. We show here that low-dose 5-aza treatment results in DNA damage and induction of p53 in NT2/D1 cells. In addition, low-dose 5-aza results in global and gene specific promoter DNA hypomethylation. Low-dose 5-aza induces a p53 transcriptional signature distinct from that induced with cisplatin in NT2/D1 cells and also uniquely downregulates genes associated with pluripotency including NANOG, SOX2, GDF3 and Myc target genes. Changes in the p53 and pluripotency signatures with 5-aza were to a large extent dependent on high levels of DNMT3B. In contrast to the majority of p53 target genes upregulated by 5-aza that did not show DNA hypomethylation, several other genes induced with 5-aza had corresponding decreases in promoter methylation. These genes include RIN1, SOX15, GPER, and TLR4 and are novel candidate tumors suppressors in TGCTs. Our studies suggest that the hypersensitivity of NT2/D1 cells to low-dose 5-aza is multifactorial and involves the combined activation of p53 targets, repression of pluripotency genes, and activation of genes repressed by DNA methylation. Low-dose 5-aza therapy may be a general strategy to treat those tumors that are sustained by cells with embryonic stem-like properties.GEO NUMBER FOR THE MICROARRAY DATA: GSE42647.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Detects Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt-Independent Traits Common to Pluripotent Murine Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Malignant Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M. Romanska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells, a potential source of somatic precursors for cell therapies, cause tumors after transplantation. Studies of mammalian carcinogenesis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy have revealed changes in the choline region, particularly increased phosphocholine (PCho content. High PCho levels in murine ES (mES cells have recently been attributed to cell pluripotency. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway has been implicated in tumor-like properties of mES cells. This study aimed to examine a potential link between the metabolic profile associated with choline metabolism of pluripotent mES cells and PI3K/Akt signaling. We used mES (ES-D3 and murine embryonal carcinoma cells (EC-F9 and compared the metabolic profiles of 1 pluripotent mES (ESD0, 2 differentiated mES (ESD14, and 3 pluripotent F9 cells. Involvement of the PI3K/Akt pathway was assessed using LY294002, a selective PI3K inhibitor. Metabolic profiles were characterized in the extracted polar fraction by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Similarities were found between the levels of choline phospholipid metabolites (PCho/total choline and PCho/glycerophosphocholine [GPCho] in ESD0 and F9 cell spectra and a greater-than five-fold decrease of the PCho/GPCho ratio associated with mES cell differentiation. LY294002 caused no significant change in relative PCho levels but led to a greater-than two-fold increase in PCho/GPCho ratios. These results suggest that the PCho/GPCho ratio is a metabolic trait shared by pluripotent and malignant cells and that PI3K does not underlie its development. It is likely that the signature identified here in a mouse model may be relevant for safe therapeutic applications of human ES cells.

  14. Recombinant 1F9 spidroin microgels for murine full-thickness wound repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisenovich, M M; Malyuchenko, N V; Arkhipova, A Yu; Goncharenko, A V; Kotlyarova, M S; Davydova, L I; Vasil'eva, T V; Bogush, V G; Agapov, I I; Debabov, V G; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-01-01

    The study of the stimulating effect of the microgels (MGs) based on recombinant 1F9 spidroin on the regeneration of the deep skin wound in mice was carried out. The use of spidroin MGs was shown to increase significantly the quality of healing compared to the control. The introduction of the MG in the wound edges led to recovery of all the structural elements of the skin: the epidermis, the dermis, including vascular and nervous network, in the periphery of the wound underlying muscles, and skin appendages (sebaceous and sweat glands and hair follicles) was revealed.

  15. The radius and other fundamental parameters of the F9 V star beta Virginis

    CERN Document Server

    North, J R; Robertson, J G; Bedding, T R; Bruntt, H; Ireland, M J; Jacob, A P; Lacour, S; O'Byrne, J W; Owens, S M; Stello, D; Tango, W J; Tuthill, P G

    2008-01-01

    We have used the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) to measure the angular diameter of the F9 V star beta Virginis. After correcting for limb darkening and combining with the revised Hipparcos parallax, we derive a radius of 1.703 +/- 0.022 R_sun (1.3%). We have also calculated the bolometric flux from published measurements which, combined with the angular diameter, implies an effective temperature of 6059 +/- 49 K (0.8%). We also derived the luminosity of beta Vir to be L = 3.51 +/- 0.08 L_sun (2.1%). Solar-like oscillations were measured in this star by Carrier et al. (2005) and using their value for the large frequency separation yields the mean stellar density with an uncertainty of about 2%. Our constraints on the fundamental parameters of beta Vir will be important to test theoretical models of this star and its oscillations.

  16. Membrane translocation of t-SNARE protein syntaxin-4 abrogates ground-state pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara-Chatani, Natsumi; Shirai, Kota; Kido, Takumi; Horigome, Tomoatsu; Yasue, Akihiro; Adachi, Naoki; Hirai, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive tools for regenerative medicine therapies. However, aberrant cell populations that display flattened morphology and lose ground-state pluripotency often appear spontaneously, unless glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1/2) are inactivated. Here, we show that membrane translocation of the t-SNARE protein syntaxin-4 possibly is involved in this phenomenon. We found that mouse ES cells cultured without GSK3β/MEK1/2 inhibitors (2i) spontaneously extrude syntaxin-4 at the cell surface and that artificial expression of cell surface syntaxin-4 induces appreciable morphological changes and mesodermal differentiation through dephosphorylation of Akt. Transcriptome analyses revealed several candidate elements responsible for this, specifically, an E-to P-cadherin switch and a marked downregulation of Zscan4 proteins, which are DNA-binding proteins essential for ES cell pluripotency. Embryonic carcinoma cell lines F9 and P19CL6, which maintain undifferentiated states independently of Zscan4 proteins, exhibited similar cellular behaviors upon stimulation with cell surface syntaxin-4. The functional ablation of E-cadherin and overexpression of P-cadherin reproduced syntaxin-4-induced cell morphology, demonstrating that the E- to P-cadherin switch executes morphological signals from cell surface syntaxin-4. Thus, spontaneous membrane translocation of syntaxin-4 emerged as a critical element for maintenance of the stem-cell niche. PMID:28057922

  17. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genomic Deletion of the Beta-1, 4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 Gene in Murine P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells Results in Low Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxin Type C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Tsukamoto

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum cause flaccid paralysis by inhibiting neurotransmitter release at peripheral nerve terminals. Previously, we found that neurons derived from the murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cell line exhibited high sensitivity to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In order to prove the utility of P19 cells for the study of the intracellular mechanism of botulinum neurotoxins, ganglioside-knockout neurons were generated by deletion of the gene encoding beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 in P19 cells using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats combined with Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system. By using this system, knockout cells could be generated more easily than with previous methods. The sensitivity of the generated beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1-depleted P19 neurons to botulinum neurotoxin type C was decreased considerably, and the exogenous addition of the gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b restored the susceptibility of P19 cells to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In particular, addition of a mixture of these three ganglioside more effectively recovered the sensitivity of knockout cells compared to independent addition of GD1a, GD1b, or GT1b. Consequently, the genome-edited P19 cells generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system were useful for identifying and defining the intracellular molecules involved in the toxic action of botulinum neurotoxins.

  18. Characterization of a DNA-damage-recognition protein from F9 teratocarcinoma cells, which is inducible by retinoic acid and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C C; Sun, N K; Lin-Chao, S

    1993-02-15

    A nuclear protein that recognizes u.v.-damaged DNA was detected in extracts from murine F9 embryonic stem cells using a DNA-binding assay. The nuclear-protein-binding activity was increased in cells after treatment with retinoic acid/dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP), with optimum induction at 6 days. In vitro treatment of nuclear extracts with agents that affect protein conformation (such as urea, Nonidet P40 and Ca2+) slightly modulated the damage-recognition activity. Furthermore, treatment of nuclear extracts with phosphatase dramatically inhibited the binding activity. In addition, damaged-DNA recognition of the nuclear extracts was effectively inhibited by damaged double- and single-stranded DNA. The expression of the nuclear protein with similar characteristics was abundant in HeLa cells and was increased in drug- or u.v.-resistant cells. The findings suggest that the recognition of a u.v.-DNA adduct is modulated, at least in part, by an activity that is induced during retinoic acid/dbcAMP-induced differentiation. These results also imply that the identified damage-recognition protein may be important for the sensitivity or resistance of mammalian cells to DNA damage.

  19. Production and characterization of a thermostable bioflocculant from Bacillus subtilis F9, isolated from wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Sib Sankar; Harshiny, M; Sen, Shib Sankar; Sukumaran, V; Park, Se Chang

    2015-11-01

    A bacterium isolated from wastewater sludge, identified as Bacillus subtilis F9, was confirmed to produce bioflocculant with excellent flocculation activity. The effects of culture conditions such as initial pH, temperature, carbon source, nitrogen source, and inoculum size on bioflocculant production were studied here. The results indicated that 2.32g/L of purified bioflocculant could be extracted with the following optimized conditions: 20gL(-1) sucrose as the carbon source, 3.5gL(-1) peptone as the nitrogen source, an initial pH of 7.0, and a temperature of 40°C. The purified bioflocculant consisted of 10.1% protein and 88.3% sugar, including 38.4% neutral sugar, 2.86% uronic acid, and 2.1% amino sugar. The neutral sugar consisted of sucrose, glucose, lactose, galactose, and mannose at a molar ratio of 2.7:4.7:3.2:9.1:0.8. Elemental analysis of the purified bioflocculant revealed that the weight fractions of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur were 30.8%, 5.3%, 54.7%, 6.4%, and 2.9%, respectively. Furthermore, the purified bioflocculant was pH tolerant within the range of 2-8 and thermotolerant from 10°C to 100°C, with optimal activity at pH 7.0 and at a temperature of 40°C. The purified bioflocculant showed industrial potential for the treatment of drinking water. Considering these properties, especially its low molecular weight (5.3×10(4)Da), this bioflocculant with excellent solubility and favorable flocculation activity is particularly suited for flocculating small particles.

  20. Branching beta 1-6N-acetylglucosaminetransferases and polylactosamine expression in mouse F9 teratocarcinoma cells and differentiated counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, M; Lotan, R; Amos, B; Palcic, M; Takano, R; Dennis, J W

    1993-01-15

    beta-All-trans-retinoic acid (RA)-induced endodermal differentiation of mouse F9 teratocarcinoma cells is accompanied by changes in glycoprotein glycosylation, including expression of i antigen (i.e. polylactosamine) and leukophytohemagglutinin-reactive oligosaccharides (i.e. -GlcNAc beta 1-6Man alpha 1-6-branched N-linked). We have used the F9 teratocarcinoma cells as a model to study developmental regulation of glycosyltransferase activities which are responsible for the biosynthesis of beta 1-6GlcNAc-branched N- and O-linked oligosaccharides and polylactosamine. Growth of F9 cells in the presence of 10(-6) M RA for 4 days increased core 2 GlcNAc transferase and GlcNAc transferase V activities by 13- and 6-fold, respectively, whereas the activities of GlcNAc transferase I, beta 1-3GlcNAc transferase (i), beta 1-4Gal transferase, and beta 1-3Gal transferase increased 2-4-fold. Induction of glycosyltransferase activities by RA was dose-dependent and showed a biphasic response with approximately half of the increase observed 3 days after RA treatment and the remainder occurred by day 4. PYS-2, a parietal endoderm cell line, showed levels of glycosyltransferase activities similar to those of RA-treated F9 cells. Glycosyltransferase activities in the RA-resistant F9 cell line (RA-3-10) were low and showed only a small induction by RA. These observations suggest that differentiation of F9 cells is closely associated with induction of multiple glycosyltransferase activities, with most pronounced increases in GlcNAc transferase V and 2',5'-tetradenylate (core 2) GlcNAc transferase. The increase in GlcNAc transferase V was also reflected by the 4-6-fold increase in the binding of 125I-leukophytohemagglutinin to several cellular glycoproteins, which occurred after 3 days of RA treatment. The endo-beta-galactosidase-sensitive polylactosamine content of membrane glycoproteins and, in particular, the LAMP-1 glycoprotein was markedly increased after RA treatment of F9 cells

  1. F9 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are expressed at low temperature and recognise Galβ1-3GlcNAc-containing glycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël J Wurpel

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the leading causative agent of urinary tract infections (UTI in the developed world. Among the major virulence factors of UPEC, surface expressed adhesins mediate attachment and tissue tropism. UPEC strains typically possess a range of adhesins, with type 1 fimbriae and P fimbriae of the chaperone-usher class the best characterised. We previously identified and characterised F9 as a new chaperone-usher fimbrial type that mediates biofilm formation. However, the regulation and specific role of F9 fimbriae remained to be determined in the context of wild-type clinical UPEC strains. In this study we have assessed the distribution and genetic context of the f9 operon among diverse E. coli lineages and pathotypes and demonstrated that f9 genes are significantly more conserved in a UPEC strain collection in comparison to the well-defined E. coli reference (ECOR collection. In the prototypic UPEC strain CFT073, the global regulator protein H-NS was identified as a transcriptional repressor of f9 gene expression at 37°C through its ability to bind directly to the f9 promoter region. F9 fimbriae expression was demonstrated at 20°C, representing the first evidence of functional F9 fimbriae expression by wild-type E. coli. Finally, glycan array analysis demonstrated that F9 fimbriae recognise and bind to terminal Galβ1-3GlcNAc structures.

  2. Maternal low-level somatic mosaicism of Cys155Tyr of F9 in severe hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ki-O; Yoo, Ki-Young; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficient coagulation factor IX from a mutation in the F9 gene. Here, we report a family with two brothers having severe hemophilia B inherited from a mother with low-level somatic mosaicism of a F9 mutation. The proband was a 2-year-old boy with severe hemophilia B from a hemizygous mutation of F9, c.464G>A (p.Cys155Tyr). He was the first child and was considered a sporadic case based on the lack of family history of bleeding diathesis. His mother was tested for carrier status and was determined to be homozygous for wild-type genotypes (noncarrier). Subsequently, however, his brother was born and also had severe hemophilia B from Cys155Tyr. This prompted us to review the chromatogram of the mother, which revealed a small peak corresponding to the mutant genotype. On suspicion of somatic low-level mosaicism in the mother, we further performed allele-specific PCR and thymine and adenine cloning, and confirmed the presence of the mutant allele in the mother. To our knowledge, this is the first case of maternal somatic mosaicism for a cytosine-phosphate-guanine transition mutation in hemophilia B. The acknowledgment of somatic mosaicism and further molecular investigation are important in sporadic hemophilia B to deliver informative genetic counseling and risk assessment.

  3. Experiment list: SRX087269 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -RXRa || chip antibody supplier=in-house antibody [generated by immunization of r...ce_name=embryonal carcinoma cells || cell line=F9 embryonal carcinoma cells || chip antibody=polyclonal anti

  4. Characterization of protein kinase CK2 protein subunits and p53 in F9 teratocarcinoma cells in the absence and presence of cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küpper, M; Köster, M; Schmidt-Spaniol, I

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cis-diaminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) on the induction of p53 and protein kinase CK2 activity was studied in the mouse teratocarcinoma cell line F9. Treatment of the cells with the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin led to the detection of p53 3 h after addition of the drug. F9 ...

  5. 7 CFR 15f.9 - What will the Director do to settle my Section 741 Complaint Request when it is received?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What will the Director do to settle my Section 741 Complaint Request when it is received? 15f.9 Section 15f.9 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... Section 741 Complaint Request when it is received? The Director will review each Section 741...

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (n-Csub>4sub>F>9sub>CH>2sub>CH>2sub>OH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Hurley, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the Cl atom initiated oxidation of 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (C4F9CH2CH2OH, 4:2 FTOH) in the presence of NOx in 700 Torr of N-2/O-2 diluent at 296 K. Chemical activation effects play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of the peroxy......, and possibly the alkoxy, radicals derived from 4:2 FTOH. Cl atoms react with C4F9CH2CH2OH to give C4F9CH2C.HOH radicals which add O-2 to give chemically activated alpha-hydroxyperoxy radicals, [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]*. In 700 Torr of N-2/ O-2 at 296 K, approximately 50% of the [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]* radicals decompose...

  7. Variations among Japanese of the factor IX gene (F9) detected by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Takahashi, Norio; Asakawa, Junichi; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Meiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    In the course of feasibility studies to examine the efficiencies and practicalities of various techniques for screening for genetic variations, the human coagulation factor IX (F9) genes of 63 Japanese families were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Four target sequences with lengths of 983-2,891 bp from the F9 genes of 126 unrelated individuals from Hiroshima and their 100 children were amplified by PCR, digested with restriction enzymes to approximately 500-bp fragments, and examined by DGGE - a total of 6,724 bp being examined per individual. GC-rich sequences (GC-clamps) of 40 bp were attached to both ends of the target sequences, as far as was feasible. Eleven types of new nucleotide substitutions were detected in the population, none of which produced RFLPs or caused hemophilia B. By examining two target sequences in a single lane, approximately 8,000 bp in a diploid individual could be examined. This approach is very effective for the detection of variations in DNA and is applicable to large-scale population studies. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. 癌胚抗原、鳞状细胞癌抗原、HPV-E7蛋白检测对宫颈癌诊断的价值%Diagnostic value of carcino embryonic antigen,squamous cell carcinoma antigen, human papilloma virus-E7 in cervical carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗雯

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨癌胚抗原( carcino embryonic antigen,CEA)、鳞状细胞癌抗原( squamous cell carcinoma antigen,SCC)、HPV-E7蛋白检测对宫颈癌诊断的价值。方法将2013年7月~2015年7月浙江省台州市中医院收治的107例妇女患者按照病理检查结果分为宫颈癌组60例和宫颈上皮内瘤变(CIN组)47例,另选择同期在医院体检的健康人群50例作为对照组,采用酶联免疫吸附试验检测3组血清HPV-E7、CEA、SCC表达水平,并以血清HPV-E7、CEA、SCC水平绘制ROC曲线以分析3个指标的诊断价值。结果宫颈癌组血清HPV-E7、CEA、SCC均显著高于CIN组和对照组(P<0.05),CIN组与对照组血清HPV-E7、CEA、SCC比较差异无统计学意义;Ⅰ~Ⅱ期宫颈癌患者血清HPV-E7、CEA、SCC水平显著低于Ⅲ~Ⅳ期患者,2者比较差异具有统计学意义( P<0.05)。 HPV-E7的ROC曲线下面积显著高于CEA和SCC(Z=2.914,2.951, P<0.05),CEA、SCC的 ROC曲线下面积比较差异无统计学意义(Z=1.580,P=0.057)。结论宫颈癌患者血清HPV-E7、CEA、SCC均显著升高,HPV-E7对宫颈癌早期诊断的价值更高,有望成为宫颈癌及时诊断的有效指标之一。%Objective To explore the diagnostic value of carcino embryonic antigen (CEA),squamous cell carcinoma antigen(SCC),human papilloma virus-E7 (HPV-E7) in cervical carcinoma.Methods A total of 107 cases of women patients treated in hospital from July 2013 to July 2015 accorded to the pathological examination results were divided into cervical cancer group 60 cases and CIN group 47 cases,another 50 cases of healthy people were selected as control group, and serum expression levels of HPV-E7, CEA and SCC in the three groups were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results The serum HPV-E7, CEA and SCC in cervical cancer group were significantly higher than those in CIN group and control group (P<0

  9. Luminescence in Li2Sr2Al2PO4F9:Dy3+ - a novel nanophosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, K N; Dhoble, S J

    2012-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed numerous advantages of the wet chemical method in reaction acceleration, yield improvement, enhanced photoluminescence properties and the evolution of new material phases. In the present study the novel nanophosphor Li(2)Sr(2)Al(2)PO(4)F(9):Dy(3+) was synthesized by a one-step wet chemical method. Formation of single-phase compounds was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and characterized by photoluminescence (PL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The average diameter of the particles was calculated from the TEM image as ca. 20 nm. The synthesized nanophosphor exhibited intense blue and yellow emissions at 482 and 575 nm, respectively, owing to the Dy(3+) ion, by Hg-free excitation at 387 nm, i.e. solid-state lighting excitation. The results obtained showed that phosphors have the potential for applications in the lamp industry.

  10. [The surface glycolipid antigen specific for the internal cell mass of the mouse blastocyst and of the stem cells of murine teratocarcinoma F9].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfimova, M L; Bannikov, G A; Troianovskiĭ, S M

    1989-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody that recognizes a new antigen on the surface of mouse teratocarcinoma F9 stem cells has been described. This antigen is a glycolipid as demonstrated by inhibition of immunofluorescence by different monosaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipid fraction of F9 cells as well as by chemical analysis. Immunofluorescent staining of in vitro cultivated preimplantation mouse embryos has demonstrated that this antigen is specific only of internal cell mass cells of late blastocyst.

  11. Carcinoma in situ testis, the progenitor of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Daugaard, G

    2005-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT), including seminomas, embryonal carcinomas, teratomas and yolk sac tumours, have a common precursor, the carcinoma in situ (CIS) cell. Recent gene expression studies displaying close similarity of CIS cells to embryonic stem cells support the longstanding theory...

  12. Involvement of ubiquitous and tale transcription factors, as well as liganded RXRα, in the regulation of human SOX2 gene expression in the NT2/D1 embryonal carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milivojević Milena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available SOX2 is a key transcription factor in embryonic development representing a universal marker of pluripotent stem cells. Based on the functional redundancy and overlapping expression patterns of SOXB1 subgroup members during development, the goal of this study has been to analyze if some aspects of regulation of expression are preserved between human SOX2 and SOX3 genes. Thus, we have tested several transcription factors previously demonstrated to play roles in controlling SOX3 gene activity for potential participation in the regulation of SOX2 gene expression in NT2/D1 cells. Here we report on the activation of SOX2 expression by ubiquitous transcription factors (NF-Y, Sp1 and MAZ, TALE family members (Pbx1 and Meis1, as well as liganded RXRα. Elucidating components involved in the regulation of SOX gene expression represent a valuable contribution in unraveling the regulatory networks operating in pluripotent embryonic cells.

  13. Effects of synthetic retinoids and retinoic acid isomers on the expression of alkaline phosphatase in F9 teratocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, M; Zanotta, S; Terao, M; Garattini, S; Garattini, E

    1993-10-15

    Expression of ALP in F9 teratocarcinoma cells is induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) (Gianni' et al., Biochem. J. 274: 673-678, 1991). The specific ligand for retinoic acid related receptors (RXRs), 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA), and three synthetic analogs binding to the alpha, beta and gamma forms of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), AM580, CD2019, and CD437, were used to study their effects on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic activity and mRNA levels. At concentrations close to the Kd for their respective receptors, 9-cis RA, AM580 (the RAR alpha agonist) and CD437 (the RAR gamma agonist) clearly upregulate the expression of the ALP gene, whereas the effect of CD2019 (the RAR beta agonist) is very modest. A specific inhibitor of the RAR alpha, Ro 41-5253, completely blocks the induction of ALP triggered by AM580, while it has minor effects on the upregulation caused by ATRA, 9-cis RA, CD437 and CD2019. The induction of ALP observed with the various retinoids is inhibited by the contemporaneous treatment with dibutyryl cAMP. The levels of the RAR alpha and gamma transcripts are unaltered, while RAR beta mRNAs are induced by ATRA, AM580, CD437 and to a lower extent by 9-cis RA and CD2019.

  14. Replication of long-bone length QTL in the F9-F10 LG,SM advanced intercross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgard, Elizabeth A; Jarvis, Joseph P; Roseman, Charles C; Maxwell, Taylor J; Kenney-Hunt, Jane P; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Pletscher, L Susan; Wang, Bing; Fawcett, Gloria L; Leatherwood, Christopher J; Wolf, Jason B; Cheverud, James M

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping techniques are frequently used to identify genomic regions associated with variation in phenotypes of interest. However, the F(2) intercross and congenic strain populations usually employed have limited genetic resolution resulting in relatively large confidence intervals that greatly inhibit functional confirmation of statistical results. Here we use the increased resolution of the combined F(9) and F(10) generations (n = 1455) of the LG,SM advanced intercross to fine-map previously identified QTL associated with the lengths of the humerus, ulna, femur, and tibia. We detected 81 QTL affecting long-bone lengths. Of these, 49 were previously identified in the combined F(2)-F(3) population of this intercross, while 32 represent novel contributors to trait variance. Pleiotropy analysis suggests that most QTL affect three to four long bones or serially homologous limb segments. We also identified 72 epistatic interactions involving 38 QTL and 88 novel regions. This analysis shows that using later generations of an advanced intercross greatly facilitates fine-mapping of confidence intervals, resolving three F(2)-F(3) QTL into multiple linked loci and narrowing confidence intervals of other loci, as well as allowing identification of additional QTL. Further characterization of the biological bases of these QTL will help provide a better understanding of the genetics of small variations in long-bone length.

  15. 原发性松果体区胚胎癌的诊断与治疗(附二例报告及文献复习)%Diagnosis and treatment of primary embryonal carcinoma in pineal region: report of two cases and literatures review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖罡; 邱炳辉; 方陆雄; 漆松涛

    2011-01-01

    Objective Primary embryonal carcinoma in pineal region is extremely rare.Here we report two such cases and combined literatures review to discuss its diagnosis,treatment and prognosis.Method Two primary embryonal carcinoma in pineal region verified histologically were presented.In one cases,the pre -operative serum alpha -fetoprotein (AFP) level reached significantly high level,6 810μg/L,but showed negative staining forβ-human chorionic gonadotropin (β- HCG).In the other one,accompanied by elevation of β-HCG level,5 260 mlU/ml,the serum AFP was negative.The tumors were microsurgically removed by transoccipito -tentorial approach.Endoscopic third ventriculostomy was used after tumor removal because of recurrent hydrocephalus.Both patients received adjunctive treatments included radiation therapy (whole central nervous system 30 Gy and tumor bed 50 Gy) and 4 course of chemotherapy.Results In both patients,the tumors were totally removed.Postoperative tumor immunohistochemistry indicators were present in case 1 with positive reaction for cytokeratin(CK) and AFP,in case 2 with positive CK and β-HCG.After adjunctive treatments,the serum AFP and β - HCG of two patiants were decreased to normal ranges.After post - operative follow - up of one year,two patients still survived and the serum markers were almost normal.Conclusions Measurement of serum β-HCG and AFP is extraordinarily significant for the diagnosis and post - treatment monitoring of pineal region embryonal carcinoma.Pathological differential diagnosis requires immunohistochemical indicators including cytokeratin (CK),AFP andβ - HCG.With radically surgical removal and combined adjunctive therapy including radiation and chemotherapy,good consequence could be obtained.%目的 原发性松果体区胚胎癌非常罕见,本文报道2例,并结合文献探讨其诊断、治疗和预后.方法 2例经病理证实的原发性松果体区胚胎癌,术前例1患者血清甲胎蛋白(AFP)6 810μg/L,人绒毛膜

  16. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  17. Sec61alpha synthesis is enhanced during translocation of nascent chains of collagen type IV in F9 teratocarcinoma cells after retinoic acid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nascent procollagen peptides and other secretory proteins are transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane through a protein-conducting channel called translocon. Sec61alpha, a multispanning membrane translocon protein, has been implicated as being essential for translocation of polypeptide chains into the cisterns of the ER. Sec61alpha forms a protein complex with collagen and Hsp47, an ER-resident heat shock protein that binds specifically to collagen. However, it is not known whether Sec61alpha is ubiquitously produced in collagen-producing F9 teratocarcinoma cells or under heat shock treatment. Furthermore, the production and utilization of Sec61alpha may depend on the stage of cell differentiation. Cultured F9 teratocarcinoma cells are capable of differentiation in response to low concentrations of retinoic acid. This differentiation results in loss of tumorigenicity. Mouse F9 cells were grown in culture medium at 37ºC and 43ºC (heat shock treatment treated or not with retinoic acid, and labeled in certain instances with 35S-methionine. Membrane-bound polysomes of procollagen IV were then isolated. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed using polyclonal antibodies against collagen IV, Hsp47 and Sec61alpha. Under retinoic acid-untreated conditions, F9 cells produced undetectable amounts of Sec61alpha. Sec61alpha, Hsp47 and type IV collagen levels were increased after retinoic acid treatment. Heat shock treatment did not alter Sec61alpha levels, suggesting that Sec61alpha production is probably not affected by heat shock. These data indicate that the enhanced production of Sec61alpha in retinoic acid-induced F9 teratocarcinoma cells parallels the increased synthesis of Hsp47 and collagen type IV.

  18. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan); Komiya, Eriko [Department of Therapy Development and Innovation for Immune Disorders and Cancers, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road- Box 100278, Room MSB M410A, Gainesville, FL, 32610 (United States); Iwao, Noriaki [Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kei, E-mail: kohnuma@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, IMSUT Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan); Morimoto, Chikao [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, IMSUT Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan)

    2016-05-20

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulating the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Knockdown of CD82 decreases EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •Anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 inhibits EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •4F9 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation via control of CD82 distribution in lipid rafts.

  19. The Analysis and Exposition on the Causes of F9 Fault Belt Water Gushing and Strengthening of Qingyunshan Mountain Extra-long Tunnel of Xiangpu Railway%向莆铁路青云山特长隧道F9断层带涌水原因分析与加固处理方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛建安

    2011-01-01

    对向莆铁路青云山特长隧道F9断层带的涌水原因进行了分析,对断层带涌水、坍塌的加固处理方案进行了论述,并谈了几点体会。%The causes to the F9 Fault Belt Water Gushing of Qingyunshan Mountain Extra-long Tunnel of Xiangpu Railway are analyzed and the strengthening treatment of water gushing and collapsing is discussed together with some experience.

  20. Parotid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristine Bjørndal; Godballe, Christian; de Stricker, Karin;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim is to investigate the expression of kit protein (KIT) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in parotid carcinomas in order to correlate the expression to histology and prognosis. Further we want to perform mutation analysis of KIT-positive adenoid cystic carcinomas....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from 73 patients with parotid gland carcinomas were used for the study. The sections were stained with both KIT and EGFR polyclonal antibodies. Twelve KIT-positive adenoid cystic carcinomas were examined for c-kit mutation in codon 816....... RESULTS: Of all carcinomas 25% were KIT-positive and 79% were EGFR-positive. Ninety-two percentage of the adenoid cystic carcinomas were KIT-positive. None of the adenoid cystic carcinomas had mutations in codon 816 of the c-kit gene. CONCLUSION: Neither KIT- nor EGFR-expression seem to harbour...

  1. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  2. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo; Komiya, Eriko; Dang, Nam H; Iwao, Noriaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2016-05-20

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulating the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Sebaceous Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hill Medical; 2008. p. 240-9. Nelson BR, Hamlet KR, Gillard M et al. “Sebaceous carcinoma.” J ... Acad Dermatol . 2003 48:401-8. Nelson BR, Hamlet KR, Gillard M et al . “Sebaceous carcinoma.” J ...

  4. Embryonic death and the creation of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, Donald W.; Zucker, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    The creation of human embryonic stem cells through the destruction of a human embryo pits the value of a potential therapeutic tool against that of an early human life. This contest of values has resulted in a polarized debate that neglects areas of common interest and perspective. We suggest that a common ground for pursuing research on human embryonic stem cells can be found by reconsidering the death of the human embryo and by applying to this research the ethical norms of essential organ ...

  5. Embryonic death and the creation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Donald W; Zucker, Howard A

    2004-11-01

    The creation of human embryonic stem cells through the destruction of a human embryo pits the value of a potential therapeutic tool against that of an early human life. This contest of values has resulted in a polarized debate that neglects areas of common interest and perspective. We suggest that a common ground for pursuing research on human embryonic stem cells can be found by reconsidering the death of the human embryo and by applying to this research the ethical norms of essential organ donation.

  6. Misdiagnosed ectopic thyroid carcinoma:report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌玲; 周水洪; 汪审清; 王丽君

    2004-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid tissue is a congenital disease caused by abnormal migration of thyroid in the embryonic stage. Malignant ectopic thyroid tissue is often misdiagnosed as a cyst of the thyroglossal duct. We treated 2 patients with papillary carcinoma in the anterior midline of the neck from May 1985 to Detober 2002.

  7. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocheke A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botyroides of the cervix, which is rare, is described in a 16-year-old. The combined use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery has markedly improved survival in those with this condition. However, our patient did not benefit from this treatment modality due to late presentation and loss to follow-up.

  8. Synthesis,structureandluminescentpropertiesofanewVernierphaseLu7O6F9 doped by Eu3+as potential scintillator with unique lath tube architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽莎; 陈昊鸿; 刘必秋; 张辉; 唐彬; 冯贤娟; 孙志嘉; 赵景泰

    2014-01-01

    To explore novel nano-scintillator with a controllable architecture, pure and Eu3+doped lutetium oxyfluoride (Lu7O6F9) powder were synthesized by combining mild hydrothermal method and solid state calcination approach. The products were all pure orthorhombic Vernier phase demonstrated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The detailed crystal structure was also studied by Reitveld refinement. Lath-like microcrystals composed of nanoparticles with unique hollow tube of the products were supported by the images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Excited by X-ray with W as the target, the pure product showed intense broad emission with the peak at about 400 nm suitable for modern photoelectric multiplier tube (PMT), while the Eu3+doped sample transferred the incident energy to Eu3+ions and gave strong 5D0→7Fj (j=0, 1, 2 and 4) emis-sion, which fitted for imaging and labeling measurements. From the luminescent properties, both pure and Eu3+-doped products are potential excellent scintillator for X-ray imaging and other high energy detectors, and the pure product is also a good host candidate for rare earth doping.

  9. Experiment list: SRX107356 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ll type=embryonal carcinoma cells || cell line=F9 || comment=Chromatin IP against RXRa. In house polyclonal ...PB105 (MDTKHFLPLDFSTQVNSSSLNSPTGRGC)] || chip antibody=in-house polyclonal Ab against RXRa || chip antibody

  10. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  11. The birth of embryonic pluripotency

    OpenAIRE

    Boroviak, Thorsten; Nichols, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/369/1657/20130541. Formation of a eutherian mammal requires concurrent establishment of embryonic and extraembryonic lineages. The functions of the trophectoderm and primitive endoderm are to enable implantation in the maternal uterus, axis specification and delivery of nutrients. The pluripotent epiblast represents the founding cell population of the embryo proper, which is...

  12. Ameloblastic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen B Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma of jaws are common and locally destructive tumors originating from odontogenic apparatus. They constitute approximately 1% of all jaw tumors with 80% occurring in the mandible. Ameloblastoma exhibiting a frank malignancy is a rare entity and occurs in less than 1% of all ameloblastomas. Among the two jaws, ameloblastic carcinoma involving maxilla is extremely rare with only few cases reported so far in the literature. Here we report two cases of ameloblastic carcinoma one involving the maxilla and the other involving mandible, with an aggressive clinical course leading to extensive local destruction of the affected jaws.

  13. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of ESGP, an Embryonic Stem Cell and Germ Cell Specific Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Mei CHEN; Zhong-Wei DU; Zhen YAO

    2005-01-01

    Several putative Oct-4 downstream genes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been identified using the suppression-subtractive hybridization method. In this study, one of the novel genes encoding an ES cell and germ cell specific protein (ESGP) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.ESGP contains 801 bp encoding an 84 amino acid small protein and has no significant homology to any known genes. There is a signal peptide at the N-terminal of ESGP protein as predicted by SeqWeb (GCG)(SeqWeb version 2.0.2, http://gcg.biosino.org:8080/). The result of immunofluorescence assay suggested that ESGP might encode a secretory protein. The expression pattern of ESGP is consistent with the expression of Oct-4 during embryonic development. ESGP protein was detected in fertilized oocyte, from 3.5 day postcoital (dpc) blastocyst to 17.5 dpc embryo, and was only detected in testis and ovary tissues in adult. In vitro, ESGP was only expressed in pluripotent cell lines, such as embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic germ cells, but not in their differentiated progenies. Despite its specific expression,forced expression of ESGP is not indispensable for the effect of Oct-4 on ES cell self-renewal, and does not affect the differentiation to three germ layers.

  14. p53 and the ribosomal protein L5 participate in high molecular mass complex formation with protein kinase CK2 in murine teratocarcinoma cell line F9 after serum stimulation and cisplatin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Issinger, O G

    1998-01-01

    Using the murine teratocarcinoma cell line F9 we investigated the influence of serum stimulation and cisplatin treatment on the p53, CK2, MDM2 levels. Both treatments led to an increase of p53, though with different kinetics; the other proteins investigated were not affected. We present direct...

  15. Developmental Stage-Specific Embryonic Induction of HepG2 Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanning; Zong, Yanhong; Xiao, Zhigang; Zhu, Mengxuan; Xiao, Hui; Qi, Jinsheng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Although hepatocellular carcinoma cells can sometimes undergo differentiation in an embryonic microenvironment, the mechanism is poorly understood. The developmental stage-specific embryonic induction of tumor cell differentiation was investigated. Both chick and mouse liver extracts and hepatoblast-enriched cells at different developmental stages were used to treat human hepatoma HepG2 cells, and the effects on the induction of differentiation were evaluated. The nuclear factors controlling differentiation, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α, HNF-1α, HNF-6 and upstream stimulatory factor-1 (USF-1), and the oncogene Myc and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were measured. HNF-4α RNA interference was used to verify the role of HNF-4α. Embryonic induction effects were further tested in vivo by injecting HepG2 tumor cells into immunodeficient nude mice. The 9-11-days chick liver extracts and 13.5-14.5-days mouse hepatoblast-enriched cells could inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of HepG2 cells, leading to either death or maturation to hepatocytes. The maturation of surviving HepG2 cells was confirmed by increases in the expressions of HNF-4α, HNF-1α, HNF-6, and USF-1, and decreases in Myc and AFP. The embryonic induction of HepG2 cell maturation could be attenuated by HNF-4α RNA interference. Furthermore, the 13.5-days mouse hepatoblast culture completely eliminated HepG2 tumors with inhibited Myc and induced HNF-4α, confirming this embryonic induction effect in vivo. This study demonstrated that developmental stage-specific embryonic induction of HepG2 cell differentiation might help in understanding embryonic differentiation and oncogenesis.

  16. UROTHELIAL CARCINOMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    normal levels (_<_ 4 IUIL) corresponded with non recurrence of tumor and the persistence of ... Table 1: Tumor Grade and Stage in 120 Patients with Human Urothelial Carcinoma. pTa pT1 T2 ..... gonadotropin~like substance secreted by lung.

  17. Carcinoma vulvar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamit Peñas Zayas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available El carcinoma de la vulva tiene una incidencia de aproximadamente un 3-5% dentro de todas las enfermedades ginecológicas malignas. El 90% de los tumores malignos de la vulva está constituido por carcinoma epidermoide, el resto son adenocarcinomas, carcinomas de células basales y melanomas. Se realiza la presentación de un caso de una paciente femenina de 25 años de edad con antecedentes  de Diabetes Mellitus tipo II y trombopatia, que ingresa en el servicio de ginecología con un cuadro cutáneo polimorfo, localizado en labios mayores y menores, dado por lesiones eritematoerosivas y vegetante, sospechándose clínicamente el diagnóstico  de un carcinoma epidermoide, corroborándose el mismo histológicamente al realizarse biopsia de piel. Se indicó tratamiento con quimioterapia. Por la edad de la paciente y ser menos frecuente en mucosa que en la piel,  motivo la presentación del caso.

  18. Parathyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Krøll, L; Ladefoged, C;

    1986-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a slow growing tumor, and the patients most often die from complications to the hypercalcemia. Therefore, any attempt should be made to remove local recurrence and metastasis surgically, as medical treatment is disappointing. A case treated with extensive vascular surgery...

  19. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Bernadette

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a tumor arising from the epithelial cells that cover the surface and line the nasopharynx. The annual incidence of NPC in the UK is 0.3 per million at age 0–14 years, and 1 to 2 per million at age 15–19 years. Incidence is higher in the Chinese and Tunisian populations. Although rare, NPC accounts for about one third of childhood nasopharyngeal neoplasms. Three subtypes of NPC are recognized in the World Health Organization (WHO classification: 1 squamous cell carcinoma, typically found in the older adult population; 2 non-keratinizing carcinoma; 3 undifferentiated carcinoma. The tumor can extend within or out of the nasopharynx to the other lateral wall and/or posterosuperiorly to the base of the skull or the palate, nasal cavity or oropharynx. It then typically metastases to cervical lymph nodes. Cervical lymphadenopathy is the initial presentation in many patients, and the diagnosis of NPC is often made by lymph node biopsy. Symptoms related to the primary tumor include trismus, pain, otitis media, nasal regurgitation due to paresis of the soft palate, hearing loss and cranial nerve palsies. Larger growths may produce nasal obstruction or bleeding and a "nasal twang". Etiological factors include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, genetic susceptibility and consumption of food with possible carcinogens – volatile nitrosamines. The recommended treatment schedule consists of three courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, irradiation, and adjuvant interferon (IFN-beta therapy.

  20. Studies on mechanism of Sialy Lewis-X antigen in liver metastases of human colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Wei Li; Yan Qing Ding; Jun Jie Cai; Shao Qing Yang; Lian Bing An; Dong Fang Qiao

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Sialyl Lewis-X antigen ,correlated with carcinoma, is a group of carbohydrate antigen containing oligosaccharide expressed of embryonic tisue and glycoproteins on cell surface of embryonic tissue[1].The SLeX antigen located on cell surface is synthesized principally by two enzymes ,al ,3fucosyltransfrease and a2, 3sialyctransferase.In adults ,SLeX antigen is expressed principally on the surfaces of granulocytic cells and some tumor cells .

  1. Epigenetic influence on embryonic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donkin, Ida; Barrès, Romain; Pinborg, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The epigenome is sensitive to environmental changes and can sustainably alter gene expression, notably during embryonic development. New research indicates that epigenetic factors are heritable, which is why paternal lifestyle may affect fetal development and risk of disease. Children conceived...... by assisted reproduction technology (ART) have an increased risk of peri- and postnatal complications, and as specific ART protocols associate with specific risk profiles, the procedures themselves may cause epigenetic changes contributing to the altered outcomes of the 5,000 Danish children annually...

  2. Embryonic anti-aging niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Irina M; Yousef, Hanadie; Conboy, Michael J

    2011-05-01

    Although functional organ stem cells persist in the old, tissue damage invariably overwhelms tissue repair, ultimately causing the demise of an organism. The poor performance of stem cells in an aged organ, such as skeletal muscle, is caused by the changes in regulatory pathways such as Notch, MAPK and TGF-β, where old differentiated tissue actually inhibits its own regeneration. This perspective analyzes the current literature on regulation of organ stem cells by their young versus old niches and suggests that determinants of healthy and prolonged life might be under a combinatorial control of cell cycle check point proteins and mitogens, which need to be tightly balanced in order to promote tissue regeneration without tumor formation. While responses of adult stem cells are regulated extrinsically and age-specifically, we put forward experimental evidence suggesting that embryonic cells have an intrinsic youthful barrier to aging and produce soluble pro-regenerative proteins that signal the MAPK pathway for rejuvenating myogenesis. Future identification of this activity will improve our understanding of embryonic versus adult regulation of tissue regeneration suggesting novel strategies for organ rejuvenation. Comprehensively, the current intersection of aging and stem cell science indicates that if the age-imposed decline in the regenerative capacity of stem cells was understood, the debilitating lack of organ maintenance in the old could be ameliorated and perhaps, even reversed.

  3. Vertebrate Embryonic Cleavage Pattern Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Andrew; Chavez, Shawn; Danilchik, Michael; Wühr, Martin; Pelegri, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The pattern of the earliest cell divisions in a vertebrate embryo lays the groundwork for later developmental events such as gastrulation, organogenesis, and overall body plan establishment. Understanding these early cleavage patterns and the mechanisms that create them is thus crucial for the study of vertebrate development. This chapter describes the early cleavage stages for species representing ray-finned fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles, mammals, and proto-vertebrate ascidians and summarizes current understanding of the mechanisms that govern these patterns. The nearly universal influence of cell shape on orientation and positioning of spindles and cleavage furrows and the mechanisms that mediate this influence are discussed. We discuss in particular models of aster and spindle centering and orientation in large embryonic blastomeres that rely on asymmetric internal pulling forces generated by the cleavage furrow for the previous cell cycle. Also explored are mechanisms that integrate cell division given the limited supply of cellular building blocks in the egg and several-fold changes of cell size during early development, as well as cytoskeletal specializations specific to early blastomeres including processes leading to blastomere cohesion. Finally, we discuss evolutionary conclusions beginning to emerge from the contemporary analysis of the phylogenetic distributions of cleavage patterns. In sum, this chapter seeks to summarize our current understanding of vertebrate early embryonic cleavage patterns and their control and evolution.

  4. Embryonic Development: Chicken and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle M. Darras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken and zebrafish are two model species regularly used to study the role of thyroid hormones in vertebrate development. Similar to mammals, chickens have one thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα and one TRβ gene, giving rise to three TR isoforms: TRα, TRβ2, and TRβ0, the latter with a very short amino-terminal domain. Zebrafish also have one TRβ gene, providing two TRβ1 variants. The zebrafish TRα gene has been duplicated, and at least three TRα isoforms are expressed: TRαA1-2 and TRαB are very similar, while TRαA1 has a longer carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. All these TR isoforms appear to be functional, ligand-binding receptors. As in other vertebrates, the different chicken and zebrafish TR isoforms have a divergent spatiotemporal expression pattern, suggesting that they also have distinct functions. Several isoforms are expressed from the very first stages of embryonic development and early chicken and zebrafish embryos respond to thyroid hormone treatment with changes in gene expression. Future studies in knockdown and mutant animals should allow us to link the different TR isoforms to specific processes in embryonic development.

  5. Carcinoma verrugoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Quesada Jiménez

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino de 76 años, vecino de Turrialba, agricultor, que consultó por una lesión de 3 años de evolución, localizada en la palma de la mano derecha a nivel palmar y compromiso de los dedos de la misma mano, caracterizada como una neoformación exofítica verrugosa de 5 por 11 cm. aproximadamente, con material caseoso entre sus crestas. La lesión ha estado creciendo de forma acelerada en los últimos 3 meses, causándole dolor y que le imposibilita ellaborar. Se le realizaron exámenes y se descartaron varias causas infecciosas, y concluyendo luego de varias biopsias con el diagnóstico de un carcinoma verrugoso. El paciente fue tratado mediante una amputación parcial de la mano. Este tumor es una variante del carcinoma epidermoide y presentamos su clasificación, patogénesis, histopatología, manifestaciones clínicas más frecuentes y diagnóstico diferencial.A 76 year old farmer from Turrialba (Cartago, presented with a 3 year old lesion of his right pal and proximal fingers. It was exophitic, wart like, and it measured 5x11 cm, draining caseous material from its crests. The lesion had grows quickly for the last 3 months and it became tender to the point of making impossible for him to work. A series of tests were done to rule out other possible infections causes, after several biopsies the diagnosis of verrocous carcinoma was made. The patient underwent a partial amputation of his hand. This tumor is considered a from of squamous cell carcinoma, we present here its classification, pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical manifestations and diferential diagnosis.

  6. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  7. Generation of a heterozygous knockout human embryonic stem cell line for the OCIAD1 locus using CRISPR/CAS9 mediated targeting: BJNhem20-OCIAD1-CRISPR-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeti K. Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma immuno-reactive antigen domain containing 1(OCIAD1 single copy was knocked out generating an OCIAD1 heterozygous knockout human embryonic stem line named BJNhem20-OCIAD1-CRISPR-20. The line was generated using CRISPR-Cas9D10A double nickase knockout strategy (Mali et al., 2013.

  8. Human embryonic stem cell microenvironment suppresses the tumorigenic phenotype of aggressive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Margaryan, Naira V; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Wheaton, William W; Abbott, Daniel E; Seftor, Richard E B; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2008-03-18

    Embryonic stem cells sustain a microenvironment that facilitates a balance of self-renewal and differentiation. Aggressive cancer cells, expressing a multipotent, embryonic cell-like phenotype, engage in a dynamic reciprocity with a microenvironment that promotes plasticity and tumorigenicity. However, the cancer-associated milieu lacks the appropriate regulatory mechanisms to maintain a normal cellular phenotype. Previous work from our laboratory reported that aggressive melanoma and breast carcinoma express the embryonic morphogen Nodal, which is essential for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) pluripotency. Based on the aberrant expression of this embryonic plasticity gene by tumor cells, this current study tested whether these cells could respond to regulatory cues controlling the Nodal signaling pathway, which might be sequestered within the microenvironment of hESCs, resulting in the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype. Specifically, we discovered that metastatic tumor cells do not express the inhibitor to Nodal, Lefty, allowing them to overexpress this embryonic morphogen in an unregulated manner. However, exposure of the tumor cells to a hESC microenvironment (containing Lefty) leads to a dramatic down-regulation in their Nodal expression concomitant with a reduction in clonogenicity and tumorigenesis accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Furthermore, this ability to suppress the tumorigenic phenotype is directly associated with the secretion of Lefty, exclusive to hESCs, because it is not detected in other stem cell types, normal cell types, or trophoblasts. The tumor-suppressive effects of the hESC microenvironment, by neutralizing the expression of Nodal in aggressive tumor cells, provide previously unexplored therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment.

  9. Mechanisms of embryonic stomach development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Kyle W; Wells, James M

    2017-06-01

    The stomach is a digestive organ that has important roles in human physiology and pathophysiology. The developmental origin of the stomach is the embryonic foregut, which also gives rise a number of other structures. There are several signaling pathways and transcription factors that are known to regulate stomach development at different stages, including foregut patterning, stomach specification, and gastric regionalization. These developmental events have important implications in later homeostasis and disease in the adult stomach. Here we will review the literature that has shaped our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that coordinate gastric organogenesis. Further we will discuss how developmental paradigms have guided recent efforts to differentiate stomach tissue from pluripotent stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  11. Molecular pathology of breast apocrine carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J.E.; Gromova, I.; Gromov, P.;

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that encompasses a wide range of histopathological types including: invasive ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, tubular carcinoma, and apocrine carcinoma among others. Pure apocrine carcinomas represent about 0.5%...

  12. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-19

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer.

  13. From embryonic stem cells to testicular germ cell cancer-- should we be concerned?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Sonne, Si Brask; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E

    2006-01-01

    that initial hypothesis but also indicating that CIS cells have a striking phenotypic similarity to embryonic stem cells (ESC). Many cancers have been proposed to originate from tissue-specific stem cells [so-called 'cancer stem cells' (CSC)] and we argue that CIS may be a very good example of a CSC......, but with exceptional features due to the retention of embryonic pluripotency. In addition, considering the fact that pre-invasive CIS cells are transformed from early fetal cells, possibly due to environmentally induced alterations of the niche, we discuss potential risks linked to the uncontrolled therapeutic use......Since the discovery of testicular carcinoma in situ (CIS) -- the precursor cell for the vast majority of germ cell tumours -- it has been proposed that CIS cells could be derived from transformed primordial germ cells or gonocytes. Here, we review recent discoveries not only substantiating...

  14. Embryonic stem cell research: an ethical problem

    OpenAIRE

    Рамазанова, А.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells offer hope for new therapies, but their use and research entail an ethical problem, which does not have a certain solution. Therefore, we can ask: What exactly are the ethical arguments? Why are they so tricky to resolve?Embryonic stem cell research poses a moral dilemma. It forces us to choose between two moral principles: The duty to prevent or alleviate suffering The duty to respect the value of human life To obtain embryonic stem cells, the early embryo has to be dest...

  15. Role of microglia in embryonic neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chih Kong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia begin colonizing the developing brain as early as embryonic day 9, prior to the emergence of neurons and other glia. Their ontogeny is also distinct from other central nervous system cells, as they derive from yolk sac hematopoietic progenitors and not neural progenitors. In this review, we feature these unique characteristics of microglia and assess the spatiotemporal similarities between microglia colonization of the central nervous system and embryonic neurogenesis. We also infer to existing evidence for microglia function from embryonic through to postnatal neurodevelopment to postulate roles for microglia in neurogenesis. PMID:27555616

  16. Carcinoma verrugoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Quesada Jiménez

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino de 76 años, vecino de Turrialba, agricultor, que consultó por una lesión de 3 años de evolución, localizada en la palma de la mano derecha a nivel palmar y compromiso de los dedos de la misma mano, caracterizada como una neoformación exofítica verrugosa de 5 por 11 cm. aproximadamente, con material caseoso entre sus crestas. La lesión ha estado creciendo de forma acelerada en los últimos 3 meses, causándole dolor y que le imposibilita ellaborar. Se le realizaron exámenes y se descartaron varias causas infecciosas, y concluyendo luego de varias biopsias con el diagnóstico de un carcinoma verrugoso. El paciente fue tratado mediante una amputación parcial de la mano. Este tumor es una variante del carcinoma epidermoide y presentamos su clasificación, patogénesis, histopatología, manifestaciones clínicas más frecuentes y diagnóstico diferencial.

  17. MicroRNA expression profiling of carcinoma in situ cells of the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotny, Guy Wayne; Belling, Kirstine Christensen; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram

    2012-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours, seminoma (SE) and non-seminoma (NS), of young adult men develop from a precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS), which resembles foetal gonocytes and retains embryonic pluripotency. We used microarrays to analyse microRNA (miRNA) expression in 12 human testis samples...

  18. Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures. It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex. In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors. Maintained in cul...

  19. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  20. Determination of mRNA, and protein levels of p53, MDM2 and protein kinase CK2 subunits in F9 cells after treatment with the apoptosis-inducing drugs cisplatin and carboplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, S; Ornskov, D; Guerra, B

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a pleiotropic serine/threonine kinase which has been shown to phosphorylate numerous substrates. Evidence is accumulating that CK2 may exist complexed to a variety of cellular proteins, e.g. p53, MDM2, and A-Raf. Here, we explored the effects of the chemotherapeutic drugs...... cisplatin and carboplatin on the mRNA and protein levels of p53, MDM2 and CK2 in a murine teratocarcinoma cell line F9. Northern and Western blot analyses were performed and the CK2 activity was determined. The degree of apoptosis after drug treatment was assessed using the TUNEL test. Six hours after...

  1. Carcinoma cuniculatum: not a verrucous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, M J; Rhatigan, R M

    2012-12-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum and verrucous carcinoma are both very well differentiated forms of squamous carcinoma and thus difficult to separate histologically from pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia. The diagnosis of each often requires clinical-pathologic correlation. We reviewed the literature on cases reported as carcinoma cuniculatum and compared these to the cases originally reported by Aird et al. In addition, we report an additional case of this entity that we encountered in our practice. In reviewing the literature it is evident that most authors consider carcinoma cuniculatum and verrucous carcinoma to be synonymous even though Aird's original two cases had no verrucous features. The lack of a clear conceptual distinction between these two entities may cause diagnostic confusion. The purpose of this report is to record a case of carcinoma cuniculatum which the authors believe to be similar to those reported by Aird et al., to emphasize the differences between carcinoma cuniculatum and verrucous carcinoma, and to explain how the lack of a clear conceptual distinction between these two tumors can lead to further delay in an already difficult diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Uncoupled embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues compromise blastocyst development after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine A Degrelle

    Full Text Available Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is the most efficient cell reprogramming technique available, especially when working with bovine species. Although SCNT blastocysts performed equally well or better than controls in the weeks following embryo transfer at Day 7, elongation and gastrulation defects were observed prior to implantation. To understand the developmental implications of embryonic/extra-embryonic interactions, the morphological and molecular features of elongating and gastrulating tissues were analysed. At Day 18, 30 SCNT conceptuses were compared to 20 controls (AI and IVP: 10 conceptuses each; one-half of the SCNT conceptuses appeared normal while the other half showed signs of atypical elongation and gastrulation. SCNT was also associated with a high incidence of discordance in embryonic and extra-embryonic patterns, as evidenced by morphological and molecular "uncoupling". Elongation appeared to be secondarily affected; only 3 of 30 conceptuses had abnormally elongated shapes and there were very few differences in gene expression when they were compared to the controls. However, some of these differences could be linked to defects in microvilli formation or extracellular matrix composition and could thus impact extra-embryonic functions. In contrast to elongation, gastrulation stages included embryonic defects that likely affected the hypoblast, the epiblast, or the early stages of their differentiation. When taking into account SCNT conceptus somatic origin, i.e. the reprogramming efficiency of each bovine ear fibroblast (Low: 0029, Med: 7711, High: 5538, we found that embryonic abnormalities or severe embryonic/extra-embryonic uncoupling were more tightly correlated to embryo loss at implantation than were elongation defects. Alternatively, extra-embryonic differences between SCNT and control conceptuses at Day 18 were related to molecular plasticity (high efficiency/high plasticity and subsequent pregnancy loss. Finally

  3. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or ...

  4. Stages of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms of adrenocortical carcinoma include pain in the abdomen. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by adrenocortical carcinoma: A lump in the abdomen . Pain the abdomen or back. A feeling of ...

  5. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  6. Undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, H.; Hamilton-Dutoit, S.; Jakel, K.T.;

    2004-01-01

    Undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas may be divided into small cell and large cell types. Among large cell undifferentiated carcinomas, lymphoepithelial carcinomas have to be distinguished, the latter of which are endemic in the Arctic regions and southern China where virtually all cases...... of these tumors are associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Association with EBV may also be observed in sporadic cases, and detection of EBV gene products may aid their diagnosis. Immunohistology may be employed to resolve the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas, comprising...... malignant lymphomas, amelanotic melanomas, Merkel cell carcinomas, and adenoid cystic carcinomas, in particular in small biopsy materials. Because of the rarity of undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas, the differential diagnosis should always include metastases of undifferentiated carcinomas arising...

  7. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynertson, Kurt A; Charlson, Mary E; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynertson, Kurt A. [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Charlson, Mary E. [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells.

  9. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  10. Chicken leukemia inhibitory factor maintains chicken embryonic stem cells in the undifferentiated state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Tategaki, Airo; Yamashita, Yusuke; Hisamatsu, Hikaru; Ogawa, Mari; Noguchi, Takashi; Aosasa, Masayoshi; Kawashima, Tsuyoshi; Akita, Sachiko; Nishimichi, Norihisa; Mitsui, Naoko; Furusawa, Shuichi; Matsuda, Haruo

    2004-06-04

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be maintained in an undifferentiated state in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family. In other mammals, this is not possible with LIF alone. Chicken ES-like cells (blastodermal cells) have only been cultured with mouse LIF because chicken LIF was not available. However the culture system is imperfect and chicken ES-like cells equivalent to mouse ES cells were not observed. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA-encoding chicken LIF using mRNA subtraction and RACE methodology. The chicken LIF cDNA encodes a protein with approximately 40% sequence identity to mouse LIF. It has 211 amino acids including a putative N-terminal signal peptide of 24 residues. Chicken blastodermal cells were cultured in the presence of bacterially expressed chicken LIF or mouse LIF. The expression of alkaline phosphatase and embryonal carcinoma cell monoclonal antibody-1 and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 and the activation of STAT3 were examined, all of which are indices of the undifferentiated state. Exposure in the blastodermal cells to recombinant chicken LIF but not to mouse LIF maintained the expression of these various markers. After 9 days of incubation, the blastodermal cells formed cystic embryoid bodies in the presence of mouse LIF but not in the presence of recombinant chicken LIF. We conclude that chicken LIF is able to maintain chicken ES cell cultures in the undifferentiated state.

  11. Embryonic Stem Cells: Isolation, Characterization and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the mammalian blastocyst. Traditionally, these cells have been derived and cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) supportive layers, which allow their continuous growth in an undifferentiated state. However, for any future industrial or clinical application hESCs should be cultured in reproducible, defined, and xeno-free culture system, where exposure to animal pathogens is prevented. From their derivation in 1998 the methods for culturing hESCs were significantly improved. This chapter wills discuss hESC characterization and the basic methods for their derivation and maintenance.

  12. Squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Maria Isabel Ramos; Vieira, Marcella Amaral Horta Barbosa; Portocarrero, Larissa Karine Leite; Fraga, Rafael Cavanellas; Kakizaki, Priscila; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma is an eccrine carcinoma subtype, and only twelve cases have been reported until now. It is a rare tumor and its histopathological diagnosis is difficult. Almost half of patients are misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma by the incisional biopsy. We report the thirteenth case of squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma. Female patient, 72 years old, in the last 6 months presenting erythematous, keratotic and ulcerated papules on the nose. The incisional biopsy diagnosed squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma. After excision, histopathology revealed positive margins. A wideningmargins surgery and grafting were performed, which again resulted in positive margins. The patient was then referred for radiotherapy. After 25 sessions, the injury reappeared. After another surgery, although the intraoperative biopsy showed free surgical margins, the product of resection revealed persistent lesion. Distinction between squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma is important because of the more aggressive nature of the first, which requires wider margins surgery to avoid recurrence.

  13. Squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Maria Isabel Ramos; Vieira, Marcella Amaral Horta Barbosa; Portocarrero, Larissa Karine Leite; Fraga, Rafael Cavanellas; Kakizaki, Priscila; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma is an eccrine carcinoma subtype, and only twelve cases have been reported until now. It is a rare tumor and its histopathological diagnosis is difficult. Almost half of patients are misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma by the incisional biopsy. We report the thirteenth case of squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma. Female patient, 72 years old, in the last 6 months presenting erythematous, keratotic and ulcerated papules on the nose. The incisional biopsy diagnosed squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma. After excision, histopathology revealed positive margins. A wideningmargins surgery and grafting were performed, which again resulted in positive margins. The patient was then referred for radiotherapy. After 25 sessions, the injury reappeared. After another surgery, although the intraoperative biopsy showed free surgical margins, the product of resection revealed persistent lesion. Distinction between squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma is important because of the more aggressive nature of the first, which requires wider margins surgery to avoid recurrence. PMID:28099603

  14. Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extensive embryonic adaptations for the uptake of nutrients secreted by the ... and in most cases a hypertrophied embryonic gut plays a role in nutrient absorption ..... Cellular surface projections in C. dorsalis are virtually confined to the ...

  15. Embryonic stem cells: testing the germ-cell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2011-10-25

    The exact cellular origin of embryonic stem cells remains elusive. Now a new study provides compelling evidence that embryonic stem cells, established under conventional culture conditions, originate from a transient germ-cell state.

  16. Transcriptome Landscapes of Mammalian Embryonic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhof, B.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes research on gene expression profiles from different embryonic stages and cell types to identify genes involved in pluripotency or differentiation in bovine and porcine cells. The results are compared with data from other mammals. RNA expression profiles of morula and blastocyst

  17. Epigenetic control of embryonic stem cell fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Nicolaj Strøyer; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the inner cell mass of the preimplantation embryo and are pluripotent, as they are able to differentiate into all cell types of the adult organism. Once established, the pluripotent ES cells can be maintained under defined culture conditions, but can also...

  18. Transcriptome Landscapes of Mammalian Embryonic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhof, B.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes research on gene expression profiles from different embryonic stages and cell types to identify genes involved in pluripotency or differentiation in bovine and porcine cells. The results are compared with data from other mammals. RNA expression profiles of morula and blastocyst

  19. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  20. Skeletal tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jukes, Jojanneke Maria

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at repairing or replacing damaged or diseased tissue. In this thesis, we investigated the potential of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for cartilage tissue engineering. After differentiation of mouse and human ESCs into the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineage had been established

  1. Physiopathology of human embryonic implantation: clinical incidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Demailly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation consists of a series of events promoting the invasion of the endometrium and then the uterine arterial system by the extra-embryonic trophoblast. In order for this semi-heterologous implantation to succeed, the endometrium has to first undergo a number of structural and biochemical changes (decidualization. The decidua's various constituents subsequently play a role in the embryonic implantation. The third step is the transformation of the uterine vascular system and the growth of the placenta, which will provide the foetoplacental unit with nutrients. Several physiopathological aspects will be discussed: 1 the implantation window, regulated by maternal and embryonic hormonal secretions and thus influenced by any defects in the latter: dysharmonic luteal phase, 21-hydroxylase block, abnormal integrin expression, 2 the successive trophoblast invasions of uterine vessels which, when defective, lead to early embryo loss or late-onset vascular pathologies, as preeclampsia, 3 the pregnancy's immunological equilibrium, with a spontaneously tolerated semi-allogeneic implant, 4 the impact of pro-coagulant factors (thrombophilia on the pregnancy's progression, 5 the environment of the uterus, ranging from hydrosalpinx to uterine contractions. In summary, the least anatomical or physiological perturbation can interfere with human embryonic implantation - a very particular phenomenon and a true biological paradox.

  2. Synchronous gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Henriksen, Birthe Merete; Hansen, Carsten Palnæs

    2009-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) are rare tumours that are divided into four subtypes depending on tumour characteristics. Patients with NECs are known to have an increased risk of synchronous and metachronous cancers mainly located in the gastrointestinal tract. A case...... of synchronous gastric NEC and hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient with several other precancerous lesions is presented. The patient had anaemia, and a gastric tumour and two duodenal polyps were identified on upper endoscopy. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed several lesions in the liver. The lesions were...... invisible on B-mode sonography and real-time sonography fused with CT was used to identify and biopsy one of the lesions. Histology showed hepatocellular carcinoma. A literature search showed that only one case of a hepatocellular carcinoma synchronous with a gastric NEC has been reported previously. TRIAL...

  3. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  4. URACHAL CARCINOMA IN BLADDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛丽燕; 吕宁; 何祖根; 林冬梅; 刘秀云

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinicopathologic features and diagnostic criteria of urachal carcinoma in the bladder.Methods: Seven cases of urachal carcinoma in the bladder were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the tumors were found locating in the dome of bladder. Of them, 4 were mucinous adenocarcinoma, one was well differentiated papillary enteric adenocarcinoma, one was well differentiated squamous carcinoma, and one was neuroendocrine carcinoma. Cystomorphous urachal remnants were found in 4 cases. The main complaint was hematuria and all patients underwent partial excision of bladder and urachus. Conclusion: Mucinous adenocarcinoma is the main histo-pathological type, and cystomorphous urachal remnants are often accompanied with urachal carcinoma in the bladder. The key diagnostic criteria of urachal carcinoma in bladder are site and histopathology. And to examine the specimens carefully to find the urachal remnants is important.

  5. Pilomatrix carcinoma of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazic, Barbara; Sramek-Zatler, Simona; Repse-Fokter, Alenka; Pizem, Joze

    2011-12-01

    Pilomatrix carcinoma, a malignant counterpart of pilomatrixoma, is a rare skin neoplasm composed of basaloid and shadow cells that characterize differentiation toward the hair matrix. The authors present a case of pilomatrix carcinoma of the clitoris, a very unusual location not previously reported. Diagnostic criteria and differential diagnoses are discussed. Pilomatrix carcinoma should be differentiated from benign pilomatrixoma and other carcinomas with shadow cells, including basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation and metastases of visceral carcinomas with shadow cells.

  6. Progress with nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Don P; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Pau, K-Y Francis; Lester, Linda

    2004-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells hold potential in the fields of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, tissue regeneration, disease pathogenicity, and drug discovery. Embryonic stem (ES) cell lines are now available in primates, including man, rhesus, and cynomologous monkeys. Monkey ES cells serve as invaluable clinically relevant models for studies that can't be conducted in humans because of practical or ethical limitations, or in rodents because of differences in physiology and anatomy. Here, we review the current status of nonhuman primate research with ES cells, beginning with a description of their isolation, characterization, and availability. Substantial limitations still plague the use of primate ES cells, such as their required growth on feeder layers, poor cloning efficiency, and restricted availability. The ability to produce homogenous populations of both undifferentiated as well as differentiated phenotypes is an important challenge, and genetic approaches to achieving these objectives are discussed. Finally, safety, efficiency, and feasibility issues relating to the transplantation of ES-derived cells are considered.

  7. Properties and applications of embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells derived from the early embryo and can be propagated stably in undifferentiated state in vitro. They retain the ability to differentiate into all cell types found in the embryonic and adult body in vivo, and can be induced to differentiate into many cell types under appropriate culture conditions in vitro. Using these properties, people have set up various differentiated systems of many cell types and tissues in vitro. Through analysis of these systems, one can identify novel bioactive factors and reveal mechanisms of cell differentiation and organogenesis. ES cell-derived differentiated cells can also be applied to cell transplantation therapy. In addition, we summarized the features and potential applications of human ES cells.

  8. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  9. Cytokine signalling in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Kalisz, Mark; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2006-01-01

    Cytokines play a central role in maintaining self-renewal in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells through a member of the interleukin-6 type cytokine family termed leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF activates the JAK-STAT3 pathway through the class I cytokine receptor gp130, which forms a trimeric...... pathways seem to converge on c-myc as a common target to promote self-renewal. Whereas LIF does not seem to stimulate self-renewal in human embryonic stem cells it cannot be excluded that other cytokines are involved. The pleiotropic actions of the increasing number of cytokines and receptors signalling...... via JAKs, STATs and SOCS exhibit considerable redundancy, compensation and plasticity in stem cells in accordance with the view that stem cells are governed by quantitative variations in strength and duration of signalling events known from other cell types rather than qualitatively different stem...

  10. OCT guided microinjections for mouse embryonic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larina, Irina V.

    2013-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is gaining popularity as live imaging tool for embryonic research in animal models. Recently we have demonstrated that OCT can be used for live imaging of cultured early mouse embryos (E7.5-E10) as well as later stage mouse embryos in utero (E12.5 to the end of gestation). Targeted delivery of signaling molecules, drugs, and cells is a powerful approach to study normal and abnormal development, and image guidance is highly important for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate that OCT can be used to guide microinjections of gold nanoshell suspensions in live mouse embryos. This approach can potentially be used for variety of applications such as guided injections of contrast agents, signaling molecules, pharmacological agents, cell transplantation and extraction, as well as other image-guided micromanipulations. Our studies also reveal novel potential for gold nanoshells in embryonic research.

  11. Current Progress with Primate Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, James A.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M.; Wolf, Don P

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated pluripotent state and differentiate into any cell type. Differentiation of ESCs into various specific cell-types may be able to cure or alleviate the symptoms of various degenerative diseases. Unresolved issues regarding maintaining function, possible apoptosis and tumor formation in vivo mean a prudent approach should be taken towards advancing ESCs into human clinical trials. Rhesus macaques provide the i...

  12. Temporal regulation of embryonic M-phases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Chesnel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Temporal regulation of M-phases of the cell cycle requires precise molecular mechanisms that differ among different cells. This variable regulation is particularly clear during embryonic divisions. The first embryonic mitosis in the mouse lasts twice as long as the second one. In other species studied so far (C. elegans, Sphaerechinus granularis, Xenopus laevis, the first mitosis is also longer than the second, yet the prolongation is less pronounced than in the mouse. We have found recently that the mechanisms prolonging the first embryonic M-phase differ in the mouse and in Xenopus embryos. In the mouse, the metaphase of the first mitosis is specifically prolonged by the unknown mechanism acting similarly to the CSF present in oocytes arrested in the second meiotic division. In Xenopus, higher levels of cyclins B participate in the M-phase prolongation, however, without any cell cycle arrest. In Xenopus embryo cell-free extracts, the inactivation of the major M-phase factor, MPF, depends directly on dissociation of cyclin B from CDK1 subunit and not on cyclin B degradation as was thought before. In search for other mitotic proteins behaving in a similar way as cyclins B we made two complementary proteomic screens dedicated to identifying proteins ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome upon the first embryonic mitosis in Xenopus laevis. The first screen yielded 175 proteins. To validate our strategy we are verifying now which of them are really ubiquitinated. In the second one, we identified 9 novel proteins potentially degraded via the proteasome. Among them, TCTP (Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, a 23-kDa protein, was shown to be partially degraded during mitosis (as well as during meiotic exit. We characterized the expression and the role of this protein in Xenopus, mouse and human somatic cells, Xenopus and mouse oocytes and embryos. TCTP is a mitotic spindle protein positively regulating cellular proliferation. Analysis of

  13. Temporal regulation of embryonic M-phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Jacek Z; Bazile, Franck; Pascal, Aude; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Polanski, Zbigniew; Ciemerych, Maria A; Chesnel, Franck

    2008-01-01

    Temporal regulation of M-phases of the cell cycle requires precise molecular mechanisms that differ among different cells. This variable regulation is particularly clear during embryonic divisions. The first embryonic mitosis in the mouse lasts twice as long as the second one. In other species studied so far (C. elegans, Sphaerechinus granularis, Xenopus laevis), the first mitosis is also longer than the second, yet the prolongation is less pronounced than in the mouse. We have found recently that the mechanisms prolonging the first embryonic M-phase differ in the mouse and in Xenopus embryos. In the mouse, the metaphase of the first mitosis is specifically prolonged by the unknown mechanism acting similarly to the CSF present in oocytes arrested in the second meiotic division. In Xenopus, higher levels of cyclins B participate in the M-phase prolongation, however, without any cell cycle arrest. In Xenopus embryo cell-free extracts, the inactivation of the major M-phase factor, MPF, depends directly on dissociation of cyclin B from CDK1 subunit and not on cyclin B degradation as was thought before. In search for other mitotic proteins behaving in a similar way as cyclins B we made two complementary proteomic screens dedicated to identifying proteins ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome upon the first embryonic mitosis in Xenopus laevis. The first screen yielded 175 proteins. To validate our strategy we are verifying now which of them are really ubiquitinated. In the second one, we identified 9 novel proteins potentially degraded via the proteasome. Among them, TCTP (Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein), a 23-kDa protein, was shown to be partially degraded during mitosis (as well as during meiotic exit). We characterized the expression and the role of this protein in Xenopus, mouse and human somatic cells, Xenopus and mouse oocytes and embryos. TCTP is a mitotic spindle protein positively regulating cellular proliferation. Analysis of other candidates

  14. Hedgehog Signalling in the Embryonic Mouse Thymus

    OpenAIRE

    Barbarulo, Alessandro; Lau, Ching-In; Mengrelis, Konstantinos; Ross, Susan; Solanki, Anisha; Saldaña, José Ignacio; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus, which provides an essential environment for T cell fate\\ud specification, and for the differentiation of multipotent progenitor cells into major histocompatibility\\ud complex (MHC)-restricted, non-autoreactive T cells. Here we review the role of the Hedgehog\\ud signalling pathway in T cell development, thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development, and\\ud thymocyte–TEC cross-talk in the embryonic mouse thymus during the last week of gestation.\\ud

  15. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-03-07

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  16. Directed hepatic differentiation from embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xuesong; Zeng, Fanyi

    2011-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ in mammals, and is important for the maintenance of normal physiological functions of other tissues and organs. Hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and other chronic liver diseases are serious threats to human health, and these problems are compounded by a scarcity of liver donors for transplantation therapies. Directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells to liver cells is a promising strategy for obtaining hepatocytes that can be used for cell trans...

  17. Embryonic stem cell differentiation: A chromatin perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen Theodore P

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cells hold immense promise for the treatment of human degenerative disease. Because ES cells are pluripotent, they can be directed to differentiate into a number of alternative cell-types with potential therapeutic value. Such attempts at "rationally-directed ES cell differentiation" constitute attempts to recapitulate aspects of normal development in vitro. All differentiated cells retain identical DNA content, yet gene expression varies widely from cell-type to ...

  18. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is concealed by embryonic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E.; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-01-01

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account.

  19. [Heart tissue from embryonic stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, W-H

    2008-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells can give rise to all somatic cells, making them an attractive cell source for tissue engineering applications. The propensity of cells to form tissue-like structures in a culture dish has been well documented. We and others made use of this intrinsic property to generate bioartificial heart muscle. First proof-of-concept studies involved immature heart cells mainly from fetal chicken, neonatal rats and mice. They eventually provided evidence that force-generating heart muscle can be engineered in vitro. Recently, the focus shifted to the application of stem cells to eventually enable the generation of human heart muscle and reach following long-term goals: (1) development of a simplified in vitro model of heart muscle development; (2) generation of a human test-bed for drug screening and development; (3) allocation of surrogate heart tissue to myocardial repair applications. This overview will provide the background for cell-based myocardial repair, introduce the main myocardial tissue engineering concepts, discuss the use of embryonic and non-embryonic stem cells, and lays out the potential direct and indirect therapeutic use of human tissue engineered myocardium.

  20. Embryonic mortality in buffalo naturally mated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Campanile

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the incidence of embryonic mortality in three different period of year in buffaloes naturally mated. The trial was carried out in a buffalo farm located in Caserta province between 2000-2006. In this period were registered natural insemination on 200 buffaloes. Pregnancy diagnosis was carried out on Day 30, confirmed on Day 45 and every 15th days until 90 days after natural mating. Buffaloes that were pregnant on Day 30 but not on Day 45 or Day 90 were considered to have undergone embryonic (EM or fetal mortality (FM respectively. EM and FM were 8.8% and 13.4% respectively throughout the experimental period. A high incidence (P<0.01 of FM was found in the transitional period (December-March than in other months of the year. The incidence of embryonic mortality was significantly (P<0.01 higher between 28-60 days of gestation and lower after 71 day of gestation. The higher fetal mortality found in this study could be due the lower serum levels of progesterone normally found in transitional period in buffalo cows.

  1. Embryonic development of Pelteobagrus fulvidraco (Richardson, 1846)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Weimin; Khalid ABBAS; YAN Ansheng

    2006-01-01

    For production enhancement and procedure upgrade, the developmental phases of laboratory-reared eggs of catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco were investigated. Twenty mature females and 10 males were collected from Dadongmen wholesale fisheries market in Wuhan City on May 8, 2003. Zygotes were stripped from mature fish after hormone-induced ovulation, fertilized, and incubated through whole embryonic development. The fertilized eggs were stocked in density of 100 eggs/L in white square tanks of 10 L. Incubation water was dechlorinated tap water with continuous aeration. The tanks were lit directly with 60 W fluorescent bulbs with a 12 light: 12 dark photoperiod. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH were 29.0±0.5℃, 6.7±0.4 mg/L and 7.4±0.2, respectively. The results showed that the eggs of P. fulvidraco were yellow, sticky and contained much yolk. The mean diameter of fertilized eggs was 2.03 mm. At the water temperature of 29.0±0.5 ℃, the ontogenesis spent about33 h after fertilization.From fertilization to hatching, the embryonic development can be divided into 30-40 phases, which varies in the emphasis and direction of development. The detailed embryonic movement was also described.

  2. Informing tendon tissue engineering with embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Zachary A.; Schiele, Nathan R.; Kuo, Catherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Tendon is a strong connective tissue that transduces muscle-generated forces into skeletal motion. In fulfilling this role, tendons are subjected to repeated mechanical loading and high stress, which may result in injury. Tissue engineering with stem cells offers the potential to replace injured/damaged tissue with healthy, new living tissue. Critical to tendon tissue engineering is the induction and guidance of stem cells towards the tendon phenotype. Typical strategies have relied on adult tissue homeostatic and healing factors to influence stem cell differentiation, but have yet to achieve tissue regeneration. A novel paradigm is to use embryonic developmental factors as cues to promote tendon regeneration. Embryonic tendon progenitor cell differentiation in vivo is regulated by a combination of mechanical and chemical factors. We propose that these cues will guide stem cells to recapitulate critical aspects of tenogenesis and effectively direct the cells to differentiate and regenerate new tendon. Here, we review recent efforts to identify mechanical and chemical factors of embryonic tendon development to guide stem/progenitor cell differentiation toward new tendon formation, and discuss the role this work may have in the future of tendon tissue engineering. PMID:24484642

  3. Informing tendon tissue engineering with embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Zachary A; Schiele, Nathan R; Kuo, Catherine K

    2014-06-27

    Tendon is a strong connective tissue that transduces muscle-generated forces into skeletal motion. In fulfilling this role, tendons are subjected to repeated mechanical loading and high stress, which may result in injury. Tissue engineering with stem cells offers the potential to replace injured/damaged tissue with healthy, new living tissue. Critical to tendon tissue engineering is the induction and guidance of stem cells towards the tendon phenotype. Typical strategies have relied on adult tissue homeostatic and healing factors to influence stem cell differentiation, but have yet to achieve tissue regeneration. A novel paradigm is to use embryonic developmental factors as cues to promote tendon regeneration. Embryonic tendon progenitor cell differentiation in vivo is regulated by a combination of mechanical and chemical factors. We propose that these cues will guide stem cells to recapitulate critical aspects of tenogenesis and effectively direct the cells to differentiate and regenerate new tendon. Here, we review recent efforts to identify mechanical and chemical factors of embryonic tendon development to guide stem/progenitor cell differentiation toward new tendon formation, and discuss the role this work may have in the future of tendon tissue engineering.

  4. Research advances in Hedgehog signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is present in many animals and plays an important role in regulating embryonic development and differentiation. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of many malignancies. Recent studies have shown that dysregulated Hh signaling pathway participates in the tumorigenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Investigation of the relationship between Hh signaling pathway and HCC will help elucidate the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis of HCC and provide a new insight into the development of novel anticancer therapy and therapeutic target.

  5. Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the mandible: A case report with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjul Tiwari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary intraosseous carcinoma (PIOC is a rare tumor that has been infrequently reported. Some diagnostic criteria have been proposed to consider a lesion as PIOC: (1 absence of ulcer in the oral mucosa overlying the tumor, (2 absence of another primary tumor at the time of diagnosis and for at least 6 months during the follow-up, and (3 histological evidence of squamous cell carcinoma. The etiology is not clear, although odontogenic embryonic origin has been reported. Probably, PIOC derives from the remnants of odontogenic tissue, either the epithelial rests of Malassez or the remnants of the dental lamina.

  6. Primary cutaneous myoepithelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Markus Winther; Steiniche, Torben; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a case of primary myoepithelial carcinoma of the skin and reviews the available literature on this topic. Myoepitheliomas and carcinomas arise most frequently from myoepithelial cells within the salivary glands but are found in many anatomical locations. We documented a case...

  7. [Breast carcinoma in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigić, B; Balvanović, D; Rac, S; Bilbija, S

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe 8 cases of carcinoma of the male breast treated at the Clinic of Surgery, Clinical Medical Center Banja Luka in the period 1968-1988. In their discussion, the authors review contemporary findings concerning the genesis, evolution and treatment of this carcinoma.

  8. Lacrimal gland ductal carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Simon; Grauslund, Morten; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    HER2 amplification was found in cases 2 and 3. CONCLUSION: This study identified a spectrum of genetic events and pattern of protein expression in DC of the lacrimal gland similar to a subset of carcinomas of the breast and ductal carcinomas of the salivary glands. For therapeutic purposes...

  9. Uncovering the post-embryonic functions of gametophytic- and embryonic-lethal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Micol, José Luis

    2011-06-01

    An estimated 500-1 000 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes mutate to embryonic lethality. In addition, several hundred mutations have been identified that cause gametophytic lethality. Thus, a significant fraction of the ∼25,000 protein-coding genes in Arabidopsis are indispensable to the early stages of the diploid phase or to the haploid gametophytic phase. The expression patterns of many of these genes indicate that they also act later in development but, because the mutants die at such early stages, conventional methods limit the study of their roles in adult diploid plants. Here, we describe the toolset that allows researchers to assess the post-embryonic functions of plant genes for which only gametophytic- and embryonic-lethal alleles have been isolated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of mRNA, and protein levels of p53, MDM2 and protein kinase CK2 subunits in F9 cells after treatment with the apoptosis-inducing drugs cisplatin and carboplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, S; Ornskov, D; Guerra, B

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a pleiotropic serine/threonine kinase which has been shown to phosphorylate numerous substrates. Evidence is accumulating that CK2 may exist complexed to a variety of cellular proteins, e.g. p53, MDM2, and A-Raf. Here, we explored the effects of the chemotherapeutic drugs...... cisplatin and carboplatin on the mRNA and protein levels of p53, MDM2 and CK2 in a murine teratocarcinoma cell line F9. Northern and Western blot analyses were performed and the CK2 activity was determined. The degree of apoptosis after drug treatment was assessed using the TUNEL test. Six hours after...... cisplatin and carboplatin treatment, the RNA level of p53 dropped by 59% +/- 9% and 86% +/- 8% respectively, whereas the observed level of p53 protein rose to 7 and 10 times over the untreated control, respectively. Treatment with 33 microM cisplatin prompted apoptosis as early as 4 h after drug treatment...

  11. Temperature inactivation of Feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 in comparison with human noroviruses using an RNA exposure assay and reverse transcribed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-A novel method for predicting virus infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, J R; Schnerr, H; Haines, J; Scott, M; Carter, M J; Willcocks, M M; Bellamy, K; Brown, D W; Gray, J J; Gallimore, C I; Knight, A I

    2009-03-01

    A one-step reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) method in combination with RNase treatment and low copy number samples was developed in order to examine the effect of temperature on the ability of virus capsids to protect their RNA content. The method was applied to a non-cultivable virus (GII.4 norovirus) and Feline calicivirus vaccine strain F-9 (FCV) which is often used as a norovirus surrogate. Results demonstrated that FCV RNA is exposed maximally after 2min at 63.3 degrees C and this correlated with a greater than 4.5log reduction in infectivity as assessed by plaque assay. In contrast human GII.4 norovirus RNA present in diluted clinical specimens was not exposed maximally until 76.6 degrees C, at least 13.3 degrees C greater than that for FCV. These data suggest that norovirus possesses greater thermostability than this commonly used surrogate. Further, these studies indicate that current food processing regimes for pasteurisation are insufficient to achieve inactivation of GII.4 NoVs. The method provides a novel molecular method for predicting virus infectivity.

  12. Structure of a novel shoulder-to-shoulder p24 dimer in complex with the broad-spectrum antibody A10F9 and its implication in capsid assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    Full Text Available Mature HIV-1 viral particles assemble as a fullerene configuration comprising p24 capsid hexamers, pentamers and dimers. In this paper, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the p24 protein from natural HIV-1 strain (BMJ4 in complex with Fab A10F9, which recognizes a conserved epitope in the C-terminal domain of the BMJ4 p24 protein. Our structures reveal a novel shoulder-to-shoulder p24 dimerization mode that is mediated by an S-S bridge at C177. Consistent with these structures, the shoulder-to-shoulder dimer that was obtained from the BMJ4 strain was also observed in p24 proteins from other strains by the introduction of a cysteine residue at position 177. The potential biological significance was further validated by the introduction of a C177A mutation in the BMJ4 strain, which then displays a low infectivity. Our data suggest that this novel shoulder-to-shoulder dimer interface trapped by this unique S-S bridge could represent a physiologically relevant mode of HIV-1 capsid assembly during virus maturation, although Cys residue itself may not be critical for HIV-I replication.

  13. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space missionXIX. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, E W; Gazzano, J -C; Mazeh, T; Rouan, D; Gibson, N; Csizmadia, Sz; Aigrain, S; Alonso, R; Almenara, J M; Auvergne, M; Baglin, A; Barge, P; Bonomo, A S; Borde, P; Bouchy, F; Bruntt, H; Cabrera, J; Carone, L; Carpano, S; Cavarroc, C; Deeg, H J; Deleuil, M; Dreizler, S; Dvorak, R; Erikson, A; Ferraz-Mello, S; Fridlund, M; Gandolfi, D; Gillon, M; Guillot, T; Hatzes, A; Havel, M; Hebrard, G; Jehin, E; Jorda, L; Lammer, H; Leger, A; Moutou, C; Nortmann, L; Ollivier, M; Ofir, A; Pasternacki, Th; Paetzold, M; Parviainen, H; Queloz, D; Rauer, H; Samuel, B; Santerne, A; Schneider, J; Tal-Or, L; Tingley, B; Weingrill, J; Wuchterl, G

    2011-01-01

    Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbi...

  14. So-called embryonal hyperplasia of Bowman's capsular epithelium: an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, K; Hajikano, H; Sakaguchi, H

    1991-01-01

    The so-called embryonal hyperplasia of Bowman's capsular epithelium (EHBCE) is a rather specific lesion occurring in kidneys of patients maintained on chronic dialysis. It consists of poorly differentiated cells proliferating around sclerosed or obsolescent glomeruli. In this study, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural characterization of EHBCE was performed. The poorly differentiated cells in the lesion exhibited a positive reaction for vimentin and a negative one for cytokeratin (PKK 1) and epithelial membrane antigen. On ultrastructural examination, specialized junctions between adjoining cells, microvilli-like structures on their surfaces, and immature basal folds were observed. These observations suggest that the cells of EHBCE may be associated with the anlage of glomerular epithelium. The background in which neoplasms like renal cell carcinoma or atypical epithelium of cyst wall develop in end-stage kidneys of adult patients on long-term dialysis may cause such a proliferation of poorly differentiated cells in young or paediatric age group patients.

  15. [Microglial cells and development of the embryonic central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Pascal; Le Corronc, Hervé

    2014-02-01

    Microglia cells are the macrophages of the central nervous system with a crucial function in the homeostasis of the adult brain. However, recent studies showed that microglial cells may also have important functions during early embryonic central nervous system development. In this review we summarize recent works on the extra embryonic origin of microglia, their progenitor niche, the pattern of their invasion of the embryonic central nervous system and on interactions between embryonic microglia and their local environment during invasion. We describe microglial functions during development of embryonic neuronal networks, including their roles in neurogenesis, in angiogenesis and developmental cell death. These recent discoveries open a new field of research on the functions of neural-microglial interactions during the development of the embryonic central nervous system.

  16. Primary “Botryoid” Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma in Mesentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran AGARWAL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm arising from primitive embryonal mesenchyma. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma mostly affects children younger than 10 years of age, but it also occurs in adolescents and young adults. Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare variant that almost always arises in adults older than 45 years of age. Mesentery is a rare site for botyroid embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and on extensive search we found only one case of a botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma in a child of 2 years. We report a rare case of botyroid embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma occurring in the mesentery of a 30 year old female.

  17. Relationship between Intrauterine Bacterial Infection and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Fei Yan; Xin-Yan Liu; Yun-Fei Cheng; Zhi-Yi Li; Jie Ou; Wei Wang; Feng-Qin Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Early embryonic developmental arrest is the most commonly understudied adverse outcome of pregnancy.The relevance of intrauterine infection to spontaneous embryonic death is rarely studied and remains unclear.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between intrauterine bacterial infection and early embryonic developmental arrest.Methods:Embryonic chorion tissue and uterine swabs for bacterial detection were obtained from 33 patients who underwent artificial abortion (control group) and from 45 patients who displayed early embryonic developmental arrest (trial group).Results:Intrauterine bacterial infection was discovered in both groups.The infection rate was 24.44% (11/45) in the early embryonic developmental arrest group and 9.09% (3/33) in the artificial abortion group.Classification analysis revealed that the highest detection rate for Micrococcus luteus in the early embryonic developmental arrest group was 13.33% (6/45),and none was detected in the artificial abortion group.M.luteus infection was significantly different between the groups (P < 0.05 as shown by Fisher's exact test).In addition,no correlation was found between intrauterine bacterial infection and history of early embryonic developmental arrest.Conclusions:M.luteus infection is related to early embryonic developmental arrest and might be one of its causative factors.

  18. Embryonic stem cells in pig and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddox-Hyttel, Poul; Wolf, Xenia Asbæk; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech

    2007-01-01

    transmission in chimaeras has never been obtained. Due to this incomplete characterization of the cell lines, the expression embryonic stem (ES)-like cells is presently used in pig and cattle. The ICM or epiblast can be isolated from the blastocyst by whole blastocyst culture, mechanical isolation...... will be available over the coming years. However, in order to reach this goal further systematic research is needed. Such cell lines hold promises for developing adequate models for human ES cell therapy and they may open for new avenues for the production of genetically modified animals as the ES cells ahve...

  19. Biobanking human embryonic stem cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell banks curating and distributing human embryonic stem cells have been established in a number of countries and by a number of private institutions. This paper identifies and critically discusses a number of arguments that are used to justify the importance of such banks in policy...... are curiously absent from the particular stem cell banking policy discourse. This to some extent artificially isolates this discourse from the broader discussions about the flows of reproductive materials and tissues in modern society, and such isolation may lead to the interests of important actors being...

  20. Segmental patterning of the vertebrate embryonic axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dequéant, Mary-Lee; Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-05-01

    The body axis of vertebrates is composed of a serial repetition of similar anatomical modules that are called segments or metameres. This particular mode of organization is especially conspicuous at the level of the periodic arrangement of vertebrae in the spine. The segmental pattern is established during embryogenesis when the somites--the embryonic segments of vertebrates--are rhythmically produced from the paraxial mesoderm. This process involves the segmentation clock, which is a travelling oscillator that interacts with a maturation wave called the wavefront to produce the periodic series of somites. Here, we review our current understanding of the segmentation process in vertebrates.

  1. Embryonic Stem Cell Research: A Policy Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Hermine

    Many health care issues generate minimal passion, promoting benign commentary and support from the various stakeholders involved. Stem cell research does not fall into this category, and on the contrary, embryonic stem cell (ESC) research has continued to foster controversy and emotion. Since 1998, which marked the first successful laboratory isolation of ESCs, this research continues to ignite moral, ethical, and legal debate over its efficacy. The focus of this policy analysis is to introduce the issues, examine and address the various perspectives that surround ESC research, and present policy options and/or solutions that may be used to successfully create a policy consensus regarding this much debated topic.

  2. Salivary gland carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Andersen, L J; Christensen, M;

    1998-01-01

    The prognosis of salivary gland carcinomas is difficult to assess. Simple mucin-type carbohydrates (T and sialosyl-T antigens, Tn and sialosyl-Tn antigens) have been shown to be of value in predicting prognosis for carcinomas in other locations. We studied the prognostic significance...... of the expression of these structures in a retrospective study of 133 patients with salivary gland carcinomas, using immunohistochemistry and a panel of well-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Sialosyl-Tn, T and sialosyl-T antigens were not correlated with prognosis...

  3. Novel Li[(CF3SO2)(n-C4F9SO2)N]-Based Polymer Electrolytes for Solid-State Lithium Batteries with Superior Electrochemical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Qi, Xingguo; Tong, Bo; Zheng, Yuheng; Feng, Wenfang; Nie, Jin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Huang, Xuejie; Chen, Liquan; Zhou, Zhibin

    2016-11-02

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) would be promising candidates for application in high-energy rechargeable lithium (Li) batteries to replace the conventional organic liquid electrolytes, in terms of the enhanced safety and excellent design flexibility. Herein, we first report novel perfluorinated sulfonimide salt-based SPEs, composed of lithium (trifluoromethanesulfonyl)(n-nonafluorobutanesulfonyl)imide (Li[(CF3SO2)(n-C4F9SO2)N], LiTNFSI) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), which exhibit relatively efficient ionic conductivity (e.g., 1.04 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 60 °C and 3.69 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 90 °C) and enough thermal stability (>350 °C), for rechargeable Li batteries. More importantly, the LiTNFSI-based SPEs could not only deliver the excellent interfacial compatibility with electrodes (e.g., Li-metal anode, LiFePO4 and sulfur composite cathodes), but also afford good cycling performances for the Li|LiFePO4 (>300 cycles at 1C) and Li-S cells (>500 cycles at 0.5C), in comparison with the conventional LiTFSI (Li[(CF3SO2)2N])-based SPEs. The interfacial impedance and morphology of the cycled Li-metal electrodes are also comparatively analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectra and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. These indicate that the LiTNFSI-based SPEs would be potential alternatives for application in high-energy solid-state Li batteries.

  4. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  5. Embryonic stem cells: from markers to market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Kaushik Dilip; Jayaprakash, Anitha Devi; Sharma, Vijay; Totey, Satish

    2008-02-01

    ABSTRACT Embryonic stem cells are considered the mother of all kinds of tissues and cells and it is envisioned as the holy grail of regenerative medicine. However, their use in cell replacement therapies (CRT) has so far been limited and their potentials are yet to be fully realized. The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) involves many safety issues pertaining to culture conditions and epigenetic changes. The role and importance of an epigenomic signature in derivation and maintenance of hESC are discussed. We provide a list of important epigenetic markers, which should be studied for evaluation of safety in hESC-based cell replacement therapies. These genes also need to be screened to determine an epigenetic signature for pluripotency in the hESCs. Finally a comprehensive list of all known stemness signature genes and the marker genes for different germ line lineages are presented. This review aims at summing up most of the intriguing molecules that can play a role in the maintenance of pluripotency and can help in determining hESC differentiation to various lineages. Extensive understanding of these markers will eventually help the researchers to transform the hESC research from bench to the bedside. The use of hESCs in CRTs is still in its infancy; much effort is warranted to turn them into the much dreamed about magic wand of regenerative medicine.

  6. Dynamics and Mechanics of Zebrafish Embryonic Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoetz, Eva-Maria; Burdine, R. D.; Steinberg, M. S.; Heisenberg, C.-P.; Foty, R. A.; Julicher, F.

    2008-03-01

    In early zebrafish embryonic development, complex flows of cell populations occur, which ultimately lead to the spatial organization of the three germ layers: Ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Here, we study the material properties of these germ layer tissues which are important for their dynamics and spatial organization in the embryo. In general, tissues can be classified as inherently active complex fluids. However, here we present examples of observed tissue behavior, which can be described satisfactorily in terms of passive visco-elastic fluids. We determined the material properties of the germ layer tissues quantitatively and found that differences in their properties influence tissue interaction. Specifically, quantitative differences in tissue surface tension result in tissue immiscibility and cell sorting behavior analogous to that of ordinary immiscible liquids. Surface tensions were measured with a tissue surface tensiometer. Furthermore, by tracking individual cells in the developing zebrafish embryo, we found differences in the migratory behavior of the different tissue types, which are, to some extent, governed by their mechanical properties. Finally, we generated a 3D velocity flow profile describing the tissue movements during zebrafish embryonic organizer development.

  7. Disseminated Cerebrospinal Embryonal Tumor in the Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armocida, Daniele; Caporlingua, Federico; Lapadula, Gennaro; Elefante, Grazia Maria; Antonelli, Manila; Salvati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. According to the 2016 World Health Organization classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System, the term Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor has been replaced by the term Embryonal Tumor (ET). We present a case of disseminated cerebrospinal ET presenting in an adult patient. Illustrative Case. A 49-year-old male presenting with low back pain, dysuria, and hypoesthesia of the lower extremities referred to our emergency department. Brain and whole spine contrast-enhanced MRI documented a diffusively disseminated heterogeneous neoplasm with intradural extra- and intramedullary involvement of the cervicothoracic tract and cauda equina. A primary biopsy of the lumbosacral localization was performed through L5 bilateral laminectomy. Histologic diagnosis was Embryonal Tumor Not Otherwise Specified. The patient underwent chemotherapy with postoperative adjuvant alternating Vincristine-Doxorubicin-Ifosfamide (VAI) and Ifosfamide-Etoposide (IE). Discussion. Spinal ETs are exceedingly rare especially when presenting in the adult patient. Neurosurgical and oncologic management is still unclear. When feasible, surgical removal should always be performed to obtain a histologic diagnosis. Postoperative adjuvant therapy might entail both chemo- and radiotherapy; however a consensus on this matter is still lacking. PMID:27818821

  8. Quantum dot imaging for embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambhir Sanjiv S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs hold increasing potential for cellular imaging both in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we aimed to evaluate in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells labeled with Qtracker delivered quantum dots (QDs. Results Murine embryonic stem (ES cells were labeled with six different QDs using Qtracker. ES cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation were not adversely affected by QDs compared with non-labeled control cells (P = NS. Afterward, labeled ES cells were injected subcutaneously onto the backs of athymic nude mice. These labeled ES cells could be imaged with good contrast with one single excitation wavelength. With the same excitation wavelength, the signal intensity, defined as (total signal-background/exposure time in millisecond was 11 ± 2 for cells labeled with QD 525, 12 ± 9 for QD 565, 176 ± 81 for QD 605, 176 ± 136 for QD 655, 167 ± 104 for QD 705, and 1,713 ± 482 for QD 800. Finally, we have shown that QD 800 offers greater fluorescent intensity than the other QDs tested. Conclusion In summary, this is the first demonstration of in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse ES cells labeled QDs. Upon further improvements, QDs will have a greater potential for tracking stem cells within deep tissues. These results provide a promising tool for imaging stem cell therapy non-invasively in vivo.

  9. Organotypic slice culture of embryonic brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Ray A M; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert F

    2007-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes how to dissect, assemble, and cultivate mouse embryonic (E) brain tissue from age E11.5 to E18.5 (days) for organotypic slice culture. These preparations can be used for a variety of assays and studies including coculture of different brain regions, cell migration assays, axon guidance assays, and DNA electroporation experiments. During electroporation, an electric current is applied to the surface of a specific target area of the brain slice in order to open holes in the plasma membrane and introduce a plasmid of coding DNA. The floating slice-on-membrane construct helps to preserve the structural integrity of the brain slices, while maintaining easy experimental access and optimal viability. Experiments can be monitored in living slices (e.g., with confocal imaging), and further studies can be completed using slices that have been fixed and cryosectioned at the end of the experiment. Any region of embryonic brain or spinal tissue can be used in this protocol.

  10. Embryonic stem cell differentiation: a chromatin perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Theodore P

    2003-11-13

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells hold immense promise for the treatment of human degenerative disease. Because ES cells are pluripotent, they can be directed to differentiate into a number of alternative cell-types with potential therapeutic value. Such attempts at "rationally-directed ES cell differentiation" constitute attempts to recapitulate aspects of normal development in vitro. All differentiated cells retain identical DNA content, yet gene expression varies widely from cell-type to cell-type. Therefore, a potent epigenetic system has evolved to coordinate and maintain tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. Recent advances show that mechanisms that govern epigenetic regulation of gene expression are rooted in the details of chromatin dynamics. As embryonic cells differentiate, certain genes are activated while others are silenced. These activation and silencing events are exquisitely coordinated with the allocation of cell lineages. Remodeling of the chromatin of developmentally-regulated genes occurs in conjunction with lineage commitment. Oocytes, early embryos, and ES cells contain potent chromatin-remodeling activities, an observation that suggests that chromatin dynamics may be especially important for early lineage decisions. Chromatin dynamics are also involved in the differentiation of adult stem cells, where the assembly of specialized chromatin upon tissue-specific genes has been studied in fine detail. The next few years will likely yield striking advances in the understanding of stem cell differentiation and developmental biology from the perspective of chromatin dynamics.

  11. Embryonic stem cell differentiation: A chromatin perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Theodore P

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Embryonic stem (ES cells hold immense promise for the treatment of human degenerative disease. Because ES cells are pluripotent, they can be directed to differentiate into a number of alternative cell-types with potential therapeutic value. Such attempts at "rationally-directed ES cell differentiation" constitute attempts to recapitulate aspects of normal development in vitro. All differentiated cells retain identical DNA content, yet gene expression varies widely from cell-type to cell-type. Therefore, a potent epigenetic system has evolved to coordinate and maintain tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. Recent advances show that mechanisms that govern epigenetic regulation of gene expression are rooted in the details of chromatin dynamics. As embryonic cells differentiate, certain genes are activated while others are silenced. These activation and silencing events are exquisitely coordinated with the allocation of cell lineages. Remodeling of the chromatin of developmentally-regulated genes occurs in conjunction with lineage commitment. Oocytes, early embryos, and ES cells contain potent chromatin-remodeling activities, an observation that suggests that chromatin dynamics may be especially important for early lineage decisions. Chromatin dynamics are also involved in the differentiation of adult stem cells, where the assembly of specialized chromatin upon tissue-specific genes has been studied in fine detail. The next few years will likely yield striking advances in the understanding of stem cell differentiation and developmental biology from the perspective of chromatin dynamics.

  12. Mechanical signaling coordinates the embryonic heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Kevin; Rocks, Jason; Prosser, Benjamin; Discher, Dennis; Liu, Andrea

    The heart is an active material which relies on robust signaling mechanisms between cells in order to produce well-timed, coordinated beats. Heart tissue is composed primarily of active heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) embedded in a passive extracellular matrix. During a heartbeat, cardiomyocyte contractions are coordinated across the heart to form a wavefront that propagates through the tissue to pump blood. In the adult heart, this contractile wave is coordinated via intercellular electrical signaling.Here we present theoretical and experimental evidence for mechanical coordination of embryonic heartbeats. We model cardiomyocytes as mechanically excitable Eshelby inclusions embedded in an overdamped elastic-fluid biphasic medium. For physiological parameters, this model replicates recent experimental measurements of the contractile wavefront which are not captured by electrical signaling models. We additionally challenge our model by pharmacologically blocking gap junctions, inhibiting electrical signaling between myocytes. We find that while adult hearts stop beating almost immediately after gap junctions are blocked, embryonic hearts continue beating even at significantly higher concentrations, providing strong support for a mechanical signaling mechanism.

  13. Breast carcinoma metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, G A; Staren, E D; Faber, L P

    1998-02-01

    With careful selection of patients, complete resection of pulmonary metastases from breast carcinoma may be a useful therapeutic option. Such a treatment appears to offer a significant survival benefit when compared with medical treatment alone, or with incomplete resection.

  14. Parathyroid carcinoma: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    STURNIOLO, G.; GAGLIANO, E.; TONANTE, A.; TARANTO, F.; PAPALIA, E.; CASCIO, R.; DAMIANO, C.; VERMIGLIO, F.; STURNIOLO, G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The authors present a case of parathyroid carcinoma in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism. Following a literature review, the clinical and diagnostic profile, treatment and prognosis of this rare disease are discussed. PMID:23837957

  15. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000331.htm Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma To use the sharing features on ... the lower neck. Causes About 80% of all thyroid cancers diagnosed in the United States are the papillary ...

  16. MEDULLARY THYROID CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Medvedev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid carcinoma belongs to orphan diseases affecting a small part of the population. Multicenter trials are required to elaborate a diagnostic algorithm, to define treatment policy, and to predict an outcome.

  17. Salivary mucoepidermoid carcinoma revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Triantafyllou, A.; Hunt, J.L.; Rinaldo, A.; Strojan, P.; Haigentz, M., Jr.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Takes, R.P.; Poorten, V. Van der; Ferlito, A.

    2015-01-01

    Clinicopathological features, prognosis and therapeutic strategies for mucoepidermoid carcinoma originating in salivary and salivary-type glands of the head and neck are reviewed. We emphasise histopathological aspects, appraise the value of histochemistry, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry

  18. Imaging of tongue carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Cheng K.; Chong, Vincent F.H.

    2006-01-01

    The tongue enables taste and plays a critical role in formation of food bolus and deglutition. The tongue is also crucial for speech and the earliest sign of tongue paresis is a change in the quality of speech. Given the importance of the tongue, tongue carcinoma should be accurately staged in order to optimise treatment options and preserve organ function. The intent of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the pertinent anatomy of the tongue and the behaviour of tongue carcinoma s...

  19. Papillary thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, C; Asschenfeldt, P; Sørensen, J A;

    1994-01-01

    The age influence on the prognosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma was analyzed in a group of 67 patients. A marked decline in cause-specific survival was found for patients older than 60 years of age at the time of diagnosis. In order to find a tumor-biological explanation of the prognostic...... invasion and distant metastases. The results indicate that 60 years of age the time of diagnosis may be the "prognostic break-point" for papillary thyroid carcinoma....

  20. Pathobiology of ovarian carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojgan Devouassoux-Shisheboran; Catherine Genestie

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian tumors comprise a heterogeneous group of lesions, displaying distinct tumor pathology and oncogenic potentiel. These tumors are subdivided into three main categories: epithelial, germ cell, and sex-cord stromal tumors. We report herein the newly described molecular abnormalities in epithelial ovarian cancers (carcinomas). Immunohistochemistry and molecular testing help pathologists to decipher the significant heterogeneity of this disease. Our better understanding of the molecular basis of ovarian carcinomas represents the first step in the development of targeted therapies in the near future.

  1. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Spontaneous cyclic embryonic movements in humans and guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felt, Renee H. M.; Mulder, Eduard J. H.; Luchinger, Annemarie B.; van Kan, Colette M.; Taverne, Marcel A. M.; de Vries, J. I. P.

    2012-01-01

    Motility assessment before birth can be used to evaluate the integrity of the nervous system. Sideways bending (SB) of head and/or rump, the earliest embryonic motility in both humans and guinea pigs, can be visualized sonographically. We know from other species that early embryonic motility is cycl

  16. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15 and a...

  17. Sox2 in Embryonic Stem Cells and Lung Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Pardo (Cristina Gontan)

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Sox2 is a fascinating transcription factor with multiple roles during embryonic development. In early embryonic development, Sox2 is one of the key transcription factors in the maintenance of the pluripotent status of the cells of the inner cell mass (ICM). Sox2 is also

  18. Pathways in pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Puy, L.

    2010-01-01

    Pluripotency - the potential to differentiate into derivatives of the three embryonic germ layers endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm - is the main characteristic of embryonic stem (ES) cells. ES cells are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of a pre-implantation blastocyst and can self-renew

  19. The mechanical consequences of mineralization in embryonic bone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanck, E.J.M.; Donkelaar, C.C. van; Jepsen, K.J.; Goldstein, S.A.; Weinans, H.; Burger, E.H.; Huiskes, R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mineralization on the mechanical properties of embryonic bone rudiments. For this purpose, four-point bending experiments were performed on unmineralized and mineralized embryonic mouse ribs at 16 and 17 days of gestational age. Young's modulus

  20. Pathways in pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Puy, L.

    2010-01-01

    Pluripotency - the potential to differentiate into derivatives of the three embryonic germ layers endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm - is the main characteristic of embryonic stem (ES) cells. ES cells are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of a pre-implantation blastocyst and can self-renew indefin

  1. Meeting embryonic requirements of broilers throughout incubation: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, R.; Reijrink, I.A.M.; Meijerhof, R.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    During incubation of chicken embryos, environmental conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 concentration, must be controlled to meet embryonic requirements that change during the different phases of embryonic development. In the current review, the effects of embryo temperature,

  2. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  3. Human embryonic stem cell lines derived from the Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Fu FANG; Fan JIN; Hui GAI; Ying CHEN; Li WU; Ai Lian LIU; Bin CHEN; Hui Zhen SHENG

    2005-01-01

    Six human embryonic stem cell lines were established from surplus blastocysts. The cell lines expressed alkaline phosphatase and molecules typical of primate embryonic stem cells, including Oct-4, Nanog, TDGF1, Sox2, EBAF,Thy-1, FGF4, Rex-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Five of the six lines formed embryoid bodies that expressed markers of a variety of cell types; four of them formed teratomas with tissue types representative of all three embryonic germ layers. These human embryonic stem cells are capable of producing clones of undifferentiated morphology, and one of them was propagated to become a subline. Human embryonic stem cell lines from the Chinese population should facilitate stem cell research and may be valuable in studies of population genetics and ecology.

  4. Oesophageal carcinoma presenting with a synchronous asymptomatic colon carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Gupta; Bharat Chauhan; V Rangarajan; Saral Desai; Vanita Noronha; Kumar Prabhash

    2013-01-01

    The advancement in diagnostic techniques has resulted in increased incidence of occult second primary in cancer patients. Here, we report a case of symptomatic oesophageal carcinoma and synchronous asymptomatic colon carcinoma diagnosed through Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography imaging.

  5. f991cp.m77t and f991cp.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-9-91-CP in Central Pacific from 09/24/1991 to 09/25/1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-9-91-CP. The cruise was conducted in the...

  6. f991cp.m77t and f991cp.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-9-91-CP in Central Pacific from 09/24/1991 to 09/25/1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-9-91-CP. The cruise was conducted in the...

  7. Synchronous thyroid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo [Chonnam National Univ. School of Dentistry, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Thyroid carcinoma occurring as a second primary associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is unusual. This report presents a synchronous thyroid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the anterior palate region of a 41-year-old man. The clinical, radiologic, and histologic features are described. At 10-month follow-up after operation, no evidence of recurrence ana metastasis was present.

  8. Quantitative analysis of the therapeutic effect of magnolol on MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson’s disease using in vivo 18F-9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ko-Ting; Ee, Ting-Wei; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chan, Ming-Huan; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Kung, Mei-Ping; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2017-01-01

    18F-9-Fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine [18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ] positron emission tomography (PET) has been shown to detect dopaminergic neuron loss associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in human and neurotoxin-induced animal models. A polyphenol compound, magnolol, was recently proposed as having a potentially restorative effect in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 6-hydroxydopamine-treated animal models. In this study, 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ PET was used to determine the therapeutic efficacy of magnolol in an MPTP–PD mouse model that was prepared by giving an intraperitoneally (i.p.) daily dose of 25 mg/kg MPTP to male C57BL/6 mice for 5 consecutive days. Twenty-minute static 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ PET scans were performed before MPTP treatment and 5 days after the termination of MPTP treatment to set up the baseline control. Half of the MPTP-treated mice then received a daily dose of magnolol (10 mg/kg dissolved in corn oil, i.p.) for 6 days. 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ PET imaging was performed the day after the final treatment. All 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ PET images were analysed and the specific uptake ratio (SUr) was calculated. Ex vivo autoradiography (ARG) and corresponding immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies were conducted to confirm the distribution of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum. The striatal SUr ratios of 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ PET images for the Sham, the MPTP, and the MPTP + Magnolol-treated groups were 1.25 ± 0.05, 0.75 ± 0.06, and 1.00 ± 0.11, respectively (n = 4 for each group). The ex vivo 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ ARG and IHC results correlated favourably with the PET imaging results. 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ PET imaging suggested that magnolol post-treatment may reverse the neuronal damage in the MPTP-lesioned PD mice. In vivo imaging of the striatal vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) distribution using 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ animal PET is a useful method to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic drugs i.e., magnolol, for the management of PD. PMID:28257461

  9. Early onset sebaceous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltreider Sara A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular sebaceous carcinoma can masquerade as benign lesions resulting in delay of diagnosis. Early recognition is even more difficult in young patients where the disease rarely occurs. Here, we provide a clinicopathological correlation of ocular sebaceous carcinoma in a young individual lacking history of hereditary cancer or immunosuppression. Findings A detailed histopathological study including p53 DNA sequencing was performed on an aggressive sebaceous carcinoma presenting in a healthy 32 year-old Caucasian woman. She had no history of retinoblastoma, evidence for a hereditary cancer syndrome, or radiation therapy. However, she potentially was at risk for excessive UV light exposure. A detailed review of the literature is also provided. A moderately well differentiated sebaceous carcinoma was established histopathologically arising from the meibomian gland of the upper eyelid. In most areas, the cytoplasm contained small but distinct Oil-red-O positive vacuoles. Direct sequencing of p53 identified a G:C→A:T mutation at a dipyrimidine site. The mutation results in substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine at residue 199 located at the p53 dimer-dimer interface. Energy minimization structural modeling predicts that G199R will neutralize negative charges contributed by nearby inter- and intramonomeric glutamate residues. Discussion This study points to the importance of recognizing that sebaceous carcinoma can occur in young patients with no evidence for hereditary cancer risk or radiation therapy. The G199R substitution is anticipated to alter the stability of the p53 tetrameric complex. The role of UV light in the etiology of sebaceous carcinoma deserves further study. Our findings, taken together with those of others, suggest that different environmental factors could lead to the development of sebaceous carcinoma in different patients.

  10. Current progress with primate embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James A; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Wolf, Don P

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated pluripotent state and differentiate into any cell type. Differentiation of ESCs into various specific cell-types may be able to cure or alleviate the symptoms of various degenerative diseases. Unresolved issues regarding maintaining function, possible apoptosis and tumor formation in vivo mean a prudent approach should be taken towards advancing ESCs into human clinical trials. Rhesus macaques provide the ideal model organism for testing the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ESC based therapies and significant numbers of primate ESC lines are now available. In this review, we will summarize progress in evaluating the genetic and epigenetic integrity of primate ESCs, examine their current use in pre-clinical trials and discuss the potential of producing ESC-derived cell populations that are genetically identical (isogenic) to the host by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  11. Human embryonic stem cells and patent protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Sanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of biotechnological research in modern diagnostics and therapeutics, on the one hand, and stimulative function of a patent, on the other hand, this work deals with the question of the possibility of pa-tent protection of human embryonic stem cells. Taking into account that this is a biotechnological invention, the key question that this paper highlights is the interpretation of the provisions of their patentability. Namely, thanks to the advanced methods of isolation, purification and preparation for implementation, modern patent systems do not exclude a priori living organisms from patent protection. Therefore, the analysis of representative administrative decisions or court rulings sought to define the criteria that would be applied in order to give patent protection to a certain biotechnological invention (stem cells while others do not.

  12. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarda Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic.

  13. Human embryonic stem cells for neuronal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2006-02-01

    Human embryonic stem cells may serve as a potentially endeless source of transplantable cells to treat various neurologic disorders. Accumulating data have shown the therapeutic value of various neural precursor cell types in experimental models of neurologic diseases. Tailoring cell therapy for specific disorders requires the generation of cells that are committed to specific neural lineages. To this end, protocols were recently developed for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, spinal motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from hESC. These protocols recapitulate normal development in culture conditions. However, a novel concept emerging from these studies is that the beneficial effect of transplanted stem cells is not only via cell replacement in damaged host tissue, but also by trophic and protective effects, as well as by an immunomodulatory effect that down-regulates detrimental brain inflammation.

  14. Compatibility of embryonic stem cells with biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschel, Jörg; Berr, Karin; Depprich, Rita; Naujoks, Christian; Kübler, Norbert R; Meyer, Ulrich; Ommerborn, Michelle; Lammers, Lydia

    2009-05-01

    Periodontal bone defects and atrophy of the jaws in an aging population are of special concern. Tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and biomaterials may offer new therapeutic options. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the compatibility of ESCs with biomaterials and the influence of biomaterials on the osteogenic gene expression profile.Therefore, ESCs are cultured with various biomaterials. The cytocompatibility of murine ESCs is measured regarding the proliferation of the cells on the materials by CyQUANT assay, the morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and the influence on the gene expression by real time PCR.The results show that insoluble collagenous bone matrix, followed by beta-tricalciumphosphate, is most suitable for bone tissue engineering regarding cell proliferation, and phenotype. The gene expression analysis indicates that biomaterials do influence the gene expression of ESCs.Our results provide new insight into the cytocompatibility of ESCs on different scaffolds.

  15. Functional analysis of Scr during embryonic and post-embryonic development in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycaj, Steven; Chesebro, John; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2010-05-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana represents a basal insect lineage that undergoes the ancestral hemimetabolous mode of development. Here, we examine the embryonic and post-embryonic functions of the hox gene Scr in Periplaneta as a way of better understanding the roles of this gene in the evolution of insect body plans. During embryogenesis, Scr function is strictly limited to the head with no role in the prothorax. This indicates that the ancestral embryonic function of Scr was likely restricted to the head, and that the posterior expansion of expression in the T1 legs may have preceded any apparent gain of function during evolution. In addition, Scr plays a pivotal role in the formation of the dorsal ridge, a structure that separates the head and thorax in all insects. This is evidenced by the presence of a supernumerary segment that occurs between the labial and T1 segments of RNAiScr first nymphs and is attributed to an alteration in engrailed (en) expression. The fact that similar Scr phenotypes are observed in Tribolium but not in Drosophila or Oncopeltus reveals the presence of lineage-specific variation in the genetic architecture that controls the formation of the dorsal ridge. In direct contrast to the embryonic roles, Scr has no function in the head region during post-embryogenesis in Periplaneta, and instead, strictly acts to provide identity to the T1 segment. Furthermore, the strongest Periplaneta RNAiScr phenotypes develop ectopic wing-like tissue that originates from the posterior region of the prothoracic segment. This finding provides a novel insight into the current debate on the morphological origin of insect wings.

  16. Integrative analysis of the mouse embryonic transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amar V; Knudsen, Kenneth B; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2007-04-10

    Monitoring global gene expression provides insight into how genes and regulatory signals work together to guide embryo development. The fields of developmental biology and teratology are now confronted with the need for automated access to a reference library of gene-expression signatures that benchmark programmed (genetic) and adaptive (environmental) regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. Such a library must be constructed from highly-distributed microarray data. Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM), an open access knowledge management system, provides custom software to mine public microarray data focused on developmental health and disease. The present study describes tools for seamless data integration in the BDSM library (MetaSample, MetaChip, CIAeasy) using the QueryBDSM module. A field test of the prototype was run using published microarray data series derived from a variety of laboratories, experiments, microarray platforms, organ systems, and developmental stages. The datasets focused on several developing systems in the mouse embryo, including preimplantation stages, heart and nerve development, testis and ovary development, and craniofacial development. Using BDSM data integration tools, a gene-expression signature for 346 genes was resolved that accurately classified samples by organ system and developmental sequence. The module builds a potential for the BDSM approach to decipher a large number developmental processes through comparative bioinformatics analysis of embryological systems at-risk for specific defects, using multiple scenarios to define the range of probabilities leading from molecular phenotype to clinical phenotype. We conclude that an integrative analysis of global gene-expression of the developing embryo can form the foundation for constructing a reference library of signaling pathways and networks for normal and abnormal regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. These tools are available free of charge from the web-site http

  17. Metabolic properties of chicken embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism correlates with cell fate,but the metabolic properties of chicken embryonic stem (chES) cells are poorly understood.Using a previously established chES cell model and electron microscopy (EM),we found that undifferentiated chES cells stored glycogen.Additionally,undifferentiated chES cells expressed lower levels of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) mRNAs but higher levels of hexokinase 1 (HK1) and glycogen synthase (GYS) mRNAs compared with control primary chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) cells,suggesting that chES cells direct glucose flux towards the glycogenic pathway.Moreover,we demonstrated that undifferentiated chES cells block gluconeogenic outflow and impede the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) from this pathway,as evidenced by the barely detectable levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PCX) and mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK2) mRNAs.Additionally,cell death occurred in undifferentiated chES cells as shown by Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide (PI) double staining,but it could be rescued by exogenous G6P.However,we found that differentiated chES cells decreased the glycogen reserve through the use of PAS staining.Moreover,differentiated chES cells expressed higher levels of GLUT1,HK1 and PFK mRNAs,while the level of GYS mRNA remained similar in control CEF cells.These data indicate that undifferentiated chES cells continue to synthesize glycogen from glucose at the expense of G6P,while differentiated chES cells have a decreased glycogen reserve,which suggests that the amount of glycogen is indicative of the chES cell state.

  18. Human embryonic stem cells and microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs possess a great potential in the field of regenerative medicine by their virtue of pluripotent potential with indefinite proliferation capabilities. They can self renew themselves and differentiate into three embryonic germ layers. Although they are conventionally grown on mitotically inactivated mouse feeder cells, there are in vitro culture systems utilizing feeder cells of human origin in order to prevent cross-species contamination. Recently established in vitro culture systems suggested that direct interaction with feeder cells is not necessary but rather attachment to a substrate is required to ensure long-term, efficient hESC culture in vitro. This substrate is usually composed of a mixture of extracellular matrix components representing in vivo natural niche. In hESC biology, the mechanism of interaction of hESCs with extracellular matrix molecules remained insufficiently explored area of research due to their transient nature of interaction with the in vivo niche. However, an in vitro culture system established using extracellular matrix molecules may provide a safer alternative to culture systems with feeder cells while paving the way to Good Manufacturing Practice-GMP production of hESCs for therapeutic purposes. Therefore, it is essential to study the interaction of extracellular matrix molecules with hESCs in order to standardize in vitro culture systems for large-scale production of hESCs in a less labor-intensive way. This would not only provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms that control pluripotency but also serve to dissect the molecular signaling pathways of directed differentiation for prospective therapeutic applications in the future. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 486-495

  19. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue.

  20. Embryonic environment and transgenerational effects in quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Sophie; Gourichon, David; Leterrier, Christine; Labrune, Yann; Coustham, Vincent; Rivière, Sandrine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Coville, Jean-Luc; Morisson, Mireille; Minvielle, Francis; Pitel, Frédérique

    2017-01-26

    Environmental exposures, for instance to chemicals, are known to impact plant and animal phenotypes on the long term, sometimes across several generations. Such transgenerational phenotypes were shown to be promoted by epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation, an epigenetic mark involved in the regulation of gene expression. However, it is yet unknown whether transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of altered phenotypes exists in birds. The purpose of this study was to develop an avian model to investigate whether changes to the embryonic environment had a transgenerational effect that could alter the phenotypes of third-generation offspring. Given its impact on the mammalian epigenome and the reproductive system in birds, genistein was used as an environment stressor. We compared several third-generation phenotypes of two quail "epilines", which were obtained from genistein-injected eggs (Epi+) or from untreated eggs (Epi-) from the same founders. A "mirrored" crossing strategy was used to minimize between-line genetic variability by maintaining similar ancestor contributions across generations in each line. Three generations after genistein treatment, a significant difference in the sexual maturity of the females, which, after three generations, could not be attributed to direct maternal effects, was observed between the lines, with Epi+ females starting to lay eggs later. Adult body weight was significantly affected by genistein treatment applied in a previous generation, and a significant interaction between line and sex was observed for body weight at 3 weeks. Behavioral traits, such as evaluating the birds' reaction to social isolation, were also significantly affected by genistein treatment. Yet, global methylation analyses revealed no significant difference between the epilines. These findings demonstrate that embryonic environment affects the phenotype of offspring three generations later in quail. While one cannot rule out the existence of some

  1. Use of murine embryonic stem cells in embryotoxicity assays: the embryonic stem cell test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Andrea E M; Buesen, Roland; Visan, Anke; Spielmann, Horst

    2006-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) takes advantage of the potential of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate in culture to test embryotoxicity in vitro. The EST represents a scientifically validated in vitro system for the classification of compounds according to their teratogenic potential based on the morphological analysis of beating cardiomyocytes in embryoid body outgrowths compared to cytotoxic effects on murine ES cells and differentiated 3T3 fibroblasts. Through a number of prevalidation and validation studies, the EST has been demonstrated to be a reliable alternative method for embryotoxicity testing based on the most important mechanisms in embryotoxicity-cytotoxicity and differentiation--as well as on differences in sensitivity between differentiated and embryonic tissues. Improvements of the EST protocol using flow cytometry analysis showed that differential expression of sarcomeric myosin heavy chain and alpha-actinin proteins quantified under the influence of a test compound is a useful marker for detecting potential teratogenicity. The in vitro embryotoxicity test described in this chapter is rapid, simple, and sensitive and can be usefully employed as a component of the risk/hazard assessment process.

  2. Proton radiotherapy of skin carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umebayashi, Y.; Uyeno, K.; Otsuka, F. (Tsukuba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Tsujii, H. (Proton Medical Research Center, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    At the Proton Medical Research Centre, University of Tsukuba, a pilot study of proton-beam radiotherapy was performed in 12 patients with the following types of carcinoma: Bowen's disease (4), oral verrucous carcinoma (5), and squamous cell carcinoma (3). They received total doses of 51-99.2 Gy in fractions of 2-12.5 Gy. All tumours responded well to the treatment. All four lesions of Bowen's disease, three of the five oral verrucous carcinomas, and the three squamous cell carcinomas completely regressed following irradiation. Two squamous cell carcinomas recurred during the follow-up period. One recurrent squamous cell carcinoma was successfully treated by a salvage surgical operation, and in the other case the patient refused further therapy. In two verrucous carcinomas there was 90% regression of tumour volume. No severe radiation-related complication occurred. (Author).

  3. Growth-promoting effects of different fractions of extra-embryonic coelomic fluid on embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, A K; Layfield, R; Pratten, M K

    2000-08-01

    In the early stages of embryonic development, many growth-promoting molecules must be provided by the maternal system. These factors may be supplied locally to the embryo, by the decidua, the placenta, or the yolk sac. In this study the growth-promoting potential of extra-embryonic coelomic fluid (EECF) and its fractions was investigated. The embryonic requirement of growth-promoting molecules may be studied by reducing the growth-supporting capacity of serum. Thus, ultrafiltration of rat serum was carried out for 8 h using Millipore filters with a molecular weight exclusion of 30 kDa. Rat embryos at 9.5 days of age were cultured for 8 days for anembryonic yolk sacs, and then EECF was collected and divided into three different molecular weight fractions by ultrafiltration. Rat embryos were cultured for 48 h in whole rat serum and the serum retenate (which has low growth-supporting capacity) in the presence and absence of EECF, its fractions, or in EECF only. Embryos grown in retenate showed severe growth retardation, and the addition of EECF significantly improved embryonic growth. The fraction which contained the molecules with molecular weight between 10 and 30 kDa had significantly more effect on embryonic development than the other fractions. This fraction of EECF was analysed by gel electrophoresis. Three of the four protein bands observed in this fraction were identified by amino-terminal sequencing as alpha-fetoprotein precursor (22 kDa), apolipoprotein A1 precursor (24 kDa) and fetal haemoglobin Y2 chain (14 kDa), none of which are likely to be responsible for the growth-promoting activity. To further investigate growth-promoting proteins, EECF was Western-blotted to nitrocellulose membranes and probed with antisera against rat prolactin, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factors I and II and human placental lactogen. No immunoreactive bands were detected in the EECF, suggesting that either these proteins are not present or are present at levels

  4. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  5. Brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almasi Saeid

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma is rare. In our center, among 301 cases of esophageal cancer referred for radiotherapy during a 14-year period, brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma was detected in one case. An unusual case of esophageal carcinoma that presented with brain metastasis is reported.

  6. Stem cell pluripotency factor NANOG is expressed in human fetal gonocytes, testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Almstrup, K; Nielsen, J E

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: NANOG is a key regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and pluripotency. Our recent genome-wide gene expression profiling study of the precursor of testicular germ cell tumours, carcinoma in situ testis (CIS), showed close similarity between ESC and CIS, including high NANOG...... earlier than for OCT-4. We detected no expression at the protein level in normal testis. CONCLUSIONS: NANOG is a new marker for testicular CIS and germ cell tumours and the high level of NANOG along with OCT-4 are determinants of the stem cell-like pluripotency of the preinvasive CIS cell. Timing of NANOG......; seminoma and embryonal carcinoma were strongly positive, differentiated somatic elements of teratoma were negative. We provide evidence for the fetal origin of testicular cancer as we detected strong expression of NANOG in fetal gonocytes up to gestational week 20, with subsequent down-regulation occurring...

  7. Primary Fallopian Tube Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad K Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary Fallopian Tube Carcinoma (PFTC is rare and accounts for about 0.3% of all gynecologic cancers. Less than 1500 cases have been reported in the literature. It arises in postmenopausal women and typically presents with abdominal pelvic pain, vaginal bleeding and watery discharge. However, a correct diagnosis is rarely achieved preoperative, and in many cases, the diagnosis is made after incidental surgery for unrelated conditions commonly being ovarian carcinoma . Compared with ovarian carcinoma, PFTC more often presents at early stages, but it has a worse prognosis. PFTC is usually managed in the same manner as ovarian cancer. We report a case of Left PFTC that presented as Left ovarian mass, and we briefly review the literature.

  8. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Carolina Barbosa de Sousa; Balassiano, Laila Klotz de Almeida; Pinto, Julyana Calegari; de Souza, Flávia Crespo Schueler; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Treu, Curt Mafra

    2016-01-01

    Although subungual squamous cell carcinoma is rare, it is the most common primary malignant neoplasms in this location. The higher incidence occurs in the fingernails, but involvement of the toenails is also possible. Subungual squamous cell carcinoma often looks like other more common benign lesions, such as fungal infection, onychomycosis, or viral wart. These factors, together with a general lack of awareness of this disease among physicians, often result in delayed diagnosis. Therefore, it is underdiagnosed, with few reports in the literature. The authors present a case of a man with a diagnosis of subungual squamous cell carcinoma in the hallux, without bone involvement, which was submitted to the appropriate surgical treatment. PMID:28099608

  9. Low oxygen levels slow embryonic development of Limulus polyphemus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch, Peter; Wang, Tobias; Pertoldi, Cino

    2016-01-01

    The American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus typically spawns in the upper intertidal zone, where the developing embryos are exposed to large variations in abiotic factors such as temperature, humidity, salinity, and oxygen, which affect the rate of development. It has been shown that embryonic...... development is slowed at both high and low salinities and temperatures, and that late embryos close to hatching tolerate periodic hypoxia. In this study we investigated the influence of hypoxia on both early and late embryonic development in L. polyphemus under controlled laboratory conditions. Embryos were...... pronounced hypoxia in later embryonic developmental stages, but also in earlier, previously unexplored, developmental stages....

  10. Screening of nanoparticle embryotoxicity using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnolo, Luisa; Fenoglio, Ivana; Massimiani, Micol; Magrini, Andrea; Pietroiusti, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles in many consumer products, rapid and economic tests for evaluating possible adverse effects on human health are urgently needed. In the present chapter the use of mouse embryonic stem cells as a valuable tool to in vitro screen nanoparticle toxicity on embryonic tissues is described. This in vitro method is a modification of the embryonic stem cell test, which has been widely used to screen soluble chemical compounds for their embryotoxic potential. The test offers an alternative to animal experimentation, reducing experimental costs and ethical issues.

  11. Simultaneous Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with thyroid papillary carcinoma is an unusual finding. From 2004 to 2011, approximately 250 patients underwent laryngectomies due to squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx at the Otolaryngology Department of Khalili Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. In three patients, synchronous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid papillary carcinoma was found. Histopathologic study of the lymph nodes revealed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. We report three cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma incidentally found on histological examinations of resected thyroid lobes, as a procedure required for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In comparison, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma needs more aggressive treatment than well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The prevalence of thyroid papillary carcinoma, as an incidental finding in our study was 0.01%. Therefore, preoperative evaluation of the thyroid gland by ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspicious lesions is recommended in patients who are candidates for open laryngectomy.

  12. Primary fallopian tube carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Segedi Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary fallopian tube carcinoma is extremely rare, making 0.3-1.6% of all female genital tract malignancies. Although the etymology of this tumor is unknown, it is suggested to be associated with chronic tubal inflammation, infertility, tuberculous salpingitis and tubal endometriosis. High parity is considered to be protective. Cytogenetic studies show the disease to be associated with over expression of p53, HER2/neu and c-myb. There is also some evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have a role in umorogeneis. Clinical features. The most prevailing symptoms with fallopian tube carcinoma are abdominal pain, abnormal vaginal discharge/bleeding and the most common finding is an adnexal mass. In many patients, fallopian tube carcinoma is asymptomatic. Diagnosis. Due to its rarity, preoperative diagnosis of primary fallopian tube carcinoma is rarely made. It is usually misdiagnosed as ovarian carcinoma, tuboovarian abscess or ectopic pregnancy. Sonographic features of the tumor are non-specific and include the presence of a fluid-filled adnexal structure with a significant solid component, a sausage-shaped mass, a cystic mass with papillary projections within, a cystic mass with cog wheel appearance and an ovoid-shaped structure containing an incomplete separation and a highly vascular solid nodule. More than 80% of patients have elevated pretreatment serum CA-125 levels, which is useful in follow-up after the definite treatment. Treatment. The treatment approach is similar to that of ovarian carcinoma, and includes total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Staging is followed with chemotherapy.

  13. Urachal Carcinoma: Imaging Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Monteiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Urachal carcinoma is a rare neoplasm, which accounts for only 0.5–2% of bladder malignancies, and arises from a remnant of the fetal genitourinary tract. A 46-year-old woman presented with a history of pelvic pain and frequent daytime urination. Ultrasound (US, computed tomography (CT, and magnetic resonance (MR demonstrated a supravesical heterogeneous mass with calcifications. The patient underwent a partial cystectomy with en-bloc resection of the mass and histopathological examination revealed the diagnosis of urachal adenocarcinoma. Urachal carcinomas are usually associated with poor prognosis and early diagnosis is fundamental. CT and MR are useful to correctly diagnose and preoperatively staging.

  14. Primary adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab S. Shaikh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinomas are extremely rare tumors presenting with extensive locoregional spread at the time of diagnosis. Patients succumb to metastases within a couple of months. As a result, very few cases are reported in the literature until now. We present a case of a 62-year old female with non-functional sarcomatoid carcinoma of the right adrenal gland. There was no radiological evidence of locoregional metastases. Patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Follow up after 3 months showed para-aortic lymphadenopathy and similar left adrenal mass on computed tomography. Patient refused further treatment and succumbed to the disease. A brief case report with review of literature is presented.

  15. Giant seminoma case with very small yolk sac and embryo carcinoma components, detected by intensive histopathological examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Nakaya, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We experienced the giant seminoma with 18 × 10 × 10 cm sized and about 2.6 kg weight of 25 year old patient. We intensively examined the histological tissue type distributions in this giant seminoma. Most of the tumor consisted of seminoma components. In addition, the tumor included the very small fragments of yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma component at the root part of the seminoma mass. This shows that intensive histological examination may contribute to the finding of other embryonic component of the large seminoma. This may show that leaving the seminoma growing may generate the other embryonic tumor component, not always big enough to find out in a routine procedure, during the growth, in the different way from the original mixed cell germ tumor.

  16. Evolution of embryonic development in nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Jens

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nematodes can be subdivided into basal Enoplea (clades 1 and 2 and more derived Chromadorea (clades 3 to 12. Embryogenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans (clade 9 has been analyzed in most detail. Their establishment of polarity and asymmetric cleavage requires the differential localization of PAR proteins. Earlier studies on selected other nematodes revealed that embryonic development of nematodes is more diverse than the essentially invariant development of C. elegans and the classic study object Ascaris had suggested. To obtain a more detailed picture of variations and evolutionary trends we compared embryonic cell lineages and pattern formation in embryos of all 12 nematode clades. Methods The study was conducted using 4-D microscopy and 3-D modeling of developing embryos. Results We found dramatic differences compared to C. elegans in Enoplea but also considerable variations among Chromadorea. We discovered 'Polarity Organizing Centers' (POCs that orient cleavage spindles along the anterior-posterior axis in distinct cells over consecutive cell generations. The resulting lineally arranged blastomeres represent a starting point for the establishment of bilateral symmetry within individual lineages. We can discern six different early cleavage types and suggest that these variations are due to modifications in the activity of the POCs in conjunction with changes in the distribution of PAR proteins. In addition, our studies indicate that lineage complexity advanced considerably during evolution, that is we observe trends towards an increase of somatic founder cells, from monoclonal to polyclonal lineages and from a variable (position-dependent to an invariable (lineage-dependent way of cell fate specification. In contrast to the early phase of embryogenesis, the second half ('morphogenesis' appears similar in all studied nematodes. Comparison of early cleavage between the basal nematode Tobrilus stefanskii and the tardigrade

  17. A toolbox to explore the mechanics of living embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campàs, Otger

    2016-07-01

    The sculpting of embryonic tissues and organs into their functional morphologies involves the spatial and temporal regulation of mechanics at cell and tissue scales. Decades of in vitro work, complemented by some in vivo studies, have shown the relevance of mechanical cues in the control of cell behaviors that are central to developmental processes, but the lack of methodologies enabling precise, quantitative measurements of mechanical cues in vivo have hindered our understanding of the role of mechanics in embryonic development. Several methodologies are starting to enable quantitative studies of mechanics in vivo and in situ, opening new avenues to explore how mechanics contributes to shaping embryonic tissues and how it affects cell behavior within developing embryos. Here we review the present methodologies to study the role of mechanics in living embryonic tissues, considering their strengths and drawbacks as well as the conditions in which they are most suitable.

  18. Graphene for enhanced embryonic stem cell photo-transfection efficiency

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their pluripotency properties, embryonic stem (ES) cells possess great potential in regenerative therapy. Since reported a promising tissue engineering scaffold material, here, graphene is demonstrated to significantly improve the ES cell...

  19. Therapeutic potentials of human embryonic stem cells in Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, Mary B; Bakay, Roy A E

    2008-01-01

    .... The isolation, differentiation, and long-term cultivation of human embryonic stem cells and the therapeutic research discovery made in relation to the beneficial properties of neurotrophic and neural...

  20. Probing Embryonic Stem Cell Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling Using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyla, Laralynne; Voldman, Joel

    2012-07-01

    Although stem cell fate is traditionally manipulated by exogenously altering the cells' extracellular signaling environment, the endogenous autocrine and paracrine signals produced by the cells also contribute to their two essential processes: self-renewal and differentiation. Autocrine and/or paracrine signals are fundamental to both embryonic stem cell self-renewal and early embryonic development, but the nature and contributions of these signals are often difficult to fully define using conventional methods. Microfluidic techniques have been used to explore the effects of cell-secreted signals by controlling cell organization or by providing precise control over the spatial and temporal cellular microenvironment. Here we review how such techniques have begun to be adapted for use with embryonic stem cells, and we illustrate how many remaining questions in embryonic stem cell biology could be addressed using microfluidic technologies.

  1. Derivation of multipotent mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilineage differentiation into fat, cartilage, bone, and skeletal muscle cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings will help to elucidate the mechanism of mesoderm specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation and provide a platform to efficiently generate specialized human mesenchymal cell types for future clinical applications.

  2. The liberation of embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Blair

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mouse embryonic stem (ES cells are defined by their capacity to self-renew and their ability to differentiate into all adult tissues including the germ line. Along with efficient clonal propagation, these properties have made them an unparalleled tool for manipulation of the mouse genome. Traditionally, mouse ES (mES cells have been isolated and cultured in complex, poorly defined conditions that only permit efficient derivation from the 129 mouse strain; genuine ES cells have not been isolated from another species in these conditions. Recently, use of small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (Gsk3 and the Fgf-MAPK signaling cascade has permitted efficient derivation of ES cells from all tested mouse strains. Subsequently, the first verified ES cells were established from a non-mouse species, Rattus norvegicus. Here, we summarize the advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways regulating mES cell self-renewal that led to the first derivation of rat ES cells and highlight the new opportunities presented for transgenic modeling on diverse genetic backgrounds. We also comment on the implications of this work for our understanding of pluripotent stem cells across mammalian species.

  3. Microglia Modulate Wiring of the Embryonic Forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Squarzoni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, has been associated with the etiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Consistently, microglia have been shown to regulate neurogenesis and synaptic maturation at perinatal and postnatal stages. However, microglia invade the brain during mid-embryogenesis and thus could play an earlier prenatal role. Here, we show that embryonic microglia, which display a transiently uneven distribution, regulate the wiring of forebrain circuits. Using multiple mouse models, including cell-depletion approaches and cx3cr1−/−, CR3−/−, and DAP12−/− mutants, we find that perturbing microglial activity affects the outgrowth of dopaminergic axons in the forebrain and the laminar positioning of subsets of neocortical interneurons. Since defects in both dopamine innervation and cortical networks have been linked to neuropsychiatric diseases, our study provides insights into how microglial dysfunction can impact forebrain connectivity and reveals roles for immune cells during normal assembly of brain circuits.

  4. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  5. COMPUTER MODELING OF EMBRYONIC MORTALITY AT CRIOCONSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to determine the regularities of influence of mammalian embryos heterogeneity and effectiveness of cryoconservation steps on their viability by using the developed simulation model. The model is based on analytical expressions that reflect the main causes of embryonic mortality during in vitro and in vivo cultivation, crioconservation and embryo transplantation. Reduction of viability depends on a set of biological factors such as the animal special, donor and recipient state, quality of embryos, and of technological ones such as the efficiency of cryopreservation method, and embryo transplantation. Fulfilled computer experiment showed, that divergence of embryos viability depending on biological parameters variations changes in a range from 0 to 100%, whereas efficiency index of chosen technology has an inaccuracy about 1%. The comparative analysis of alternative technologies of embryos cryopreservation showed the maximum efficiency of stages of use of the cryoprotectant, freezing regime and in vitro and in vivo cultivation of biological object. The application of computer modeling gives an opportunity to reduce the range of embryos viability results, obtained in different experiments is many times, thereby to shorten the time, monetary costs and the slaughter of laboratory animals in obtaining reliable results.

  6. Biological impact of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Miguel; Menéndez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells is currently a field of great potential in biomedicine. These cells represent a highly valuable tool for developmental biology studies, disease models, and drug screening and toxicity. The ultimate goal of hESCs and iPS cell research is the treatment of diseases or disorders for which there is currently no treatment or existing therapies are only partially effective. Despite the disproportionate short-term hopes generated, which are putting too much pressure on scientists, the international scientific community is making rapid progress in understanding hESCs and iPS cells. Nonetheless, great efforts have to be made to provide an answer to still quite basic questions concerning their biology. Moreover, translation to clinical applications in cell replacement therapy requires prior solution to ethical barriers. The recent development of iPS cells has provided a strong alternative to overcome ethical issues concerning hESCs. However, an in-depth characterization of their genetic and epigenetic features, as well as their differentiation potential still remains to be undertaken. This chapter will describe, precisely, what the critical issues are, where scientific and ethical barriers stand, and how we are to overcome them. Only then, we shall finally discover whether hESCs and iPS cells will allow building reproducible disease models, and whether they really are a safe tool, with great potential for regenerative medicine.

  7. Verrucous carcinoma of larynx

    OpenAIRE

    Varshney, Saurabh; Singh, Jasprit; Saxena, R. K.; Kaushal, Anoop; Pathak, V. P.

    2004-01-01

    A 55 years male presented with hoarsness of voice (4 months), cough (1 month), difficulty in breathing (15 days). Patient underwent an emergency tracneostomy and further workup proved it to be a case of verrucous carcinoma of larynx. Patient was treated surgically with satisfactory result.

  8. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, E. van der; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the recent literature on extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. Until now, only four cases have been published in the English literature, two of those in the Southern Medical Journal. Sharing the information on diagnosis and treatment of these cases is important for better unders

  9. Intraosseous acinic cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-17

    Dec 17, 2011 ... Treatment of acinic cell carcinoma in most cases is surgical. High recurrence ... back tooth region. Based on ... life and that slow‑growing swelling and pain are the ... 2nd to 3rd molar of left mandible, preliminary diagnosis was.

  10. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-I Lin

    2007-12-01

    Conclusion: The possibility of rare nasopharyngeal carcinoma should be considered in any pregnant woman with presenting symptoms of persistent headache and abnormal nasal discharge, and a detailed thorough investigation is indicated. Successful pregnancy outcome can be achieved after tailored use of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  11. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazaretian, S.P.; Schenberg, M.E.; Simpson, I.; Slootweg, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) is the malignant counterpart of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour and dentinogenic ghost cell tumour. This is the case of a middle-aged male who presented with a slow-growing maxillary tumour. He was asymptomatic until pain symptoms developed prior to initi

  12. Ontogeny and embryonic description of Betta splendens, Perciformes (Regan, 1910)

    OpenAIRE

    Shaytner Campos DUARTE; Vasconcellos,Breno de Faria e; Manuel Vazquez VIDAL JÚNIOR; Ferreira,Andre Veloso; Mattos,Douglas da Cruz; Branco,Allex Trindade

    2012-01-01

    Ontogeny process comprises the embryo development from the moment of fecundation, through embryonic development phase, until hatching or later phases. The study of embryogenesis is an important tool for growth study of the species within their natural environment. The present work observed and registered the main stages of Betta splendens embryonic development, one of the most promising ornamental species mostly because of the increasing commercial interest, to describe the initial ontogeny a...

  13. Human embryonic stem cell research: ethical and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J A

    2001-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells to replace damaged cells and tissues promises future hope for the treatment of many diseases. However, many countries now face complex ethical and legal questions as a result of the research needed to develop these cell-replacement therapies. The challenge that must be met is how to permit research on human embryonic tissue to occur while maintaining respect for human life generally.

  14. Potential of embryonic and adult stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Wiese, Cornelia; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Cross, Michael; Wobus, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stem cell research indicate their enormous potential as a source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The success of such applications will depend on the precise properties and potentials of stem cells isolated either from embryonic, fetal or adult tissues. Embryonic stem cells established from the inner cell mass of early mouse embryos are characterized by nearly unlimited proliferation, and the capacity to differentiate into derivatives of essentially all lineages. The recent isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cell lines presents new opportunities for reconstructive medicine. However, important problems remain; first, the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts creates ethical problems, and second, the current techniques for the directed differentiation into somatic cell populations yield impure products with tumorigenic potential. Recent studies have also suggested an unexpectedly wide developmental potential of adult tissue-specific stem cells. Here too, many questions remain concerning the nature and status of adult stem cells both in vivo and in vitro and their proliferation and differentiation/transdifferentiation capacity. This review focuses on those issues of embryonic and adult stem cell biology most relevant to their in vitro propagation and differentiation. Questions and problems related to the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation are discussed.

  15. Induction of embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to get hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells and to study development mechanisms of hematopoietic cells, the method of inducing embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells was explored by differenciating mouse ES cells and human embryonic cells in three stages. The differentiated cells were identified by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and Wright's staining. The results showed that embryoid bodies (EBs) could form when ES cells were cultured in the medium with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). However, cytokines, such as stem cell factor (SCF), thrombopoietin (TPO), interleukin-3 (IL-3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), erythropoietin (EPO) and granular colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), were not helpful for forming EBs. SCF, TPO and embryonic cell conditional medium were useful for the differentiation of mouse EBs to hematopoietic progenitors. Eighty-six percent of these cells were CD34+ after 6-d culture. Hematopoietic progenitors differentiated to B lymphocytes when they were cocultured with primary bone marrow stroma cells in the DMEM medium with SCF and IL-6. 14 d later, most of the cells were CD34-CD38+. Wright's staining and immunohistochemistry showed that 80% of these cells were plasma-like morphologically and immunoglubolin positive. The study of hematopoietic cells from human embryonic cells showed that human embryonic cell differentiation was very similar to that of mouse ES cells. They could form EBs in the first stage and the CD34 positive cells account for about 48.5% in the second stage.

  16. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda Plovmand

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.......Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis....

  17. Brief embryonic strychnine exposure in zebrafish causes long-term adult behavioral impairment with indications of embryonic synaptic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nicole M; Arpie, Brianna; Lugo, Joseph; Linney, Elwood; Levin, Edward D; Cerutti, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish provide a powerful model of the impacts of embryonic toxicant exposure on neural development that may result in long-term behavioral dysfunction. In this study, zebrafish embryos were treated with 1.5mM strychnine for short embryonic time windows to induce transient changes in inhibitory neural signaling, and were subsequently raised in untreated water until adulthood. PCR analysis showed indications that strychnine exposure altered expression of some genes related to glycinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal synapses during embryonic development. In adulthood, treated fish showed significant changes in swimming speed and tank diving behavior compared to controls. Taken together, these data show that a short embryonic exposure to a neurotoxicant can alter development of neural synapses and lead to changes in adult behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Wnt Signaling in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC accounts for 90% of all kidney cancers. Due to poor diagnosis, high resistance to the systemic therapies and the fact that most RCC cases occur sporadically, current research switched its focus on studying the molecular mechanisms underlying RCC. The aim is the discovery of new effective and less toxic anti-cancer drugs and novel diagnostic markers. Besides the PI3K/Akt/mTOR, HGF/Met and VHL/hypoxia cellular signaling pathways, the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RCC is commonly studied. Wnt signaling and its targeted genes are known to actively participate in different biological processes during embryonic development and renal cancer. Recently, studies have shown that targeting this pathway by alternating/inhibiting its intracellular signal transduction can reduce cancer cells viability and inhibit their growth. The targets and drugs identified show promising potential to serve as novel RCC therapeutics and prognostic markers. This review aims to summarize the current status quo regarding recent research on RCC focusing on the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and how its understanding could facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic targets, new drugs and diagnostic biomarkers.

  19. A rare case report: Carcinoma pancreas with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous double malignancies involving different organs are relatively rare and uncommon finding. We report an interesting case of double malignancy in which a patient exhibited synchronous two separate carcinomas, pancreatic and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Patient was a 64-year-old male who presented primarily with symptoms pertaining to the biliary obstruction and ultrasound of abdomen revealing pancreatic head mass. HCC was detected incidentally during the investigations for carcinoma pancreas.

  20. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  1. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of nucleosome

  2. The carcinoma of parathyroid gland

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni P; Parikh Purvish

    2004-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma constitutes less than 1% of primary hyperparathyroidism. The exact etiology is not known. Prior radiation to neck, chronic renal failure and genetic factors are thought to play a role. The male to female ratio is one. Parathyroid carcinomas are slow growing, have a tendency to recur locally and metastasize late. 95% of parathyroid carcinomas are functioning. The major distinguishing features of malignant hyperparathyroidism are presence of a palpable mass i...

  3. Tumor suppressor and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliette Martin; Jean-Frangois Dufour

    2008-01-01

    A few signaling pathways are driving the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. Each of these pathways possesses negative regulators. These enzymes, which normally suppress unchecked cell proliferation, are circumvented in the oncogenic process, either the over-activity of oncogenes is sufficient to annihilate the activity of tumor suppressors or tumor suppressors have been rendered ineffective. The loss of several key tumor suppressors has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we systematically review the evidence implicating tumor suppressors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Adenosquamous carcinoma arising within a retrorectal tailgut cyst: Report of a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zoran Krivokapic; Ivan Dimitrijevic; Goran Barisic; Velimir Markovic; Miodrag Krstic

    2005-01-01

    Retrorectal, developmental tail gut cysts, include dermoid cysts, rectal duplication cysts and retrorectal cyst-hamartomas. Retrorectal cyst-hamartomas (RCH) are derived from remnants of the tail gut, the most caudal part of the embryonic hind gut, which normally involutes by the 8th wk of embryonic development (3-8 mm stage). They have specific radiological and histopathological features that distinguish them from other similar formations (dermoid cysts, enteric duplication cysts and teratomas). We report a patient with adenosquamous carcinoma arising within RCH, who underwent complete resection of the cyst through anterior laparotomy, and reached complete (recurrencefree for 14 mo, so far) functional recovery. The cyst was incidentally discovered during hysterectomy 12 years ago.Diagnostic, therapeutic and histopathological aspects of this rare case are discussed. The mentioned period between diagnosis and surgical treatment suggests that RCH, given enough time, can develop malignant degeneration, and should be resected at the time of diagnosis.

  5. Expression of maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase gene in human hepatocellular carcinoma and its effect on the growth and apoptosis of Hep3B interfered by RNA%母系胚胎亮氨酸拉链激酶基因在肝癌中的表达及siRNA干扰后对肝癌细胞Hep3B生长、凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张壮壮; 李坤雨; 王玉平; 韩泽广; 邓庆

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨母系胚胎亮氨酸拉链激酶(MELK)基因在肝癌中的表达及siRNA干扰后对肝癌细胞Hep3B生长、凋亡的影响.方法 利用逆转录聚合酶链式反应(RT-PCR)技术和实时定量PCR技术检测MELK基因在肝癌和癌旁组织中的表达差异;评价MELK与肝癌早期指标甲胎蛋白(AFP),δ1样同系物(DLK1)在48例肝癌样本中表达的关系;采用化学合成siRNA沉默内源性MELK基因表达,分析肝癌细胞Hep3B的生长活性、凋亡.结果 在半定量PCR检测的72例肝癌患者中,55例癌组织中MELK基因mRNA的表达水平高于相应癌旁组织;实时定量PCR结果显示MELK基因在肝癌组织中的表达量显著高于癌旁组织(P <0.001).MELK、AFP、DLK1在肝癌样本中的阳性率分别为66.7%、50%、54.2%,MELK在肝癌中的阳性比例高于AFP、DLK1;干扰MELK基因在肝癌细胞Hep3B中的表达可抑制细胞生长.结论 MELK激酶作为胚胎干细胞标志性基因在肝癌发生时高表达,是治疗肝癌的潜在靶基因.%and apoptosis and to discuss the feasibility that MELK kinase acts as a potential target gene against cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods By applying reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time polymerase chain reaction, the different expressions of MELK mRNAs in tumor and non-tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples were examined; the relationship of MELK, alpha-fetal protein (AFP) and delta-like 1 homolog (DLK1) were further evaluated in 48 HCC patients to determine different subtype of HCC samples according to the expression pattern of these progenitor cell markers. The cellular viability and apoptosis were analyzed when MELK is interfered by chemically synthesized siRNAs in Hep3B cells. Results Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that MELK mRNA had increasing expressions in 55 of 72 HCC samples, compared with corresponding non-tumor tissues. It showed that

  6. Pediatric Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which originates from thyroid parafollicular C cells, accounts for 3 to 5% of thyroid malignancies. MTC occurs either sporadically or in an inherited autosomal dominant manner. Hereditary MTC occurs as a familial MTC or as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and B syndromes. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed between hereditary MTC and germ-line ?gain of function? mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Most cases of pedi...

  7. Carcinoma in a fibroadenoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarela A

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A carcinoma arising within a fibroadenoma is an unusual occurrence, with only a little over 100 reported cases. The purpose of this report is to increase the awareness of this entity and to discourage the practice of rendering a diagnosis on gross examination of the tumor. We are reporting a case with two distinct primary tumors within the same breast, one of which was arising within the fibroadenoma. Only two such cases have been previously reported.

  8. Metaplastic carcinoma of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dewasi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Metaplastic carcinomas of breast are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumours in which part or all of the carcinomatous epithelium is transformed into a nonglandular (metaplastic growth process. This rare neoplasm usually runs an aggressive course. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i7.10320 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2014 Vol. 4, 594-596

  9. Cryotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awad, Tahany; Thorlund, Kristian; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS until June 2009. We identified further studies by searching...... national and topic-specific databases, bibliographies, conference abstracts, journals, and grey literature. Furthermore, we reviewed the reference lists and contacted the principal authors of the identified studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials (irrespective of language or publication...

  10. Emerging therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed endocrine malignancy. Its incidence is currently rising worldwide. The discovery of genetic mutations associated with the development of thyroid cancer, such as BRAF and RET, has lead to the development of new drugs which target the pathways which they influence. Despite recent advances, the prognosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is still unfavourable. In this review we look at emerging novel therapies for the treatment of well-differentiated and medullary thyroid carcinoma, and advances and future directions in the management of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  11. Epidemiological investigation of esophageal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhang; Shao-Hua Chen; You-Ming Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To review the characteristics of esophageal carcinoma in recent 30 years in the epidemiological investigation.METHODS: A total of 1 520 cases of esophageal carcinoma in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University Medical College admitted from 1970 until now were reviewed. Their age, gender, position of carcinoma and histological type were analyzed.RESULTS: The morbidity of esophageal carcinoma was increasing during the observation period. Compared with the 1970s (9.5%), the ratio of adenocarcinoma significantly increased after the 1980s (19.1%). The difference was significant (P≤0.05).CONCLUSION: The morbidity of esophageal adenocarcinoma was increasing and advanced clinical study should be strengthened.

  12. Vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaria, R N; Bowles, D W; Lewis, K D; Jimeno, A

    2012-07-01

    Vismodegib is a novel, small-molecule inhibitor of smoothened, a key component of the hedgehog signaling pathway. Increased hedgehog pathway signaling is critical in the development of hereditary and spontaneous basal cell carcinomas of the skin, and has been implicated in the development of a number of other tumors. In preclinical models, vismodegib demonstrated potent antitumor activity in hedgehog-dependent tumors, particularly basal cell carcinomas. Clinically, phase I and II studies showed dramatic anticancer activity in patients with advanced basal cell carcinomas. In January 2012, vismodegib was approved by the FDA for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic basal cell carcinomas of the skin.

  13. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient posterior

  14. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Brenneis

    Full Text Available Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i immunolabeling, (ii histology and (iii scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida, the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two

  15. Embryonic development of Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850) (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Paludicola).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara, D C; Leal-Zanchet, A M; Lizardo-Daudt, H m

    2008-11-01

    The embryonic development of freshwater triclads is mainly known from studies of species of Dendrocoelum, Planaria, Polycelis, and, more recently, Schmidtea. The present study characterizes the development of Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850) by means of optical microcopy using glycol methacrylate semi-thin sections. 94 cocoons were collected in the period from laying to hatching, with intervals of up to twenty-four hours. The sequence of morphological changes occurring in the embryo permitted the identification of nine embryonic stages. At the time of cocoon laying, numerous embryos were dispersed among many yolk cells, with a rigid capsule covering the entire cocoon. In the first stage (approx. up to 6 hours after cocoon laying), yolk cells and embryonic cells showed random distribution. Stage II (between 12 and 24 hours after cocoon laying) is characterized by aggregates of blastomeres, which later aggregate forming an enteroblastula. Approximately 2 days after cocoon laying (stage III), formation of the embryonic epidermis and embryonic digestive system took place, the latter degenerating during the subsequent stage. Stage V (until the fourth day) is characterized by the formation of the definitive epidermis. Between 4 and 6 days after laying, organogenesis of the definitive inner organs starts (stage VI). Approximately 14 days after laying (stage IX), formation of the nervous system is completed. At this stage, the embryo shows similar characteristics to those of newly hatched juveniles. The hatching of Girardia tigrina occurs in the period between twelve to twenty-two days after cocoon laying.

  16. Evolution of the mammalian embryonic pluripotency gene regulatory network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Tresguerres, Beatriz; Cañon, Susana; Rayon, Teresa; Pernaute, Barbara; Crespo, Miguel; Torroja, Carlos; Manzanares, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotency in the mouse is established and maintained by a gene-regulatory network under the control of a core set of transcription factors that include octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4; official name POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1, Pou5f1), sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box containing gene 2 (Sox2), and homeobox protein Nanog. Although this network is largely conserved in eutherian mammals, very little information is available regarding its evolutionary conservation in other vertebrates. We have compared the embryonic pluripotency networks in mouse and chick by means of expression analysis in the pregastrulation chicken embryo, genomic comparisons, and functional assays of pluripotency-related regulatory elements in ES cells and blastocysts. We find that multiple components of the network are either novel to mammals or have acquired novel expression domains in early developmental stages of the mouse. We also find that the downstream action of the mouse core pluripotency factors is mediated largely by genomic sequence elements nonconserved with chick. In the case of Sox2 and Fgf4, we find that elements driving expression in embryonic pluripotent cells have evolved by a small number of nucleotide changes that create novel binding sites for core factors. Our results show that the network in charge of embryonic pluripotency is an evolutionary novelty of mammals that is related to the comparatively extended period during which mammalian embryonic cells need to be maintained in an undetermined state before engaging in early differentiation events. PMID:21048080

  17. Embryonated chicken eggs: An experimental model for Pythium insidiosum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Camila M; Jesus, Francielli P K; Kommers, Glaucia; Ledur, Pauline C; Azevedo, Maria I; Loreto, Erico S; Tondolo, Juliana S M; Andrade, Eduardo N C; Schlemmer, Karine B; Alves, Sydney H; Santurio, Janio M

    2017-10-03

    Pythiosis is a severe disease caused by Pythium insidiosum. Currently, the research on the treatment of pythiosis uses rabbits as an experimental infection model. To reduce the use of animals in scientific experimentation, alternative models are increasingly necessary options. The objective of this study was to establish a new experimental infection model for pythiosis using embryonated chicken eggs. First, we tested the inoculation of 4 zoospore concentrations into the egg allantoic cavity at 3 embryonic days. We observed that increased zoospore concentration causes a decrease in survival time, and at a later embryonic day (the 14th) of infection, embryos showed delayed mortality. To confirm the reproducibility of the model, we chose the 14th embryonic day for the inoculation of 50 zoospores/egg, and the experiment was repeated twice. Mortality began with 30% embryos 48 hours after inoculation, and 95% embryos died within 72 hours. There was no mortality in the uninfected control group. The infection was confirmed by culture, PCR and histopathology. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of hyphae in blood vessels in the umbilical cords in 95% of embryos and only 1 liver (5%). Our results suggest that embryonated eggs can be a very useful alternative infection model to study pythiosis. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. High frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM signals) affect gene expression levels in tumor suppressor p53-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Guan, Kaomei; Zeng, Qinghua; Nikolova, Teodora; Meister, Armin; Schönborn, Frank; Schuderer, Jürgen; Kuster, Niels; Wobus, Anna M

    2004-05-01

    Effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) simulating exposure to the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) signals were studied using pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro. Wild-type ES cells and ES cells deficient for the tumor suppressor p53 were exposed to pulse modulated EMF at 1.71 GHz, lower end of the uplink band of GSM 1800, under standardized and controlled conditions, and transcripts of regulatory genes were analyzed during in vitro differentiation. Two dominant GSM modulation schemes (GSM-217 and GSM-Talk), which generate temporal changes between GSM-Basic (active during talking phases) and GSM-DTX (active during listening phases thus simulating a typical conversation), were applied to the cells at and below the basic safety limits for local exposures as defined for the general public by the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). GSM-217 EMF induced a significant upregulation of mRNA levels of the heat shock protein, hsp70 of p53-deficient ES cells differentiating in vitro, paralleled by a low and transient increase of c-jun, c-myc, and p21 levels in p53-deficient, but not in wild-type cells. No responses were observed in either cell type after EMF exposure to GSM-Talk applied at similar slot-averaged specific absorption rates (SAR), but at lower time-averaged SAR values. Cardiac differentiation and cell cycle characteristics were not affected in embryonic stem and embryonic carcinoma cells after exposure to GSM-217 EMF signals. Our data indicate that the genetic background determines cellular responses to GSM modulated EMF. Bioelectromagnetics 25:296-307, 2004.

  19. The influence of a human embryonic stem cell-derived microenvironment on targeting of human solid tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzukerman, Maty; Rosenberg, Tzur; Reiter, Irena; Ben-Eliezer, Shoshana; Denkberg, Galit; Coleman, Raymond; Reiter, Yoram; Skorecki, Karl

    2006-04-01

    The awareness of the important role that the surrounding tissue microenvironment and stromal response play in the process of tumorigenesis has grown as a result of in vivo models of tumor xenograft growth in immunocompromised mice. In the current study, we used human embryonic stem cells in order to study the interactions of tumor cells with the surrounding microenvironment of differentiated human cell tissues and structures. Several cancer cell types stably expressing an H2A-green fluorescence protein fusion protein, which allowed tracking of tumor cells, were injected into mature teratomas and developed into tumors. The salient findings were: (a) the observation of growth of tumor cells with high proliferative capacity within the differentiated microenvironment of the teratoma, (b) the identification of invasion by tumor cells into surrounding differentiated teratoma structures, and (c) the identification of blood vessels of human teratoma origin, growing adjacent to and within the cancer cell-derived tumor. Mouse embryonic stem cell-derived teratomas also supported cancer cell growth, but provided a less suitable model for human tumorigenesis studies. Anticancer immunotherapy treatment directed against A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell-related epitopes induced the complete regression of A431-derived tumor xenografts following direct i.m. injection in immunocompromised mice, as opposed to corresponding tumors growing within a human embryonic stem cell-derived microenvironment, wherein remnant foci of viable tumor cells were detected and resulted in tumor recurrence. We propose using this novel experimental model as a preclinical platform for investigating and manipulating the stromal response in tumor cell growth as an additional tool in cancer research.

  20. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Evan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages...... the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature...... expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how...

  1. Impact of nutritional stress on early embryonic survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanta Mondal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low reproductive efficiency is the most critical problem faced by the livestock industry across the globe. Early embryonic loss is one the major cause of poor reproductive efficiency resulting in delayed pregnancy, fewer calves born, reduced milk production, slower genetic progress and substantial financial loss to the beef or dairy industry. The establishment of pregnancy results from the interaction between the embryo and the dam and is the culmination of a series of events initiated with development of the follicle and gametes. Among numerous internal and external factors nutrition has the potency to alter the micro-environment of the oocyte and the embryo, making it more hostile to optimal fertilization and pre-implantation embryonic growth. Understanding the impact of nutritional stress on oocyte function, embryo development and reciprocal signaling networks between the embryo and uterus will lead to alleviation of the problems of early embryonic mortality.

  2. Microfluidics for gametes, embryos, and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G D; Swain, J E; Bormann, C L

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics is a young but established field that holds significant potential for scientific discovery. The utility of microfluidics can improve our knowledge of basic biology as well as expand our understanding in specialized areas such as assisted reproduction and stem cell developmental biology. This review describes the technology of microfluidics and discusses applications within assisted reproduction technology and embryonic stem cell growth and directed differentiation. Development of an integrated microfluidic platform for assisted reproduction, which can manipulate gametes, embryos, embryonic stem cells, their culture environment, and incorporate biomarker analysis, could have a dramatic impact on the basic understanding of embryo/embryonic stem cell development, as well as provide significant improvements in current technologies used to treat infertility, preserve fertility, and derive therapeutic cells from stem cells.

  3. Development of neural precursor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xuan; LI Hai-di; Li Shu-nong; XU Hai-wei; XU Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the serum-free culture conditions for differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells)into neural precursor cells (NPC) and compare the effects of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) as the feeder layer of ES with that of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF)in vitro. Methods: Mouse ES cells were cultured in or not in feeder layer cells medium containing or not leukemia inhibitory factor to suppress their differentiation. Immunocytochemical method was used to identify NPC by detecting nestin antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Results: The ES cells cultured in HEF were positive to alkaline phosphatase. Serum-free medium allowed the differentiation of ES cells into NPC. Conclusion:HEF could replace MEF and keep the undifferentiated condition of ES cells with more benefits. NPC of high purity could be cultured from ES cells by serum-free culture method.

  4. Targeting Notch3 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Catia; Bolondi, Luigi; Gramantieri, Laura

    2016-12-28

    The Notch signaling pathway is a very conserved system that controls embryonic cell fate decisions and the maintenance of adult stem cells through cell to cell communication. Accumulating evidence support the relevance of Notch signaling in different human diseases and it is one of the most commonly activated signaling pathways in cancer. This review focuses mainly on the role of Notch3 signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma and its potential therapeutic applications against this malignancy. In this regard, the crosstalk between Notch and p53 may play an important role.

  5. Targeting Notch3 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Giovannini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Notch signaling pathway is a very conserved system that controls embryonic cell fate decisions and the maintenance of adult stem cells through cell to cell communication. Accumulating evidence support the relevance of Notch signaling in different human diseases and it is one of the most commonly activated signaling pathways in cancer. This review focuses mainly on the role of Notch3 signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma and its potential therapeutic applications against this malignancy. In this regard, the crosstalk between Notch and p53 may play an important role.

  6. Vismodegib: a promising drug in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirix, Luc; Rutten, Annemie

    2012-08-01

    Hedgehog pathway signaling is important for embryonic development; however, inappropriate reactivation of this pathway in adults has been linked to several forms of cancer. Vismodegib (Erivedge™), a first-in-class hedgehog pathway inhibitor, blocks the pathway by inhibiting the activity of the signaling protein SMO. Preclinical studies have provided promising indications of potential tumor-reducing activity in several cancers. Thus far, clinical pharmacology and Phase I studies have demonstrated the unique pharmacokinetic profile of vismodegib, its efficacy in certain types of tumors and a generally tolerable adverse-event profile. A pivotal Phase II clinical trial confirmed the favorable benefit:risk profile of vismodegib in advanced basal cell carcinoma.

  7. Transcriptional control of Shh/Ptc1 signaling in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Shin-Ju E; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2006-02-15

    In vivo profiling of signal-directed gene expression patterns is a major bottleneck in studying developmental biology. A signal molecule initiates its specific gene expression pattern through the activation of certain transcription factor (TF); however, tissue heterogeneity often masks this pattern due to intercellular complexity of other signal transduction pathways. To decipher the synergistic regulation of signal-directed gene expression in the tissue level, we report here a unique transcriptional responsive element (TRE) existing in the 5'-upstream promoter regions (5'-UPR) of the genes responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signal transduction pathway during feather placode development in chicken embryos. By locating the TRE homologue and its interactive TF, we were able to reveal the gene expression pattern of the Shh/Ptc1 signaling. We firstly demonstrated that homology profiling of the 5'-UPR of the genes, Gli1, TGF-beta2 and Msx2, responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signaling showed a more than 70% conserved region. Computer alignment of the consensus sequences in the conserved region revealed a 37-nucleotide TRE sequence, containing two regulatory elements homologous to human and mouse Gli-binding sites. Activation of this newly identified Shh/Ptc1-responsive TRE by active Smo signaling in chicken hepatoepithelial carcinoma cells elicited a strong synergistic expression of the Shh/Ptc1-downstream genes. Based on previous bioinformatics and the present experimental findings, we successfully established an in vivo signaling model for the Shh/Ptc1-directed embryonic feather morphogenesis.

  8. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell lines from parthenogenetic blastocysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyun Mai; Yang Yu; Tao Li; Liu Wang; Mei-jue Chen; Shu-zhen Huang; Canquan Zhou; Qi Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Parthenogenesis is one of the main, and most useful, methods to derive embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which may be an important source of histocompatible cells and tissues for cell therapy. Here we describe the derivation and characterization of two ESC lines (hPES-1 and hPES-2) from in vitro developed blastocysts following parthenogenetic activation of human oocytes. Typical ESC morphology was seen, and the expression of ESC markers was as expected for alkaline phosphatase, octamer-binding transcription factor 4, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3, stage-specific embryonic antigen 4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81, and there was absence of expression of negative markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen 1. Expression of genes specific for different embryonic germ layers was detected from the embryoid bodies (EBs) of both hESC lines, suggesting their differentiation potential in vitro. However, in vivo, only hPES-1 formed teratoma consisting of all three embryonic germ layers (hPES-2 did not). Interestingly, after continuous proliferation for more than 100 passages, hPES-1 cells still maintained a normal 46 XX karyotype; hPES-2 displayed abnormalities such as chromosome translocation after long term passages. Short Tandem Repeat (STR) results demonstrated that the hPES lines were genetic matches with the egg donors, and gene imprinting data confirmed the parthenogenetic origin of these ES cells. Genome-wide SNP analysis showed a pattern typical of parthenogenesis. All of these results demonstrated the feasibility to isolate and establish human parthenogenetic ESC lines, which provides an important tool for studying epigenetic effects in ESCs as well as for future therapeutic interventions in a clinical setting.

  9. PTBP1 is required for embryonic development before gastrulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Suckale

    Full Text Available Polypyrimidine-tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1 is an important cellular regulator of messenger RNAs influencing the alternative splicing profile of a cell as well as its mRNA stability, location and translation. In addition, it is diverted by some viruses to facilitate their replication. Here, we used a novel PTBP1 knockout mouse to analyse the tissue expression pattern of PTBP1 as well as the effect of its complete removal during development. We found evidence of strong PTBP1 expression in embryonic stem cells and throughout embryonic development, especially in the developing brain and spinal cord, the olfactory and auditory systems, the heart, the liver, the kidney, the brown fat and cartilage primordia. This widespread distribution points towards a role of PTBP1 during embryonic development. Homozygous offspring, identified by PCR and immunofluorescence, were able to implant but were arrested or retarded in growth. At day 7.5 of embryonic development (E7.5 the null mutants were about 5x smaller than the control littermates and the gap in body size widened with time. At mid-gestation, all homozygous embryos were resorbed/degraded. No homozygous mice were genotyped at E12 and the age of weaning. Embryos lacking PTBP1 did not display differentiation into the 3 germ layers and cavitation of the epiblast, which are hallmarks of gastrulation. In addition, homozygous mutants displayed malformed ectoplacental cones and yolk sacs, both early supportive structure of the embryo proper. We conclude that PTBP1 is not required for the earliest isovolumetric divisions and differentiation steps of the zygote up to the formation of the blastocyst. However, further post-implantation development requires PTBP1 and stalls in homozygous null animals with a phenotype of dramatically reduced size and aberration in embryonic and extra-embryonic structures.

  10. The Forkhead box transcription factor FOXM1 is required for the maintenance of cell proliferation and protection against oxidative stress in human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T.D. Kwok

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs exhibit unique cell cycle structure, self-renewal and pluripotency. The Forkhead box transcription factor M1 (FOXM1 is critically required for the maintenance of pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, but its role in hESCs remains unclear. Here, we show that FOXM1 expression was enriched in undifferentiated hESCs and was regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner with peak levels detected at the G2/M phase. Expression of FOXM1 did not correlate with OCT4 and NANOG during in vitro differentiation of hESCs. Importantly, knockdown of FOXM1 expression led to aberrant cell cycle distribution with impairment in mitotic progression but showed no profound effect on the undifferentiated state. Interestingly, FOXM1 depletion sensitized hESCs to oxidative stress. Moreover, genome-wide analysis of FOXM1 targets by ChIP-seq identified genes important for M phase including CCNB1 and CDK1, which were subsequently confirmed by ChIP and RNA interference analyses. Further peak set comparison against a differentiating hESC line and a cancer cell line revealed a substantial difference in the genomic binding profile of FOXM1 in hESCs. Taken together, our findings provide the first evidence to support FOXM1 as an important regulator of cell cycle progression and defense against oxidative stress in hESCs.

  11. Verrucous Carcinoma of Hard Plate

    OpenAIRE

    Parmod Kalstra,Monica Manhas,Rajdeep Sood

    2000-01-01

    VerrucouS squamous cell carcinoma occurs mainly in oral cavity and larynx, buccal mucosa being most commonly involved. One case of verrucous carcinoma involvmg left hard palate (T4 No Mo)in an adult male is being reported who underwent left total maxillectomy. The tumor behaviour andlts management has been dlscussed.

  12. Nitric Oxide Synthase-3 Promotes Embryonic Development of Atrioventricular Valves

    OpenAIRE

    Yin Liu; Xiangru Lu; Fu-Li Xiang; Man Lu; Qingping Feng

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3) has recently been shown to promote endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in the developing atrioventricular (AV) canal. The present study was aimed to investigate the role of NOS3 in embryonic development of AV valves. We hypothesized that NOS3 promotes embryonic development of AV valves via EndMT. To test this hypothesis, morphological and functional analysis of AV valves were performed in wild-type (WT) and NOS3(-/-) mice at postnatal day 0. Our data s...

  13. Rhabdomyosarcoma-associated renal cell carcinoma: a link with constitutional Tp53 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curry, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    The 2004 World Health Organization classification includes the new entity "neuroblastoma-associated renal cell carcinoma." The pathogenetic link between these entities is unknown as yet. The patient reported herein developed renal cell carcinoma after anaplastic embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a previously unknown association. The 2nd malignancy developed very soon after the 1st one, prompting concern for inherent cancer predisposition rather than a therapy-induced 2nd malignancy. A variety of features raised suspicion for Tp53 mutation, and indeed a pathogenic germline Tp53 mutation was identified in this child, despite a negative family history for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Consideration of underlying predisposition is advocated in the context of rapid evolution of 2nd childhood malignancy.

  14. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamel, J W; Eiferman, R A; Guibor, P

    1984-05-01

    A 73-year-old man had a limbal nodule that, on histopathologic examination, proved to be mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the conjunctiva. Despite radiation therapy and extensive corneoscleral lamellar resection, widespread invasion of the lids and orbit ultimately led to exenteration. Although mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the conjunctiva resembles squamous cell carcinoma clinically and histopathologically, it pursues a more rapid and destructive clinical course. Intraepithelial invasion often leads to tumor involvement of conjunctiva and skin that seem normal on clinical examination. Special stains and a high level of suspicion are required for diagnosis of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the conjunctiva, and proper initial management demands more aggressive surgical resection than is usually indicated for squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路平; 梁秋冬; 魏磊; 郑全庆

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate factors for prognosis of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Expressions of mn23- HI, erbB3 and erbB4 were examined by immunohistochemical staining. The apoptosis was detected in situ by the TdT mediated duip-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) technique. Mitotic cell were counted by HE dyeing. Results: FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis were the most important factors for evaluating prognosis in adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. AI/MI was positively correlated with 5-year survival of cervical carcinoma. Positive expression of nm23-H1 combed with negative expression of erbB4 [nm23-H1(+)/erbB4(-)] predicted good prognosis for adeno-carcinoma. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, only FIGO stage and AI/MI were into equation. Conclusion: FIGO stage and AI/MI were independent evaluating parameter for adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Julie L; Burns, Rachel E; Brown, Holly M; LeRoy, Bruce E; Kosarek, Carrie E

    2009-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a relatively common, malignant neoplasm of dogs and cats that can arise in a variety of locations. The gross appearance of SCC can be variable and nonspecific, so definitive diagnosis requires microscopic examination of the tissue (cytology or histology). Several treatment modalities exist, but surgical excision, if possible, is regarded as the best treatment option. Early diagnosis and treatment of SCC are key because small, early-stage tumors are the most amenable to treatment and carry the best prognosis.

  17. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  18. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  19. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  20. Verrucous carcinoma of the maxillary antrum

    OpenAIRE

    Vaid, Neelam; Nagare, Sachin

    2003-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a well-differentiated variant of squumous cell carcinoma. In this article, we present a patient of verrucous carcinoma of the maxillary annum. There are only 6 reported cases of verrucous carcinoma of the maxillary antrum. Ours is the 7th case. We, here, would like to highlight that our case had a different clinical presentation from the previously reported cases.

  1. Ethanol Inactivated Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Maintain the Self-Renew and Proliferation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) inactivated by mitomycin C or irradiation were applied to support the self-renew and proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). To avoid the disadvangtages of mitomycin C and irradiation, here MEFs were treated by ethanol (ET). Our data showed that 10% ET-inactivated MEFs (eiMEFs) could well maintain the self-renew and proliferation of hESCs. hESCs grown on eiMEFs expressed stem cell markers of NANOG, octamer-binding protein 4 (OCT4...

  2. Preliminary study on human fibroblasts as feeder layer for human embryonic stem cells culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To avoid the direct contact with mouse cells and possible heterogeneous pathogen in future application, we need to replace mouse embryonic fibroblastswith human fibroblasts as the feeder layer to maintain human embryonic stem cells growth in the undifferentiated state. We successfully use human fibroblasts derived from aborted fetus and adult prepuce as feeder layer to maintain human embryonic stem cells growth. During the passage and growth on this feeder layer, the human embryonic stem cells can keep their undifferentiated state.

  3. Totipotent Embryonic Stem Cells Arise in Ground-State Culture Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgani, Sophie M; Canham, Maurice A; Nichols, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are derived from mammalian embryos during the transition from totipotency, when individual blastomeres can make all lineages, to pluripotency, when they are competent to make only embryonic lineages. ESCs maintained with inhibitors of MEK and GSK3 (2i) are thought...... not directly support Nanog-positive epiblast-like ESCs. Thus, 2i and LIF support a totipotent state comparable to early embryonic cells that coexpress embryonic and extraembryonic determinants....

  4. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. De Sousa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The human embryonic stem cell line RCM-1 was derived from a failed to fertilise egg undergoing parthenogenetic stimulation. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. It has a normal 46XX female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available.

  5. Origin and the embryonic transformations of vertebrate heart conducting system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tverdokhleb I.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As the embryonic structure, the cardiac conduction system must continue to develop in a coordinated manner at all embryonic stages. This requires not only the formation of distinct components of the conduction system, but the integration of these components into a functioning whole. The development of the chambered heart and a conduction system requires the proper arrangement of a number of embryonic building blocks, comprising inflow tract, atria, atrioventricular canal, compact and trabecular ventricular myocardium, and outflow tract. In the mammalian heart, the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes will aggregate in the slow-conducting inflow tract and atrioventricular canal. The ventricular conduction system may develop in its entirety from the trabecular ventricular myocardium, the remodeling of which results in a gradual transition toward the compact myocardium. So the development of the conduction system does not require the invention of new building components but a remodeling of existing components. Many details in the fashioning of the embryonic blocks of the heart into the conduction system of the formed heart still need to be worked out. The factors that specify the cardiac building blocks and regulate their coordinated morphogenesis have remained largely unknown. Their identification will benefit from combined molecular, genetic, and morphological approaches.

  6. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing...

  7. Transplantation of embryonic porcine neocortical tissue into newborn rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, Anthony J; Meyer, Morten; Møller Dall, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Several previous studies, suggesting the potential use of embryonic xenografts in the treatment of neurological disorders, indicate that neural growth and axonal guidance factors may function across species. In this light, blocks of fetal porcine neocortex were grafted into small cortical lesion...

  8. Characterization of embryonic stem cell transplantation immunobiology using molecular imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swijnenburg, Rutger-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Given their self-renewing and pluripotent capabilities, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are well-poised as a cellular source for tissue regeneration therapy. Successful in vitro differentiation of both mouse (m) and human (h) ESCs into multiple somatic cell types has been reported, including cardiomyocy

  9. Differentiation of neuroepithelia from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We describe the method for in vitro differentiation of neuroepithelial cells from human embryonic stem cells under a chemically defined condition. The protocol is established following the fundamental principle of in vivo neuroectodermal specification. The primitive neuroepithelial cells generated by this protocol can be further induced into neuronal and glia cells with forebrain, mid/hind brain, and spinal cord identities.

  10. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Munoz, J.; Braam, S.R.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Linding, R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during

  11. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Munoz, J.; Braam, S.R.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Linding, R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during different

  12. Improved genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, S.R.; Denning, C.; van den Brink, S.; Kats, P.; Hochstenbach, R.; Passier, R.; Mummery, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Low efficiency of transfection limits the ability to genetically manipulate human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and differences in cell derivation and culture methods require optimization of transfection protocols. We transiently transferred multiple independent hESC lines with different growth requ

  13. Adverse effects of advanced glycation end products on embryonal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiramatsu,Yuji

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs, which are known to accumulate in patients with diabetes, autoimmune diseases, or those who smoke, on embryonal development. Pronuclear (PN embryos were obtained by flushing the fallopian tubes of rats after superovulation and mating. The cleavage rate and blastocyst yield were evaluated at 24, 72, 96, and 120 h of culture. Glyoxal, an AGE-forming aldehyde, suppressed embryonal development at every stage from PN to blastocyst in a concentration-dependent manner. The cleavage rate of the embryo was also signifi cantly decreased by treatment with glyoxal at concentrations of 1 mM or higher. The blastocyst yield was significantly decreased by treatment with glyoxal at concentrations of 0.5 mM or higher. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (L-NAC at 1 mM significantly suppressed the glyoxal-induced embryonal toxicity. BSA-AGEs at 5 microg/ml or higher concentration signifi cantly reduced the cleavage rate and blastocyst yield compared to those for BSA-treated embryos. L-NAC at 1 mM significantly suppressed BSAAGE-induced embryonal toxicity. Because AGEs are embryo-toxic, AGE contamination may influence the pregnancy rate of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. AGEs, which are increased in women under pathological conditions, may also be involved in their infertility.

  14. Cuticle morphogenesis in crustacean embryonic and postembryonic stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrak, Polona; Bogataj, Urban; Štrus, Jasna; Žnidaršič, Nada

    2017-01-01

    The crustacean cuticle is a chitin-based extracellular matrix, produced in general by epidermal cells and ectodermally derived epithelial cells of the digestive tract. Cuticle morphogenesis is an integrative part of embryonic and postembryonic development and it was studied in several groups of crustaceans, but mainly with a focus on one selected aspect of morphogenesis. Early studies were focused mainly on in vivo or histological observations of embryonic or larval molt cycles and more recently, some ultrastructural studies of the cuticle differentiation during development were performed. The aim of this paper is to review data on exoskeletal and gut cuticle formation during embryonic and postembryonic development in crustaceans, obtained in different developmental stages of different species and to bring together and discuss different aspects of cuticle morphogenesis, namely data on the morphology, ultrastructure, composition, connections to muscles and molt cycles in relation to cuticle differentiation. Based on the comparative evaluation of microscopic analyses of cuticle in crustacean embryonic and postembryonic stages, common principles of cuticle morphogenesis during development are discussed. Additional studies are suggested to further clarify this topic and to connect the new knowledge to related fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Got root? Initiation of the embryonic root meristem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademacher, E.H.; Weijers, D.

    2007-01-01

    Plant development relies on the activity of meristems, small groups of undifferentiated cells that produce all organs. The first meristems are formed in the embryo, and all subsequent development depends on their proper establishment, making embryonic meristem initiation a key step in plant life.

  16. Twenty years of embryonic stem cell research in farm animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notable distinctions between an embryonic stem cell (ESC) and somatic cell are that the ESC can maintain an undifferentiated state indefinitely, self renew, and is pluripotent, meaning that the ESC can potentially generate cells representing all the three primordial germ layers and contribute to the...

  17. Alterations to embryonic serotonin change aggression and fearfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenatal environment, including maternal hormones, affects the development of the serotonin (5-HT) system, with long-lasting effects on mood and behavioral exhibition in children and adults. The chicken provides a unique animal model to study the effects of embryonic development on childhood and ado...

  18. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  19. Formation of transcription factor complexes during embryonic erythroid development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Yu (Xiao)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a classic model for the study of embryonic and adult stem cell differentiation. Erythropoiesis is the process of generating erythrocytes from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In Chapter1, we introduce the process of erythropoiesis and discuss proteins and protein complexe

  20. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  1. Dihydroartemisinin promotes angiogenesis during the early embryonic development of zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian BA; Juan DUAN; Jia-qiang TIAN; Zi-liang WANG; Tao CHEN; Xiao-guang LI; Pei-zhan CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the embryotoxicity of dihydroartemisinin (DHA),the main active metabolite of artemisinin,in zebrafish,and explore the corresponding mechanisms.Methods:The embryos of wild type and TG (flk1:GFP) transgenic zebrafish were exposed to DHA.Developmental phenotypes of the embryos were observed.Development of blood vessels was directly observed in living embryos of TG (flk1:GFP) transgenic zebrafish under fluorescence microscope.The expression of angiogenesis marker genes vegfa,flk1,and flt1 in the embryos was detected using real-time PCR and RNA in situ hybridization assays.Results:Exposure to DHA (1-10 mg/L) dose-dependently caused abnormal zebrafish embryonic phenotypes in the early developmental stage.Furthermore,exposure to DHA (10 mg/L) resulted in more pronounced embryonic angiogenesis in TG (flk1:GFP)zebrafish line.Exposure to DHA (10 mg/L) significantly increased the mRNA expression of vegfa,flk1,and flt1 in the embryos.Knockdown of the ilk1 protein partially blocked the effects of DHA on embryogenesis.Conclusion:DHA causes abnormal embryonic phenotypes and promotes angiogenesis in zebrafish early embryonic development,demonstrating the potential embryotoxicity of DHA.

  2. Innovative virtual reality measurements for embryonic growth and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Verwoerd-Dikkeboom (Christine); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); N. Exalto (Niek); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground Innovative imaging techniques, using up-to-date ultrasonic equipment, necessitate specific biometry. The aim of our study was to test the possibility of detailed human embryonic biometry using a virtual reality (VR) technique. Methods In a longitudinal study, three-dimensional

  3. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Muñoz, Javier; Braam, Stefan R

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during...

  4. Hepaticportalvenousgasinpancreaticsolitary metastasisfromanesophagealsquamouscell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeshi Sawada; Yasushi Adachi; Manabu Noda; Kimishige Akino; Takefumi Kikuchi; Hiroaki Mita; Yoshifumi Ishii and Takao Endo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is a rare entity commonly associated with intestinal necrosis and fatal outcome, and various underlying diseases have been reported. Pancreatic solitary metastasis without local extension is also rare in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. METHODS: This report describes an interesting and unusual case of HPVG arising from pancreatic tumor. Autopsy revealed pathogenesis  of  HPVG  and  synchronous  tumors  of  the esophagus and pancreas. RESULTS: A 73-year-old man developed synchronous double tumor in the esophagus and pancreas several months before acute  abdomen  and  his  death,  which  were  generated  by HPVG. Autopsy revealed that HPVG was caused by gastric wall infarction owing to expansion of an isolated pancreatic metastasis from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: This is the ifrst case of HPVG that was derived from pancreatic tumor inifltration. If he had been diagnosed with solitary pancreatic metastasis from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the ifrst time, he might have an option for chemotherapy, which could let him live longer.

  5. Varied presentations of ectopic breast - polymastia, fibroadenoma, and carcinoma arising from ectopic breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Khatib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic breast is a congenital anomaly of the breast which can have varied presentations because of its different sites and pathologies arising from it. Lesions of ectopic breast tissue (EBT are commonly seen due to persistence of embryonic remnants along the milk line. They have also been reported from other sites like face, vulva, and perineum. They are prone to the same physiological and pathological alterations seen in the normal breast. Only 0.3% of breast carcinomas arise in the ectopic breast, whereas only a few cases of fibroadenoma have been reported at this site. We present a case of polymastia in a 21-year-old female in the inframammary region. We report two cases of fibroadenoma and carcinoma arising from EBT in the axilla of a 26 and 45-year females. Fibroadenoma was treated by simple excision while for carcinoma modified radical mastectomy was done followed by radiation and chemotherapy. Patient developed metastasis in the sternum. Carcinoma arising from EBT has a poorer prognosis and needs early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Reliability of a Tissue Microarray in Detecting Thyroid Transcription Factor-1 Protein in Lung Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Bai; Hong Shen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the expression of the thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) in human normal adult type Ⅱ alveolar epithelial cells,embryonic pneumocytes and cancer cells of lung carcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes using a tissue microarray (TMA) along with paired conventional full sections.and to jnvestigate the reliability of tissue microarrays in detecting protein expression in lung carcinoma.METHODS A lung carcinoma TMA including 765 cores was constructed.TTF-1 protein expression in both TMA and paired conventional full sections were detected by yhe immunohistochemical SP method using a monoclonal antibody to TTF-1.A PU (Positive Unit) of TTF-1 protein was assessed quantitatively by the Leica Q500MC image analysis system with results from the paired conventional full sections as controls.RESULTS There was no signifcance between TMA and paired conven tional full sections in TTF-1 expression in difierent nuclei of the lung tissue.CONCLUSION TTF-1 protein expression in lung carcinoma detected by TMA was highly concordanl with that of paired full sections.TMA is a reliable method in detecting protein expression.

  7. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_flank [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: His.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_face [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. Human embryonic growth trajectories and associations with fetal growth and birthweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uitert, Evelyne M.; Exalto, Niek; Burton, Graham J.; Willemsen, Sten P.; Koning, Anton H. J.; Eilers, Paul H. C.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P. M.

    2013-01-01

    How do human embryonic growth trajectories evolve in the first trimester, and is first-trimester embryonic growth associated with fetal growth and birthweight (BW)? Human embryonic growth rates increase between 9 and 10 weeks of gestation and are associated with mid-pregnancy fetal growth and BW. Fe

  2. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.embryonic_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX13186...172944,SRX172947,SRX172942,SRX1318630,SRX335561,SRX564562,SRX564563,SRX564564,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX13186...172944,SRX172947,SRX172942,SRX1318630,SRX335561,SRX564562,SRX564563,SRX564564,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX17294...X172943,SRX172946,SRX172947,SRX335561,SRX172942,SRX564562,SRX564563,SRX564564,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX131...8627,SRX172940,SRX335560,SRX172938,SRX172941,SRX172939,SRX564562,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX1318628,SR...X1318629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX131...8627,SRX335560,SRX172938,SRX172940,SRX172941,SRX172939,SRX564562,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX13186...X172944,SRX172946,SRX172947,SRX335561,SRX172942,SRX564562,SRX564563,SRX564564,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX1318628,SR...X1318629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX172...940,SRX1318627,SRX172938,SRX335560,SRX172941,SRX172939,SRX564562,SRX564561 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX1318628,SR...X1318629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic kidney SRX1318628,SR...X1318629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_kidney.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic eye SRX804054,SRX804056...,SRX1038028,SRX1038027 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic eye SRX804054,SRX8...04056,SRX745813,SRX1038028,SRX804057,SRX804055,SRX1038027 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic eye SRX804055,SRX1...038028,SRX804056,SRX804054,SRX745813,SRX804057,SRX1038027 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic eye SRX804057,SRX...804055 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic eye SRX1038028,SRX80405...6,SRX804054,SRX1038027 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic eye SRX804056,SRX8...04054,SRX745813,SRX804057,SRX804055,SRX1038028,SRX1038027 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic eye SRX804055,SRX...804057 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_eye.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic heart SRX11293...9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic heart SRX248279,...SRX190172,SRX112936,SRX022494 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic heart SRX248279,...SRX190172,SRX112936,SRX022494 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic heart SRX143735...RX377685,SRX377687,SRX967654,SRX077933,SRX377683,SRX967652,SRX244285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic heart SRX967652...RX077933,SRX377683,SRX377685,SRX377681,SRX377687,SRX967654,SRX244285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 No description Embryo Embryonic heart SRX11004...02,SRX1100404,SRX1100405 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic heart SRX112938,...7,SRX967654,SRX967653,SRX1100404,SRX244285,SRX112936,SRX1100405,SRX022494,SRX337963 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic heart SRX112938,...52,SRX967653,SRX112936,SRX1100405,SRX112937,SRX185857,SRX244285,SRX022494,SRX337963 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic heart SRX967652,...4,SRX1437348,SRX377683,SRX377685,SRX377687,SRX190172,SRX244285,SRX1100405,SRX337963 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic heart SRX11293...9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic heart SRX967652...RX698167,SRX377681,SRX967654,SRX377683,SRX377685,SRX377687,SRX244285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_heart mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic heart SRX11293...9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_heart.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149181,...SRX804051,SRX804052,SRX149179,SRX149180,SRX149178,SRX804053,SRX149182 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149181,SRX80...4051,SRX804052,SRX149179,SRX149182 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149181,SRX80...4051,SRX804052,SRX149179,SRX149182 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119,S...RX1035120 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035120 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119,S...RX1035120 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119,S...RX1035120 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035120 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035120 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035120 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic nose SRX1035119,S...RX1035120 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_nose.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 Histone Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149182,SRX14...9179,SRX149181,SRX804052,SRX804051 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149180...,SRX149178,SRX804053 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149180,...SRX149182,SRX149179,SRX149178,SRX149181,SRX804052,SRX804051,SRX804053,SRX388185 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic gonad SRX149181,...SRX804051,SRX804052,SRX149179,SRX149180,SRX149178,SRX804053,SRX149182 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_gonad.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic palates ERX650...310 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 No description Embryo Embryonic palates ERX6...50310 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 No description Embryo Embryonic palates ERX6...50310 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic palates http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic palates ERX650...310 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic palates http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  11. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic palates http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  12. File list: NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 No description Embryo Embryonic palates ERX6...50310 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic palates ERX650...310 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic palates http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  15. Differentiation of neuron-like cells from mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingrong Yan; Liwen Li; Fulin Chen; Yanhong Yang; Wei Liu; Wenxin Geng; Huichong Du; Jihong Cui; Xin Xie; Jinlian Hua; Shumin Yu

    2013-01-01

    Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells have pluripotent differentiation potentials, akin to fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. The aim of this study was to compare the neuronal differentiation potential of parthenogenetic and fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. Before differentiation, karyotype analysis was performed, with normal karyotypes detected in both parthenogenetic and fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. Sex chromosomes were identified as XX. Immunocytochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR detected high expression of the pluripotent gene, Oct4, at both the mRNA and protein levels, indicating pluripotent differentiation potential of the two embryonic stem cell subtypes. Embryonic stem cells were induced with retinoic acid to form embryoid bodies, and then dispersed into single cells. Single cells were differentiated in N2 differentiation medium for 9 days. Immunocytochemistry showed parthenogenetic and fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells both express the neuronal cell markers nestin, βIII-tubulin and myelin basic protein. Quantitative real-time PCR found expression of neurogenesis related genes (Sox-1, Nestin, GABA, Pax6, Zic5 and Pitx1) in both types of embryonic stem cells, and Oct4 expression was significantly decreased. Nestin and Pax6 expression in parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells was significantly higher than that in fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells. Thus, our experimental findings indicate that parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells have stronger neuronal differentiation potential than fertilized embryo-derived embryonic stem cells.

  16. Dynamic changes in energy metabolism upon embryonic stem cell differentiation support developmental toxicant identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dartel, van D.A.M.; Schulpen, S.H.; Theunissen, P.T.; Bunschoten, A.; Piersma, A.H.; Keijer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are widely used to study embryonic development and to identify developmental toxicants. Particularly, the embryonic stem cell test (EST) is well known as in vitro model to identify developmental toxicants. Although it is clear that energy metabolism plays a crucial role in

  17. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_brains [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: DNS.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_brains [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_brains [Chip-atlas[Archive

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