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Sample records for f-actin ring formation

  1. Septins promote F-actin ring formation by crosslinking actin filaments into curved bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, Manos; Azou-Gros, Yannick; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Alvarado, José; Bertin, Aurélie; Iv, Francois; Kress, Alla; Brasselet, Sophie; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Lecuit, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis requires a contractile ring of crosslinked actin filaments and myosin motors. How contractile rings form and are stabilized in dividing cells remains unclear. We address this problem by focusing on septins, highly conserved proteins in eukaryotes whose precise contribution to cytokinesis remains elusive. We use the cleavage of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo as a model system, where contractile actin rings drive constriction of invaginating membranes to produce an epithelium in a manner akin to cell division. In vivo functional studies show that septins are required for generating curved and tightly packed actin filament networks. In vitro reconstitution assays show that septins alone bundle actin filaments into rings, accounting for the defects in actin ring formation in septin mutants. The bundling and bending activities are conserved for human septins, and highlight unique functions of septins in the organization of contractile actomyosin rings.

  2. Characterization of Ring-Like F-Actin Structure as a Mechanical Partner for Spindle Positioning in Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  3. 5DFRXXL region of long myosin light chain kinase causes F-actin bundle formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chunxiang; WEI Dongmei; CHEN Chen; YU Weiping; ZHU Minsheng

    2005-01-01

    Long myosin light chain kinase (L-MLCK) contains five DFRXXL motifs with ability to bind F-actin. Binding stoichiometry data indicated that each DFRXXL motif might bind each G-actin, but its biological significance remained unknown. We hypothesized that L-MLCK might act as an F-actin bundle peptides by its multiple binding sites of 5DFRXXL motifs to actin. In order to characterize F-actin-bundle formation properties of 5DFRXXL region of long myosin light chain kinase, we expressed and purified 5DFRXXL peptides tagged with HA in vitro. The properties of 5DFRXXL peptides binding to myofilaments or F-actin were analyzed by binding stoichiometries assays. The results indicated that 5DFRXXL peptides bound to myofilaments or F-actin with high affinity. KD values of 5DFRXXL binding to myofilaments and F-actin were 0.45 and 0.41 μmol/L, re- spectively. Cross-linking assay demonstrated that 5DFRXXL peptides could bundle F-actin efficiently. Typical F-actin bundles were observed morphologically through determina- tion of confocal and electron microscopy after adding 5DFRXXL peptides. After transfection of pEGFP-5DFRXXL plasmid into eukaryocyte, spike structure was observed around cell membrane edge. We guess that such structure formation may be attributable to F-actin over-bundle forma- tion caused by 5DFRXXL peptides. Therefore, we suppose that L-MLCK may be a new bundling protein and somehow play a certain role in organization of cell skeleton besides mediating cell contraction by it kinase activity.

  4. F-actin localization dynamics during appressorium formation in Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Li; Shaw, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Appressoria are essential penetration structures for many phytopathogenic fungi. Here F-actin localization dynamics were documented during appressorium formation in vitro and in planta in Colletotrichum graminicola Four discernible stages of dynamic F-actin distribution occurring in a programmed order were documented from differentiation of appressoria to formation of penetration pores: (stage A) from germ tube enlargement to complete expansion of the appressorium; (stage S) septation occurs; (stage L) a long period of low F-actin activity; (stage P) the penetration pore forms. The F-actin subcellular localization corresponded to each stage. A distinct redistribution of actin cables occurred at the transition from stage A to stage S. The in planta assays revealed that F-actin also assembled in invasive hyphae and that actin cables might play an essential role for penetration-peg development. The F-actin localization distribution may be used as a subcellular marker to define the developmental stages during appressorium formation. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  5. Drosophila Imp iCLIP identifies an RNA assemblage coordinating F-actin formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi Theil; Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær; Adolph, Sidsel Kramshøj;

    2015-01-01

    CLIP) technologies in Drosophila cells to identify transcripts associated with cytoplasmic ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) containing the RNA-binding protein Imp. RESULTS: We find extensive binding of Imp to 3'UTRs of transcripts that are involved in F-actin formation. A common denominator of the RNA-protein interface....... This demonstrates a physiological significance of the defined RNA regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Our data imply that Drosophila Imp RNPs may function as cytoplasmic mRNA assemblages that encode proteins which participate in actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Thus, they may facilitate co-ordinated protein expression in sub...... is the presence of multiple motifs with a central UA-rich element flanked by CA-rich elements. Experiments in single cells and intact flies reveal compromised actin cytoskeletal dynamics associated with low Imp levels. The former shows reduced F-actin formation and the latter exhibits abnormal neuronal patterning...

  6. Vacuole formation in mast cells responding to osmotic stress and to F-actin disassembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koffer, Anna; Williams, Mark; Johansen, Torben

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescent probes were used to visualize the morphology of membranes and of F-actin in rat peritoneal mast cells, exposed to hyperosmotic medium and consequently reversed to isotonicity. Hypertonicity induced cell shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase, and cell alkalinization...

  7. Coupled excitable Ras and F-actin activation mediates spontaneous pseudopod formation and directed cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haastert, Peter J M; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kortholt, Arjan

    2017-04-01

    Many eukaryotic cells regulate their mobility by external cues. Genetic studies have identified >100 components that participate in chemotaxis, which hinders the identification of the conceptual framework of how cells sense and respond to shallow chemical gradients. The activation of Ras occurs during basal locomotion and is an essential connector between receptor and cytoskeleton during chemotaxis. Using a sensitive assay for activated Ras, we show here that activation of Ras and F-actin forms two excitable systems that are coupled through mutual positive feedback and memory. This coupled excitable system leads to short-lived patches of activated Ras and associated F-actin that precede the extension of protrusions. In buffer, excitability starts frequently with Ras activation in the back/side of the cell or with F-actin in the front of the cell. In a shallow gradient of chemoattractant, local Ras activation triggers full excitation of Ras and subsequently F-actin at the side of the cell facing the chemoattractant, leading to directed pseudopod extension and chemotaxis. A computational model shows that the coupled excitable Ras/F-actin system forms the driving heart for the ordered-stochastic extension of pseudopods in buffer and for efficient directional extension of pseudopods in chemotactic gradients. © 2017 van Haastert et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Dendritic cell podosome dynamics does not depend on the F-actin regulator SWAP-70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Götz

    Full Text Available In addition to classical adhesion structures like filopodia or focal adhesions, dendritic cells similar to macrophages and osteoclasts assemble highly dynamic F-actin structures called podosomes. They are involved in cellular processes such as extracellular matrix degradation, bone resorption by osteoclasts, and trans-cellular diapedesis of lymphocytes. Besides adhesion and migration, podosomes enable dendritic cells to degrade connective tissue by matrix metalloproteinases. SWAP-70 interacts with RhoGTPases and F-actin and regulates migration of dendritic cells. SWAP-70 deficient osteoclasts are impaired in F-actin-ring formation and bone resorption. In the present study, we demonstrate that SWAP-70 is not required for podosome formation and F-actin turnover in dendritic cells. Furthermore, we found that toll-like receptor 4 ligand induced podosome disassembly and podosome-mediated matrix degradation is not affected by SWAP-70 in dendritic cells. Thus, podosome formation and function in dendritic cells is independent of SWAP-70.

  9. Platelet rich plasma promotes skeletal muscle cell migration in association with up-regulation of FAK, paxillin, and F-Actin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Mioa-Sui; Tsai, Ting-Ta; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2017-02-24

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) contains various cytokines and growth factors which may be beneficial to the healing process of injured muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of PRP on migration of skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells intrinsic to Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with PRP. The cell migration was evaluated by transwell filter migration assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The spreading of cells was evaluated microscopically. The formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. The protein expressions of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Transfection of paxillin small-interfering RNA (siRNAs) to muscle cells was performed to validate the role of paxillin in PRP-mediated promotion of cell migration. Dose-dependently PRP promotes migration of and spreading and muscle cells. Protein expressions of paxillin and FAK were up-regulated dose-dependently. F-actin formation was also enhanced by PRP treatment. Furthermore, the knockdown of paxillin expression impaired the effect of PRP to promote cell migration. It was concluded that PRP promoting migration of muscle cells is associated with up-regulation of proteins expression of paxillin and FAK as well as increasing F-actin formation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Regulation of bone mass and osteoclast function depend on the F-actin modulator SWAP-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, Annette I; Roscher, Anne; Schüler, Christiane; Lutter, Anne-Helen; Glösmann, Martin; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Chopin, Michael; Hempel, Ute; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rammelt, Stefan; Egerbacher, Monika; Erben, Reinhold G; Jessberger, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    Bone remodeling involves tightly regulated bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Determining osteoclast function is central to understanding bone diseases such as osteoporosis and osteopetrosis. Here, we report a novel function of the F-actin binding and regulatory protein SWAP-70 in osteoclast biology. F-actin ring formation, cell morphology, and bone resorption are impaired in Swap-70(-/-) osteoclasts, whereas the expression of osteoclast differentiation markers induced in vitro by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) remains unaffected. Swap-70(-/-) mice develop osteopetrosis with increased bone mass, abnormally dense bone, and impaired osteoclast function. Ectopic expression of SWAP-70 in Swap-70(-/-) osteoclasts in vitro rescues their deficiencies in bone resorption and F-actin ring formation. Rescue requires a functional pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, known to support membrane localization of SWAP-70, and the F-actin binding domain. Transplantation of SWAP-70-proficient bone marrow into Swap-70(-/-) mice restores osteoclast resorption capacity in vivo. The identification of the role of SWAP-70 in promoting osteoclast function through modulating membrane-proximal F-actin rearrangements reveals a new pathway to control osteoclasts and bone homeostasis.

  11. ARF6 promotes the formation of Rac1 and WAVE-dependent ventral F-actin rosettes in breast cancer cells in response to epidermal growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Marchesin

    Full Text Available Coordination between actin cytoskeleton assembly and localized polarization of intracellular trafficking routes is crucial for cancer cell migration. ARF6 has been implicated in the endocytic recycling of surface receptors and membrane components and in actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here we show that overexpression of an ARF6 fast-cycling mutant in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-derived cells to mimick ARF6 hyperactivation observed in invasive breast tumors induced a striking rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at the ventral cell surface. This phenotype consisted in the formation of dynamic actin-based podosome rosette-like structures expanding outward as wave positive for F-actin and actin cytoskeleton regulatory components including cortactin, Arp2/3 and SCAR/WAVE complexes and upstream Rac1 regulator. Ventral rosette-like structures were similarly induced in MDA-MB-231 cells in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation and to Rac1 hyperactivation. In addition, interference with ARF6 expression attenuated activation and plasma membrane targeting of Rac1 in response to EGF treatment. Our data suggest a role for ARF6 in linking EGF-receptor signaling to Rac1 recruitment and activation at the plasma membrane to promote breast cancer cell directed migration.

  12. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  13. Formation and function of the polar body contractile ring in Spisula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielak, Rafal M; Gaysinskaya, Valeriya A; Cohen, William D

    2004-05-15

    Initial studies suggested that spatial organization of the putative polar body contractile ring was determined by the peripheral aster in Spisula [Biol. Bull. 205 (2003) 192]. Here we report detailed supporting observations, including testing of aster and ring function with inhibitors. The metaphase peripheral aster was confirmed to spread cortically in an umbrella-like pattern, with microtubule-poor center. The aster disassembled during anaphase, leaving the spindle docked at the F-actin-poor center of a newly generated cortical F-actin ring that closely approximated the aster in location, measured diameter range, and pattern. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin-B permitted all events except ring and polar body formation. Nocodazole disassembly or taxol stabilization of the peripheral aster produced poorly defined rings or bulging anaphase asters within the ring center, respectively, inhibiting polar body formation. Polar body extrusion occurred at the ring center, the diameter of which diminished. Ring contractility-previously assumed-was verified using blebbistatin, a myosin-II ATPase inhibitor that permitted ring assembly but blocked polar body extrusion. The data support the hypothesis that peripheral aster spreading, perhaps dynein-driven, is causally related to polar body contractile ring formation, with anaphase entry and aster disassembly also required for polar body biogenesis. Previously reported astral spreading during embryonic micromere formation suggests that related mechanisms are involved in asymmetric somatic cytokinesis.

  14. A synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing F-actin formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bingyu [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Luo, Qing, E-mail: qing.luo@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Mao, Xinjian [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Xu, Baiyao [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ju, Yang [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-03-10

    Tendon injuries are common in sports and are frequent reasons for orthopedic consultations. The management of damaged tendons is one of the most challenging problems in orthopedics. Mechano-growth factor (MGF), a recently discovered growth repair factor, plays positive roles in tissue repair through the improvement of cell proliferation and migration and the protection of cells against injury-induced apoptosis. However, it remains unclear whether MGF has the potential to accelerate tendon repair. We used a scratch wound assay in this study to demonstrate that MGF-C25E (a synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide) promotes the migration of rat tenocytes and that this promotion is accompanied by an elevation in the expression of the following signaling molecules: focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibitors of the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways inhibited the MGF-C25E-induced tenocyte migration, indicating that MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration through the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The analysis of the mechanical properties showed that the Young's modulus of tenocytes was decreased through treatment of MGF-C25E, and an obvious formation of pseudopodia and F-actin was observed in MGF-C25E-treated tenocytes. The inhibition of the FAK or ERK1/2 signals restored the decrease in Young's modulus and inhibited the formation of pseudopodia and F-actin. Overall, our study demonstrated that MGF-C25E promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing pseudopodia formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Mechano-growth factor E peptide (MGF-C25E) promotes migration of rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E activates the FAK-ERK1/2 pathway in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E induces the actin remodeling and the formation of pseudopodia, and decreases the stiffness in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration via altering stiffness and forming pseudopodia by the activation of the

  15. Peroxynitrite induces F-actin depolymerization and blockade of myosin ATPase stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Ramos, Susana; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2006-03-31

    Treatment of F-actin with the peroxynitrite-releasing agent 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) produced a dose-dependent F-actin depolymerization. This is due to released peroxynitrite because it is not produced by 'decomposed SIN-1', and it is prevented by superoxide dismutase concentrations efficiently preventing peroxynitrite formation. F-actin depolymerization has been found to be very sensitive to peroxynitrite, as exposure to fluxes as low as 50-100nM peroxynitrite leads to nearly 50% depolymerization in about 1h. G-actin polymerization is also impaired by peroxynitrite although with nearly 2-fold lower sensitivity. Exposure of F-actin to submicromolar fluxes of peroxynitrite produced cysteine oxidation and also a blockade of the ability of actin to stimulate myosin ATPase activity. Our results suggest that an imbalance of the F-actin/G-actin equilibrium can account for the observed structural and functional impairment of myofibrils under the peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative stress reported for some pathophysiological conditions.

  16. Microtubules Modulate F-actin Dynamics during Neuronal Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Meka, Durga Praveen; Scharrenberg, Robin; König, Theresa; Schwanke, Birgit; Kobler, Oliver; Windhorst, Sabine; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina; Calderon de Anda, Froylan

    2017-08-29

    Neuronal polarization is reflected by different dynamics of microtubule and filamentous actin (F-actin). Axonal microtubules are more stable than those in the remaining neurites, while dynamics of F-actin in axonal growth cones clearly exceed those in their dendritic counterparts. However, whether a functional interplay exists between the microtubule network and F-actin dynamics in growing axons and whether this interplay is instrumental for breaking cellular symmetry is currently unknown. Here, we show that an increment on microtubule stability or number of microtubules is associated with increased F-actin dynamics. Moreover, we show that Drebrin E, an F-actin and microtubule plus-end binding protein, mediates this cross talk. Drebrin E segregates preferentially to growth cones with a higher F-actin treadmilling rate, where more microtubule plus-ends are found. Interruption of the interaction of Drebrin E with microtubules decreases F-actin dynamics and arrests neuronal polarization. Collectively the data show that microtubules modulate F-actin dynamics for initial axon extension during neuronal development.

  17. Nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 mediates p21-activated kinase 1 activation in the modulation of chemokine-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation and injury-induced vascular wall remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Kumar, Sanjay; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2013-07-26

    Recent literature suggests that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) mediate cell migration. However, the mechanisms were not known. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test whether cyclin/CDKs activate Pak1, an effector of Rac1, whose involvement in the modulation of cell migration and proliferation is well established. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a delayed time-dependent manner. MCP1 also stimulated F-actin stress fiber formation in a delayed manner in HASMCs, as well as the migration and proliferation of these cells. Inhibition of Pak1 suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. MCP1 induced cyclin D1 expression as well as CDK6 and CDK4 activities, and these effects were dependent on activation of NFATc1. Depletion of NFATc1, cyclin D1, CDK6, or CDK4 levels attenuated MCP1-induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation and resulted in decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. CDK4, which appeared to be activated downstream of CDK6, formed a complex with Pak1 in response to MCP1. MCP1 also activated Rac1 in a time-dependent manner, and depletion/inhibition of its levels/activation abrogated MCP1-induced NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling and, thereby, decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 led to decreased cyclin D1 expression and CDK6, CDK4, and Pak1 activities, resulting in reduced neointima formation in response to injury. Thus, these observations reveal that Pak1 is a downstream effector of CDK4 and Rac1-dependent, NFATc1-mediated cyclin D1 expression and CDK6 activity mediate this effect. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 prevented the capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells for MCP-1-induced activation of the cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling axis, affecting

  18. Formation of polar ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, F

    2003-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies are peculiar systems in which a gas rich, nearly polar ring surrounds an early-type or elliptical host galaxy. Two formation scenarios for these objects have been proposed: they are thought to form either in major galaxy mergers or by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich donor galaxy. Both scenarios are studied through N-body simulations including gas dynamics and star formation. Constraints on physical parameters are drawn out, in order to determine which scenario is the most likely to occur. Polar ring galaxies from each scenario are compared with observations and we discuss whether the accretion scenario and the merging scenario account for observational properties of polar ring galaxies. The conclusion of this study is that the accretion scenario is both the most likely and the most supported by observations. Even if the merging scenario is rather robust, most polar ring galaxies are shown to be the result of tidal gas accretion events.

  19. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima.

  20. F-actin cytoskeleton and the fate of organelles in chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, José; Gimenez-Molina, Yolanda; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2016-06-01

    the role of transport systems and the existence of an F-actin cortical structure as the main factors behind the formation of organelle subpopulations in this neuroendocrine cell model. This article is part of a mini review series on Chromaffin cells (ISCCB Meeting, 2015). Cover image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13322.

  1. Dissociative mechanism of F-actin thermal denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, V V; Kurganov, B I; Pivovarova, A V; Levitsky, D I

    2006-11-01

    We have applied differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermal unfolding of F-actin. It has been shown that the thermal stability of F-actin strongly depends on ADP concentration. The transition temperature, T(m), increases with increasing ADP concentration up to 1 mM. The T(m) value also depends on the concentration of F-actin: it increases by almost 3 degrees C as the F-actin concentration is increased from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/ml. Similar dependence of the T(m) value on protein concentration was demonstrated for F-actin stabilized by phalloidin, whereas it was much less pronounced in the presence of AlF4(-). However, T(m) was independent of protein concentration in the case of monomeric G-actin. The results suggest that at least two reversible stages precede irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin; one of them is dissociation of ADP from actin subunits, and another is dissociation of subunits from the ends of actin filaments. The model explains why unfolding of F-actin depends on both ADP and protein concentration.

  2. Quantitation of liquid-crystalline ordering in F-actin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, C M; Leavis, P C

    1992-09-01

    Actin filaments (F-actin) are important determinants of cellular shape and motility. These functions depend on the collective organization of numerous filaments with respect to both position and orientation in the cytoplasm. Much of the orientational organization arises spontaneously through liquid crystal formation in concentrated F-actin solutions. In studying this phenomenon, we found that solutions of purified F-actin undergo a continuous phase transition, from the isotropic state to a liquid crystalline state, when either the mean filament length or the actin concentration is increased above its respective threshold value. The phase diagram representing the threshold filament lengths and concentrations at which the phase transition occurs is consistent with that predicted by Flory's theory on solutions of noninteracting, rigid cylinders (Flory, 1956b). However, in contrast to other predictions based on this model, we found no evidence for the coexistence of isotropic and anisotropic phases. Furthermore, the phase transition proved to be temperature dependent, which suggests the existence of orientation-dependent interfilament interactions or of a temperature-dependent filament flexibility. We developed a simple method for growing undistorted fluorescent acrylodan-labeled F-actin liquid crystals; and we derived a simple theoretical treatment by which polarization-of-fluorescence measurements could be used to quantitate, for the first time, the degree of spontaneous filament ordering (nematic order parameter) in these F-actin liquid crystals. This order parameter was found to increase monotonically with both filament length and concentration. Actin liquid crystals can readily become distorted by a process known as "texturing." Zigzaging and helicoidal liquid crystalline textures which persisted in the absence of ATP were observed through the polarizing microscope. Possible texturing mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Fluorescence studies of the carboxyl-terminal domain of smooth muscle calponin effects of F-actin and salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartegi, A; Roustan, C; Kassab, R; Fattoum, A

    1999-06-01

    The fluorescence parameters of the environment-sensitive acrylodan, selectively attached to Cys273 in the C-terminal domain of smooth muscle calponin, were studied in the presence of F-actin and using varying salt concentrations. The formation of the F-actin acrylodan labeled calponin complex at 75 mm NaCl resulted in a 21-nm blue shift of the maximum emission wavelength from 496 nm to 474 nm and a twofold increase of the fluorescent quantum yield at 460 nm. These spectral changes were observed at the low ionic strengths ( 110 mm) where the binding stoichiometry is a 1 : 2 ratio of calponin : actin monomers. On the basis of previous three-dimensional reconstruction and chemical crosslinking of the F-actin-calponin complex, the actin effect is shown to derive from the low ionic strength interaction of calponin with the bottom of subdomain-1 of an upper actin monomer in F-actin and not from its further association with the subdomain-1 of the adjacent lower monomer which occurs at the high ionic strength. Remarkably, the F-actin-dependent fluorescence change of acrylodan is qualitatively but not quantitatively similar to that earlier reported for the complexes of calponin and Ca2+-calmodulin or Ca2+-caltropin. As the three calponin ligands bind to the same segment of the protein, encompassing residues 145-182, the acrylodan can be considered as a sensitive probe of the functioning of this critical region. A distance of 29 A was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between Cys273 of calponin and Cys374 of actin in the 1 : 1 F-actin-calponin complex suggesting that the F-actin effect was allosteric reflecting a global conformational change in the C-terminal domain of calponin.

  4. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  5. Adhesive F-actin waves: a novel integrin-mediated adhesion complex coupled to ventral actin polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B Case

    Full Text Available At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in "ventral F-actin waves" that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These "adhesive F-actin waves" require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization.

  6. Control of nuclear organization by F-actin binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Karin; Jayo, Asier; Parsons, Maddy

    2017-01-06

    The regulation of nuclear shape and deformability is a key factor in controlling diverse events from embryonic development to cancer cell metastasis, but the mechanisms governing this process are still unclear. Our recent study demonstrated an unexpected role for the F-actin bundling protein fascin in controlling nuclear plasticity through a direct interaction with Nesprin-2. Nesprin-2 is a component of the LINC complex that is known to couple the F-actin cytoskeleton to the nuclear envelope. We demonstrated that fascin, which is predominantly associated with peripheral F-actin rich filopodia, binds directly to Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope in a range of cell types. Depleting fascin or specifically blocking the fascin-Nesprin-2 complex leads to defects in nuclear polarization, movement and cell invasion. These studies reveal a novel role for an F-actin bundling protein in control of nuclear plasticity and underline the importance of defining nuclear-associated roles for F-actin binding proteins in future.

  7. Self-organized gels in DNA/F-actin mixtures without crosslinkers: networks of induced nematic domains with tunable density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ghee Hwee; Butler, John C; Zribi, Olena V; Smalyukh, Ivan I; Angelini, Thomas E; Purdy, Kirstin R; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C L

    2008-11-21

    We examine mixtures of DNA and filamentous actin (F-actin) as a model system of like-charged rigid rods and flexible chains. Confocal microscopy reveals the formation of elongated nematic F-actin domains reticulated via defect-free vertices into a network embedded in a mesh of random DNA. Synchrotron x-ray scattering results indicate that the DNA mesh squeezes the F-actin domains into a nematic state with an interactin spacing that decreases with increasing DNA concentration as d(actin) proportional, variantrho(DNA)(-1/2). Interestingly, the system changes from a counterion-controlled regime to a depletion-controlled regime with added salt, with drastic consequences for the osmotic pressure induced phase behavior.

  8. Polar ring galaxies formation and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, F; Bournaud, Frederic; Combes, Francoise

    2003-01-01

    Formation scenarios for polar ring galaxies are studied through N-body simulatio ns that are compared with existing observations. It is shown that polar rings ar e likely to be formed by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich d onor galaxy. The distribution of dark matter in polar ring galaxies is studied: dark halos seem to be flattened towards the polar rings.

  9. Triggering signaling pathways using F-actin self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, A; Bonnemay, L; Gayrard, C; Gautier, J; Gueroui, Z

    2016-10-04

    The spatiotemporal organization of proteins within cells is essential for cell fate behavior. Although it is known that the cytoskeleton is vital for numerous cellular functions, it remains unclear how cytoskeletal activity can shape and control signaling pathways in space and time throughout the cell cytoplasm. Here we show that F-actin self-organization can trigger signaling pathways by engineering two novel properties of the microfilament self-organization: (1) the confinement of signaling proteins and (2) their scaffolding along actin polymers. Using in vitro reconstitutions of cellular functions, we found that both the confinement of nanoparticle-based signaling platforms powered by F-actin contractility and the scaffolding of engineered signaling proteins along actin microfilaments can drive a signaling switch. Using Ran-dependent microtubule nucleation, we found that F-actin dynamics promotes the robust assembly of microtubules. Our in vitro assay is a first step towards the development of novel bottom-up strategies to decipher the interplay between cytoskeleton spatial organization and signaling pathway activity.

  10. Counteracting ring formation in rotary kilns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisaroni, M.; Sadi, R.; Lahaye, D.

    Avoiding the formation of rings in rotary kilns is an issue of primary concern to the cement production industry. We developed a numerical combustion model that revealed that in our case study rings are typically formed in zones of maximal radiative heat transfer. This local overheating causes the o

  11. Effect of cytochalasins on F-actin and morphology of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, J W; Falsig Pedersen, S; Walmod, P S

    2000-01-01

    that, in intact cells, different cytochalasins can have varying effects on cell morphology and F-actin content and organization. To examine this problem in more detail, we analyzed the effects of cytochalasins on the cell morphology of and F-actin content and organization in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT......) cells. After a 3-min exposure to 0.5 microM cytochalasin D, B, or E, F-actin content was equally reduced in all cases and this correlated with a reduction in the amount of cortical F-actin associated with the EAT cell membrane. However, only with CE was cell morphology markedly altered......, with the appearance of numerous blebs. At 10 microM, blebbing was present in all conditions and the organization of cortical F-actin was disrupted. F-actin content, however, was not further reduced by this higher concentration and in CD it was identical to control levels. Exposure of EAT cells to similar...

  12. Chromatin ring formation at plant centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed the formation of chromatin ring structures at centromeres of somatic rye and Arabidopsis chromosomes. To test whether this behavior is present also in other plant species and tissues we analyzed Arabidopsis, rye, wheat, Aegilops and barley centromeres during cell divisions and in interphase nuclei by immunostaining and FISH. Furthermore, structured illumination microscopy (super-resolution was applied to investigate the ultrastructure of centromere chromatin beyond the classical refraction limit of light. It became obvious, that a ring formation at centromeres may appear during mitosis, meiosis and in interphase nuclei in all species analyzed. However, varying centromere structures, as ring formations or globular organized chromatin fibers, were identified in different tissues of one and the same species. In addition, we found that a chromatin ring formation may also be caused by subtelomeric repeats in barley. Thus, we conclude that the formation of chromatin rings may appear in different plant species and tissues, but that it is not specific for centromere function. Based on our findings we established a model describing the ultrastructure of plant centromeres and discuss it in comparison to previous models proposed for animals and plants.

  13. Cell stress promotes the association of phosphorylated HspB1 with F-actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Clarke

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the small heat shock protein, HspB1, has a direct influence on the dynamics of cytoskeletal elements, in particular, filamentous actin (F-actin polymerization. In this study we have assessed the influence of HspB1 phosphorylation on its interaction(s with F-actin. We first determined the distribution of endogenous non-phosphorylated HspB1, phosphorylated HspB1 and F-actin in neuroendocrine PC12 cells by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. We then investigated a potential direct interaction between HspB1 with F-actin by precipitating F-actin directly with biotinylated phalloidin followed by Western analyses; the reverse immunoprecipitation of HspB1 was also carried out. The phosphorylation influence of HspB1 in this interaction was investigated by using pharmacologic inhibition of p38 MAPK. In control cells, HspB1 interacts with F-actin as a predominantly non-phosphorylated protein, but subsequent to stress there is a redistribution of HspB1 to the cytoskeletal fraction and a significantly increased association of pHspB1 with F-actin. Our data demonstrate HspB1 is found in a complex with F-actin both in phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms, with an increased association of pHspB1 with F-actin after heat stress. Overall, our study combines both cellular and biochemical approaches to show cellular localization and direct demonstration of an interaction between endogenous HspB1 and F-actin using methodolgy that specifically isolates F-actin.

  14. F-actin distribution and function during sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J; Nielsen, O; Egel, R

    1998-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is induced from the G1 phase of the cell cycle by nitrogen starvation and the presence of mating pheromones. We describe the distribution of F-actin during sexual differentiation. Cortical F-actin dots have previously been shown to be restricted...

  15. F-actin distribution and function during sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J; Nielsen, O; Egel, R;

    1998-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is induced from the G1 phase of the cell cycle by nitrogen starvation and the presence of mating pheromones. We describe the distribution of F-actin during sexual differentiation. Cortical F-actin dots have previously been shown to be restricted...

  16. F-actin reorganization upon de- and rehydration in the aeroterrestrial green alga Klebsormidium crenulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaas, Kathrin; Holzinger, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) is a dynamic network involved in many cellular processes like cell division and cytoplasmic streaming. While many studies have addressed the involvement of F-actin in different cellular processes in cultured cells, little is known on the reactions to environmental stress scenarios, where this system might have essential regulatory functions. We investigated here the de- and rehydration kinetics of breakdown and reassembly of F-actin in the streptophyte green alga Klebsormidium crenulatum. Measurements of the chlorophyll fluorescence (effective quantum yield of photosystem II [ΔF/Fm']) via pulse amplitude modulation were performed as a measure for dehydration induced shut down of physiological activity, which ceased after 141±15min at ∼84% RH. We hypothesized that there is a link between this physiological parameter and the status of the F-actin system. Indeed, 20min of dehydration (ΔF/Fm'=0) leads to a breakdown of the fine cortical F-actin network as visualized by Atto 488 phalloidin staining, and dot-like structures remained. Already 10min after rehydration a beginning reassembly of F-actin is observed, after 25min the F-actin network appeared similar to untreated controls, indicating a full recovery. These results demonstrate the fast kinetics of F-actin dis- and reassembly likely contributing to cellular reorganization upon rehydration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. F-actin-binding protein drebrin regulates CXCR4 recruitment to the immune synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Cabrero, José Román; Barrero-Villar, Marta; Rey, Mercedes; Mittelbrunn, María; Lamana, Amalia; Morlino, Giulia; Calabia, Carmen; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Shirao, Tomoaki; Vázquez, Jesús; González-Amaro, Roberto; Veiga, Esteban; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The adaptive immune response depends on the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells at the immune synapse. Formation of the immune synapse and the subsequent T-cell activation are highly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. In this work, we describe that T cells express drebrin, a neuronal actin-binding protein. Drebrin colocalizes with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and F-actin at the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster in the immune synapse. Drebrin interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CXCR4 and both proteins redistribute to the immune synapse with similar kinetics. Drebrin knockdown in T cells impairs the redistribution of CXCR4 and inhibits actin polymerization at the immune synapse as well as IL-2 production. Our data indicate that drebrin exerts an unexpected and relevant functional role in T cells during the generation of the immune response.

  18. Orbit/CLASP is required for germline cyst formation through its developmental control of fusomes and ring canals in Drosophila males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie Miyauchi

    Full Text Available Orbit, a Drosophila ortholog of microtubule plus-end enriched protein CLASP, plays an important role in many developmental processes involved in microtubule dynamics. Previous studies have shown that Orbit is required for asymmetric stem cell division and cystocyte divisions in germline cysts and for the development of microtubule networks that interconnect oocyte and nurse cells during oogenesis. Here, we examined the cellular localization of Orbit and its role in cyst formation during spermatogenesis. In male germline stem cells, distinct localization of Orbit was first observed on the spectrosome, which is a spherical precursor of the germline-specific cytoskeleton known as the fusome. In dividing stem cells and spermatogonia, Orbit was localized around centrosomes and on kinetochores and spindle microtubules. After cytokinesis, Orbit remained localized on ring canals, which are cytoplasmic bridges between the cells. Thereafter, it was found along fusomes, extending through the ring canal toward all spermatogonia in a cyst. Fusome localization of Orbit was not affected by microtubule depolymerization. Instead, our fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments suggested that Orbit is closely associated with F-actin, which is abundantly found in fusomes. Surprisingly, F-actin depolymerization influenced neither fusome organization nor Orbit localization on the germline-specific cytoskeleton. We revealed that two conserved regions of Orbit are required for fusome localization. Using orbit hypomorphic mutants, we showed that the protein is required for ring canal formation and for fusome elongation mediated by the interaction of newly generated fusome plugs with the pre-existing fusome. The orbit mutation also disrupted ring canal clustering, which is essential for folding of the spermatogonia after cytokinesis. Orbit accumulates around centrosomes at the onset of spermatogonial mitosis and is required for the capture of one of the

  19. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Guaqueta, Camilo; Strohman, Michael J.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C.L. (UIUC)

    2008-07-11

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  20. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, L.K.; Xian, W.; Guaqueta, C.; Strohman, M.; Vrasich, C.R.; Luijten, E.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  1. Centaur's ring system formation by close encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santana, Thamiris; Winter, Othon

    2016-10-01

    Rupture of small bodies due to close approach to a massive body is a frequent event in the Solar System. Some of these small bodies can just disintegrate completely or suffer a material loss.In this work we study the gravitational interaction between a giant planet and a small body in close encounters in order to simulate the formation of a planetary ring system around a centaur by the partial rupture of the small body.Considering the current Chariklo's body and a disk of particles around it, we simulated the system under close encounters with one of giant planets.Another motivation for the study is also the centaur Chiron, that is a candidate to have a ring system like Chariklo. The characteristics of the encounters are defined by the impact parameter and the velocity at infinity.The results are presented in terms of conditions that could lead to a rupture that could generate a ring like system.

  2. Cell shape change and invagination of the cephalic furrow involves reorganization of F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Allison K; Siddiqui, Bilal A; Thomas, Jeffrey H

    2015-06-15

    Invagination of epithelial sheets to form furrows is a fundamental morphogenetic movement and is found in a variety of developmental events including gastrulation and vertebrate neural tube formation. The cephalic furrow is a deep epithelial invagination that forms during Drosophila gastrulation. In the first phase of cephalic furrow formation, the initiator cells that will lead invagination undergo apicobasal shortening and apical constriction in the absence of epithelial invagination. In the second phase of cephalic furrow formation, the epithelium starts to invaginate, accompanied by both basal expansion and continued apicobasal shortening of the initiator cells. The cells adjacent to the initiator cells also adopt wedge shapes, but only after invagination is well underway. Myosin II does not appear to drive apical constriction in cephalic furrow formation. However, cortical F-actin is increased in the apices of the initiator cells and in invaginating cells during both phases of cephalic furrow formation. These findings suggest that a novel mechanism for epithelial invagination is involved in cephalic furrow formation.

  3. Modulating F-actin organization induces organ growth by affecting the Hippo pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Sansores-Garcia, Leticia; Bossuyt, Wouter; Wada, Ken-Ichi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Tao, Chunyao; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Halder, Georg

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies actin organization as an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway: F-actin accumulation promotes Yorkie-dependent transcriptional activation. This modulation of Hippo signalling by actin regulators controls organ growth in Drosophila.

  4. Spectrin-dependent and -independent association of F-actin with the erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C M; Foley, S F

    1980-08-01

    Binding of F-actin to spectrin-actin-depleted erythrocyte membrane inside-out vesicles was measured using [3H]F-actin. F-actin binding to vesicles at 25 degrees C was stimulated 5-10 fold by addition of spectrin dimers or tetramers to vesicles. Spectrin tetramer was twice as effective as dimer in stimulating actin binding, but neither tetramer nor dimer stimulated binding at 4 degrees C. The addition of purified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 to spectrin-reconstituted vesicles doubled their actin-binding capacity. Trypsinization of unreconstituted vesicles that contain ghosts, decreased their F-actin-binding capacity by 70%. Whereas little or none of the residual spectrin was affected by trypsinization, band 4.1 was significantly degraded. Our results show that spectrin can anchor actin filaments to the cytoplasmic surface of erythrocyte membranes and suggest that band 4.1 may be importantly involved in the association.

  5. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Kumar, Ram P; Abmayr, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs), and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre) and Sticks-and-stones (Sns) on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia) and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and lysosomes in the

  6. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Haralalka

    Full Text Available The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs, and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre and Sticks-and-stones (Sns on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and

  7. Quantification of Filamentous Actin (F-actin) Puncta in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Aksenova, Marina; Bertrand, Sarah J; Mactutus, Charles F; Booze, Rosemarie

    2016-02-10

    Filamentous actin protein (F-actin) plays a major role in spinogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and synaptic stability. Changes in dendritic F-actin rich structures suggest alterations in synaptic integrity and connectivity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for culturing primary rat cortical neurons, Phalloidin staining for F-actin puncta, and subsequent quantification techniques. First, the frontal cortex of E18 rat embryos are dissociated into low-density cell culture, then the neurons grown in vitro for at least 12-14 days. Following experimental treatment, the cortical neurons are stained with AlexaFluor 488 Phalloidin (to label the dendritic F-actin puncta) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2; to validate the neuronal cells and dendritic integrity). Finally, specialized software is used to analyze and quantify randomly selected neuronal dendrites. F-actin rich structures are identified on second order dendritic branches (length range 25-75 µm) with continuous MAP2 immunofluorescence. The protocol presented here will be a useful method for investigating changes in dendritic synapse structures subsequent to experimental treatments.

  8. Dendrite architecture organized by transcriptional control of the F-actin nucleator Spire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago; Ou, Yimiao; Li, Sally; Giniger, Edward; van Meyel, Donald J

    2014-02-01

    The architectures of dendritic trees are crucial for the wiring and function of neuronal circuits because they determine coverage of receptive territories, as well as the nature and strength of sensory or synaptic inputs. Here, we describe a cell-intrinsic pathway sculpting dendritic arborization (da) neurons in Drosophila that requires Longitudinals Lacking (Lola), a BTB/POZ transcription factor, and its control of the F-actin cytoskeleton through Spire (Spir), an actin nucleation protein. Loss of Lola from da neurons reduced the overall length of dendritic arbors, increased the expression of Spir, and produced inappropriate F-actin-rich dendrites at positions too near the cell soma. Selective removal of Lola from only class IV da neurons decreased the evasive responses of larvae to nociception. The increased Spir expression contributed to the abnormal F-actin-rich dendrites and the decreased nocifensive responses because both were suppressed by reduced dose of Spir. Thus, an important role of Lola is to limit expression of Spir to appropriate levels within da neurons. We found Spir to be expressed in dendritic arbors and to be important for their development. Removal of Spir from class IV da neurons reduced F-actin levels and total branch number, shifted the position of greatest branch density away from the cell soma, and compromised nocifensive behavior. We conclude that the Lola-Spir pathway is crucial for the spatial arrangement of branches within dendritic trees and for neural circuit function because it provides balanced control of the F-actin cytoskeleton.

  9. A Wnt-planar polarity pathway instructs neurite branching by restricting F-actin assembly through endosomal signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Hao; Liao, Chien-Po

    2017-01-01

    Spatial arrangement of neurite branching is instructed by both attractive and repulsive cues. Here we show that in C. elegans, the Wnt family of secreted glycoproteins specify neurite branching sites in the PLM mechanosensory neurons. Wnts function through MIG-1/Frizzled and the planar cell polarity protein (PCP) VANG-1/Strabismus/Vangl2 to restrict the formation of F-actin patches, which mark branching sites in nascent neurites. We find that VANG-1 promotes Wnt signaling by facilitating Frizzled endocytosis and genetically acts in a common pathway with arr-1/β-arrestin, whose mutation results in defective PLM branching and F-actin patterns similar to those in the Wnt, mig-1 or vang-1 mutants. On the other hand, the UNC-6/Netrin pathway intersects orthogonally with Wnt-PCP signaling to guide PLM branch growth along the dorsal-ventral axis. Our study provides insights for how attractive and repulsive signals coordinate to sculpt neurite branching patterns, which are critical for circuit connectivity. PMID:28384160

  10. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D

    2016-01-27

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation.

  11. Effects of plasma membrane cholesterol level and cytoskeleton F-actin on cell protrusion mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Khatibzadeh

    Full Text Available Protrusions are deformations that form at the surface of living cells during biological activities such as cell migration. Using combined optical tweezers and fluorescent microscopy, we quantified the mechanical properties of protrusions in adherent human embryonic kidney cells in response to application of an external force at the cell surface. The mechanical properties of protrusions were analyzed by obtaining the associated force-length plots during protrusion formation, and force relaxation at constant length. Protrusion mechanics were interpretable by a standard linear solid (Kelvin model, consisting of two stiffness parameters, k0 and k1 (with k0>k1, and a viscous coefficient. While both stiffness parameters contribute to the time-dependant mechanical behavior of the protrusions, k0 and k1 in particular dominated the early and late stages of the protrusion formation and elongation process, respectively. Lowering the membrane cholesterol content by 25% increased the k0 stiffness by 74%, and shortened the protrusion length by almost half. Enhancement of membrane cholesterol content by nearly two-fold increased the protrusion length by 30%, and decreased the k0 stiffness by nearly two-and-half-fold as compared with control cells. Cytoskeleton integrity was found to make a major contribution to protrusion mechanics as evidenced by the effects of F-actin disruption on the resulting mechanical parameters. Viscoelastic behavior of protrusions was further characterized by hysteresis and force relaxation after formation. The results of this study elucidate the coordination of plasma membrane composition and cytoskeleton during protrusion formation.

  12. F-actin distribution at nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in mammalian sciatic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Alejandra; Canclini, Lucía; Rosso, Gonzalo; Bresque, Mariana; Romeo, Carlos; Hanusz, Alicia; Cal, Karina; Calliari, Aldo; Sotelo Silveira, José; Sotelo, José R

    2012-07-01

    Very little is known about the function of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the regeneration and pathology of peripheral nerve fibers. The actin cytoskeleton has been associated with maintenance of tissue structure, transmission of traction and contraction forces, and an involvement in cell motility. Therefore, the state of the actin cytoskeleton strongly influences the mechanical properties of cells and intracellular transport therein. In this work, we analyze the distribution of F-actin at Schmidt-Lanterman Incisures (SLI) and nodes of Ranvier (NR) domains in normal, regenerating and pathologic Trembler J (TrJ/+) sciatic nerve fibers, of rats and mice. F-actin was quantified and it was found increased in TrJ/+, both in SLI and NR. However, SLI and NR of regenerating rat sciatic nerve did not show significant differences in F-actin, as compared with normal nerves. Cytochalasin-D and Latrunculin-A were used to disrupt the F-actin network in normal and regenerating rat sciatic nerve fibers. Both drugs disrupt F-actin, but in different ways. Cytochalasin-D did not disrupt Schwann cell (SC) F-actin at the NR. Latrunculin-A did not disrupt F-actin at the boundary region between SC and axon at the NR domain. We surmise that the rearrangement of F-actin in neurological disorders, as presented here, is an important feature of TrJ/+ pathology as a Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) model.

  13. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  14. Small heat shock protein Hsp27 prevents heat-induced aggregation of F-actin by forming soluble complexes with denatured actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Chernik, Ivan S; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2007-11-01

    Previously, we have shown that the small heat shock protein with apparent molecular mass 27 kDa (Hsp27) does not affect the thermal unfolding of F-actin, but effectively prevents aggregation of thermally denatured F-actin [Pivovarova AV, Mikhailova VV, Chernik IS, Chebotareva NA, Levitsky DI & Gusev NB (2005) Biochem Biophys Res Commun331, 1548-1553], and supposed that Hsp27 prevents heat-induced aggregation of F-actin by forming soluble complexes with denatured actin. In the present work, we applied dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and size exclusion chromatography to examine the properties of complexes formed by denatured actin with a recombinant human Hsp27 mutant (Hsp27-3D) mimicking the naturally occurring phosphorylation of this protein at Ser15, Ser78, and Ser82. Our results show that formation of these complexes occurs upon heating and accompanies the F-actin thermal denaturation. All the methods show that the size of actin-Hsp27-3D complexes decreases with increasing Hsp27-3D concentration in the incubation mixture and that saturation occurs at approximately equimolar concentrations of Hsp27-3D and actin. Under these conditions, the complexes exhibit a hydrodynamic radius of approximately 16 nm, a sedimentation coefficient of 17-20 S, and a molecular mass of about 2 MDa. It is supposed that Hsp27-3D binds to denatured actin monomers or short oligomers dissociated from actin filaments upon heating and protects them from aggregation by forming relatively small and highly soluble complexes. This mechanism might explain how small heat shock proteins prevent aggregation of denatured actin and by this means protect the cytoskeleton and the whole cell from damage caused by accumulation of large insoluble aggregates under heat shock conditions.

  15. Leading tip drives soma translocation via forward F-actin flow during neuronal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Zhang, Zheng-hong; Guan, Chen-bing; Xia, Di; Yuan, Xiao-bing

    2010-08-11

    Neuronal migration involves coordinated extension of the leading process and translocation of the soma, but the relative contribution of different subcellular regions, including the leading process and cell rear, in driving soma translocation remains unclear. By local manipulation of cytoskeletal components in restricted regions of cultured neurons, we examined the molecular machinery underlying the generation of traction force for soma translocation during neuronal migration. In actively migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture, a growth cone (GC)-like structure at the leading tip exhibits high dynamics, and severing the tip or disrupting its dynamics suppressed soma translocation within minutes. Soma translocation was also suppressed by local disruption of F-actin along the leading process but not at the soma, whereas disrupting microtubules along the leading process or at the soma accelerated soma translocation. Fluorescent speckle microscopy using GFP-alpha-actinin showed that a forward F-actin flow along the leading process correlated with and was required for soma translocation, and such F-actin flow depended on myosin II activity. In migrating neurons, myosin II activity was high at the leading tip but low at the soma, and increasing or decreasing this front-to-rear difference accelerated or impeded soma advance. Thus, the tip of the leading process actively pulls the soma forward during neuronal migration through a myosin II-dependent forward F-actin flow along the leading process.

  16. A theory of ring formation around Be stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.-S.

    1976-01-01

    A theory for the formation of gaseous rings around Be stars is developed which involves the combined effect of stellar rotation and radiation pressure. A qualitative scenario of ring formation is outlined in which the envelope formed about a star from ejected material is in the form of a disk in the equatorial plane, collisions between ejected gas blobs are inevitable, and particles with high angular momenta form a rotating ring around the star. A quantitative description of this process is then formulated by considering the angular momentum and dynamical energy of the ejected matter as well as those of the ring alone, without introducing any other assumptions.

  17. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage anal...

  18. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Omp29 is associated with bacterial entry to gingival epithelial cells by F-actin rearrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikihito Kajiya

    Full Text Available The onset and progressive pathogenesis of periodontal disease is thought to be initiated by the entry of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa into periodontal tissue, especially gingival epithelium. Nonetheless, the mechanism underlying such bacterial entry remains to be clarified. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the possible role of Aa outer membrane protein 29 kD (Omp29, a homologue of E. coli OmpA, in promoting bacterial entry into gingival epithelial cells. To accomplish this, Omp29 expression vector was incorporated in an OmpA-deficient mutant of E. coli. Omp29(+/OmpA(- E. coli demonstrated 22-fold higher entry into human gingival epithelial line cells (OBA9 than Omp29(-/OmpA(- E. coli. While the entry of Aa and Omp29(+/OmpA(- E. coli into OBA9 cells were inhibited by anti-Omp29 antibody, their adherence to OBA9 cells was not inhibited. Stimulation of OBA9 cells with purified Omp29 increased the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, a pivotal cell-signaling molecule that can up-regulate actin rearrangement. Furthermore, Omp29 increased the formation of F-actin in OBA9 cells. The internalization of Omp29-coated beads and the entry of Aa into OBA9 were partially inhibited by treatment with PI3-kinase inhibitor (Wortmannin and Rho GTPases inhibitor (EDIN, both known to convey FAK-signaling to actin-rearrangement. These results suggest that Omp29 is associated with the entry of Aa into gingival epithelial cells by up-regulating F-actin rearrangement via the FAK signaling pathway.

  19. Vortex formation in magnetic narrow rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, J. A. C.

    2002-03-01

    Underlying the current interest in magnetic elements is the possibility such systems provide both for the study of fundamental phenomena in magnetism (such as domain wall trapping and spin switching) and for technological applications, such as high density magnetic storage or magnetic random access memories (MRAM). One key issue is to control the magnetic switching precisely. To achieve this one needs first to have a well defined and reproducible remanent state, and second the switching process itself must be simple and reproducible. Among the many studied geometries, rings are shown to exhibit several advantages over other geometries, in that they show relatively simple stable magnetic states at remanence, with fast and simple magnetisation switching mechanisms. This is borne out of our systematic investigation of the magnetic properties of epitaxial and polycrystalline Co rings, where both the static, dynamic and transport properties have been studied. Magnetic measurements and micromagnetic simulations show that for appropriate ring structures a two step switching process occurs at high fields, indicating the existence of two different stable states. In addition to the vortex state, which occurs at intermediate fields, we have identified a new bi-domain state, which we term the `onion state', corresponding to opposite circulation of the magnetisation in each half of the ring. The magnetic elements were fabricated using a new technique based on the pre-patterning of Si ring structures and subsequent epitaxial growth of Cu/Co/Cu sandwich films on top of the Si elements. This technique has allowed the growth of epitaxial fcc Co(001) structures and in contrast to conventional lithographic methods, no damage to the magnetic layer structure is introduced by the patterning process [1,2]. We have studied the magnetic switching properties of arrays of narrow Co(100) epitaxial ring magnets, with outer diameters between 1 μm and 2 μm, varying inner diameters and varying

  20. Direct observation of motion of single F-actin filaments in the presence of myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Toshio; Nakase, Michiyuki; Nishiyama, Katsumi; Oosawa, Fumio

    1984-01-01

    Actin is found in almost all kinds of non-muscle cells where it is thought to have an important role in cell motility. A proper understanding of that role will only be possible when reliable in vitro systems are available for investigating the interaction of cellular actin and myosin. A start has been made on several systems1-4, most recently by Sheetz and Spudich who demonstrated unidirectional movement of HMM-coated beads along F-actin cables on arrays of chloroplasts exposed by dissection of a Nitella cell5. As an alternative approach, we report here the direct observation by fluorescence microscopy of the movements of single F-actin filaments interacting with soluble myosin fragments energized by Mg2+-ATP.

  1. Total synthesis of (-)-doliculide, structure-activity relationship studies and its binding to F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcha, Kiran; Madduri, Ashoka V R; Roy, Sayantani; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert; Hirsch, Anna K H; Minnaard, Adriaan J

    2012-11-26

    Actin, an abundant protein in most eukaryotic cells, is one of the targets in cancer research. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to the synthesis and function of actin-targeting compounds and their use as effective molecular probes in chemical biology. In this study, we have developed an efficient synthesis of (-)-doliculide, a very potent actin binder with a higher cell-membrane permeability than phalloidin. Actin polymerization assays with (-)-doliculide and two analogues on HeLa and BSC-1 cells, together with a prediction of their binding mode to F-actin by unbiased computational docking, show that doliculide stabilizes F-actin in a similar way to jasplakinolide and chondramide C. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Formation of the storm-time ring current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Lun; PU Zuyin; ZHOU Xuzhi; FU Suiyan; ZONG Qiugang

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study of ring current injection and intensification of the storm-time symmetric ring current is conducted with three-dimensional (3-D) test particle trajectory calculations (TPTCs) in this paper. TPTCs reveal more accurately the process of ring current injection. The main results are the following: (1) an intense convection electric field can effectively energize and inject plasma sheet particles into ring current region within 1-3 h. (2) Injection ions often follow chaotic trajectories in non-adiabatic regions,which may have implications in storm and ring current physics. (3) The shielding electric field, which arises as a consequence of enhanced convection and co-exists with injection and convection electric field, leads the original open trajectories to change into closed ones, thus may play an important role in the formation of the symmetric ring current.

  3. The formation of peak rings in large impact craters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joanna V; Gulick, Sean P S; Bralower, Timothy; Chenot, Elise; Christeson, Gail; Claeys, Philippe; Cockell, Charles; Collins, Gareth S; Coolen, Marco J L; Ferrière, Ludovic; Gebhardt, Catalina; Goto, Kazuhisa; Jones, Heather; Kring, David A; Le Ber, Erwan; Lofi, Johanna; Long, Xiao; Lowery, Christopher; Mellett, Claire; Ocampo-Torres, Rubén; Osinski, Gordon R; Perez-Cruz, Ligia; Pickersgill, Annemarie; Poelchau, Michael; Rae, Auriol; Rasmussen, Cornelia; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Riller, Ulrich; Sato, Honami; Schmitt, Douglas R; Smit, Jan; Tikoo, Sonia; Tomioka, Naotaka; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Whalen, Michael; Wittmann, Axel; Yamaguchi, Kosei E; Zylberman, William

    2016-11-18

    Large impacts provide a mechanism for resurfacing planets through mixing near-surface rocks with deeper material. Central peaks are formed from the dynamic uplift of rocks during crater formation. As crater size increases, central peaks transition to peak rings. Without samples, debate surrounds the mechanics of peak-ring formation and their depth of origin. Chicxulub is the only known impact structure on Earth with an unequivocal peak ring, but it is buried and only accessible through drilling. Expedition 364 sampled the Chicxulub peak ring, which we found was formed from uplifted, fractured, shocked, felsic basement rocks. The peak-ring rocks are cross-cut by dikes and shear zones and have an unusually low density and seismic velocity. Large impacts therefore generate vertical fluxes and increase porosity in planetary crust. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. The formation of peak rings in large impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joanna V.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Bralower, Timothy; Chenot, Elise; Christeson, Gail; Claeys, Philippe; Cockell, Charles; Collins, Gareth S.; Coolen, Marco J. L.; Ferrière, Ludovic; Gebhardt, Catalina; Goto, Kazuhisa; Jones, Heather; Kring, David A.; Le Ber, Erwan; Lofi, Johanna; Long, Xiao; Lowery, Christopher; Mellett, Claire; Ocampo-Torres, Rubén; Osinski, Gordon R.; Perez-Cruz, Ligia; Pickersgill, Annemarie; Poelchau, Michael; Rae, Auriol; Rasmussen, Cornelia; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Riller, Ulrich; Sato, Honami; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Smit, Jan; Tikoo, Sonia; Tomioka, Naotaka; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Whalen, Michael; Wittmann, Axel; Yamaguchi, Kosei E.; Zylberman, William

    2016-11-01

    Large impacts provide a mechanism for resurfacing planets through mixing near-surface rocks with deeper material. Central peaks are formed from the dynamic uplift of rocks during crater formation. As crater size increases, central peaks transition to peak rings. Without samples, debate surrounds the mechanics of peak-ring formation and their depth of origin. Chicxulub is the only known impact structure on Earth with an unequivocal peak ring, but it is buried and only accessible through drilling. Expedition 364 sampled the Chicxulub peak ring, which we found was formed from uplifted, fractured, shocked, felsic basement rocks. The peak-ring rocks are cross-cut by dikes and shear zones and have an unusually low density and seismic velocity. Large impacts therefore generate vertical fluxes and increase porosity in planetary crust.

  5. The formation of spiral arms and rings in barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Gomez, M; Masdemont, J J; García-Gomez, C

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain the formation of spiral arms and of all types of outer rings in barred galaxies. We have extended and applied the technique used in celestial mechanics to compute transfer orbits. Thus, our theory is based on the chaotic orbital motion driven by the invariant manifolds associated to the periodic orbits around the hyperbolic equilibrium points. In particular, spiral arms and outer rings are related to the presence of heteroclinic or homoclinic orbits. Thus, R1 rings are associated to the presence of heteroclinic orbits, while R1R2 rings are associated to the presence of homoclinic orbits. Spiral arms and R2 rings, however, appear when there exist neither heteroclinic nor homoclinic orbits. We examine the parameter space of three realistic, yet simple, barred galaxy models and discuss the formation of the different morphologies according to the properties of the galaxy model. The different morphologies arise from differences in the dynamical parameters of the galaxy.

  6. Treatment of ras-induced cancers by the F-actin-bundling drug MKT-077.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, A; Shakri, R; Connolly, L; Hirokawa, Y; Shishido, T; Bowers, B; Ye, L H; Kohama, K; Simpson, R J; Maruta, H

    2000-01-01

    A rhodacyanine dye called MKT-077 has shown a highly selective toxicity toward several distinct human malignant cell lines, including bladder carcinoma EJ, and has been subjected to clinical trials for cancer therapy. In the pancreatic carcinoma cell line CRL-1420, but not in normal African green monkey kidney cell line CV-1, it is selectively accumulated in mitochondria. However, both the specific oncogenes responsible for its selective toxicity toward cancer cells, and its target proteins in these cancer cells, still remain to be determined. This study was conducted using normal and ras-transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts to determine whether oncogenic ras mutants such as v-Ha-ras are responsible for the selective toxicity of MKT-077 and also to identify its targets, using its derivative called "compound 1" as a specific ligand. We have found that v-Ha-ras is responsible for the selective toxicity of MKT-077 in both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we have identified and affinity purified at least two distinct proteins of 45 kD (p45) and 75 kD (p75), which bind MKT-077 in v-Ha-ras-transformed cells but not in parental normal cells. Microsequencing analysis has revealed that the p45 is a mixture of beta- and gamma-actin, whereas the p75 is HSC70, a constitutive member of the Hsp70 heat shock adenosine triphosphatase family, which inactivates the tumor suppressor p53. MKT-077 binds actin directly, bundles actin filaments by cross-linking, and blocks membrane ruffling. Like a few F-actin-bundling proteins such as HS1, alpha-actinin, and vinculin as well as F-actin cappers such as tensin and chaetoglobosin K (CK), the F-actin-bundling drug MKT-077 suppresses ras transformation by blocking membrane ruffling. These findings suggest that other selective F-actin-bundling/capping compounds are also potentially useful for the chemotherapy of ras-associated cancers.

  7. Comparative in vitro phagocytosis and F-actin polymerization of bovine neonatal neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiola, F; Spycher, M; Wyder-Walther, M; Zwahlen, R D

    1994-04-01

    Analysis of neonatal neutrophil (PMN) functions should help to reveal factors which could contribute to the impaired host defense system of neonates. We analysed functional parameters of PMN from newborn calves (N-PMN) and adult bovines (A-PMN): cellular volume and F-actin content upon stimulation with complement factors, by cytofluorometry and phagocytosis of E. coli 78:80B with a colorimetric assay. Polymerization of F-actin was rapid in both N- and A-PMN, but reached higher levels in N-PMN. N-PMN are significantly smaller than A-PMN throughout the whole activation time. Percentage of phagocytosing PMN, the rate of phagocytosis, and the rate of killing are similar between A- and N-PMN after opsonization of bacteria with adult serum (AS). Opsonization with newborn serum (NS) reduced all three examined parameters: in A-PMN more (P dexamethasone) and non-steroidal (phenylbutazone) anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited phagocytosis by N-PMN less than by A-PMN. Higher relative F-actin content of N-PMN can be correlated with the documented functional hyperactivity of bovine N-PMN. However, the exaggerated impairment of phagocytosis in calves observed after age-matched opsonization of bacteria could potentially indicate a specific host defence defect.

  8. Structural definition of the F-actin-binding THATCH domain from HIP1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Tom J; Legendre-Guillemin, Valerie; McPherson, Peter S; Fremont, Daved H

    2006-02-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein-1 related (HIP1R) has a crucial protein-trafficking role, mediating associations between actin and clathrin-coated structures at the plasma membrane and trans-Golgi network. Here, we characterize the F-actin-binding region of HIP1R, termed the talin-HIP1/R/Sla2p actin-tethering C-terminal homology (THATCH) domain. The 1.9-A crystal structure of the human HIP1R THATCH core reveals a large sequence-conserved surface patch created primarily by residues from the third and fourth helices of a unique five-helix bundle. Point mutations of seven contiguous patch residues produced significant decreases in F-actin binding. We also show that THATCH domains have a conserved C-terminal latch capable of oligomerizing the core, thereby modulating F-actin engagement. Collectively, these results establish a framework for investigating the links between endocytosis and actin dynamics mediated by THATCH domain-containing proteins.

  9. Ena/VASP Enabled is a highly processive actin polymerase tailored to self-assemble parallel-bundled F-actin networks with Fascin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Jonathan D; Bilancia, Colleen G; Peifer, Mark; Kovar, David R

    2014-03-18

    Filopodia are exploratory finger-like projections composed of multiple long, straight, parallel-bundled actin filaments that protrude from the leading edge of migrating cells. Drosophila melanogaster Enabled (Ena) is a member of the Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein protein family, which facilitates the assembly of filopodial actin filaments that are bundled by Fascin. However, the mechanism by which Ena and Fascin promote the assembly of uniformly thick F-actin bundles that are capable of producing coordinated protrusive forces without buckling is not well understood. We used multicolor evanescent wave fluorescence microscopy imaging to follow individual Ena molecules on both single and Fascin-bundled F-actin in vitro. Individual Ena tetramers increase the elongation rate approximately two- to threefold and inhibit capping protein by remaining processively associated with the barbed end for an average of ∼10 s in solution, for ∼60 s when immobilized on a surface, and for ∼110 s when multiple Ena tetramers are clustered on a surface. Ena also can gather and simultaneously elongate multiple barbed ends. Collectively, these properties could facilitate the recruitment of Fascin and initiate filopodia formation. Remarkably, we found that Ena's actin-assembly properties are tunable on Fascin-bundled filaments, facilitating the formation of filopodia-like F-actin networks without tapered barbed ends. Ena-associated trailing barbed ends in Fascin-bundled actin filaments have approximately twofold more frequent and approximately fivefold longer processive runs, allowing them to catch up with leading barbed ends efficiently. Therefore, Fascin and Ena cooperate to extend and maintain robust filopodia of uniform thickness with aligned barbed ends by a unique mechanistic cycle.

  10. Signatures of recent star formation in ring S0 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, A; Rampazzo, R; Thilker, D; Annibali, F; Bressan, A; Buson, L M; 10.1007/s10509-010-0588-3

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the stellar populations of ring and/or arm-like structures in a sample of S0 galaxies using GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet imaging and SDSS optical data. Such structures are prominent in the UV and reveal recent star formation. We quantitatively characterize these rejuvenation events, estimating the average age and stellar mass of the ring structures, as well as of the entire galaxy. The mass fraction of the UV-bright rings is a few percent of the total galaxy mass, although the UV ring luminosity reaches 70% of the galaxy luminosity. The integrated colors of these S0s locates them in the red sequence (NGC 2962) and in the so-called green valley. We suggest that the star formation episodes may be induced by different triggering mechanisms, such as the inner secular evolution driven by bars, and interaction episodes.

  11. Hyperosmotic stress induces Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase-mediated cofilin phosphorylation in tubular cells: key role in the osmotically triggered F-actin response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirone, Ana C P; Speight, Pam; Zulys, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress induces cytoskeleton reorganization and a net increase in cellular F-actin, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. While de novo F-actin polymerization likely contributes to the actin response, the role of F-actin severing is unknown. To address this proble...... in the hyperosmotic stress-induced F-actin increase. Key words: cytoskeleton, hypertonicity, cell volume, small GTPases.......Hyperosmotic stress induces cytoskeleton reorganization and a net increase in cellular F-actin, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. While de novo F-actin polymerization likely contributes to the actin response, the role of F-actin severing is unknown. To address this problem...... we investigated whether hyperosmolarity regulates cofilin, a key actin-severing protein, whose activity is inhibited by phosphorylation. Since the small GTPases Rho and Rac are sensitive to cell volume changes, and can regulate cofilin phosphorylation, we also asked if they might link osmostress...

  12. The formation of super-rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G

    1980-01-01

    The author has calculated the collision of a small neutral cloud (surface density approximately 10/sup 19/ cm/sup -2/) with a constant density galactic disk. Through the collision, a large amount of energy is deposited in a small volume of the galaxy, resulting in a supersonic expansion of very hot (10/sup 6/-10/sup 7/K) gas into the Galaxy and out of the galactic disk. The expansion generates a large cavity (a super-ring) with physical characteristics (diameter, velocity of expansion, etc.) in agreement with the observations, and a large volume of hot low-density gas with properties similar to those of the observed coronal gas. (31 refs).

  13. Dual chemotaxis signalling regulates Dictyostelium development: intercellular cyclic AMP pulses and intracellular F-actin disassembly waves induce each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Michael G; Grutsch, James F

    2008-10-01

    Aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae periodically emit and relay cAMP, which regulates their chemotaxis and morphogenesis into a multicellular, differentiated organism. Cyclic AMP also stimulates F-actin assembly and chemotactic pseudopodium extension. We used actin-GFP expression to visualise for the first time intracellular F-actin assembly as a spatio-temporal indicator of cell reactions to cAMP, and thus the kinematics of cell communication, in aggregating streams. Every natural cAMP signal pulse induces an autowave of F-actin disassembly, which propagates from each cell's leading end to its trailing end at a linear rate, much slower than the calculated and measured velocities of cAMP diffusion in aggregating Dictyostelium. A sequence of transient reactions follows behind the wave, including anterior F-actin assembly, chemotactic pseudopodium extension and cell advance at the cell front and, at the back, F-actin assembly, extension of a small retrograde pseudopodium (forcing a brief cell retreat) and chemotactic stimulation of the following cell, yielding a 20s cAMP relay delay. These dynamics indicate that stream cell behaviour is mediated by a dual signalling system: a short-range cAMP pulse directed from one cell tail to an immediately following cell front and a slower, long-range wave of intracellular F-actin disassembly, each inducing the other.

  14. Shear stress-mediated changes in the expression of complement regulatory protein CD59 on human endothelial progenitor cells by ECM-integrinαVβ3-F-actin pathway in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Bu, Hongnan; Liu, Na; Li, Hong; Guan, Xiumei; Yan, Hong; Wang, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hua; Ding, Yuzhen; Cheng, Min

    2017-09-21

    Membrane regulatory proteins, such as CD46, CD55, and CD59, prevent excess complement activation and to protect cells from damage. Previous investigations confirmed that shear stress in the physiological range was more favorable for endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to repair injured vascular endothelial cells and operates mainly in atheroprotective actions. However, detailed events that contribute to shear stress-induced protection in EPCs, particularly the mechanisms of signal transduction, remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed shear stress-mediated changes in the expression of complement regulatory proteins CD46, CD55, and CD59 on human EPCs and focused on the mechanical transmission mechanism in transformed cells in response to the ECM-F-actin pathway in vitro. Shear stress was observed to promote the expression of complement regulatory protein CD59, but not CD46 or CD55, on EPCs. In addition, the shear stress-induced CD59 expression was confirmed to be associated with the ECM components and was alleviated in EPCs pretreated with GRGDSP, which inhibits ECM components-integrin interaction. Furthermore, shear stress also promotes the rearrangement and polymerization of F-actin. However, shear stress-induced CD59 expression was reduced when the F-actin stress fiber formation process was delayed by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (GRGDSP) or destroyed by cytochalasin D (Cyto D), while Jasplakinolide (JAS) reversed the expression of CD59 through promotion of F-actin polymerization and its stabilizing capacities. Our results indicates that shear stress is an important mediator in EPC expression of CD59 regulated by the ECM-F-actin pathway, which is a key factor in preventing membrane attack complex (MAC) -mediated cell autolysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Ring species as demonstrations of the continuum of species formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Ricardo José Do Nascimento; Wake, David B.

    2015-01-01

    In the mid-20th century, Ernst Mayr (1942) and Theodosius Dobzhansky (1958) championed the significance of 'circular overlaps' or 'ring species' as the perfect demonstration of the gradual nature of species formation. As an ancestral species expands its range, wrapping around a geographic barrier...... resulted in restrictive gene flow relative to that observed around the ring, their results suggest that circular overlaps might be more common in nature than currently recognized in the literature. Most importantly, this work shows that the continuum of species formation that Mayr and Dobzhansky praised...

  16. An atomic model of the tropomyosin cable on F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-08-05

    Tropomyosin regulates a wide variety of actin filament functions and is best known for the role that it plays together with troponin in controlling muscle activity. For effective performance on actin filaments, adjacent 42-nm-long tropomyosin molecules are joined together by a 9- to 10-residue head-to-tail overlapping domain to form a continuous cable that wraps around the F-actin helix. Yet, despite the apparent simplicity of tropomyosin's coiled-coil structure and its well-known periodic association with successive actin subunits along F-actin, the structure of the tropomyosin cable on actin is uncertain. This is because the conformation of the overlap region that joins neighboring molecules is poorly understood, thus leaving a significant gap in our understanding of thin-filament structure and regulation. However, recent molecular-dynamics simulations of overlap segments defined their overall shape and provided unique and sufficient cues to model the whole actin-tropomyosin filament assembly in atomic detail. In this study, we show that these MD structures merge seamlessly onto the ends of tropomyosin coiled-coils. Adjacent tropomyosin molecules can then be joined together to provide a comprehensive model of the tropomyosin cable running continuously on F-actin. The resulting complete model presented here describes for the first time (to our knowledge) an atomic-level structure of αα-striated muscle tropomyosin bound to an actin filament that includes the critical overlap domain. Thus, the model provides a structural correlate to evaluate thin-filament mechanics, self-assembly mechanisms, and the effect of disease-causing mutations.

  17. Microstructural model for cyclic hardening in F-actin networks crosslinked by α-actinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Menéndez, Horacio; Rodríguez, José Félix

    2016-06-01

    The rheology of F-actin networks has attracted a great attention during the last years. In order to gain a complete understanding of the rheological properties of these novel materials, it is necessary the study in a large deformations regime to alter their internal structure. In this sense, Schmoller et al. (2010) showed that the reconstituted networks of F-actin crosslinked with α-actinin unexpectedly harden when they are subjected to a cyclical shear. This observation contradicts the expected Mullins effect observed in most soft materials, such as rubber and living tissues, where a pronounced softening is observed when they are cyclically deformed. We think that the key to understand this stunning effect is the gelation process. To define it, the most relevant constituents are the chemical crosslinks - α-actinin -, the physical crosslinks - introduced by the entanglement of the semiflexible network - and the interaction between them. As a consequence of this interaction, a pre-stressed network emerges and introduces a feedback effect, where the pre-stress also regulates the adhesion energy of the α-actinin, setting the structure in a metastable reference configuration. Therefore, the external loads and the evolvement of the trapped stress drive the microstructural changes during the cyclic loading protocol. In this work, we propose a micromechanical model into the framework of nonlinear continuum mechanics. The mechanics of the F-actin filaments is modelled using the wormlike chain model for semiflexible filaments and the gelation process is modelled as mesoscale dynamics for the α-actinin and physical crosslink. The model has been validated with reported experimental results.

  18. F-actin-like filaments formed by plasmid segregation protein ParM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Ent, Fusinita; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Amos, Linda A.;

    2002-01-01

    It was the general belief that DNA partitioning in prokaryotes is independent of a cytoskeletal structure, which in eukaryotic cells is indispensable for DNA segregation. Recently, however, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed highly dynamic, filamentous structures along the longitudinal axis...... of Escherichia coli formed by ParM, a plasmid-encoded protein required for accurate segregation of low-copy-number plasmid R1. We show here that ParM polymerizes into double helical protofilaments with a longitudinal repeat similar to filamentous actin (F-actin) and MreB filaments that maintain the cell shape...

  19. The Luminous Starburst Ring in NGC 7771 Sequential Star Formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; Haynes, M P; Neff, S G; Smith, Denise A.; Herter, Terry; Haynes, Martha P.; Neff, Susan G.

    1999-01-01

    Only two of the twenty highly luminous starburst galaxies analyzed by Smith et al. exhibit circumnuclear rings of star formation. These galaxies provide a link between 10^11 L_sun systems and classical, less-luminous ringed systems. We report the discovery of a near-infrared counterpart to the nuclear ring of radio emission in NGC 7771. A displacement between the ~10 radio bright clumps and the ~10 near-infrared bright clumps indicates the presence of multiple generations of star formation. The estimated thermal emission from each radio source is equivalent to that of ~35000 O6 stars. Each near-infrared bright knot contains ~5000 red supergiants, on average. The stellar mass of each knot is estimated to be ~10^7 M_sun. The implied time-averaged star formation rate is system and other ringed and non-ringed starbursts. Morphological differences between NGC 7771 and the starburst + Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 suggest that NGC 7771 may not be old enough to fuel an AGN, or may not be capable of fueling an AGN. Alter...

  20. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G;

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another...... patient, who also exhibited Down syndrome, showed evidence of a third mechanism of ring formation. The likely initial event was breakage and reunion of the short and long arms, resulting in a small r(21), followed by a sister-chromatid exchange resulting in a double-sized and symmetrically dicentric r(21...

  1. Negative plant soil feedback explaining ring formation in clonal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartenì, Fabrizio; Marasco, Addolorata; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Rietkerk, Max; Giannino, Francesco

    2012-11-21

    Ring shaped patches of clonal plants have been reported in different environments, but the mechanisms underlying such pattern formation are still poorly explained. Water depletion in the inner tussocks zone has been proposed as a possible cause, although ring patterns have been also observed in ecosystems without limiting water conditions. In this work, a spatially explicit model is presented in order to investigate the role of negative plant-soil feedback as an additional explanation for ring formation. The model describes the dynamics of the plant biomass in the presence of toxicity produced by the decomposition of accumulated litter in the soil. Our model qualitatively reproduces the emergence of ring patterns of a single clonal plant species during colonisation of a bare substrate. The model admits two homogeneous stationary solutions representing bare soil and uniform vegetation cover which depend only on the ratio between the biomass death and growth rates. Moreover, differently from other plant spatial patterns models, but in agreement with real field observations of vegetation dynamics, we demonstrated that the pattern dynamics always lead to spatially homogeneous vegetation covers without creation of stable Turing patterns. Analytical results show that ring formation is a function of two main components, the plant specific susceptibility to toxic compounds released in the soil by the accumulated litter and the decay rate of these same compounds, depending on environmental conditions. These components act at the same time and their respective intensities can give rise to the different ring structures observed in nature, ranging from slight reductions of biomass in patch centres, to the appearance of marked rings with bare inner zones, as well as the occurrence of ephemeral waves of plant cover. Our results highlight the potential role of plant-soil negative feedback depending on decomposition processes for the development of transient vegetation patterns.

  2. Purification from Acanthamoeba castellanii of proteins that induce gelation and syneresis of F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruta, H; Korn, E D

    1977-01-10

    From Acanthamoeba castellanii, we have purified four proteins each of which alone causes a solution of F-actin to gel. The four active proteins have subunit molecular weights of about 23,000, 28,000, 32,000 and 38,000, respectively; the last three may be dimers in their native proteins. Together, these four proteins account for about 97% of the gelation activity of the whole extract; not more than about 3% of the total activity of the unfractionated extract can be due to a 250,000-dalton polypeptide. Another protein fraction, purified by agarose chromatography, induces shrinking (syneresis) of gels formed from F-actin and any of the gelation factors. That fraction contains a high Ca2+-, low (K+,EDTA)-ATPase and a major polypeptide of 170,000 daltons both of which bind to actin in the shrunken gel pellet. The active fraction does not contain the previously described Acanthamoeba myosin (Pollard, T. D., and Korn, E. D. (1973) J. Biol. Chem. 248, 4682-4690).

  3. Mechanosensitive channel activity and F-actin organization in cholesterol-depleted human leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morachevskaya, Elena; Sudarikova, Anastasiya; Negulyaev, Yuri

    2007-04-01

    This study focuses on the functional role of cellular cholesterol in the regulation of mechanosensitive cation channels activated by stretch in human leukaemia K562 cells. The patch-clamp method was employed to examine the effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), a synthetic cholesterol-sequestering agent, on stretch-activated single currents. We found that cholesterol-depleting treatment with MbetaCD resulted in a suppression of the activity of mechanosensitive channels without a change in the unitary conductance. The probability that the channel was open significantly decreased after treatment with MbetaCD. Fluorescent microscopy revealed F-actin reorganization, possibly involving actin assembly, after incubation of the cells with MbetaCD. We suggest that suppression of mechanosensitive channel activation in cholesterol-depleted leukaemia cells is due to F-actin rearrangement, presumably induced by lipid raft destruction. Our observations are consistent with the notion that stretch-activated cation channels in eukaryotic cells are regulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton complex rather than by tension developed purely in the lipid bilayer.

  4. Ring formation from a drying sessile colloidal droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ring formation from drying sessile colloidal droplets (∼1.0 mm in size containing microparticles of silicon or polystyrene was investigated with video microscopy. Results show that ring formation begins at the pinned contact line with the growth of an annular nucleus in a line by line way, which recedes inward albeit only slightly, followed by stacking of particles when the flow velocity becomes sufficiently large. The central height of the droplet decreases linearly with evaporation time, which implies that in the early stage, the number of particles arriving at contact line increases with time in a power law N∝t3/(1 + λ, where the parameter λ, according to Deegan's evaporation model, is related to the contact angle via λ=π−2θc2π−2θc. Experimental values of λ agree well with model calculation for small contact angles, but are relatively smaller in the case of large contact angles. ‘Amorphization’ mechanism for the deposit at different stages of evaporation is discussed. Marangoni flow in a droplet on heated substrate introduces a desorption path for particles along the liquid surface, which can partially resolve the ring. Residual particles floating on the liquid surface may leave behind a homogeneous monolayer coating inside the dried spot. A “jump” in the droplet surface area at later stage of evaporation seems inevitably to cause a depletion zone of particles next to the ring. These results may be helpful for the development of strategies towards suppression of coffee ring effect and/or obtaining homogeneous coatings from drying colloidal suspension.

  5. Actin-Capping Protein and the Hippo pathway regulate F-actin and tissue growth in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Beatriz García; Gaspar, Pedro; Brás-Pereira, Catarina; Jezowska, Barbara; Rebelo, Sofia Raquel; Janody, Florence

    2011-06-01

    The conserved Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key kinase cascade that controls tissue growth by regulating the nuclear import and activity of the transcription co-activator Yorkie. Here, we report that the actin-Capping Protein αβ heterodimer, which regulates actin polymerization, also functions to suppress inappropriate tissue growth by inhibiting Yorkie activity. Loss of Capping Protein activity results in abnormal accumulation of apical F-actin, reduced Hippo pathway activity and the ectopic expression of several Yorkie target genes that promote cell survival and proliferation. Reduction of two other actin-regulatory proteins, Cofilin and the cyclase-associated protein Capulet, cause abnormal F-actin accumulation, but only the loss of Capulet, like that of Capping Protein, induces ectopic Yorkie activity. Interestingly, F-actin also accumulates abnormally when Hippo pathway activity is reduced or abolished, independently of Yorkie activity, whereas overexpression of the Hippo pathway component expanded can partially reverse the abnormal accumulation of F-actin in cells depleted for Capping Protein. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel interplay between Hippo pathway activity and actin filament dynamics that is essential for normal growth control.

  6. The circular F-actin bundles provide a track for turnaround and bidirectional movement of mitochondria in Arabidopsis root hair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available The movement of organelles in root hairs primarily occurs along the actin cytoskeleton. Circulation and "reverse fountain" cytoplasmic streaming constitute the typical forms by which most organelles (such as mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus in plant root hair cells engage in bidirectional movement. However, there remains a lack of in-depth research regarding the relationship between the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton and turnaround organelle movement in plant root hair cells.In this paper, Arabidopsis seedlings that had been stably transformed with a GFP-ABD2-GFP (green fluorescent protein-actin-binding domain 2-green fluorescent protein construct were utilized to study the distribution of bundles of filamentous (F-actin and the directed motion of mitochondria along these bundles in root hairs. Observations with a confocal laser scanning microscope revealed that there were widespread circular F-actin bundles in the epidermal cells and root hairs of Arabidopsis roots. In root hairs, these circular bundles primarily start at the sub-apical region, which is the location where the turnaround movement of organelles occurs. MitoTracker probes were used to label mitochondria, and the dynamic observation of root hair cells with a confocal laser scanning microscope indicated that turnaround mitochondrial movement occurred along circular F-actin bundles.Relevant experimental results demonstrated that the circular F-actin bundles provide a track for the turnaround and bidirectional movement of mitochondria.

  7. Regulation of retinoschisin secretion in Weri-Rb1 cells by the F-actin and microtubule cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko Kitamura

    Full Text Available Retinoschisin is encoded by the gene responsible for X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS, an early onset macular degeneration that results in a splitting of the inner layers of the retina and severe loss in vision. Retinoschisin is predominantly expressed and secreted from photoreceptor cells as a homo-oligomer protein; it then associates with the surface of retinal cells and maintains the retina cellular architecture. Many missense mutations in the XLRS1 gene are known to cause intracellular retention of retinoschisin, indicating that the secretion process of the protein is a critical step for its normal function in the retina. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoschisin's secretion remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the secretion of retinoschisin by treating Weri-Rb1 cells, which are known to secrete retinoschisin, with cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide, Y-27632, and dibutyryl cGMP. Our results show that cytochalasin D and jasplakinolide inhibit retinoschisin secretion, whereas Y-27632 and dibutyryl cGMP enhance secretion causing F-actin alterations. We also demonstrate that high concentrations of taxol, which hyperpolymerizes microtubules, inhibit retinoschisin secretion. Our data suggest that retinoschisin secretion is regulated by the F-actin cytoskeleton, that cGMP or inhibition of ROCK alters F-actin structure enhancing the secretion, and that the microtubule cytoskeleton is also involved in this process.

  8. Clinical and biologic importance of F-actin autoantibodies in HCV monoinfected and HCV-HIV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudacko, Rachel M; Alvarez, Gustavo A; Talal, Andrew H; Jacobson, Ira; Wan, David W; Zhou, Xi K; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum filamentous (F)-actin antibody titers and severity of hepatitis present in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. Liver biopsy samples from 18 HCV monoinfected and 20 HCV-HIV coinfected patients were graded with respect to the degree of hepatitis activity and intensity of plasma cell infiltration using MUM-1 and CD138 immunostains. Of the 38 HCV-infected patients, 6 (16%) had F-actin antibody titers in excess of 30 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units. We found a positive trend between serum F-actin antibody levels and the mean number of plasma cells present in the portal tracts of patients with HCV infection (r = 0.31; P = .06) and a significant association between these factors in HCV-HIV coinfected patients (r = 0.64; P = .002). Our data suggest that elevated serum F-actin antibody titers are commonly encountered in HCV-infected patients and may reflect more active inflammation in liver biopsy samples, similar to autoimmune hepatitis.

  9. Comparative genome analysis of cortactin and HSI : the significance of the F-actin binding repeat domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, AGSH; Schuuring-Scholtes, E; Seggelen, VV; Kluin, PM; Schuuring, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: In human carcinomas, overexpression of cortactin correlates with poor prognosis. Cortactin is an F-actin-binding protein involved in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell migration by promoting actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 mediated actin polymerization. It shares a high amino acid seque

  10. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion.

  11. Biological basis of tree-ring formation: a crash course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Barthélémy Karl Rathgeber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wood is of crucial importance for man and biosphere. In this mini review, we present the fundamental processes involved in tree-ring formation and intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity, along with the influences of the environmental factors. During wood formation, new xylem cells produced by the cambium are undergoing profound transformations, passing through successive differentiation stages, which enable them to perform their functions in trees. Xylem cell formation can be divided in five major phases: (1 the division of a cambial mother cell that creates a new cell; (2 the enlargement of this newly formed cell; (3 the deposition of its secondary wall; (4 the lignification of its cell wall; and finally, (5 its programmed cell death. In most regions of the world cambial activity follows a seasonal cycle. At the beginning of the growing season, when temperature increases, the cambium resumes activity, producing new xylem cells. These cells are disposed along radial files, and start their differentiation program according to their birth date, creating typical developmental strips in the forming xylem. The width of these strips smoothly changes along the growing season. Finally, when climatic conditions deteriorate (temperature or water availability in particular, cambial activity stops, soon followed by cell enlargement, and later on by secondary wall deposition. Without a clear understanding of the xylem formation process, it is not possible to comprehend how annual growth rings and typical wood structures are formed, recording seasonal variations of the environment as well as extreme climatic events.

  12. Dynamic Arc SUMOylation and Selective Interaction with F-Actin-Binding Protein Drebrin A in LTP Consolidation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajeevkumar R.; Patil, Sudarshan; Tiron, Adrian; Kanhema, Tambudzai; Panja, Debabrata; Schiro, Lars; Parobczak, Kamil; Wilczynski, Grzegorz; Bramham, Clive R.

    2017-01-01

    Activity-regulatedcytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) protein is implicated as a master regulator of long-term forms of synaptic plasticity and memory formation, but the mechanisms controlling Arc protein function are little known. Post-translation modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins has emerged as a major mechanism for regulating protein-protein interactions and function. We first show in cell lines that ectopically expressed Arc undergoes mono-SUMOylation. The covalent addition of a single SUMO1 protein was confirmed by in vitro SUMOylation of immunoprecipitated Arc. To explore regulation of endogenous Arc during synaptic plasticity, we induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus of live anesthetized rats. Using coimmunoprecipitation of native proteins, we show that Arc synthesized during the maintenance phase of LTP undergoes dynamic mono-SUMO1-ylation. Levels of unmodified Arc increase in multiple subcellular fractions (cytosol, membrane, nuclear and cytoskeletal), whereas enhanced Arc SUMOylation was specific to the synaptoneurosomal and the cytoskeletal fractions. Dentate gyrus LTP consolidation requires a period of sustained Arc synthesis driven by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Local infusion of the BDNF scavenger, TrkB-Fc, during LTP maintenance resulted in rapid reversion of LTP, inhibition of Arc synthesis and loss of enhanced Arc SUMO1ylation. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that SUMO1-ylated Arc forms a complex with the F-actin-binding protein drebrin A, a major regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics in dendritic spines. Although Arc also interacted with dynamin 2, calcium/calmodulindependentprotein kinase II-beta (CaMKIIβ), and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), these complexes lacked SUMOylated Arc. The results support a model in which newly synthesized Arc is SUMOylated and targeted for actin cytoskeletal regulation during in vivo LTP. PMID:28553222

  13. Influence of botulinum C2 toxin on F-actin and N-formyl peptide receptor dynamics in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Stimulation of human neutrophils with the chemotactic N-formyl peptide causes production of oxygen radicals and conversion of monomeric actin (G-actin) to polymeric actin (F-actin). The effects of the binary botulinum C2 toxin on the amount of F-actin and on neutrophil cell responses were studied. Two different methods for analyzing the actin response were used in formyl peptide-stimulated cells: staining of F- actin with rhodamine-phalloidin and a transient right angle light scatter. Preincubation of neutrophils with 400 ng/ml component I and 1,600 ng/ml component II of botulinum C2 toxin for 30 min almost completely inhibited the formyl peptide-stimulated polymerization of G- actin and at the same time decreased the amount of F-actin in unstimulated neutrophils by an average of approximately 30%. Botulinum C2 toxin preincubation for 60 min destroyed approximately 75% of the F- actin in unstimulated neutrophils. Right angle light scatter analysis showed that control neutrophils exhibited the transient response characteristic of actin polymerization; however, after botulinum C2 toxin treatment, degranulation was detected. Single components of the binary botulinum C2 toxin were without effect on the actin polymerization response. Fluorescence flow cytometry and fluorospectrometric binding studies showed little alteration in N- formyl peptide binding or dissociation dynamics in the toxin-treated cells. However, endocytosis of the fluorescent N-formyl peptide ligand- receptor complex was slower but still possible in degranulating neutrophils treated with botulinum C2 toxin for 60 min. The half-time of endocytosis, estimated from initial rates, was 4 and 8 min in control and botulinum C2 toxin-treated neutrophils, respectively. PMID:2768337

  14. Ring formation by tidal disruption of a passing body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Charnoz, Sébastien; Genda, Hidenori; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    The origin of rings around giant planets remains elusive. Here we investigate the tidal disruption of a passing object and the subsequent formation of planetary rings. First, we perform SPH simulations of the tidal destruction of differentiated objects with the mass of M~1022kg that experience close encounters with Saturn or Uranus. We find that about 0.1-10% of the mass of the passing body is gravitationally captured around the planet. However, these fragments are initially big chunks and have highly eccentric orbits around the planet. Therefore, in order to see their long-term evolution, we perform N-body simulations including the planet's oblateness up to J4 starting with data obtained from the SPH simulations. Our N-body simulations show that the chunks are tidally destructed during their next several orbits and become collections of smaller particles. Their individual orbits then start to precess incoherently around the planet's equator, which enhances their encounter velocities on longer-term evolution, resulting in more destructive impacts. These collisions would damp their eccentricities resulting in a progressive collapse of the debris cloud into a thin equatorial and low-eccentricity ring.

  15. Drosophila Imp iCLIP identifies an RNA assemblage coordinating F-actin formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi Theil; Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær; Adolph, Sidsel Kramshøj;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-transcriptional RNA regulons ensure co-ordinated expression of monocistronic mRNAs encoding functionally related proteins. In this study, we employ a combination of RIP-seq and short- and long-wave individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP...

  16. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation inside the coffee ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Ding; Wang, Yuren

    2017-04-01

    The rearrangement of particles in the final stage of droplet evaporation has been investigated by utilizing differential interference contrast microscopy and the formation mechanism of a network pattern inside a coffee ring has been revealed. A tailored substrate with a circular hydrophilic domain is prepared to obtain thin liquid film containing monolayer particles. Real-time bottom-view images show that the evolution of a dry patch could be divided into three stages: rupture initiation, dry patch expansion, and drying of the residual liquid. A growing number of dry patches will repeat these stages to form the network patterns inside the ringlike stain. It can be shown that the suction effect promotes the rupture of the liquid film and the formation of the dry patch. The particle-assembling process is totally controlled by the liquid film dewetting and dominated by the surface tension of the liquid film, which eventually determine the ultimate deposition patterns.

  17. Rheological characterization of the bundling transition in F-actin solutions induced by methylcellulose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Köhler

    Full Text Available In many in vitro experiments Brownian motion hampers quantitative data analysis. Therefore, additives are widely used to increase the solvent viscosity. For this purpose, methylcellulose (MC has been proven highly effective as already small concentrations can significantly slow down diffusive processes. Beside this advantage, it has already been reported that high MC concentrations can alter the microstructure of polymer solutions such as filamentous actin. However, it remains to be shown to what extent the mechanical properties of a composite actin/MC gel depend on the MC concentration. In particular, significant alterations might occur even if the microstructure seems unaffected. Indeed, we find that the viscoelastic response of entangled F-actin solutions depends sensitively on the amount of MC added. At concentrations higher than 0.2% (w/v MC, actin filaments are reorganized into bundles which drastically changes the viscoelastic response. At small MC concentrations the impact of MC is more subtle: the two constituents, actin and MC, contribute in an additive way to the mechanical response of the composite material. As a consequence, the effect of methylcellulose on actin solutions has to be considered very carefully when MC is used in biochemical experiments.

  18. The structural dynamics of α-tropomyosin on F-actin shape the overlap complex between adjacent tropomyosin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, William; Li, Xiaochuan (Edward); Orzechowski, Marek; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin, localized on actin filaments in virtually all eukaryotic cells, serves as a gatekeeper regulating access of the motor protein myosin and other actin-binding proteins onto the thin filament surface. Tropomyosin's modular pseudo-repeating pattern of approximately 39 amino acid residues is designed to allow binding of the coiled-coil to successive actin subunits along thin filaments. Even though different tropomyosin isoforms contain varying numbers of repeat modules, the pseudo-repeat length, in all cases, matches that of a single actin subunit. Thus, the seven pseudo-repeats of 42 nm long muscle tropomyosin bind to seven successive actin subunits along thin filaments, while simultaneously bending into a super-helical conformation that is preshaped to the actin filament helix. In order to form a continuous cable on thin filaments that is free of gaps, adjacent tropomyosin molecules polymerize head-to-tail by means of a short (∼9 residue) overlap. Several laboratories have engineered peptides to mimic the N- and C-terminal tropomyosin association and to characterize the overlap structure. All overlapping domains examined show a compact N-terminal coiled-coil inserting into a partially opened C-terminal partner, where the opposing coiled-coils at the overlap junction face each other at up to ∼90° twist angles. Here, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine constraints on the formation of the tropomyosin overlap complex and to assess the amount of twisting exhibited by full-length tropomyosin when bound to actin. With the exception of the last 20 to 40 C- and N-terminal residues, we find that the average tropomyosin structure closely resembles a “canonical” model proposed in the classic work of McLachlan and Stewart, displaying perfectly symmetrical supercoil geometry matching the F-actin helix with an integral number of coiled-coil turns, a coiled-coil helical pitch of 137 Å, a superhelical pitch of 770

  19. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  20. Comparative genome analysis of cortactin and HS1: the significance of the F-actin binding repeat domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seggelen Vera

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In human carcinomas, overexpression of cortactin correlates with poor prognosis. Cortactin is an F-actin-binding protein involved in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell migration by promoting actin-related protein (Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization. It shares a high amino acid sequence and structural similarity to hematopoietic lineage cell-specific protein 1 (HS1 although their functions differ considerable. In this manuscript we describe the genomic organization of these two genes in a variety of species by a combination of cloning and database searches. Based on our analysis, we predict the genesis of the actin-binding repeat domain during evolution. Results Cortactin homologues exist in sponges, worms, shrimps, insects, urochordates, fishes, amphibians, birds and mammalians, whereas HS1 exists in vertebrates only, suggesting that both genes have been derived from an ancestor cortactin gene by duplication. In agreement with this, comparative genome analysis revealed very similar exon-intron structures and sequence homologies, especially over the regions that encode the characteristic highly conserved F-actin-binding repeat domain. Cortactin splice variants affecting this F-actin-binding domain were identified not only in mammalians, but also in amphibians, fishes and birds. In mammalians, cortactin is ubiquitously expressed except in hematopoietic cells, whereas HS1 is mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells. In accordance with their distinct tissue specificity, the putative promoter region of cortactin is different from HS1. Conclusions Comparative analysis of the genomic organization and amino acid sequences of cortactin and HS1 provides inside into their origin and evolution. Our analysis shows that both genes originated from a gene duplication event and subsequently HS1 lost two repeats, whereas cortactin gained one repeat. Our analysis genetically underscores the significance of the F-actin binding domain in

  1. Tidal disruption of satellites and formation of narrow rings

    CERN Document Server

    Leinhardt, Zoe M; Latter, Henrik N; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the formation of narrow planetary rings such as those found around Uranus and Saturn through the tidal disruption of a weak, gravitationally bound satellite that migrates within its Roche limit. Using $N$-body simulations, we study the behaviour of rubble piles placed on circular orbits at different distances from a central planet. We consider both homogeneous satellites and differentiated bodies containing a denser core. We show that the Roche limit for a rubble pile is closer to the planet than for a fluid body of the same mean density. The Roche limit for a differentiated body is also closer to the planet than for a homogeneous satellite of the same mean density. Within its Roche limit, a homogeneous satellite totally disrupts and forms a narrow ring. The initial stages of the disruption are similar to the evolution of a viscous fluid ellipsoid, which can be computed semi-analytically. On the other hand, when a differentiated satellite is just within the Roche limit only the ma...

  2. F-actin and beta-tubulin localization in the myxospore stinging apparatus of Myxobolus pseudodispar Gorbunova, 1936 (Myxozoa, Myxosporea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskaya, A V; Raikova, O I

    2004-01-01

    To understand the discharge mechanism of Myxozoan polar capsule (cnida) it is necessary to verify the role of major cytoskeletal proteins in the process. With this aim F-actin and beta-tubulin localization in spores of myxosporean developmental phase (in myxospores) of Myxobolus pseudodispar Gorbunova, 1936 has been studied under confocal scanning laser microscope using phalloidin fluorescent staining of F-actin and indirect anti-beta-tubulin immunostaining. F-actin has been detected in walls of the stinging tube invaginated into the polar capsule of myxospore. The fact suggests the contractile proteins involvement in the process of myxozoan polar capsule extrusion. In addition, the cytoplasm of amoeboid sporoplasm inside the spore cavity is stained by phalloidin. A polar cap with strong beta-tubulin immunoreacton is observed at the front pole of fully mature myxospore above the outlets of the polar capsule discharge channels. The role of the beta-tubulin cap is supposed to be similar to that of the cnidarian cnidocil made of microtubules. The weaker beta-tubulin immunoreactivity has been found in stinging tubes, in polar capsule walls as well as in the suture line of spore walls and in the cytoplasm of amoeboid sporoplasm. The involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the process of polar capsule extrusion is discussed. A hypothesis on the myxozoan polar capsule discharge mechanism is suggested. The mechanism of myxozoan cnida discharge is compared with that of cnidaria.

  3. Enterocyte loss of polarity and gut wound healing rely upon the F-actin-severing function of villin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelmann, Florent; Chamaillard, Mathias; El-Marjou, Fatima; Simon, Anthony; Netter, Jeanne; Vignjevic, Danijela; Nichols, Buford L; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Grandjean, Teddy; Louvard, Daniel; Revenu, Céline; Robine, Sylvie

    2013-04-09

    Efficient wound healing is required to maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier because of its constant exposure to a large variety of environmental stresses. This process implies a partial cell depolarization and the acquisition of a motile phenotype that involves rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we address how polarized enterocytes harboring actin-rich apical microvilli undergo extensive cell remodeling to drive injury repair. Using live imaging technologies, we demonstrate that enterocytes in vitro and in vivo rapidly depolarize their microvilli at the wound edge. Through its F-actin-severing activity, the microvillar actin-binding protein villin drives both apical microvilli disassembly in vitro and in vivo and promotes lamellipodial extension. Photoactivation experiments indicate that microvillar actin is mobilized at the lamellipodium, allowing optimal migration. Finally, efficient repair of colonic mechanical injuries requires villin severing of F-actin, emphasizing the importance of villin function in intestinal homeostasis. Thus, villin severs F-actin to ensure microvillus depolarization and enterocyte remodeling upon injury. This work highlights the importance of specialized apical pole disassembly for the repolarization of epithelial cells initiating migration.

  4. Mechanisms of vegetation-ring formation in water-limited systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, Efrat; Yizhaq, Hezi; Shachak, Moshe; Meron, Ehud

    2011-03-21

    A common patch form in dryland landscapes is the vegetation ring. Vegetation patch formation has recently been attributed to self-organization processes that act to increase the availability of water to vegetation patches under conditions of water scarcity. The view of ring formation as a water-limited process, however, has remained largely unexplored. Using laboratory experiments and model studies we identify two distinct mechanisms of ring formation. The first mechanism pertains to conditions of high infiltration contrast between vegetated and bare soil, under which overland water flow is intercepted at the patch periphery. The decreasing amount of water that the patch core receives as the patch expands, leads to central dieback and ring formation. The second mechanism pertains to plants with large lateral root zones, and involves central dieback and ring formation due to increasing water uptake by the newly recruited individuals at the patch periphery. In general the two mechanisms act in concert, but the relative importance of each mechanism depends on environmental conditions. We found that strong seasonal rainfall variability favors ring formation by the overland-flow mechanism, while a uniform rainfall regime favors ring formation by the water-uptake mechanism. Our results explain the formation of rings by fast-growing species with confined root zones in a dry-Mediterranean climate, such as Poa bulbosa. They also explain the formation of rings by slowly growing species with highly extended root zones, such as Larrea tridentata (Creosotebush).

  5. Effect of Leflunomide on the Abnormal Expression of Lipid Rafts and F-Actin in B Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Fu Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purposes. To investigate the possible changes in B cell subsets and in B cell expression patterns of lipid rafts (LRs and F-actin in patients with SLE and whether leflunomide treatment may have effect on these changes. Methods. The B cell subsets and LRs expression were determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, and F-actin expression was examined by confocal microscopy. Results. CD27+IgD+ B cell subsets were significantly decreased while CD38+CD95+ B cell subsets increased in SLE patients. The LRs levels of B cells were remarkably increased and positively correlated with SLEDAI and anti-dsDNA titer in SLE patients. The expression level of LRs was significantly higher in CD38+ B cells than CD38− B cells and negatively correlated with C3 levels. The increased expression of LRs was associated with reduced expression of F-actin in the B cells from active SLE patients. Furthermore, in vitro treatment of the cells with A771726 reduced the expression level of LRs, attenuated the overaggregation of LRs, and normalized the distribution of F-actin. Conclusions. There were abnormalities in B cell subsets and LRs and F-actin expression of B cell from SLE patients. Modulation of B cell expression of LRs and F-actin by LEF could be a potential therapeutic target for SLE.

  6. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  7. The Schrodinger Basin and Peak-Ring Formation on the Moon: Implications for the Earth's Chicxulub Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, D. A.; Collins, G. S.; Kramer, G. Y.; Potter, R. W. K.; Chandnani, M.

    2016-08-01

    Geological mapping of the Moon's Schrodinger peak ring is integrated with numerical modeling to evaluate the process of peak ring formation. Implications for the Chicxulub crater on Earth, whose peak ring is currently being drilled, are discussed.

  8. A model for the formation of spokes in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence is mounting which implies that the generation, evolution, and motion of spokes require a dense plasma near the Saturn ring plane. It is presently suggested that spokes consist of charged, micron-sized dust particles which are elevated from the rings by radially moving, dense plasma columns due to meteor impacts on the ring. Electrostatic wall sheaths at the ring, and ring charging by electric fields sufficiently strong to overcome the gravitational force on small dust particles, arise from the dense plasma, which also increases the probability of dust particle excess electronic charge. The radial motion of the plasma column is due to an azimuthal polarization electric field due to the relative motion between the corotating plasma and the negatively charged dust particles moving at Keplerian speeds.

  9. G protein-coupled receptors engage the mammalian Hippo pathway through F-actin: F-Actin, assembled in response to Galpha12/13 induced RhoA-GTP, promotes dephosphorylation and activation of the YAP oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regué, Laura; Mou, Fan; Avruch, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    The Hippo pathway, a cascade of protein kinases that inhibits the oncogenic transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ, was discovered in Drosophila as a major determinant of organ size in development. Known modes of regulation involve surface proteins that mediate cell-cell contact or determine epithelial cell polarity which, in a tissue-specific manner, use intracellular complexes containing FERM domain and actin-binding proteins to modulate the kinase activities or directly sequester YAP. Unexpectedly, recent work demonstrates that GPCRs, especially those signaling through Galpha12/13 such as the protease activated receptor PAR1, cause potent YAP dephosphorylation and activation. This response requires active RhoA GTPase and increased assembly of filamentous (F-)actin. Morever, cell architectures that promote F-actin assembly per se also activate YAP by kinase-dependent and independent mechanisms. These findings unveil the ability of GPCRs to activate the YAP oncogene through a newly recognized signaling function of the actin cytoskeleton, likely to be especially important for normal and cancerous stem cells.

  10. Binding of the N-terminal fragment C0-C2 of cardiac MyBP-C to cardiac F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Robert W; Shaffer, Justin F; Harris, Samantha P

    2011-04-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), a major accessory protein of cardiac thick filaments, is thought to play a key role in the regulation of myocardial contraction. Although current models for the function of the protein focus on its binding to myosin S2, other evidence suggests that it may also bind to F-actin. We have previously shown that the N-terminal fragment C0-C2 of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) bundles actin, providing evidence for interaction of cMyBP-C and actin. In this paper we directly examined the interaction between C0-C2 and F-actin at physiological ionic strength and pH by negative staining and electron microscopy. We incubated C0-C2 (5-30μM, in a buffer containing in mM: 180 KCl, 1 MgCl(2), 1 EDTA, 1 DTT, 20 imidazole, at pH 7.4) with F-actin (5μM) for 30min and examined negatively-stained samples of the solution by electron microscopy (EM). Examination of EM images revealed that C0-C2 bound to F-actin to form long helically-ordered complexes. Fourier transforms indicated that C0-C2 binds with the helical periodicity of actin with strong 1st and 6th layer lines. The results provide direct evidence that the N-terminus of cMyBP-C can bind to F-actin in a periodic complex. This interaction of cMyBP-C with F-actin supports the possibility that binding of cMyBP-C to F-actin may play a role in the regulation of cardiac contraction.

  11. Cytotoxic effects of incense particles in relation to oxidative stress, the cell cycle and F-actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim; Chen, Tzu-Tao; BéruBé, Kelly

    2013-07-18

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that combustion-derived smoke, such as that produced during incense burning, is a deleterious air pollutant. It is capable of initiating oxidative stress and mutation; however, the related apoptotic processes remain unclear. In order to elucidate the biological mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced respiratory toxicology, alveolar epithelial A549 cells were exposed to incense particulate matter (PM), with and without antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). The cross-linking associations between oxidative capacity, cell cycle events, actin cytoskeletal dynamics and intracellular calcium signals were investigated. An incense PM suspension caused significant oxidative stress in A549 cells, as shown by inhibition of the cell cycle at G1 and G2/M check-points, and the induction of apoptosis at Sub-G1. At the same time, alterations in the F-actin filamentous assemblies were observed. The levels of intracellular Ca(2+) were increased after incense PM exposure. Antioxidant NAC treatment revealed that oxidative stress and F-actin remodelling was significantly mitigated. This suggests that ROS accumulation could alter cell cycle regulation and anomalous remodelling of the cortical cytoskeleton that allowed impaired cells to enter into apoptosis. This study has elucidated the integral patho-physiological interactions of incense PM and the potential mechanisms for the development of ROS-driven respiratory impairment.

  12. Detecting the formation of single-walled carbon nanotube rings by photoabsorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Akira; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Koji

    2016-08-01

    Photoabsorption spectroscopy was conducted on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) during the formation of ring structures. The absorption bands observed before starting the formation gradually shifted while broadening in the middle. When they finally disappeared, it was found, via atomic force microscopy observations, that almost all SWNTs were transformed into rings. The spectral changes were assumed to be due to the changes in the electronic states of SWNTs. This idea was supported by the results of an investigation using a scanning tunneling microscope. It could be said that photoabsorption spectroscopy is useful for detecting ring formation in situ.

  13. False ring formation in eastern hemlock branches: impacts of hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda-King, Liahna; Radville, Laura; Preisser, Evan L

    2012-06-01

    Herbivores can alter plant physiology through the induction of abnormal wood formation. Feeding by some insects induces the formation of false rings, a band of thick-walled latewood cells within the earlywood portion of the tree ring that reduces water transport. Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) and elongate hemlock scale (Fiorinia externa Ferris) are invasive insects that both feed on eastern hemlock [Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière]. Adelges tsugae has a greater effect on tree health than F. externa, but the mechanism underlying their differential effect is unknown. We explored the effects of these herbivores by assessing growth ring formation in branches of trees that had been experimentally infested for 4 yr with A. tsugae, F. externa, or neither insect. We measured false ring density, ring growth, and earlywood: latewood ratios in the two most recently deposited growth rings. Branches from A. tsugae-infested trees had 30% more false rings than branches from F. externa-infested trees and 50% more than branches from uninfested trees. In contrast, branches from F. externa-infested trees and control trees did not differ in false ring formation. Radial growth and earlywood: latewood ratios did not differ among treatments. Our results show that two invasive herbivores with piercing-sucking mouth parts have differing effects on false ring formation in eastern hemlock. These false rings may be the product of a systemic plant hypersensitive response to feeding by A. tsugae on hemlock stems. If false rings are responsible for or symptomatic of hemlock water stress, this may provide a potential explanation for the relatively large effect of A. tsugae infestations on tree health.

  14. Size segregated ring pattern formation in particle impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, J. R.; Fredericks, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Typical particle impactors consist of a nozzle that directs a particle laden flow onto a plate, and is designed to capture particles greater than a cutoff diameter. Connected in series as a cascade, with each impactor designed to have a progressively smaller cutoff diameter, the particle size distribution can be measured. Typical impactors utilize a nozzle-to-plate distance S that is on the order of one nozzle diameter W, S / W 1 , and give a nominally Gaussian particle deposition pattern on the plate. We explored conditions where S / W < < 1 and observed deposition patterns consisting of very fine rings. Moreover, we found that the ring diameter increased with decreasing particle diameter and the ring thickness increased with particle diameter. These results suggest a potential method for sizing particles by using the mature technology of impactors in a different way. Potential mechanisms for how these ring patterns are formed will be discussed. We note that prior studies have observed conditions where particle deposition patterns exhibited "halos". These halos appear less distinct than the rings we have observed, and it is unclear whether they are related.

  15. Protein phosphatase 1ß limits ring canal constriction during Drosophila germline cyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Bayat, Vafa; Bellen, Hugo J; Tan, Change

    2013-01-01

    Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw), a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT). This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well.

  16. Protein phosphatase 1ß limits ring canal constriction during Drosophila germline cyst formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw, a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT. This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well.

  17. A Numerical Simulation of Star Formation in Nuclear Rings of Barred-Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, W.

    2014-01-01

    We use grid-based hydrodynamic simulations to study star formation history in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We assume infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and unmagnetized gaseous disk. To investigate effects of spiral arm potential, we calculate both models with and without spiral. We find that star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is determined by the mass inflow rate to the ring rather than the total gas mass in the ring. In case of models without spiral arms, the SFR shows a strong primary burst at early time, and declines to small values after after that. The primary burst is caused by the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth. On the other hand, models with spiral arms show multiple star bursts at late time caused by additional gas inflow from outside bar region. When the SFR is low, ages of young star clusters exhibit a bipolar azimuthal gradient along the ring since star formation occurs near the contact points between dust lanes and the nuclear ring. When the SFR is large, there are no age gradient of star clusters since star formation sites are widely distributed throughout the whole ring region.

  18. The formation of the Cassini division in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1978-01-01

    An explanation for the size and location of the Cassini division in Saturn's rings is proposed. The explanation is based on the collective response of the particles in the ring to the resonant forcing by Mimas. An upper limit is calculated for the width of the gap that could be opened at a resonance. In addition, an estimate is obtained regarding the damping of the density waves by viscous and nonlinear effects. A picture is presented of the development of a gap. The results are compared with the observed properties of the divisions in Saturn's rings. The exact position of the inner edge of the Cassini division is difficult to predict, because the 2:1 resonance lies very near several weaker resonances (4:2 and 6:3 with Mimas, 4:1 with Tethys). However, the edge should lie near 17 seconds, and this is consistent with ground based observations.

  19. Multi-ring Aggregate Formation in Styrene Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何炳林; 王国昌; 叶彦春; 栗凤珍; 高传喜

    1994-01-01

    The photophysical properties of some cross-linked/linear styrene polymers are studied.Ithas been further demonstrated that the phenyl multi-ring aggregate forms not only in excited state instyrene/divinylbenzene cross-linked polymers hut also in ground state.Moreover,the similar multi-ring ag-gregate has also been observed in linear polystyrene with structural heterogeneity.These results are ex-plained in terms of "superdense structure" formed by chemical cross-linking and physical gelation,whichcharacterize the morphological heterogeneity in styrene polymers.

  20. Cholesterol modulates the volume-regulated anion current in Ehrlich-Lettre ascites cells via effects on Rho and F-actin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Hougaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Else K

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] in this pr......The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2...... in cellular cholesterol content increased cortical and stress fiber-associated F-actin content in swollen cells. Cholesterol depletion increased VRAC activation rate and maximal current after a modest (15%), but not after a severe (36%) reduction in extracellular osmolarity. The cholesterol depletion...

  1. Functional characterization of skeletal F-actin labeled on the NH2-terminal segment of residues 1-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, R; Chaussepied, P; Audemard, E; Kassab, R

    1989-05-15

    Rabbit skeletal alpha-actin was covalently labeled in the filamentous state by the fluorescent nucleophile, N-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (EDANS) in the presence of the carboxyl group activator 1-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC). The coupling reaction was continued until the incorporation of nearly 1 mol EDANS/mol actin. After limited proteolytic digestion of the labeled protein and chromatographic identification of the EDANS-peptides, about 80% of the attached fluorophore was found on the actin segment of residues 1-28, most probably within the N-terminal acidic region of residues 1-7. A minor labeling site was located on the segment that consists of residues 40-113. No label was incorporated into the COOH-terminal moiety consisting of residues 113-375. The isolated EDANS-G-actin undergoes polymerization in the presence of salts but at a rate significantly greater than unlabeled actin. The EDANS-F-actin could be complexed to skeletal chymotryptic myosin subfragment 1 (S-1) and to tropomyosin. The complex formed between EDANS-F-actin and S-1 could not be further crosslinked by EDC but the two proteins were readily joined by glutaraldehyde as observed for native actin-S-1, suggesting that the EDANS-substituted carboxyl site is also involved in the EDC crosslinking of native actin to S-1. Moreover, the EDANS labeling of F-actin resulted in a 20-fold increase in the Km of the actin-activated Mg2+.ATPase of S-1. Thus, this labeling, while it did not much affect the rigor actin-S-1 interaction, changes the actin binding to the S-1-nucleotide complexes significantly. The selective introduction of a variety of spectral probes, like EDANS, or other classes of fluorophores, on the N-terminal region of actin, through the reported carbodiimide coupling reaction, would provide several different derivatives valuable for assessing the functional role of the negatively charged N-terminus of actin during its interaction with myosin and other actin

  2. ElectronTransfer Induced Ring Opening of α-Epoxyketones: Spirodioxolane Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Nikpour

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereospecific formation of spirodioxolanes has been observed on electron transfer induced ring opening of α-epoxyketones by 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate in the presence of cyclohexanone

  3. Agulhas ring formation as a barotropic instability of the retroflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, Wilbert; Zharkov, Volodymyr; Nof, Doron; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Ruijter, Wilhelmus P.M. de; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Arjen; Wubs, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Agulhas Leakage is an important link in the global ocean circulation, as it transfers a significant volume of relatively warm and salty water from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean. The main route of this transfer is through the shedding of large Agulhas rings from the Agulhas retroflection. In

  4. Ring distributions leading to species formation: a global topographic analysis of geographic barriers associated with ring species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monahan William B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mid 20th century, Ernst Mayr and Theodosius Dobzhansky championed the significance of circular overlaps or ring species as the perfect demonstration of speciation, yet in the over 50 years since, only a handful of such taxa are known. We developed a topographic model to evaluate whether the geographic barriers that favor processes leading to ring species are common or rare, and to predict where other candidate ring barriers might be found. Results Of the 952,147 geographic barriers identified on the planet, only about 1% are topographically similar to barriers associated with known ring taxa, with most of the likely candidates occurring in under-studied parts of the world (for example, marine environments, tropical latitudes. Predicted barriers separate into two distinct categories: (i single cohesive barriers (2, associated with taxa that differentiate at smaller spatial scales (salamander: Ensatina eschscholtzii; tree: Acacia karroo; and (ii composite barriers - formed by groups of barriers (each 184,000 to 1.7 million km2 in close geographic proximity (totaling 1.9 to 2.3 million km2 - associated with taxa that differentiate at larger spatial scales (birds: Phylloscopus trochiloides and Larus (sp. argentatus and fuscus. When evaluated globally, we find a large number of cohesive barriers that are topographically similar to those associated with known ring taxa. Yet, compared to cohesive barriers, an order of magnitude fewer composite barriers are similar to those that favor ring divergence in species with higher dispersal. Conclusions While these findings confirm that the topographic conditions that favor evolutionary processes leading to ring speciation are, in fact, rare, they also suggest that many understudied natural systems could provide valuable demonstrations of continuous divergence towards the formation of new species. Distinct advantages of the model are that it (i requires no a priori information on the

  5. The effect of Cytochalasin D on F-Actin behavior of single-cell electroendocytosis using multi-chamber micro cell chip

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Ran

    2012-03-01

    Electroendocytosis (EED) is a pulsed-electric-field (PEF) induced endocytosis, facilitating cells uptake molecules through nanometer-sized EED vesicles. We herein investigate the effect of a chemical inhibitor, Cytochalasin D (CD) on the actin-filaments (F-Actin) behavior of single-cell EED. The CD concentration (C CD) can control the depolymerization of F-actin. A multi-chamber micro cell chip was fabricated to study the EED under different conditions. Large-scale single-cell data demonstrated EED highly depends on both electric field and C CD. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Cell swelling activates cloned Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels: a role for the F-actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Nanna K; Pedersen, Stine F; Rasmussen, Hanne B;

    2003-01-01

    Cloned Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels of intermediate (hIK) or small (rSK3) conductance were expressed in HEK 293 cells, and channel activity was monitored using whole-cell patch clamp. hIK and rSK3 currents already activated by intracellular calcium were further increased by 95% and 125......%, respectively, upon exposure of the cells to a 33% decrease in extracellular osmolarity. hIK and rSK3 currents were inhibited by 46% and 32%, respectively, by a 50% increase in extracellular osmolarity. Cell swelling and channel activation were not associated with detectable increases in [Ca(2+)](i), evidenced...... by population and single-cell measurements. In addition, inhibitors of IK and SK channels significantly reduced the rate of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in cells expressing these channels. Cell swelling induced a decrease, and cell shrinkage an increase, in net cellular F-actin content. The swelling...

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Disruption of F-Actin Polymerization, and Transcriptomic Alterations in Zebrafish Larvae Exposed to Trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Damayanti, Nur P; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2016-02-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is primarily used as an industrial degreasing agent and has been in use since the 1940s. TCE is released into the soil, surface, and groundwater. From an environmental and regulatory standpoint, more than half of Superfund hazardous waste sites on the National Priority List are contaminated with TCE. Occupational exposure to TCE occurs primarily via inhalation, while environmental TCE exposure also occurs through ingestion of contaminated drinking water. Current literature links TCE exposure to various adverse health effects including cardiovascular toxicity. Current studies aiming to address developmental cardiovascular toxicity utilized rodent and avian models, with the majority of studies using relatively higher parts per million (mg/L) doses. In this study, to further investigate developmental cardiotoxicity of TCE, zebrafish embryos were treated with 0, 10, 100, or 500 parts per billion (ppb; μg/L) TCE during embryogenesis and/or through early larval stages. After the appropriate exposure period, angiogenesis, F-actin, and mitochondrial function were assessed. A significant dose-response decrease in angiogenesis, F-actin, and mitochondrial function was observed. To further complement this data, a transcriptomic profile of zebrafish larvae was completed to identify gene alterations associated with the 10 ppb TCE exposure. Results from the transcriptomic data revealed that embryonic TCE exposure caused significant changes in genes associated with cardiovascular disease, cancer, and organismal injury and abnormalities with a number of targets in the FAK signaling pathway. Overall, results from our study support TCE as a developmental cardiovascular toxicant, provide molecular targets and pathways for investigation in future studies, and indicate a need for continued priority for environmental regulation.

  8. Hierarchical Star Formation across the ring galaxy NGC 6503

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Elmegreen, Debra M; Calzetti, Daniela; Lee, Janice C; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Cignoni, Michele; Cook, David O; Dale, Daniel; Gallagher, John S; Grasha, Kathryn; Grebel, Eva K; Davo, Artemio Herrero; Hunter, Deidre A; Johnson, Kelsey E; Kim, Hwihyun; Nair, Preethi; Nota, Antonella; Pellerin, Anne; Ryon, Jenna; Sabbi, Elena; Sacchi, Elena; Smith, Linda J; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo; Whitmore, Brad

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed clustering analysis of the young stellar population across the star-forming ring galaxy NGC 6503, based on the deep HST photometry obtained with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). We apply a contour-based map analysis technique and identify in the stellar surface density map 244 distinct star-forming structures at various levels of significance. These stellar complexes are found to be organized in a hierarchical fashion with 95% being members of three dominant super-structures located along the star-forming ring. The size distribution of the identified structures and the correlation between their radii and numbers of stellar members show power-law behaviors, as expected from scale-free processes. The self-similar distribution of young stars is further quantified from their autocorrelation function, with a fractal dimension of ~1.7 for length-scales between ~20 pc and 2.5 kpc. The young stellar radial distribution sets the extent of the star-forming ring at radial distances betwe...

  9. The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in corneal ring abscess formation in pseudomonal keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kamata, R; Aoki, H; Matsumoto, K; Okamura, R; Kambara, T

    1993-09-01

    In order to identify the causative factors of ring abscess, which is the characteristic feature of pseudomonal keratitis, pseudomonal endotoxin, exotoxin A, and elastase were each separately injected into guinea pig cornea. There was no formation of ring abscess. Injection of living Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains IFO3455 and Takamatsu which produce all three molecules, clearly induced ring abscess. In contrast, when heat-killed bacteria strain IFO3455 or living bacteria of the non-elastase-producing strain PA103 were injected, ring abscess was not induced. Furthermore, when living bacteria strain IFO3455 were injected with anti-elastase antibody or a protease inhibitor, ovomacroglobulin, ring abscess formation was significantly inhibited. Histological examination demonstrated that the ring abscess was a dense accumulation and aggregation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with debris of cells and lamellae in the deep stroma at the corneal margins, suggesting prevention of PMN migration to the central lesion. The presence of anti-elastase antibody or a specific elastase inhibitor facilitated PMN migration towards living bacteria strain IFO3455 in an in vitro model. These results indicate that pseudomonal elastase is a necessary but not sufficient factor in the formation of ring abscess in pseudomonal keratitis.

  10. Hypocellular scar formation or aberrant fibrosis induced by an intrastromal corneal ring: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Hema L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intrastromal corneal rings or segments are approved for the treatment of myopia and astigmatism associated with keratoconus. We describe a clinicopathological case of intrastromal corneal rings. For the first time, the molecular pathological findings of intrastromal corneal rings in the cornea are illustrated. Case presentation A 47-year-old African-American man with a history of keratoconus and failure in using a Rigid Gas Permeable contact lens received an intrastromal corneal ring implant in his left eye. Due to complications, penetrating keratoplasty was performed. The intrastromal corneal ring channels were surrounded by a dense acellular (channel haze and/or hypocellular (acidophilic densification collagen scar and slightly edematous keratocytes. Mild macrophage infiltration was found near the inner aspect of the intrastromal corneal rings. Molecular analyses of the microdissected cells surrounding the intrastromal corneal ring channels and central corneal stroma revealed 10 times lower relative expression of IP-10/CXCL10 mRNA and two times higher CCL5 mRNA in the cells surrounding the intrastromal corneal ring, as compared to the central corneal stroma. IP-10/CXCL10 is a fibrotic and angiostatic chemokine produced by macrophages, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Conclusion An intrastromal corneal ring implant can induce hypocellular scar formation and mild inflammation, which may result from aberrant release of fibrosis-related chemokines.

  11. Bimodality and the formation of Saturn's ring particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrels, T.

    1980-11-01

    The F ring appears to have an outer and an inner rim, with only the latter observed by the imaging photopolarimeter (IPP) on the Pioneer Saturn spacecraft. The inside of the G ring, near 2.49 R/sub S/, may also be seen in the optical data. 1979S1 is red as well as dark. The light scattered through the B ring is noticeably red. The A ring has a dense outer rim. The Cassini Division and the French Division (Dollfus Division) have a dark gap near their centers. The C ring becomes weaker toward the center such that outer, middle, and inner C rings can be recognized. The Pioneer and earth-based observations are explained with a model for the B and A rings to some extent of a bimodal size distributions of particles; the larger ones may be original accretions, while small debris diffuses inward through the Cassini Division and the C ring. During the formation of the ring system, differential gravitation allowed only silicaceous grains of higher density (rho> or approx. =3 g cm/sup -3/) to coagulate. These serve as interstitial cores for snowy carbonaceous grains, between the times of accretion from interplanetary cometary grains and liberation by collision followed by diffusion inward to Saturn and final evaporation.

  12. Pattern Formation and Continuation in a Trineuron Ring with Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Jiang GUO; Li Hong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a single-directional ring of three neurons with delays. First, linear stability of the model is investigated by analyzing the associated characteristic transcendental equation. Next, we studied the local Hopf bifurcations and the spatio-temporal patterns of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits. Basing on the normal form approach and the center manifold theory, we derive the formula for determining the properties of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbit, such as the direction of Hopf bifurcation. Finally, global existence conditions for Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits are derived by using degree theory methods.

  13. Moesin is required for HIV-1-induced CD4-CXCR4 interaction, F-actin redistribution, membrane fusion and viral infection in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero-Villar, Marta; Cabrero, José Román; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Alvarez-Losada, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope regulates the initial attachment of viral particles to target cells through its association with CD4 and either CXCR4 or CCR5. Although F-actin is required for CD4 and CXCR4 redistribution, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this fundamental process in HIV infection. Using CD4(+) CXCR4(+) permissive human leukemic CEM T cells and primary lymphocytes, we have investigated whether HIV-1 Env might promote viral entry and infection by activating ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins to regulate F-actin reorganization and CD4/CXCR4 co-clustering. The interaction of the X4-tropic protein HIV-1 gp120 with CD4 augments ezrin and moesin phosphorylation in human permissive T cells, thereby regulating ezrin-moesin activation. Moreover, the association and clustering of CD4-CXCR4 induced by HIV-1 gp120 requires moesin-mediated anchoring of actin in the plasma membrane. Suppression of moesin expression with dominant-negative N-moesin or specific moesin silencing impedes reorganization of F-actin and HIV-1 entry and infection mediated by the HIV-1 envelope protein complex. Therefore, we propose that activated moesin promotes F-actin redistribution and CD4-CXCR4 clustering and is also required for efficient X4-tropic HIV-1 infection in permissive lymphocytes.

  14. The NAV2 homolog Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth in Drosophila mushroom body neurons via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Satoshi; Hiroi, Makoto; Nitta, Yohei; Maeyama, Yuko; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    The Rac-Cofilin pathway is essential for cytoskeletal remodeling to control axonal development. Rac signals through the canonical Rac-Pak-LIMK pathway to suppress Cofilin-dependent axonal growth and through a Pak-independent non-canonical pathway to promote outgrowth. Whether this non-canonical pathway converges to promote Cofilin-dependent F-actin reorganization in axonal growth remains elusive. We demonstrate that Sickie, a homolog of the human microtubule-associated protein neuron navigator 2, cell-autonomously regulates axonal growth of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons via the non-canonical pathway. Sickie was prominently expressed in the newborn F-actin-rich axons of MB neurons. A sickie mutant exhibited axonal growth defects, and its phenotypes were rescued by exogenous expression of Sickie. We observed phenotypic similarities and genetic interactions among sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling components. Using the MARCM technique, distinct F-actin and phospho-Cofilin patterns were detected in developing axons mutant for sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling regulators. The upregulation of Cofilin function alleviated the axonal defect of the sickie mutant. Epistasis analyses revealed that Sickie suppresses the LIMK overexpression phenotype and is required for Pak-independent Rac1 and Slingshot phosphatase to counteract LIMK. We propose that Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway in a Slingshot-dependent manner.

  15. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  16. Cholesterol modulates the volume-regulated anion current in Ehrlich-Lettre ascites cells via effects on Rho and F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Hougaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-10-01

    The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] in this process. In Ehrlich-Lettre ascites (ELA) cells, a current with biophysical and pharmacological properties characteristic of VRAC was activated by hypotonic swelling. A 44% increase in cellular cholesterol content had no detectable effects on F-actin organization or VRAC activity. A 47% reduction in cellular cholesterol content increased cortical and stress fiber-associated F-actin content in swollen cells. Cholesterol depletion increased VRAC activation rate and maximal current after a modest (15%), but not after a severe (36%) reduction in extracellular osmolarity. The cholesterol depletion-induced increase in maximal VRAC current was prevented by F-actin disruption using latrunculin B (LB), while the current activation rate was unaffected by LB, but dependent on Rho kinase. Rho activity was decreased by approximately 20% in modestly, and approximately 50% in severely swollen cells. In modestly swollen cells, this reduction was prevented by cholesterol depletion, which also increased isotonic Rho activity. Thrombin, which stimulates Rho and causes actin polymerization, potentiated VRAC in modestly swollen cells. VRAC activity was unaffected by inclusion of a water-soluble PtdIns(4,5)P(2) analogue or a PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-blocking antibody in the pipette, or neomycin treatment to sequester PtdIns(4,5)P(2). It is suggested that in ELA cells, F-actin and Rho-Rho kinase modulate VRAC magnitude and activation rate, respectively, and that cholesterol depletion potentiates VRAC at least in part by preventing the hypotonicity-induced decrease in Rho activity and eliciting actin polymerization.

  17. Decavanadate binding to a high affinity site near the myosin catalytic centre inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2004-05-11

    Decameric vanadate (V(10)) inhibits the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity, noncompetitively with actin or with ATP upon interaction with a high-affinity binding site (K(i) = 0.27 +/- 0.05 microM) in myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The binding of V(10) to S1 can be monitored from titration with V(10) of the fluorescence of S1 labeled at Cys-707 and Cys-697 with N-iodo-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) or 5-(iodoacetamido) fluorescein, which showed the presence of only one V(10) binding site per monomer with a dissociation constant of 0.16-0.7 microM, indicating that S1 labeling with these dyes produced only a small distortion of the V(10) binding site. The large quenching of AEDANS-labeled S1 fluorescence produced by V(10) indicated that the V(10) binding site is close to Cys-697 and 707. Fluorescence studies demonstrated the following: (i) the binding of V(10) to S1 is not competitive either with actin or with ADP.V(1) or ADP.AlF(4); (ii) the affinity of V(10) for the complex S1/ADP.V(1) and S1/ADP.AlF(4) is 2- and 3-fold lower than for S1; and (iii) it is competitive with the S1 "back door" ligand P(1)P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate. A local conformational change in S1 upon binding of V(10) is supported by (i) a decrease of the efficiency of fluorescence energy transfer between eosin-labeled F-actin and fluorescein-labeled S1, and (ii) slower reassociation between S1 and F-actin after ATP hydrolysis. The results are consistent with binding of V(10) to the Walker A motif of ABC ATPases, which in S1 corresponds to conserved regions of the P-loop which form part of the phosphate tube.

  18. Ablation of EYS in zebrafish causes mislocalisation of outer segment proteins, F-actin disruption and cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaojing; Hu, Xuebin; Liu, Fei; Soares, Dinesh C.; Liu, Xiliang; Yu, Shanshan; Gao, Meng; Han, Shanshan; Qin, Yayun; Li, Chang; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Daji; Guo, An-Yuan; Tang, Zhaohui; Liu, Mugen

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in EYS are associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (arCRD) however, the function of EYS and the molecular mechanisms of how these mutations cause retinal degeneration are still unclear. Because EYS is absent in mouse and rat, and the structure of the retina differs substantially between humans and Drosophila, we utilised zebrafish as a model organism to study the function of EYS in the retina. We constructed an EYS-knockout zebrafish-line by TALEN technology which showed visual impairment at an early age, while the histological and immunofluorescence assays indicated the presence of progressive retinal degeneration with a cone predominately affected pattern. These phenotypes recapitulate the clinical manifestations of arCRD patients. Furthermore, the EYS−/− zebrafish also showed mislocalisation of certain outer segment proteins (rhodopsin, opn1lw, opn1sw1, GNB3 and PRPH2), and disruption of actin filaments in photoreceptors. Protein mislocalisation may, therefore, disrupt the function of cones and rods in these zebrafish and cause photoreceptor death. Collectively, these results point to a novel role for EYS in maintaining the morphological structure of F-actin and in protein transport, loss of this function might be the trigger for the resultant cellular events that ultimately lead to photoreceptor death. PMID:28378834

  19. Effects of Spiral Arms on Star Formation in Nuclear Rings of Barred-spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Woo-Young

    2014-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of spiral arms on the star formation rate (SFR) occurring in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We find that spiral arms can be an efficient means of gas transport from the outskirts to the central parts, provided that the arms are rotating slower than the bar. While the ring star formation in models with no-arm or corotating arms is active only during about the bar growth phase, arm-driven gas accretion makes the ring star formation both enhanced and prolonged significantly in models with slow-rotating arms. The arm-enhanced SFR is larger by a factor of ~ 3-20 than in the no-arm model, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. Arm-induced mass inflows also make dust lanes stronger. Nuclear rings in slow-arm models are ~ 45% larger than in the no-arm counterparts. Star clusters that form in a nuclear ring exhibit an age gradient in the azimuthal direction only when the SFR is small, whereas no noticeable age gradient is found in the...

  20. Reversibility and Viscoelastic Properties of Micropillar Supported and Oriented Magnesium Bundled F-Actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Maier

    Full Text Available Filamentous actin is one of the most important cytoskeletal elements. Not only is it responsible for the elastic properties of many cell types, but it also plays a vital role in cellular adhesion and motility. Understanding the bundling kinetics of actin filaments is important in the formation of various cytoskeletal structures, such as filopodia and stress fibers. Utilizing a unique pillar-structured microfluidic device, we investigated the time dependence of bundling kinetics of pillar supported free-standing actin filaments. Microparticles attached to the filaments allowed the measurement of thermal motion, and we found that bundling takes place at lower concentrations than previously found in 3-dimensional actin gels, i.e. actin filaments formed bundles in the presence of 5-12 mM of magnesium chloride in a time-dependent manner. The filaments also displayed long term stability for up to hours after removing the magnesium ions from the buffer, which suggests that there is an extensive hysteresis between cation induced crosslinking and decrosslinking.

  1. Ring-opening of cyclic ethers with carbon–carbon bond formation by Grignard reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stig Holden; Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The ring-opening of cyclic ethers with concomitant C–C bond formation was studied with a number of Grignard reagents. The transformation was performed in a sealed vial by heating to ∼160 °C in an aluminum block or at 180 °C in a microwave oven. Good yields of the product alcohols were obtained wi...

  2. Formation of five- and seven-membered rings enabled by the triisopropylsilyl auxiliary group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanov, Dmitry L; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    A highly convenient synthetic pathway to 2-indanones from aldehydes was established. The introduction of a triisopropylsilyl group greatly facilitated Meinwald rearrangement of the intermediate epoxides and alleviated the necessity of polysubstitution for the clean formation of indenes and cyclopentadienes via cyclodehydration of allylic alcohols; unprecedented freedom with respect to the product structure was thus achieved. The developed methodology could also be applicable to the formation of seven-membered rings leading to dibenzo[7]annulenes and dibenzosuberones.

  3. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization....... In contrast, the previously reported shrinkage-induced actin polymerization [Pedersen et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 252, 63-74] was independent of Rho kinase, p38, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and protein kinase C (PKC), which thus do not exert their effects on the shrinkage-activated transporters via...... by osmotic shrinkage and by the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A (CL-A). Both stimuli caused Rho kinase-dependent myosin II relocation to the cortical cytoplasm, but in contrast to the shrinkage-induced F-actin polymerization, CL-A treatment elicited a slight F-actin depolymerization...

  4. Parvin overexpression uncovers tissue-specific genetic pathways and disrupts F-actin to induce apoptosis in the developing epithelia in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chountala

    Full Text Available Parvin is a putative F-actin binding protein important for integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Here we used overexpression of Drosophila Parvin to uncover its functions in different tissues in vivo. Parvin overexpression caused major defects reminiscent of metastatic cancer cells in developing epithelia, including apoptosis, alterations in cell shape, basal extrusion and invasion. These defects were closely correlated with abnormalities in the organization of F-actin at the basal epithelial surface and of integrin-matrix adhesion sites. In wing epithelium, overexpressed Parvin triggered increased Rho1 protein levels, predominantly at the basal side, whereas in the developing eye it caused a rough eye phenotype and severely disrupted F-actin filaments at the retina floor of pigment cells. We identified genes that suppressed these Parvin-induced dominant effects, depending on the cell type. Co-expression of both ILK and the apoptosis inhibitor DIAP1 blocked Parvin-induced lethality and apoptosis and partially ameliorated cell delamination in epithelia, but did not rescue the elevated Rho1 levels, the abnormal organization of F-actin in the wing and the assembly of integrin-matrix adhesion sites. The rough eye phenotype was suppressed by coexpression of either PTEN or Wech, or by knock-down of Xrp1. Two main conclusions can be drawn from our studies: (1, high levels of cytoplasmic Parvin are toxic in epithelial cells; (2 Parvin in a dose dependent manner affects the organization of actin cytoskeleton in both wing and eye epithelia, independently of its role as a structural component of the ILK-PINCH-Parvin complex that mediates the integrin-actin link. Thus, distinct genetic interactions of Parvin occur in different cell types and second site modifier screens are required to uncover such genetic circuits.

  5. Regulation of SGLT expression and localization through Epac/PKA-dependent caveolin-1 and F-actin activation in renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Mi Ok; Ryu, Jung Min; Han, Ho Jae

    2012-04-01

    This study demonstrated that exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac) and protein kinase A (PKA) by 8-bromo (8-Br)-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) stimulated [(14)C]-α-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (α-MG) uptake through increased sodium-glucose cotransporters (SGLTs) expression and translocation to lipid rafts in renal proximal tubule cells (PTCs). In PTCs, SGLTs were colocalized with lipid raft caveolin-1 (cav-1), disrupted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Selective activators of Epac or PKA, 8-Br-cAMP, and forskolin stimulated expressions of SGLTs and α-MG uptake in PTCs. In addition, 8-Br-cAMP-induced PKA and Epac activation increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which were involved in expressions of SGLTs. Furthermore, 8-Br-cAMP stimulated SGLTs translocation to lipid rafts via filamentous actin (F-actin) organization, which was blocked by cytochalasin D. In addition, cav-1 and SGLTs stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP were detected in lipid rafts, which were blocked by cytochalasin D. Furthermore, 8-Br-cAMP-induced SGLTs translocation and α-MG uptake were attenuated by inhibition of cav-1 activation with cav-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibition of F-actin organization with TRIO and F-actin binding protein (TRIOBP). In conclusion, 8-Br-cAMP stimulated α-MG uptake via Epac and PKA-dependent SGLTs expression and trafficking through cav-1 and F-actin in PTCs.

  6. Modelling the formation of the circumnuclear ring in the Galactic centre

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Several thousand solar masses of molecular, atomic and ionized gas lie in the innermost ~10 pc of our Galaxy. The most relevant structure of molecular gas is the circumnuclear ring (CNR), a dense and clumpy ring surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH), with a radius of ~2 pc. We propose that the CNR formed through the tidal disruption of a molecular cloud, and we investigate this scenario by means of N-body smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations. We ran a grid of simulations with different cloud mass (4X10^4, 1.3X10^5 solar masses), different initial orbital velocity (v_in=0.2-0.5 v_esc, where v_esc is the escape velocity from the SMBH), and different impact parameter (b=8, 26 pc). The disruption of the molecular cloud leads to the formation of very dense and clumpy gas rings, containing most of the initial cloud mass. If the initial orbital velocity of the cloud is sufficiently low (v_in0.5 v_esc), at least two rings form around the SMBH: an inner ring (with radius ~0.4 pc) and an outer ring (wit...

  7. On the role of collective interactions in asymmetric ring current formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bespalov

    Full Text Available The contribution of resonant wave-particle interactions to the formation and decay of the magnetospheric ring current is analysed in the framework of a self-consistent set of equations which take into account azimuthal plasmasphere asymmetry. It is shown that the cyclotron interaction of westward drifting energetic protons with Alfven waves in the evening-side plasmaspheric bulge region leads to the formation of a ring current asymmetry located near 18:00 MLT. The time-scale of this asymmetry is determined by the proton drift time through the plasmaspheric bulge and is about 1 - 3 h. A symmetrical ring current decays mainly due to charge exchange processes. The theory is compared with known experimental data on ions and waves in the ring current and on low-latitude magnetic disturbances. New low-latitude magnetometer data on the magnetic storm of 24 - 26 July 1986 are also discussed. The model presented explains the observed localization of an asymmetrical ring current loop in the evening sector and the difference in relaxation time-scales of the asymmetry and the Dst index. It also explains measured wave turbulence levels in the evening-side plasmasphere and wave observation statistics.

  8. Excess F-actin mechanically impedes mitosis leading to cytokinesis failure in X-linked neutropenia by exceeding Aurora B kinase error correction capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulding, Dale A; Moeendarbary, Emad; Valon, Leo; Record, Julien; Charras, Guillaume T; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2012-11-01

    The constitutively active mutant of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (CA-WASp) is the cause of X-linked neutropenia and is linked with genomic instability and myelodysplasia. CA-WASp generates abnormally high levels of cytoplasmic F-actin through dysregulated activation of the Arp2/3 complex leading to defects in cell division. As WASp has no reported role in cell division, we hypothesized that alteration of cell mechanics because of increased F-actin may indirectly disrupt dynamic events during mitosis. Inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex revealed that excess cytoplasmic F-actin caused increased cellular viscosity, slowed all phases of mitosis, and perturbed mitotic mechanics. Comparison of chromosome velocity to the cytoplasmic viscosity revealed that cells compensated for increased viscosity by up-regulating force applied to chromosomes and increased the density of microtubules at kinetochores. Mitotic abnormalities were because of overload of the aurora signaling pathway as subcritical inhibition of Aurora in CA-WASp cells caused increased cytokinesis failure, while overexpression reduced defects. These findings demonstrate that changes in cell mechanics can cause significant mitotic abnormalities leading to genomic instability, and highlight the importance of mechanical sensors such as Aurora B in maintaining the fidelity of hematopoietic cell division.

  9. Assessment of different formation scenarios for the ring system of (10199) Chariklo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melita, M. D.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Campo-Bagatin, A.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The discovery that the Centaur (10199) Chariklo possesses a ring system opens questions about their origin. Aims: We here asses the plausibility of different scenarios for the origin of the observed ring system. Methods: We first consider the possibility that the material of the ring originated in the disruption of a satellite that had reached a critical distance from the Centaur. We discuss the conditions for the putative satellite to approach the Centaur as a consequence of tidal interaction. A three-body encounter is also considered as a transport mechanism. In addition, we study the case in which the ring is formed by the ejecta of a cratering collision on the Centaur and we constrain the collision parameters and the size of the resulting crater of the event. Finally, we consider that the ring material originates from a catastrophic collision between a background object and a satellite located at a distance corresponding to the the current location of the ring. We compute the typical timescales for these scenarios. Results: We estimate that in order to be tidally disrupted a satellite would have had to be larger than approximately 6.5 km at the location of the rings. However the tidal interaction is rather weak for objects of the size of outer solar system bodies at the ring location, therefore we considered other more effective mechanisms by which a satellite might have approached the Centaur. Collisonal scenarios are both physically plausible for the formation, but semianalytical estimations indicate that the probability of the corresponding collisions is low under current conditions.

  10. Re-evaluating the roles of myosin 18Aα and F-actin in determining Golgi morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Kyle; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Sellers, James R; Hammer, John A

    2017-03-22

    The peri-centrosomal localization and morphology of the Golgi apparatus depends largely on the microtubule cytoskeleton and the microtubule motor protein dynein. Recent studies proposed that myosin 18Aα (M18Aα) also contributes to Golgi morphology by binding the Golgi protein GOLPH3 and walking along adjacent actin filaments to stretch the Golgi into its classic ribbon structure. Biochemical analyses have shown, however, that M18A is not an actin-activated ATPase and lacks motor activity. Our goal, therefore, was to define the precise molecular mechanism by which M18Aα determines Golgi morphology. We show that purified M18Aα remains inactive in the presence of GOLPH3, arguing against the Golgi-specific activation of the myosin. Using M18A-specific antibodies and expression of GFP-tagged M18Aα, we find no evidence that it localizes to the Golgi. Moreover, several cell lines with reduced or eliminated M18Aα expression exhibited normal Golgi morphology. Interestingly, actin filament disassembly resulted in a marked reduction in lateral stretching of the Golgi in both control and M18Aα-deficient cells. Importantly, this reduction was accompanied by an expansion of the Golgi in the vertical direction, vertical movement of the centrosome, and increases in the height of both the nucleus and the cell. Collectively, our data indicate that M18Aα does not localize to the Golgi or play a significant role in determining its morphology, and suggest that global F-actin disassembly alters Golgi morphology indirectly by altering cell shape. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamical studies of the Mersa Matruh Gyre: intense meander and ring formation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnaraghi, Maryam

    A study of the dynamics of the Mersa Matruh Gyre and the Mid-Mediterranean Jet flow system in the southwestern Levantine basin is presented. Data-driven simulations in the Levantine basin, using an eddy-resolving quasigeostrophic model initialized with two quasi-synoptic hydrographic data sets, reveal intense mesoscale meander and ring formation events involving the Mid-Mediterranean Jet, the Mersa Matruh Gyre and the Rhodes Gyre. The dynamics of these events are quantified via local energy and vorticity budget analyses. The dominant processes are investigated and compared with previously studied events in the Gulf Stream Ring and Meander region.

  12. Vortex ring formation in starting forced plumes with negative and positive buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Yu, S. C. M.

    2016-11-01

    The limiting process of vortex ring formation in starting forced plumes, with Richardson number in the range of -0.06 ≤ Ri ≤ 0.06, was studied numerically under the Boussinesq approximation. The examination of the dynamics of the starting flow evolution reveals that the plume-ambient density difference affects the vortex ring pinch-off mainly through three mechanisms, i.e., the baroclinic production of vorticity, the buoyancy acceleration (or deceleration) on the vortical structures, and its effect on the trailing shear layer instability. As Ri increases from negative to positive values, three regimes can be identified in terms of the vortex interaction patterns during the pinch-off process, i.e., the weak-interaction regime (-0.06 results show that the variation trends of formation number and separation number against Ri change near the critical value of Ric ≈ - 0.02. In the weak-interaction regime, both formation number and separation number increase rapidly against Ri. While in the transition and strong-interaction regimes alike, the formation number increases at a much slower rate than in the weak-interaction regime, and the separation number declines dramatically as Ri increases. Finally, a qualitative explanation on the variation patterns of formation number and separation number is proposed based on the buoyancy effects on the dynamic properties of the leading vortex ring and the vortex interaction patterns.

  13. Effects of notches on the order of flux-closure state formation in bi-rings by micromagnetic simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shu-Ting; Chang Shuang-Quan; Shi Hui-Gang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the number and the location of notches on the formation of flux-closure states in bi-rings with fields applied in the x direction (i.e.,along the short axis direction of bi-rings) and y direction (i.e.,along the long axis direction of bi-rings) are investigated using micromagnetic simulation.For the bi-rings with one notch and the bi-rings with two notches symmetric about y axis,the order of flux-closure state formation in each ring can be controlled.But the flux-closure state forms simultaneously in each ring for the bi-rings with two notches symmetric about x axis.For the bi-rings with two notches that are symmetric neither about x axis nor about y axis,only one ring can form a fluxclosure state in the y-direction field and no flux-closure state can be found in rings in the x-direction field.Therefore,logic states can be defined by controlling the order of flux-closure state formation,which can be utilized in future logic devices.

  14. Peak-ring formation in large impact craters: geophysical constraints from Chicxulub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.

    2000-12-01

    A seismic reflection and three-dimensional wide-angle tomographic study of the buried, ˜200-km diameter, Chicxulub impact crater in Mexico reveals the kinematics of central structural uplift and peak-ring formation during large-crater collapse. The seismic data show downward and inward radial collapse of the transient cavity in the outer crater, and upward and outward collapse within the central structurally uplifted region. Peak rings are formed by the interference between these two flow regimes, and involve significant radial transport of material. Hydrocode modeling replicates the observed collapse features. Impact-generated melt rocks lie mostly inside the peak ring; the melt appears to be clast-rich and undifferentiated, with a maximum thickness of 3.5 km in the center.

  15. Noise-induced cochlear F-actin depolymerization is mediated via ROCK2/p-ERM signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Wang, Xianren; Chen, Jun; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Our previous work has suggested that traumatic noise activates Rho-GTPase pathways in cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), resulting in cell death and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we investigated Rho effectors, Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), and the targets of ROCKs, the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, in the regulation of the cochlear actin cytoskeleton using adult CBA/J mice under conditions of noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) hearing loss, which result in changes to the F/G-actin ratio. The levels of cochlear ROCK2 and p-ERM decreased 1 h after either TTS- or PTS-noise exposure. In contrast, ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs decreased only after PTS-, not after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of the Rho pathway, resulted in significant reversal of the F/G-actin ratio changes caused by noise exposure and attenuated OHC death and NIHL. Conversely, the down-regulation of ROCK2 by pretreatment with ROCK2 siRNA reduced the expression of ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs, exacerbated TTS to PTS, and worsened OHC loss. Additionally, pretreatment with siRNA against radixin, an ERM protein, aggravated TTS to PTS. Our results indicate that a ROCK2-mediated ERM-phosphorylation signaling cascade modulates noise-induced hair cell loss and NIHL by targeting the cytoskeleton. We propose the following cascade following noise trauma leading to alteration of the F-actin arrangement in the outer hair cell cytoskeleton: Noise exposure reduces the levels of GTP-RhoA and subsequently diminishes levels of RhoA effector ROCK2 (Rho-associated kinase 2). Phosphorylation of ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) by ROCK2 normally allows ERM to cross-link actin filaments with the plasma membrane. Noise-decreased levels of ROCK results in reduction of phosphorylation of ERM that leads to depolymerization of actin filaments. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an agonist of RhoA, binds to the G-protein-coupled receptor

  16. Ring Formation around Giant Planets by Tidal Disruption of a Single Passing Large Kuiper Belt Object

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Genda, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    The origin of rings around giant planets remains elusive. Saturn's rings are massive and made of 90-95% of water ice. In contrast, the much less massive rings of Uranus and Neptune are dark and likely to have higher rock fraction. Here we investigate, for the first time, the tidal disruption of a passing object, including the subsequent formation of planetary rings. First, we perform SPH simulations of the tidal destruction of big differentiated objects ($M_{\\rm body}=10^{21-23}$) that experience close encounters with Saturn or Uranus. We find that about $0.1-10$% of the mass of the passing body is gravitationally captured around the planet. However, these fragments are initially big chunks and have highly eccentric orbits around the planet. Then, we perform N-body simulations including the planet's oblateness, starting with data obtained from the SPH simulations. Our N-body simulations show that the chunks are tidally destroyed during their next several orbits. Their individual orbits then start to precess i...

  17. Ring formation around giant planets by tidal disruption of a single passing large Kuiper belt object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Charnoz, Sébastien; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Genda, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    The origin of rings around giant planets remains elusive. Saturn's rings are massive and made of 90-95% of water ice with a mass of ∼1019 kg. In contrast, the much less massive rings of Uranus and Neptune are dark and likely to have higher rock fraction. According to the so-called "Nice model", at the time of the Late Heavy Bombardment, giant planets could have experienced a significant number of close encounters with bodies scattered from the primordial Kuiper Belt. This belt could have been massive in the past and may have contained a larger number of big objects (Mbody =1022 kg) than what is currently observed in the Kuiper Belt. Here we investigate, for the first time, the tidal disruption of a passing object, including the subsequent formation of planetary rings. First, we perform SPH simulations of the tidal destruction of big differentiated objects (Mbody =1021 and 1023 kg) that experience close encounters with Saturn or Uranus. We find that about 0.1-10% of the mass of the passing body is gravitationally captured around the planet. However, these fragments are initially big chunks and have highly eccentric orbits around the planet. In order to see their long-term evolution, we perform N-body simulations including the planet's oblateness up to J4 starting with data obtained from the SPH simulations. Our N-body simulations show that the chunks are tidally destroyed during their next several orbits and become collections of smaller particles. Their individual orbits then start to precess incoherently around the planet's equator, which enhances their encounter velocities on longer-term evolution, resulting in more destructive impacts. These collisions would damp their eccentricities resulting in a progressive collapse of the debris cloud into a thin equatorial and low-eccentricity ring. These high energy impacts are expected to be catastrophic enough to produce small particles. Our numerical results also show that the mass of formed rings is large enough to

  18. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) acts directly on F-actin to accelerate cofilin-mediated actin severing across the range of physiological pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normoyle, Kieran P M; Brieher, William M

    2012-10-12

    Fast actin depolymerization is necessary for cells to rapidly reorganize actin filament networks. Utilizing a Listeria fluorescent actin comet tail assay to monitor actin disassembly rates, we observed that although a mixture of actin disassembly factors (cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1 is sufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological G-actin concentrations this mixture was insufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological F-actin concentrations. Using biochemical complementation, we purified cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from thymus extracts as a factor that protects against the inhibition of excess F-actin. CAP has been shown to participate in actin dynamics but has been thought to act by liberating cofilin from ADP·G-actin monomers to restore cofilin activity. However, we found that CAP augments cofilin-mediated disassembly by accelerating the rate of cofilin-mediated severing. We also demonstrated that CAP acts directly on F-actin and severs actin filaments at acidic, but not neutral, pH. At the neutral pH characteristic of cytosol in most mammalian cells, we demonstrated that neither CAP nor cofilin are capable of severing actin filaments. However, the combination of CAP and cofilin rapidly severed actin at all pH values across the physiological range. Therefore, our results reveal a new function for CAP in accelerating cofilin-mediated actin filament severing and provide a mechanism through which cells can maintain high actin turnover rates without having to alkalinize cytosol, which would affect many biochemical reactions beyond actin depolymerization.

  19. Cyclase-associated Protein (CAP) Acts Directly on F-actin to Accelerate Cofilin-mediated Actin Severing across the Range of Physiological pH*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normoyle, Kieran P. M.; Brieher, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Fast actin depolymerization is necessary for cells to rapidly reorganize actin filament networks. Utilizing a Listeria fluorescent actin comet tail assay to monitor actin disassembly rates, we observed that although a mixture of actin disassembly factors (cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1 is sufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological G-actin concentrations this mixture was insufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological F-actin concentrations. Using biochemical complementation, we purified cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from thymus extracts as a factor that protects against the inhibition of excess F-actin. CAP has been shown to participate in actin dynamics but has been thought to act by liberating cofilin from ADP·G-actin monomers to restore cofilin activity. However, we found that CAP augments cofilin-mediated disassembly by accelerating the rate of cofilin-mediated severing. We also demonstrated that CAP acts directly on F-actin and severs actin filaments at acidic, but not neutral, pH. At the neutral pH characteristic of cytosol in most mammalian cells, we demonstrated that neither CAP nor cofilin are capable of severing actin filaments. However, the combination of CAP and cofilin rapidly severed actin at all pH values across the physiological range. Therefore, our results reveal a new function for CAP in accelerating cofilin-mediated actin filament severing and provide a mechanism through which cells can maintain high actin turnover rates without having to alkalinize cytosol, which would affect many biochemical reactions beyond actin depolymerization. PMID:22904322

  20. Molecular structure and ring tunneling of phenyl formate as observed by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferres, Lynn; Mouhib, Halima; Stahl, Wolfgang; Schwell, Martin; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2017-07-01

    Phenyl formate has been investigated by molecular jet Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the frequency range from 2 to 26.5 GHz. Quantum chemical calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory indicate that this molecule does not have a plane of symmetry at equilibrium, and that the phenyl ring performs a large amplitude tunneling motion from one side of the Cs configuration to the other. The tilt angle of the ring out of the Hsbnd (Cdbnd O)O plane is ±70° and the calculated tunneling barrier is only 28 cm-1. The two lowest torsional states vt = 0 and 1 are assigned in the experimental spectrum and fitted using the program SPFIT/SPCAT. The Coriolis splitting ΔE between these states is 46.2231(25) GHz, very close to the value of 48.24 GHz calculated using a simple two-top torsional Hamiltonian of the formate group and the phenyl ring.

  1. Self-assembled formation and transformation of In/CdZnTe(110) nano-rings into camel-humps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen-Taguri, G. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Materials and Nanotechnologies Program, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ruzin, A. [School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Goldfarb, I. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Materials and Nanotechnologies Program, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Research Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-05-21

    We used in situ scanning tunneling microscopy to monitor in real time the formation of nano-rings at the molecular beam epitaxially grown In/CdZnTe(110) surface, and Auger electron spectroscopy to explore the corresponding compositional changes. In-diffusion of In and segregation of Cd to the surface in course of annealing lead to a formation of elliptically distorted nano-rings, elongated along the fast [110] diffusion direction. Exacerbated diffusion anisotropy in the liquid state, at temperatures above the melting point of In, further distorts the nano-rings into a camel-hump shape.

  2. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Mizui

    Full Text Available The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1 chemical long-term potentiation (LTP stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2 Ca(2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3 the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  3. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  4. Poloidal flow and toroidal particle ring formation in a sessile drop driven by megahertz order vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Amgad R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2014-09-23

    Poloidal flow is curiously formed in a microliter sessile water drop over 157-225 MHz because of acoustic streaming from three-dimensional standing Lamb waves in a lithium niobate substrate. The flow possesses radial symmetry with downwelling at the center and upwelling around the periphery of the drop. Outside this frequency range, the attenuation occurs over a length scale incompatible with the drop size and the poloidal flow vanishes. Remarkably, shear-induced migration was found to drive toroidal particle ring formation with diameters inversely proportional to the frequency of the acoustic irradiation.

  5. The formation of peak-ring basins: Working hypotheses and path forward in using observations to constrain models of impact-basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Collins, Gareth S.; Potter, Ross W. K.

    2016-07-01

    Impact basins provide windows into the crustal structure and stratigraphy of planetary bodies; however, interpreting the stratigraphic origin of basin materials requires an understanding of the processes controlling basin formation and morphology. Peak-ring basins (exhibiting a rim crest and single interior ring of peaks) provide important insight into the basin-formation process, as they are transitional between complex craters with central peaks and larger multi-ring basins. New image and altimetry data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as a suite of remote sensing datasets have permitted a reassessment of the origin of lunar peak-ring basins. We synthesize morphometric, spectroscopic, and gravity observations of lunar peak-ring basins and describe two working hypotheses for the formation of peak rings that involve interactions between inward collapsing walls of the transient cavity and large central uplifts of the crust and mantle. Major facets of our observations are then compared and discussed in the context of numerical simulations of peak-ring basin formation in order to plot a course for future model refinement and development.

  6. A mutation in the converter subdomain of Aspergillus nidulans MyoB blocks constriction of the actomyosin ring in cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Terry W; Jackson-Hayes, Loretta; Wang, Xiao; Hoge, Brianna L

    2015-02-01

    We have identified a mutant allele of the Aspergillus nidulans homologue of myosin II (myoB; AN4706), which prevents normal septum formation. This is the first reported myosin II mutation in a filamentous fungus. Strains expressing the myoB(G843D) allele produce mainly aberrant septa at 30 °C and are completely aseptate at temperatures above 37 °C. Conidium formation is greatly reduced at 30 °C and progressively impaired with increasing temperature. Sequencing of the myoB(G843D) allele identified a point mutation predicted to result in a glycine-to-aspartate amino acid substitution at residue 843 in the myosin II converter domain. This residue is conserved in all fungal, plant, and animal myosin sequences that we have examined. The mutation does not prevent localization of the myoB(G843D) gene product to contractile rings, but it does block ring constriction. MyoB(G843D) rings at sites of abortive septation disassemble after an extended period and dissipate into the cytoplasm. During contractile ring formation, both wild type and mutant MyoB::GFP colocalize with actin--an association that begins at the pre-ring "string" stage. Down-regulation of wild-type myoB expression under control of the alcA promoter blocks septation but does not prevent actin from aggregating at putative septation sites--the actin rings, however, do not fully coalesce. Both septation and targeting of MyoB are blocked by disruption of filamentous actin using latrunculin B. We propose a model in which myosin assembly at septation sites depends upon the presence of F-actin, but assembly of the actin component of contractile rings depends upon normal levels of myosin only for the final stages of ring compaction.

  7. Association of Phosphatidylinositol Kinase, Phosphatidylinositol Monophosphate Kinase, and Diacylglycerol Kinase with the Cytoskeleton and F-Actin Fractions of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Cells Grown in Suspension Culture : Response to Cell Wall-Degrading Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Z; Boss, W F

    1992-12-01

    Phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI), phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase, and diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase activities were detected in the cytoskeletal fraction isolated from microsomes and plasma membranes of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells grown in suspension culture. The lipid kinase activities were associated with the actin filament fraction (F-actin fraction) isolated from the cytoskeleton. The PI and PIP kinase activity in the F-actin fraction significantly increased after cells were treated with Driselase, a mixture of cell wall-degrading enzymes; however, the DAG kinase activity in the F-actin fraction was unaffected by the Driselase treatment. These data indicate that at least one form of PI, PIP, and DAG kinase preferentially associates with actin filaments and/or actin binding proteins and that cytoskeletal-associated PI and PIP kinase activities can change in response to external stimulation.

  8. Association of Phosphatidylinositol Kinase, Phosphatidylinositol Monophosphate Kinase, and Diacylglycerol Kinase with the Cytoskeleton and F-Actin Fractions of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Cells Grown in Suspension Culture 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zheng; Boss, Wendy F.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI), phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase, and diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase activities were detected in the cytoskeletal fraction isolated from microsomes and plasma membranes of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells grown in suspension culture. The lipid kinase activities were associated with the actin filament fraction (F-actin fraction) isolated from the cytoskeleton. The PI and PIP kinase activity in the F-actin fraction significantly increased after cells were treated with Driselase, a mixture of cell wall-degrading enzymes; however, the DAG kinase activity in the F-actin fraction was unaffected by the Driselase treatment. These data indicate that at least one form of PI, PIP, and DAG kinase preferentially associates with actin filaments and/or actin binding proteins and that cytoskeletal-associated PI and PIP kinase activities can change in response to external stimulation. Images Figure 2 PMID:16653250

  9. Difference in F-Actin Depolymerization Induced by Toxin B from the Clostridium difficile Strain VPI 10463 and Toxin B from the Variant Clostridium difficile Serotype F Strain 1470

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Genth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA and toxin B (TcdB are the causative agent of the C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD and its severe form, the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC. TcdB from the C. difficile strain VPI10463 mono-glucosylates (thereby inactivates the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, while Toxin B from the variant C. difficile strain serotype F 1470 (TcdBF specifically mono-glucosylates Rac but not Rho(A/B/C. TcdBF is related to lethal toxin from C. sordellii (TcsL that glucosylates Rac1 but not Rho(A/B/C. In this study, the effects of Rho-inactivating toxins on the concentrations of cellular F-actin were investigated using the rhodamine-phalloidin-based F-actin ELISA. TcdB induces F-actin depolymerization comparable to the RhoA-inactivating exoenzyme C3 from C. limosum (C3-lim. In contrast, the Rac-glucosylating toxins TcdBF and TcsL did not cause F-actin depolymerization. These observations led to the conclusion that F-actin depolymerization depends on the toxin’s capability of glucosylating RhoA. Furthermore, the integrity of focal adhesions (FAs was analyzed using paxillin and p21-activated kinase (PAK as FA marker proteins. Paxillin dephosphorylation was observed upon treatment of cells with TcdB, TcdBF, or C3-lim. In conclusion, the Rho-inactivating toxins induce loss of cell shape by either F-actin depolymerization (upon RhoA inactivation or the disassembly of FAs (upon Rac1 inactivation.

  10. Structure Formation in Gas-Rich Galactic Discs with Finite Thickness: From Discs to Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Behrendt, Manuel; Schartmann, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational instabilities play an important role in structure formation of gas-rich high-redshift disc galaxies. In this paper, we revisit the axisymmetric perturbation theory and the resulting growth of structure, by taking the realistic thickness of the disc into account. In the unstable regime, which corresponds for thick discs to a Toomre parameter below the critical value Q=0.696, we find a fastest growing perturbation wavelength that is always a factor 1.93 times larger than in the classical razor-thin disc approximation. This result is independent of the adopted disc scale height and by this independent of temperature and surface density. In order to test the analytical theory, we compare it with a high resolution hydrodynamical simulation of an isothermal gravitationally unstable gas disc with the typical vertical sech density profile and study its break-up into rings that subsequently fragment into dense clumps. In the first phase rings form, that organise themselves discretely, with distances corr...

  11. Analysis of SDWDM Ring Network and Enhancement Using Different Hybrid Optical Amplifiers and Modulation Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vineet; Sharma, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, performance enhancement of super-dense wavelength division multiplexing (SDWDM) optical add-drop multiplexer optical ring network for six nodes, 50 wavelengths having channel spacing of 0.2 nm for 300 km unidirectional nonlinear fiber is successfully demonstrated. The performance of the designed system is enhanced by comparing different modulation formats (non-return to zero (NRZ), return to zero (RZ), soliton, chirped return to zero (CRZ), carrier-suppressed RZ (CSRZ)) and hybrid amplifiers (Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA)-EDFA, semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-SOA, SOA, EDFA, EDFA-SOA) on the basis of eye diagram and bit error rate (BER). It has been observed that CRZ modulation format and EDFA-SOA shows the best results. It has been reported that EDFA-SOA/CRZ modulation format can achieve BER as better as e-13, which gives best performance. The effect of channel spacing on SDWDM system and performance degradation due to crosstalk is also evaluated.

  12. Aromatic ring formation in opposed-flow diffusive 1,3-butadiene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Moshammer, Kai

    2016-10-17

    This paper is concerned with the formation of one- and two-ring aromatic species in near atmospheric-pressure opposed-flow diffusion flames of 1,3-butadiene (1,3-CH). The chemical structures of two different 1,3-CH/Ar-O/Ar flames were explored using flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry with both electron and single-photon ionization. We provide mole fraction profiles of 47 components as function of distance from the fuel outlet and compare them to chemically detailed modeling results. To this end, the hierarchically developed model described by Seidel et al. [16] has been updated to accurately comprise the chemistry of 1,3-butadiene. Generally a very good agreement is observed between the experimental and modeling data, allowing for a meaningful reaction path analysis. With regard to the formation of aromatic species up to naphthalene, it was essential to improve the fulvene and the C chemistry description in the mechanism. In particular, benzene is found to be formed mainly via fulvene through the reactions of the CH isomers with CH The n-CH radical reacts with CH forming 1,3-pentadiene (CH), which is subsequently oxidized to form the naphthalene precursor cyclopentadienyl (CH). Oxidation of naphthalene is predicted to be a contributor to the formation of phenylacetylene (CH), indicating that consumption reactions can be of similar importance as molecular growth reactions.

  13. TIMING OF FALSE RING FORMATION IN PINUS HALEPENSIS AND ARBUTUS UNEDO IN SOUTHERN ITALY: OUTLOOK FROM AN ANALYSIS OF XYLOGENESIS AND TREE-RING CHRONOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eDe Micco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean tree rings are characterized by Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs due to partly climate-driven cambial activity. IADFs are used as structural signals to gain information on relations between environmental conditions and eco-physiological processes during xylogenesis, with intra-annual resolution.To reach an unbiased synchronization of the IADF position within tree rings and seasonal fluctuations in environmental conditions, it is necessary to know the timing of cambial activity and wood formation, which are species- and site-specific processes.We applied the microcoring technique to analyze xylogenesis in Pinus halepensis and Arbutus unedo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to study xylogenesis in a hardwood species forming frequent IADFs. Both species co-occur at a site in southern Italy characterized by a Mediterranean climate. To facilitate tree-ring dating and identification of IADFs, we performed traditional dendroecological analysis. We analyzed xylogenesis during summer, which is considered a constraint for xylogenesis and a trigger for IADF formation. We followed the different phases of cell development in the current wood increment with the aim of evaluating whether and which type of IADFs were formed. We additionally analyzed the same phases again in September and in winter to verify the possible formation of IADFs in fall and whether cell production and differentiation was completed by the end of the calendar year.Both species formed the same type of IADFs (earlywood-like cells within latewood, due to temporary growth restoration triggered by rain events during the period of summer drought. At the end of the calendar year, no cells in the phases of enlargement and secondary cell wall deposition occurred. A. unedo was more sensitive than P. halepensis because IADFs were formed earlier in the season and were more frequent in the tree-ring series.The dendro-anatomical approach, combining

  14. Assessing the role of oxygen on ring current formation and evolution through numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.; Yu Ganushkina, N.; Daldorff, L. K. S.

    2015-06-01

    We address the effect of ionospheric outflow and magnetospheric ion composition on the physical processes that control the development of the 5 August 2011 magnetic storm. Simulations with the Space Weather Modeling Framework are used to investigate the global dynamics and energization of ions throughout the magnetosphere during storm time, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the ring current. Simulations involving multifluid (with variable H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) and single-fluid (with constant H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) MHD for the global magnetosphere with inner boundary conditions set either by specifying a constant ion density or by physics-based calculations of the ion fluxes reveal that dynamical changes of the ion composition in the inner magnetosphere alter the total energy density of the magnetosphere, leading to variations in the magnetic field as well as particle drifts throughout the simulated domain. A low oxygen to hydrogen ratio and outflow resulting from a constant ion density boundary produced the most disturbed magnetosphere, leading to a stronger ring current but misses the timing of the storm development. Conversely, including a physics-based solution for the ionospheric outflow to the magnetosphere system leads to a reduction in the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). The increased presence of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere affects the global magnetospheric structure and dynamics and brings the nightside reconnection point closer to the Earth. The combination of reduced CPCP together with the formation of the reconnection line closer to the Earth yields less adiabatic heating in the magnetotail and reduces the amount of energetic plasma that has access to the inner magnetosphere.

  15. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  16. Vortex ring formation in the left ventricle of the heart: analysis by 4D flow MRI and Lagrangian coherent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töger, Johannes; Kanski, Mikael; Carlsson, Marcus; Kovács, Sándor J; Söderlind, Gustaf; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that vortex ring formation during left ventricular (LV) rapid filling is an optimized mechanism for blood transport, and that the volume of the vortex ring is an important measure. However, due to lack of quantitative methods, the volume of the vortex ring has not previously been studied. Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) is a new flow analysis method, which enables in vivo quantification of vortex ring volume. Therefore, we aimed to investigate if vortex ring volume in the human LV can be reliably quantified using LCS and magnetic resonance velocity mapping (4D PC-MR). Flow velocities were measured using 4D PC-MR in 9 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with dilated ischemic cardiomyopathy. LV LCS were computed from flow velocities and manually delineated in all subjects. Vortex volume in the healthy volunteers was 51 ± 6% of the LV volume, and 21 ± 5% in the patients. Interobserver variability was -1 ± 13% and interstudy variability was -2 ± 12%. Compared to idealized flow experiments, the vortex rings showed additional complexity and asymmetry, related to endocardial trabeculation and papillary muscles. In conclusion, LCS and 4D PC-MR enables measurement of vortex ring volume during rapid filling of the LV.

  17. Wheels of Fire IV. Star Formation and the Neutral Interstellar Medium in the Ring Galaxy AM0644-741

    CERN Document Server

    Higdon, James L; Rand, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    We combine data from the ATNF and SEST to investigate the neutral ISM in AM0644-741, a large robustly star forming ring galaxy. The galaxy's ISM is concentrated in the 42-kpc diameter ring and appears dominated by HI, with a global molecular fraction of only 6.2%. Outside the starburst peak, the gas ring appears gravitationally stable (Q_gas = 3-11). Including the stellar component lowers Q overall, but not enough to make Q100 Myr confinement time in the starburst ring, which amplifies the effects of embedded massive stars and SNe. The ring's molecular ISM becomes dominated by small clouds, causing H2 to be significantly underestimated by 12CO line fluxes: in effect X_CO >> X_Gal despite the ring's >solar metallicity. The observed HI is primarily a low density photo-dissociation product, i.e., a tracer rather than a precursor of star formation. Such an "over-cooked" ISM may be a general characteristic of evolved ring galaxies.

  18. Eruption sequence of the Suwanoharu tuff ring in the Pliocene Oyano formation, western Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, H.; Yokose, H.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanism in the Ariake sea region, west Kyushu, Japan, where is the northern extension of the Okinawa trough, have been active during the last 5 million years, from Pliocene to present Unzen volcano. The region has been subsided with development of the tectonic graben. Pliocene Oyano formation is predominated in shallow marine pyroclastic deposits including some base surge deposits. A series of stratified pyroclastic deposits, which were originated by phreatomagmatic eruption cycles is exposed on a sea cliff and is considered to be a remnant of tuff ring, which is called Suwanoharu tuff ring. Suwanoharu tuff ring is expected to preserve the complete eruption sequence. The sequence is basically alternation of massive white tuff layers and laminated gray coarse to lapilli tuff layers. We can identify seven eruption cycles bounded by the massive white air fall pyroclastic deposits (unit 1- 7). The gray pyroclastic deposits consist of massive dark gray medium tuff, crudely laminated medium to coarse-grained tuff, inversely graded lapilli tuff, cross-bedded lapilli tuff, and lapillistone and are considered to be a base surge deposit. Ascending to the eruption cycles, the thickness of massive white tuff layers is decreasing, but the gray layers are increasing. Representative samples were collected from 42 horizons of the tuff ring sequence and analyzed the bulk rock chemical compositions using XRF and the mineral assemblages using XRD. The bulk rock chemical compositions of the gray layers changes from andesite at the lower horizon to basalt at the upper horizon. On the other hand, massive white tuff layers have almost identical and are andesite. Because the compositions of basal layers are very similar to the silt of the basement rock, the beds in the unit 1 may have been deposited fragmented basement rocks by the first phreatomagmatic eruption. At the upper layers of the first eruption cycle (unit 1), chlorine contents are up to the maximum level (ca. 4%) and the

  19. Piracy of decay-accelerating factor (CD55) signal transduction by the diffusely adhering strain Escherichia coli C1845 promotes cytoskeletal F-actin rearrangements in cultured human intestinal INT407 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, I; Servin, A L; Bernet-Camard, M F

    1998-09-01

    Diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 (clinical isolate) harboring the fimbrial adhesin F1845 can infect cultured human differentiated intestinal epithelial cells; this process is followed by the disassembly of the actin network in the apical domain. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism by which DAEC C1845 promotes F-actin rearrangements. For this purpose, we used a human embryonic intestinal cell line (INT407) expressing the membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein-anchored decay-accelerating factor (DAF), the receptor of the F1845 adhesin. We show here that infection of INT407 cells by DAEC C1845 can provoke dramatic F-actin rearrangements without cell entry. Clustering of phosphotyrosines was observed, revealing that the DAEC C1845-DAF interaction involves the recruitment of signal transduction molecules. A pharmacological approach with a subset of inhibitors of signal transduction molecules was used to identify the cascade of signal transduction molecules that are coupled to the DAF, that are activated upon infection, and that promote the F-actin rearrangements. DAEC C1845-induced F-actin rearrangements can be blocked dose dependently by protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cgamma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and Ca2+ inhibitors. F-actin rearrangements and blocking by inhibitors were observed after infection of the cells with two E. coli recombinants carrying the plasmids containing the fimbrial adhesin F1845 or the fimbrial hemagglutinin Dr, belonging to the same family of adhesins. These findings show that the DAEC Dr family of pathogens promotes alterations in the intestinal cell cytoskeleton by piracy of the DAF-GPI signal cascade without bacterial cell entry.

  20. NanoRocks: A Long-Term Microgravity Experiment to Stydy Planet Formation and Planetary Ring Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, J.; Colwell, J. E.; Dove, A.; Maukonen, D.; Brown, N.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the results of the NanoRocks experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), which simulates collisions that occur in protoplanetary disks and planetary ring systems. A critical stage of the process of early planet formation is the growth of solid bodies from mm-sized chondrules and aggregates to km-sized planetesimals. To characterize the collision behavior of dust in protoplanetary conditions, experimental data is required, working hand in hand with models and numerical simulations. In addition, the collisional evolution of planetary rings takes place in the same collisional regime. The objective of the NanoRocks experiment is to study low-energy collisions of mm-sized particles of different shapes and materials. An aluminum tray (~8x8x2cm) divided into eight sample cells holding different types of particles gets shaken every 60 s providing particles with initial velocities of a few cm/s. In September 2014, NanoRocks reached ISS and 220 video files, each covering one shaking cycle, have already been downloaded from Station. The data analysis is focused on the dynamical evolution of the multi-particle systems and on the formation of cluster. We track the particles down to mean relative velocities less than 1 mm/s where we observe cluster formation. The mean velocity evolution after each shaking event allows for a determination of the mean coefficient of restitution for each particle set. These values can be used as input into protoplanetary disk and planetary rings simulations. In addition, the cluster analysis allows for a determination of the mean final cluster size and the average particle velocity of clustering onset. The size and shape of these particle clumps is crucial to understand the first stages of planet formation inside protoplanetary disks as well as many a feature of Saturn's rings. We report on the results from the ensemble of these collision experiments and discuss applications to planetesimal formation and planetary ring

  1. The transition from complex crater to peak-ring basin on Mercury: New observations from MESSENGER flyby data and constraints on basin formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Schon, Samuel C.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Prockter, Louise M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Solomon, Sean C.; Strom, Robert G.

    2011-12-01

    The study of peak-ring basins and other impact crater morphologies transitional between complex craters and multi-ring basins is important to our understanding of the mechanisms for basin formation on the terrestrial planets. Mercury has the largest population, and the largest population per area, of peak-ring basins and protobasins in the inner solar system and thus provides important data for examining questions surrounding peak-ring basin formation. New flyby images from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have more than doubled the area of Mercury viewed at close range, providing nearly complete global coverage of the planet's surface when combined with flyby data from Mariner 10. We use this new near-global dataset to compile a catalog of peak-ring basins and protobasins on Mercury, including measurements of the diameters of the basin rim crest, interior ring, and central peak (if present). Our catalog increases the population of peak-ring basins by ˜150% and protobasins by ˜100% over previous catalogs, including 44 newly identified peak-ring basins (total=74) and 17 newly identified protobasins (total=32). A newly defined transitional basin type, the ringed peak-cluster basin (total=9), is also described. The new basin catalog confirms that Mercury has the largest population of peak-ring basins of the terrestrial planets and also places the onset rim-crest diameter for peak-ring basins at 126-26+33km, which is intermediate between the onset diameter for peak-ring basins on the Moon and those for the other terrestrial planets. The ratios of ring diameter to rim-crest diameter further emphasize that protobasins and peak-ring basins are parts of a continuum of basin morphologies relating to their processes of formation, in contrast to previous views that these forms are distinct. Comparisons of the predictions of peak-ring basin-formation models with the characteristics of the basin catalog for Mercury

  2. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-08-15

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  3. SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to formation of ring sideroblasts in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconte, Valeria; Rogers, Heesun J; Singh, Jarnail; Barnard, John; Bupathi, Manoj; Traina, Fabiola; McMahon, James; Makishima, Hideki; Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna; Jerez, Andres; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Advani, Anjali S; Copelan, Edward; Koseki, Haruhiko; Isono, Kyoichi; Padgett, Richard A; Osman, Sami; Koide, Kazunori; O'Keefe, Christine; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Tiu, Ramon V

    2012-10-18

    Whole exome/genome sequencing has been fundamental in the identification of somatic mutations in the spliceosome machinery in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other hematologic disorders. SF3B1, splicing factor 3b subunit 1 is mutated in 60%-80% of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) and RARS associated with thrombocytosis (RARS-T), 2 distinct subtypes of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDSs/MPNs). An idiosyncratic feature of RARS/RARS-T is the presence of abnormal sideroblasts characterized by iron overload in the mitochondria, called RS. Based on the high frequency of mutations of SF3B1 in RARS/RARS-T, we investigated the consequences of SF3B1 alterations. Ultrastructurally, SF3B1 mutants showed altered iron distribution characterized by coarse iron deposits compared with wild-type RARS patients by transmission electron microscopy. SF3B1 knockdown experiments in K562 cells resulted in down-regulation of U2-type intron-splicing by RT-PCR. RNA-sequencing analysis of SF3B1 mutants showed differentially used genes relevant in MDS pathogenesis, such as ASXL1, CBL, EZH, and RUNX families. A SF3B pharmacologic inhibitor, meayamycin, induced the formation of RS in healthy BM cells. Further, BM aspirates of Sf3b1 heterozygous knockout mice showed RS by Prussian blue. In conclusion, we report the first experimental evidence of the association between SF3B1 and RS phenotype. Our data suggest that SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to RS formation.

  4. Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  5. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient.

  6. Formation of fine dust on Saturn's rings as suggested by the presence of spokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1983-01-01

    The common interpretation of spokes on the B ring of Saturn is that they are the result of light scattered by electrostatically levitated micrometer- and submicrometer-size dust particles. The origin of this dust in terms of radiation-induced thermal fatigue and collisions between the particles of the ring as well as meteoritic bombardment is investigated.

  7. Directionality and coordination of dehydration and ring formation during biosynthesis of the lantibiotic nisin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelski, J.; Khusainov, R.; Kuipers, O.P.

    2009-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a potent antimicrobial substance, which contains unusual lanthionine rings and dehydrated amino acid residues and is produced by Lactococcus lactis. Recently, the nisin biosynthetic machinery has been applied to introduce lanthionine rings in peptides other than nisin with p

  8. Formation of ring calcium oxalate patterns induced by domains in DPPC Langmuir-Blodgett films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ming Liu; Sui Ping Deng; Hui Zheng; Jian Ming Ouyang

    2007-01-01

    The ring patterns of calcium oxalate crystals were induced by domains in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of dipalmitoylpho-sphatidylcholine (DPPC). The result was explained by the defects at the ring boundaries of liquid condensed (LC) and liquid expanded (LE) phases of LB film. These boundaries could provide less free energy and much more nucleating sites for COM crystals.

  9. Large ring polymers align FtsZ polymers for normal septum formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guendogdu, Muhammet E.; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Pavlendova, Nada; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Gündoğdu, Muhammet E.

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinesis in bacteria is initiated by polymerization of the tubulin homologue FtsZ into a circular structure at midcell, the Z-ring. This structure functions as a scaffold for all other cell division proteins. Several proteins support assembly of the Z-ring, and one such protein, SepF, is required

  10. Study of the Formation of the First Aromatic Rings in the Pyrolysis of Cyclopentene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbinet, Olivier; Rodriguez, Anne; Husson, Benoit; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Zhandong; Cheng, Zhanjun; Qi, Fei

    2016-02-11

    The thermal decomposition of cyclopentene was studied in a jet-stirred reactor operated at constant pressure and temperature to provide new experimental information about the formation of the first aromatic rings from cyclic C5 species. Experiments were carried out at a residence time of 1 s, a pressure of 106.7 kPa, temperatures ranging from 773 to 1073 K and under diluted conditions (cyclopentene inlet mole fraction of 0.04). Species were quantified using three analytical methods: gas chromatography, synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry (SVUV-PIMS), and single photon laser ionization mass spectrometry (SPI-MS). Several species could be quantified using both methods allowing comparison of experimental data obtained with the three apparatuses. Discrepancies observed in mole fraction profiles of some large aromatics suggest that the direct sampling in the gas phase (with a molecular beam or a capillary tube) provide more reliable results. The main reaction products are 1,3-cyclopentadiene and hydrogen. The formation of many unsaturated C2-C6 olefins, diolefins and alkynes was also observed but in smaller amounts. Benzene, toluene, styrene, indene, and naphthalene were detected from 923 K. SVUV-PIMS data allowed the identification of another C6H6 isomer which is 1,5-hexadien-3-yne rather than fulvene. The quantification of the cyclopentadienyl radical was obtained from SVUV-PIMS and SPI-MS data with some uncertainty induced by the possible contribution to the signal for m/z 65 of a fragment from the decomposition of a larger ion. This is the first time that a radical is quantified in a jet-stirred reactor using non-optical techniques. SPI-MS analyses allowed the detection of species likely being combination products of allyl and cyclopentadienyl radicals. A model was developed for the pyrolysis of cyclopentene. This model includes routes of formation of aromatics from the cyclopentadienyl radical. The comparison of experimental and

  11. G345.45+1.50: An expanding ring-like structure with massive star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Calderon, Cristian; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Garay, Guido; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Bergman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Ring-like structures in the ISM are commonly associated with high-mass stars. Kinematic studies of large structures in GMCs toward these ring-like structures may help us to understand how massive stars form. The origin and properties of the ring-like structure G345.45+1.50 is investigated through observations of the 13CO(3-2) line. The aim of the observations is to determine the kinematics in the region and to compare physical characteristics estimated from gas emission with those previously determined using dust continuum emission. The 13CO(3-2) line was mapped toward the whole ring using the APEX telescope. The ring is found to be expanding with a velocity of 1.0 km/s, containing a total mass of 6.9e3 Msun, which agrees well with that determined using 1.2 mm dust continuum emission. An expansion timescale of 3e6 yr and a total energy of 7e46 erg are estimated. The origin of the ring might have been a supernova explosion, since a 35.5 cm source, J165920-400424, is located at the center of the ring without an...

  12. Surveying approaches to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds between a pyran and an adjacent ring

    OpenAIRE

    Frein, Jeffrey D.; Rovis, Tomislav

    2006-01-01

    We have examined several methods for the stereoselective formation of carbon-carbon bonds between contiguous rings where a stereogenic center is already present. The approaches investigated were a [1,3] oxygen to carbon rearrangement of cyclic vinyl acetals, an intermolecular enolsilane addition into an in situ generated oxocarbenium ion, an intramolecular conjugate addition of tethered alkoxy enones, and epimerization of several α-pyranyl cycloalkanones. These routes have been found to be co...

  13. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-02-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  14. Gravitational vortices and clump formation in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  15. Drosophila Kelch functions with Cullin-3 to organize the ring canal actin cytoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Andrew M.; Cooley, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Kelch (KEL) is the founding member of a diverse protein family defined by a repeated sequence motif known as the KEL repeat (KREP). Several KREP proteins, including Drosophila KEL, bind filamentous actin (F-actin) and contribute to its organization. Recently, a subset of KREP proteins has been shown to function as substrate adaptor proteins for cullin-RING (really interesting new gene) ubiquitin E3 ligases. In this study, we demonstrate that association of Drosophila K...

  16. F-actin-based extensions of the head cyst cell adhere to the maturing spermatids to maintain them in a tight bundle and prevent their premature release in Drosophila testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Krishanu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, all the 64 clonally derived spermatocytes differentiate in syncytium inside two somatic-origin cyst cells. They elongate to form slender spermatids, which are individualized and then released into the seminal vesicle. During individualization, differentiating spermatids are organized in a tight bundle inside the cyst, which is expected to play an important role in sperm selection. However, actual significance of this process and its underlying mechanism are unclear. Results We show that dynamic F-actin-based processes extend from the head cyst cell at the start of individualization, filling the interstitial space at the rostral ends of the maturing spermatid bundle. In addition to actin, these structures contained lamin, beta-catenin, dynamin, myosin VI and several other filopodial components. Further, pharmacological and genetic analyses showed that cytoskeletal stability and dynamin function are essential for their maintenance. Disruption of these F-actin based processes was associated with spermatid bundle disassembly and premature sperm release inside the testis. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggests that the head cyst cell adheres to the maturing spermatid heads through F-actin-based extensions, thus maintaining them in a tight bundle. This is likely to regulate mature sperm release into the seminal vesicle. Overall, this process bears resemblance to mammalian spermiation.

  17. Rice chalky ring formation caused by temporal reduction in starch biosynthesis during osmotic adjustment under foehn-induced dry wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hiroshi; Masumoto-Kubo, Chisato; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Morita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Foehn-like extreme hot and dry wind conditions (34°C, >2.5 kPa vapor pressure deficit, and 7 m s(-1)) strongly affect grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.). This is a current concern because of the increasing frequency and intensity of combined heat and water-deficit stress under climate change. Foehn-induced dry wind conditions during the grain-filling stage increase ring-shaped chalkiness as a result of spatiotemporal reduction in starch accumulation in the endosperm, but kernel growth is sometimes maintained by osmotic adjustment. Here, we assess the effects of dry wind on chalky ring formation in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Our results showed that hot and dry wind conditions that lasted for >24 h dramatically increased chalky ring formation. Hot and dry wind conditions temporarily reduced panicle water potential to -0.65 MPa; however, kernel growth was maintained by osmotic adjustment at control levels with increased transport of assimilate to the growing kernels. Dynamic tracer analysis with a nano-electrospray-ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometer and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that starch degradation was negligible in the short-term treatment. Overall expression of starch synthesis-related genes was found to be down-regulated at moderately low water potential. Because the events observed at low water potential preceded the packing of starch granules in cells, we concluded that reduced rates of starch biosynthesis play a central role in the events of cellular metabolism that are altered at osmotic adjustment, which leads to chalky ring formation under short-term hot and dry wind conditions.

  18. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina eGeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  19. Formation of a 6FDA-based ring polyimide with nanoscale cavity evaluated by DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamai, Yoshinori

    2005-04-01

    The computer-aided molecular design of a rigid ring molecule has been performed. As a candidate molecule, the polyimide derived from 2,2-bis(3,4-carboxylphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) with m-phenylenediamine (MDA) has been used. The optimized structures of the 6FDA-MDA model compounds including a precursor type amic acid model were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. Using the optimized structures of the model compounds, the probable combinations to form a flat ring polyimide are considered by taking the spatial angles between the respective aromatic groups into consideration. We selected several combinations with different conformations and the number of monomer units. We showed that the dimer, trimer and tetramer of not only the 6FDA-based ring imide but also the corresponding ring amic acid can have a stable geometry. Each of them contains a cavity of sub-nanometer size and characteristic shape. Among them, the interaction energy with some guest molecules are evaluated for the smallest ring imide constructed from two units of 6FDA-MDA using the DFT calculations.

  20. Sintering-induced Dust Ring Formation in Protoplanetary Disks: Application to the HL Tau Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sirono, Sin-iti; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    The latest observation of HL Tau by ALMA revealed spectacular concentric dust rings in its circumstellar disk. We attempt to explain the multiple ring structure as a consequence of aggregate sintering. Sintering is a process that reduces the sticking efficiency of dust aggregates, and takes place where the temperature is slightly below the sublimation point of some constituent material. We here present a dust growth model that incorporates sintering, and use it to simulate global dust evolution in a modeled HL Tau disk taking into account coagulation, fragmentation, and radial inward drift. We show that the aggregates collisionally disrupt and pile up at multiple locations where different volatiles cause sintering. At wavelengths of 0.87--1.3 mm, these "sintering zones" appear as bright, optically thick rings with spectral slope $\\approx$ 2, whereas the non-sintering zones as darker, optically thinner rings of spectral slope $\\approx$ 2.3--2.5, consistent with major bright and dark rings found in the HL Tau d...

  1. Numerical simulations of expanding supershells in dwarf irregular galaxies. II. Formation of giant HI rings

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, E I; Basu, Shantanu

    2004-01-01

    We perform numerical hydrodynamic modeling of various physical processes that can form an HI ring as is observed in Holmberg I. Three energetic mechanisms are considered: multiple supernova explosions (SNe), a hypernova explosion associated with a gamma ray burst (GRB), and the vertical impact of a high velocity cloud (HVC). The total released energy has an upper limit of 10^54 ergs. We find that multiple SNe are in general more effective in producing shells that break out of the disk than a hypernova explosion of the same total energy. As a consequence, multiple SNe form rings with a high ring-to-center contrast K 45 deg) the HI image is characterized by two kidney-shaped density enhancements and a mild central depression.

  2. Defect Formation in Superconducting Rings: External Fields and Finite-Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. J.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Consistent with the predictions of Kibble and Zurek, scaling behaviour has been seen in the production of fluxoids during temperature quenches of superconducting rings. However, deviations from the canonical behaviour arise because of finite-size effects and stray external fields. Technical developments, including laser heating and the use of long Josephson tunnel junctions, have improved the quality of data that can be obtained. With new experiments in mind we perform large-scale 3D simulations of quenches of small, thin rings of various geometries with fully dynamical electromagnetic fields, at nonzero externally applied magnetic flux. We find that the outcomes are, in practise, indistinguishable from those of much simpler Gaussian analytical approximations in which the rings are treated as one-dimensional systems and the magnetic field fluctuation-free.

  3. Enzymatic formation of carbohydrate rings catalyzed by single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Moon Seop; Park, Jong Pil; Seo, Dongkyun; Chang, Sung-Jin; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Sang Yup; Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-05-01

    Macrocyclic carbohydrate rings were formed via enzymatic reactions around single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a catalyst. Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, starch substrate and SWNTs were reacted in buffer solution to yield cyclodextrin (CD) rings wrapped around individual SWNTs. Atomic force microscopy showed the resulting complexes to be rings of 12-50 nm in diameter, which were highly soluble and dispersed in aqueous solution. They were further characterized by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulation using density functional theory calculation. In the absence of SWNT, hydrogen bonding between glucose units determines the structure of maltose (the precursor of CD) and produces the curvature along the glucose chain. Wrapping SWNT along the short axis was preferred with curvature in the presence of SWNTs and with the hydrophobic interactions between the SWNTs and CD molecules. This synthetic approach may be useful for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes for development of nanostructures.

  4. Planetary Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft. Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The main rings of Saturn comprise our system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty...

  5. Simultaneous Synthesis of both Rings of Chromenes via a Benzannulation/o-Quinone Methide Formation/Electrocyclization Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Nilanjana; Korthals, Keith A.; Wulff, William D.

    2011-01-01

    A new route to the chromene ring system has been developed which involves the reaction of an α,β-unsaturated Fischer carbene complex of chromium with a propargyl ether bearing an alkenyl group on the propargylic carbon. This transformation involves a cascade of reactions that begins with a benzannulation reaction and is followed by the formation of an o-quinone methide and finally, results in the emergence of a chromene upon an electrocyclization. This reaction was extended to the provide access to by employing an aryl carbene complex. This constitutes the first synthesis of chromenes in which both rings of the chromene system are generated in a single step and is highlighted in the synthesis of lapachenole and Vitamin E. PMID:22176537

  6. Absence of nucleoid occlusion effector Noc impairs formation of orthogonal FtsZ rings during Staphylococcus aureus cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Helena; Jorge, Ana M; Pinho, Mariana G

    2011-06-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides by synthesizing the septum in three orthogonal planes over three consecutive division cycles. This process has to be tightly coordinated with chromosome segregation to avoid bisection of the nucleoid by the septum. Here we show that deletion of the nucleoid occlusion effector Noc in S. aureus results in the formation of Z-rings over the nucleoid, as well as in DNA breaks, indicating that Noc has an important role as an antiguillotine checkpoint that prevents septa from forming over the DNA. Furthermore, Noc deleted cells show multiple Z-rings which are no longer placed in perpendicular planes. We propose that the axis of chromosome segregation has a role in determining the placement of the division septum. This is achieved via the action of Noc which restricts the placement of the division septum to one of an infinite number of potential division planes that exist in S. aureus.

  7. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Irminger Ring Formation and Boundary–Interior Heat Exchange in FLAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M. F.; Bower, A.S.; Furey, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of warm-core anticyclones shed by the Irminger Current offWestGreenland, known asIrminger rings, to the restratification of the upper layers of the Labrador Sea is investigated in the 1/ 128Family of Linked Atlantic Models Experiment (FLAME) model. The model output, covering the 199

  8. G345.45+1.50: an expanding ring-like structure with massive star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Calderón, Cristian; Bronfman, Leonardo; Nyman, Lars-Åke; Garay, Guido; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Bergman, Per

    2016-11-01

    Context. Ring-like structures in the interstellar medium (ISM) are commonly associated with high-mass stars. Kinematic studies of large structures in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) toward these ring-like structures may help us to understand how massive stars form. Aims: The origin and properties of the ring-like structure G345.45+1.50 is investigated through observations of the 13CO(3-2) line. The aim of the observations is to determine the kinematics in the region and to compare physical characteristics estimated from gas emission with those previously determined using dust continuum emission. This area in the sky is well suited for studies like this because the ring is located 1.5° above the Galactic plane at 1.8 kpc from the Sun, thus molecular structures are rarely superposed on our line of sight, which minimizes confusion effects that might hinder identifying of individual molecular condensations. Methods: The 13CO(3-2) line was mapped toward the whole ring using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope. The observations cover 17' × 20' in the sky with a spatial resolution of 0.2 pc and an rms of 1 K at a spectral resolution of 0.1 km s-1. Results: The ring is found to be expanding with a velocity of 1.0 km s-1, containing a total mass of 6.9 × 103M⊙, which agrees well with that determined using 1.2 mm dust continuum emission. An expansion timescale of 3 × 106 yr and a total energy of 7 × 1046 erg are estimated. The origin of the ring might have been a supernova explosion, since a 35.5 cm source, J165920-400424, is located at the center of the ring without an infrared counterpart. The ring is fragmented, and 104 clumps were identified with diameters of between 0.3 and 1.6 pc, masses of between 2.3 and 7.5 × 102M⊙, and densities of between 102 and 104 cm-3. At least 18% of the clumps are forming stars, as is shown in infrared images. Assuming that the clumps can be modeled as Bonnor-Ebert spheres, 13 clumps are collapsing, and the rest of

  9. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808B, which is in the process of PR formation. We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging. PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Both PRGs contain young CSSs ($< 1$ Gyr) with masses of up to 5$\\times$10$^6$M$_\\odot$, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive ...

  10. Volumetric analysis of complex lunar craters - Implications for basin ring formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, W. S.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The crater to basin transition in complex lunar craters is characterized by combining morphological and volumetric analyses of their central peaks with subsurface data from terrestrial complex impact structures which suggest that the amount of uplifted material, as judged from its depth of origin, continues to increase with increasing rim diameter. This latter phenomenon implies that a redistribution of uplifted material away from a centralized peak may occur in the larger craters. The morphological and volumetric changes described occur over a rim diameter range of 51-80 km, which is considerably lower than the previously proposed range for the crater to basin transition of 140-175 km. Evidence is given in support of a crater to basin transition which begins at 51-80 km, and is characterized by a relative reduction in central peak volume and a development of rings of floor roughening which may be precursors of peak ring development.

  11. Formation and Evolution Mechanism of Plasmon Resonance from Single Ring-Shaped Nanotube to Dimer and Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Q. Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation and evolution mechanisms of plasmon resonance from single Ring-shaped nanotube to dimer and arrays are studied; an attempt has been made to bridge the gap between single-tube, dimer, and array. Results show that resonant modes can be divided into three types: quadrupole, hexapole, and octupole resonance from visible to near infrared region, and each mode maintains relatively stable resonant characteristics, but the optical transmission properties including redshift and blueshift of the modes and band gap are highly tunable by adjusting the number of nanotube and intertube spacing values. The field-interference mechanism has been suggested to explain the physical origin.

  12. Formation of x-ray Newton’s rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Nishikino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton’s rings (NRs were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  13. Formation of x-ray Newton's rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Noboru; Tomita, Takuro; Minami, Yasuo; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Izutsu, Rui; Baba, Motoyoshi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Suemoto, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs) laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton's rings (NRs) were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  14. Formation of irregular rings in silica aerogel structure during the sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinić Ivana I.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of low-density, highly disordered silica aerogel with initial bulk density of 0.16 g/cm3, were sintered isothermally in different time intervals at 1000ºC. Structural changes during the sintering process have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Defect modes of irregular three and four membered rings were observed in the Raman spectra of sintered samples.

  15. Ab Initio Calculations of 31P NMR Chemical Shielding Anisotropy Tensors in Phosphates: Variations Due to Ring Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M. Alam

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ring formation in phosphate systems is expected to influence both the magnitude and orientation of the phosphorus (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA tensor. Ab initio calculations of the 31P CSA tensor in both cyclic and acyclic phosphate clusters were performed as a function of the number of phosphate tetrahedral in the system. The calculation of the 31P CSA tensors employed the GAUSSIAN 98 implementation of the gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO method at the Hartree-Fock (HF level. It is shown that both the 31P CSA tensor anisotropy, and the isotropic chemical shielding can be used for the identification of cyclic phosphates. The differences between the 31P CSA tensor in acyclic and cyclic phosphate systems become less pronounced with increasing number of phosphate groups within the ring. The orientation of the principal components for the 31P CSA tensor shows some variation due to cyclization, most notably with the smaller, highly strained ring systems.

  16. Ring Structure Formation in Protoplanetary Disks due to the Two-Fluid Secular Gravitational Instability: An Indicator of Dust Concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Sanemichi Z

    2013-01-01

    The instability in protoplanetary disks due to gas-dust friction and self-gravity of gas and dust is investigated by linear analysis. For conditions typical of protoplanetaly disks, the instability grows, even in gravitationally stable disks, on a timescale of order $10^{4-5}$yr at a radius of order 100AU. If we ignore the dynamical feedback from dust grains in the gas equation of motion, the instability reduces to the so-called "secular gravitational instability", that was investigated previously as the instability of dust in a fixed background gas flow. In this work, we solve the equation of motion for both gas and dust consistently and find that long-wavelength perturbations are stable, in contrast to the secular gravitational instability in the simplified treatment. The instability is expected to form ring structures in protoplanetary disks. The width of the ring formed at a radius of 100 AU is a few tens of AU. Therefore, the instability is a candidate for the formation mechanism of observed ring-like st...

  17. Rings and arcs around evolved stars - I. Fingerprints of the last gasps in the formation process of planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Larios, G.; Santamaría, E.; Guerrero, M. A.; Marquez-Lugo, R. A.; Sabin, L.; Toalá, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    Evolved stars such as asymptotic giant branch stars (AGB), post-AGB stars, proto-planetary nebulae (proto-PNe), and planetary nebulae (PNe) show rings and arcs around them and their nebular shells. We have searched for these morphological features in optical Hubble Space Telescope and mid-infrared Spitzer Space Telescope images of ˜650 proto-PNe and PNe and discovered them in 29 new sources. Adding those to previous detections, we derive a frequency of occurrence ≃8 per cent. All images have been processed to remove the underlying envelope emission and enhance outer faint structures to investigate the spacing between rings and arcs and their number. The averaged time lapse between consecutive rings and arcs is estimated to be in the range 500-1200 yr. The spacing between them is found to be basically constant for each source, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the formation of these structures in the final stages of evolved stars is stable during time periods of the order of the total duration of the ejection. In our sample, this period of time spans ≤4500 yr.

  18. GRAIL Gravity Observations of the Transition from Complex Crater to Peak-Ring Basin on the Moon: Implications for Crustal Structure and Impact Basin Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Bierson, Carver J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission provide the opportunity to analyze the detailed gravity and crustal structure of impact features in the morphological transition from complex craters to peak-ring basins on the Moon. We calculate average radial profiles for free-air anomalies and Bouguer anomalies for peak-ring basins, proto-basins, and the largest complex craters. Complex craters and proto-basins have free-air anomalies that are positively correlated with surface topography, unlike the prominent lunar mascons (positive free-air anomalies in areas of low elevation) associated with large basins. The Bouguer gravity anomaly profiles of complex craters are highly irregular, with central positive anomalies that are generally absent or not clearly tied to interior morphology. In contrast, gravity profiles for peak-ring basins (approx. 200 km to 580 km) are much more regular and are highly correlated with surface morphology. A central positive Bouguer anomaly is confined within the peak ring and a negative Bouguer anomaly annulus extends from the edge of the positive anomaly outward to about the rim crest. A number of degraded basins lacking interior peak rings have diameters and gravity patterns similar to those of well-preserved peak-ring basins. If these structures represent degraded peak-ring basins, the number of peak-ring basins on the Moon would increase by more than a factor of two to 34. The gravity anomalies within basins are interpreted to be due to uplift of the mantle confined within the peak ring and an annulus of thickened crust between the peak ring and rim crest. We hypothesize that mantle uplift is influenced by interaction between the transient cavity and the mantle. Further, mascon formation is generally disconnected from the number of basin rings formed and occurs over a wide range of basin sizes. These observations have important implications for models of basin and mascon formation on the

  19. GRAIL gravity observations of the transition from complex crater to peak-ring basin on the Moon: Implications for crustal structure and impact basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Bierson, Carver J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-08-01

    High-resolution gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission provide the opportunity to analyze the detailed gravity and crustal structure of impact features in the morphological transition from complex craters to peak-ring basins on the Moon. We calculate average radial profiles of free-air anomalies and Bouguer anomalies for peak-ring basins, protobasins, and the largest complex craters. Complex craters and protobasins have free-air anomalies that are positively correlated with surface topography, unlike the prominent lunar mascons (positive free-air anomalies in areas of low elevation) associated with large basins. The Bouguer gravity anomaly profiles of complex craters are highly irregular, with central positive anomalies that are generally absent or not clearly tied to interior morphology. In contrast, gravity profiles for peak-ring basins (∼200 km to 580 km) are much more regular and are highly correlated with surface morphology. A central positive Bouguer anomaly is confined within the peak ring and a negative Bouguer anomaly annulus extends from the edge of the positive anomaly outward to about the rim crest. A number of degraded basins lacking interior peak rings have diameters and gravity patterns similar to those of well-preserved peak-ring basins. If these structures represent degraded peak-ring basins, the number of peak-ring basins on the Moon would increase by more than a factor of two to 34. The gravity anomalies within basins are interpreted to be due to uplift of the mantle confined within the peak ring and an annulus of thickened crust between the peak ring and rim crest. We hypothesize that mantle uplift is influenced by interaction between the transient cavity and the mantle. Further, mascon formation is generally disconnected from the number of basin rings formed and occurs over a wide range of basin sizes. These observations have important implications for models of basin and mascon formation on the Moon

  20. Formation pathways of gamma-butyrolactone from the furan ring of tegafur during its conversion to 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamiya, Ikuo; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Matsushima, Eiji; Nagayama, Sekio

    2010-08-01

    Tegafur (FT) is a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug that has been clinically used for various cancer chemotherapies. The following metabolites of FT were identified in patients: 5-FU, fluoro-beta-alanine, and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and its acidic form, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). GBL/GHB, which is probably generated from the furan ring of FT, inhibits tumor cell angiogenesis, contributing to the antitumor effect of FT-based therapies. In the present study, we identified the metabolites formed from the furan ring of FT by CYP2A6 and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization procedures and clarified the metabolic pathway of FT to GBL/GHB. Succinaldehyde (SA) and 4-hydroxybutanal (4-OH-BTL) were produced as the metabolites because of the cleavage of the furan ring of FT during its conversion to 5-FU in cDNA-expressed CYP2A6 and purified TPase, respectively; however, GBL/GHB was hardly detected in cDNA-expressed CYP2A6 and purified TPase. GBL/GHB was formed after human hepatic microsomes or cDNA-expressed CYP2A6 mixed with cytosol were incubated with FT. Furthermore, 4-OH-BTL was converted to GBL/GHB in the microsomes and cytosol. These results suggest that GBL/GHB is generated from FT through the formation of SA and 4-OH-BTL but not directly from FT. Furthermore, the amount of 5-FU and GBL/GHB formed in the hepatic S9 was markedly decreased in the presence of a CYP2A6 inhibitor, suggesting that GBL/GHB may be mainly generated through the CYP2A6-mediated formation of SA.

  1. From N-alkylimidazole ligands at a rhenium center: ring opening or formation of NHC complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertos, Miguel A; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía; Menéndez-Velázquez, Amador

    2008-10-15

    Cationic rhenium tricarbonyl complexes with three N-alkylimidazole ligands undergo deprotonation of the central CH group upon reaction with 1 equiv of KN(SiMe3)2. For the tris(N-methylimidazole) complex, the metal fragment shifts from N to C, leaving an NHC complex with a nonsubstituted N atom. For compounds with at least one N-mesitylimidazole ligand, the intramolecular attack of the deprotonated carbon onto the central carbon of an N-mesitylimidazole ligand results in ring opening of the latter.

  2. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  3. Lamb Wave-Based Acoustic Radiation Force-Driven Particle Ring Formation Inside a Sessile Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-04-05

    We demonstrate an acoustofluidic device using Lamb waves (LWs) to manipulate polystyrene (PS) microparticles suspended in a sessile droplet of water. The LW-based acoustofluidic platform used in this study is advantageous in that the device is actuated over a range of frequencies without changing the device structure or electrode pattern. In addition, the device is simple to operate and cheap to fabricate. The LWs, produced on a piezoelectric substrate, attenuate inside the fluid and create acoustic streaming flow (ASF) in the form of a poloidal flow with toroidal vortices. The PS particles experience direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) in addition to being influenced by the ASF, which drive the concentration of particles to form a ring. This phenomenon was previously attributed to the ASF alone, but the present experimental results confirm that the ARF plays an important role in forming the particle ring, which would not be possible in the presence of only the ASF. We used a range of actuation frequencies (45-280 MHz), PS particle diameters (1-10 μm), and droplet volumes (5, 7.5, and 10 μL) to experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon.

  4. The formation of Saturn's satellites and rings, as influenced by Saturn's contraction history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, J. B.; Grossman, A. S.; Moore, R.; Graboske, H. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The paper investigates constraints imposed on the ice content of Saturn's satellites and rings by the planet's high luminosity during the early part of its quasi-equilibrium contraction phase. It is assumed that the addition of ices to the satellites was not completed until after the start of the quasi-equilibrium contraction and that the condensation of ices ceased at the same time within the primordial nebulae of Jupiter and Saturn. Using previously derived limits on the time of condensation cessation for Jupiter's system, the following tentative conclusions are made: (1) Titan is the innermost satellite at whose position a methane-containing ice could condense; (2) water ice could have condensed at the positions of all the satellites; (3) the systematic decrease in the mass of the regular satellites with decreasing distance from the planet may have been caused, in part, by the larger time intervals, for the closer satellites, between the start of contraction and the first condensation of ices at their positions; and (4) ammonia ices, primarily NH4SH, were able to condense at the positions of all but the innermost satellites. It is also shown that water ice could have condensed in the region of the rings near the end of the condensation period.

  5. Flood-Ring Formation and Root Development in Response to Experimental Flooding of Young Quercus robur Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copini, Paul; den Ouden, Jan; Robert, Elisabeth M. R.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Loesberg, Walter A.; Goudzwaard, Leo; Sass-Klaassen, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Spring flooding in riparian forests can cause significant reductions in earlywood-vessel size in submerged stem parts of ring-porous tree species, leading to the presence of ‘flood rings’ that can be used as a proxy to reconstruct past flooding events, potentially over millennia. The mechanism of flood-ring formation and the relation with timing and duration of flooding are still to be elucidated. In this study, we experimentally flooded 4-year-old Quercus robur trees at three spring phenophases (late bud dormancy, budswell, and internode expansion) and over different flooding durations (2, 4, and 6 weeks) to a stem height of 50 cm. The effect of flooding on root and vessel development was assessed immediately after the flooding treatment and at the end of the growing season. Ring width and earlywood-vessel size and density were measured at 25- and 75-cm stem height and collapsed vessels were recorded. Stem flooding inhibited earlywood-vessel development in flooded stem parts. In addition, flooding upon budswell and internode expansion led to collapsed earlywood vessels below the water level. At the end of the growing season, mean earlywood-vessel size in the flooded stem parts (upon budswell and internode expansion) was always reduced by approximately 50% compared to non-flooded stem parts and 55% compared to control trees. This reduction was already present 2 weeks after flooding and occurred independent of flooding duration. Stem and root flooding were associated with significant root dieback after 4 and 6 weeks and mean radial growth was always reduced with increasing flooding duration. By comparing stem and root flooding, we conclude that flood rings only occur after stem flooding. As earlywood-vessel development was hampered during flooding, a considerable number of narrow earlywood vessels present later in the season, must have been formed after the actual flooding events. Our study indicates that root dieback, together with strongly reduced hydraulic

  6. Hydrogeothermal Convective Circulation Model for the Formation of the Chicxulub Ring of Cenotes in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Rios, E.; Beddows, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite being deeply buried, the topography and geophysical characteristics of the multi-ring Chicxulub impact structure are reflected on the now subaerial Yucatan Peninsula with aligned arcs of cenotes (sinkholes), forming the "Ring of Cenotes". A pending question is the determination of the geological, geochemical, structural features and associated processes that have led to void development, and the upwards propagation of the voids, cross cutting over 1000 m of super-deposited carbonate sequences. Drawing from the published literature on drill core and geophysical surveys undertaken by Pemex, UNAM, and IODP/ICDP, numerical modeling, and general carbonate platform hydrothermal reactive transport models, we provide a conceptual model for the genesis of the Ring of Cenotes. In horizontally bedded carbonate platforms, geothermal gradients will drive convective flow, with strong vertical components specifically in the platform center. In the Yucatan Platform, a high occurrence of anhydrite and dolomite at depth evokes early burial dolomitization and anhydritization, sourcing Mg from seawater. The Chicxulub impact near the center of the platform produced a low permeability and high thermal conductivity melt rock that arguably extends to the basement rock at 3.5 km below surface. Heat of impact enforced the pre-existing geothermal circulation pattern, and even with depletion of the heat of impact, the high thermal conductivity of the crystalline melt would lead to enhanced geothermal gradients in the center of the platform. The cenotes overlying the crater are deep (150+ m) vertical shafts with most (but not all) breaching the surface. The pit geomorphology suggests a bottom-up formation. Excess Si in the shallow groundwater points to a convective circulation with strong vertical components geochemically linking the granodioritic basement rock to the surface. Water temperature and conductivity profiles support ongoing vertical flux in some deep pit cenotes. Within

  7. Formation of Sharp Eccentric Rings in Debris Disks with Gas but Without Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, W.; Kuchner, M.

    2013-01-01

    'Debris disks' around young stars (analogues of the Kuiper Belt in our Solar System) show a variety of non-trivial structures attributed to planetary perturbations and used to constrain the properties of those planets. However, these analyses have largely ignored the fact that some debris disks are found to contain small quantities of gas, a component that all such disks should contain at some level. Several debris disks have been measured with a dust-to-gas ratio of about unity, at which the effect of hydrodynamics on the structure of the disk cannot be ignored. Here we report linear and nonlinear modelling that shows that dust-gas interactions can produce some of the key patterns attributed to planets. We find a robust clumping instability that organizes the dust into narrow, eccentric rings, similar to the Fomalhaut debris disk. The conclusion that such disks might contain planets is not necessarily required to explain these systems.

  8. Formation of sharp eccentric rings in debris disks with gas but without planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, W; Kuchner, M

    2013-07-11

    'Debris disks' around young stars (analogues of the Kuiper Belt in our Solar System) show a variety of non-trivial structures attributed to planetary perturbations and used to constrain the properties of those planets. However, these analyses have largely ignored the fact that some debris disks are found to contain small quantities of gas, a component that all such disks should contain at some level. Several debris disks have been measured with a dust-to-gas ratio of about unity, at which the effect of hydrodynamics on the structure of the disk cannot be ignored. Here we report linear and nonlinear modelling that shows that dust-gas interactions can produce some of the key patterns attributed to planets. We find a robust clumping instability that organizes the dust into narrow, eccentric rings, similar to the Fomalhaut debris disk. The conclusion that such disks might contain planets is not necessarily required to explain these systems.

  9. Contraction and polymerization cooperate to assemble and close actomyosin rings around Xenopus oocyte wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2001-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes assemble an array of F-actin and myosin 2 around plasma membrane wounds. We analyzed this process in living oocytes using confocal time-lapse (four-dimensional) microscopy. Closure of wounds requires assembly and contraction of a classic “contractile ring” composed of F-actin and myosin 2. However, this ring works in concert with a 5–10-μm wide “zone” of localized actin and myosin 2 assembly. The zone forms before the ring and can be uncoupled from the ring by inhibition of cortical flow and contractility. However, contractility and the contractile ring are required for the stability and forward movement of the zone, as revealed by changes in zone dynamics after disruption of contractility and flow, or experimentally induced breakage of the contractile ring. We conclude that wound-induced contractile arrays are provided with their characteristic flexibility, speed, and strength by the combined input of two distinct components: a highly dynamic zone in which myosin 2 and actin preferentially assemble, and a stable contractile actomyosin ring. PMID:11502762

  10. A Coarse Grained Model for Methylcellulose: Spontaneous Ring Formation at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenjun; Larson, Ronald

    Methylcellulose (MC) is widely used as food additives and pharma applications, where its thermo-reversible gelation behavior plays an important role. To date the gelation mechanism is not well understood, and therefore attracts great research interest. In this study, we adopted coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations to model the MC chains, including the homopolymers and random copolymers that models commercial METHOCEL A, in an implicit water environment, where each MC monomer modeled with a single bead. The simulations are carried using a LAMMPS program. We parameterized our CG model using the radial distribution functions from atomistic simulations of short MC oligomers, extrapolating the results to long chains. We used dissociation free energy to validate our CG model against the atomistic model. The CG model captured the effects of monomer substitution type and temperature from the atomistic simulations. We applied this CG model to simulate single chains up to 1000 monomers long and obtained persistence lengths that are close to those determined from experiment. We observed the chain collapse transition for random copolymer at 600 monomers long at 50C. The chain collapsed into a stable ring structure with outer diameter around 14nm, which appears to be a precursor to the fibril structure observed in the methylcellulose gel observed by Lodge et al. in the recent studies. Our CG model can be extended to other MC derivatives for studying the interaction between these polymers and small molecules, such as hydrophobic drugs.

  11. Straw Formation and Enhanced Damping of Strong Density Waves in Saturn’s Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2017-06-01

    High resolution Cassini images of strong density waves in Saturn’s rings often show kilometer-scale structures in the wave troughs that are sometimes described as straw-like structures. These structures are likely formed by transient gravitational instabilities within the density wave and have the potential to greatly enhance the local viscous angular momentum transport and thereby limit the maximum amplitude of the density wave. A Hamiltonian theory for density waves has been developed that can describe the rate of local gravitational instabilities in the wave train. The Hamiltonian for single particle motion in the vicinity of an inner Lindblad resonance with a Saturnian satellite can be formulated such that the angle variable conjugate to the radial action is the resonant argument for the resonance. The density wave can then be derived using Hamiltonian perturbation methods to remove the satellite perturbation such that the transformed radial action and conjugate angles include the usual solution for self-gravitating density waves. Local gravitational instabilities in the density wave can now be formulated using a linearized collisionless Boltzmann equation that is expressed in terms of the transformed action-angle variables that contain the density wave solution. The gravitational potential of the linearized perturbation is found to be enhanced by a factor of ten or more in strong density waves, which likely explains the observation of kilometer-scale structures in these waves. The Hamiltonian formalism can also be used to derive an enhanced effective viscosity that results from these straw-like structures.

  12. Wound-induced contractile ring: a model for cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darenfed, Hassina; Mandato, Craig A

    2005-12-01

    The actomyosin-based contractile ring is required for several biological processes, such as wound healing and cytokinesis of animal cells. Despite progress in defining the roles of this structure in both wound closure and cell division, we still do not fully understand how an actomyosin ring is spatially and temporally assembled, nor do we understand the molecular mechanism of its contraction. Recent results have demonstrated that microtubule-dependent local assembly of F-actin and myosin-II is present in wound closure and is similar to that in cytokinesis in animal cells. Furthermore, signalling factors such as small Rho GTPases have been shown to be involved in the regulation of actin dynamics during both processes. In this review we address recent findings in an attempt to better understand the dynamics of actomyosin contractile rings during wound healing as compared with the final step of animal cell division.

  13. Actin Rings of Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles.

  14. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  15. Stereochemical course of ring formation in fumitremorgin-B and verruculogen, metabolites of pennincillim-verrucuilosum-investigation into the loss of stereochemical

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vleggaar, R

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation studies of [2-(2)H(3),2-(13)C].acetate and different [2H, 13C]-labelled mevalonolactones into verruculogen established the stereochemical course of ring C formation in fumitremorgin B, which results in the loss of stereochemical...

  16. 宿主细胞F-actin聚集在顶复门原虫入侵过程中的作用研究%A Role for Host Cell F-actin Polymerization during the Protozoan Parasite Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴彩艳; 王祯; 李娟; 林栩慧; 廖申权; 戚南山; 吕敏娜; 孙铭飞

    2016-01-01

    病原入侵宿主细胞,由宿主细胞肌动蛋白(F actin)聚集引起的细胞骨架重排起着极其重要的作用,本文主要就宿主细胞整合素介导的宿主细胞F-actin聚集重排在顶复门原虫入侵过程中的作用进行系统的阐述,对解析顶复门原虫的入侵机制及以此研制新型寄生虫病药物和疫苗具有非常重要的意义.

  17. Unexpected Scholl Reaction of 6,7,13,14-Tetraarylbenzo[k]tetraphene: Selective Formation of Five-Membered Rings in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzhi; Narita, Akimitsu; Osella, Silvio; Zhang, Wen; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Beljonne, David; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-03-02

    Cyclodehydrogenation is a versatile reaction that has enabled the syntheses of numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We now describe a unique Scholl reaction of 6,7,13,14-tetraarylbenzo[k]tetraphene, which "unexpectedly" forms five-membered rings accompanying highly selective 1,2-shift of aryl groups. The geometric and optoelectronic nature of the resulting bistetracene analogue with five-membered rings is comprehensively investigated by single-crystal X-ray, NMR, UV-vis absorption, and cyclic voltammetry analyses. Furthermore, a possible mechanism is proposed to account for the selective five-membered-ring formation with the rearrangement of the aryl groups, which can be rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The theoretical results suggest that the formation of the bistetracene analogue with five-membered rings is kinetically controlled while an "expected" product with six-membered rings is thermodynamically more favored. These experimental and theoretical results provide further insights into the still controversial mechanism of the Scholl reaction as well as open up an unprecedented entry to extend the variety of PAHs by programing otherwise unpredictable rearrangements during the Scholl reaction.

  18. Src64 controls a novel actin network required for proper ring canal formation in the Drosophila male germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenes, Åsmund Husabø; Malerød, Lene; Lie-Jensen, Anette; Sem Wegner, Catherine; Brech, Andreas; Liestøl, Knut; Stenmark, Harald; Haglund, Kaisa

    2015-12-01

    In many organisms, germ cells develop as cysts in which cells are interconnected via ring canals (RCs) as a result of incomplete cytokinesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of incomplete cytokinesis remain poorly understood. Here, we address the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of RCs in the Drosophila male germline. We uncover a hierarchy of tyrosine phosphorylation within germline cysts that positively correlates with RC age. The kinase Src64 is responsible for mediating RC tyrosine phosphorylation, and loss of Src64 causes a reduction in RC diameter within germline cysts. Mechanistically, we show that Src64 controls an actin network around the RCs that depends on Abl and the Rac/SCAR/Arp2/3 pathway. The actin network around RCs is required for correct RC diameter in cysts of developing germ cells. We also identify that Src64 is required for proper germ cell differentiation in the Drosophila male germline independent of its role in RC regulation. In summary, we report that Src64 controls actin dynamics to mediate proper RC formation during incomplete cytokinesis during germline cyst development in vivo.

  19. Formation of Janus and Epimetheus from Saturn's rings as coorbitals, thanks to Mimas' 2:3 inner Mean Motion Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurélien, Crida; El Moutamid, Maryame

    2017-06-01

    Janus and Epimetheus orbit Saturn at 151461 km on average, on mutual horseshoe orbits with orbital separation 50 km, exchanging position every 4 years. This configuration is unique and intriguing : Lissauer et al. (1985) have shown that their orbital separation should converge to zero in about 20 Myrs only, and no satisfactory model for the origin of this co-orbital resonance exists yet. Charnoz et al. (2010) have shown that Janus and Epimetheus probably formed from the spreading of the rings beyond the Roche radius. Here, we study this phenomenon in the frame of the elliptical restricted 3-body problem, where ring particles are perturbed by the 2:3 mean motion resonances with the outer satellite Mimas.Two types of resonances play different roles. The Lindblad resonance (LR) confines the rings radially, and prevents their spreading (like the B-ring into the Cassini division). The Corotation resonance (CR) confines the rings azimuthally in two capture sites (akin Neptune's arcs). Because of Saturn's J_2, the CR is 130 km closer to Saturn than the LR. A few hundred million years ago, the 2:3 mean motion resonances with Mimas were just inside the Roche radius ; hence the rings could not spread and the two capture sites were full of ring material. When Mimas migrated outwards so that its 2:3 mean motion resonances receded past the Roche radius, the captured material agglomerated into two bodies of ~10^{15} kg on the exact same orbit. These bodies then migrated outwards together due to their interaction with the rings, in mutual horseshoe orbits. The rings then spawn new small satellites, eventually accreted by the proto-Janus and the proto-Epimetheus following the pyramidal regime of the ring spreading model (Crida & Charnoz 2012). The two bodies then grow in mass following a Fibonacci sequence, and this excites their orbital separation, leading to a configuration close to the present one.

  20. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  1. 阿魏酸对兔受损窦房结细胞骨架F-actin、Vinculin的影响%Impacts of Ferulic Acid in F-actin and Vinculin of Cytoskeleton in Dam-aged Atrionector of Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘如秀; 彭杰; 刘宇; 刘金凤; 汪艳丽

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察阿魏酸对模拟缺血再灌注损伤兔窦房结细胞骨架蛋白F-actin和Vinculin的影响,探讨其保护窦房结细胞的机制。方法取新生乳兔窦房结细胞,以缺氧缺糖模拟缺血,以恢复氧和糖的供应模拟再灌注造成窦房结细胞损伤模型。正常对照组与模型组给予等体积培养基,阿魏酸高、中、低剂量组分别给予相应浓度药物(终浓度分别为100μmol/ml、20μmol/ml、10μmol/ml),运用酶标仪、激光共聚焦显微镜观察各组窦房结细胞活性、细胞骨架蛋白F-actin和Vinculin形态的变化。结果模型组活细胞量较正常对照组明显减少(P<0.01);细胞骨架蛋白F-actin和Vinculin裂解明显。阿魏酸高、中、低剂量组活细胞量明显高于模型组(P<0.01),F-actin和Vinculin结构较模型组明显完整,平均荧光强度明显高于模型组( P<0.01)。结论阿魏酸可抑制模拟缺血再灌注引起的窦房结细胞损伤;阿魏酸保护窦房结细胞的机制可能与保护细胞骨架蛋白F-actin和Vinculin从而维持细胞电生理稳定有关。%Objective To observe the impact of ferulic acid in F-actin and Vinculin of cytoskele-ton in the rabbits with damaged atrionector of ischemic reperfusion and explore its protective mechanism on atrionector cells. Methods The atrionector cells of newly born rabbits were collected. The ischemia was sim-ulated with deprivation of oxygen and glucose. The reperfusion was simulated with recovery of oxygen and glu-cose. The same volume medium was used in the normal control group and the model group. The medicine of corresponding concentrations was used in ferulic acid high dose group,middle dose group and low dose group ( the final concentration was 100 μmol/ml,20 μmol/ml or 10 μmol/ml). ELIASA and laser scanning confo-cal microscope were used to observe the changes of atrionector cell activity and F-actin and Vinculin of cy-toskeleton. Results The

  2. Asymmetric Synthesis of Bicyclic Nitrocyclopropanes from Primary Nitro Compounds and Stereoselective Formation of Tetrahydro-2H-cyclopenta[b]furans via Ring Expansion/Cyclization Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akio; Moriyama, Takaaki; Ito, Yuji; Kawamoto, Takuji; Uno, Hidemitsu

    2016-06-03

    Optically active bicyclic nitrocyclopropanes are readily prepared from primary chiral nitro compounds, prepared by the conjugate addition of propionaldehyde to a nitro alkene in the presence of proline-derived organocatalysts. The one-step cyclopropanation took place smoothly in a highly stereoselective manner regardless of the stereogenic center adjacent to the allylic unit. Although the allylation reaction catalyzed by BF3·OEt2 provides a mixture of two possible diastereomers, subsequent oxidation of the alcoholic carbon after the formation of nitrocyclopropanes gave diastereomerically pure single products. As a result, separation of the diastereomers during the reaction sequence is unnecessary. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of the bicyclic nitrocyclopropane ketones followed by enolization resulted in stereoselective formation of a novel cyclopenta[b]furan ring in good yield via ring expansion followed by transannular nucleophilic cyclization.

  3. Actin-binding proteins implicated in the formation of the punctate actin foci stimulated by the self-incompatibility response in Papaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Natalie S; Staiger, Christopher J; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target for signaling networks and plays a central role in translating signals into cellular responses in eukaryotic cells. Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important mechanism responsible for preventing self-fertilization. The SI system of Papaver rhoeas pollen involves a Ca(2+)-dependent signaling network, including massive actin depolymerization as one of the earliest cellular responses, followed by the formation of large actin foci. However, no analysis of these structures, which appear to be aggregates of filamentous (F-)actin based on phalloidin staining, has been carried out to date. Here, we characterize and quantify the formation of F-actin foci in incompatible Papaver pollen tubes over time. The F-actin foci increase in size over time, and we provide evidence that their formation requires actin polymerization. Once formed, these SI-induced structures are unusually stable, being resistant to treatments with latrunculin B. Furthermore, their formation is associated with changes in the intracellular localization of two actin-binding proteins, cyclase-associated protein and actin-depolymerizing factor. Two other regulators of actin dynamics, profilin and fimbrin, do not associate with the F-actin foci. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first insights into the actin-binding proteins and mechanisms involved in the formation of these intriguing structures, which appear to be actively formed during the SI response.

  4. Formation of Janus and Epimetheus from Saturn's rings as coorbitals, thanks to Mimas' 2:3 inner Mean Motion Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crida, Aurelien; El Moutamid, Maryame

    2016-10-01

    Janus and Epimetheus orbit Saturn at 151461 km on average, on mutual horseshoe orbits with orbital separation 50 km, exchanging position every 4 years. This configuration is unique and intriguing : Lissauer et al. (1985) have shown that their orbital separation should converge to zero in about 20 Myrs only, and no satisfactory model for the origin of this co-orbital resonance exists yet.Charnoz et al. (2010) have shown that Janus and Epimetheus probably formed from the spreading of the rings beyond the Roche radius. Here, we show that this happened when Mimas' 2:3 Lindblad Resonance, which used to confine the rings, receded past the Roche radius. This first explains the gap in mass and distance between Janus and Mimas, which is unexpected in the pyramidal regime of the ring spreading model (Crida & Charnoz 2012). Furthermore, at this time, the two capture sites of Mimas's 2:3 Corotation Resonance were full of ring material. We suggest that as the two capture sites were brought beyond the Roche radius, the captured material agglomerated into two bodies of ~1015 kg on the exact same orbit. These bodies then migrated outwards together due to their interaction with the rings, in mutual horseshoe orbits. The rings then spawn new small satellites, eventually accreted by the proto-Janus and the proto-Epimetheus. This excites their orbital separation, leading to today's configuration.

  5. Effects of oridonin on cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma cells%冬凌草甲素对胰腺癌细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军楼; 沈洪; 徐力; 杨继兵; 于希忠; 孙志岭

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose:Traditional Chinese medicine with notable effect and little adverse reaction is increasingly concerned about the medical profession because of its great potential and advantage in treating pancreatic carcinoma. In this experiment, we studied the effects of oridonin on apoptosis and cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells. Methods:SW1990 cells in culture medium were treated with different concentrations of oridonin. The inhibitory rate of the cells was measured by MTT assay. Morphology of cell apoptosis was observed by DAPI stain and cell apoptotic rate was detected by lfow cytometry (FCM). The morphological changes of F-actin were observed by laser confocal microscopy. Results:The growth of human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells was signiifcantly inhibited by oridonin. Apoptosis morphological changes including condensation of chromatin and nuclear fragmentation were observed clearly by DAPI stain. The early apoptotic rate of SW1990 cells treated with 25, 50μmol/L oridonin was signiifcantly higher than that of the control group (3.78±0.46, 9.51±0.63 vs 0.73±0.06, P<0.05), and the late apoptotic rate and cell necrosis rate were also signiifcantly higher than that of the control group (14.40±1.78, 20.53±2.54 vs 4.16±0.31, P<0.05). F-actin was showed from polymerization to depolymerization after oridonin treatment. Conclusion:Oridonin can obviously inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of SW1990 cells. The mechanisms may involve the depolymerization of F-actin after treatment with oridonin.%背景与目的:中医药治疗肿瘤不良反应低且疗效显著,在防治胰腺癌方面有较大的潜力与优势,日益受到国内、外医学界的关注。本研究观察中草药冬凌草的有效成分冬凌草甲素对人胰腺癌SW1990凋亡及细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响。方法:以不同浓度的冬凌草甲素作用于体外培养的SW1990细胞,采用MTT法检测细胞生长

  6. Vascular ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... Vascular ring is rare. It accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition ...

  7. EBT ring physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A. (ed.)

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  8. Saturn's largest ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  9. The significance of compression wood in restoration of the leader in Pinus sihestris L. damaged by moose (Alces alces. II. Structure of growth rings in regenerating stems in relation to juvenile wood formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Molski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The corewood of pine ds very prone to compression wood formation, this changing the whole pattern of the tree ring structure and the siz.es of early and late wood. Compression wood always increases the formation of late wood at the expense of early wood. Tree rings with compression wood are generally wider than those without it, but there occur also tree rings wihout compression wood wider than those in which it is present, formed in the same year and in the same tree.

  10. Resveratrol antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli is mediated by Z-ring formation inhibition via suppression of FtsZ expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dahyun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2015-05-05

    Resveratrol exhibits a potent antimicrobial activity. However, the mechanism underlying its antibacterial activity has not been shown. In this study, the antibacterial mechanism of resveratrol was investigated. To investigate induction of the SOS response, a strain containing the lacZ+gene under the control of an SOS-inducible sulA promoter was constructed. DNA damage was measured by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). After resveratrol treatment, the cells were observed by confocal microscopy. For the RNA silencing assay, ftsZ-specific antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was used. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increased in Escherichia coli after resveratrol treatment; however, cell growth was not recovered by ROS quenching, indicating that, in this experiment, ROS formation and cell death following resveratrol treatment were not directly correlated. Resveratrol treatment increased DNA fragmentation in cells, while SOS response-related gene expression levels increased in a dose-dependent manner. Cell elongation was observed after resveratrol treatment. Elongation was induced by inhibiting FtsZ, an essential cell-division protein in prokaryotes, and resulted in significant inhibition of Z-ring the formation in E. coli. The expression of ftsZ mRNA was suppressed by resveratrol. Our results indicate that resveratrol inhibits bacterial cell growth by suppressing FtsZ expression and Z-ring formation.

  11. Effect of VEGF-C siRNA and endostatin on ring formation and proliferation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma lymphatic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng YP

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuping Zheng,1–3,* Miaomiao Sun,4,* Jinyan Chen,1,2 Lulu He,1,2 Na Zhao,1,2 Kuisheng Chen1,2 1Pathology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 2Henan Key Laboratory of Tumor Pathology, 3Pathology Department, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, 4Pathology Department, Henan Tumor Hospital, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To study the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor C small interfering RNA and endostatin on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-related ring formation in vitro and proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells.Materials and methods: KYSE150 cells were subjected to analysis of cell transfection and endostatin operation. The groups were as follows: negative group, blank group, negative plus endostatin group, endostatin group, SG1 group, SG2 group, SG1 plus endostatin group, and SG2 plus endostatin group. The esophageal cancer-related microlymphatic endothelial cells were three-dimensionally cultured. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay was employed to detect cell proliferation.Results: The negative group’s three-dimensional culture result was the highest, followed by the blank group, negative plus endostatin group, endostatin group, SG2 group, SG1 group, SG1 plus endostatin group, and SG2 plus endostatin group. The quantity of living cells in the blank group was the highest, followed by the negative control, endostatin, SG2, SG1, negative plus endostatin, SG1 plus endostatin, and SG2 plus endostatin groups. Conclusion: Both vascular endothelial growth factor C small interfering RNA and endostatin could inhibit ring formation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells. Keywords: esophageal squamous carcinoma cells, esophageal cancer-associated lymphatic endothelial cells, VEGF-C, ring formation, proliferation

  12. Adduct Formation, B-H Activation and Ring Expansion at Room Temperature from Reactions of HBcat with NHCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtemberger-Pietsch, Sabrina; Schneider, Heidi; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2016-09-05

    We report the reactions of catecholborane (HBcat; 1) with unsaturated and saturated NHCs as well as CAAC(Me) . Mono-NHC adducts of the type HBcat⋅NHC (NHC=nPr2 Im, iPr2 Im, iPr2 Im(Me) , and Dipp2 Im) were obtained by stoichiometric reactions of HBcat with the unsaturated NHCs. The reaction of CAAC(Me) with HBcat yielded the B-H activated product CAAC(Me) (H)Bcat via insertion of the carbine-carbon atom into the B-H bond. The saturated NHC Dipp2 SIm reacted in a 2:2 ratio yielding an NHC ring-expanded product at room temperature forming a six-membered -B-C=N-C=C-N- ring via C-N bond cleavage and further migration of the hydrides from two HBcat molecules to the former carbene-carbon atom.

  13. Formation of diverse ring-satellite systems around Centaurs through tidal disruption at close encounters with giant planet

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Genda, Hidenori; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Centaurs are minor planets orbiting between Jupiter and Neptune that have or had crossing orbits with one or more giant planets. Recent observations and reinterpretation of previous observations have revealed the existence of ring systems around 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron. However, the origin of the ring systems around such a minor planet is still an open question. Here, we propose that the tidal disruption of a differentiated object that experiences a close encounter with a giant planet could naturally form diverse ring-satellite systems around the Centaurs. During the close encounter, the icy mantle of the passing object is preferentially ripped off by the planet's tidal force and the debris is distributed mostly within the Roche limit of the largest remnant body. Assuming the existence of $20-50$wt% silicate core below the icy mantle, a disk of particles is formed when the objects pass within $0.4-0.8$ of the planet's Roche limit with the relative velocity at infinity $3-6$km s$^{-1}$ and 8h initial sp...

  14. Catechol estrogen formation and metabolism in brain tissue: comparison of tritium release from different positions in ring A of the steroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellinck, P.H.; Hahn, E.F.; Norton, B.I.; Fishman, J.

    1984-11-01

    Catechol estrogens labeled with /sup 3/H at different positions in rings A and B of the steroid were synthesized by chemical or enzymatic methods, and their oxidative transformation by male rat brain microsomes was followed by the transfer of /sup 3/H into /sup 3/H/sub 2/O. This reaction was shown to occur more readily with the catechol estrogens than with the parent steroid and was also influenced by the position of the radiolabel. Tritium was displaced less readily from C-1 than from C-2 or C-4 of the aromatic ring. Spermine, which is known to increase cytochrome P-450-mediated hydroxylation reactions, had no effect on the release of /sup 3/H from ring A of either estradiol or 2-hydroxyestradiol with rat brain microsomes in contrast to liver. Glutathione and other thiols were able to cause a rapid loss of /sup 3/H from labeled catechol estrogens, even in the absence of tissue, but in double label experiments with (4-/sup 3/H)- and (4-/sup 14/C)2-hydroxyestradiol, the isotope ratio in the recovered catechol estrogen was unchanged. The results illustrate some of the problems in determining accurately the metabolism of estrogens by measuring /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formation when aromatic hydroxylation is involved and also highlight the possible interaction of the catechol estrogens with cellular nucleophiles such as glutathione.

  15. Ring blowers. Ring blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Y.; Okamura, T.; Takahashi, M. (Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-10

    Features, structures and several products of ring blowers were outlined. The ring blower is featured by its medium characteristics because it is higher in air pressure than a turboblower and larger in airflow than a vane blower, and it is applicable flexibly to not only air blasting but various industrial fields such as suction transfer. As several products corresponding to various fields, the followings were outlined: the low noise type with optimum shapes of inlet, outlet and casing cover for reducing noises by 10 dB or more, the heat resistant, water-tight and explosion-proof types suitable for severe environmental conditions, the multi-voltage type for every country served at different voltages, the high air pressure type with two pressure rise stages, and the large airflow type with a wide impeller. In addition, as special use products, the glass fiber reinforced unsatulated polyester ring blower for respiration apparatus, and the variable speed blushless DC motor-driven one for medical beds were outlined. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Formation of Pyrroline and Tetrahydropyridine Rings in Amino Acids Catalyzed by Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2014-06-10

    The dehydrogenase PylD catalyzes the ultimate step of the pyrrolysine pathway by converting the isopeptide L-lysine-Nε-3R-methyl-D-ornithine to the 22nd proteinogenic amino acid. In this study, we demonstrate how PylD can be harnessed to oxidize various isopeptides to novel amino acids by combining chemical synthesis with enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography. The data enable a detailed description of the PylD reaction trajectory for the biosynthesis of pyrroline and tetrahydropyridine rings as constituents of pyrrolysine analogues. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A novel synthetic pathway for tropolone ring formation via the olefin monoterpene intermediate terpinolene in cultured Cupressus lusitanica cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Koki; Bunyu, Yasufumi; Kuroda, Ken'ich; Ashitani, Tatsuya; Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    β-Thujaplicin is a wood monoterpene and tropolone compound with a unique conjugated 7-membered ring. Because of its strong antifungal and antitumor activities, β-thujaplicin is used in several fields. The biosynthesis pathway of β-thujaplicin has not yet been elucidated. Using Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures in a radioisotope feeding experiment, our group previously demonstrated that geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) is the starting material of β-thujaplicin biosynthesis. The results of our previous terpene synthase assay suggested that terpinolene is the first olefin terpenoid intermediate from GPP to β-thujaplicin, although there was no experimental evidence of this at that time. In the present study, we fed deuterium-labeled terpinolene to cultured C. lusitanica cells to determine whether terpinolene is an intermediate metabolite of β-thujaplicin biosynthesis. A gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of the cell extracts from labeled terpinolene cultures revealed a peak of labeled β-thujaplicin that was not observed after treatment with non-labeled terpinolene. The identification of labeled β-thujaplicin was also performed by mass spectrum assignment. The outcome indicated that terpinolene is indeed an intermediate metabolite of β-thujaplicin biosynthesis. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no prior report that tropolone compounds are biosynthesized via a terpene biosynthesis system, and our results thus suggest the existence of a novel biosynthetic pathway that produces the conjugated 7-membered ring.

  18. Revocable Ring Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Y. W. Liu; Joseph K. Liu; Yi Mu; Willy Susilo; Duncan S. Wong

    2007-01-01

    Group signature allows the anonymity of a real signer in a group to be revoked by a trusted party called group manager. It also gives the group manager the absolute power of controlling the formation of the group. Ring signature, on the other hand, does not allow anyone to revoke the signer anonymity, while allowing the real signer to forma group (also known as a ring) arbitrarily without being controlled by any other party. In this paper, we propose a new variant for ring signature, called Revocable Ring Signature. The signature allows a real signer to form a ring arbitrarily while allowing a set of authorities to revoke the anonymity of the real signer. This new variant inherits the desirable properties from both group signature and ring signature in such a way that the real signer will be responsible for what it has signed as the anonymity is revocable by authorities while the real signer still has the freedom on ring formation. We provide a formal security model for revocable ring signature and propose an efficient construction which is proven secure under our security model.

  19. Volumetric flow imaging reveals the importance of vortex ring formation in squid swimming tail-first and arms-first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Williams, Sheila; Thompson, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    Squids use a pulsed jet and fin movements to swim both arms-first (forward) and tail-first (backward). Given the complexity of the squid multi-propulsor system, 3D velocimetry techniques are required for the comprehensive study of wake dynamics. Defocusing digital particle tracking velocimetry, a volumetric velocimetry technique, and high-speed videography were used to study arms-first and tail-first swimming of brief squid Lolliguncula brevis over a broad range of speeds [0-10 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) s(-1)] in a swim tunnel. Although there was considerable complexity in the wakes of these multi-propulsor swimmers, 3D vortex rings and their derivatives were prominent reoccurring features during both tail-first and arms-first swimming, with the greatest jet and fin flow complexity occurring at intermediate speeds (1.5-3.0 DML s(-1)). The jet generally produced the majority of thrust during rectilinear swimming, increasing in relative importance with speed, and the fins provided no thrust at speeds >4.5 DML s(-1). For both swimming orientations, the fins sometimes acted as stabilizers, producing negative thrust (drag), and consistently provided lift at low/intermediate speeds (swimming orientation, and η for swimming sequences with clear isolated jet vortex rings was significantly greater (η=78.6±7.6%, mean±s.d.) than that for swimming sequences with clear elongated regions of concentrated jet vorticity (η=67.9±19.2%). This study reveals the complexity of 3D vortex wake flows produced by nekton with hydrodynamically distinct propulsors.

  20. Why Are Ring Galaxies Interesting?

    CERN Document Server

    Higdon, James L

    2010-01-01

    Compared with ordinary spirals, the ISM in ring galaxies experiences markedly different physical conditions and evolution. As a result, ring galaxies provide interesting perspectives on the triggering/quenching of large scale star formation and the destructive effects of massive stars on molecular cloud complexes. We use high resolution radio, sub-millimeter, infrared, and optical data to investigate the role of gravitational stability in star formation regulation, factors influencing the ISM's molecular fraction, and evidence of peculiar star formation laws and efficiencies in two highly evolved ring galaxies: Cartwheel and the Lindsay-Shapley ring.

  1. Underviseres og studerendes erfaringer med undervisning og læring i tre formater: Blended Learning, Synkron, online deltagelse, Mooc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    christiansen, rene b; Bichel, Rikke Aarestrup; Frimand, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Denne rapport er en afdækning af erfaringer, som undervisere og studerende ved pædagoguddannelsen på University College Sjælland (afdelingerne i Roskilde og Slagelse) gjorde sig omkring et forløb på uddannelsen, som blev udbudt i tre formater: blended undervisning, synkron, online undervisning og...

  2. Analytical solutions of jam pattern formation on a ring for a class of optimal velocity traffic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Berkemer, Rainer; Caputo, Jean Guy

    2009-01-01

    A follow-the-leader model of traffic flow on a closed loop is considered in the framework of the extended optimal velocity (OV) model where the driver reacts to both the following and the preceding car. Periodic wave train solutions that describe the formation of traffic congestion patterns...

  3. A theoretical model investigation of peptide bond formation involving two water molecules in ribosome supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang [School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Gao, Jun, E-mail: gaojun@sdu.edu.cn [Agricultural Bioinformatics Key Laboratory of Hubei Province, College of Informatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu [School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • We theoretical studied peptide bond formation reaction mechanism with two water molecules. • The first water molecule can decrease the reaction barriers by forming hydrogen bonds. • The water molecule mediated three-proton transfer mechanism is the favorable mechanism. • Our calculation supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism. - Abstract: The ribosome is the macromolecular machine that catalyzes protein synthesis. The kinetic isotope effect analysis reported by Strobel group supports the two-step mechanism. However, the destination of the proton originating from the nucleophilic amine is uncertain. A computational simulation of different mechanisms including water molecules is carried out using the same reaction model and theoretical level. Formation the tetrahedral intermediate with proton transfer from nucleophilic nitrogen, is the rate-limiting step when two water molecules participate in peptide bond formation. The first water molecule forming hydrogen bonds with O9′ and H15′ in the A site can decrease the reaction barriers. Combined with results of the solvent isotope effects analysis, we conclude that the three-proton transfer mechanism in which water molecule mediate the proton shuttle between amino and carbon oxygen in rate-limiting step is the favorable mechanism. Our results will shield light on a better understand the reaction mechanism of ribosome.

  4. Proper actin ring formation and septum constriction requires coordinated regulation of SIN and MOR pathways through the germinal centre kinase MST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Yvonne; Dettmann, Anne; Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa R; Schmitt, Kerstin; Valerius, Oliver; Seiler, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear DBF2p-related (NDR) kinases constitute a functionally conserved protein family of eukaryotic regulators that control cell division and polarity. In fungi, they function as effector kinases of the morphogenesis (MOR) and septation initiation (SIN) networks and are activated by pathway-specific germinal centre (GC) kinases. We characterized a third GC kinase, MST-1, that connects both kinase cascades. Genetic and biochemical interactions with SIN components and life cell imaging identify MST-1 as SIN-associated kinase that functions in parallel with the GC kinase SID-1 to activate the SIN-effector kinase DBF-2. SID-1 and MST-1 are both regulated by the upstream SIN kinase CDC-7, yet in an opposite manner. Aberrant cortical actomyosin rings are formed in Δmst-1, which resulted in mis-positioned septa and irregular spirals, indicating that MST-1-dependent regulation of the SIN is required for proper formation and constriction of the septal actomyosin ring. However, MST-1 also interacts with several components of the MOR network and modulates MOR activity at multiple levels. MST-1 functions as promiscuous enzyme and also activates the MOR effector kinase COT-1 through hydrophobic motif phosphorylation. In addition, MST-1 physically interacts with the MOR kinase POD-6, and dimerization of both proteins inactivates the GC kinase hetero-complex. These data specify an antagonistic relationship between the SIN and MOR during septum formation in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa that is, at least in part, coordinated through the GC kinase MST-1. The similarity of the SIN and MOR pathways to the animal Hippo and Ndr pathways, respectively, suggests that intensive cross-communication between distinct NDR kinase modules may also be relevant for the homologous NDR kinases of higher eukaryotes.

  5. Proper actin ring formation and septum constriction requires coordinated regulation of SIN and MOR pathways through the germinal centre kinase MST-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Heilig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear DBF2p-related (NDR kinases constitute a functionally conserved protein family of eukaryotic regulators that control cell division and polarity. In fungi, they function as effector kinases of the morphogenesis (MOR and septation initiation (SIN networks and are activated by pathway-specific germinal centre (GC kinases. We characterized a third GC kinase, MST-1, that connects both kinase cascades. Genetic and biochemical interactions with SIN components and life cell imaging identify MST-1 as SIN-associated kinase that functions in parallel with the GC kinase SID-1 to activate the SIN-effector kinase DBF-2. SID-1 and MST-1 are both regulated by the upstream SIN kinase CDC-7, yet in an opposite manner. Aberrant cortical actomyosin rings are formed in Δmst-1, which resulted in mis-positioned septa and irregular spirals, indicating that MST-1-dependent regulation of the SIN is required for proper formation and constriction of the septal actomyosin ring. However, MST-1 also interacts with several components of the MOR network and modulates MOR activity at multiple levels. MST-1 functions as promiscuous enzyme and also activates the MOR effector kinase COT-1 through hydrophobic motif phosphorylation. In addition, MST-1 physically interacts with the MOR kinase POD-6, and dimerization of both proteins inactivates the GC kinase hetero-complex. These data specify an antagonistic relationship between the SIN and MOR during septum formation in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa that is, at least in part, coordinated through the GC kinase MST-1. The similarity of the SIN and MOR pathways to the animal Hippo and Ndr pathways, respectively, suggests that intensive cross-communication between distinct NDR kinase modules may also be relevant for the homologous NDR kinases of higher eukaryotes.

  6. Ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rowen, Louis H

    1991-01-01

    This is an abridged edition of the author's previous two-volume work, Ring Theory, which concentrates on essential material for a general ring theory course while ommitting much of the material intended for ring theory specialists. It has been praised by reviewers:**""As a textbook for graduate students, Ring Theory joins the best....The experts will find several attractive and pleasant features in Ring Theory. The most noteworthy is the inclusion, usually in supplements and appendices, of many useful constructions which are hard to locate outside of the original sources....The audience of non

  7. How pattern formation in ring networks of excitatory and inhibitoryspiking neurons depends on the input current regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eKriener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern formation, i.e., the generation of an inhomogeneous spatial activity distribution in a dynamical system with translation invariant structure, is a well-studied phenomenon in neuronal network dynamics,specifically in neural field models. These are population models to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of large groups of neurons in terms of macroscopic variables such as population firing rates. Though neural field models are often deduced from and equipped with biophysically meaningfulproperties, a direct mapping to simulations of individual spiking neuron populations is rarely considered. Neurons have a distinct identity defined by their action on their postsynaptic targets. In its simplest form they act either excitatorily or inhibitorily.When the distribution of neuron identities is assumed to be periodic, pattern formation can be observed, given the coupling strength is supercritical, i.e., larger than a critical weight. We find that this critical weight is strongly dependent on the characteristics of the neuronal input, i.e., depends on whether neurons are mean- orfluctuation driven, and different limits in linearizing the full non-linear system apply in order to assess stability.In particular, if neurons are mean-driven, the linearization has a very simple form and becomesindependent of both the fixed point firing rate and the variance of the input current, while in the very strongly fluctuation-driven regime the fixed point rate, as well as the input mean and variance areimportant parameters in the determination of the critical weight.We demonstrate that interestingly even in ``intermediate'' regimes, when the system is technically fluctuation-driven, the simple linearization neglecting the variance of the input can yield the better prediction of the critical couplingstrength. We moreover analyze the effects of structural randomness by rewiring individualsynapses or redistributing weights, as well as coarse-graining on pattern

  8. Analytical solutions of jam pattern formation on a ring for a class of optimal velocity traffic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaididei, Yu B.; Berkemer, R.; Caputo, J. G.; Christiansen, P. L.; Kawamoto, A.; Shiga, T.; Sørensen, M. P.; Starke, J.

    2009-07-01

    A follow-the-leader model of traffic flow on a closed loop is considered in the framework of the extended optimal velocity (OV) model where the driver reacts to both the following and the preceding car. Periodic wave train solutions that describe the formation of traffic congestion patterns are found analytically. Their velocity and amplitude are determined from a perturbation approach based on collective coordinates with the discrete modified Korteweg-de Vries equation as the zero order equation. This contains the standard OV model as a special case. The analytical results are in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  9. Analytical solutions of jam pattern formation on a ring for a class of optimal velocity traffic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaididei, Yu B [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Metrologichna str. 14 B, 01413, Kiev (Ukraine); Berkemer, R; Soerensen, M P; Starke, J [Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Caputo, J G [Laboratoire de Mathematiques, INSA de Rouen, B.P. 8, 76131 Mont-Saint-Aignan cedex (France); Christiansen, P L [Department of Informatics and Mathematical Modeling and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kawamoto, A; Shiga, T [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Nagakute Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan)], E-mail: galinag@mail.univ.kiev.ua, E-mail: r.berkemer@mat.dtu.dk, E-mail: caputo@insa-rouen.fr, E-mail: plc@imm.dtu.dk, E-mail: m.p.soerensen@mat.dtu.dk, E-mail: j.starke@mat.dtu.dk

    2009-07-15

    A follow-the-leader model of traffic flow on a closed loop is considered in the framework of the extended optimal velocity (OV) model where the driver reacts to both the following and the preceding car. Periodic wave train solutions that describe the formation of traffic congestion patterns are found analytically. Their velocity and amplitude are determined from a perturbation approach based on collective coordinates with the discrete modified Korteweg-de Vries equation as the zero order equation. This contains the standard OV model as a special case. The analytical results are in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  10. Substituent and ring effects on enthalpies of formation: 2-methyl- and 2-ethylbenzimidazoles versus benzene- and imidazole-derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Pilar; Roux, María Victoria; Dávalos, Juan Z.; Temprado, Manuel; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria Das Dores M. C.; Amaral, Luísa M. P. F.; Cabildo, Pilar; Claramunt, Rosa M.; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Elguero, José

    The enthalpies of combustion, heat capacities, enthalpies of sublimation and enthalpies of formation of 2-methylbenzimidazole (2MeBIM) and 2-ethylbenzimidazole (2EtBIM) are reported and the results compared with those of benzimidazole itself (BIM). Theoretical estimates of the enthalpies of formation were obtained through the use of atom equivalent schemes. The necessary energies were obtained in single-point calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) on B3LYP/6-31G* optimized geometries. The comparison of experimental and calculated values of benzenes, imidazoles and benzimidazoles bearing H (unsubstituted), methyl and ethyl groups shows remarkable homogeneity. The energetic group contribution transferability is not followed, but either using it or adding an empirical interaction term, it is possible to generate an enormous collection of reasonably accurate data for different substituted heterocycles (pyrazole-derivatives, pyridine-derivatives, etc.) from the large amount of values available for substituted benzenes and those of the parent (pyrazole, pyridine) heterocycles.

  11. Sitagliptin, An Anti-diabetic Drug, Suppresses Estrogen Deficiency-Induced OsteoporosisIn Vivo and Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuandong Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a disease characterized by excessive osteoclastic bone resorption. Some anti-diabetic drugs were demonstrated for anti-osteoclastic bone-loss effects. The present study investigated the skeletal effects of chronic administration of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV inhibitor that is increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatments, in an estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis and elucidated the associated mechanisms. This study indicated that sitagliptin effectively prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss and reduced osteoclast numbers in vivo. It was also indicated that sitagliptin suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation, bone resorption, and F-actin ring formation in a manner of dose-dependence. In addition, sitagliptin significantly reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific markers in mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, including calcitonin receptor (Calcr, dendrite cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dc-stamp, c-Fos, and nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (Nfatc1. Further study indicated that sitagliptin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing AKT and ERK signaling pathways, scavenging ROS activity, and suppressing the Ca2+ oscillation that consequently affects the expression and/or activity of the osteoclast-specific transcription factors, c-Fos and NFATc1. Collectively, these findings suggest that sitagliptin possesses beneficial effects on bone and the suppression of osteoclast number implies that the effect is exerted directly on osteoclastogenesis.

  12. Unidirectional, dual-comb lasing under multiple pulse formation mechanisms in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ya; Hu, Guoqing; Li, Cui; Zhao, Bofeng; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Dual-comb lasers from which asynchronous ultrashort pulses can be simultaneously generated have recently become an interesting research subject. They could be an intriguing alternative to the current dual-laser optical-frequency-comb source with highly sophisticated electronic control systems. If generated through a common light path traveled by all pulses, the common-mode noises between the spectral lines of different pulse trains could be significantly reduced. Therefore, coherent dual-comb generation from a completely common-path, unidirectional lasing cavity would be an interesting territory to explore. In this paper, we demonstrate such a dual-comb lasing scheme based on a nanomaterial saturable absorber with additional pulse narrowing and broadening mechanisms concurrently introduced into a mode-locked fiber laser. The interactions between multiple soliton formation mechanisms result in unusual bifurcation into two-pulse states with quite different characteristics. Simultaneous oscillation of pulses wit...

  13. Stereochemistry of Pd(II)-Catalyzed THF Ring Formation of ε-Hydroxy Allylic Alcohols and Synthesis of 2,3,5-Trisubstituted and 2,3,4,5-Tetrasubstituted Tetrahydrofurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yuki; Uenishi, Jun'ichi

    2016-09-02

    Pd(II)-catalyzed ring formation of 2,3,5-trisubstituted and 2,3,4,5-tetrasubstituted tetrahydrofurans is described. Oxypalladation of a chiral ε-hydroxy allylic alcohol provides a 5-alkenyltetrahydrofuran ring in excellent yields via a 5-exo-trigonal process. Nine substrates including six secondary allylic alcohols and three primary allylic alcohols with or without an additional secondary hydroxy substituent at the γ-position have been examined. Their structures are restricted by a 2,2,4,4-tetraisopropyl-1,3,5,2,4-trioxadisilocane ring. The stereochemistry of the resulting tetrahydrofuran products was determined by chemical transformation. The reaction mechanism is discussed on the basis of the stereochemical results. The steps in the chiral allylic alcohol directed or the nucleophilic alcohol directed facial selection for the formation of the alkene-Pd(II)-π-complex, the cis-oxypalladation, and a syn-elimination mechanism account for the observed stereochemistry of the reaction.

  14. Syndapin promotes pseudocleavage furrow formation by actin organization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlekar, Aparna; Rikhy, Richa

    2016-07-01

    Coordinated membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling activities are required for membrane extension in processes such as cytokinesis and syncytial nuclear division cycles in Drosophila Pseudocleavage furrow membranes in the syncytial Drosophila blastoderm embryo show rapid extension and retraction regulated by actin-remodeling proteins. The F-BAR domain protein Syndapin (Synd) is involved in membrane tubulation, endocytosis, and, uniquely, in F-actin stability. Here we report a role for Synd in actin-regulated pseudocleavage furrow formation. Synd localized to these furrows, and its loss resulted in short, disorganized furrows. Synd presence was important for the recruitment of the septin Peanut and distribution of Diaphanous and F-actin at furrows. Synd and Peanut were both absent in furrow-initiation mutants of RhoGEF2 and Diaphanous and in furrow-progression mutants of Anillin. Synd overexpression in rhogef2 mutants reversed its furrow-extension phenotypes, Peanut and Diaphanous recruitment, and F-actin organization. We conclude that Synd plays an important role in pseudocleavage furrow extension, and this role is also likely to be crucial in cleavage furrow formation during cell division.

  15. Role of hydrogen abstraction acetylene addition mechanisms in the formation of chlorinated naphthalenes. 2. Kinetic modeling and the detailed mechanism of ring closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Grant J; Russell, Douglas K

    2014-12-26

    The dominant formation mechanisms of chlorinated phenylacetylenes, naphthalenes, and phenylvinylacetylenes in relatively low pressure and temperature (∼40 Torr and 1000 K) pyrolysis systems are explored. Mechanism elucidation is achieved through a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques, the former employing a novel simplification of kinetic modeling which utilizes rate constants in a probabilistic framework. Contemporary formation schemes of the compounds of interest generally require successive additions of acetylene to phenyl radicals. As such, infrared laser powered homogeneous pyrolyses of dichloro- or trichloroethylene were perturbed with 1,2,4- or 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene. The resulting changes in product identities were compared with the major products expected from conventional pathways, aided by the results of our previous computational work. This analysis suggests that a Bittner-Howard growth mechanism, with a novel amendment to the conventional scheme made just prior to ring closure, describes the major products well. Expected products from a number of other potentially operative channels are shown to be incongruent with experiment, further supporting the role of Bittner-Howard channels as the unique pathway to naphthalene growth. A simple quantitative analysis which performs very well is achieved by considering the reaction scheme as a probability tree, with relative rate constants being cast as branching probabilities. This analysis describes all chlorinated phenylacetylene, naphthalene, and phenylvinylacetylene congeners. The scheme is then tested in a more general system, i.e., not enforcing a hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism, by pyrolyzing mixtures of di- and trichloroethylene without the addition of an aromatic precursor. The model indicates that these mechanisms are still likely to be operative.

  16. SUPRAMITRAL RING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Supra mitral ring is a rare cause for congenital mitral valve obstr uction. The reported incidence of supramitral ring is 0.2-0.4% in general population and 8% in patients with congenital mitral valve disease. The condition is characterized by an abnormal ridge of connective tissue often circumferential in shape ,on the atrial side of the mitral valve encroaching on the orifice of the mitral valve. It may adhere to the leaflets of the valve and restrict their movements. Although a supramitral ring may be rarely nonobstructive, it often results in mitral valve inflow obstruction.

  17. Ring-Ringlet Interactions in Saturn's C Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    The overall obejective of this work is to derive a theoretical model for the formation of gaps harboring isolated ringlets in order to explain the presence of such features in Saturn's C ring and Cassini division.

  18. The rap GTPases regulate B cell morphology, immune-synapse formation, and signaling by particulate B cell receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Zabetian, Saba; Brugger, Hayley; Weber, Michele; Lei, Victor; Dang-Lawson, May; Tse, Kathy W K; Santamaria, Rene; Batista, Facundo D; Gold, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocytes spread and extend membrane processes when searching for antigens and form immune synapses upon contacting cells that display antigens on their surface. Although these dynamic morphological changes facilitate B cell activation, the signaling pathways underlying these processes are not fully understood. We found that activation of the Rap GTPases was essential for these changes in B cell morphology. Rap activation was important for B cell receptor (BCR)- and lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-induced spreading, for BCR-induced immune-synapse formation, and for particulate BCR ligands to induce localized F-actin assembly and membrane-process extension. Rap activation and F-actin assembly were also required for optimal BCR signaling in response to particulate antigens but not soluble antigens. Thus by controlling B cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization, Rap might play a key role in the activation of B cells by particulate and cell-associated antigens.

  19. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  20. Determinantal rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bruns, Winfried

    1988-01-01

    Determinantal rings and varieties have been a central topic of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Their study has attracted many prominent researchers and has motivated the creation of theories which may now be considered part of general commutative ring theory. The book gives a first coherent treatment of the structure of determinantal rings. The main approach is via the theory of algebras with straightening law. This approach suggest (and is simplified by) the simultaneous treatment of the Schubert subvarieties of Grassmannian. Other methods have not been neglected, however. Principal radical systems are discussed in detail, and one section is devoted to each of invariant and representation theory. While the book is primarily a research monograph, it serves also as a reference source and the reader requires only the basics of commutative algebra together with some supplementary material found in the appendix. The text may be useful for seminars following a course in commutative ring theory since a ...

  1. Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Drosophila Germline Ring Canals Depends on Kelch Function in a Cullin-RING E3 Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Andrew M; Mannix, Katelynn M; Cooley, Lynn

    2015-11-01

    The Drosophila Kelch protein is required to organize the ovarian ring canal cytoskeleton. Kelch binds and cross-links F-actin in vitro, and it also functions with Cullin 3 (Cul3) as a component of a ubiquitin E3 ligase. How these two activities contribute to cytoskeletal remodeling in vivo is not known. We used targeted mutagenesis to investigate the mechanism of Kelch function. We tested a model in which Cul3-dependent degradation of Kelch is required for its function, but we found no evidence to support this hypothesis. However, we found that mutant Kelch deficient in its ability to interact with Cul3 failed to rescue the kelch cytoskeletal defects, suggesting that ubiquitin ligase activity is the principal activity required in vivo. We also determined that the proteasome is required with Kelch to promote the ordered growth of the ring canal cytoskeleton. These results indicate that Kelch organizes the cytoskeleton in vivo by targeting a protein substrate for degradation by the proteasome.

  2. Cave Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by...who expanded on Deegan et al.[3] to find an exact form for the evaporation flux over a sessile drop . It turns out that solving 179 for the flux is

  3. Vascular rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 系统性红斑狼疮患者外周血B细胞脂筏及细胞骨架蛋白的表达初探%Study on the expression of lipid rafts and F-actin in peripheral blood B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何德宁; 董光富; 张晓; 张光锋; 谢悦胜; 李玲; 雷云霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of lipid rafts (LRs) and actin cytoskeleton (F-actin) in the peripheral blood B lymphocytes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated by Ficoll-Hypaque.B lymphocytes were isolated by positive selection from PBMCs.Membrane staining for LRs was achieved with FITC-conjugated cholera toxin B (CTB).The level and distribution of LRs were studied by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.Staining for F-actin was carried out with Rhodamine phalloidin.The expression of F-actin was analyzed by confocal microscopy.In an in vitro examination,the effect of Leflunomide on lipid rafts in B lymphocytes from SLE was analyzed.Disease carried out was measured using the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI).Analysis of the enumerical data was performed using ANOVA or paired-samples t test.Correlation was examined by Pearson's rank correlation test.Results The number of CTB-binding lipid rafts in B cell from active SLE patients or from SLE patients in disease remission.who were treated with immunosuppressive drugs was higher than B cells from healthy controls [(59+4)%,(51±5)%,(33±4)%,F=9.21,P=0.001].Confocal microscopy revealed that in B cell from healthy controls,lipid raft was found to be small and uniformly distributed on the plasma membrane.F-actin was found mainly in the cortical region of the cells.This pattern was different from the pattern seen in B cells from patients with SLE,which presented with stronger staining and irregular large clustering of LRs,with a decrease in F-actin levels.In addition,the number of CTB-binding LRs in B cells from the active SLE patients was correlated significantly with the SLEDAI score (r=0.632,P=0.028).Furthermore,thein vitro results showed that leflunomide treatment reduced the number of CTB-binding LRs in B cell from SLE patients [(48±5)% vs (39±5)%,t=2.29,P=0.048].Conclusion The altered expression of Lipid raft and F-actin

  5. Saturn's rings - high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained this high-resolution picture of Saturn's rings Aug. 22, when the spacecraft was 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) away. Evident here are the numerous 'spoke' features, in the B-ring; their very sharp, narrow appearance suggests short formation times. Scientists think electromagnetic forces are responsible in some way for these features, but no detailed theory has been worked out. Pictures such as this and analyses of Voyager 2's spoke movies may reveal more clues about the origins of these complex structures. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  6. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...... and discussed, and the previously reported cases of familially transmitted G-group ring chromosomes are reviewed....

  7. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  8. Copper Causes Regiospecific Formation of C4F8-Containing Six-Membered Rings and their Defluorination/Aromatization to C4F4-Containing Rings in Triphenylene/1,4-C4F8I2 Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rippy, Kerry C.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Popov, Alexey; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.

    2016-01-18

    The presence of Cu in reactions of triphenylene (TRPH) and 1,4-C4F8I2 at 360 °C led to regiospecific substitution of TRPH ortho C(β) atoms to form C4F8-containing rings, completely suppressing substitution on C(α) atoms. In addition, Cu caused selective reductive-defluorination/aromatization (RD/A) to form C4F4- containing aromatic rings. Without Cu, the reactions of TRPH and 1,4- C4F8I2 were not regiospecific and no RD/A was observed. These results, supported by DFT calculations, are the first examples of Cupromoted (i) regiospecific perfluoroannulation, (ii) preparative C–F activation, and (iii) RD/A. HPLC-purified products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature PES, and 1H/19F NMR.

  9. Topological rings

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1993-01-01

    This text brings the reader to the frontiers of current research in topological rings. The exercises illustrate many results and theorems while a comprehensive bibliography is also included. The book is aimed at those readers acquainted with some very basic point-set topology and algebra, as normally presented in semester courses at the beginning graduate level or even at the advanced undergraduate level. Familiarity with Hausdorff, metric, compact and locally compact spaces and basic properties of continuous functions, also with groups, rings, fields, vector spaces and modules, and with Zorn''s Lemma, is also expected.

  10. Podosome Force Generation Machinery: A Local Balance between Protrusion at the Core and Traction at the Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouissou, Anaïs; Proag, Amsha; Bourg, Nicolas; Pingris, Karine; Cabriel, Clément; Balor, Stéphanie; Mangeat, Thomas; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Dupuis, Guillaume; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Poincloux, Renaud

    2017-04-25

    Determining how cells generate and transduce mechanical forces at the nanoscale is a major technical challenge for the understanding of numerous physiological and pathological processes. Podosomes are submicrometer cell structures with a columnar F-actin core surrounded by a ring of adhesion proteins, which possess the singular ability to protrude into and probe the extracellular matrix. Using protrusion force microscopy, we have previously shown that single podosomes produce local nanoscale protrusions on the extracellular environment. However, how cellular forces are distributed to allow this protruding mechanism is still unknown. To investigate the molecular machinery of protrusion force generation, we performed mechanical simulations and developed quantitative image analyses of nanoscale architectural and mechanical measurements. First, in silico modeling showed that the deformations of the substrate made by podosomes require protrusion forces to be balanced by local traction forces at the immediate core periphery where the adhesion ring is located. Second, we showed that three-ring proteins are required for actin polymerization and protrusion force generation. Third, using DONALD, a 3D nanoscopy technique that provides 20 nm isotropic localization precision, we related force generation to the molecular extension of talin within the podosome ring, which requires vinculin and paxillin, indicating that the ring sustains mechanical tension. Our work demonstrates that the ring is a site of tension, balancing protrusion at the core. This local coupling of opposing forces forms the basis of protrusion and reveals the podosome as a nanoscale autonomous force generator.

  11. Non-commutative Modal Rings and Internalized Equality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Fearnley-Sander; A.V. Kelarev; T. Stokes

    2002-01-01

    We generalize the notion of modal Boolean rings to rings in general. The connection between Boolean rings with equality and modal Boolean rings provides a cue for the definition. The main motivation lies in the existence of examples such as matrix and polynomial rings over modal Boolean rings and Cartesian products of associative rings with identity, along with the desire that the class of "modal rings" be closed under formation of not only the usual homomorphic image, subalgebra and direct product constructions, but also the ring-theoretic constructions of forming matrices and polynomials.

  12. Ring interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Zhurov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the creation of a comprehensive formalism for quantitative description of polarized modes' linear interaction in modern single-mode optic fibers. The theory of random connections between polarized modes, developed in the monograph, allows calculations of the zero shift deviations for a fiber ring interferometer. The monograph addresses also the

  13. Passive scalar mixing in vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Rajes; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of passive scalar mixing in vortex rings are performed, with and without crossflow. The simulation results without crossflow agree well with experimental data for `formation number', total circulation, trajectory and entrainment fraction. Scalar profiles, mixedness and volume of scalar carrying fluid are used to quantify mixing, whose characteristics are quite different in the formation and propagation phases of the ring. These results are explained in terms of entrainment by the ring. The simulations with crossflow show that the ring tilts and deforms. When the stroke ratio is greater than formation number, the ring tilts in the direction of the crossflow. On the other hand, when the stroke ratio is less than formation number, the ring tilts in the opposite direction, such that its induced velocity opposes the crossflow. The Magnus effect may be used to provide a simple explanation. The impact of this behavior on mixing will be discussed.

  14. On SAP-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixiang, Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rings whose simple right modules are absolutely pure are called right $SAP$-rings. We give a new characterization of right $SAP$ rings, right $V$ rings, and von Neumann regular rings. We also obtain a new decomposition theory of right selfinjective von Neumann regular rings. The relationships between $SAP$-rings, $V$-rings, and von Neumann regular rings are explored. Some recent results obtained by Faith are generalized and the results of Wu-Xia are strengthened.

  15. Studies of methanol maser rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bartkiewicz, A; van Langevelde, H J; De Buizer, J M; Pihlström, Y

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of studies of a new class of 6.7 GHz methanol maser sources with a ring-like emission structure discovered recently with the EVN. We have used the VLA to search for water masers at 22 GHz and radio continuum at 8.4 GHz towards a sample of high-mass star forming regions showing a ring-like distribution of methanol maser spots. Using the Gemini telescopes we found mid-infrared (MIR) counterparts of five methanol rings with a resolution of 0."15. The centres of methanol maser rings are located within, typically, only 0."2 of the MIR emission peak, implying their physical relation with a central star. These results strongly support a scenario wherein the ring-like structures appear at the very early stage of massive star formation before either water-maser outflows or H II regions are seen.

  16. Decavanadate interactions with actin: cysteine oxidation and vanadyl formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Susana; Duarte, Rui O; Moura, José J G; Aureliano, Manuel

    2009-10-14

    Incubation of actin with decavanadate induces cysteine oxidation and oxidovanadium(IV) formation. The studies were performed combining kinetic with spectroscopic (NMR and EPR) methodologies. Although decavanadate is converted to labile oxovanadates, the rate of deoligomerization can be very slow (half-life time of 5.4 h, at 25 degrees C, with a first order kinetics), which effectively allows decavanadate to exist for some time under experimental conditions. It was observed that decavanadate inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity with an IC(50) of 0.8 microM V(10) species, whereas 50 microM of vanadate or oxidovanadium(IV) only inhibits enzyme activity up to 25%. Moreover, from these three vanadium forms, only decavanadate induces the oxidation of the so called "fast" cysteines (or exposed cysteine, Cys-374) when the enzyme is in the polymerized and active form, F-actin, with an IC(50) of 1 microM V(10) species. Decavanadate exposition to F- and G-actin (monomeric form) promotes vanadate reduction since a typical EPR oxidovanadium(IV) spectrum was observed. Upon observation that V(10) reduces to oxidovanadium(IV), it is proposed that this cation interacts with G-actin (K(d) of 7.48 +/- 1.11 microM), and with F-actin (K(d) = 43.05 +/- 5.34 microM) with 1:1 and 4:1 stoichiometries, respectively, as observed by EPR upon protein titration with oxidovanadium(IV). The interaction of oxidovanadium(IV) with the protein may occur close to the ATP binding site of actin, eventually with lysine-336 and 3 water molecules.

  17. Observations of the effect of varying Hoop stress on fatigue failure and the formation of white etching areas in hydrogen infused 100Cr6 steel rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janakiraman, Shravan; West, Ole; Klit, Peder;

    2015-01-01

    White etching cracks (WECs) in wind turbine gearbox bearings have been studied previously. Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) tests are conducted on 100Cr6 bearing steel rings, in this study, to generate WECs like those found in wind turbine bearings. This research studies the effect of two different...

  18. Experiments with vortex rings in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R. H.; Cibert, B.; Béchet, C.

    2006-09-01

    We report quantitative experimental measurements of the instability of vortex rings generated in air. Vortex rings are created by pushing air through the circular orifice of a cylindrical cavity with a flat piston driven by a loudspeaker. Hot-wire anemometry provides accurate measurements of the velocity profile at all stages of the ring formation including stable and unstable rings. Flow visualization using a laser light sheet shows that the initially undisturbed vortex ring is progressively deformed in the azimuthal direction giving rise to a wavy azimuthal and periodic pattern in the circumference of the ring. The wavy pattern is steady, i.e., it does not rotate or translate during the ring's motion. However as the vortex motion progresses in the axial direction, the displaced portions of the ring are convected away from the initial undisturbed position and the wavy pattern grows with local Reynolds number.

  19. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  20. Expression of a dynamin 2 mutant associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease leads to aberrant actin dynamics and lamellipodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kinue; Zhang, Yubai; Takeda, Tetsuya; Takei, Kohji

    2016-08-15

    Specific mutations in dynamin 2 are linked to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), an inherited peripheral neuropathy. However, the effects of these mutations on dynamin function, particularly in relation to the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton remain unclear. Here, selected CMT-associated dynamin mutants were expressed to examine their role in the pathogenesis of CMT in U2OS cells. Ectopic expression of the dynamin CMT mutants 555Δ3 and K562E caused an approximately 50% decrease in serum stimulation-dependent lamellipodia formation; however, only K562E caused aberrations in the actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the K562E mutation resulted in the disappearance of radially aligned actin bundles and the simultaneous appearance of F-actin clusters. Live-cell imaging analyses showed F-actin polymers of decreased length assembled into immobile clusters in K562E-expressing cells. The K562E dynamin mutant colocalized with the F-actin clusters, whereas its colocalization with clathrin-coated pit marker proteins was decreased. Essentially the same results were obtained using another cell line, HeLa and NG108-15 cells. The present study is the first to show the association of dynamin CMT mutations with aberrant actin dynamics and lamellipodia, which may contribute to defective endocytosis and myelination in Schwann cells in CMT. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Origami rings

    CERN Document Server

    Buhler, Joe; de Launey, Warwick; Graham, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a question in origami, we consider sets of points in the complex plane constructed in the following way. Let $L_\\alpha(p)$ be the line in the complex plane through $p$ with angle $\\alpha$ (with respect to the real axis). Given a fixed collection $U$ of angles, let $\\RU$ be the points that can be obtained by starting with $0$ and $1$, and then recursively adding intersection points of the form $L_\\alpha(p) \\cap L_\\beta(q)$, where $p, q$ have been constructed already, and $\\alpha, \\beta$ are distinct angles in $U$. Our main result is that if $U$ is a group with at least three elements, then $\\RU$ is a subring of the complex plane, i.e., it is closed under complex addition and multiplication. This enables us to answer a specific question about origami folds: if $n \\ge 3$ and the allowable angles are the $n$ equally spaced angles $k\\pi/n$, $0 \\le k < n$, then $\\RU$ is the ring $\\Z[\\zeta_n]$ if $n$ is prime, and the ring $\\Z[1/n,\\zeta_{n}]$ if $n$ is not prime, where $\\zeta_n := \\exp(2\\pi i/n)$ is ...

  2. 葡萄糖转运蛋白4及其下游信号分子在高糖刺激下肾小球系膜细胞中的作用%Effects of high glucose and insulin on expression of glucose transporter 4, Cbl-associated protein and cytoskeleton protein F-actin in rat glomerular mesangial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜新; 黄颂敏; 唐万欣; 柳飞; 赖学莉

    2009-01-01

    )GLUT4、CAP和F-actin是糖尿病肾病发生发展的重要影响因子之一.%Objective To investigate the effects of high glucose and insulin on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), Cbl-associated protein (CAP) and cytoskeleton protein F-actin of glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs), in order to explore the function of GLUT4, Cbl-associated protein and F-actin in the pathogenesis and development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Methods Cultured 1097 rat glomerular mesangial cells were divided into 8 groups: control, 10-9 mol/L insulin, 10-8 mol/L insulin, 10-6 mol/L insulin, high glucose (30 mmol/L), mannitol (25 mmol/L mannitol+5 mmol/L glucose), high glucose plus 10-6 mol/L insulin, high glucose plus 10-9 mol/L insulin. Expression of CAP mRNA and GLUT4 was measured by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry method. F-actin was stained by rhodamine-pholloidin and the fluorescent intensity was calculated by image analysis system. Results The expression of GLUT4 mRNA and protein, CAP mRNA was found in normal giomerular mesangial cells (control), and there was no significant difference in 10-9 mol/L insulin group. The expression of GLUT4 mRNA (P<0.05) and protein (P<0.01), CAP mRNA (P<0.01) level was decreased in high glucose group compared with that of control group, but there was no significant difference in mannitol group. The expression of GLUT4 and CAP mRNA up-regulated with the increase of concentration of insulin. The expressions of GLUT4 mRNA in 10-8 mol/L insulin and 10-6 mol/L insulin groups were 2.06-fold and 2.66-fold of 10-9 mol/L insulin group, of GLUT4 protein were 1.93-fold and 2.83-fold of control, and of CAP mRNA were 1.91-fold and 2.15-fold of control, respectively. The expressions of GLUT4 mRNA, GLUT4 protein, CAP mRNA in high glucose plus insulin group were 2.15-fold, 2.08-fold, 2.14-fold of high glucose group respectively. High glucose decreased the fluorescent intensity of F-actin to 44.5% (P<0.01). 10-8 mol/L insulin and 10-6 mol/L insulin groups

  3. Syn- and post-eruptive erosion, gully formation, and morphological evolution of a tephra ring in tropical climate erupted in 1913 in West Ambrym, Vanuatu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.

    2007-04-01

    Syn- and post-eruptive erosion of volcanic cones plays an important role in mass redistribution of tephra over short periods. Descriptions of the early stages of erosion of tephra from monogenetic volcanic cones are rare, particularly those with a well-constrained timing of events. In spite of this lack of data, cone morphologies and erosion features are commonly used for long-term erosion-rate calculations and relative age determinations in volcanic fields. This paper offers new observations which suggest differing constraints on the timing of erosion of a tephra ring may be operating than those conventionally cited. In 1913 a tephra ring was formed as part of an eruption in west Ambrym Island, Vanuatu and is now exposed along a continuous 2.5 km long coastal section. The ring surrounds an oval shaped depression filled by water. It is composed of a succession of a phreatomagmatic fall and base-surge beds, interbedded with thin scoriaceous lapilli units. Toward the outer edges of the ring, base-surge beds are gradually replaced in the succession by fine ash-dominated debris flows and hyperconcentrated flow deposits. The inter-fingering of phreatomagmatic deposits with syn-volcanic reworked volcaniclastic sediments indicates that an ongoing remobilisation of freshly deposited tephra was already occurring during the eruption. Gullies cut into the un-weathered tephra are up to 4 m deep and commonly have c. 1 m of debris flow deposit fill in their bases. There is no indication of weathering, vegetation fragments or soil development between the gully bases and the basal debris flow fills. Gully walls are steep and superficial fans of collapsed sediment are common. Most gullies are heavily vegetated although some active (ephemeral) channels occur. These observations suggest that the majority of the erosion of such tephra rings in tropical climates takes place directly during eruption and possibly for only a period of days to weeks afterward. After establishment of the

  4. Estimates of primary ejecta and local material for the Orientale basin: Implications for the formation and ballistic sedimentation of multi-ring basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Minggang; Zhu, Meng-Hua

    2016-04-01

    A clear understanding of thickness distributions of primary ejecta and local material is critical to interpreting the process of ballistic sedimentation, provenances of lunar samples, the evolution of the lunar surface, and the origin of multi-ring basins. The youngest lunar multi-ring basin, Orientale, provides the best preserved structure for determining the thicknesses of primary ejecta and local material. In general, the primary ejecta thickness was often estimated using crater morphometry. However, previous methods ignored either crater erosion, the crater interior geometry, or both. In addition, ejecta deposits were taken as mostly primary ejecta. And, as far as we know, the local material thickness had not been determined for the Orientale. In this work, we proposed a model based on matching measurements of partially filled pre-Orientale craters (PFPOCs) with the simulations of crater erosion to determine their thicknesses. We provided estimates of primary ejecta thickness distribution with the thickness of 0.85 km at Cordillera ring and a decay power law exponent of b = 2.8, the transient crater radius of 200 km, excavation volume of 2.3 ×106 km3, primary ejecta volume of 2.8 ×106 km3. These results suggest that previous works (e.g., Fassett et al., 2011; Moore et al., 1974) might overestimate the primary ejecta thicknesses of Orientale, and the primary ejecta thickness model of Pike (1974a) for multi-ring basins may give better estimates than the widely cited model of McGetchin et al. (1973) and the scaling law for impacts into Ottawa Sand (Housen et al., 1983). Structural uplift decays slower than previously thought, and rim relief is mostly rim uplift for Orientale. The main reason for rim uplift may be the fracturing and squeezing upward of the surrounding rocks. The proportion of local material to ejecta deposits increases with increasing radial distance from basin center, and the thickness of local material is larger than that of primary ejecta at

  5. Braided rings a scattering billiard model

    CERN Document Server

    Bénet, L

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a billiard scattering model consisting of two non-overlapping rotating discs in the context of the formation and structural properties of planetary rings. We show that due to the arrangement of the symmetric periodic orbits, stable orbits are found which in the configuration space lead to the appearance of patterns qualitatively similar to planetary rings. Rings associated with different stability regions are naturally braided; different braids may overlap displaying features similar to clumps. Erosion mechanisms within the model are discussed.

  6. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Erik T; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactivity of Tp(Me2) -supported yttrium alkyl complexes toward aromatic N-heterocycles: ring-opening or C-C bond formation directed by C-H activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Weiyin; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Shujian; Weng, Linhong; Zhou, Xigeng

    2014-01-13

    Unusual chemical transformations such as three-component combination and ring-opening of N-heterocycles or formation of a carbon-carbon double bond through multiple C-H activation were observed in the reactions of Tp(Me2) -supported yttrium alkyl complexes with aromatic N-heterocycles. The scorpionate-anchored yttrium dialkyl complex [Tp(Me2) Y(CH2 Ph)2 (THF)] reacted with 1-methylimidazole in 1:2 molar ratio to give a rare hexanuclear 24-membered rare-earth metallomacrocyclic compound [Tp(Me2) Y(μ-N,C-Im)(η(2) -N,C-Im)]6 (1; Im=1-methylimidazolyl) through two kinds of C-H activations at the C2- and C5-positions of the imidazole ring. However, [Tp(Me2) Y(CH2 Ph)2 (THF)] reacted with two equivalents of 1-methylbenzimidazole to afford a C-C coupling/ring-opening/C-C coupling product [Tp(Me2) Y{η(3) -(N,N,N)-N(CH3 )C6 H4 NHCHC(Ph)CN(CH3 )C6 H4 NH}] (2). Further investigations indicated that [Tp(Me2) Y(CH2 Ph)2 (THF)] reacted with benzothiazole in 1:1 or 1:2 molar ratio to produce a C-C coupling/ring-opening product {(Tp(Me2) )Y[μ-η(2) :η(1) -SC6 H4 N(CHCHPh)](THF)}2 (3). Moreover, the mixed Tp(Me2) /Cp yttrium monoalkyl complex [(Tp(Me2) )CpYCH2 Ph(THF)] reacted with two equivalents of 1-methylimidazole in THF at room temperature to afford a trinuclear yttrium complex [Tp(Me2) CpY(μ-N,C-Im)]3 (5), whereas when the above reaction was carried out at 55 °C for two days, two structurally characterized metal complexes [Tp(Me2) Y(Im-Tp(Me2) )] (7; Im-Tp(Me2) =1-methyl-imidazolyl-Tp(Me2) ) and [Cp3 Y(HIm)] (8; HIm=1-methylimidazole) were obtained in 26 and 17 % isolated yields, respectively, accompanied by some unidentified materials. The formation of 7 reveals an uncommon example of construction of a CC bond through multiple C-H activations.

  8. Effect of the nature of the substituent in N-alkylimidazole ligands on the outcome of deprotonation: ring opening versus the formation of N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertos, Miguel A; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía; Díaz, Jesús; López, Ramón

    2010-07-26

    Complexes [Re(CO)(3)(N-RIm)(3)]OTf (N-RIm=N-alkylimidazole, OTf=trifluoromethanesulfonate; 1a-d) have been straightforwardly synthesised from [Re(OTf)(CO)(5)] and the appropriate N-alkylimidazole. The reaction of compounds 1a-d with the strong base KN(SiMe(3))(2) led to deprotonation of a central C-H group of an imidazole ligand, thus affording very highly reactive derivatives. The latter can evolve through two different pathways, depending on the nature of the substituents of the imidazole ligands. Compound 1a contains three N-MeIm ligands, and its product 2a features a C-bound imidazol-2-yl ligand. When 2a is treated with HOTf or MeOTf, rhenium N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) 3a or 4a are afforded as a result of the protonation or methylation, respectively, of the non-coordinated N atom. The reaction of 2a with [AuCl(PPh(3))] led to the heterobimetallic compound 5, in which the N-heterocyclic ligand is once again N-bound to the Re atom and C-coordinated to the gold fragment. For compounds 1b-d, with at least one N-arylimidazole ligand, deprotonation led to an unprecedented reactivity pattern: the carbanion generated by the deprotonation of the C2-H group of an imidazole ligand attacks a central C-H group of a neighbouring N-RIm ligand, thus affording the product of C-C coupling and ring-opening of the imidazole moiety that has been attacked (2c, d). The new complexes featured an amido-type N atom that can be protonated or methylated, thus obtaining compounds 3c, d or 4c, d, respectively. The latter reaction forces a change in the disposition of the olefinic unit generated by the ring-opening of the N-RIm ligand from a cisoid to a transoid geometry. Theoretical calculations help to rationalise the experimental observation of ring-opening (when at least one of the substituents of the imidazole ligands is an aryl group) or tautomerisation of the N-heterocyclic ligand to afford the imidazol-2-yl product.

  9. Prime rings with PI rings of constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, V K; Rodríguez-Romo, S

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that if the ring of constants of a restricted differential Lie algebra with a quasi-Frobenius inner part satisfies a polynomial identity (PI) then the original prime ring has a generalized polynomial identitiy (GPI). If additionally the ring of constants is semiprime then the original ring is PI. The case of a non-quasi-Frobenius inner part is also considered.

  10. Photochemistry of 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives: Diradical Formation, Delocalization and Trapping as a Route to Novel Tricyclic and Tetracyclic Nitrogen Heterocyclic Ring Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader A. Al-Jalal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of an acetonitrile solution of 4-aryl-3,5-dibenzoyl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives 1a–c and maleimides 2a–c using medium pressure Hg-arc lamp (λ > 290 nm afforded three different cycloadducts 4, 5, 6 in addition to the oxidation products 3. These results indicate that compounds 1a–c undergoes intermolecular cycloaddition reaction through three biradical intermediates and behave photochemically different than those reported previously for the analogous 3,5-diacetyl and 3,5-dicarboxylic acid derivatives. The present work also offers simple access to novel tricyclic and tetracyclic nitrogen heterocyclic ring systems of potential biological and synthetic applications. The structure of the photoproducts was established spectroscopically and by single crystal X-ray crystallography.

  11. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  12. Radical theory of rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, JW

    2003-01-01

    Radical Theory of Rings distills the most noteworthy present-day theoretical topics, gives a unified account of the classical structure theorems for rings, and deepens understanding of key aspects of ring theory via ring and radical constructions. Assimilating radical theory's evolution in the decades since the last major work on rings and radicals was published, the authors deal with some distinctive features of the radical theory of nonassociative rings, associative rings with involution, and near-rings. Written in clear algebraic terms by globally acknowledged authorities, the presentation

  13. Nanograin densities outside Saturn's A-ring

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert E; Elrod, Meredith K; Persoon, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    The observed disparity between the radial dependence of the ion and electron densities measured by the Cassini plasma and radio science instruments are used to show that the region between the outer edge of Saturn's main rings and its tenuous G-ring is permeated with small charged grains (nanograins). These grains emanate from the edge of the A-ring and from the tenuous F-ring and G-ring. This is a region of Saturn's magnetosphere that is relatively unexplored, but will be a focus of Cassini's F-ring orbits prior to the end of mission in September 2017. Confirmation of the grain densities predicted here will enhance our ability to describe the formation and destruction of material in this important region of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  14. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  15. Stirling engine piston ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  16. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring A A A What's in this article? ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  17. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  18. RING-between-RINGs—keeping the safety on loaded guns

    OpenAIRE

    Dove, Katja K.; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2012-01-01

    Auto-inhibition of the ‘RING-between-RINGs'-type E3 Ub ligase HOIP is released by its binding partners HOIL-1L or SHARPIN, allowing linear Ub-chain formation via a RING/HECT-hybrid transfer mechanism.

  19. Multicellular rosette formation links planar cell polarity to tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, J Todd; Backovic, Stephanie T; Sanny, Justina S P; Weitz, Ori; Zallen, Jennifer A

    2006-10-01

    Elongation of the body axis is accompanied by the assembly of a polarized cytoarchitecture that provides the basis for directional cell behavior. We find that planar polarity in the Drosophila embryo is established through a sequential enrichment of actin-myosin cables and adherens junction proteins in complementary surface domains. F-actin accumulation at AP interfaces represents the first break in planar symmetry and occurs independently of proper junctional protein distribution at DV interfaces. Polarized cells engage in a novel program of locally coordinated behavior to generate multicellular rosette structures that form and resolve in a directional fashion. Actin-myosin structures align across multiple cells during rosette formation, and adherens junction proteins assemble in a stepwise fashion during rosette resolution. Patterning genes essential for axis elongation selectively affect the frequency and directionality of rosette formation. We propose that the generation of higher-order rosette structures links local cell interactions to global tissue reorganization during morphogenesis.

  20. Helical twist controls the thickness of F-actin bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, M.M.A.E.; Semmrich, C.; Ramos, L.; Bausch, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of condensing agents such as nonadsorbing polymer, multivalent counter ions, and specific bundling proteins, chiral biopolymers typically form bundles with a finite thickness, rather than phase-separating into a polymer-rich phase. Although short-range repulsive interactions or geome

  1. Mical links semaphorins to F-actin disassembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hung, R.J.; Yazdani, U.; Yoon, J.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.; Gupta, N.; Huang, Z.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Terman, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    How instructive cues present on the cell surface have their precise effects on the actin cytoskeleton is poorly understood. Semaphorins are one of the largest families of these instructive cues and are widely studied for their effects on cell movement, navigation, angiogenesis, immunology and cancer

  2. Mical links semaphorins to F-actin disassembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hung, R.J.; Yazdani, U.; Yoon, J.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.; Gupta, N.; Huang, Z.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Terman, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    How instructive cues present on the cell surface have their precise effects on the actin cytoskeleton is poorly understood. Semaphorins are one of the largest families of these instructive cues and are widely studied for their effects on cell movement, navigation, angiogenesis, immunology and

  3. The insulator protein Suppressor of Hairy wing is required for proper ring canal development during oogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Jui; Plata, Maria P; Ernest, Ben; Asgarifar, Saghi; Labrador, Mariano

    2015-07-01

    Chromatin insulators orchestrate gene transcription during embryo development and cell differentiation by stabilizing interactions between distant genomic sites. Mutations in genes encoding insulator proteins are generally lethal, making in vivo functional analyses of insulator proteins difficult. In Drosophila, however, mutations in the gene encoding the Suppressor of Hairy wing insulator protein [Su(Hw)] are viable and female sterile, providing an opportunity to study insulator function during oocyte development. Whereas previous reports suggest that the function of Su(Hw) in oogenesis is independent of its insulator activity, many aspects of the role of Su(Hw) in Drosophila oogenesis remain unexplored. Here we show that mutations in su(Hw) result in smaller ring canal lumens and smaller outer ring diameters, which likely obstruct molecular and vesicle passage from nurse cells to the oocyte. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that lack of Su(Hw) leads to excess accumulation of Kelch (Kel) and Filament-actin (F-actin) proteins in the ring canal structures of developing egg chambers. Furthermore, we found that misexpression of the Src oncogene at 64B (Src64B) may cause ring canal development defects as microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR revealed there is a three fold decrease in Src64B expression in su(Hw) mutant ovaries. Restoration of Src64B expression in su(Hw) mutant female germ cells rescued the ring phenotype but did not restore fertility. We conclude that loss of su(Hw) affects expression of many oogenesis related genes and down-regulates Src64B, resulting in ring canal defects potentially contributing to obstruction of molecular flow and an eventual failure of egg chamber organization.

  4. A novel function of RING finger protein 10 in transcriptional regulation of the myelin-associated glycoprotein gene and myelin formation in Schwann cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Hoshikawa

    Full Text Available Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG has been detected in Schwann cells prior to the onset of myelination, suggesting its functions in the initiation of myelination. However, transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of MAG remain to be elucidated. Here, we analyzed the promoter of the MAG gene by using luciferase reporter systems in the primary rat Schwann cells. We identified a novel cis-acting element located 160 bp upstream from the MAG transcription initiation site. Using the identified cis-element as a bait, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening and isolated a cDNA encoding a RNF10 as a putative trans-acting protein. When overexpressed in Schwann cells, RNF10 enhanced the activity of the MAG promoter. When RNF10 expression in Schwann cells was knocked down by siRNA, endogenous MAG mRNA and protein expression decreased. Furthermore, we evaluated myelin synthesis using Schwann cell-DRG neuron cocultures. When Schwann cells were infected with retrovirus expressing RNF10 siRNA, myelin formation was inhibited. These data suggest that RNF10 regulates MAG expression and is required for myelin formation.

  5. On JB-Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin CHEN

    2007-01-01

    A ring R is a QB-ring provided that aR + bR = R with a, b ∈ R implies that there exists a y ∈ R such that a+by ∈ R-1q. It is said that a ring R is a JB-ring provided that R/J(R) is a QB-ring, where J(R) is the Jacobson radical of R. In this paper, various necessary and sufficient conditions, under which a ring is a JB-ring, are established. It is proved that JB-rings can be characterized by pseudo-similarity. Furthermore, the author proves that R is a J B-ring iff so is R/J(R)2.

  6. Pedagogical aspects of effective use of simulator "Straps with ring" during the formation motor skills of pupils of 10 classes during the skiing training in the lessons of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarenko M.G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop a system of ski training exercises using a functional simulator at physical training lessons. Material : The study took 90 young men attended 10 class. To determine the level of formation of motor skills of pupils were tested on 7 indicators: skiing skating style 5 km; skiing classic style 3 km; pulling up on the bar; long jump with space, running 60 meters, running 3 miles, 4x9 meters shuttle run. A year after the first experiment was conducted a second experiment. Results : The developed and adapted to the physical education class simulator exercises which compounded the gravity load and moving straps with rings. The test results confirmed that the proposed method makes it possible to more effectively shape the motor skills of pupils in the process of ski training at physical training lessons. Conclusions : It is recommended to the lessons of physical training on use of ski training complex of 22 exercises that will most effectively influence the formation of motor skills of pupils.

  7. Statistical Correlations Between Near-Infrared Luminosities and Ring Sizes in Field Ringed Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wentao

    2008-01-01

    Statistically complete samples of inner-pseudo-, inner-, and outer-ringed galaxies can be extracted from the Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies. Redshifts and near-infrared (NIR) photometric data are available for the samples, allowing the derivation of the statistical correlations between the total NIR luminosities (L NIR) and the projected ring major axes in the physical scale (D) for these galaxies. For any of the three types of rings, the correlations are approximately L NIR vprop D 1.2 among the early-type ringed galaxies (the most commonly observed ringed galaxies). The correlations among late-type ringed galaxies appear significantly different. The results contradict the previous suggestion by Kormendy (1979, ApJ, 227, 714), who gave LB vprop D 2 (LB : B-band galaxy luminosity). The relations can be used in future to test theoretical simulations of dynamical structures of ringed galaxies as well as those of ring formation under the framework of cosmological models. Currently the results indicate at most small differences in the relative contributions of disk components to total galaxy masses and in the initial disk velocity dispersions between commonly observed ringed galaxies of similar type. The correlations also suggest a new approach to effectively use ring sizes as tertiary cosmological distance indicators, to help enhance the reliability of the measurement of the Hubble Constant.

  8. On semi ring bornologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, A. N.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Husain, Sh. K. Said

    2016-06-01

    Our main focus in this work is to introduce new structure bornological semi rings. This generalizes the theory of algebraic semi rings from the algebraic setting to the framework of bornological sets. We give basic properties for this new structure. As well as, We study the fundamental construction of bornological semi ring as product, inductive limits and projective limits and their extensions on bornological semi ring. Additionally, we introduce the category of bornological semi rings and study product and pullback (fiber product) in the category of bornological semi rings.

  9. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  10. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  11. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ...

  12. On Weakly Semicommutative Rings*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN WEI-XING; CUI SHU-YING

    2011-01-01

    A ring R is said to be weakly scmicommutative if for any a, b ∈ R,ab = 0 implies aRb C_ Nil(R), where Nil(R) is the set of all nilpotcnt elements in R.In this note, we clarify the relationship between weakly semicommutative rings and NI-rings by proving that the notion of a weakly semicommutative ring is a proper generalization of NI-rings. We say that a ring R is weakly 2-primal if the set of nilpotent elements in R coincides with its Levitzki radical, and prove that if R is a weakly 2-primal ring which satisfies oα-condition for an endomorphism α of R (that is, ab = 0 (←→) aα(b) = 0 where a, b ∈ R) then the skew polynomial ring R[π; αα]is a weakly 2-primal ring, and that if R is a ring and I is an ideal of R such that I and R/I are both weakly semicommutative then R is weakly semicommutative.Those extend the main results of Liang et al. 2007 (Taiwanese J. Math., 11(5)(2007),1359-1368) considerably. Moreover, several new results about weakly semicommutative rings and NI-rings are included.

  13. Efficient and selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted Z alkenes by ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions catalyzed by Mo- or W-based monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complexes: applications to total syntheses of epilachnene, yuzu lactone, ambrettolide, epothilone C, and nakadomarin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenbo; Yu, Miao; Kyle, Andrew F; Jakubec, Pavol; Dixon, Darren J; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2013-02-18

    The first broadly applicable set of protocols for efficient Z-selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted alkenes through catalytic ring-closing metathesis (RCM) is described. Cyclizations are performed with 1.2-7.5 mol% of a Mo- or W-based monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complex at 22 °C and proceed to complete conversion typically within two hours. Utility is demonstrated by synthesis of representative macrocyclic alkenes, such as natural products yuzu lactone (13-membered ring: 73% Z) epilachnene (15-membered ring: 91% Z), ambrettolide (17-membered ring: 91% Z), an advanced precursor to epothilones C and A (16-membered ring: up to 97% Z), and nakadomarin A (15-membered ring: up to 97% Z). We show that catalytic Z-selective cyclizations can be performed efficiently on gram-scale with complex molecule starting materials and catalysts that can be handled in air. We elucidate several critical principles of the catalytic protocol: 1) The complementary nature of the Mo catalysts, which deliver high activity but can be more prone towards engendering post-RCM stereoisomerization, versus W variants, which furnish lower activity but are less inclined to cause loss of kinetic Z selectivity. 2) Reaction time is critical to retaining kinetic Z selectivity not only with MAP species but with the widely used Mo bis(hexafluoro-tert-butoxide) complex as well. 3) Polycyclic structures can be accessed without significant isomerization at the existing Z alkenes within the molecule.

  14. Physics of quantum rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Vladimir M

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with a new class of materials, quantum rings. Innovative recent advances in experimental and theoretical physics of quantum rings are based on the most advanced state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization techniques as well as theoretical methods. The experimental efforts allow to obtain a new class of semiconductor quantum rings formed by capping self-organized quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Novel optical and magnetic properties of quantum rings are associated with non-trivial topologies at the nanoscale. An adequate characterization of quantum rings is po

  15. Envelopes of Commutative Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael PARRA; Manuel SAOR(I)N

    2012-01-01

    Given a significative class F of commutative rings,we study the precise conditions under which a commutative ring R has an F-envelope.A full answer is obtained when.F is the class of fields,semisimple commutative rings or integral domains.When F is the class of Noetherian rings,we give a full answer when the Krull dimension of R is zero and when the envelope is required to be epimorphic.The general problem is reduced to identifying the class of non-Noetherian rings having a monomorphic Noetherian envelope,which we conjecture is the empty class.

  16. RING PROXY SIGNATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Proxy signatures have been used to enable the transfer of digital signing power within some context and ring signatures can be used to provide the anonymity of a signer. By combining the functionalities of proxy signatures and ring signatures, this paper introduces a new concept, named ring proxy signature, which is a proxy signature generated by an anonymous member from a set of potential signers. The paper also constructs the first concrete ring proxy signature scheme based on the provably secure Schnorr's signatures and two ID-based ring proxy signature schemes. The security analysis is provided as well.

  17. The contraceptive vaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Jill; Jamshidi, Roxanne

    2010-03-01

    The contraceptive vaginal ring offers effective contraception that is self-administered, requires less frequent dosing than many other forms of contraception, and provides low doses of hormones. NuvaRing (Organon, Oss, The Netherlands), the only contraceptive vaginal ring approved for use in the United States, contains etonogestrel and ethinyl estradiol. It is inserted into the vagina for 3 weeks, followed by a 1-week ring-free period, and works by inhibiting ovulation. Most women note a beneficial effect on bleeding profiles and are satisfied with NuvaRing. Commonly reported adverse events include vaginitis, leukorrhea, headaches, and device-related events such as discomfort. Serious adverse events are rare. In Chile and Peru, progesterone-only vaginal contraceptive rings are available for nursing women. Studies are ongoing examining new formulations of vaginal contraceptive rings.

  18. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  19. Certain near-rings are rings, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard E. Bell

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate distributively-generated near-rings R which satisfy one of the following conditions: (i for each x,y∈R, there exist positive integers m, n for which xy=ymxn; (ii for each x,y∈R, there exists a positive integer n such that xy=(yxn. Under appropriate additional hypotheses, we prove that R must be a commutative ring.

  20. On Exchange QB∞-Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin Chen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of rings, the QB∞-rings. We investigate necessary and sufficient conditions under which an exchange ring is a QB∞-ring. The modules over an exchange QB∞-ring are studied. Also, we prove that every regular square matrix over an exchange QB∞-ring admits a diagonal reduction by pseudo-invertible matrices.

  1. Neutrosophic LA-Semigroup Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophic LA-semigroup is a midway structure between a neutrosophic groupoid and a commutative neutrosophic semigroup. Rings are the old concept in algebraic structures. We combine the neutrosophic LA-semigroup and ring together to form the notion of neutrosophic LA-semigroup ring. Neutrosophic LAsemigroup ring is defined analogously to neutrosophic group ring and neutrosophic semigroup ring.

  2. Polar Ring Galaxies and Warps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, F.

    Polar ring galaxies, where matter is in equilibrium in perpendicular orbits around spiral galaxies, are ideal objects to probe the 3D shapes of dark matter halos. The conditions to constrain the halos are that the perpendicular system does not strongly perturb the host galaxy, or that it is possible to derive back its initial shape, knowing the formation scenario of the polar ring. The formation mechanisms are reviewed: mergers, tidal accretion, or gas accretion from cosmic filaments. The Tully-Fisher diagram for polar rings reveals that the velocity in the polar plane is higher than in the host plane, which can only be explained if the dark matter is oblate and flattened along the polar plane. Only a few individual systems have been studied in details, and 3D shapes of their haloes determined by several methods. The high frequency of warps could be explained by spontaneous bending instability, if the disks are sufficiently self-gravitating, which can put constraints on the dark matter flattening.

  3. Polar ring galaxies and warps

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2005-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies, where matter is in equilibrium in perpendicular orbits around spiral galaxies, are ideal objects to probe the 3D shapes of dark matter halos. The conditions to constrain the halos are that the perpendicular system does not strongly perturb the host galaxy, or that it is possible to derive back its initial shape, knowing the formation scenario of the polar ring. The formation mechanisms are reviewed: mergers, tidal accretion, or gas accretion from cosmic filaments. The Tully-Fisher diagram for polar rings reveals that the velocity in the polar plane is higher than in the host plane, which can only be explained if the dark matter is oblate and flattened along the polar plane. Only a few individual systems have been studied in details, and 3D shapes of their haloes determined by several methods. The high frequency of warps could be explained by spontaneous bending instability, if the disks are sufficiently self-gravitating, which can put constraints on the dark matter flattening.

  4. High-Speed Ring Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  5. Gulf ring algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although they rank among the tiniest of the microspcopic phytoplankton, coccolithophore algae aid oceanographers studying the Gulf Stream rings and the ring boundaries. The algal group could help to identify more precisely the boundary of the warm rings of water that spin off from the Gulf Stream and become independent pools of warm water in the colder waters along the northeastern U.S. coast.Coccolithophore populations in the Gulf Stream rings intrigue oceanographers for two reasons: The phytoplankton are subjected to an environment that changes every few days, and population explosions within one coccolithophore species seem to be associated with changes in the characteristics of ocean water, said Pat Blackwelder, an associate professor at the Nova Oceanographic Center in Dania, Fla. She is one of many studying the physics, chemistry, and biology of warm core rings. A special oceanography session on these rings was held at the recent AGU Fall Meeting/ASLO Winter Meeting.

  6. Token Ring Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Ionescu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ring topology is a simple configuration used to connect processes that communicate among themselves. A number of network standards such as token ring, token bus, and FDDI are based on the ring connectivity. This article will develop an implementation of a ring of processes that communicate among themselves via pipe links. The processes are nodes in the ring. Each process reads from its standard input and writes in its standard output. N-1 process redirects the its standard output to a standard input of the process through a pipe. When the ring-structure is designed, the project can be extended to simulate networks or to implement algorithms for mutual exclusion

  7. Formation of the G-ring arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves increasing the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario in which the excitation of Mimas's eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance. This is a possible explanation for the origin of the arcs.

  8. Formation of the G-ring arc

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, N C S; Foryta, D W

    2016-01-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  9. Ring formation on an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robert; Du, Xiyu

    2015-11-01

    A drop dried on a solid surface will typically leave a narrow band of solute deposited along the contact line. We examined variations of this deposit due to the inclination of the substrate using numerical simulations of a two-dimensional drop, equivalent to a strip-like drop. An asymptotic analysis of the contact line region predicts that the upslope deposit will grow faster at early times, but the growth of this deposit ends sooner because the upper contact line depins first. From our simulations we find that the deposit can be larger at either the upper or lower contact line depending on the initial drop volume and substrate inclination. For larger drops and steeper inclinations, the early lead in deposited mass at the upper contact line is wiped out by the earlier depinning of the upper contact line and subsequent continued growth at the lower contact line. Conversely, for smaller drops and shallower inclinations, the early lead of the upper contact line is insurmountable despite its earlier termination in growth. Our results show that it is difficult to reconstruct a postiorithe inclination of the substrate based solely on the shape of the deposit. The authors thank the James S. McDonnell Foundation for support through a 21st Century Science Initiative in Studying Complex Systems Research Award, and the National Science Foundation for support under Grant No. 0932600.

  10. Dusty plasma (Yukawa) rings

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, T E

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional strongly-coupled dusty plasma rings have been created experimentally. Longitudinal (acoustic) and transverse (optical) dispersion relations for the 1-ring were measured and found to be in very good agreement with the theory for an unbounded straight chain of particles interacting through a Yukawa (i.e., screened Coulomb or Debye-H\\"uckel) potential. These rings provide a new system in which to study one-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional physics.

  11. Token ring technology report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This report provides an overview of the IBM Token-Ring technology and products built by IBM and compatible vendors. It consists of two sections: 1. A summary of the design trade-offs for the IBM Token-Ring. 2. A summary of the products of the major token-ring compatible vendors broken down by adapters and components, wiring systems, testing, and new chip technology.

  12. On -Coherent Endomorphism Rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li-Xin Mao

    2008-11-01

    A ring is called right -coherent if every principal right ideal is finitely presented. Let $M_R$ be a right -module. We study the -coherence of the endomorphism ring of $M_R$. It is shown that is a right -coherent ring if and only if every endomorphism of $M_R$ has a pseudokernel in add $M_R; S$ is a left -coherent ring if and only if every endomorphism of $M_R$ has a pseudocokernel in add $M_R$. Some applications are given.

  13. Physics of quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fomin, Vladimir M. (ed.) [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Presents the new class of materials of quantum rings. Provides an elemental basis for low-cost high-performance devices promising for electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics and quantum information processing. Explains the physical properties of quantum rings to cover a gap in scientific literature. Presents the application of most advanced nanoengineering and nanocharacterization techniques. This book deals with a new class of materials, quantum rings. Innovative recent advances in experimental and theoretical physics of quantum rings are based on the most advanced state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization techniques as well as theoretical methods. The experimental efforts allow to obtain a new class of semiconductor quantum rings formed by capping self-organized quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Novel optical and magnetic properties of quantum rings are associated with non-trivial topologies at the nanoscale. An adequate characterization of quantum rings is possible on the basis of modern characterization methods of nanostructures, such as Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. A high level of complexity is demonstrated to be needed for a dedicated theoretical model to adequately represent the specific features of quantum rings. The findings presented in this book contribute to develop low-cost high-performance electronic, spintronic, optoelectronic and information processing devices based on quantum rings.

  14. Ring Around a Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  15. Сonditions investigations of induction of the "steady" plasma ring in the electrodynamic accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sakun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The numerical investigation of conditions of the "steady" plasma ring induction in the electrodynamic accelerator was made. The influence of a ring resistance on transition of the ring to "steady" state was determined. The dependence of the coefficient of electrical energy conversion into magnetic field energy on the number of inductor turns and the initial velocity of the ring was found out. The technical requirements to the electrodynamic accelerator by which possible the formation of "steady" plasma ring was obtained.

  16. Neptune's ring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, C. C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Lissauer, J. J.; Esposito, L. W.

    The authors review the current state of knowledge regarding the structure, particle properties, kinematics, dynamics, origin, and evolution of the Neptune rings derived from Earth-based and Voyager data. Neptune has a diverse system of five continuous rings - 2 broad (Galle and Lassell) and 3 narrow (Adams, Le Verrier, and Arago) - plus a narrow discontinuous ring sharing the orbit of one of its ring-region satellites, Galatea. The outermost Adams ring contains the only arcs observed so far in Voyager images. The five arcs vary in angular extent from ≡1° to ≡10°, and exhibit internal azimuthal structure with typical spatial scales of ≡0.5°. All five lie within ≡40° of longitude. Dust is present throughout the Neptune system and measureable quantities of it were detected over Neptune's north pole. The Adams ring (including the arcs) and the Le Verrier ring contain a significant fraction of dust. The Neptune ring particles are probably red, and may consist of ice "dirtied" with silicates and/or some carbon-bearing material. A kinematic model for the arcs derived from Voyager data, the arcs' physical characteristics, and their orbital geometry and phasing are all roughly in accord with single-satellite arc shepherding by Galatea, though the presence of small kilometer-sized bodies embedded either within the arcs or placed at their Lagrange points may explain some inconsistencies with this model.

  17. Algorithms for finite rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciocanea Teodorescu I.,

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we are interested in describing algorithms that answer questions arising in ring and module theory. Our focus is on deterministic polynomial-time algorithms and rings and modules that are finite. The first main result of this thesis is a solution to the module isomorphism problem in

  18. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  19. The Fermilab recycler ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  20. Smoke Ring Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  1. Algorithms for finite rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciocanea Teodorescu I.,

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we are interested in describing algorithms that answer questions arising in ring and module theory. Our focus is on deterministic polynomial-time algorithms and rings and modules that are finite. The first main result of this thesis is a solution to the module isomorphism problem in

  2. Planetary rings - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderies, Nicole

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary-ring dynamics are examined in a brief analytical review. The mathematical description of streamlines and streamline interactions is outlined; the redistribution of angular momentum due to collisions between particles is explained; and problems in the modeling of broad, narrow, and arc rings are discussed.

  3. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  4. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  5. Recent applications of ring-rearrangement metathesis in organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM involves multiple metathesis processes such as ring-opening metathesis (ROM/ring-closing metathesis (RCM in a one-pot operation to generate complex targets. RRM delivers complex frameworks that are difficult to assemble by conventional methods. The noteworthy point about this type of protocol is multi-bond formation and it is an atom economic process. In this review, we have covered literature that appeared during the last seven years (2008–2014.

  6. Efficient and Selective Formation of Macrocyclic Disubstituted Z Alkenes by Ring-Closing Metathesis (RCM) Reactions Catalyzed by Mo- or W-Based Monoaryloxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Complexes. Applications to Total Syntheses of Epilachnene, Yuzu Lactone, Ambrettolide, Epothilone C and Nakadomarin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenbo; Yu, Miao; Kyle, Andrew F.; Jakubec, Jakubec; Dixon, Darren J.; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2014-01-01

    The first broadly applicable set of protocols for efficient and highly Z-selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted alkenes through catalytic ring-closing metathesis (RCM) is described. Cyclizations are performed in the presence of 1.2–7.5 mol % of a Mo- or W-based mono-aryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complex at 22 °C and typically proceed to complete conversion within two hours. The utility of the catalytic strategy is demonstrated by stereoselective synthesis of representative macrocyclic alkenes, including natural products yuzu lactone (13-membered ring: 73% Z) epilachnene (15-membered ring: 91% Z), ambrettolide (17-membered ring: 91% Z), an advanced precursor to epothilones C and A (16-membered ring: up to 97% Z) and nakadomarin A (polycyclic 15-membered ring: up to 97% Z). We demonstrate the complementary nature of the Mo-based catalysts, which deliver high activity but can be more prone to causing post-RCM stereoisomerization, versus W-based variants, which furnish lower activity but are less inclined towards causing loss of kinetic Z selectivity; a number of catalytic Z-selective cases are provided to elucidate which catalyst class is best suited for which substrate and particular type of alkene RCM process. Mechanistic models that rationalize the origin and the trends in Z selectivity as a function of alterations in the catalyst structure (i.e., Mo vs W and different imido and aryloxide or alkoxide ligands) are provided; we show that reaction time can be critical in retaining the Z selectivity attained not only with MAP complexes but with the original Mo-based bis-alkoxides as well. The W-based catalysts are sufficiently stable to be manipulated in air even with humidity levels of up to 80%; the catalytic Z-selective cyclizations can be performed on gram scale with complex molecule starting materials. PMID:23345004

  7. Effects of recombinant baculovirus AcMNPV-BmK IT on the formation of early cables and nuclear polymerization of actin in Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuejun; Lin, Taotao; Liang, Aihua; Hu, Fengyun

    2016-05-01

    Autographa californica nuclearpoly hedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is one of the most important baculoviridae. However, the application of AcMNPV as a biocontrol agent has been limited. Previously, we engineered Buthus martensii Karsch insect toxin (BmK IT) gene into the genome of AcMNPV. The bioassay data indicated that the recombinant baculovirus AcMNPV-BmK IT significantly enhanced the anti-insect efficacy of the virus. The actin cytoskeleton is the major component beneath the surface of eukaryotic cells. In this report, the effects of AcMNPV-BmK IT on the formation of early cables of actin and nuclear filamentous-actin (F-actin) were studied. The results indicated that these baculovirus induced rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton of host cells during infection and actin might participate in the transportation of baculovirus from cytoplasm to the nuclei. AcMNPV-BmK IT delayed the formation of early cables of actin and nuclear F-actin and accelerated the clearance of actin in the nuclei.

  8. The Enceladus Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled) This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background. The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view. Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring. Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione. An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus. One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane. Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally scatters any particles that lie very close to

  9. Formation of Fused-Ring 2′-Deoxycytidine Adducts from 1-Chloro-3-buten-2-one, an in Vitro 1,3-Butadiene Metabolite, under in Vitro Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Pelah, Avishay; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhong, Yu-Fang; An, Jing; Yu, Ying-Xin; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2013-01-01

    1-Chloro-3-buten-2-one (CBO) is a potential metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), a carcinogenic air pollutant. CBO is a bifunctional alkylating agent that readily reacts with glutathione (GSH) to form mono-GSH and di-GSH adducts. Recently, CBO and its precursor 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene (CHB) were found to be cytotoxic and genotoxic in human liver cells in culture with CBO being approximately 100-fold more potent than CHB. In the present study, CBO was shown to react readily with 2′-deoxycytidine (dC) under in vitro physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C) to form four dC adducts with the CBO moieties forming fused rings with the N3 and N4 atoms of dC. The four products were structurally characterized as 2-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-7-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahy dro-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-1 and dC-2, a pair of diastereomers), 4-chloromethyl-4-hydroxy-7-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydr o-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-3), and 2-chloromethyl-2-hydroxy-7-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydr o-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-4). Interestingly, dC-1 and dC-2 were stable under our experimental conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C, 6 h) and existed in equilibrium as indicated by HPLC analysis, whereas dC-3 and dC-4 were labile with the half-lives being 3.0 ± 0.36 and 1.7 ± 0.06 h, respectively. Decomposition of dC-4 produced both dC-1 and dC-2, whereas acid hydrolysis of dC-1/dC-2 and dC-4 in 1 M HCl at 100 °C for 30 min yielded the deribosylated adducts dC-1H/dC-2H and dC-4H, respectively. Because fused-ring dC adducts of other chemicals are mutagenic, the characterized CBO-dC adducts could be mutagenic and play a role in the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of CBO and its precursors, CHB and BD. The CBO-dC adducts may also be used as standards to characterize CBO-DNA adducts and to develop potential biomarkers for CBO formation in vivo. PMID:24020501

  10. Gorenstein Homological Dimensions and Change of Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan YANG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we shall be concerned with what happens of Gorenstein homological dimensions when certain modifications are made to a ring. The five structural operations addressed later are the formation of excellent extensions,localizations,Morita equivalences,polynomial extensions and power series extensions.

  11. A Collisional Origin for the Leo Ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel-Dansac, Leo; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Bournaud, Frederic; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Emsellem, Eric; Oosterloo, Tom; Morganti, Raffaella; Serra, Paolo; Ibata, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    Extended H I structures around galaxies are of prime importance for probing galaxy formation scenarios. The giant H I ring in the Leo group is one of the largest and most intriguing H I structures in the nearby universe. Whether it consists of primordial gas, as suggested by the apparent absence of

  12. Local loop near-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Franetič, Damir

    2015-01-01

    We study loop near-rings, a generalization of near-rings, where the additive structure is not necessarily associative. We introduce local loop near-rings and prove a useful detection principle for localness.

  13. Theodolite Ring Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  14. Heavy ion storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  15. 铜离子催化DPKA关环反应及其潜在应用%Cu Ⅱ-induced Ring-formation Reaction of Di-pyridylketone Azine and Its Potential Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴大雨; 黄薇; 闫文波; 段春迎; 谢黎霞; 孟庆金

    2007-01-01

    铜离子催化的氧化关环有机反应,用于选择性荧光探测金属铜离子的存在.晶体结构和光谱分析表明,在DPKA的乙腈/水混合溶剂中,引入铜离子可以促使苯并三氮唑类荧光化合物(2)的形成,该反应可以使得溶液的荧光明显增强.而且在滴定溶液里,引入Cu2+螯合剂EDTA,并不能使得溶液的荧光减弱,表明荧光是由有机物2发射的.同时,其他金属离子的引入并不能产生荧光,而且干扰离子的存在也不能使得荧光光谱发生显著改变,表明DPKA可以高选择性的检测溶液中的铜离子.研究表明,荧光响应呈现2个线性关系,区间分别在0.64~3.2 mg·kg-1和3.84~7.04 mg·kg-1.%A Cu-promoted ring-closed reaction of di-pyridylketone azine (DPKA) was developed in the design of a fluorescent chemodosimeter for potential selective Cu (Ⅱ)detection. Structure and spectroscopic investigations demonstrated the formation of a 3H-pyrazolo[4,3-b]pyridine (2) and the "turn-on" response for Cu(Ⅱ) in aqueous acetonitrile media. The introduction of Cu2+ chelator, such as EDTA, into the titration solution will not weaken the fluorescence, indicating the fluorescence is emitted from the organic compound (2). Two independent linear correlations exist in the range of 0.64~3.2mg·kg-1 and 3.84~7.04mg·kg-1,respectively.

  16. RING domains: master builders of molecular scaffolds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, K L

    2000-02-04

    Intense interest in the RING domain has arisen because of its widespread occurrence and involvement in human disease. Several intriguing characteristics evident from the study of this cysteine-rich, zinc-binding domain have made it difficult to establish a single defining biochemical function for RINGs. These proteins are found throughout the cell and mediate diverse cellular processes, e.g. oncogenesis, apoptosis, development and viral infection. Recent developments indicate that RING-mediated protein interactions are critical for transcriptional repression and for ubiquitination. These data are in addition to previously established functions for RINGs in RNA processing, cell-cycle control and peroxisomal biogenesis, to name a few. At first glance, there appears to be little to link such disparate actions. Collectively, these results suggest that RINGs function in formation and architecture of large protein complexes that contribute to diverse cellular processes. Here, new developments, in the context of previous results, are discussed in an attempt to establish a unifying theory for RING function.

  17. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attree, Nicholas Oliver; Murray, Carl; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's highly dynamic F ring contains a population of small (radius ~ 1 km) moonlets embedded within its core or on nearby orbits. These objects interact, both gravitationally and collisionally, with the ring producing a range of features, some of which are unique to it. Here we present a brief overview of F ring collisional processes, investigated using a combination of Cassini imaging, simulations and orbital dynamics. Collisions produce linear debris clouds, known as 'jets' and 'mini-jets', which evolve, due to differential orbital motion, over periods ranging from hours to months. Mini-jet-forming collisions occur daily in the F ring whilst larger, more dramatic, events are rarer but produce jets that persist for many months, 'wrapping around' the ring to form almost parallel strands. Measuring jet properties, such as formation rates and relative orbits, allows us to infer a local population of order hundreds of objects colliding at relative velocities of a few metres per second. N-body modelling of the collisions shows good agreement with observations when two aggregates are allowed to impact and partially fragment (as opposed to a solid moonlet encountering dust), implying massive objects both in the core and nearby. Multiple, repeated collisions by the same, or fragments of the same, object are also important in explaining some jet morphology, showing that many objects survive the collisions. The F ring represents a natural laboratory for observing low-velocity collisions between icy objects as well as the ongoing aggregation and accretion that most-likely forms them.

  18. Ringed Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) of the five subspecies of ringed seals (Phoca hispida). It was produced...

  19. The g-2 ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The precise measurement of "g-2", the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, required a special muon storage ring with electrostatic focussing and very accurate knowledge of the magnetic bending field. For more details see under photo 7405430.

  20. Modified Newton's rings: II

    CERN Document Server

    Chaitanya, T Sai; Krishna, V Sai; Anandh, B Shankar; Umesh, K S

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier work (Shankar kumar Jha, A Vyas, O S K S Sastri, Rajkumar Jain & K S Umesh, 'Determination of wavelength of laser light using Modified Newton's rings setup', Physics Education, vol. 22, no.3, 195-202(2005)) reported by our group, a version of Newton's rings experiment called Modified Newton's rings was proposed. The present work is an extension of this work. Here, a general formula for wavelength has been derived, applicable for a plane of observation at any distance. A relation between the focal length and the radius curvature is also derived for a plano-convex lens which is essentially used as a concave mirror. Tracker, a video analysis software, freely downloadable from the net, is employed to analyze the fringes captured using a CCD camera. Two beams which give rise to interference fringes in conventional Newton's rings and in the present setup are clearly distinguished.

  1. Linear signal processing using silicon micro-ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Ding, Yunhong; Ou, Haiyan;

    2012-01-01

    We review our recent achievements on the use of silicon micro-ring resonators for linear optical signal processing applications, including modulation format conversion, phase-to-intensity modulation conversion and waveform shaping....

  2. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-11-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order 20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  3. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-09-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order ~20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  4. Alterations in Expression of F-actin and DNA of Fluid Shear Stress Treated-mesenchymal Stem Cells Affected by Titaninum Particles Loading%钛颗粒负荷对切应力作用下骨髓间质干细胞F-actin表达和DNA含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴江; 陈槐卿; 曹慧; 周江; 张立; K-L Paul Sung

    2004-01-01

    假体磨损碎屑颗粒是引起假体-骨界面无菌性炎症和骨溶解而致全关节置换术失败的主要原因之一.磨屑颗粒所诱发的骨溶解须有周围骨组织中成骨细胞分泌足够的骨基质以弥补丢失的骨量,而成骨细胞正常的数量和质量有赖于其来源骨髓祖细胞-骨髓间质干细胞的正常增殖分化能力的维持.为了探讨磨屑钛颗粒对大鼠骨髓间质干细胞(Rat MSCs,rMSCs)产生细胞毒性的可能细胞分子机制, 选用健康3月龄SD雄性大鼠,采用Percoll等密度梯度离心法分离获取rMSCs,经体外传代纯化培养后,与不同直径、不同负荷浓度、不同负荷作用时间的钛颗粒悬液共孵育,再采用精准的流室系统对钛颗粒负荷的rMSCs施加一定的流体剪切应力(Fluid shear stress, FSS)后立刻固定细胞,经免疫荧光抗体染色,结合激光共聚焦显微镜技术和图像分析软件定性定量分析rMSCs F-actin表达和DNA含量的变化情况.同时设置相应的未经钛颗粒孵育的rMSCs细胞为对照组细胞.结果显示,切应力作用可上调rMSCs 胞内F-actin 的表达.亚微(Submicron)直径(0.9μm)的钛颗粒负荷对rMSCs F-actin表达和DNA含量的抑制作用最为显著,并伴有凋亡小体出现;直径为2.7μm的钛颗粒负荷产生的抑制作用略为减弱,而较大直径(6.9μm)的抑制效应最弱.相同条件下,钛颗粒负荷对F-actin的抑制效应有一定的时间和浓度依赖性:以0.1wt%浓度对F-actin表达和DNA含量的抑制效应最为明显,亦有凋亡小体的出现;随着浓度的降低,抑制作用亦减弱,以0.01wt%浓度最弱;随着作用时间的延长,F-actin表达和DNA含量逐渐降低,至实验中的32 h达到最低值.提示:磨屑颗粒对rMSCs活力的抑制作用是假体无菌性松动的可能分子机制,对其具体细胞分子机制进行深入研究,必将有助于有效防治假体松动药物的研发应用以及人工关节材料的优化设计,从而

  5. Linear signal processing using silicon micro-ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Ding, Yunhong; Ou, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    We review our recent achievements on the use of silicon micro-ring resonators for linear optical signal processing applications, including modulation format conversion, phase-to-intensity modulation conversion and waveform shaping.......We review our recent achievements on the use of silicon micro-ring resonators for linear optical signal processing applications, including modulation format conversion, phase-to-intensity modulation conversion and waveform shaping....

  6. Biopolymers and the fellowship of DNA rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James C

    2013-12-01

    This article presents a brief account of the historical backdrop of the study of interlocked DNA rings (DNA catenanes), their formation in cells, and the importance of resolving the component rings of an intracellular DNA catenane if they are to be properly partitioned into a pair of progeny cells. In humans, for example, aberrant segregation of intertwined chromosomes is a major cause of birth defects, as well as termination of pregnancy in utero. Some yet unresolved issues of DNA catenation, including plausible structural and/or functional roles of DNA interlacing in chromosomes, are briefly mentioned.

  7. Descent from the form ring and Buchsbaum rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schenzel, P

    1996-01-01

    There is a spectral sequence technique in order to estimate the local cohomology of a ring by the local cohomology of a certain form ring. As applications there are information on the descent of homological properties (Cohen-Macaulay, Buchsbaum etc.) from the form ring to the ring itself. In the case of Buchsbaum ring there is a discussion of the descent of the surjectivity of a natural map into the local cohomology.

  8. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

    2007-12-01

    Reaction pathways are presented for hydrogen-mediated isomerization of a five and six member carbon ring complex on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction sequence that reverses orientation of the ring complex, or 'flips' it, was identified. Competition between the flip reaction and 'ring separation' was examined. Ring separation is the reverse of the five and six member ring complex formation reaction, previously reported as 'ring collision'. The elementary steps of the pathways were analyzed using density-functional theory (DFT). Rate coefficients were obtained by solution of the energy master equation and classical transition state theory utilizing the DFT energies, frequencies, and geometries. The results indicate that the flip reaction pathway dominates the separation reaction and should be competitive with other pathways important to the graphene zigzag edge growth in high temperature environments.

  9. Holomorphic Dynamics and Herman Rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Christian

    1997-01-01

    Existence theorem for Herman Rings of holomorphic mappings in a certain holomorphic family is given, using quasiconformal mappings. Proofs of topological properties of these Herman rings are given.......Existence theorem for Herman Rings of holomorphic mappings in a certain holomorphic family is given, using quasiconformal mappings. Proofs of topological properties of these Herman rings are given....

  10. Hybrid macrocycle formation and spiro annulation on cis-syn-cis-tricyclo[6.3.0.02,6]undeca-3,11-dione and its congeners via ring-closing metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple methodology to transform cis-syn-cis-triquinane derivative 2 into the diindole based macrocycle 6 involving Fischer indolization and ring-closing metathesis (RCM. Various spiro-polyquinane derivatives have been assembled via RCM as a key step.

  11. DnaG interacts with a linker region that joins the N- and C-domains of DnaB and induces the formation of 3-fold symmetric rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirlway, Jenny; Turner, Ian J.; Gibson, Christopher T.; Gardiner, Laurence; Brady, Kevin; Allen, Stephanie; Roberts, Clive J.; Soultanas, Panos

    2004-01-01

    Loading of the replicative ring helicase onto the origin of replication (oriC) is the final outcome of a well coordinated series of events that collectively constitute a primosomal cascade. Once the ring helicase is loaded, it recruits the primase and signals the switch to the polymerization mode. The transient nature of the helicase–primase (DnaB–DnaG) interaction in the Escherichia coli system has hindered our efforts to elucidate its structure and function. Taking advantage of the stable DnaB–DnaG complex in Bacillus stearothermophilus, we have reviewed conflicting mutagenic data from other bacterial systems and shown that DnaG interacts with the flexible linker that connects the N- and C-terminal domains of DnaB. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging experiments show that binding of the primase to the helicase induces predominantly a 3-fold symmetric morphology to the hexameric ring. Overall, three DnaG molecules appear to interact with the hexameric ring helicase but a small number of complexes with two and even one DnaG molecule bound to DnaB were also detected. The structural/functional significance of these data is discussed and a speculative structural model for this complex is suggested. PMID:15173380

  12. Thermodynamic black di-rings

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Previously the five dimensional $S^1$-rotating black rings have been superposed in concentric way by some solitonic methods and regular systems of two $S^1$-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions black di-rings). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution-sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings are shown, in which both iso-thermality and iso-rotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

  13. Ringed accretion disks: equilibrium configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a model of ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the General Relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can be then determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We pr...

  14. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  15. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C; Anders, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in three galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to H$\\alpha$ data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral-energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  16. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grijs, Richard; Ma, Chao; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C.; Anders, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in two galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to Hα data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  17. Saturn's F-ring and inner satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Saturn's F-ring and its inner shepherding satellite (1980S27) are pictured in this closeup Voyager 2 image acquired Aug. 25 from a range of 365,000 kilometers (227,000 miles). Features as small as 6 km. (3.7 mi.) across are visible. The satellite is elongated and irregular, with its longest axis pointing toward the center of Saturn (toward the upper right in this view). As seen here, the F-ring is thin and does not show the multiple, braided structure Voyager 1 saw last fall. Nor is there any indication of a band or kink in the ring at its closest point to the shepherd; such a feature would be consistent with some of the theories advanced on the formation of the braids. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  18. The origin and evolution of planetary rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    Roche (1847) suggested that Saturn's rings may be the fragments of a disrupted satellite rather than the uncoagulated remnant of a circumplanetary disk from which the regular satellites formed. In order to address this unresolved central issue, attention is given to the dynamical processes of viscous spreading, gas drag, particulate coagulation, and the effect of further matter infall from heliocentric orbit onto the planet/disk, all of which act on a gas/solid disk in Keplerian motion. In view of these considerations, it is suggested that rings were created by the disruption of large satellites which were less sensitive to the destructive processes present during the planet's formation. This hypothesis explains the presence of shepherd satellites, such as large collision fragments, which coexist in the same orbital range as the ring particles.

  19. Tree Rings in the Tropics: Insights into the Ecology and Climate Sensitivity of Tropical Trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, R.J.W.; Schöngart, J.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tree-ring studies provide important contributions to understanding the climate sensitivity of tropical trees and the effects of global change on tropical forests. This chapter reviews recent advances in tropical tree-ring research. In tropical lowlands, tree ring formation is mainly driven by season

  20. Ring galaxies as the cradle for ULXs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Ring galaxies are unique laboratories where the effects of galaxy interactions can be studied and the final stages of stellar evolution investigated. They are characterized by high star formation rates (SFR) and low metallicity, which favours the formation of high mass remnants. The few ring galaxies for which high resolution X-ray data are available show enhanced X-ray emission, and large numbers of Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Due to the peculiar morphology of ring galaxies, detected point sources in the ring are very likely to be physically associated with the galaxy, reducing the problem of contamination from spurious sources which affects other samples. However the evidence in the X-ray band is based on a very scanty sample of four galaxies.In order to find an unbiased sample with which to compare these findings, we have selected all the peculiar galaxies labelled as collisional rings with a spectroscopic redshift z<0.02 from the Arp & Madore `Catalogue of southern peculiar galaxies and associations'. This selection produces a sample of 12 galaxies which we have observed with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We will discuss the results of these observations and support for current models that propose low metallicity environments as the ideal cradle for ULXs. We will compare the results from this statistically selected sample with those from brighter and known ring galaxies in order to asses the likelihood to find IMBHs due to collision events. We will address the presence of other signs of interaction, from high SFR to multiwavelenght morphology and spectra (eg. IR, Halpha..).

  1. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  2. Rings dominate western Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  3. Autocatalytic chemical smoke rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, M C; Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2005-01-01

    Buoyant plumes, evolving free of boundary constraints, may develop well-defined mushroom shaped heads. In normal plumes, overturning flow in the head entrains less buoyant fluid from the surroundings as the head rises, robbing the plume of its driving force. We consider here a new type of plume in which the source of buoyancy is an autocatalytic chemical reaction. The reaction occurs at a sharp front which separates reactants from less dense products. In this type of plume, entrainment assists the reaction, producing new buoyancy which fuels an accelerating plume head. When the head has grown to a critical size, it detaches from the upwelling conduit, forming an accelerating, buoyant vortex ring. This vortex is analogous to a rising smoke ring. A second-generation head then develops at the point of detachment.Multiple generations of chemical vortex rings can detach from a single triggering event.

  4. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  5. Almost ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This book develops thorough and complete foundations for the method of almost etale extensions, which is at the basis of Faltings' approach to p-adic Hodge theory. The central notion is that of an "almost ring". Almost rings are the commutative unitary monoids in a tensor category obtained as a quotient V-Mod/S of the category V-Mod of modules over a fixed ring V; the subcategory S consists of all modules annihilated by a fixed ideal m of V, satisfying certain natural conditions. The reader is assumed to be familiar with general categorical notions, some basic commutative algebra and some advanced homological algebra (derived categories, simplicial methods). Apart from these general prerequisites, the text is as self-contained as possible. One novel feature of the book - compared with Faltings' earlier treatment - is the systematic exploitation of the cotangent complex, especially for the study of deformations of almost algebras.

  6. On Simple Noetherian Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somyot Plubtieng

    2003-01-01

    A module M is called a CS-module (or extending module [5]) if every submodule of M is essential in a direct summand of M. It is shown that (i) a simple ring R is right noetherian if and only if every cyclic singular right R-module is either a CS-module or a noetherian module; (ii) for a prime ring R, if every proper cyclic right R-module is a direct sum of a quasi-injective module and a finitely cogenerated module, then R is either semisimple artinian or a right Ore domain; and (iii) a prime ring R is right noetherian if and only if every cyclic right R-module is a direct sum of a quasi-injective module and a noetherian module.

  7. Tunneling Through Black Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Liu

    2007-01-01

    Hawking radiation of black ring solutions to 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory is analyzed by use of the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling method. To get the correct tunneling amplitude and emission rate, we adopt and develop the Angheben-Nadalini-Vanzo-Zerbini covariant approach to cover the effects of rotation and electronic discharge all at once, and the effect of back reaction is also taken into account. This constitutes a unified approach to the tunneling problem. Provided the first law of thermodynamics for black rings holds, the emission rate is proportional to the exponential of the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Explicit calculation for black ring temperatures agrees exactly with the results obtained via the classical surface gravity method and the quasi-local formalism.

  8. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  9. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Ferreira, W. P.; Farias, G. A.; Ferreira, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov–Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born–von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov–Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  10. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Ferreira, W P; Farias, G A; Ferreira, R

    2017-04-26

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov-Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born-von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  11. Electrostatic discharges in Saturn's B-ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J. W.; Romig, J. H.; Evans, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Voyager observations of electrical discharges in Saturn's rings strongly support earlier speculations on the role played by electrostatics, magnetic fields, and lightning phenomena in the primitive solar system. They also suggest conditions then by direct analogy rather than by extrapolating backwards through time from conditions now. The observed discharges show a pronounced 10h periodicity, which suggests a source in Keplerian orbit at 1.80 + or - 0.01 Saturn radii. In that region, the B ring is thicker than optical depth 1.8 for about 5,000 km. At 1.805 + or - 0.001 Saturn radii, however, the ring is virtually transparent for a gap of width 200 m. It is concluded that a small satellite orbits Saturn at that radius and clears the gap. The gap edges must prevent diffusive filling of the gap by fine material which is especially abundant at this position in the rings and would otherwise destroy the gap in minutes. The discharges represent the satellite's interaction with the outer edge of the gap. Spoke formation may involve the interaction of ring material in the vicinity of the gap.

  12. Increasing the Brønsted acidity of Ph2PO2H by the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3. Formation of an eight-membered boraphosphinate ring [Ph2POB(C6F5)2O]2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Ralf; Rychagova, Elena; Sanz Camacho, Paula; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Woollins, J Derek; Robben, Lars; Lork, Enno; Ketkov, Sergey; Beckmann, Jens

    2016-09-21

    Autoprotolysis of the metastable acid (C6F5)3BOPPh2OH, prepared in situ by the reaction of the rather weak Brønsted acid Ph2PO2H with the strong Lewis acid B(C6F5)3, gave rise to the formation of the eight-membered ring [Ph2POB(C6F5)2O]2 and C6F5H. The conjugate base was isolated as stable sodium crown ether salt [Na(15-crown-5)][Ph2PO2B(C6F5)3].

  13. Kinetics of tracheid development explain conifer tree-ring structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick; Fournier, Meriem

    2014-09-01

    Conifer tree rings are generally composed of large, thin-walled cells of light earlywood followed by narrow, thick-walled cells of dense latewood. Yet, how wood formation processes and the associated kinetics create this typical pattern remains poorly understood. We monitored tree-ring formation weekly over 3 yr in 45 trees of three conifer species in France. Data were used to model cell development kinetics, and to attribute the relative importance of the duration and rate of cell enlargement and cell wall deposition on tree-ring structure. Cell enlargement duration contributed to 75% of changes in cell diameter along the tree rings. Remarkably, the amount of wall material per cell was quite constant along the rings. Consequently, and in contrast with widespread belief, changes in cell wall thickness were not principally attributed to the duration and rate of wall deposition (33%), but rather to the changes in cell size (67%). Cell enlargement duration, as the main driver of cell size and wall thickness, contributed to 56% of wood density variation along the rings. This mechanistic framework now forms the basis for unraveling how environmental stresses trigger deviations (e.g. false rings) from the normal tree-ring structure.

  14. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B;

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  15. Planetary ring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Miner, Ellis D; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N

    2007-01-01

    This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date book on the topic of planetary rings systems yet written. The book is written in a style that is easily accessible to the interested non expert. Each chapter includes notes, references, figures and tables.

  16. On topologies over rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M. Fakhruddin

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note, we show that if a topology F¯ over a ring A satisfies a certain finiteness condition, then the Gabriel topology G¯ generated by F¯ can be explicitly constructed and it also satisfies the same finiteness condition.

  17. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from [12] and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of noncommutative symmetric...... functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also compute the fu- sion rings for type G2....

  18. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from [12] and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of noncommutative symmetric...... functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also compute the fu- sion rings for type G2....

  19. Rings from Close Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  20. Ring autosomes: some unexpected findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, L; Rusu, C; Plăiaşu; Gug, G; Grămescu, M; Bujoran, C; Ochiană, D; Voloşciuc, M; Popescu, R; Braha, E; Pânzaru, M; Butnariu, L; Sireteanu, A; Covic, M; Gorduza, Ev

    2012-12-01

    Ring chromosomes are rare entities, usually associated with phenotypic abnormalities in correlation with the loss of genetic material. There are various breakpoints and sometimes there is a dynamic mosaicism that is reflected in clinical features. Most of the ring chromosomes are de novo occurrences. Our study reflects the experience of three Romanian cytogenetic laboratories in the field of ring chromosomes. We present six cases with ring chromosomes involving chromosomes 5, 13, 18, and 21. All ring chromosomes were identified after birth in children with plurimalformative syndromes. The ring chromosome was present in mosaic form in three cases, and this feature reflects the ring's instability. In case of ring chromosome 5, we report a possible association with oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum.

  1. On Skew Triangular Matrix Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-liang; Wang Yao; Ren Yan-li

    2016-01-01

    Letαbe a nonzero endomorphism of a ring R, n be a positive integer and Tn(R,α) be the skew triangular matrix ring. We show that some properties related to nilpotent elements of R are inherited by Tn(R,α). Meanwhile, we determine the strongly prime radical, generalized prime radical and Behrens radical of the ring R[x;α]/(xn), where R[x;α] is the skew polynomial ring.

  2. e-læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    e-læring kan defineres på ganske mange måder. Ordet e-læring består jo tydeligt nok af to elementer. E + læring ligesom e-handel eller e-banking, og umiddelbart vil de fleste nok sige, at det så handler om læring vha. internettet. I bidraget advokeres for en læringsmæssig frem for normativ tilgang....

  3. The Black Ring is Unstable

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    We study non-axisymmetric linearised gravitational perturbations of the Emparan-Reall black ring using numerical methods. We find an unstable mode whose onset lies within the "fat" branch of the black ring and continues into the "thin" branch. Together with previous results using Penrose inequalities that fat black rings are unstable, this provides numerical evidence that the entire black ring family is unstable.

  4. Electron Delocalization Determined Anomalous Stability in Small Water Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bo; Dai, Xing; Song, Ruixia; Meng, Yan; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Ruiqin

    2013-01-01

    Water clusters are known to form through hydrogen bonding. However, this study shows that the formation of very small water clusters significantly deviates from this mechanism and instead involves both hydrogen bonding and electron delocalization. Our density functional theory calculations show that small water rings (H2O)n of n=3 or 4 show strong electron delocalization originating from both the hydrogen and oxygen atoms and extending to the ring center. This is very different from larger rings. Further energy decomposition of rings with n=3-6 demonstrates an upward trend in the polarization component but an decrease in the electrostatic and exchange repulsion components, presenting a minimum and accounting for 33% of interaction energy at n=3. This significantly promotes stability of the small water rings. Our findings provide a comprehensive analysis and improve our understanding of the stability characteristics of water clusters.

  5. Nanograin Density Outside Saturn’s A Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Tseng, Wei-Ling; Elrod, M. K.; Persoon, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The observed disparity between the radial dependence of the ion and electron densities measured by the Cassini plasma (CAPS) and radio (RPWS) science instruments are used to show that the region between the outer edge of Saturn’s main rings and its tenuous G ring is permeated with small charged grains (nanograins). These grains emanate from the edge of the A ring and from the tenuous F and G rings. This is a region of Saturn’s magnetosphere that is relatively unexplored, but will be a focus of Cassini’s F ring orbits prior to the end of mission in 2017 September. Confirmation of the grain densities predicted here will enhance our ability to describe the formation and destruction of material in this important region of Saturn’s magnetosphere.

  6. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  7. Equilibrium Sequences and Gravitational Instability of Rotating Isothermal Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear rings at centers of barred galaxies exhibit strong star formation activities. They are thought to undergo gravitational instability when sufficiently massive. We approximate them as rigidly-rotating isothermal objects and investigate their gravitational instability. Using a self-consistent field method, we first construct their equilibrium sequences specified by two parameters: alpha corresponding to the thermal energy relative to gravitational potential energy, and R_B measuring the ellipticity or ring thickness. Unlike in the incompressible case, not all values of R_B yield an isothermal equilibrium, and the range of R_B for such equilibria shrinks with decreasing alpha. The density distributions in the meridional plane are steeper for smaller alpha, and well approximated by those of infinite cylinders for slender rings. We also calculate the dispersion relations of nonaxisymmetric modes in rigidly-rotating slender rings with angular frequency Omega_0 and central density rho_max. Rings with smaller ...

  8. A Database of Invariant Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, Gregor; Körding, Elmar; Malle, Gunter; Matzat, B. Heinrich; Vogel, Denis; Wiese, Gabor

    2001-01-01

    We announce the creation of a database of invariant rings. This database contains a large number of invariant rings of finite groups, mostly in the modular case. It gives information on generators and structural properties of the invariant rings. The main purpose is to provide a tool for researchers in invariant theory.

  9. Integrated silicon optofluidic ring resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testa, G.; Huang, Y.; Sarro, P.M.; Zeni, L.; Bernini, R.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of an integrated silicon optofluidic ring resonator is demonstrated. Liquid core antiresonant reflecting optical waveguides are used to realize a rectangular ring resonator with a multimode interference liquid core coupler between the ring and the bus waveguide. In this configuration

  10. Non-Commutative Ring Theory

    CERN Document Server

    López-Permouth, Sergio

    1990-01-01

    The papers of this volume share as a common goal the structure and classi- fication of noncommutative rings and their modules, and deal with topics of current research including: localization, serial rings, perfect endomorphism rings, quantum groups, Morita contexts, generalizations of injectivitiy, and Cartan matrices.

  11. Ring closure in actin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  12. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  13. The Rings Node for the Planetary Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Bollinger, Kenneth J.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1994-01-01

    The Planetary Data System's Rings Node is devoted to the archiving and distributing of scientific data sets relevant to planetary ring systems. The two major classes of ring data are images and occultation profiles, although a variety of additional data types (e.g. spectra, particle absorption signatures, etc.) are also of interest. A large fraction of our data sets are from the Voyager missions to the outer planets, but Earth-based and Hubble Space Telescope data sets are also represented. Archiving work often includes re-formatting the data into standardized formats and reconstructing some of the data processing steps. The Rings Node also performs a variety of services to support research into these data sets. These services include developing on-line catalogs and information systems, filling orders for data, developing software tools, and coordinating special observing campaigns.

  14. Parameterization of tree-ring growth in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychkov, Ivan; Popkova, Margarita; Shishov, Vladimir; Vaganov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    No doubt, climate-tree growth relationship is an one of the useful and interesting subject of studying in dendrochronology. It provides an information of tree growth dependency on climatic environment, but also, gives information about growth conditions and whole tree-ring growth process for long-term periods. New parameterization approach of the Vaganov-Shashkin process-based model (VS-model) is developed to described critical process linking climate variables with tree-ring formation. The approach (co-called VS-Oscilloscope) is presented as a computer software with graphical interface. As most process-based tree-ring models, VS-model's initial purpose is to describe variability of tree-ring radial growth due to variability of climatic factors, but also to determinate principal factors limiting tree-ring growth. The principal factors affecting on the growth rate of cambial cells in the VS-model are temperature, day light and soil moisture. Detailed testing of VS-Oscilloscope was done for semi-arid area of southern Siberia (Khakassian region). Significant correlations between initial tree-ring chronologies and simulated tree-ring growth curves were obtained. Direct natural observations confirm obtained simulation results including unique growth characteristic for semi-arid habitats. New results concerning formation of wide and narrow rings under different climate conditions are considered. By itself the new parameterization approach (VS-oscilloscope) is an useful instrument for better understanding of various processes in tree-ring formation. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF # 14-14-00219).

  15. The AGC Ser/Thr kinase Aga1 is essential for appressorium formation and maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton in the smut fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Patrick; Lanver, Daniel; Kahmann, Regine

    2010-12-01

    On the plant surface the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis switches from budding to hyphal growth and differentiates appressoria. To get more insight into these highly regulated processes we report on the role of a conserved Ser/Thr kinase of the AGC kinase family, Aga1. U. maydis Aga1 could functionally replace Ypk1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. aga1 deletion mutants were affected in growth, cell wall integrity, mating as well as the ability to form appressoria and showed defects in actin organization and actin-dependent endocytosis. With respect to appressorium formation and endocytosis, the aga1 deletion phenotype could be mimicked by inhibiting the formation of actin filaments with Latrunculin A. These data suggest a critical role of Aga1 in F-actin organization during the morphological changes accompanying the development of appressoria.

  16. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  17. On the mass and origin of Chariklo's rings

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Observations in 2013 and 2014 of the Centaur 10199 Chariklo and its ring system consistently indicated that the radial width of the inner, more massive ring varies with longitude. That strongly suggests that this ring has a finite eccentricity despite the fast differential precession that Chariklo's large quadrupole moment should induce. If the inferred apse alignment is maintained by the ring's self-gravity, as it is for the Uranian rings, we estimate a ring mass of a few times 10^16 g and a typical particle size of a few meters. These imply a short collisional spreading time of ~10^5 years, somewhat shorter than the typical Centaur dynamical lifetime of a few Myrs and much shorter than the age of the solar system. In light of this time constraint, we evaluate previously suggested ring formation pathways including collisional ejection and satellite disruption. We also investigate in detail a contrasting formation mechanism, the lofting of dust particles off Chariklo's surface into orbit via outflows of subli...

  18. ON THE MASS AND ORIGIN OF CHARIKLO’S RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Margaret; Wu, Yanqin, E-mail: pan@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    Observations in 2013 and 2014 of the Centaur 10199 Chariklo and its ring system consistently indicated that the radial width of the inner, more massive ring varies with longitude. That strongly suggests that this ring has a finite eccentricity despite the fast differential precession that Chariklo’s large quadrupole moment should induce. If the inferred apse alignment is maintained by the ring’s self-gravity, as it is for the Uranian rings, we estimate a ring mass of a few times 10{sup 16} g and a typical particle size of a few meters. These values imply a collisional spreading time of ∼10{sup 5} years, which is somewhat shorter than the typical Centaur dynamical lifetime of a few million years and much shorter than the age of the solar system. In light of this time constraint, we evaluate previously suggested ring formation pathways including collisional ejection and satellite disruption. We also investigate in detail a contrasting formation mechanism, the lofting of dust particles off Chariklo’s surface into orbit via outflows of sublimating CO and/or N{sub 2} triggered after Chariklo was scattered inward by giant planets. This alternate scenario predicts that rings should be common among 100 km class Centaurs but rare among Kuiper Belt objects and smaller Centaurs. It also predicts that Centaurs should show seasonal variations in cometary activity with activity maxima occurring shortly after equinox.

  19. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Dipolar Rings of Microscopic Ellipsoids: Magnetic Manipulation and Cell Entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Cebers, Andrejs; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    We study the formation and the dynamics of dipolar rings composed by microscopic ferromagnetic ellipsoids, which self-assemble in water by switching the direction of the applied field. We show how to manipulate these fragile structures and control their shape via the application of external static and oscillating magnetic fields. We introduce a theoretical framework which describes the ring deformation under an applied field, allowing us to understand the underlying physical mechanism. Our microscopic rings are finally used to capture, entrap, and later release a biological cell via a magnetic command, i.e., performing a simple operation which can be implemented in other microfluidic devices which make use of ferromagnetic particles.

  1. Computational studies of carbodiimide rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrauer, Robert; Lin, Hai; Damrauer, Niels H

    2014-05-02

    Computational studies of alicyclic carbodiimides (RN═C═NR) (rings five through twelve) at the MP2/6-31G(d,p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory were conducted to locate the transition states between carbodiimides isomers. Transition states for rings six through twelve were found. The RNCNR dihedral angle is ∼0° for even-numbered rings, but deviates from 0° for rings seven, nine, eleven, and twelve. The even- and odd-numbered ring transition states have different symmetry point groups. Cs transition states (even rings) have an imaginary frequency mode that transforms as the asymmetric irreducible representation of the group. C2 transition states (odd rings) have a corresponding mode that transforms as the totally symmetric representation. Intrinsic reaction coordinate analyses followed by energy minimization along the antisymmetric pathways led to enantiomeric pairs. The symmetric pathways give diastereomeric isomers. The five-membered ring carbodiimide is a stable structure, possibly isolable. A twelve-membered ring transition state was found only without applying symmetry constraints (C1). Molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics studies of the seven-, eight-, and nine-membered rings gave additional structures, which were then minimized using ab initio methods. No structures beyond those found from the IRC analyses described were found. The potential for optical resolution of the seven-membered ring is discussed.

  2. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Silchenko, O; Sokoloff, D; Horellou, C; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\\alpha-\\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where th...

  3. How Prometheus creates structure in Saturn's F ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Carl D; Chavez, Carlos; Beurle, Kevin; Cooper, Nick; Evans, Michael W; Burns, Joseph A; Porco, Carolyn C

    2005-10-27

    Images of Saturn's narrow and contorted F ring returned by the Cassini spacecraft have revealed phenomena not previously detected in any planetary ring system. The perturbing effect of the inner shepherding satellite, Prometheus, seems to introduce channels through the F ring and a 'streamer'--a line of particles that link the ring to the satellite. The detailed mechanism for the formation of these features has been lacking an explanation. Here we show that these phenomena can be understood in terms of a simple gravitational interaction as Prometheus approaches and recedes from the F ring every 14.7 hours. Our numerical models show that as Prometheus recedes from its closest approach to the F ring, it draws out ring material; one orbital period later, this affected region has undergone keplerian shear and is visible as a channel, in excellent agreement with structures seen in the Cassini images. Prometheus' periodic disruption of the F ring will become more pronounced as the two orbits approach their minimum separation in 2009. The model predicts that the appearance of streamers and the associated channels will vary in a regular fashion on a timescale of one orbital period.

  4. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  5. The Nonbarred Double-Ringed Galaxy, PGC 1000714

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigar, Marc; Mutlu Pakdil, Burcin; Mangedarage, Mithila; Treuthardt, Patrick M.

    2017-01-01

    Hoag-type galaxies are rare peculiar systems which bear strong resemblance to Hoag's Object with an elliptical-like core, a detached outer ring, and no signs of a bar or stellar disk. They represent extreme cases and help us understand the formation of galaxies in general by providing clues on formation mechanisms. The nature of outer rings in Hoag-type galaxies is still debated and may be related either to slow secular evolution, such as dissolution of a barlike structure or to environmental processes, such as galaxy-galaxy interactions or gas infall. Due to a fairly superficial resemblance to Hoag's Object, PGC 1000714 is a good target for detailed study of the peculiar structure of this type. We present the first photometric study of PGC 1000714 that has not yet been described in the literature. Our aim is to evaluate its structure and properties as well as understand the origin of outer rings in such galaxies. Surface photometry of the central body is performed using near-UV, BVRI and JHK images. Based on the photometric data, the nearly round central body follows a de Vaucouleurs profile almost all the way to the center. The detailed photometry reveals a reddish inner ring-shaped structure that shares the same center as the central body. However, no sign of a bar or stellar disk is detected. The outer ring appears as a bump in the surface brightness profile with a peak brightness of 25.8 mag/arcsec^{2} in the B-band and shows no sharp outer boundary. By reconstructing the observed SED for the central body and the rings, we recover the stellar population properties of the galaxy components. Our work suggests different formation histories for the inner and outer rings. We rule out the secular evolution model as being a formation mechanism for the outer ring. The colors of the outer ring are consistent with a feature that may have experienced a burst of star formation due to a possible recent accretion event. In addition, our work supports that the central body

  6. The Rings Characterized by Minimal Left Ideals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chao WEI

    2005-01-01

    We study these rings with every minimal left ideal being a projective, direct summand and a p-injective module, respectively. Some characterizations of these rings are given, and the relations among them are obtained. With these rings, we characterize semisimple rings. Finally, we introduce MC2 rings, and give some characterizations of MC2 rings.

  7. Synthesis of the EF-ring of ciguatoxin 3C based on the [2,3]-Wittig rearrangement and ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Akiyoshi; Fujiwara, Kenshu; Kawai, Ayako; Kawai, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Takanori

    2007-12-20

    The EF-ring segment of ciguatoxin 3C, a causative toxin of ciguatera fish poisoning, was synthesized in three major steps: 1,4-addition for the C20O-C27 bond connection, chirality transferring anti selective [2,3]-Wittig rearrangement for the construction of the anti-2-hydroxyalkyl ether part, and ring-closing olefin metathesis for the F-ring formation.

  8. RING E3 ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Kim, Jong Hum

    2017-01-01

    response pathways of plants through various molecular and genetic studies. In particular, it was recently discovered that ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), a regulatory mechanism for protein turn over, is greatly involved in the stress responsive pathways. In the UPS, many E3 ligases play key roles...... in recognizing and tethering poly-ubiquitins on target proteins for subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here we discuss the roles of RING ligases that have been defined in related to abiotic stress responses in plants....

  9. Analysing the New Saturnian Rings, R/2004 S1 and R/2004 S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S. M. Giuliatti; Sfair, R.; Mourão, D. C.; Bastos, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Cassini-Huygens arrival into the Saturnian system brought a large amount of data about the satellites and rings. Two diffuse rings were found in the region between the A ring and Prometheus. R/2004 S1 is coorbital to Atlas and R/2004 S2 is close to Prometheus. In this work we analysed the closest approach between Prometheus and both rings. As a result we found that the satellite removes particles from R/2004 S2 ring. Long-term numerical simulations showed that some particles can cross the F ring region . The well known region of the F ring, where small satellites are present and particles are being taking from the ring, gains a new insight with the presence of particles from R/2004 S2 ring. The computation of the Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent reveled that the R/2004 S2 ring lies in a chaotic region while R/2004 S1 ring and Atlas are in a stable region. Atlas is responsible for the formation of three regimes in the R/2004 S1 ring, as expected for a satellite embedded in a ring.

  10. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction and a realis......We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction...... and a realisation as quotient of quantum cohomology. Adv. Math. 225(1), 200–268, (2010) and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of non-commutative symmetric functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also...... compute the fusion rings for type G2....

  11. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  13. Large-Scale Outer Rings of Early-type Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kostiuk, Irina P

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for presence of current star formation in outer stellar rings of early-type disk (S0-Sb) galaxies by inspecting a representative sample of nearby galaxies with rings from the recent Spitzer catalog ARRAKIS (Comeron et al. 2014). We have found that regular rings (of R-type) reveal young stellar population with the age of less than 200~Myr in about half of all the cases, while in the pseudorings (open rings, R'), which inhabit only spiral galaxies, current star formation proceeds almost always.

  14. Ring current and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  15. Magnetization of two coupled rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avishai, Y [Department of Physics and Ilse Katz Center for Nanotechnology, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Luck, J M [Institut de Physique Theorique, IPhT, CEA Saclay, and URA 2306, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)], E-mail: yshai@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: jean-marc.luck@cea.fr

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the persistent currents and magnetization of a mesoscopic system consisting of two clean metallic rings sharing a single contact point in a magnetic field. Many novel features with respect to the single-ring geometry are underlined, including the explicit dependence of wavefunctions on the Aharonov-Bohm fluxes, the complex pattern of two-fold and three-fold degeneracies, the key role of length and flux commensurability, and in the case of commensurate ring lengths the occurrence of idle levels which do not carry any current. Spin-orbit interactions, induced by the electric fields of charged wires threading the rings, give rise to a peculiar version of the Aharonov-Casher effect where, unlike for a single ring, spin is not conserved. Remarkably enough, this can only be realized when the Aharonov-Bohm fluxes in both rings are neither integer nor half-integer multiples of the flux quantum.

  16. Burnside Rings of Fusion Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Sune Precht

    , and we produce a basis for the Burnside ring that shares properties with the transitive sets for a finite group. We construct a transfer map from the p-local Burnside ring of the underlying p-group S to the p-local Burnside ring of F. Using such transfer maps, we give a new explicit construction...... of Burnside rings given by multiplication with the characteristic idempotent, and we show that this map is the transfer map previously constructed. Applying these results, we show that for every saturated fusion system the ring generated by all (non-idempotent) characteristic elements in the p-local double...... of the characteristic idempotent of F { the unique idempotent in the p-local double Burnside ring of S satisfying properties of Linckelmann and Webb. We describe this idempotent both in terms of fixed points and as a linear combination of transitive bisets. Additionally, using fixed points we determine the map...

  17. Black di-ring and infinite nonuniqueness

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, H; Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We show that the $S^1$-rotating black rings can be superposed by the solution generating technique. We analyze the black di-ring solution for the simplest case of multiple rings. There exists an equilibrium black di-ring where the conical singularities are cured by the suitable choice of physical parameters. Also there are infinite numbers of black di-rings with the same mass and angular momentum. These di-rings can have two different continuous limits of single black rings. Therefore we can transform the fat black ring to the thin ring with the same mass and angular momentum by way of the di-ring solutions.

  18. Novel coiled-coil cell division factor ZapB stimulates Z ring assembly and cell division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Galli, Elisa; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2008-01-01

    Formation of the Z ring is the first known event in bacterial cell division. However, it is not yet known how the assembly and contraction of the Z ring are regulated. Here, we identify a novel cell division factor ZapB in Escherichia coli that simultaneously stimulates Z ring assembly and cell...

  19. Saturn's Rings and Associated Ring Plasma Cavity: Evidence for Slow Ring Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C- ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturns ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma fountains. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >10(exp 9) years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  20. ring og refleksion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, B.; Rattleff, Pernille; Høyrup, S.

    State of the art inden for forskning om læring på arbejdspladsen samt gennemgang af læringsteori og refleksionsbegrebet hos Dewey, Dreyfus, Schön, Argyris, Kolb, Jarvis, Mezirow og Brookfield. Afsluttes med diskussion af syntetiseret model for læring på arbejdspladsen.......State of the art inden for forskning om læring på arbejdspladsen samt gennemgang af læringsteori og refleksionsbegrebet hos Dewey, Dreyfus, Schön, Argyris, Kolb, Jarvis, Mezirow og Brookfield. Afsluttes med diskussion af syntetiseret model for læring på arbejdspladsen....

  1. On Weakly P.P. Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yue-ming; Ouyang Lun-qun; Wang Shu-gui

    2015-01-01

    We introduce, in this paper, the right weakly p.p. rings as the generaliza-tion of right p.p. rings. It is shown that many properties of the right p.p. rings can be extended onto the right weakly p.p. rings. Relative examples are constructed. As applications, we also characterize the regular rings and the semisimple rings in terms of the right weakly p.p. rings.

  2. Gravitational Instability of Nuclear Rings in Barred Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Moon, Sanghyuk

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear rings at centers of barred galaxies exhibit strong star formation activities. They are thought to undergo gravitational instability when sufficiently massive. We approximate them as rigidly-rotating isothermal objects and investigate their gravitational instability. Using a self-consistent field method, we first construct their equilibrium sequences specified by two parameters: alpha corresponding to the thermal energy relative to gravitational potential energy, and R_B measuring the ellipticity or ring thickness. The density distributions in the meridional plane are steeper for smaller alpha, and well approximated by those of infinite cylinders for slender rings. We also calculate the dispersion relations of nonaxisymmetric modes in rigidly-rotating slender rings with angular frequency Omega and central density rho_c. Rings with smaller are found more unstable with a larger unstable range of the azimuthal mode number. The instability is completely suppressed by rotation when Omega exceeds the critical value. The critical angular frequency is found to be almost constant at 0.7(G rho_c)^0.5 for alph > 0.01 and increases rapidly for smaller alpha . We apply our results to a sample of observed star-forming rings and confirm that rings without a noticeable azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters are indeed gravitationally unstable.

  3. The eRHIC Ring-Ring Collider Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fuhua; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Deshpande, Abhay A; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Franklin, Wilbur; Graves, William; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Milner, Richard; Montag, Christoph; Ozaki, Satoshi; Parker, Brett; Peggs, Steve; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tschalär, C; Wang, Dong; Zolfaghari, Abbasali; Zwart, Townsend; van der Laan, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The eRHIC ring-ring collider is the main design option of the future lepton-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We report the revisions of the ring-ring collider design features to the baseline design presented in the eRHIC Zeroth Design Report (ZDR). These revisions have been made during the past year. They include changes of the interaction region which are required from the modifications in the design of the main detector. They also include changes in the lepton storage ring for high current operations as a result of better understandings of beam-beam interaction effects. The updated collider luminosity and beam parameters also take into account a more accurate picture of current and future operational aspects of RHIC.

  4. De novo actin polymerization is required for model Hirano body formation in Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Dong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hirano bodies are eosinophilic, actin-rich inclusions found in autopsied brains in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism of Hirano body formation is unknown. Mass spectrometry analysis was performed to identify proteins from partially purified model Hirano bodies from Dictyostelium. This analysis identified proteins primarily belonging to ribosomes, proteasomes, mitochondria and cytoskeleton. Profilin, Arp/2/3 and WASH identified by mass spectrometry were found to colocalise with model Hirano bodies. Due to their roles in actin regulation, we selected these proteins for further investigation. Inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex by CK666 prevented formation of model Hirano bodies. Since Arp2/3 activation occurs via the WASH or WAVE complex, we next investigated how these proteins affect Hirano body formation. Whereas model Hirano bodies could form in WASH-deficient cells, they failed to form in cells lacking HSPC300, a member of the WAVE complex. We identified other proteins required for Hirano body formation that include profilin and VASP, an actin nucleation factor. In the case of VASP, both its G- and F-actin binding domains were required for model Hirano body formation. Collectively, our results indicate that de novo actin polymerization is required to form model Hirano bodies.

  5. A novel genetic mechanism regulates dorsolateral hinge-point formation during zebrafish cranial neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Molly K; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2009-06-15

    During neurulation, vertebrate embryos form a neural tube (NT), the rudiment of the central nervous system. In mammals and birds, a key step in cranial NT morphogenesis is dorsolateral hinge-point (DLHP) bending, which requires an apical actomyosin network. The mechanism of DLHP formation is poorly understood, although several essential genes have been identified, among them Zic2, which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor. We found that DLHP formation in the zebrafish midbrain also requires actomyosin and Zic function. Given this conservation, we used the zebrafish to study how genes encoding Zic proteins regulate DLHP formation. We demonstrate that the ventral zic2a expression border predicts DLHP position. Using morpholino (MO) knockdown, we show zic2a and zic5 are required for apical F-actin and active myosin II localization and junction integrity. Furthermore, myosin II activity can function upstream of junction integrity during DLHP formation, and canonical Wnt signaling, an activator of zic gene transcription, is necessary for apical active myosin II localization, junction integrity and DLHP formation. We conclude that zic genes act downstream of Wnt signaling to control cytoskeletal organization, and possibly adhesion, during neurulation. This study identifies zic2a and zic5 as crucial players in the genetic network linking patterned gene expression to morphogenetic changes during neurulation, and strengthens the utility of the zebrafish midbrain as a NT morphogenesis model.

  6. Prenatal Diagnosis of a Fetus with Congenital Heart Defect and Ring Chromosome 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Monosomy of chromosome 14 has been reported in only a few prenatal cases. Generally, this monosomy is associated with a mosaicism of ring chromosome 14. Ring chromosome 14 is a rare cytogenetic entity with clinical characteristics that include growth retardation, facial dysmorphia, hypotonia, seizures, and retinitis pigmentosa. Given that the majority of symptoms appear postnatally, few cases have been reported of prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism monosomy/ring chromosome 14. We describe the prenatal diagnosis of a case of chromosomal mosaicism, a cell line with ring chromosome 14, r(14, and a second cell line with monosomy 14, in a fetus with aortic coarctation and chamber asymmetry. This is the first case of a prenatal diagnosis associating mosaicism with ring chromosome 14, monosomy 14, and fetal cardiopathy. We identified the exact breakpoint in ring chromosome 14 in IGH locus, which may provide further insight into the mode of ring formation as well as prenatal findings.

  7. Clean Elements in Abelian Rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelina Y M Chin

    2009-04-01

    Let be a ring with identity. An element in is said to be clean if it is the sum of a unit and an idempotent. is said to be clean if all of its elements are clean. If every idempotent in is central, then is said to be abelian. In this paper we obtain some conditions equivalent to being clean in an abelian ring.

  8. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  9. Pyrimidine-pyridine ring interconversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, van der H.C.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discusses the pyrimidine-to-pyridine ring transformation and pyridine-to-pyrimidine ring transformation. In nucleophile-induced pyrimidine-to-pyridine rearrangements, two types of reactions can be distinguished depending on the structure of the nucleophile: (1) reactions in which the ni

  10. Supercharacter theories and Schur rings

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, Anders O F

    2010-01-01

    Diaconis and Isaacs have defined the supercharacter theories of a finite group to be certain approximations to the ordinary character theory of the group. We make explicit the connection between supercharacter theories and Schur rings, and we provide supercharacter theory constructions which correspond to Schur ring constructions of Leung and Man and of Tamaschke.

  11. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  12. Constructions over localizations of rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Logar

    1987-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we construct a category of effective noetherian rings in which linear equations can be “solved”. This category is closed with respect to some important constructions like trascendental extensions, quotientations, finite products and localizations with respect to a large class of multiplicatively closed systems. Hence it gives a definition of “constructive” rings.

  13. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  14. The Search for Ringed Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Are planetary rings as common in our galaxy as they are in our solar system? A new study demonstrates how we might search for ringed exoplanets and then possibly finds one!Saturns Elsewhere?Artists illustration of the super ring system around exoplanet J1407b. This is the only exoplanet weve found with rings, but its not at all like Saturn. [Ron Miller]Our solar system is filled with moons and planetary rings, so it stands to reason that exoplanetary systems should exhibit the same features. But though weve been in the planet-hunting game for decades, weve only found one exoplanet thats surrounded by a ring system. Whats more, that system J1407b has enormous rings that are vastly different from the modest, Saturn-like rings that we might expect to be more commonplace.Have we not discovered ringed exoplanets just because theyre hard to identify? Or is it because theyre not out there? A team of scientists led by Masataka Aizawa (University of Tokyo) has set out to answer this question by conducting a systematic search for rings around long-period planet candidates.The transit light curve of KIC 10403228, shown with three models: the best-fitting planet-only model (blue) and the two best-fitting planet+ring models (green and red). [Aizawa et al. 2017]The Hunt BeginsWhy long-period planets? Rings are expected to be unstable as the planet gets closer to the central star. Whats more, the planet needs to be far enough away from the stars warmth for the icy rings to exist. The authors therefore select from the collection of candidate transiting planets 89 long-period candidates that might be able to host rings.Aizawa and collaborators then fit single-planet models (with no rings) to the light curves of these planets and search for anomalies curves that arent fit well by these standard models. Particularly suspicious characteristics include a long ingress/egress as the planet moves across the face of the star, and asymmetry of the transit shape.After applying a series of

  15. Ionization cooling ring for muons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Palmer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical ionization cooling rings could lead to lower cost or improved performance in neutrino factory or muon collider designs. The ring modeled here uses realistic three-dimensional fields. The performance of the ring compares favorably with the linear cooling channel used in the second U.S. Neutrino Factory Study. The normalized 6D emittance of an ideal ring is decreased by a factor of approximately 240, compared with a factor of only 15 for the linear channel. We also examine such real-world effects as windows on the absorbers and rf cavities and leaving empty lattice cells for injection and extraction. For realistic conditions the ring decreases the normalized 6D emittance by a factor of 49.

  16. A Note on Clean Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Wang; Jianlong Chen

    2007-01-01

    Let R be a ring and g(x) a polynomial in C[x],where C=C(R) denotes the center of R.Camillo and Sim6n called the ring g(x)-clean if every element of R can be written as the sum of a unit and a root of g(x).In this paper,we prove that for a,b (E) C,the ring R is clean and b - a is invertible in R if and only if R is g1(x)-clean,where gl(x) = (x - a)(x - b).This implies that in some sense the notion of g(x)-clean rings in the Nicholson-Zhou Theorem and in the Camillo-Sim6n Theorem is indeed equivalent to the notion of clean rings.

  17. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  18. The intermetallic bonding between a ring carrier and aluminum piston alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Manasijevic, Srećko; Dolić, Natalija; Djurdjevic, Mile; Mišić, Nataša; Davitkov, Novica

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigating the formation of intermetallic bond between a ring carrier and aluminum piston alloy. The ring carrier is made of austenitic cast iron (Ni-Resist) in order to increase the wear resistance of the first ring groove and applied in highly loaded diesel engines. Metallographic examination of the quality of alfin bond was done. A metallographic investigation using an optical microscope in combination with the SEM/EDS analysis of the quality of the in...

  19. [Cortical cytoskeletal ring in prophase II leads to correction of abnormalities of the first meiotic division and to meiotic restitution of pollen mother cell nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamina, N V; Zaporozhchenko, I A; Maksiutova, Iu R; Shatskaia, O A

    2007-01-01

    The deviation of prophase cytoskeletal ring formation was determined during meiotic division in 50% of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in maize haploid No 1498 (Zea mays). At prophase in both meiotic divisions the cytoskeletal ring is formed in cortical region of cytoplasm instead of perinuclear. Sometimes formation of both perinuclear and cortical rings is observed in the same cell. It has been shown that in multinucleate PMCs the cortical ring leads to the consolidation of chromosomes into common spindle and to meiotic restitution.

  20. CO Gas orbiting around the GG Tauri A triple System: rings beyond the ring ?

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Ya-Wen; Guilloteau, Stephane; Chapillon, Edwige; Pietu, Vincent; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Herve; Boehler, Yann; Gueth, Frederic; Hure, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Simon, Michal

    2015-01-01

    We aim at unveiling the observational imprint of physical mechanisms that govern planetary formation in the young, multiple system GG Tau A. We present ALMA observations of $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO 3-2 and continuum at 0.9 mm at 0.35" resolution. The $^{12}$CO gas, found in the cavity of the dust ring where no $^{13}$CO gas is detected, confirms the existence of a CO accretion shock near the circumstellar disk of GG Tau Aa. The outer disk and the hot spot lying at the outer edge of the dust ring are observed both in $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO. The gas emission in the outer disk can be radially decomposed in a series of slightly overlapping gaussian rings, suggesting the presence of unresolved gaps. The dip closest to the disk center lies at a radius very close to the CO hot spot location ($\\sim250-260$~au). Studies of the CO excitation conditions reveal that the outer disk remains in the shadow of the ring. The hot spot probably results from local heating processes. The two latter points strongly support the hypo...

  1. Black Hole Ringing, Quasinormal Modes, and Light Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Modelling of gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral has played an important role in the recent observations of such signals. The late-stage ringdown phase of the gravitational waveform is often associated with the null particle orbit (\\light ring") of the black hole spacetime. With simple models we show that this link between the light ring and spacetime ringing is based more on the history of applications than on an actual constraining relationship. We also show, in particular, that a better understanding of the disassociation between the two, may be relevant to the astrophysically interesting case of rotating (Kerr) black holes.

  2. Is the bell ringing?

    CERN Multimedia

    Francesco Poppi

    2010-01-01

    During the Nobel prize-winning UA1 experiment, scientists in the control room used to ring a bell if a particularly interesting event had occurred. Today, the “CMS Exotica hotline” routine produces a daily report that lists the exotic events that were recorded the day before.   Display of an event selected by the Exotica routine. Take just a very small fraction of the available data (max. 5%); define the events that you want to keep and set the parameters accordingly; run the Exotica routine and only look at the very few images that the system has selected for you. This is the recipe that a small team of CMS researchers has developed to identify the signals coming from possible new physics processes. “This approach does not replace the accurate data analysis on the whole set of data. However, it is a very fast and effective way to focus on just a few events that are potentially very interesting”, explains Maurizio Pierini (CERN), who developed the...

  3. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-08-15

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated.

  4. Trace formation during locomotion of L929 mouse fibroblasts continuously recorded by interference reflection microscopy (IRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, E; Hitzler, H; Zimmermann, H; Hagedorn, R; Fuhr, G

    2000-09-01

    The recently reported formation of highly ordered traces by migrating cells has been studied on L929 fibroblasts in time lapse experiments by means of interference reflection microscopy (IRM) as well as by conventional microscopy. Formation of pronounced traces on glass substrates correlates to migration after cell division, and the trace arrangement on the substrate depends on migration velocity: slow migration results in a highly branched, broad, and relatively short trace, while fast migration yields a slim and long trace with few branches. IRM-irradiation caused cessation of locomotion and trace formation and accelerated degradation of existing traces. Traces consist of cord-like cytoplasmic strands, which contain F-actin filaments and they seem to be enveloped by a membrane. It is supposed that cell traces are homologous to filopodia. Traces arise mainly from non-retracted filopodia at the rear margin of the migrating cell. The branches within the traces are the result of the repeated stretching out of a backwardly directed lamellipodium. They arise from the formation of new filopodia that emerge at the actin ribs of the lamellipodium.

  5. Ideals in Morita Rings and Morita Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qun CHEN; Yun FAN; Zhi Feng HAO

    2005-01-01

    We characterize the lattice of all ideals of a Morita ring (semigroup) when the corresponding pair of rings (semigroups) in the Morita context are Morita equivalent s-unital (like-unity) rings(semigroups).

  6. Investigation of air entrapment and weld line defects in micro injection moulded thermoplastic elastomer micro rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasnaes, F.B.; Tosello, Guido; Calaon, Matteo;

    2015-01-01

    The micro injection moulding (μIM) process for the production of micro rings in thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) was investigated and optimized. The objective was to minimize the formation of air entrapments and the depth of micro weld line created on the surface of the TPE micro moulded rings...

  7. Periodicity of growth rings in Juniperus procera from Ethiopia inferred from crossdating and radiocarbon dating.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wils, T.; Robertson, I.; Eshetu, Z.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Koprowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    African pencil cedar (Juniperus procera Hochst. ex Endlicher 1847) is a tropical, irregularly growing species that can produce annual growth rings in response to an annual cycle of wet and dry seasons. In this paper, we assess the periodicity of growth-ring formation for 13 stem discs from a site in

  8. Periodicity of growth rings in Juniperus procera from Ethiopia inferred from crossdating and radiocarbon dating.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wils, T.; Robertson, I.; Eshetu, Z.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Koprowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    African pencil cedar (Juniperus procera Hochst. ex Endlicher 1847) is a tropical, irregularly growing species that can produce annual growth rings in response to an annual cycle of wet and dry seasons. In this paper, we assess the periodicity of growth-ring formation for 13 stem discs from a site in

  9. Soft Congruence Relations over Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Xin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft congruence relations by using the soft set theory. The notions of soft quotient rings, generalized soft ideals and generalized soft quotient rings, are introduced, and several related properties are investigated. Also, we obtain a one-to-one correspondence between soft congruence relations and idealistic soft rings and a one-to-one correspondence between soft congruence relations and soft ideals. In particular, the first, second, and third soft isomorphism theorems are established, respectively.

  10. Soft congruence relations over rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiaolong; Li, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft congruence relations by using the soft set theory. The notions of soft quotient rings, generalized soft ideals and generalized soft quotient rings, are introduced, and several related properties are investigated. Also, we obtain a one-to-one correspondence between soft congruence relations and idealistic soft rings and a one-to-one correspondence between soft congruence relations and soft ideals. In particular, the first, second, and third soft isomorphism theorems are established, respectively.

  11. On the synthesis, measurement and applications of octanuclear heterometallic rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, T. B.

    Inorganic macrocycles have stimulated interest in recent years for their magnetic properties, their associated host-guest chemistry and their aesthetically appealing structures. These characteristics have led to suggestions that they could be exploited for the purposes of ion recognition, catalysis, as single molecule magnets, MRI agents, antibacterial agents and as part of larger architectures in a molecular machine. This thesis explores the properties of a group of chromium(III) macrocycles, with functionality tailored towards different pursuits. Firstly the magnetic properties of a newly synthesised family of ring dimers are investigated. The nature of magnetic exchange within each ring leads to a net electronic spin which, it has been proposed, could represent a quantum binary digit within a quantum information processing system. By linking together pairs of rings, the degree of inter-ring communication can be determined. Such interactions are important for the correlation of spin as initiation of quantum entanglement, a pre-requisite for quantum computing. The rings can also act as fluoro-metallocrown, hosting the molecule which templated their formation. A range of rings with different guests are synthesised and their solid and solution state structures are explored. On templating about bulky dialykyl amines hybrid organic-inorganic rotaxanes are formed where the guest is fixed. In contrast when using small amines and alkali metals, exchange of guests is possible. The dynamics of all of these systems are investigated with proton NMR, quite remarkable for such highly paramagnetic complexes.

  12. Pioneer fly-by of Saturn and its rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, T.; Esposito, L.

    1981-01-01

    Results acquired by the imaging photopolarimeter on board Pioneer 11 during the spacecraft fly-by of Saturn and its rings on September 1, 1979 are reviewed. Analysis of the broadband photometry and polarimetry obtained of the Saturn atmosphere has been used to determine a cloud top height of 300 mb and a scale height of the aerosol distribution about 1/4 that of the ambient gas, and to point out differences between the forward scattering and belt and zone characteristics of the Saturn and Jupiter atmospheres. Images of Saturn's rings have been used to derive a profile of ring optical depth between 1.22 and 2.35 Saturn radii, and reveal new divisions and thin rings and azimuthal variations in the brightness of the A ring not observable from earth. Linear polarization observations of Titan in red and blue light reveal that the aerosols near the top of the atmosphere have radii less than about 0.09 micron and that the optical thickness of the small aerosol layer is about 0.6 above an effectively depolarizing surface, and indicate radii of 2845 + or - 25 km and 2880 + or - 22 km in red and blue light, respectively. Earth-based and spacecraft data are consistent with the formation of rings structures as a result of Poynting-Robertson drag and gravitational satellite resonances with the original ice and rock particles.

  13. Discrete Element Model for Suppression of Coffee-Ring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Lam, Miu Ling; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-02-01

    When a sessile droplet evaporates, coffee-ring effect drives the suspended particulate matters to the droplet edge, eventually forming a ring-shaped deposition. Because it causes a non-uniform distribution of solid contents, which is undesired in many applications, attempts have been made to eliminate the coffee-ring effect. Recent reports indicated that the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed by a mixture of spherical and non-spherical particles with enhanced particle-particle interaction at air-water interface. However, a model to comprehend the inter-particulate activities has been lacking. Here, we report a discrete element model (particle system) to investigate the phenomenon. The modeled dynamics included particle traveling following the capillary flow with Brownian motion, and its resultant 3D hexagonal close packing of particles along the contact line. For particles being adsorbed by air-water interface, we modeled cluster growth, cluster deformation, and cluster combination. We found that the suppression of coffee-ring effect does not require a circulatory flow driven by an inward Marangoni flow at air-water interface. Instead, the number of new cluster formation, which can be enhanced by increasing the ratio of non-spherical particles and the overall number of microspheres, is more dominant in the suppression process. Together, this model provides a useful platform elucidating insights for suppressing coffee-ring effect for practical applications in the future.

  14. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  15. Autumn study on storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  16. Ring Model for Pneumatic Tires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    危银涛; 范成建; 管迪华

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the ring modeling method for tires, emphasizing the differences among the various tire ring models. A general tire ring model was then developed including all the nonlinear terms in the ring strain and the initial stresses induced by the internal pressure and rotation. The general equations of motion were derived from the Hamilton principle whth the geometric parameters for the model directly obtained from the tire design. The physical parameters were calculated from experimental mode parameters. A numerical example is given for a 195/70 R14-type tire. The analysis shows that the predicted natural frequencies and the tire mode shape agree well with experimental results.

  17. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    We study pairs of co-axial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  18. Synlig læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Introduktionen af John Hatties synlig læring i den danske skoleverden møder stadig meget kritik. Mange lærere og pædagoger oplever synlig læring som en tornado, der vil opsuge og ødelægge deres særlige danske udgave af den kontinentale dannelsestænkning, didaktik og pædagogik. Spørgsmålet er om...

  19. Commuting Π-regular rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ‎$R$ is called commuting regular ring (resp‎. ‎semigroupif‎ for each $x,y\\in R$ there exists $a\\in R$‎ such that$xy=yxayx$‎. ‎In this paper‎, ‎we introduce the concept of‎‎commuting $\\pi$-regular rings (resp‎. ‎semigroups and‎‎study various properties of them.

  20. Erosion of the granular layer due to the collision of a vortex ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Junya; Sano, Osamu, E-mail: y.junya.0511@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    The erosion of a granular layer due to the normal impact of a vortex ring was investigated experimentally. We observed two characteristic surface patterns, grooves and dimples, depending on the magnitude of the vortex ring, its travelling distance, and the properties of the granular material. In order to clarify these pattern formation mechanisms, we measured the temporal variation of the layer thickness using the transmitted light intensity, as well as the velocity field using particle image velocimetry. These patterns are found to be generated by successive collisions of the primary vortex ring and the secondary vortex ring which develops on the granular layer. (paper)