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Sample records for eye muscle proprioception

  1. Eye muscle proprioception is represented bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Albert, Neil B; Miall, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The cortical representation of eye position is still uncertain. In the monkey a proprioceptive representation of the extraocular muscles (EOM) of an eye were recently found within the contralateral central sulcus. In humans, we have previously shown a change in the perceived position of the right...... eye after a virtual lesion with rTMS over the left somatosensory area. However, it is possible that the proprioceptive representation of the EOM extends to other brain sites, which were not examined in these previous studies. The aim of this fMRI study was to sample the whole brain to identify...... the proprioceptive representation for the left and the right eye separately. Data were acquired while passive eye movement was used to stimulate EOM proprioceptors in the absence of a motor command. We also controlled for the tactile stimulation of the eyelid by removing from the analysis voxels activated by eyelid...

  2. Eye proprioception may provide real time eye position information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pan, Yujun

    2013-03-01

    Because of the frequency of eye movements, online knowledge of eye position is crucial for the accurate spatial perception and behavioral navigation. Both the internal monitoring signal (corollary discharge) of eye movements and the eye proprioception signal are thought to contribute to the localization of the eye position in the orbit. However, the functional role of these two eye position signals in spatial cognition has been disputed for more than a century. The predominant view proposes that the online analysis of eye position is exclusively provided by the corollary discharge signal, while the eye proprioception signal only plays a role in the long-term calibration of the oculomotor system. However, increasing evidence from recent behavioral and physiological studies suggests that the eye proprioception signal may play a role in the online monitoring of eye position. The purpose of this review is to discuss the feasibility and possible function of the eye proprioceptive signal for online monitoring of eye position.

  3. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  4. Eye proprioception used for visual localization only if in conflict with the oculomotor plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balslev, Daniela; Himmelbach, Marc; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Borchers, Svenja; Odoj, Bartholomaeus

    2012-06-20

    Both the corollary discharge of the oculomotor command and eye muscle proprioception provide eye position information to the brain. Two contradictory models have been suggested about how these two sources contribute to visual localization: (1) only the efference copy is used whereas proprioception is a slow recalibrator of the forward model, and (2) both signals are used together as a weighted average. We had the opportunity to test these hypotheses in a patient (R.W.) with a circumscribed lesion of the right postcentral gyrus that overlapped the human eye proprioceptive representation. R.W. was as accurate and precise as the control group (n = 19) in locating a lit LED that she viewed through the eye contralateral to the lesion. However, when the task was preceded by a brief (proprioception is not used for visual localization. Eye proprioception is, however, continuously monitored to be incorporated into the eye position estimate when a mismatch with the efference copy of the motor command is detected. Our result thus supports the first model and, furthermore, identifies the limits for its operation.

  5. Neck muscle fatigue alters upper limb proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Limb proprioception is an awareness by the central nervous system (CNS) of the location of a limb in three-dimensional space and is essential for movement and postural control. The CNS uses the position of the head and neck when interpreting the position of the upper limb, and altered input from neck muscles may affect the sensory inputs to the CNS and consequently may impair the awareness of upper limb joint position. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue of the cervical extensors muscles (CEM) using a submaximal fatigue protocol alters the ability to recreate a previously presented elbow angle with the head in a neutral position. Twelve healthy individuals participated. CEM activity was examined bilaterally using surface electromyography, and kinematics of the elbow joint was measured. The fatigue protocol included an isometric neck extension task at 70 % of maximum until failure. Joint position error increased following fatigue, demonstrating a significant main effect of time (F 2, 18 = 19.41, p ≤ 0.0001) for absolute error. No significant differences were found for variable error (F 2, 18 = 0.27, p = 0.76) or constant error (F 2, 18 = 1.16 of time, p ≤ 0.33). This study confirms that fatigue of the CEM can reduce the accuracy of elbow joint position matching. This suggests that altered afferent input from the neck subsequent to fatigue may impair upper limb proprioception.

  6. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  7. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and strength training to gain muscle strength in elderly women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesário, Denise Ferreira; Mendes, Geovânia Barbosa da Silva; Uchôa, Érica Patrícia Borba Lira; Veiga, Paulo Henrique Altran

    2014-01-01

    ...: To perform comparative analyze of results of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and strength training to gain muscle strength of biceps and quadriceps and grip in the elderly...

  8. Knee proprioception after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, R; Vasques, J; Duarte, J A; Cabri, J M H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exercise-induced quadriceps muscle damage affects knee proprioception such as joint position sense (JPS), force sense and the threshold to detect passive movement (TTDPM). Fourteen young men performed sets of eccentric quadriceps contractions at a target of 60% of the maximal concentric peak torque until exhaustion; the exercise was interrupted whenever the subject could not complete two sets. Muscle soreness, JPS, the TTDPM and force sense were examined before the exercise as well as one, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after exercise. The results were compared using one-way repeated-measure ANOVA. Plasma CK activity, collected at the same times, was analyzed by the Friedman's test to discriminate differences between baseline values and each of the other assessment moments (pknee flexion and force sense were significantly decreased up to 48 h, whereas TTDPM decreased significantly at only one hour and 24 h after exercise, at 30 and 70 degrees of the knee flexion, respectively. The results allow the conclusion that eccentric exercise leading to muscle damage alters joint proprioception, suggesting that there might be impairment in the intrafusal fibres of spindle muscles and in the tendon organs.

  9. Proprioceptive Feedback through a Neuromorphic Muscle Spindle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Vannucci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Connecting biologically inspired neural simulations to physical or simulated embodiments can be useful both in robotics, for the development of a new kind of bio-inspired controllers, and in neuroscience, to test detailed brain models in complete action-perception loops. The aim of this work is to develop a fully spike-based, biologically inspired mechanism for the translation of proprioceptive feedback. The translation is achieved by implementing a computational model of neural activity of type Ia and type II afferent fibers of muscle spindles, the primary source of proprioceptive information, which, in mammals is regulated through fusimotor activation and provides necessary adjustments during voluntary muscle contractions. As such, both static and dynamic γ-motoneurons activities are taken into account in the proposed model. Information from the actual proprioceptive sensors (i.e., motor encoders is then used to simulate the spindle contraction and relaxation, and therefore drive the neural activity. To assess the feasibility of this approach, the model is implemented on the NEST spiking neural network simulator and on the SpiNNaker neuromorphic hardware platform and tested on simulated and physical robotic platforms. The results demonstrate that the model can be used in both simulated and real-time robotic applications to translate encoder values into a biologically plausible neural activity. Thus, this model provides a completely spike-based building block, suitable for neuromorphic platforms, that will enable the development of sensory-motor closed loops which could include neural simulations of areas of the central nervous system or of low-level reflexes.

  10. Connections between the facial and trigeminal nerves: Anatomical basis for facial muscle proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Cobo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception is a quality of sensibility that originates in specialized sensory organs (proprioceptors that inform the central nervous system about static and dynamic conditions of muscles and joints. The facial muscles are innervated by efferent motor nerve fibers and typically lack proprioceptors. However, facial proprioception plays a key role in the regulation and coordination of the facial musculature and diverse reflexes. Thus, facial muscles must be necessarily supplied also for afferent sensory nerve fibers provided by other cranial nerves, especially the trigeminal nerve. Importantly, neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated that facial proprioceptive impulses are conveyed through branches of the trigeminal nerve to the central nervous system. The multiple communications between the facial and the trigeminal nerves are at the basis of these functional characteristics. Here we review the literature regarding the facial (superficial communications between the facial and the trigeminal nerves, update the current knowledge about proprioception in the facial muscles, and hypothesize future research in facial proprioception.

  11. Development of a BIONic muscle spindle for prosthetic proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Nicholas A; Loeb, Gerald E

    2007-06-01

    The replacement of proprioceptive function, whether for conscious sensation or feedback control, is likely to be an important aspect of neural prosthetic restoration of limb movements. Thus far, however, it has been hampered by the absence of unobtrusive sensors. We propose a method whereby fully implanted, telemetrically operated BIONs monitor muscle movement, and thereby detect changes in joint angle(s) and/or limb posture without requiring the use of secondary components attached to limb segments or external reference frames. The sensor system is designed to detect variations in the electrical coupling between devices implanted in neighboring muscles that result from changes in their relative position as the muscles contract and stretch with joint motion. The goal of this study was to develop and empirically validate mathematical models of the sensing scheme and to use computer simulations to provide an early proof of concept and inform design of the overall sensor system. Results from experiments using paired dipoles in a saline bath and finite element simulations have given insight into the current distribution and potential gradients exhibited within bounded anisotropic environments similar to a human limb segment and demonstrated an anticipated signal to noise ratio of at least 8:1 for submillimeter resolution of relative implant movement over a range of implant displacements up to 15 cm.

  12. The effects of eccentric exercise on muscle function and proprioception of individuals being overweight and underweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Deli, Chariklia K; Raso, Vagner; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Giakas, Giannis; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of being overweight or underweight on proprioception at rest and after muscle damaging eccentric exercise. Twelve lean, 12 overweight, and 8 underweight female participants performed an eccentric exercise session using the knee extensor muscles of the dominant leg. Muscle damage indices and proprioception were assessed up to 3 days postexercise. The results indicated that proprioception at baseline of the lean individuals was superior to that of the other 2 groups. The overweight individuals exhibited a smaller knee joint reaction angle to release than did the lean group, whereas the underweight individuals exhibited a larger reaction angle to release than did the lean group. After eccentric exercise, proprioception was affected more in the overweight and the underweight groups than in the lean group. The greater exercise-induced muscle damage appeared in the overweight group, and the deficient muscle mass of the underweight participants could explain in part the greater disturbances that appeared in proprioception in these 2 groups than for the lean counterparts. In conclusion, deviating from the normal body mass is associated with significant disturbances in the proprioception of the legs at rest and after participation in activities involving eccentric actions.

  13. Experimental muscle pain produces central modulation of proprioceptive signals arising from jaw muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, N F; Ro, J Y

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline, a well-established experimental model for muscle pain, on central processing of proprioceptive input from jaw muscle spindle afferents. Fifty-seven cells were recorded from the medial edge of the subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) and the adjacent parvicellular reticular formation from 11 adult cats. These cells were characterized as central units receiving jaw muscle spindle input based on their responses to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, muscle palpation and jaw stretch. Forty-five cells, which were successfully tested with 5% hypertonic saline, were categorized as either dynamic-static (DS) (n=25) or static (S) (n=20) neurons based on their responses to different speeds and amplitudes of jaw movement. Seventy-six percent of the cells tested with an ipsilateral injection of hypertonic saline showed a significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during opening and/or holding phases. The most remarkable saline-induced change was a significant reduction of MFR during the hold phase in S units (100%, 18/18 modulated). Sixty-nine percent of the DS units (11/16 modulated) also showed significant changes in MFRs limited to the hold phase. However, in the DS neurons, the MFRs increased in seven units and decreased in four units. Finally, five DS neurons showed significant changes of MFRs during both opening and holding phases. Injections of isotonic saline into the ipsilateral masseter muscle had little effect, but hypertonic saline injections made into the contralateral masseter muscle produced similar results to ipsilateral injections with hypertonic saline. These results unequivocally demonstrate that intramuscular injection with an algesic substance, sufficient to produce muscle pain, produces significant changes in the proprioceptive properties of the jaw movement-related neurons. Potential mechanisms involved in saline-induced changes in the

  14. Thoracolumbar fascia does not influence proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscle spindles in the cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Pickar, Joel G

    2009-01-01

    The thoracolumbar fascia attaches to the lumbar spinous processes and encloses the paraspinal muscles to form a muscle compartment. Because muscle spindles can respond to transverse forces applied at a muscle’s surface, we were interested in the mechanical effects this fascia may have on proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscles during vertebral movement. The discharge of paraspinal muscle spindles at rest and in response to muscle history were investigated in the presence and absence of the thoracolumbar fascia in anesthetized cats. Muscle-history was induced by positioning the L6 vertebra in conditioning directions that lengthened and shortened the paraspinal muscles. The vertebra was then returned to an intermediate position for testing the spindles. Neither resting discharge (P= 0.49) nor the effects of muscle history (P>0.30) was significantly different with the fascia intact vs. removed. Our data showed that the thoracolumbar fascia did not influence proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscles spindles during small passive vertebral movements in cats. In addition, comparison of the transverse threshold pressures needed to stimulate our sample of muscle spindles in the cat with the thoracolumbar fascia compartmental pressures measured in humans during previous studies suggests that the thoracolumbar fascia likely does not affect proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscle spindles in humans. PMID:19627391

  15. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients...... groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, with a progressively increasing intensity. The WBV groups performed unloaded static WBV exercise. The following were measured: knee muscle strength (extension/flexion) and proprioception (threshold for detection of passive movement (TDPM)). Self-reported disease...

  16. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits.

  17. Corticospinal Excitability in the Hand Muscles is Decreased During Eye Movement with Visual Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Yuta; Jono, Yasutomo; Tani, Keisuke; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles decreases during smooth pursuit eye movement. The present study tested a hypothesis that the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles at rest during eye movement is not caused by visual feedback but caused by motor commands to the eye muscles. Healthy men (M age = 28.4 yr., SD = 5.2) moved their eyes to the right with visual occlusion (dark goggles) while their arms and hands remained at rest. The motor-evoked potential in the hand muscles was suppressed by 19% in the third quarter of the eye-movement period, supporting a view that motor commands to the eye muscles are the cause of the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles. The amount of the suppression was not significantly different among the muscles, indicating that modulation of corticospinal excitability in one muscle induced by eye movement is not dependent on whether eye movement direction and the direction of finger movement when the muscle contracts are identical. Thus, the finding failed to support a hypothetical view that motor commands to the eye muscles concomittantly produce motor commands to the hand muscles. Moreover, the amount of the suppression was not significantly different between the forearm positions, indicating that the suppression was not affected by proprioception of the forearm muscles when visual feedback is absent. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. The proprioceptive senses: their roles in signaling body shape, body position and movement, and muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proske, Uwe; Gandevia, Simon C

    2012-10-01

    This is a review of the proprioceptive senses generated as a result of our own actions. They include the senses of position and movement of our limbs and trunk, the sense of effort, the sense of force, and the sense of heaviness. Receptors involved in proprioception are located in skin, muscles, and joints. Information about limb position and movement is not generated by individual receptors, but by populations of afferents. Afferent signals generated during a movement are processed to code for endpoint position of a limb. The afferent input is referred to a central body map to determine the location of the limbs in space. Experimental phantom limbs, produced by blocking peripheral nerves, have shown that motor areas in the brain are able to generate conscious sensations of limb displacement and movement in the absence of any sensory input. In the normal limb tendon organs and possibly also muscle spindles contribute to the senses of force and heaviness. Exercise can disturb proprioception, and this has implications for musculoskeletal injuries. Proprioceptive senses, particularly of limb position and movement, deteriorate with age and are associated with an increased risk of falls in the elderly. The more recent information available on proprioception has given a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these senses as well as providing new insight into a range of clinical conditions.

  19. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius.

  20. THE ROLE OF LEG AND TRUNK MUSCLES PROPRIOCEPTION ON STATIC AND DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED Hossein Hosseinimehr

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The proprioception information is a prerequisite for balance, body’s navigation system, and the movement coordinator. Due to changes between the angles of ankle, knee, and hip joints the aforementioned information are important in the coordination of the limbs and postural balance. The aim of this study was to investigate therole of leg and trunk muscles proprioception on static and dynamic postural control. Thirty males students of physical education and sport sciences (age =21.23 ± 2.95 years, height = 170.4 ± 5.1 cm, and weight = 70.7 ± 5.6 kg participated in this study volunteered. Vibration (100HZ was used to disturb of proprioception. Vibrationoperated on leg muscle (gasterocnemius and trunk muscles (erector spine muscle, at L1 level. Leg stance time and Star Excursion Balance Test were used for evaluation of static and dynamic postural control respectively.Subjects performed pre and post (with operated vibration leg stance time and star excursion balance test. Paired sample test used for investigation the effect of vibration on leg and trunk muscles in static and dynamic postural control. Result of this study showed in static postural control, there is no significant difference between pre and post test (operated vibration in leg and trunk muscles (p≤0.05. In contrast there is significant difference indynamic postural control between pre and post test in leg muscles in 8 directions of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05 while there is only significant difference in trunk muscle in antrolateral and lateral of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05. During physical training such conditions like fatigue and injury can disturbproprioceptions’ information. Thus, due to the importance of this information we recommend that coaches'additionally specific trainings any sport used specific exercises to enhance the proprioception information

  1. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  2. Effects of NGF-induced muscle sensitization on proprioception and nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cairns, Brian E

    2008-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are associated with perturbation of proprioceptive and nociceptive function. Recent studies have shown that injection of the neurotrophic protein nerve growth factor (NGF) into the masseter muscle causes sensitization to mechanical pressure stimuli; however, it is not clear if vibration sense and jaw stretch reflexes as measures of proprioceptive function as well as glutamate-evoked pain are also altered. We tested the hypothesis that NGF-induced mechanical sensitization would be associated with changes in vibration sense and stretch reflex sensitivity as well as facilitation of glutamate-evoked pain responses. A double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study was conducted on 14 healthy men. In one session subjects received an injection of NGF (5 microg in 0.2 ml) into the masseter muscle and in a control session an injection of buffered isotonic saline (0.9%, 0.2 ml). Subjects assessed their pain intensity on a 0-10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) for 15 min after the injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT), vibration sense and jaw stretch reflexes were recorded at baseline and 1, 2, 3 and 24 h post-injection. The sensitivity to injections of glutamate into the masseter muscle (1 M, 0.2 ml) was assessed after 24 h. ANOVAs were used to assess significant differences. NGF did not cause more pain than isotonic saline, but significantly reduced PPTs 1, 2, 3 and 24 h post-injection (P affected by the NGF-induced sensitization; however, after glutamate injection a significant increase in the stretch reflex was observed in the injected masseter muscle in both sessions (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the perceived pain intensity of the glutamate injection between the masseter muscle pretreated with NGF or control (P > 0.414), although the glutamate-evoked pain drawing areas were larger for the NGF-pretreated masseter muscle (P = 0.009). In conclusion, this study confirms that masseter muscle injection of

  3. Postural muscle atrophy prevention and recovery and bone remodelling through high frequency proprioception for astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Rossitto, Franco; Battocchio, Luciano

    2009-09-01

    The difficulty in applying active exercises during space flights increases the importance of passive countermeasures, but coupling load and instability remains indispensable for generating high frequency (HF) proprioceptive flows and preventing muscle atrophy and osteoporosis. The present study, in microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight, verified whether an electronic system, composed of a rocking board, a postural reader and a bungee-cord loading apparatus creates HF postural instability comparable to that reachable on the Earth. Tracking the subject, in single stance, to real-time visual signals is necessary to obtain HF instability situations. The bungee-cord loading apparatus allowed the subject to manage the 81.5% body weight load (100% could easily be exceeded). A preliminary training programme schedule on the Earth and in space is suggested. Comparison with a pathological muscle atrophy is presented. The possibility of generating HF proprioceptive flows could complement current countermeasures for the prevention and recovery of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis in terrestrial and space environments. These exercises combine massive activation of spindles and joint receptors, applying simultaneously HF variations of pressure to different areas of the sole of the foot. This class of exercises could improve the effectiveness of current countermeasures, reducing working time and fatigue.

  4. Extraocular Muscles Tension, Tonus, and Proprioception in Infantile Strabismus: Role of the Oculomotor System in the Pathogenesis of Infantile Strabismus—Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Schiavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role played by the extraocular muscles (EOMs in the etiology of concomitant infantile strabismus is still debated and it has not yet definitively established if the sensory anomalies in concomitant strabismus are a consequence or a primary cause of the deviation. The commonest theory supposes that most strabismus results from abnormal innervation of the EOMs, but the cause of this dysfunction and its origin, whether central or peripheral, are still unknown. The interaction between sensory factors and innervational factors, that is, esotonus, accommodation, convergence, divergence, and vestibular reflexes in visually immature infants with family predisposition, is suspected to create conditions that prevent binocular alignment from stabilizing and strengthening. Some role in the onset of fixation instability and infantile strabismus could be played by the feedback control of eye movements and by dysfunction of eye muscle proprioception during the critical period of development of the visual sensory system. A possible role in the onset, maintenance, or worsening of the deviation of abnormalities of muscle force which have their clinical equivalent in eye muscle overaction and underaction has been investigated under either isometric or isotonic conditions, and in essence no significant anomalies of muscle force have been found in concomitant strabismus.

  5. The effect of a combined strength and proprioceptive training on muscle strength and postural balance in boys with intellectual disability: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachouri, Hiba; Borji, Rihab; Baccouch, Rym; Laatar, Rabeb; Rebai, Haithem; Sahli, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of a combined strength and proprioception training (CSPT) program on muscle strength and postural balance in children with intellectual disability (ID). The maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and postural parameters (CoPVm, CoPLX, CoPLY) of 20 children with ID were recorded before and after 8 weeks of a CSPT program. The participants were divided into two groups: an experimental group who attended a CSPT program and a control group who continued with daily activities. In the trained group, the MVC increased significantly (ptraining period and the postural parameters decreased significantly in Double-Leg Stance (DLS) and One-Leg Stance (OLS) during the firm surface condition as well as in the DLS during the foam surface condition; in both eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. A CSPT program improves postural balance in children with ID could be due to the enhancement in muscle strength and proprioceptive input integration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of proprioceptive afferents in the control of respiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Euler, C

    1973-01-01

    Building largely on the results of previous studies of motor control in respiration the role of proprioceptive control of respiratory movements is discussed with particular reference to the significance of the following points: (i) The co-activation of fusimotor and alpha motoneurons in load compensation and in the control of velocity and force of the respiratory movements. (ii) The convergence onto the same intercostal spindle of fusimotor fibres for respiratory movements and for postural activity. (iii) The difference between proprioceptive control of intercostal muscles on the one hand and the diaphragm on the other, and of the control of the phrenic motoneuron pool exerted by intercostal proprioceptors. (iv) The cerebellar control both of the fusimotor-alpha balance between the indirect drive of the intercostal motoneurons and of the responsiveness of the phrenic motoneuron pool to respiratory and reflex influences. (v) Results suggesting spinobulbar reflex effects on the control of rate and depth of respiration from muscle and joint receptors of the thoracic wall.

  7. The effect of motor imagery training for trunk movements on trunk muscle control and proprioception in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Sik; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of motor imagery training for trunk movements on trunk muscle control and proprioception in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 12 study subjects were randomly assigned to the experimental group (a motor imagery training group) and the control group (a neurodevelopmental treatment, NDT) group. The two groups were treated five times (30 minutes each time) per week for 4 weeks. The experimental group underwent imagery training for 10 minutes and trunk control centered NDT for 20 minutes and the control group underwent only trunk control centered NDT for 30 minutes. The trunk muscle activity and the position sense of the subjects were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The two groups showed significant improvements in muscle activity after the intervention. Only the experimental group showed significant improvements in proprioception. The experimental group showed significant improvements in the variations of muscle activity and proprioception compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Motor imagery training for trunk movements can be effectively used to improve trunk muscle activity and proprioception in stroke patients.

  8. Atrophy/hypertrophy cell signaling in muscles of young athletes trained with vibrational-proprioceptive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Helmut; Pelosi, Laura; Coletto, Luisa; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Vogelauer, Michael; Trimmel, Lukas; Cvecka, Jan; Hamar, Dusan; Kovarik, Josef; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Protasi, Feliciano; Adami, Nicoletta; Biral, Donatella; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo

    2011-12-01

    To compare the effects of isokinetic (ISO-K) and vibrational-proprioceptive (VIB) trainings on muscle mass and strength. In 29 ISO-K- or VIB-trained young athletes we evaluated: force, muscle fiber morphometry, and gene expression of muscle atrophy/hypertrophy cell signaling. VIB training increased the maximal isometric unilateral leg extension force by 48·1%. ISO-K training improved the force by 24·8%. Both improvements were statistically significant (P⩿0·01). The more functional effectiveness of the VIB training in comparison with the ISO-K training was shown by the statistical significance changes only in VIB group in: rate of force development in time segment 0-50 ms (Pmuscle fibers (-3%, not significant). No neural cell adhesion molecule-positive (N-CAM(+)) and embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive (MHC-emb(+)) myofibers were detected. VIB induced a significant twofold increase (Pmuscle isoform insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) Ec mRNA. Atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1) did not change, but myostatin was strongly downregulated after VIB training (Pmuscle damage. Only VIB-trained group showed statistical significance increase of hypertrophy cell signaling pathways (IGF-1Ec and PGC-1α upregulation, and myostatin downregulation) leading to hypertrophy of fast twitch muscle fibers.

  9. Cortico-muscular synchronization by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles during isometric tongue protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Mima, Tatsuya; Yazawa, Shogo; Matsuhashi, Masao; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Tongue movements contribute to oral functions including swallowing, vocalizing, and breathing. Fine tongue movements are regulated through efferent and afferent connections between the cortex and tongue. It has been demonstrated that cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) is reflected at two frequency bands during isometric tongue protrusions: the beta (β) band at 15-35Hz and the low-frequency band at 2-10Hz. The CMC at the β band (β-CMC) reflects motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the tongue muscles through hypoglossal motoneuron pools. However, the generator mechanism of the CMC at the low-frequency band (low-CMC) remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of low-CMC during isometric tongue protrusion using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) were also recorded following electrical tongue stimulation. Significant low-CMC and β-CMC were observed over both hemispheres for each side of the tongue. Time-domain analysis showed that the MEG signal followed the electromyography signal for low-CMC, which was contrary to the finding that the MEG signal preceded the electromyography signal for β-CMC. The mean conduction time from the tongue to the cortex was not significantly different between the low-CMC (mean, 80.9ms) and SEFs (mean, 71.1ms). The cortical sources of low-CMC were located significantly posterior (mean, 10.1mm) to the sources of β-CMC in M1, but were in the same area as tongue SEFs in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). These results reveal that the low-CMC may be driven by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles to S1, and that the oscillatory interaction was derived from each side of the tongue to both hemispheres. Oscillatory proprioceptive feedback from the tongue muscles may aid in the coordination of sophisticated tongue movements in humans.

  10. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  11. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus.

  12. Refined distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres in Mueller's muscle as the mechanoreceptors to induce involuntary reflexive contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Chihiro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2009-11-01

    Stretching of mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle induces reflexive contraction of not only the levator muscle but also the frontalis muscle as two different eyelid-opening muscles. Previously, we reported that fine neural myelinated structures, acting as mechanoreceptors, were found in the proximal Mueller's muscle. Since there is a risk of misunderstanding that the middle and distal Mueller's muscle does not contain mechanoreceptors and can be invalidated or resected, the accurate distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres as mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle was refined horizontally in this study. We explored 10 whole Mueller's muscles between the levator muscle and the tarsus of the upper eyelids obtained from five Japanese cadavers. The specimens were serially sliced along the horizontal plane and stained with HE, S-100 protein to determine the presence of Schwann cells, and smooth muscle actin antibody to determine the presence of Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. Although all myelinated nerve fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues among the sympathetically innervated Mueller's multi-unit smooth muscle fibres may not correspond to the proprioceptive nerve fibres, the nerve bundles consisting of multiple myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the proximal Mueller's muscle, and single myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the middle and distal Mueller's muscle. We believe that the mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle consist of myelinated proprioceptive nerve fibres with nerve endings possibly attached to collagen fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues present among Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. As the myelinated nerve fibres innervate the middle and distal Mueller's muscle to a greater extent than those in the proximal Mueller's muscle, the former may be more important as mechanoreceptors than the latter and should not be invalidated or excised during surgery for treatment of blepharoptosis to

  13. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy (-110 °C) on proprioception and indices of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, J T; Algar, L A; Donnelly, A E

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on proprioceptive function, muscle force recovery following eccentric muscle contractions and tympanic temperature (T(TY) ). Thirty-six subjects were randomly assigned to a group receiving two 3-min treatments of -110 ± 3 °C or 15 ± 3 °C. Knee joint position sense (JPS), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the knee extensors, force proprioception and T(TY) were recorded before, immediately after the exposure and again 15 min later. A convenience sample of 18 subjects also underwent an eccentric exercise protocol on their contralateral left leg 24 h before exposure. MVIC (left knee), peak power output (PPO) during a repeated sprint on a cycle ergometer and muscles soreness were measured pre-, 24, 48 and 72h post-treatment. WBC reduced T(TY) , by 0.3 °C, when compared with the control group (Pproprioception was not affected. Similarly, WBC did not effect MVIC, PPO or muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. WBC, administered 24 h after eccentric exercise, is ineffective in alleviating muscle soreness or enhancing muscle force recovery. The results of this study also indicate no increased risk of proprioceptive-related injury following WBC.

  14. Effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance and head alignment in stroke patients with neglect syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si-Eun; Min, Kyung-Ok; Lee, Sang-Bin; Choi, Wan-Suk; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups: the eye movements (EM) group; and the PNF with eye movements (PEM) group. The program was conducted five times each week for 6 weeks. Balance (both static and dynamic) and head alignment (craniovertebral angle and cranial rotation angle) were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurements of static balance, the EM group showed significant improvement in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not when examined in the eyes-closed condition. The PEM group showed significant improvement when examined under both conditions. In the assessment of dynamic balance, both groups showed significant improvement in measurements of sway areas. With respect to head alignment, there were no significant differences pre- and post-testing in either the craniovertebral angle or the cranial rotation angle in the EM group, but the PEM group showed significant differences in both measurements. [Conclusion] These results suggest that in stroke patients with neglect syndrome, PNF with eye movements, rather than eye movements alone, has a greater positive effect on balance and head alignment.

  15. Clinical measurements of proprioception, muscle strength and laxity in relation to function in the ACL-injured knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D; Ageberg, E; Andersson, G; Fridén, T

    2007-01-01

    A knee injury with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture may cause deficits in proprioception, increased laxity and decreased muscle strength. Although it may be common knowledge that these factors affect knee function, only a few studies have been performed where this has been investigated in the clinical situation, and the results are not conclusive. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate how and to what extent proprioception, laxity and strength affect knee joint function and evaluate if the methods commonly used for estimating these factors clinically seem to be relevant. The study encompassed 36 patients with ACL deficiency. A single-leg hop test for distance and subjective rating of knee function were defined as dependent variables and analyzed separately in stepwise linear regression models where proprioception, knee joint laxity, hamstrings and quadriceps strength, age and sex were defined as independent variables. Higher threshold values (poorer proprioception), increased side-to-side difference of anterior laxity and poorer strength significantly predicted shorter length of the hop test. Higher rating of subjective function corresponded to female gender, lesser side-to-side difference of anterior laxity and better proprioception.

  16. Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, A; Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2014-06-15

    These experiments on the human forearm are based on the hypothesis that drift in the perceived position of a limb over time can be explained by receptor adaptation. Limb position sense was measured in 39 blindfolded subjects using a forearm-matching task. A property of muscle, its thixotropy, a contraction history-dependent passive stiffness, was exploited to place muscle receptors of elbow muscles in a defined state. After the arm had been held flexed and elbow flexors contracted, we observed time-dependent changes in the perceived position of the reference arm by an average of 2.8° in the direction of elbow flexion over 30 s (Experiment 1). The direction of the drift reversed after the arm had been extended and elbow extensors contracted, with a mean shift of 3.5° over 30 s in the direction of elbow extension (Experiment 2). The time-dependent changes could be abolished by conditioning elbow flexors and extensors in the reference arm at the test angle, although this led to large position errors during matching (±10°), depending on how the indicator arm had been conditioned (Experiments 3 and 4). When slack was introduced in the elbow muscles of both arms, by shortening muscles after the conditioning contraction, matching errors became small and there was no drift in position sense (Experiments 5 and 6). These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms.

  17. Lower-limb proprioceptive awareness in professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Adam W; Riley, Michael A; Shockley, Kevin; Sitton, Candace A; Hewett, Timothy E; Cummins-Sebree, Sarah; Haas, Jacqui G

    2013-09-01

    Enhanced proprioceptive feedback strengthens synergistic muscle groups and stabilizes the coordination of limbs, thus contributing to the movement efficiency of ballet dancers. The present study compared lower-limb proprioceptive awareness in professional ballet dancers to matched controls who had no dance training. Two assessment methods were used to test the hypothesis that ballet dancers would demonstrate increased proprioceptive awareness in the ankle, knee, and hip: 1. a joint-position matching task to assess static proprioceptive joint awareness, and 2. an eyes-closed, quiet standing task to assess both static and dynamic proprioceptive awareness through measures of center of pressure (COP) variability. Results of the matching task indicated that the dancers exhibited greater proprioceptive awareness than controls for all three joints (p 0.05), whereas controls were less aware of their ankle position compared to their knee and hip joints (p 0.05). This indicates that quiet stance may have limited value as a means for evaluating proprioception. These findings provide preliminary evidence that enhanced proprioceptive awareness of lower limb joints should be considered as an evaluative criterion for dancers' ability to learn complex ballet skills. They also indicate that quiet standing tasks may not provide sufficient challenge for dancers' enhanced proprioceptive awareness to manifest.

  18. The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    McGRATH, RYAN P.; James R. Whitehead; CAINE, DENNIS J.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the scientific community believed that post-exercise stretching could reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but recent reviews of studies on the topic have concluded that pre- or post-exercise static stretching has no effect on mitigating DOMS. However, the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) post-exercise stretching on preventing DOMS has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of post-exercise PNF stretc...

  19. The effects of ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercise programs accompanied by functional electrical stimulation on stroke patients' balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Kyou Sik

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercises accompanied by functional electrical stimulation on stroke patients' balance ability. [Methods] For six weeks beginning in April 2015, 22 stroke patients receiving physical therapy at K Hospital located in Gyeonggi-do were divided into a functional electrical stimulation (FES), ankle proprioceptive exercise and ankle joint muscle strengthening exercise group (FPS group) of 11 patients and an FES and stretching exercise group (FS group) of 11 patients. The stimulation and exercises were conducted for 30 min per day, five days per week for six weeks. Balance ability was measured using a BioRescue and the Berg balance scale, functional reach test, and the timed up-and-go test were also used as clinical evaluation indices. Repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to examine differences between before the exercises and at three and six weeks after beginning the exercises within each group, and the amounts of change between the two groups were compared. [Results] In the comparison within each group, both groups showed significant differences between before and after the experiment in all the tests and comparison between the groups showed that greater improvement was seen in all values in the FPS group. [Conclusion] In the present study, implementing FES and stretching exercises plus ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercises was more effective at improving stroke patients balance ability than implementing only FES and stretching exercises.

  20. Proprioceptive accuracy in women with early and established knee osteoarthritis and its relation to functional ability, postural control, and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Isabel A C; Mahmoudian, Armaghan; Nieuwenhuys, Angela; Jonkers, Ilse; Staes, Filip; Luyten, Frank P; Truijen, Steven; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify differences in knee proprioceptive accuracy between subjects with early knee osteoarthritis (OA), established knee OA, and healthy controls. Furthermore, the relation between proprioceptive accuracy on the one hand and functional ability, postural balance, and muscle strength on the other hand was also explored. New MRI-based classification criteria showing evidence of beginning joint degeneration have been used to identify subjects with early knee OA. A total of 45 women with knee OA (early OA, n = 21; established OA, n = 24) and 20 healthy female control subjects participated in the study. Proprioceptive accuracy was evaluated using the repositioning error of a knee joint position sense test using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Subjective and objective functional ability was assessed by the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score, the timed "Up & Go" test, and the stair climbing test. The sensory organization test measured postural control. Muscle strength was measured by isokinetic dynamometry. Early OA subjects showed no significant differences in proprioceptive accuracy compared to healthy controls. In contrast, established OA subjects showed a higher repositioning error compared to early OA subjects (+29 %, P = 0.033) and healthy controls (+25 %, P = 0.068). Proprioceptive accuracy was not significantly associated with functional ability, postural balance, and muscle strength. Knee joint proprioceptive deficits were observed in established OA but not in early OA, suggesting that impaired proprioception is most likely a consequence of structural degeneration, rather than a risk factor in the pathogenesis of knee OA. Impaired proprioceptive accuracy was not associated with disease-related functionality in knee OA patients. Treatment strategies designed to address proprioceptive deficits may be not effective in prevention of knee OA progression and may have no impact on patients

  1. The cortical eye proprioceptive signal modulates neural activity in higher-order visual cortex as predicted by the variation in visual sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Siebner, Hartwig R; Paulson, Olaf B

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the links between eye movements and the shifts in visual attention are well established, less is known about how eye position affects the prioritization of visual space. It was recently observed that visual sensitivity varies with the direction of gaze and the level of excitability...... in the eye proprioceptive representation in human left somatosensory cortex (S1(EYE)), so that after 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over S1(EYE), targets presented nearer the center of the orbit are detected more accurately. Here we used whole-brain functional magnetic resonance...... target when the right eye was rotated leftwards as compared with when it was rotated rightwards. This effect was larger after S1(EYE)-rTMS than after rTMS of a control area in the motor cortex. The neural response to retinally identical stimuli in this area could be predicted from the changes in visual...

  2. Spatiotemporal Profiles of Proprioception Processed by the Masseter Muscle Spindles in Rat Cerebral Cortex: An Optical Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Kaneko, Mari; Nakamura, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Muscle spindles in the jaw-closing muscles, which are innervated by trigeminal mesencephalic neurons (MesV neurons), control the strength of occlusion and the position of the mandible. The mechanisms underlying cortical processing of proprioceptive information are critical to understanding how sensory information from the masticatory muscles regulates orofacial motor function. However, these mechanisms are mostly unknown. The present study aimed to identify the regions that process proprioception of the jaw-closing muscles using in vivo optical imaging with a voltage-sensitive dye in rats under urethane anesthesia. First, jaw opening that was produced by mechanically pulling down the mandible evoked an optical response, which reflects neural excitation, in two cortical regions: the most rostroventral part of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and the border between the ventral part of the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) and the insular oral region (IOR). The kinetics of the optical signal, including the latency, amplitude, rise time, decay time and half duration, in the S1 region for the response with the largest amplitude were comparable to those in the region with the largest response in S2/IOR. Second, we visualized the regions responding to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, which activates both motor efferent fibers and somatosensory afferent fibers, including those that transmit nociceptive and proprioceptive information. Masseter nerve stimulation initially excited the rostral part of the S2/IOR region, and an adjacent region responded to jaw opening. The caudal part of the region showing the maximum response overlapped with the region responding to jaw opening, whereas the rostral part overlapped with the region responding to electrical stimulation of the maxillary and mandibular molar pulps. These findings suggest that proprioception of the masseter is processed in S1 and S2/IOR. Other sensory information, such as nociception, is

  3. Comparison of Balance, Proprioception and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Total Hip Replacement Patients With and Without Fracture: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there was a difference in balance, proprioception, and skeletal muscle mass among patients who undergo hip fracture surgery relative to and elective total hip replacement (THR). Methods Thirty-one THR patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups: fracture group (n=15) and non-fracture group (n=16). Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was used to balance the proprioception of the hip joint while a joint position sense (JPS) test was used to evaluate it. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed using a 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). All tests were assessed at 3 months after the surgery. An independent t-test was used to compare the fracture group and non-fracture group. Spearman correlation was used to identify the correlation of each variable. Results In an independent t-test, the BBS score of patients undergoing elective surgery was higher than the BBS score of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. There was a significant correlation between the BBS and JPS score after a THR. SMI also correlated with the score of BBS. Conclusion It seems that THR patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture might have more trouble balancing than elective THR patients. Therefore THR patients undergoing hip fracture surgery might need more care during rehabilitation. PMID:28119837

  4. Proprioception exercises in medical rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Stępień, Justyna

    2013-01-03

    Proprioception, or kinesthesia, is the sense of orientation responsible for perception of body and relative position of its parts. Kinaesthesia is received by receptors located in muscles and tendons. In this study a set of proprioception developing exercises was presented. Proprioception should be restored in case of musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. Proprioception training can also be used as a prophylaxis before starting various sporting activities. Proprioception developing exercises have significant meaning for the elderly, who are at risk of balance disorders. These exercises help developing motor memory and at the same time protect from falls.

  5. Leg muscle vibration modulates bodily self-consciousness: integration of proprioceptive, visual, and tactile signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluel, Estelle; Aspell, Jane Elizabeth; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Behavioral studies have used visuo-tactile conflicts between a participant's body and a visually presented fake or virtual body to investigate the importance of bodily perception for self-consciousness (bodily self-consciousness). Illusory self-identification with a fake body and changes in tactile processing--modulation of visuo-tactile cross-modal congruency effects (CCEs)--were reported in previous findings. Although proprioceptive signals are deemed important for bodily self-consciousness, their contribution to the representation of the full body has not been studied. Here we investigated whether and how self-identification and tactile processing (CCE magnitude) could be modified by altering proprioceptive signals with 80-Hz vibrations at the legs. Participants made elevation judgments of tactile cues (while ignoring nearby lights) during synchronous and asynchronous stroking of a seen fake body. We found that proprioceptive signals during vibrations altered the magnitude of self-identification and mislocalization of touch (CCE) in a synchrony-dependent fashion: we observed an increase of self-identification and CCE magnitude during asynchronous stroking. In a second control experiment we studied whether proprioceptive signals per se, or those from the lower limbs in particular, were essential for these changes. We applied vibrations at the upper limbs (which provide no information about the position of the participant's body in space) and in this case observed no modulation of bodily self-consciousness or tactile perception. These data link proprioceptive signals from the legs that are conveyed through the dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathway to bodily self-consciousness. We discuss their integration with bodily signals from vision and touch for full-body representations.

  6. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme P. T. Areas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elastic resistance bands (ERB combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. OBJECTIVES: The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. METHOD: Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10 or the control group (CG, n=10. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and inspiratory pressure (MIP were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. RESULTS: PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05. In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01 and ∆MEP (p=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength.

  7. A murine model of a novel surgical architecture for proprioceptive muscle feedback and its potential application to control of advanced limb prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clites, Tyler R.; Carty, Matthew J.; Srinivasan, Shriya; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Proprioceptive mechanisms play a critical role in both reflexive and volitional lower extremity control. Significant strides have been made in the development of bionic limbs that are capable of bi-directional communication with the peripheral nervous system, but none of these systems have been capable of providing physiologically-relevant muscle-based proprioceptive feedback through natural neural pathways. In this study, we present the agonist-antagonist myoneural interface (AMI), a surgical approach with the capacity to provide graded kinesthetic feedback from a prosthesis through mechanical activation of native mechanoreceptors within residual agonist-antagonist muscle pairs. Approach. (1) Sonomicrometery and electroneurography measurement systems were validated using a servo-based muscle tensioning system. (2) A heuristic controller was implemented to modulate functional electrical stimulation of an agonist muscle, using sonomicrometric measurements of stretch from a mechanically-coupled antagonist muscle as feedback. (3) One AMI was surgically constructed in the hindlimb of each rat. (4) The gastrocnemius-soleus complex of the rat was cycled through a series of ramp-and-hold stretches in two different muscle architectures: native (physiologically-intact) and AMI (modified). Integrated electroneurography from the tibial nerve was compared across the two architectures. Main results. Correlation between stretch and afferent signal demonstrated that the AMI is capable of provoking graded afferent signals in response to ramp-and-hold stretches, in a manner similar to the native muscle architecture. The response magnitude in the AMI was reduced when compared to the native architecture, likely due to lower stretch amplitudes. The closed-loop control system showed robustness at high stretch magnitudes, with some oscillation at low stretch magnitudes. Significance. These results indicate that the AMI has the potential to communicate meaningful kinesthetic

  8. The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGRATH, Ryan P; Whitehead, James R; Caine, Dennis J

    Until recently, the scientific community believed that post-exercise stretching could reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but recent reviews of studies on the topic have concluded that pre- or post-exercise static stretching has no effect on mitigating DOMS. However, the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) post-exercise stretching on preventing DOMS has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of post-exercise PNF stretching on DOMS. Young adult participants (N=57) were randomly assigned to a PNF stretching group (n=19), a static stretching group (n=20), and to a no-stretching control group (n=18). All participants completed exercise designed to induce DOMS prior to post-exercise experimental stretching protocols. Participants rated their soreness level on a pain scale 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. A 3 × 2 mixed ANOVA showed there was an effect for time (p<.01). Post hoc testing revealed that DOMS pain significantly decreased (p<.05) from 24 to 48 hours post-exercise for the PNF and control groups, but not for the static stretching group. Other analyses revealed a significant correlation (r=.61, p<.01) between the pre- and post-exercise stretch scores and the 48 hour post-exercise pain score for the PNF group. Consistent with the results of previous research on post-exercise static stretching, these results indicate that post-exercise PNF stretching also does not prevent DOMS. However, the correlation analysis suggests it is possible the pre-stretch muscle contractions of the post-exercise PNF protocol may have placed a load on an already damaged muscle causing more DOMS for some participants.

  9. Contrasting phenotypes of putative proprioceptive and nociceptive trigeminal neurons innervating jaw muscle in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Mark

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the clinical significance of muscle pain, and the extensive investigation of the properties of muscle afferent fibers, there has been little study of the ion channels on sensory neurons that innervate muscle. In this study, we have fluorescently tagged sensory neurons that innervate the masseter muscle, which is unique because cell bodies for its muscle spindles are in a brainstem nucleus (mesencephalic nucleus of the 5th cranial nerve, MeV while all its other sensory afferents are in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. We examine the hypothesis that certain molecules proposed to be used selectively by nociceptors fail to express on muscle spindles afferents but appear on other afferents from the same muscle. Results MeV muscle afferents perfectly fit expectations of cells with a non-nociceptive sensory modality: Opiates failed to inhibit calcium channel currents (ICa in 90% of MeV neurons, although ICa were inhibited by GABAB receptor activation. All MeV afferents had brief (1 msec action potentials driven solely by tetrodotoxin (TTX-sensitive Na channels and no MeV afferent expressed either of three ion channels (TRPV1, P2X3, and ASIC3 thought to be transducers for nociceptive stimuli, although they did express other ATP and acid-sensing channels. Trigeminal masseter afferents were much more diverse. Virtually all of them expressed at least one, and often several, of the three putative nociceptive transducer channels, but the mix varied from cell to cell. Calcium currents in 80% of the neurons were measurably inhibited by μ-opioids, but the extent of inhibition varied greatly. Almost all TG masseter afferents expressed some TTX-insensitive sodium currents, but the amount compared to TTX sensitive sodium current varied, as did the duration of action potentials. Conclusion Most masseter muscle afferents that are not muscle spindle afferents express molecules that are considered characteristic of nociceptors, but these

  10. Intraoperative length and tension curves of human eye muscles. Including stiffness in passive horizontal eye movement in awake volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G.H. Kolling (Gerold); H. Kaufmann (Herbert); B. van Dijk (Bob)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIntraoperative continuous-registration length and tension curves of attached and detached eye muscles were made in 18 strabismic patients under general anesthesia. For relaxed eye muscles, we found an exponential relation between length and tension. An increased stiffness was quantified

  11. Dynamic reconstruction of eye closure by muscle transposition or functional muscle transplantation in facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Manfred; Giovanoli, Pietro; Tzou, Chieh-Han John; Kropf, Nina; Friedl, Susanne

    2004-09-15

    For patients with facial palsy, lagophthalmus is often a more serious problem than the inability to smile. Dynamic reconstruction of eye closure by muscle transposition or by free functional muscle transplantation offers a good solution for regaining near-normal eye protection without the need for implants. This is the first quantitative study of three-dimensional preoperative and postoperative lid movements in patients treated for facial paralysis. Between February of 1998 and April of 2002, 44 patients were treated for facial palsy, including reconstruction of eye closure. Temporalis muscle transposition to the eye was used in 34 cases, and a regionally differentiated part of a free gracilis muscle transplant after double cross-face nerve grafting was used in 10 cases. Patients' facial movements were documented by a three-dimensional video analysis system preoperatively and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively. For this comparative study, only the data of patients with preoperative and 12-month postoperative measurements were included. In the 27 patients with a final result after temporalis muscle transposition for eye closure, the distance between the upper and lower eyelid points during eye closing (as for sleep) was reduced from 10.33 +/- 2.43 mm (mean +/- SD) preoperatively to 5.84 +/- 4.34 mm postoperatively on the paralyzed side, compared with 0.0 +/- 0.0 mm preoperatively and postoperatively on the contralateral healthy side. In the resting position, preoperative values for the paralyzed side changed from 15.11 +/- 1.92 mm preoperatively to 13.46 +/- 1.94 mm postoperatively, compared with 12.17 +/- 2.02 mm preoperatively and 12.05 +/- 1.95 mm postoperatively on the healthy side. In the nine patients with a final result after surgery using a part of the free gracilis muscle transplant reinnervated by a zygomatic branch of the contralateral healthy side through a cross-face nerve graft, eyelid closure changed from 10.21 +/- 2.72 mm to 1.68 +/- 1.35 mm

  12. Force-length recording of eye muscles during local-anesthesia surgery in 32 strabismus patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. Force-length recordings were made from isolated human eye muscles during strabismus surgery in local, eye-drop anesthesia in 32 adult patients. From each muscle three recordings were made: (1) while the patient looked with the other eye into the field of action of the recorded

  13. Collision and containment detection between biomechanically based eye muscle volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Sosa, Graciela; Kaltofen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Collision and containment detection between three-dimensional objects is a common requirement in simulation systems. However, few solutions exist when exclusively working with deformable bodies. In our ophthalmologic diagnostic software system, the extraocular eye muscles are represented by surface models, which have been reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. Those models are projected onto the muscle paths calculated by the system's biomechanical model. Due to this projection collisions occur. For their detection, three approaches have been implemented, which we present in this paper: one based on image-space techniques using OpenGL, one based on the Bullet physics library and one using an optimized space-array data structure together with software rendering. Finally, an outlook on a possible response to the detected collisions is given.

  14. Muscle fibre types in the external eye muscles of the pigeon, Columba livia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVean, A; Stelling, J; Rowlerson, A

    1987-10-01

    Fibre typing with antisera raised against specific myosin types from muscles of known physiological properties were used to characterise the fibre types within the oculorotatory muscles of pigeons. Fibres reacting strongly to antiserum anti-ALD (specific for tonic fibre myosin) were found lying along the global margin of the muscle and also in a layer lying immediately beneath a discrete band of fibres running along the orbital margin. These fibres resembled those of the skeletal muscle ALD in their type properties. Using another antiserum, anti-I, specific for slow twitch and to a lesser extent, slow tonic myosins, it was possible to identify another slow fibre type which formed the orbital layer and also lay scattered randomly through the body of the muscle. No equivalent to this type was found in the skeletal muscles ALD or iliofibularis. The remaining fibres which did not react with either anti-ALD or anti-I formed 58% of the fibre population and reacted with an antiserum specific for fast myosin. However, their response to alkali preincubation suggests that the fast fibres of eye muscles also contain a myosin which is different from those in skeletal muscle.

  15. Predictive modeling by the cerebellum improves proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H; Okamura, Allison M; Bastian, Amy J

    2013-09-04

    Because sensation is delayed, real-time movement control requires not just sensing, but also predicting limb position, a function hypothesized for the cerebellum. Such cerebellar predictions could contribute to perception of limb position (i.e., proprioception), particularly when a person actively moves the limb. Here we show that human cerebellar patients have proprioceptive deficits compared with controls during active movement, but not when the arm is moved passively. Furthermore, when healthy subjects move in a force field with unpredictable dynamics, they have active proprioceptive deficits similar to cerebellar patients. Therefore, muscle activity alone is likely insufficient to enhance proprioception and predictability (i.e., an internal model of the body and environment) is important for active movement to benefit proprioception. We conclude that cerebellar patients have an active proprioceptive deficit consistent with disrupted movement prediction rather than an inability to generally enhance peripheral proprioceptive signals during action and suggest that active proprioceptive deficits should be considered a fundamental cerebellar impairment of clinical importance.

  16. Novel retinal findings in an infant with muscle-eye-brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mehnaz; Hamid, Rizwan; Recchia, Franco M

    2012-01-01

    To describe novel retinal findings in an infant with muscle-eye-brain disease and suggest a novel mechanism for congenital retinal detachment. Case report. A 7-week-old, white, female infant presented with total retinal detachment, peripheral retinal avascularity, and neovascularization of the right eye. In the left eye, there was hypoplastic optic nerve, no identifiable foveal avascular zone, and a small area of avascularity in the temporal peripheral retina. Genetic testing ultimately confirmed the diagnosis of muscle-eye-brain disease, a disorder of aberrant neuronal migration. This case describes retinal findings that, to our knowledge, have not been reported in previous cases of muscle-eye-brain disease: peripheral avascularity, leading to retinal detachment in one eye, and foveal dysplasia. It is speculated that aberrant retinal vasculogenesis arose from disordered migration and patterning of retinal neurons.

  17. Minimally assistive robot training for proprioception enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Maura; Morasso, Pietro; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Giannoni, Psiche

    2009-04-01

    In stroke survivors, motor impairment is frequently associated with degraded proprioceptive and/or somatosensory functions. Here we address the question of how to use robots to improve proprioception in these patients. We used an 'assist-as-needed' protocol, in which robot assistance was kept to a minimum and was continuously adjusted during exercise. To specifically train proprioceptive functions, we alternated blocks of trials with and without vision. A total of nine chronic stroke survivors participated in the study, which consisted of a total of ten 1-h exercise sessions. We used a linear mixed-effects statistical model to account for the effects of exercise, vision and the degree of assistance on the overall performance, and to capture both the systematic effects and the individual variations. Although there was not always a complete recovery of autonomous movements, all subjects exhibited an increased amount of voluntary control. Moreover, training with closed eyes appeared to be beneficial for patients with abnormal proprioception. Our results indicate that training by alternating vision and no-vision blocks may improve the ability to use proprioception as well as the ability to integrate it with vision. We suggest that the approach may be useful in the more general case of motor skill acquisition, in which enhancing proprioception may improve the ability to physically interact with the external world.

  18. Cryotherapy impairs proprioception function?

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Nuno; Henriques, Sara

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cryotherapy application over a joint causes a nerve conduction velocity decrease and proprioceptive changes. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine if cryotherapy impairs proprioception acuity. METHODS: Proprioception was assessed by joint position sense (JPS), measured with an isokinetic dynamometer Biodex System 3, in twenty one females on experimental group, before 15 minutes cryotherapy (T0) and immediately after (T1). A control group (n=20) performed also the JPS...

  19. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...

  20. Effect of static and dynamic muscle stretching as part of warm up procedures on knee joint proprioception and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory S

    2017-10-01

    The importance of warm up procedures prior to athletic performance is well established. A common component of such procedures is muscle stretching. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of static stretching (SS) as part of warm up procedures on knee joint position sense (KJPS) and the effect of dynamic stretching (DS) on KJPS is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic and static stretching as part warm up procedures on KJPS and knee extension and flexion strength. This study had a randomised cross-over design and ten healthy adults (20±1years) attended 3 visits during which baseline KJPS, at target angles of 20° and 45°, and knee extension and flexion strength tests were followed by 15min of cycling and either a rest period (CON), SS, or DS and repeat KJPS and strength tests. All participants performed all conditions, one condition per visit. There were warm up×stretching type interactions for KJPS at 20° (p=0.024) and 45° (p=0.018), and knee flexion (p=0.002) and extension (pstretching is to be performed as part of a warm up, DS should be favoured over SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors affecting proprioceptive recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Mou-wang; GU Li; CHEN Ya-ping; YU Chang-long; AO Ying-fang; HUANG Hong-shi; YANG Yan-yan

    2008-01-01

    Background Proprioception plays an important role in knee movements.Since there are controversies surrounding the overall recovery time of proprioception following surgery,it is necessary to define the factors affecting proprioceptive recovery after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to investigate the relationship between proprioception and muscle strength.Methods A total of 36 patients who had their ACL reconstructed with a semitendinosus/gracilis graft (reconstructed group:6 months post-surgery) and 13 healthy adults without any knee injury (control group) were included in the study.Knee proprioception was evaluated with a passive reproduction test.Isokinetic strength was measured using the Biodex System.Statistical analysis was used to compare proprioception of the reconstructed group versus the control group,and to define causal factors,including sex,hamstring/quadriceps ratio,and the course of injury before reconstruction.We also investigated the correlation between the passive reproduction error and quadriceps index.Results There was a significant difference in proprioception between the reconstructed and control groups (P <0.05).When the course of injury before reconstruction was less than 4 months,there was a linear correlation with proprioception 6 months after the operation (r=0.713,P <0.05).There was a positive correlation between post-surgery proprioception and the quadriceps index at 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Impaired knee proprioception is observed 6 months after ACL reconstruction.Within 4 months of injury,early undertaking of reconstruction is associated with better proprioception outcome.Patients with enhanced proprioception have a better quadriceps index.

  2. Proprioceptive isokinetic exercise test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, P. T.; Bernauer, E. M.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Proprioception, the reception of stimuli within the body that indicates position, is an important mechanism for optimal human performance. People exposed to prolonged bed rest, microgravity, or other deconditioning situations usually experience reduced proprioceptor and kinesthetic stimuli that compromise body balance, posture, and equilibrium. A new proprioceptive test is described that utilizes the computer-driven LIDO isokinetic ergometer. An overview of the computer logic, software, and testing procedure for this proprioceptive test, which can be performed with the arms or legs, is described.

  3. Results of Frontalis Suspension Surgery in Eyes with Poor Levator Muscle Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Yaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the results of frontal suspension surgery with autologous fascia lata or silicon rod. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the results and the complications of frontalis suspension surgery performed in patients with levator muscle function ≤5 mm, who presented with the complaint of ptosis. In patients operated unilaterally, the success of the surgery was graded according the difference between eyelid heights: a difference of 2 mm was accepted as unsuccessful. In those who were operated bilaterally, the success of the surgery was graded according the upper eyelid level: an eyelid level 0-3 mm below the limbus was recorded as successful, >3 mm below the limbus with an open optic axis - satisfactory, and occluded axis was considered unsuccessful. Results: Seventeen eyes of 14 patients enrolled in the study. Silicon rod was used in 9 eyes and autogenous fascia lata was used in 8 eyes. Surgical outcome was recorded as successful in 9 eyes, as satisfactory in 4 eyes and as unsuccessful in 4 eyes. In eyes with unsuccessful outcome, revision surgery was performed within 10 days after surgery. Punctate keratopathy (5 eyes, lagophthalmos (1 eye, mild undercorrection in the temporal side of the eyelid (1 eye and severe upper eyelid edema (1 eye were recorded as complications. One patient who was operated with autologous fascia lata complained of leg pain in donor site and, in one patient, incision dehiscence needed to be repaired. Conclusion: Surgical success after primary and revision surgeries were rated as successful in 13 of 17 eyes (76.47% and as satisfactory in 4 of 17 eyes (23.53%. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2015; 53:36-40

  4. Artificial proprioceptive feedback for myoelectric control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistohl, Tobias; Joshi, Deepak; Ganesh, Gowrishankar; Jackson, Andrew; Nazarpour, Kianoush

    2015-05-01

    The typical control of myoelectric interfaces, whether in laboratory settings or real-life prosthetic applications, largely relies on visual feedback because proprioceptive signals from the controlling muscles are either not available or very noisy. We conducted a set of experiments to test whether artificial proprioceptive feedback, delivered noninvasively to another limb, can improve control of a two-dimensional myoelectrically-controlled computer interface. In these experiments, participants were required to reach a target with a visual cursor that was controlled by electromyogram signals recorded from muscles of the left hand, while they were provided with an additional proprioceptive feedback on their right arm by moving it with a robotic manipulandum. Provision of additional artificial proprioceptive feedback improved the angular accuracy of their movements when compared to using visual feedback alone but did not increase the overall accuracy quantified with the average distance between the cursor and the target. The advantages conferred by proprioception were present only when the proprioceptive feedback had similar orientation to the visual feedback in the task space and not when it was mirrored, demonstrating the importance of congruency in feedback modalities for multi-sensory integration. Our results reveal the ability of the human motor system to learn new inter-limb sensory-motor associations; the motor system can utilize task-related sensory feedback, even when it is available on a limb distinct from the one being actuated. In addition, the proposed task structure provides a flexible test paradigm by which the effectiveness of various sensory feedback and multi-sensory integration for myoelectric prosthesis control can be evaluated.

  5. Design and Kinematic Analysis of a Novel Humanoid Robot Eye Using Pneumatic Artificial Muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan-yin Wang; Yang Zhang; Xiao-jie Fu; Gui-shan Xiang

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel humanoid robot eye, which is driven by six Pneumatic Artificial Muscles (PAMs) and rotates with 3 Degree of Freedom (DOF). The design of the mechanism and motion type of the robot eye are inspired by that of human eyes. The model of humanoid robot eye is established as a parallel mechanism, and the inverse-kinematic problem of this flexible tendons driving parallel system is solved by the analytical geometry method. As an extension, the simulation result for saccadic movement is presented under three conditions. The design and kinematic analysis of the prototype could be a sig nificant step towards the goal of building an autonomous humanoid robot eye with the movement and especially the visual functions similar to that of human.

  6. Anchoring the "floating arm": Use of proprioceptive and mirror visual feedback from one arm to control involuntary displacement of the other arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, C; Guerraz, M

    2015-12-01

    Arm movement control takes advantage of multiple inputs, including those originating from the contralateral arm. In the mirror paradigm, it has been suggested that control of the unseen arm, hidden by the mirror, is facilitated by the reflection of the other, moving arm. Although proprioceptive feedback originating from the moving arm, (the image of which is reflected in the mirror), is always coupled with visual feedback in the mirror paradigm, the former has received little attention. We recently showed that the involuntary arm movement following a sustained, isometric contraction, known as the "floating arm" or "Kohnstamm phenomenon", was adjusted to the passive-motorized displacement of the other arm. However, provision of mirror feedback, that is, the reflection in the mirror of the passively moved arm, did not add to this coupling effect. Therefore, the interlimb coupling in the mirror paradigm may to a large extent have a proprioceptive origin rather than a visual origin. The objective of the present study was to decouple mirror feedback and proprioceptive feedback from the reflected, moving arm and evaluate their respective contributions to interlimb coupling in the mirror paradigm. First (in Experiment 1, under eyes-closed conditions), we found that masking the proprioceptive afferents of the passively moved arm (by co-vibrating the antagonistic biceps and triceps muscles) suppressed the interlimb coupling between involuntary displacement of one arm and passive displacement of the other. Next (in Experiment 2), we masked proprioceptive afferents of the passively moved arm and specifically evaluated mirror feedback. We found that interlimb coupling through mirror feedback (though significant) was weaker than interlimb coupling through proprioceptive feedback. Overall, the present results show that in the mirror paradigm, proprioceptive feedback is stronger and more consistent than visual-mirror feedback in terms of the impact on interlimb coupling.

  7. Studies of cytotoxic antibodies against eye muscle antigens in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.-G.; Hiromatsu, Y.; Salvi, M.; Triller, H.; Bernard, N.; Wall, J.R. (Thyroid Research Unit, The Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Medeiros-Neto, G.; Iacona, A.; Lima, N. (Thyroid Clinic, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the prevalence and significance of cytotoxic antibodies against human eye muscle cells, as detected in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (CMAC) in {sup 51}Cr release assays, in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A high prevalence of positive ADCC tests was found in all groups of patients with ophthalmopathy tested. Tests were positive in 64% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy from an area of severe iodine deficiency (Sao Paulo) and in 64% of such patients from an iodine replete area (Montreal). In patients with so-called ''euthyroid ophthalmopathy'', i.e. eye disease associated with thyroiditis, ADCC tests were positive in 75 and 38% of patients from the two areas, respectively, while tests were positive in 40 and 22%, respectively, of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism without evident eye disease. In normal subjects, levels of {sup 51}Cr release was always at background levels. In a group of patients from the high-iodine area, levels of antibodies in ADCC correlated positively with the intraocular pressure (mmHg) in primary position as a parameter of eye muscle dysfunction. In patients with ophthalmopathy, positive ADCC tests were assciated with antibodies to eye muscle membrane antigens of 55,65 and 95 kD as detected by immunoblotting, although the correlation was not close for any antigen. in contrast, CMAC tests were negative in all patients with ophthalmopathy. We also tested 9 mouse and 10 human monoclonal antibodies, reactive with orbital antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for cytotoxic activity, in ADCC and CMAC, against eye muscle and thyroid cells. All monoclonal antibodies were of the IgM class and negative in ADCC assays. (Abstract Truncated)

  8. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  9. Micro movements of the upper limb in fibromyalgia: The relation to proprioceptive accuracy and visual feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardal, Ellen Marie; Roeleveld, Karin; Ihlen, Espen; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual and proprioceptive feedback in upper limb posture control in fibromyalgia (FM) and to assess the coherence between acceleration measurements of upper limb micro movements and surface electromyography (sEMG) of shoulder muscle activity (upper trapezius and deltoid). Twenty-five female FM patients and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) performed three precision motor tasks: (1) maintain a steady shoulder abduction angle of 45° while receiving visual feedback about upper arm position and supporting external loads (0.5, 1, or 2kg), (2) maintain the same shoulder abduction angle without visual feedback (eyes closed) and no external loading, and (3) a joint position sense test (i.e., assessment of proprioceptive accuracy). Patients had more extensive increase in movement variance than HCs when visual feedback was removed (PProprioceptive accuracy was related to movement variance in HCs (R⩾0.59, P⩽0.002), but not in patients (R⩽0.25, P⩾0.24). There was no difference between patients and HCs in coherence between sEMG and acceleration data. These results may indicate that FM patients are more dependent on visual feedback and less reliant on proprioceptive information for upper limb posture control compared to HCs.

  10. Muscle fibre types in the external eye muscles of the pigeon, Columba livia.

    OpenAIRE

    McVean, A; Stelling, J; Rowlerson, A.

    1987-01-01

    Fibre typing with antisera raised against specific myosin types from muscles of known physiological properties were used to characterise the fibre types within the oculorotatory muscles of pigeons. Fibres reacting strongly to antiserum anti-ALD (specific for tonic fibre myosin) were found lying along the global margin of the muscle and also in a layer lying immediately beneath a discrete band of fibres running along the orbital margin. These fibres resembled those of the skeletal muscle ALD i...

  11. Shaping motor cortex plasticity through proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzino, Laura; Pelosin, Elisa; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bassolino, Michela; Pozzo, Thierry; Bove, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Short-term upper limb disuse induces a hemispheric unbalance between the primary motor cortices (M1s). However, it is still unclear whether these changes are mainly attributable to the absence of voluntary movements or to the reduction of proprioceptive information. The goal of this work was to investigate the role of proprioception in modulating hemispheric balance during a short-term right arm immobilization. We evaluated the 2 M1s excitability and the interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) between M1s in 3 groups of healthy subjects. Two groups received during the immobilization a proprioceptive (P-VIB, 80 Hz) and tactile (T-VIB, 30 Hz) vibration to the right hand, respectively. Another group did not receive any conditioning sensory inputs (No-VIB). We found that in the No-VIB and in the T-VIB groups immobilization induced a decrease of left M1 excitability and IHI from left to right hemisphere and an increase of right M1 excitability and IHI from right to left hemisphere. Differently, only a partial decrease in left M1 excitability, no change in right M1 excitability and in IHI was observed in the P-VIB group. Our findings demonstrate that the maintenance of dynamic proprioceptive inputs in an immobilized arm through muscle vibration can prevent the hemispheric unbalance induced by short-term limb disuse.

  12. Dynamic Imaging of the Eye, Optic Nerve, and Extraocular Muscles With Golden Angle Radial MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Saikat; Smith, David S; Smith, Alex K; Welch, E Brian; Smith, Seth A

    2017-08-01

    The eye and its accessory structures, the optic nerve and the extraocular muscles, form a complex dynamic system. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of this system in motion can have substantial benefits in understanding oculomotor functioning in health and disease, but has been restricted to date to imaging of static gazes only. The purpose of this work was to develop a technique to image the eye and its accessory visual structures in motion. Dynamic imaging of the eye was developed on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner, based on a golden angle radial sequence that allows freely selectable frame-rate and temporal-span image reconstructions from the same acquired data set. Retrospective image reconstructions at a chosen frame rate of 57 ms per image yielded high-quality in vivo movies of various eye motion tasks performed in the scanner. Motion analysis was performed for a left-right version task where motion paths, lengths, and strains/globe angle of the medial and lateral extraocular muscles and the optic nerves were estimated. Offline image reconstructions resulted in dynamic images of bilateral visual structures of healthy adults in only ∼15-s imaging time. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the motion enabled estimation of trajectories, lengths, and strains on the optic nerves and extraocular muscles at very high frame rates of ∼18 frames/s. This work presents an MRI technique that enables high-frame-rate dynamic imaging of the eyes and orbital structures. The presented sequence has the potential to be used in furthering the understanding of oculomotor mechanics in vivo, both in health and disease.

  13. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities.

  14. Piezo2 is the principal mechanotransduction channel for proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung-Hyun; Lukacs, Viktor; de Nooij, Joriene C; Zaytseva, Dasha; Criddle, Connor R; Francisco, Allain; Jessell, Thomas M; Wilkinson, Katherine A; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-12-01

    Proprioception, the perception of body and limb position, is mediated by proprioceptors, specialized mechanosensory neurons that convey information about the stretch and tension experienced by muscles, tendons, skin and joints. In mammals, the molecular identity of the stretch-sensitive channel that mediates proprioception is unknown. We found that the mechanically activated nonselective cation channel Piezo2 was expressed in sensory endings of proprioceptors innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs in mice. Two independent mouse lines that lack Piezo2 in proprioceptive neurons showed severely uncoordinated body movements and abnormal limb positions. Moreover, the mechanosensitivity of parvalbumin-expressing neurons that predominantly mark proprioceptors was dependent on Piezo2 expression in vitro, and the stretch-induced firing of proprioceptors in muscle-nerve recordings was markedly reduced in Piezo2-deficient mice. Together, our results indicate that Piezo2 is the major mechanotransducer of mammalian proprioceptors.

  15. Extraocular muscle afferent signals modulate visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balslev, Daniela; Newman, William; Knox, Paul C

    2012-10-09

    Extraocular muscle afferent signals contribute to oculomotor control and visual localization. Prompted by the close links between the oculomotor and attention systems, it was investigated whether these proprioceptive signals also modulated the allocation of attention in space. A suction sclera contact lens was used to impose an eye rotation on the nonviewing, dominant eye. With their viewing, nondominant eye, participants (n = 4) fixated centrally and detected targets presented at 5° in the left or right visual hemifield. The position of the viewing eye was monitored throughout the experiment. As a control, visual localization was tested using finger pointing without visual feedback of the hand, whereas the nonviewing eye remained deviated. The sustained passive rotation of the occluded, dominant eye, while the other eye maintained central fixation, resulted in a lateralized change in the detectability of visual targets. In all participants, the advantage in speed and accuracy for detecting right versus left hemifield targets that occurred during a sustained rightward eye rotation of the dominant eye was reduced or reversed by a leftward eye rotation. The control experiment confirmed that the eye deviation procedure caused pointing errors consistent with an approximately 2° shift in perceived eye position, in the direction of rotation of the nonviewing eye. With the caveat of the small number of participants, these results suggest that extraocular muscle afferent signals modulate the deployment of attention in visual space.

  16. Modeling movement disorders¿CRPS-related dystonia explained by abnormal proprioceptive reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, W.; Munts, A.G.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Humans control their movements using adaptive proprioceptive feedback from muscle afferents. The interaction between proprioceptive reflexes and biomechanical properties of the limb is essential in understanding the etiology of movement disorders. A non-linear neuromuscular model of the wrist incorp

  17. Neck proprioceptive training for balance function in patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Oh, Duck-Won

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neck proprioceptive training on the balance of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Three patients with chronic stroke were recruited for this study. [Methods] The subjects underwent neck proprioceptive training using the red light of a laser pointer (30 min daily, five times per week for 4 weeks). Outcome measures included the stability and weight distribution indices measured with a Tetrax system and Timed Up and Go (TUG) and proprioception tests. [Results] For all subjects, the stability and weight distribution indices increased by 1.87-9.66% in the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions, and the TUG and proprioception test scores improved by 2.49-15.27%. [Conclusion] Neck proprioceptive training may be a good option for improving the balance function of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis.

  18. Loop myopexy with true muscle transplantation for very large angle heavy eye syndrome patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Jethani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man presenting with complaints of squint for last 20 years. His visual acuity was 20/400 in right eye (RE and 20/30 in left eye (LE with glasses. His refraction was RE -16.75/-2.5 D cycl 180 and LE was -14.5/-1.5 D cycl 180. His axial length was 31.23 mm In RE and 29.72 mm in LE. On examination we found he had RE large esotropia with hypotropia measuring 130 pd base out and 40 pd base up in RE. A computerized tomography scan revealed that the superior rectus (SR was shifted nasally, and lateral rectus (LR was shifted inferiorly. A RE medial rectus (MR recession and LR resection with muscle transplantation on the MR was done. A loop myopexy was done to correct the path of the LR and SR. The patient had only 18 pd eso and 20 pd hypo on follow-up after 3 months. Loop myopexy in conjunction with muscle transplantation is a safe and effective procedure for large angle esotropia associated with heavy eye syndrome.

  19. Proprioceptive changes impair balance control in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Janssens

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Balance deficits are identified as important risk factors for falling in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the specific use of proprioception, which is of primary importance during balance control, has not been studied in individuals with COPD. The objective was to determine the specific proprioceptive control strategy during postural balance in individuals with COPD and healthy controls, and to assess whether this was related to inspiratory muscle weakness. METHODS: Center of pressure displacement was determined in 20 individuals with COPD and 20 age/gender-matched controls during upright stance on an unstable support surface without vision. Ankle and back muscle vibration were applied to evaluate the relative contribution of different proprioceptive signals used in postural control. RESULTS: Individuals with COPD showed an increased anterior-posterior body sway during upright stance (p = 0.037. Compared to controls, individuals with COPD showed an increased posterior body sway during ankle muscle vibration (p = 0.047, decreased anterior body sway during back muscle vibration (p = 0.025, and increased posterior body sway during simultaneous ankle-muscle vibration (p = 0.002. Individuals with COPD with the weakest inspiratory muscles showed the greatest reliance on ankle muscle input when compared to the stronger individuals with COPD (p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with COPD, especially those with inspiratory muscle weakness, increased their reliance on ankle muscle proprioceptive signals and decreased their reliance on back muscle proprioceptive signals during balance control, resulting in a decreased postural stability compared to healthy controls. These proprioceptive changes may be due to an impaired postural contribution of the inspiratory muscles to trunk stability. Further research is required to determine whether interventions such as proprioceptive training and inspiratory muscle

  20. Eye muscle nerves and the ciliary ganglion of Malpolon monspessulana (Colubridae, Ophidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel R. Omar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Malpolon monspessulana, the nervus oculomotorius arises from the ventral side of the pars peduncularis mesencephali of the midbrain by a single root. It runs closely applied to both the nervus abducens and the ramus nasalis of the nervus trigeminus. These nerves together with the nervus trochlearis leave the cranial cavity through the foramen orbitale magnum. Within this foramen the nervus oculomotorius divides into two rami: superior and inferior. The two rami innervate the rectus superior, rectus inferior, rectus medialis and the obliquus inferior muscles. The nervus trochlearis arises from the lateral side of the mesencephalon by a single root and passes to innervate the obliquus superior muscle. The nervus abducens arises from the ventral side of the medulla oblongata by a single root and passes for a distance through the vidian canal excavated in the parachordal cartilage. It innervates the rectus lateralis muscle. The eye muscle nerves carry special somatic motor fibres. The ciliary ganglion receives the preganglionic parasympathetic fibres from the ramus inferior of the nervus oculomotorius via the radix ciliaris brevis. Both the radix ciliaris longa and sympathetic root are absent. The ciliary ganglion is a well defined mass located in the postorbital region, irregular in shape formed of one type of neuron and gives off only one ciliary nerve.

  1. Surgical Responses of Medial Rectus Muscle Recession in Thyroid Eye Disease-Related Esotropia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jeong Lyu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the surgical outcomes and surgical responses of medial rectus muscle (MR recession patients with thyroid eye disease (TED-related esotropia (ET. The surgical dose-response curves 1 week postoperatively and at the final visit were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were applied to investigate factors influencing surgical dose-response. A total of 43 patients with TED-related ET that underwent MR recession were included. The final success rate was 86.0% and the rate of undercorrection was 14.0%. The surgical dose-response curves of TED-related ET showed a gentle slope compared with those of standard surgical tables. In the univariable model, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was the only significant factor influencing surgical dose-response of MR recession in TED-related ET (β = -0.397, P = 0.044. In a model adjusted for age, sex, type of surgery, and preoperative horizontal angle of deviation, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession showed marginal significance (β = -0.389, P = 0.064. The surgical dose-response curve of TED-related ET was unique. Simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was associated with increased surgical dose-response in TED-related ET.

  2. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  3. Modeling control of eye orientation in three dimensions. I. Role of muscle pulleys in determining saccadic trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T

    1998-05-01

    This study evaluates the effects of muscle axis shifts on the performance of a vector velocity-position integrator in the CNS. Earlier models of the oculomotor plant assumed that the muscle axes remained fixed relative to the head as the eye rotated into secondary and tertiary eye positions. Under this assumption, the vector integrator model generates torsional transients as the eye moves from secondary to tertiary positions of fixation. The torsional transient represents an eye movement response to a spatial mismatch between the torque axes that remain fixed in the head and the displacement plane that changes by half the angle of the change in eye orientation. When muscle axis shifts were incorporated into the model, the torque axes were closer to the displacement plane at each eye orientation throughout the trajectory, and torsional transients were reduced dramatically. Their size and dynamics were close to reported data. It was also shown that when the muscle torque axes were rotated by 50% of the eye rotation, there was no torsional transient and Listing's law was perfectly obeyed. When muscle torque axes rotated >50%, torsional transients reversed direction compared with what occurred for muscle axis shifts of law is implemented by the oculomotor plant subject to a two-dimensional command signal that is confined to the pitch-yaw plane, having zero torsion. Saccades that bring the eye to orientations outside Listing's plane could easily be corrected by a roll pulse that resets the roll state of the velocity-position integrator to zero. This would be a simple implementation of the corrective controller suggested by Van Opstal and colleagues. The model further indicates that muscle axis shifts together with the torque orientation relationship for tissue surrounding the eye and Newton's laws of motion form a sufficient plant model to explain saccadic trajectories and periods of fixation when driven by a vector command confined to the pitch-yaw plane. This implies

  4. Neglect and extinction in kinesthesia and thesesthesia: understanding proprioceptive inattention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgiou, Elissaios

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new observation of neglect and extinction of kinesthesia and thesesthesia (movement and position imperception), jointly reflecting proprioceptive inattention, in a series of patients with parietal lesions. A prototypical case is discussed in detail and unaddressed aspects of proprioceptive inattention are discussed through findings from four additional cases. Thesesthetic and kinesthetic extinction were tested through simultaneous antidromic vertical displacement of index fingers, while having patients report on finger proprioceptive perception with eyes closed. Patients had variable degrees of proprioceptive inattention affecting a specific limb, but without pallesthetic inattention or somatoagnosia, whereas symptoms often resolved with visual feedback or active limb movements. Findings support that kinesthesia and thesesthesia (a) are subserved by near-identical brain networks, (b) relate more to tactile perception than pallesthesia in higher order cortical areas, and (c) have a somatotopic cortical organization even in association brain areas. Furthermore, proprioceptive extinction and neglect involve (i) "attention network" structures, (ii) either hemisphere, (iii) gray or subcortical white matter damage, (iv) defective vigilance mechanisms possibly through premature habituation of spatiotemporally saturated neural capacitor circuits, and (v) are not the result of somatoagnosia, while (vi) their resolution is observed through reafferent motor-sensory or visual feedback.

  5. Structural Functional Associations of the Orbit in Thyroid Eye Disease: Kalman Filters to Track Extraocular Rectal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-02-27

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  6. Structural functional associations of the orbit in thyroid eye disease: Kalman filters to track extraocular rectal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L.; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-03-01

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention, and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  7. Shoulder proprioception in baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, M R; Borsa, P A; Lephart, S M; Fu, F H; Warner, J J

    2001-01-01

    We examined proprioceptive differences between the dominant and nondominant shoulders of 21 collegiate baseball pitchers without a history of shoulder instability or surgery. A proprioceptive testing device was used to measure kinesthesia and joint position sense. Joint position sense was significantly (P =.05) more accurate in the nondominant shoulder than in the dominant shoulder when starting at 75% of maximal external rotation and moving into internal rotation. There were no significant differences for proprioception in the other measured positions or with kinesthesia testing. Six pitchers with recent shoulder pain had a significant (P =.04) kinesthetic deficit in the symptomatic dominant shoulder compared with the asymptomatic shoulder, as measured in neutral rotation moving into internal rotation. The net effect of training, exercise-induced laxity, and increased external rotation in baseball pitchers does not affect proprioception, although shoulder pain, possibly due to rotator cuff inflammation or tendinitis, is associated with reduced kinesthetic sensation.

  8. Proprioception and Knee Arthroplasty: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodowski, Andrew J; Swigler, Colin W; Liu, Hongchao; Nord, Keith M; Toy, Patrick C; Mihalko, William M

    2016-04-01

    Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors provide neural feedback for position in space and are critical for three-dimensional interaction. Proprioception is decreased with osteoarthritis of the knees, which leads to increased risk of falling. As the prevalence of osteoarthritis increases so does the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and knowing the effect of TKA on proprioception is essential. This article reviews the literature regarding proprioception and its relationship to balance, aging, osteoarthritis, and the effect of TKA on proprioception. Knee arthroplasty involving retention of the cruciate ligaments is also reviewed, as well the evidence of proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament after TKA.

  9. Studies in Proprioception(Part 1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward R. Laskowski, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    The terms "proprioceptive deficit" , "proprioceptive training" , and "proprioceptive rehabilitation" are being used with increasing frequency in sports medicine literature. Despite the popularity of this terminology, multiple definitions for "proprioception" exist. Many researchers have defined proprioception as the afferent input of joint position sense ( i. e. , detection of position or movement) , whereas others consider proprioception in a broader scope of neuromuscular control. In addition to detection of an afferent stimulus, neuromuscular control includes processing of the stimulus and a reactionary efferent output mediated via the neuromuscular system.

  10. A critical role for Piezo2 channels in the mechanotransduction of mouse proprioceptive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Paz, Danny; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Kuner, Rohini; Gomis, Ana

    2016-05-17

    Proprioceptors are responsible for the conscious sensation of limb position and movement, muscle tension or force, and balance. Recent evidence suggests that Piezo2 is a low threshold mechanosensory receptor in the peripheral nervous system, acting as a transducer for touch sensation and proprioception. Thus, we characterized proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus that are involved in processing proprioceptive information from the face and oral cavity. This is a specific population of neurons that produce rapidly adapting mechanically-activated currents that are fully dependent on Piezo2. As such, we analyzed the deficits in balance and coordination caused by the selective deletion of the channel in proprioceptors (conditional knockout). The data clearly shows that Piezo2 fulfills a critical role in a defined homogeneous population of proprioceptor neurons that innervate the head muscles, demonstrating that this ion channel is essential for mammalian proprioceptive mechanotransduction.

  11. Grid-enabled SEE++, A Grid-Based Medical Decision Support System for Eye Muscle Surgery Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiner, W.; Buchberger, M.; Kaltofen, T.

    2006-01-01

    JKU/RISC currently develops in cooperation with Upper Austrian Research (UAR) the SEE-GRID software system. SEE-GRID is based on the SEE++ software for the biomechanical 3D simulation of the human eye and its muscles. SEE++ simulates the common eye muscle surgery techniques in a graphic interactive way that is familiar to an experienced surgeon. SEE++ is world-wide the most advanced software for this purpose; it is used by various hospitals and medical doctors for surgery training and planning, SEE++ deals with the support of diagnosis and treatment of strabismus, which is the common name given to usually persistent or regularly occuring misalignment of the eyes. Strabismus is a visual defect in which eyes point in different directions. A person suffering from it may see double images due to misaligned eyes. SEE++ is able to simulate the result of the Hess-Lancaster test, from which the pathological reason of strabismus can be estimated. The outcome of such an examination is two gaze patterns of blue points a...

  12. Accommodation: The role of the external muscles of the eye: A consideration of refractive errors in relation to extraocular malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, B K

    2014-11-01

    Speculation as to optical malfunction has led to dissatisfaction with the theory that the lens is the sole agent in accommodation and to the suggestion that other parts of the eye are also conjointly involved. Around half-a-century ago, Robert Brooks Simpkins suggested that the mechanical features of the human eye were precisely such as to allow for a lengthening of the globe when the eye accommodated. Simpkins was not an optical man but his theory is both imaginative and comprehensive and deserves consideration. It is submitted here that accommodation is in fact a twofold process, and that although involving the lens, is achieved primarily by means of a give - and - take interplay between adducting and abducting external muscles, whereby an elongation of the eyeball is brought about by a stretching of the delicate elastic fibres immediately behind the cornea. The three muscles responsible for convergence (superior, internal and inferior recti) all pull from in front backwards, while of the three abductors (external rectus and the two obliques) the obliques pull from behind forwards, allowing for an easy elongation as the eye turns inwards and a return to its original length as the abducting muscles regain their former tension, returning the eye to distance vision. In refractive errors, the altered length of the eyeball disturbs the harmonious give - and - take relationship between adductors and abductors. Such stresses are likely to be perpetuated and the error exacerbated. Speculation is not directed towards a search for a possible cause of the muscular imbalance, since none is suspected. Muscles not used rapidly lose tone, as evidenced after removal of a limb from plaster. Early attention to the need for restorative exercise is essential and results usually impressive. If flexibility of the external muscles of the eyes is essential for continuing good sight, presbyopia can be avoided and with it the supposed necessity of glasses in middle life. Early attention

  13. Elastic modulus of orbicularis oculi muscle in normal humans, humans with Graves' eye disease, and cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreicher, J H; Frueh, B R

    1995-06-01

    We built an experimental apparatus to investigate the passive elastic characteristics of orbicularis oculi muscle and examined specimens from normal humans, humans with stable Graves' eye disease, and cynomolgus monkeys. Stress-strain curves were determined and found to be exponential. The elastic modulus (Young's modulus), analogous to the stiffness of the material, was calculated as a function of strain. Elastic modulus as a function of instantaneous stress was linear. Monkey elastic modulus values were determined, but did not allow meaningful interspecies comparison because of the small sample size. No significant difference was found between normal humans and humans with Graves' eye disease with respect to elastic modulus values.

  14. Myosin Heavy Chain 2B isoform is expressed in specialized eye muscles but not in trunk and limb muscles of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Maccatrozzo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHC of adult skeletal muscles are codified by four genes named: slow, or type 1, and fast types 2A, 2X and 2B. The slow, 2A and 2X isoforms have been found expressed in all mammalian species studied so far whereas there is a large inter-species variability in the expression of MHC-2B. In this study histochemistry (m- ATPase, immunohistochemistry with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies and RT-PCR were combined together to assess whether the MHC-2B gene is expressed in bovine muscles. ATPase staining and RT-PCR experiments showed that three MHC isoforms (1, 2A, 2X were expressed in trunk and limb muscles. Slow or type 1 expression was confirmed using a specific antibody (BA-F8 whereas the detection of fast MHC isoforms were validate by means of BF-35 antibody although not by the SC-71 antibody. MHC-2B was absent in limb and trunk muscles, but was present in specialized eye muscles (rectus lateralis and retractor bulbi as consistently showed by RT-PCR and reactivity with a specific antibody (BF-F3. Interestingly, a cardiac isoform, MHC-a- cardiac was found to be expressed not only in extraocular muscles but also in masticatory muscles as masseter.

  15. [Cüppers' "Fadenoperation" for complicated eye-muscle disturbances and non-accomodative convergence-excess (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Decker, W; Conrad, H G

    1975-08-01

    More than ever the "Fadenoperation" according to Cüppers has become an important method to improve the pathological relation between eye position, innervation, and resulting motility. This is achieved by sutural fixation of an over-acting muscle far behind its original insertion. In particular a palsy can be influenced by making a handicap for the contralateral yoke muscle. 40 patients (palsies, nystagmus, strabismus incomitans), who have been treated so far, may demonstrate how the purpose of changing the innervation rather than the length of muscles can be integrated in general therapeutic schemes. The procedure is also helpful in weakening the over-acting int. rectus muscle in strabismus cases with habitual excessive convergence.

  16. Proprioceptive gait and speed selection in a slender inertial swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentina, Mederic; Gazzola, Mattia; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a slender inertial swimmer accounting for hydrodynamics, mechanics, muscle activity and sensory feedbacks. Our theory elucidates how elastic properties and proprioception contribute to selecting swimming speed and locomotion gait. Swimmers are shown to take advantage of resonance phenomena to enhance speed and efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrate how a minimal proprioceptive model, in which the local muscle activation is function of body curvature, is sufficient to exploit hydro-mechanic properties and drive elastic instabilities associated with thrust production. Our results quantitatively agree with live fish experiments and provide a mechanistic basis for the relation U/L ~ f between the swimmer's speed U, length L and tail beat frequency f determined empirically by Bainbridge more than half a century ago.

  17. Effect of 16-week Regular Tai Chi Exercise on Proprioception and Muscle Strength of Lower Limbs in the Elderly%16周规律太极拳练习对中老年人下肢本体感觉和肌力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蕊; 李玉周

    2016-01-01

    Objective:to discuss the effect of regular Tai Chi exercise on lower limb function,so as to provide theoretical basis for preventing or delaying the decline of lower limb function in the elderly.Methods:40 healthy subjects were randomly divided into experimental group(16 weeks of 24 forms simplified Tai Chi exercise) and control group(no regular exercise) to complete the proprioception,muscle strength and neuromuscular control test of lower limb before and after 16 weeks.Results:after comparing the results before and after the experiment,it is found that:(1)muscle strength of lower limbs in both groups were increased,changes in the isometric strength 60° in Tai Chi exercise group were significant;(2) the kinesthesia of left and right knees was improved obviously in experimental group,but no significant change in control group,and there is no significant change in the 3D position sense of the left and right sides of knee joints in both groups before and after the experiment;(3)the time of standing on one leg with eyes closed has improved in both groups,but no significant change before and after the experiment;(4) the deviation of walking straight with eyes closed changed significantly,compared to that before the experiment,in experimental group.Conclusion:(1)16-week regular Tai Chi exercise can significantly improve the muscle strength and proprioception of lower limbs of the elderly;(2) 16-week regular Tai Chi exercise can improve the neuromuscular control ability of lower limb,but no obvious effect on balance function;(3) 16-week regular Tai Chi exercise can improve lower limb function in elderly people.It should be applied in mass fitness to prevent the occurrence of falls in the elderly.%目的:探讨规律太极拳练习对下肢机能的影响,为预防或延缓老年人下肢功能衰退提供理论依据.方法:选择40名普通健康人为研究对象,随机分为实验组(16周24式简化太极拳练习)和对照组(无规律运动),完成16周前、后

  18. Proprioceptive information processing in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M H

    This doctoral thesis focuses on brain activity in response to proprioceptive stimulation in schizophrenia. The works encompass methodological developments substantiated by investigations of healthy volunteers and two clinical studies of schizophrenia spectrum patients. American psychiatrist Sandor...... Rado (1890-1972) suggested that one of two un-reducible deficits in schizophrenia was a disorder of proprioception. Exploration of proprioceptive information processing is possible through the measurement of evoked and event related potentials. Event related EEG can be analyzed as conventional time......-series averages or as oscillatory averages transformed into the frequency domain. Gamma activity evoked by electricity or by another type of somatosensory stimulus has not been reported before in schizophrenia. Gamma activity is considered to be a manifestation of perceptual integration. A new load stimulus...

  19. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings.

  20. Proprioception in motor learning: lessons from a deafferented subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, N; Cole, J; Rothwell, J; Diedrichsen, J

    2015-08-01

    Proprioceptive information arises from a variety of channels, including muscle, tendon, and skin afferents. It tells us where our static limbs are in space and how they are moving. It remains unclear however, how these proprioceptive modes contribute to motor learning. Here, we studied a subject (IW) who has lost large myelinated fibres below the neck and found that he was strongly impaired in sensing the static position of his upper limbs, when passively moved to an unseen location. When making reaching movements however, his ability to discriminate in which direction the trajectory had been diverted was unimpaired. This dissociation allowed us to test the involvement of static and dynamic proprioception in motor learning. We found that IW showed a preserved ability to adapt to force fields when visual feedback was present. He was even sensitive to the exact form of the force perturbation, responding appropriately to a velocity- or position-dependent force after a single perturbation. The ability to adapt to force fields was also preserved when visual feedback about the lateral perturbation of the hand was withdrawn. In this experiment, however, he did not exhibit a form of use-dependent learning, which was evident in the control participants as a drift of the intended direction of the reaching movement in the perturbed direction. This suggests that this form of learning may depend on static position sense at the end of the movement. Our results indicate that dynamic and static proprioception play dissociable roles in motor learning.

  1. Pointing to oneself: active versus passive proprioception revisited and implications for internal models of motor system function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capaday, Charles; Darling, Warren G.; Stanek, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    We re-examined the issue of active versus passive proprioception to more fully characterize the accuracy afforded by proprioceptive information in natural, unconstrained, movements in 3-dimensions. Subjects made pointing movements with their non-dominant arm to various locations with eyes closed....... They then proprioceptively localized the tip of its index finger with a prompt pointing movement of their dominant arm, thereby bringing the two indices in apposition. Subjects performed this task with remarkable accuracy. More remarkably, the same subjects were equally accurate at localizing the index finger when the arm...... of the existence of an internal forward model-based state-reconstruction scheme. Three principal conclusions derive from this study. First, in unconstrained movements, proprioceptive information provides highly accurate estimates of limb position. Second, so-called active proprioception does not provide better...

  2. Proprioceptive information processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnfred, Sidse M H

    2012-03-01

    This doctoral thesis focuses on brain activity in response to proprioceptive stimulation in schizophrenia. The works encompass methodological developments substantiated by investigations of healthy volunteers and two clinical studies of schizophrenia spectrum patients. American psychiatrist Sandor Rado (1890-1972) suggested that one of two un-reducible deficits in schizophrenia was a disorder of proprioception. Exploration of proprioceptive information processing is possible through the measurement of evoked and event related potentials. Event related EEG can be analyzed as conventional time-series averages or as oscillatory averages transformed into the frequency domain. Gamma activity evoked by electricity or by another type of somatosensory stimulus has not been reported before in schizophrenia. Gamma activity is considered to be a manifestation of perceptual integration. A new load stimulus was constructed that stimulated the proprioceptive dimension of recognition of applied force. This load stimulus was tested both in simple and several types of more complex stimulus paradigms, with and without tasks, in total in 66 healthy volunteers. The evoked potential (EP) resulting from the load stimulus was named the proprioceptive EP. The later components of the proprioceptive EP (> 150 ms) were modulated similarly to previously reported electrical somatosensory EPs by repetition and cognitive task. The earlier activity was further investigated through decomposition of the time-frequency transformed data by a new non-negative matrix analysis, and previous research and visual inspection validated these results. Several time-frequency components emerged in the proprioceptive EP. The contra-lateral parietal gamma component (60-70 ms; 30-41 Hz) had not previously been described in the somatosensory modality without electrical stimulation. The parietal beta component (87-103 ms; 19-22 Hz) was increased when the proprioceptive stimulus appeared in a predictable sequence in

  3. Proprioceptive Factors in Operative Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, M. J.

    Time estimation is improved when the interval is filled with a motor response, with the proprioceptive feedback (PFB) presumably acting as a mediator. Altering the resistive dynamics of a handle moved 60 centimeters to fill a two-second interval manipulated the PFB from the response. Spelling aloud 2-, 3-, and 4-letter words during the motor…

  4. Conducting polymer actuators: From basic concepts to proprioceptive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Gil, Jose Gabriel

    Designers and engineers have been dreaming for decades of motors sensing, by themselves, working and surrounding conditions, as biological muscles do originating proprioception. Here bilayer full polymeric artificial muscles were checked up to very high cathodic potential limits (-2.5 V) in aqueous solution by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical driven exchange of ions from the conducting polymer film, and the concomitant Faradaic bending movement of the muscle, takes place in the full studied potential range. The presence of trapped counterion after deep reduction was corroborated by EDX determinations giving quite high electronic conductivity to the device. The large bending movement was used as a tool to quantify the amount of water exchanged per reaction unit (exchanged electron or ion). The potential evolutions of self-supported films of conducting polymers or conducting polymers (polypyrrole, polyaniline) coating different microfibers, during its oxidation/reduction senses working mechanical, thermal, chemical or electrical variables. The evolution of the muscle potential from electrochemical artificial muscles based on electroactive materials such as intrinsically conducting polymers and driven by constant currents senses, while working, any variation of the mechanical (trailed mass, obstacles, pressure, strain or stress), thermal or chemical conditions of work. One physically uniform artificial muscle includes one electrochemical motor and several sensors working simultaneously under the same driving reaction. Actuating (current and charge) and sensing (potential and energy) magnitudes are present, simultaneously, in the only two connecting wires and can be read by the computer at any time. From basic polymeric, mechanical and electrochemical principles a physicochemical equation describing artificial proprioception has been developed. It includes and describes, simultaneously, the evolution of the muscle potential during actuation as a function of the

  5. Eye features in three Danish patients with multisystemic smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Hans Ulrik; Fledelius, Hans C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2012-01-01

    A de novo mutation of the ACTA2 gene encoding the smooth muscle cell α-actin has been established in patients with multisystemic smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome associated with patent ductus arteriosus and mydriasis present at birth....

  6. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Hama, Yuki; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Eyelid opening stretches mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle to activate the proprioceptive fiber supplied by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. This proprioception induces reflex contractions of the slow-twitch fibers in the levator palpebrae superioris and frontalis muscles to sustain eyelid and eyebrow positions against gravity. The cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalon potentially make gap-junctional connections with the locus coeruleus neurons. The locus coeruleus is implicated in arousal and autonomic function. Due to the relationship between arousal, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and skin conductance, we assessed whether upgaze with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation activates sympathetically innervated sweat glands and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Specifically, we examined whether 60° upgaze induces palmar sweating and hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex in 16 subjects. Sweating was monitored using a thumb-mounted perspiration meter, and prefrontal cortex activity was measured with 45-channel, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and 2-channel NIRS at Fp1 and Fp2. In 16 subjects, palmar sweating was induced by upgaze and decreased in response to downgaze. Upgaze activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex with an accumulation of integrated concentration changes in deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin levels in 12 subjects. Upgaze phasically and degree-dependently increased deoxyhemoglobin level at Fp1 and Fp2, whereas downgaze phasically decreased it in 16 subjects. Unilateral anesthetization of mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle used to significantly reduce trigeminal proprioceptive evocation ipsilaterally impaired the increased deoxyhemoglobin level by 60° upgaze at Fp1 or Fp2 in 6 subjects. We concluded that upgaze with strong trigeminal proprioceptive evocation was sufficient to phasically activate sympathetically innervated sweat glands

  7. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Matsuo

    Full Text Available Eyelid opening stretches mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle to activate the proprioceptive fiber supplied by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. This proprioception induces reflex contractions of the slow-twitch fibers in the levator palpebrae superioris and frontalis muscles to sustain eyelid and eyebrow positions against gravity. The cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalon potentially make gap-junctional connections with the locus coeruleus neurons. The locus coeruleus is implicated in arousal and autonomic function. Due to the relationship between arousal, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and skin conductance, we assessed whether upgaze with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation activates sympathetically innervated sweat glands and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Specifically, we examined whether 60° upgaze induces palmar sweating and hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex in 16 subjects. Sweating was monitored using a thumb-mounted perspiration meter, and prefrontal cortex activity was measured with 45-channel, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and 2-channel NIRS at Fp1 and Fp2. In 16 subjects, palmar sweating was induced by upgaze and decreased in response to downgaze. Upgaze activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex with an accumulation of integrated concentration changes in deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin levels in 12 subjects. Upgaze phasically and degree-dependently increased deoxyhemoglobin level at Fp1 and Fp2, whereas downgaze phasically decreased it in 16 subjects. Unilateral anesthetization of mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle used to significantly reduce trigeminal proprioceptive evocation ipsilaterally impaired the increased deoxyhemoglobin level by 60° upgaze at Fp1 or Fp2 in 6 subjects. We concluded that upgaze with strong trigeminal proprioceptive evocation was sufficient to phasically activate sympathetically

  8. Pointing to oneself: active versus passive proprioception revisited and implications for internal models of motor system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaday, Charles; Darling, Warren G; Stanek, Konrad; Van Vreeswijk, Carl

    2013-08-01

    We re-examined the issue of active versus passive proprioception to more fully characterize the accuracy afforded by proprioceptive information in natural, unconstrained, movements in 3-dimensions. Subjects made pointing movements with their non-dominant arm to various locations with eyes closed. They then proprioceptively localized the tip of its index finger with a prompt pointing movement of their dominant arm, thereby bringing the two indices in apposition. Subjects performed this task with remarkable accuracy. More remarkably, the same subjects were equally accurate at localizing the index finger when the arm was passively moved and maintained in its final position by an experimenter. Two subjects were also tested with eyes open, and they were no more accurate than with eyes closed. We also found that the magnitude of the error did not depend on movement duration, which is contrary to a key observation in support of the existence of an internal forward model-based state-reconstruction scheme. Three principal conclusions derive from this study. First, in unconstrained movements, proprioceptive information provides highly accurate estimates of limb position. Second, so-called active proprioception does not provide better estimates of limb position than passive proprioception. Lastly, in the active movement condition, an internal model-based estimation of limb position should, according to that hypothesis, have occurred throughout the movement. If so, it did not lead to a better estimate of final limb position, or lower variance of the estimate, casting doubt on the necessity to invoke this hypothetical construct.

  9. Orofacial proprioceptive thalamus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Atsushi; Fujio, Takashi; Sato, Fumihiko; Ali, Md Sams Sazzad; Haque, Tahsinul; Ohara, Haruka; Moritani, Masayuki; Kato, Takafumi; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Tachibana, Yoshihisa

    2017-08-01

    The ascending pathway mediating proprioception from the orofacial region is still not fully known. The present study elucidated the relay of jaw-closing muscle spindle (JCMS) inputs from brainstem to thalamus in rats. We injected an anterograde tracer into the electrophysiologically identified supratrigeminal nucleus (Su5), known to receive JCMS input. Many thalamic axon terminals were labeled and were found mainly contralaterally in a small, unpredicted area of the caudo-ventromedial edge (VPMcvm) of ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus (VPM). Electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve and passive jaw movements induced large responses in the VPMcvm. The VPMcvm is far from the rostrodorsal part of ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus (VPL) where proprioceptive inputs from the body are represented. After injection of a retrograde tracer into the electrophysiologically identified VPMcvm, many neurons were labeled almost exclusively in the contralateral Su5, whereas no labeled neurons were found in the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (Pr5) and spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5). In contrast, after injection of a retrograde tracer into the core of VPM, many neurons were labeled contralaterally in the Pr5 and Sp5, but none in the Su5. We conclude that JCMS input excites trigeminothalamic projection neurons in the Su5 which project primarily to the VPMcvm in marked contrast to other proprioceptors and sensory receptors in the orofacial region which project to the core VPM. These findings suggest that lesions or deep brain stimulation in the human equivalent of VPMcvm may be useful for treatment of movement disorders (e.g., orofacial tremor) without affecting other sensations.

  10. Defining proprioceptive behaviors for autonomous mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, James L.; Hudas, Greg R.; Gerhart, Grant R.

    2002-07-01

    Proprioception is a sense of body position and movement that supports the control of many automatic motor functions such as posture and locomotion. This concept, normally relegated to the fields of neural physiology and kinesiology, is being utilized in the field of unmanned mobile robotics. This paper looks at developing proprioceptive behaviors for use in controlling an unmanned ground vehicle. First, we will discuss the field of behavioral control of mobile robots. Next, a discussion of proprioception and the development of proprioceptive sensors will be presented. We will then focus on the development of a unique neural-fuzzy architecture that will be used to incorporate the control behaviors coming directly from the proprioceptive sensors. Finally we will present a simulation experiment where a simple multi-sensor robot, utilizing both external and proprioceptive sensors, is presented with the task of navigating an unknown terrain to a known target position. Results of the mobile robot utilizing this unique fusion methodology will be discussed.

  11. Update on proprioception: considerations for dance education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Glenna

    2009-01-01

    Proprioception is a topic of interest within the larger scope of dance pedagogy, science, and rehabilitation. As the science of proprioception changes, approaches to proprioceptive training also change. Thus, proprioceptive training in dance medicine has expanded to include balance protocols. A key concept within these protocols for treatment of lower extremity injuries is perturbation. Perturbation training is designed to evoke focal neuromuscular control at injured joint sites, as well as more global postural responses for overall balance and coordination. This article provides an update on the science of proprioception within the framework of postural control and balance. Specific practices from rehabilitation that integrate balance exercises into proprioceptive training are considered. Further research is needed to test the efficacy and utility of these exercises within the context of the dance studio.

  12. Assessing Proprioception in Children: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Virginia Way Tong

    2016-12-09

    Proprioception is the subconscious and conscious awareness of the spatial and mechanical status of the musculoskeletal framework. When working with children with motor delays and sensory integrative dysfunction, occupational therapists routinely assess the client's proprioceptive system. However, currently available assessments for occupational therapists are primarily observer-based and concerns have been raised about the reliability of observer-based assessments of sensation. The author's purpose was to review measures of proprioception currently available to occupational therapists and explore direct measures of proprioception from neuroscience and rehabilitation that can be adapted for pediatric clinical use. Observer-based and direct measurements of proprioception assessments complement each other in meeting clinical needs. A better understanding of both types of evaluation will improve proprioceptive evaluation.

  13. Assessing proprioception: A critical review of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Han

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To control movement, the brain has to integrate proprioceptive information from a variety of mechanoreceptors. The role of proprioception in daily activities, exercise, and sports has been extensively investigated, using different techniques, yet the proprioceptive mechanisms underlying human movement control are still unclear. In the current work we have reviewed understanding of proprioception and the three testing methods: threshold to detection of passive motion, joint position reproduction, and active movement extent discrimination, all of which have been used for assessing proprioception. The origin of the methods, the different testing apparatus, and the procedures and protocols used in each approach are compared and discussed. Recommendations are made for choosing an appropriate technique when assessing proprioceptive mechanisms in different contexts.

  14. Efeitos da crioterapia e facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva sobre a força muscular nas musculaturas flexora e extensora de joelho Effects of cryotherapy and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on muscle strength at the flexor and extensor muscles of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Moreira Mortari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As musculaturas flexora e extensora do joelho são freqüentemente lesionadas devido a um desequilíbrio entre esses grupos. Recursos térmicos, como a crioterapia, e técnicas de alongamento, como a técnica mantém-relaxa da facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva (FNP, influenciam a flexibilidade e força muscular, proporcionando maior homogeneidade entre essas musculaturas e diminuindo a incidência de lesões. Este estudo objetivou verificar os efeitos da crioterapia e da FNP sobre a força das musculaturas flexora e extensora de joelho. A amostra foi composta por 18 mulheres com idade entre 18 e 24 anos, não-praticantes de atividade física regular, divididas em dois grupos: um submetido a crioterapia e o outro à técnica mantém-relaxa da FNP. Antes e após uma sessão de aplicação das técnicas foi feita avaliação isocinética. A aplicação da técnica mantém-relaxa provocou aumento da força em ambas as musculaturas em ambos os membros, atingindo nível de significância nos flexores do membro inferior direito (p=0,04. A crioterapia diminuiu a força dos extensores e exerceu efeito contrário sobre os flexores, tendo gerado aumento significativo nos flexores do membro inferior direito (p=0,035. Quando comparadas as técnicas, a técnica mantém-relaxa gerou maiores valores de pico de torque, principalmente nos extensores do membro inferior esquerdo (p=0,042. Conclui-se que a técnica mantém-relaxa da FNP gerou maiores valores no pico de torque em relação à crioterapia.Knee extensor and flexor muscles are often injured due to an imbalance between these groups, which may lead to a deficit in muscle performance. Thermal resources, such as cryotherapy, and stretching techniques, such as the "hold-relax" of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF, influence flexibility and muscle strength and may reduce the chances of muscle tendon injuries. The aim of the study was to verify the effects of cryotherapy and of the PNF

  15. Studies in Proprioception(Part 2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward R. Laskowski

    2004-01-01

    @@ (上接第8期508页)Proprioceptively Enriched Rehabilitative Exercises Despite the absence of definitive knowledge of discrete aspects of the proprioceptive system, rehabilitation programs can be designed to challenge, enhance, and improve this system. In addition, non-injured athletes may benefit from incorporation of proprioceptive exercise into their training program. Healthy upper extremity athletes have been shown to have kinesthetic deficits in their throwing shoulder compared with their non-dominant shoulder[32].

  16. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    OpenAIRE

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Knight, Kenneth L

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the kne...

  17. Knee joint proprioception in ballet dancers and non-dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieling, Simone; van der Esch, Martin; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of upper-leg muscle fatigue on knee joint proprioception in 13 ballet dancers and 13 non-dancer controls. Proprioception acuity, expressed as position and motion sense, was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. The position and motion sense assessments were prior to and immediately after an isokinetic upper-leg muscle fatigue protocol. Participants wore blindfolds for both tasks to eliminate vision, an inflated air splint on their lower leg to neutralize cutaneous sensation, and headphones with white noise during the motion sense task to eliminate auditory cues. Results showed no significant differences in position and motion sense between dancers and controls in the non-fatigued state. In the fatigued state no significant differences were found in position sense between dancers and controls, while controls increased significantly in motion sense error (p = 0.030) and ballet dancers showed no change in motion sense. It is concluded that position sense and motion sense acuity are not affected by muscle fatigue in dancers, but motion sense is affected by muscle fatigue in non-dancers.

  18. Notes on electropherograms of eye-lens, muscle proteins and zymograms of muscle esterases of fish collected during the first Brazilian expedition to the Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Ngan Phan

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was carried out on electropherograms of eye-lens, muscle proteins and zymograms of muscle esterases of ten Notothenia larseni, six Notothenia nudifrons and one lanternfish, Electrona antarctica. The fish were collected by the R/V "Prof. W. Besnard" of the Institute of Oceanography, University of São Paulo, during the First Brazilian Expedition to Antarctica. Eye-lens proteins were analysed on cellulose acetate membrane, muscle proteins and esterases on gel of polyaorylamide. Eye-lens proteins showed three types of electropherograms for N. larseni, and two types for N. nudifrons. One of the electropherograms of N. larseni can be readily distinguished from those of N. nudifrons. Electropherograms of muscle proteins of N. larseni and N. nudifrons are very similar and, consist of sixteen to seventeen fractions. Electropherograms of muscle proteins of N. larseni are severely affected by the conservation of the extracts overnight under -20ºC. All N. nudifrons were of the same zymograms of esterases while those of N. larseni varied. Electropherograms of eye-lens and muscle proteins as well as zymograms of esterases of the lanternfish are different from those of nototheniids.Foi realizado um estudo preliminar sobre eletroferogramas de proteínas de cristalino e de músculo esquelético, e zimogramas de esterases de músculo esquelético de dez Notothenia larseni, seis Notothenia nudifrons e de um peixe-lanterna, Electrona antarctica. Os peixes foram coletados pelo N/Oc. "Prof. W. Besnard" do Instituto Oceanográfico da Universidade de São Paulo durante a I Expedição Brasileira à Antártica. As proteinas do cristalino foram analisadas em membranas de acetato de celulose, enquanto que as proteínas e esterases do músculo esquelético, em gel de poliacrilamida. As proteínas do cristalino apresentam três tipos distintos de eletroferogramas para N. larseni, e dois para N. nudifrons. Um dos eletroferogramas de N. larseni, pode ser

  19. Importance of Proprioceptive Information for Postural Control in Children with Strabismus before and after Strabismus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Maria P.; Soufi, Hayette; Villeneuve, Philippe; Colleville, Lucile; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Lions, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the role of proprioception in postural balance in children with strabismus before and after realignment of their visual axes by eye surgery. Postural recordings were made with the TechnoConcept® force platform in 23 children. Several conditions were studied, whether the subjects had both eyes open, or either the dominant or the non-dominant eye open, without and with foam pads of 4 mm underfoot. Recordings were performed before and after strabismus surgery. The surface area, the length and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP) were analyzed. Before strabismus surgery, all children showed better stability with both eyes open with respect to the condition with the non-dominant eye open; furthermore postural stability improved in the presence of foam pads. After surgery, the surface area of CoP decreased significantly, especially in the non-dominant eye viewing condition. We suggest that strabismic children use mainly proprioceptive information in order to control their posture, but also visual inputs, which are important for obtaining a good postural stability. The alignment of the visual axes after surgery provides enhanced postural stability, suggesting, again the major role of visual inputs in the control of posture. Proprioceptive plasticity after strabismus surgery may allow better visual rehabilitation. PMID:27656133

  20. Importance of proprioceptive information for postural control in children with strabismus before and after strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pia Bucci

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the role of proprioception in postural balance in children with strabismus before and after realignment of their visual axes by eye surgery. Postural recordings were made with the TechnoConcept® force platform in twenty three children. Several conditions were studied, whether the subjects had both eyes open, or either the dominant or the non-dominant eye open, without and with foam pads of 4 mm underfoot. Recordings were performed before and after strabismus surgery. The surface area, the length and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP were analyzed. Before strabismus surgery, all children showed better stability with both eyes open with respect to the condition with the non dominant eye open; furthermore postural stability improved in the presence of foam pads. After surgery, all postural parameters (surface area, length and mean speed of CoP decreased significantly, especially in the non-dominant eye viewing condition. We suggest that strabismic children use mainly proprioceptive information in order to control their posture, but also visual inputs, which are important for obtaining a good postural stability. The alignment of the visual axes after surgery provides enhanced postural stability, suggesting, again the major role of visual inputs in the control of posture. Proprioceptive plasticity after strabismus surgery may allow better visual rehabilitation.

  1. Increasing cutaneous afferent feedback improves proprioceptive accuracy at the knee in patients with sensory ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Goulding, Niamh; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Fuente Mora, Cristina; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III) features disturbed proprioception and a marked ataxic gait. We recently showed that joint angle matching error at the knee is positively correlated with the degree of ataxia. Using intraneural microelectrodes, we also documented that these patients lack functional muscle spindle afferents but have preserved large-diameter cutaneous afferents, suggesting that patients with better proprioception may be relying more on proprioceptive cues provided by tactile afferents. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing cutaneous sensory feedback by stretching the skin at the knee joint using unidirectional elasticity tape could improve proprioceptive accuracy in patients with a congenital absence of functional muscle spindles. Passive joint angle matching at the knee was used to assess proprioceptive accuracy in 25 patients with HSAN III and 9 age-matched control subjects, with and without taping. Angles of the reference and indicator knees were recorded with digital inclinometers and the absolute error, gradient, and correlation coefficient between the two sides calculated. Patients with HSAN III performed poorly on the joint angle matching test [mean matching error 8.0 ± 0.8° (±SE); controls 3.0 ± 0.3°]. Following application of tape bilaterally to the knee in an X-shaped pattern, proprioceptive performance improved significantly in the patients (mean error 5.4 ± 0.7°) but not in the controls (3.0 ± 0.2°). Across patients, but not controls, significant increases in gradient and correlation coefficient were also apparent following taping. We conclude that taping improves proprioception at the knee in HSAN III, presumably via enhanced sensory feedback from the skin.

  2. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hilal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders.

  3. The effects of cryotherapy on proprioception system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanek, Mariusz Paweł; Słomka, Kajetan; Juras, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Proprioception plays an important role in the complex mechanism of joint control. Contemporary sport activities impose extremely high physical demands on athletes. Winter sports are played in areas with excessively low temperatures. Moreover, many athletes are subjected to treatments that involve local lowering of the body temperature before, during, and after physical activity. This work reviews the current knowledge regarding the influence of local cryotherapy on the proprioception system. The reviewed literature identified several tests that evaluate different aspects of proprioception. There is no universally agreed protocol, or clear set of criteria for test conditions. The outcomes of different tests and assessments of cryotherapy procedures using different cold modalities are poorly correlated. In general, the published results on the mechanism of cryotherapy effects on proprioception are not uniquely conclusive and are frequently contradictory. Additional high-quality research is required to explicitly answer the following questions: (1) whether local cryotherapy influences all aspects of proprioception; (2) whether the current methods of evaluation are adequate for the exploration of the relationship between cryotherapy and proprioception; and (3) whether the application of local cryotherapy is safe for athletes regarding proprioception. The review clearly showed that there is no comprehensive model relating cryotherapy and proprioception.

  4. The Effects of Cryotherapy on Proprioception System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Paweł Furmanek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception plays an important role in the complex mechanism of joint control. Contemporary sport activities impose extremely high physical demands on athletes. Winter sports are played in areas with excessively low temperatures. Moreover, many athletes are subjected to treatments that involve local lowering of the body temperature before, during, and after physical activity. This work reviews the current knowledge regarding the influence of local cryotherapy on the proprioception system. The reviewed literature identified several tests that evaluate different aspects of proprioception. There is no universally agreed protocol, or clear set of criteria for test conditions. The outcomes of different tests and assessments of cryotherapy procedures using different cold modalities are poorly correlated. In general, the published results on the mechanism of cryotherapy effects on proprioception are not uniquely conclusive and are frequently contradictory. Additional high-quality research is required to explicitly answer the following questions: (1 whether local cryotherapy influences all aspects of proprioception; (2 whether the current methods of evaluation are adequate for the exploration of the relationship between cryotherapy and proprioception; and (3 whether the application of local cryotherapy is safe for athletes regarding proprioception. The review clearly showed that there is no comprehensive model relating cryotherapy and proprioception.

  5. Proprioception in knee osteoarthritis: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Leeden, M. van der; Lems, W.F.; Esch, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of the literature on knee proprioception in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Method: A literature search was performed and reviewed using the narrative approach. Results: (1) Three presumed functions of knee proprioception have been described in the literature: prote

  6. The Effects of Cryotherapy on Proprioception System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanek, Mariusz Paweł; Słomka, Kajetan; Juras, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Proprioception plays an important role in the complex mechanism of joint control. Contemporary sport activities impose extremely high physical demands on athletes. Winter sports are played in areas with excessively low temperatures. Moreover, many athletes are subjected to treatments that involve local lowering of the body temperature before, during, and after physical activity. This work reviews the current knowledge regarding the influence of local cryotherapy on the proprioception system. The reviewed literature identified several tests that evaluate different aspects of proprioception. There is no universally agreed protocol, or clear set of criteria for test conditions. The outcomes of different tests and assessments of cryotherapy procedures using different cold modalities are poorly correlated. In general, the published results on the mechanism of cryotherapy effects on proprioception are not uniquely conclusive and are frequently contradictory. Additional high-quality research is required to explicitly answer the following questions: (1) whether local cryotherapy influences all aspects of proprioception; (2) whether the current methods of evaluation are adequate for the exploration of the relationship between cryotherapy and proprioception; and (3) whether the application of local cryotherapy is safe for athletes regarding proprioception. The review clearly showed that there is no comprehensive model relating cryotherapy and proprioception. PMID:25478573

  7. Anatomy of the eye of the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, Poul; Heegaard, S.; Tougaard, J.

    2003-01-01

    Ophthalmology, cetacea, odontocetes, vision, retraction, rete ophthalmica, retractor muscle, eye muscles, Physeter......Ophthalmology, cetacea, odontocetes, vision, retraction, rete ophthalmica, retractor muscle, eye muscles, Physeter...

  8. The Proprioceptive System Regulates Morphologic Restoration of Fractured Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Blecher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful fracture repair requires restoration of bone morphology and mechanical integrity. Recent evidence shows that fractured bones of neonatal mice undergo spontaneous realignment, dubbed “natural reduction.” Here, we show that natural reduction is regulated by the proprioceptive system and improves with age. Comparison among mice of different ages revealed, surprisingly, that 3-month-old mice exhibited more rapid and effective natural reduction than newborns. Fractured bones of null mutants for transcription factor Runx3, lacking functional proprioceptors, failed to realign properly. Blocking Runx3 expression in the peripheral nervous system, but not in limb mesenchyme, recapitulated the null phenotype, as did inactivation of muscles flanking the fracture site. Egr3 knockout mice, which lack muscle spindles but not Golgi tendon organs, displayed a less severe phenotype, suggesting that both receptor types, as well as muscle contraction, are required for this regulatory mechanism. These findings uncover a physiological role for proprioception in non-autonomous regulation of skeletal integrity.

  9. Integration of proprioceptive signals and attentional capacity during postural control are impaired but subject to improvement in dyslexic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, Patrick; Demougeot, Laurent; Dos Santos, Mickaël; Bonnetblanc, François

    2011-04-01

    Children with developmental dyslexia suffer from delayed reading capabilities and may also exhibit attentional and sensori-motor deficits. The objective of this study was twofold. First, we aimed at investigating whether integration of proprioceptive signals in balance control was more impaired in dyslexic children when the attentional demand was varied. Secondly, we checked whether this effect was reduced significantly by using a specific treatment to improve eye control deficits and certain postural signs that are often linked to dyslexia (Quercia et al. in J Fr Ophtalmol 28:713-723, 2005, J Fr Ophtalmol 30:380-89, 2007). Thirty dyslexic and 51 treated dyslexic children (> 3 months of treatment) were compared with 42 non-dyslexic children in several conditions (mean age: 136.2 ± 23.6, 132.2 ± 18.7 and 140.2 ± 25 months, respectively). Co-vibration of ankle muscles was effected in order to alter proprioceptive information originating from the ankle. In two vibration conditions, ankle muscles were either not vibrated or vibrated at 85 Hz without illusion of any movement. These two vibration conditions were combined with two attentional conditions. In the first such condition, children maintained balance while merely fixing their gaze on a point in front of them. In the second condition, they had to look for smaller or larger stars in a panel showing forty of each kind. Balance was assessed by means of a force plate. Results indicated that the mean velocity (i.e. the total length) of the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in the 85-Hz vibration condition increased significantly more (compared with no vibration) in the dyslexic and the treated dyslexic groups than in the control group, irrespective of the attention task. Interestingly, in the condition without vibration, the attentional performance of treated children was similar to that of the control group, whereas the attentional performance of the untreated dyslexic children was significantly impaired

  10. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P proprioceptive/strengthening exercises experienced greater improvements in function and pain than those receiving the exercise program alone. Between-groups effect sizes were large in all outcomes (SMD > 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability.

  11. On the bimanual integration of proprioceptive information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Esther; De Havas, Jack; Silkoset, Emilie; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Proprioception can be defined as the sense for body movement and position. While most sensory information can be successfully integrated across hemispheres, little is known about the bilateral integration of proprioceptive information. In two behavioural experiments, we investigated whether estimates of the position of one hand are influenced by simultaneous proprioceptive information from the other hand. We further investigated whether such putative bimanual proprioceptive integration would differ between expert dancers and non-dancer controls. Either one hand or both hands were passively moved to novel positions, and participants indicated the perceived location of the index finger tip of the designated target hand, by orienting a visible laser beam mounted on a cap. Synchronized bimanual movements compared to unimanual movements significantly improved proprioceptive position sense. In particular, we found a bias reduction to perceive the target hand's index finger tip as shifted away from the midline in the bimanual condition, compared to the unimanual condition. Expert dancers, in contrast, did not show this change in proprioceptive position sense after bimanual movements. We suggest that bimanual movements may improve proprioception due to interhemispheric integration in controls, but not in expert dancers.

  12. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit. PMID:27390420

  13. Experimental changes in bodily self-consciousness are tuned to the frequency sensitivity of proprioceptive fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluel, Estelle; Aspell, Jane Elizabeth; Lavanchy, Tom; Blanke, Olaf

    2012-04-18

    Several lines of evidence suggest an important implication of proprioceptive signals in bodily self-consciousness. By manipulating proprioceptive signals using muscle vibration, here, we investigated whether such effects depend on the vibration frequency by testing three different vibratory stimuli applied at the lower limbs (20, 40 and 80 Hz). We thus explored whether frequency-specific proprioceptive interference that has been reported in postural or motor tasks will also be found for measures of bodily self-consciousness. Self-identification (questionnaires) and visuotactile integration (asking participants to make tactile discriminations) were quantified during synchronous and asynchronous stroking conditions that are known to manipulate bodily self-consciousness. We found that even though muscle vibrations were applied at the same body location in all cases, 20 Hz vibrations did not alter the magnitude of self-identification and visuotactile integration, whereas 40 and 80 Hz vibrations did. These frequency-specific effects extend earlier vibration effects on motor and postural tasks to bodily self-consciousness. We suggest that the observed changes in bodily self-consciousness are due to altered proprioceptive signals from the lower limbs and that these changes depend on the tuning of Ia fibres to muscle vibration.

  14. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit.

  15. [Irritative effect of aclacinomycin A on the eye mucous membrane, skin and muscle (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, K; Hirano, S; Kiyosaki, T; Hori, S; Tone, H

    1980-04-01

    Aclacinomycin A, a new anthracycline antitumor antibiotic, was given to rabbits by single instillation or single intracutaneous injection and to guinea pigs by single subcutaneous or intramuscular injection to examine the irritative effect. Slight dilatation of blood vessel and swelling in the conjunctiva and nictitating membrane were observed in the eyes of rabbits given 1% solution. Edema in the bulbar conjunctiva, iris and cornea was histologically noted. Washing of the eyes after drug instillation prevented these damages. Subcutaneous and intracutaneous injections of 1% solution (0.2 ml) gave hyperemia, swelling and necrosis at injection site. Cellular infiltration, fibrosis and necrosis were histologically detected. Intramuscular injection of 1% solution (0.2 ml) also provided induration and swelling at injection site. Histologically cellular infiltration and necrosis were observed. These irritative effects were much slighter in administration of 0.1% solution. No change was observed with 0.01% solution.

  16. Do gravity-related sensory information enable the enhancement of cortical proprioceptive inputs when planning a step in microgravity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saradjian, Anahid H; Paleressompoulle, Dany; Louber, Didier; Coyle, Thelma; Blouin, Jean; Mouchnino, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    We recently found that the cortical response to proprioceptive stimulation was greater when participants were planning a step than when they stood still, and that this sensory facilitation was suppressed in microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test whether the absence of gravity-related sensory afferents during movement planning in microgravity prevented the proprioceptive cortical processing to be enhanced. We reestablished a reference frame in microgravity by providing and translating a horizontal support on which the participants were standing and verified whether this procedure restored the proprioceptive facilitation. The slight translation of the base of support (lateral direction), which occurred prior to step initiation, stimulated at least cutaneous and vestibular receptors. The sensitivity to proprioceptive stimulation was assessed by measuring the amplitude of the cortical somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP, over the Cz electrode) following the vibration of the leg muscle. The vibration lasted 1 s and the participants were asked to either initiate a step at the vibration offset or to remain still. We found that the early SEP (90-160 ms) was smaller when the platform was translated than when it remained stationary, revealing the existence of an interference phenomenon (i.e., when proprioceptive stimulation is preceded by the stimulation of different sensory modalities evoked by the platform translation). By contrast, the late SEP (550 ms post proprioceptive stimulation onset) was greater when the translation preceded the vibration compared to a condition without pre-stimulation (i.e., no translation). This suggests that restoring a body reference system which is impaired in microgravity allowed a greater proprioceptive cortical processing. Importantly, however, the late SEP was similarly increased when participants either produced a step or remained still. We propose that the absence of step-induced facilitation of proprioceptive cortical

  17. Do gravity-related sensory information enable the enhancement of cortical proprioceptive inputs when planning a step in microgravity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahid H Saradjian

    Full Text Available We recently found that the cortical response to proprioceptive stimulation was greater when participants were planning a step than when they stood still, and that this sensory facilitation was suppressed in microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test whether the absence of gravity-related sensory afferents during movement planning in microgravity prevented the proprioceptive cortical processing to be enhanced. We reestablished a reference frame in microgravity by providing and translating a horizontal support on which the participants were standing and verified whether this procedure restored the proprioceptive facilitation. The slight translation of the base of support (lateral direction, which occurred prior to step initiation, stimulated at least cutaneous and vestibular receptors. The sensitivity to proprioceptive stimulation was assessed by measuring the amplitude of the cortical somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP, over the Cz electrode following the vibration of the leg muscle. The vibration lasted 1 s and the participants were asked to either initiate a step at the vibration offset or to remain still. We found that the early SEP (90-160 ms was smaller when the platform was translated than when it remained stationary, revealing the existence of an interference phenomenon (i.e., when proprioceptive stimulation is preceded by the stimulation of different sensory modalities evoked by the platform translation. By contrast, the late SEP (550 ms post proprioceptive stimulation onset was greater when the translation preceded the vibration compared to a condition without pre-stimulation (i.e., no translation. This suggests that restoring a body reference system which is impaired in microgravity allowed a greater proprioceptive cortical processing. Importantly, however, the late SEP was similarly increased when participants either produced a step or remained still. We propose that the absence of step-induced facilitation of

  18. Effects of whole body vibration on spinal proprioception in normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T Y; Chow, D H K

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common health problem with high reoccurrence rate. While most LBP cases are classified as non-specific, patients in general often present impaired proprioception. Whole body vibration (WBV) has been proven to improve muscle function and proprioception in the lumbo-pelvic region. The aim of this study was to determine whether WBV would affect spinal proprioception. Eleven young normal individuals were recruited. Their body alignment, lumbar repositioning error and lumbo-pelvic coordination during dynamic motion were assessed before and after 5 minutes WBV (18 Hz, 6 mm amplitude). Assessments were conducted before, immediately after, 30 minutes after and 1 hour after WBV. Subjects were found to have improved lumbo-pelvic coordination and flexibility without any adverse effect on the neuromuscular system after WBV. However, WBV had no significant immediate effect on lumbar repositioning ability and body alignment. Future studies of the effects of different WBV protocols on LBP patients are recommended.

  19. Haptic proprioception in a virtual locomotor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Kiran; Abbruzzese, Kevin; Xu, Hao; Ehrenberg, Naphtaly; Foulds, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Normal gait needs both proprioceptive and visual feedback to the nervous system to effectively control the rhythmicity of motor movement. Current preprogrammed exoskeletons provide only visual feedback with no user control over the foot trajectory. We propose an intuitive controller where hand trajectories are mapped to control contralateral foot movement. Our study shows that proprioceptive feedback provided to the users hand in addition to visual feedback result in better control during virtual ambulation than visual feedback alone. Hand trajectories resembled normal foot trajectories when both proprioceptive and visual feedback was present. Our study concludes that haptic feedback is essential for both temporal and spatial aspects of motor control in rhythmic movements.

  20. Correlation analysis of proprioceptive acuity in ipsilateral position-matching and velocity-discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Domkin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    In order to plan and control movements the central nervous system (CNS) needs to continuously keep track of the state of the musculoskeletal system. Therefore the CNS constantly uses sensory input from mechanoreceptors in muscles, joints and skin to update information about body configuration on different levels of the CNS. On the conscious level, such representations constitute proprioception. Different tests for assessment of proprioceptive acuity have been described. However, it is unclear if the proprioceptive acuity measurements in these tests correlate within subjects. By using both uni- and multivariate analysis we compared proprioceptive acuity in different variants of ipsilateral active and passive limb position-matching and ipsilateral passive limb movement velocity-discrimination in a group of healthy subjects. The analysis of the position-matching data revealed a higher acuity of matching for active movements in comparison to passive ones. The acuity of matching was negatively correlated to movement extent. There was a lack of correlation between proprioceptive acuity measurements in position-matching and velocity-discrimination.

  1. Can pain influence the proprioception and the motor behavior in subjects with mild and moderate knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Daniela C Silveira; Barboza, Saulo Delfino; da Costa, Franciele Dias; Cabral, Monnique Ponciano; Silva, Vanessa Martins Pereira; Dionisio, Valdeci Carlos

    2014-09-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic disease, usually characterized by pain, which is associated with reduced muscle strength, disability and progressive loss of function. However, the pain influence over proprioception and motor behaviour remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of the study was to identify the levels of pain, the proprioceptive acuity and the pattern of muscle recruitment during stair ascent and descent in elderly patients with mild and moderate osteoarthritis (OA) compared to healthy subjects. The study participants included 11 healthy elderly subjects (7 women and 4 men) and 31 elderly patients with knee OA (19 women and 12 men). The functional capacity was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index; the pain was evaluated by Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT); the proprioceptive acuity was based on the joint position sense evaluated by electrogoniometer; and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the major muscles of the lower limb were evaluated during a task of stair ascent and descent of 15 cm. For statistical analysis it was used Statistic for Windows software (StatSoft Inc., version 5.0). Data from the WOMAC index, WBS, the proprioceptive acuity and IEMG (for each muscle in each phase) were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and data from PPT was used Kruskal-Wallis test. Higher scores were found in the WOMAC index and WBS whereas lower scores were seen in PPT in patients with knee OA compared to healthy subjects. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the proprioceptive acuity and EMG results of most muscles analyzed between the groups. The presence of pain does not influence the proprioception and the motor behavior of the thigh muscles during stair ascent and descent in subjects with mild and moderate knee OA.

  2. Proprioceptive ability at the lips and jaw measured using the same psychophysical discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    In the human face, the muscles and joints that generate movement have different properties. Whereas the jaw is a conventional condyle joint, the facial musculature has neither distinct origin nor insertion points, and the muscles do not contain muscle spindle proprioceptors. This current study aims to compare the proprioceptive ability at the orofacial muscles with that of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 21 neuro-typical people aged between 18 and 65 years. A novel psychophysical task was devised for use with both structures that involved a fixed 30.5 mm start separation followed by closure onto stimuli of 5, 6, 7, 8 mm diameter. The mean proprioceptive score when using the lips was 0.84 compared to 0.79 at the jaw (p proprioceptive mechanism. Additionally, unlike the lack of correlation previously observed between joints in the upper and lower limbs, at the face the scores from performing the task with the two different structures were significantly correlated (r = 0.5, p = 0.018). These data extend the understanding of proprioception being correlated for the same left and right joints and correlated within the same structure (e.g. ankle dorsiflexion and inversion), to include use-dependant proprioception, with performance in different structures being correlated through extended coordinated use. At the lips and jaw, it is likely that this arises from extensive coordinated use. This informs clinical assessment and suggests a potential for coordinated post-injury training of the lips and jaw, as well as having the potential to predict premorbid function via measurement of the uninjured structure, when monitoring progress and setting clinical rehabilitation goals.

  3. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  4. Does proprioceptive system stimulation improve sit-to-walk performance in healthy young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marcelo P; Pelicioni, Paulo H S; Lahr, Juliana; Gobbi, Lilian T B

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] Sit-to-walk performance is linked to proper proprioceptive information processing. Therefore, it is believed that an increase of proprioceptive inflow (using muscle vibration) might improve sit-to-walk performance. However, before testing muscle vibration effects on a frail population, assessment of its effects on healthy young people is necessary. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of muscle vibration on sit-to-walk performance in healthy young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen young adults performed the sit-to-walk task under three conditions: without vibration, with vibration applied before movement onset, and with vibration applied during the movement. Vibration was applied bilaterally for 30 s to the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris, and upper trapezius muscles bellies. The vibration parameters were as follows: 120 Hz and 1.2 mm. Kinematics and kinetic data were assessed using a 3D motion capture system and two force plates. The coordinates of reflective markers were used to define the center-of-mass velocities and displacements. In addition, the first step spatiotemporal variables were assessed. [Results] No vibration effect was observed on any dependent variables. [Conclusion] The results show that stimulation of the proprioceptive system with local muscle vibration does not improve sit-to-walk performance in healthy young adults.

  5. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develops. There they help to push the baby out of the mother's body when it's time to be born. You'll find smooth muscles at work behind the scenes in your eyes, too. These muscles keep the eyes ... thick muscles of the heart contract to pump blood out and then relax to let blood back in ...

  6. The Effects of Balance Training on Stability and Proprioception Scores of the Ankle in College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Shim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if stability and proprioception scores improved on college-aged students using a slack line device. Methods: One group of 20 participants aged 18-23 from a Midwestern university performed a pre-test/post-test on a computerized posturography plate to determine Center of Pressure (CoP and Limit of Stability (LoS scores.  Participants performed three 20-30 minute sessions per week of balance and proprioceptive training using a Balance Bow for a period of four weeks. Data were analyzed (SPSS 21.0 using a dependent t-test to determine if any changes occurred between pre- and post-test scores after four weeks.  Results: The analyses found no significance difference in Center of Pressure (CoP, normal stability eyes open (NSEO, normal stability eyes closed (NSEC, perturbed stability eyes open (PSEO, perturbed stability eyes closed (PSEC, or LoS forward (F, backward (B, or right (R scores in college-aged participants. A significant difference was found in LoS left (L and a notable trend towards significance was found in LoS R results. Conclusion: With the exception of LoS L stability scores, it was concluded that 12 sessions of 20-30 minutes, utilizing a slack line device, over a four week training period did not significantly improve stability and proprioceptive scores of the ankle in college-aged participants. Keywords: Proprioception, Limit of Stability (LoS, Center of Pressure (CoP, slack line device

  7. Visual and proprioceptive contributions to postural control of upright stance in unilateral vestibulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin; McCrum, Christopher; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2016-06-01

    Preserving upright stance requires central integration of the sensory systems and appropriate motor output from the neuromuscular system to keep the centre of pressure (COP) within the base of support. Unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder (UPVD) causes diminished stance stability. The aim of this study was to determine the limits of stability and to examine the contribution of multiple sensory systems to upright standing in UPVD patients and healthy subjects. We hypothesized that closure of the eyes and Achilles tendon vibration during upright stance will augment the postural sway in UPVD patients more than in healthy subjects. Seventeen UPVD patients and 17 healthy subjects performed six tasks on a force plate: forwards and backwards leaning, to determine limits of stability, and upright standing with and without Achilles tendon vibration, each with eyes open and closed (with blackout glasses). The COP displacement of the patients was significantly greater in the vibration tasks than the controls and came closer to the posterior base of support boundary than the controls in all tasks. Achilles tendon vibration led to a distinctly more backward sway in both subject groups. Five of the patients could not complete the eyes closed with vibration task. Due to the greater reduction in stance stability when the proprioceptive, compared with the visual, sensory system was disturbed, we suggest that proprioception may be more important for maintaining upright stance than vision. UPVD patients, in particular, showed more difficulty in controlling postural stability in the posterior direction with visual and proprioceptive sensory disturbance.

  8. A visual ergonomics intervention in mail sorting facilities: effects on eyes, muscles and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphälä, Hillevi; Eklund, Jörgen

    2012-01-01

    Visual requirements are high when sorting mail. The purpose of this visual ergonomics intervention study was to evaluate the visual environment in mail sorting facilities and to explore opportunities for improving the work situation by reducing visual strain, improving the visual work environment and reducing mail sorting time. Twenty-seven postmen/women participated in a pre-intervention study, which included questionnaires on their experiences of light, visual ergonomics, health, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Measurements of lighting conditions and productivity were also performed along with eye examinations of the postmen/women. The results from the pre-intervention study showed that the postmen/women who suffered from eyestrain had a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and sorted slower, than those without eyestrain. Illuminance and illuminance uniformity improved as a result of the intervention. The two post-intervention follow-ups showed a higher prevalence of MSD among the postmen/women with eyestrain than among those without. The previous differences in sorting time for employees with and without eyestrain disappeared. After the intervention, the postmen/women felt better in general, experienced less work induced stress, and considered that the total general lighting had improved. The most pronounced decreases in eyestrain, MSD, and mail sorting time were seen among the younger participants of the group.

  9. Neuromechanical models for insect locomotion: Stability, maneuverability, and proprioceptive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukillaya, R.; Proctor, J.; Holmes, P.

    2009-06-01

    We describe a hierarchy of models for legged locomotion, emphasizing relationships among feedforward (preflexive) stability, maneuverability, and reflexive feedback. We focus on a hexapedal geometry representative of insect locomotion in the ground plane that includes a neural central pattern generator circuit, nonlinear muscles, and a representative proprioceptive sensory pathway. Although these components of the model are rather complex, neglect of leg mass yields a neuromechanical system with only three degrees of freedom, and numerical simulations coupled with a Poincaré map analysis shows that the feedforward dynamics is strongly stable, apart from one relatively slow mode and a neutral mode in body yaw angle. These modes moderate high frequency perturbations, producing slow heading changes that can be corrected by a stride-to-stride steering strategy. We show that the model's response to a lateral impulsive perturbation closely matches that of a cockroach subject to a similar impulse. We also describe preliminary studies of proprioceptive leg force feedback, showing how a reflexive pathway can reinforce the preflexive stability inherent in the system.

  10. Predictors of the Dose-Effect Relationship regarding Unilateral Inferior Rectus Muscle Recession in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate whether inferior rectus muscle (IRM thickness, the degree of adipose change in the IRM, smoking status, and the previous history of orbital radiotherapy can predict the dose-effect relationship regarding unilateral IRM recession in thyroid eye disease (TED. Methods. Twenty-five patients were retrospectively reviewed. We calculated the largest IRM cross-sectional area and evaluated the degree of adipose change in the IRM using magnetic resonance imaging. The degree of adipose change and smoking status were classified using grading scales (0–3; previous orbital radiotherapy was graded as 0 when a history was not available and 1 when it was available. The correlation between the dose-effect relationship and the hypothesized predictive factors was evaluated using stepwise multiple regression analysis. Results. The multiple regression model, with the exception of the history of the previous orbital radiotherapy, estimated a significant dose-effect relationship for the parameters evaluated (YDOSE-EFFECT = 0.013XIRM AREA  − 0.222XADIPOSE  − 0.102XSMOKING + 1.694; r = 0.668; adjusted r2 = 0.367; P = 0.005. Conclusions. The dose-effect relationship regarding unilateral IRM recession in TED could be predicted using IRM thickness, degree of intramuscular adipose change, and smoking status but could not be predicted using the previous orbital radiotherapy history.

  11. Anatomy of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anatomy of the Eye En Español Read in Chinese External (Extraocular) Anatomy Extraocular Muscles: There are six muscles that are ...

  12. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Salom-Moreno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33±3 years individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS. They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F=8.211; P=0.008; SPORTS: F=13.943; P 2.1 in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability.

  13. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability. PMID:26064172

  14. Acute Muscle Stretching and Shoulder Position Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Crenshaw, Albert G.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Stretching is common among athletes as a potential method for injury prevention. Stretching-induced changes in the muscle spindle properties are a suggested mechanism, which may imply reduced proprioception after stretching; however, little is known of this association.

  15. Kinesthetic information facilitates saccades towards proprioceptive-tactile targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, Dimitris; Goettker, Alexander; Mueller, Stefanie; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-05-01

    Saccades to somatosensory targets have longer latencies and are less accurate and precise than saccades to visual targets. Here we examined how different somatosensory information influences the planning and control of saccadic eye movements. Participants fixated a central cross and initiated a saccade as fast as possible in response to a tactile stimulus that was presented to either the index or the middle fingertip of their unseen left hand. In a static condition, the hand remained at a target location for the entire block of trials and the stimulus was presented at a fixed time after an auditory tone. Therefore, the target location was derived only from proprioceptive and tactile information. In a moving condition, the hand was first actively moved to the same target location and the stimulus was then presented immediately. Thus, in the moving condition additional kinesthetic information about the target location was available. We found shorter saccade latencies in the moving compared to the static condition, but no differences in accuracy or precision of saccadic endpoints. In a second experiment, we introduced variable delays after the auditory tone (static condition) or after the end of the hand movement (moving condition) in order to reduce the predictability of the moment of the stimulation and to allow more time to process the kinesthetic information. Again, we found shorter latencies in the moving compared to the static condition but no improvement in saccade accuracy or precision. In a third experiment, we showed that the shorter saccade latencies in the moving condition cannot be explained by the temporal proximity between the relevant event (auditory tone or end of hand movement) and the moment of the stimulation. Our findings suggest that kinesthetic information facilitates planning, but not control, of saccadic eye movements to proprioceptive-tactile targets.

  16. Mapping Proprioception across a 2D Horizontal Workspace

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Relatively few studies have been reported that document how proprioception varies across the workspace of the human arm. Here we examined proprioceptive function across a horizontal planar workspace, using a new method that avoids active movement and interactions with other sensory modalities. We systematically mapped both proprioceptive acuity (sensitivity to hand position change) and bias (perceived location of the hand), across a horizontal-plane 2D workspace. Proprioception of both the le...

  17. Proprioception and person perception: politicians and professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-12-01

    Social-categorical knowledge is partially grounded in proprioception. In Study 1, participants describing "hard" and "soft" politicians, and "hard" and "soft" scientists used different "hard" and "soft" traits for the two groups, suggesting that the meaning of these traits is context specific. Studies 2 to 4 showed that both meanings were supported by hard and soft proprioception. Consistent with political stereotypes, perceivers viewing faces while handling a hard ball were more likely to categorize them as Republicans rather than as Democrats, compared to perceivers viewing the same faces while handling a soft ball (Study 2). Similarly, consistent with stereotypes of "hard" and "soft" academic disciplines, perceivers were more likely to categorize photographs of professors as physicists than historians when handling a hard versus soft ball (Study 3). Finally, thinking about Republicans and Democrats led participants to perceive a ball as harder or softer, respectively, suggesting that simulating proprioception might aid social-categorical thinking (Study 4).

  18. Measuring and enhancing proprioception in musicians and dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitt, Myrim Sillevis; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    Proprioception is important to many musicians and all dancers. Methods of measuring proprioception in the hands of musicians and globally in dancers are reviewed. Their uses in defining proprioception in performers and thereby reducing the risk of injury as well as enhancing performance are discussed.

  19. Prism adaptation changes the subjective proprioceptive localization of the hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpina, Federica; Van Der Stigchel, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29880977X; Nijboer, Tanja Cornelia Wilhelmina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832421; Dijkerman, Hendrik Christiaan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829757

    2015-01-01

    Prism adaptation involves a proprioceptive, a visual and a motor component. As the existing paradigms are not able to distinguish between these three components, the contribution of the proprioceptive component remains unclear. In the current study, a proprioceptive judgement task, in the absence of

  20. Delayed early proprioceptive information processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hemmingsen, Ralf P; Parnas, Josef

    2006-12-01

    It was first suggested that disordered proprioception was a core feature of schizophrenia by Sandor Rado in 1953. Using a recently designed proprioceptive event-related potential paradigm based on a change of load, we studied 12 unmedicated male out-patients with schizophrenia and 24 controls. In the patients, the early contralateral parietal activity was delayed and later central activity had increased amplitude, but gating was unaffected. The results could be understood within the "deficiency of corollary discharge" model of schizophrenia but not within the "filtering" theory. Further studies, including psychiatric controls, are necessary to verify the specificity of the abnormality.

  1. Delayed early proprioceptive information processing in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hemmingsen, RP; Parnas, Josef;

    2006-01-01

    It was first suggested that disordered proprioception was a core feature of schizophrenia by Sandor Rado in 1953. Using a recently designed proprioceptive event-related potential paradigm based on a change of load, we studied 12 unmedicated male out-patients with schizophrenia and 24 controls....... In the patients, the early contralateral parietal activity was delayed and later central activity had increased amplitude, but gating was unaffected. The results could be understood within the "deficiency of corollary discharge" model of schizophrenia but not within the "filtering" theory. Further studies...

  2. Delayed early proprioceptive information processing in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hemmingsen, RP; Parnas, Josef

    2006-01-01

    It was first suggested that disordered proprioception was a core feature of schizophrenia by Sandor Rado in 1953. Using a recently designed proprioceptive event-related potential paradigm based on a change of load, we studied 12 unmedicated male out-patients with schizophrenia and 24 controls....... In the patients, the early contralateral parietal activity was delayed and later central activity had increased amplitude, but gating was unaffected. The results could be understood within the "deficiency of corollary discharge" model of schizophrenia but not within the "filtering" theory. Further studies...

  3. The effect of muscle strengthening exercise and proprioception training on elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis%肌力训练和本体感觉训练治疗老年膝关节骨性关节炎的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林伟; 叶洪青; 蒋小毛; 倪建芳; 沈诸花

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨肌力、关节活动度及本体感觉训练对老年膝关节骨性关节炎(OA)患者的疗效.方法 80名老年膝关节OA患者,随机分为治疗组(n=40)和对照组(n=40),治疗组给予包括肌力、关节活动度、本体感觉训练的运动方式进行运动干预,对照组只进行日常的自主运动,治疗前、后以Lequesne指数进行膝关节功能评定,同时采用SF-36简明健康调查量表进行生活质量的评定.结果 治疗后2组患者的膝关节功能和生活质量评分与治疗前比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).治疗组治疗后膝关节功能评分中的运动时痛、关节压痛、关节肿胀、关节晨僵、总指数等5项指标与对照组治疗后相比,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);生活质量评分中的肢体疼痛项与对照组相比,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 包含有肌力、本体感觉、关节活动度训练的运动处方是适合老年膝关节OA患者的治疗方法.%Objective To observe the therapeutic effect of muscle strengthening,range of motion and proprioeeption training on elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis(OA).Methods Based on clinical diagnostic criteria,80 elderly patients with knee OA were randomly divided into a treatment group(40 cases)and a control group (40 cases).The patients in the treatment group were administered muscle strengthening exercise and range of motion and proprioception training,while the patients of the control group were not given any special exercise.Before and after 6 months of treatment,knee function and quality of life were assessed with Leqesene's Index and a 36-item shortform health survey(SF-36). Results The patients in both groups scored significantly higher on Leqesene's Index and the SF-36 after 6 months of treatment.The pain with motion,knee tenderness,knee swelling,morning stiffness,total score and bodily pain of the treatment group were better than those of the control group. Conclusion The range of

  4. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population.

  5. Recruitment properties and significance of short latency reflexes in neck and eye muscles evoked by brief lateral head accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch, James G; Dennis, Danielle L; Govender, Sendhil; Chen, Peggy; Todd, Neil P McAngus

    2014-09-01

    Short lateral head accelerations were applied to investigate the recruitment properties of the reflexes underlying the earliest ocular and cervical electromyographic reflex responses to these disturbances. Components of both reflexes are vestibular dependent and have been termed "ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials" and "cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials", respectively. Previous investigations using a unilateral vestibular stimulus have indicated that some but not all these vestibular-dependent reflexes show a simple power law relationship to stimulus intensity. In particular, crossed otolith-ocular reflexes showed evidence of an inflection separating two types of behaviour. The present stimulus acts bilaterally, and only the earliest crossed otolith-ocular reflex, previously shown to have a strictly unilateral origin, showed evidence of an inflection. Reflex changes in ocular torsion could, in principle, correct for the changes associated with translation for an elevated eye, but our findings indicated that the responses were consistent with previous reports of tilt-type reflexes. For the neck, both vestibular and segmental (muscle spindle) reflexes were evoked and followed power law relationships, without any clear separation in sensitivity. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence of "tilt-like" reflexes evoked by lateral acceleration and suggest that the departure from a power law occurs as a consequence of a unilateral crossed pathway. For the neck, responses to transients are likely to always consist of both vestibular and non-vestibular (segmental) components. Most of the translation-evoked ocular and cervical reflexes appear to follow power law relationship to stimulus amplitude over a physiological range.

  6. Effects of Tai Chi versus Proprioception Exercise Program on Neuromuscular Function of the Ankle in Elderly People: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese medicine exercise used for improving neuromuscular function. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Tai Chi versus proprioception exercise program on neuromuscular function of the ankle in elderly people. Methods. Sixty elderly subjects were randomly allocated into three groups of 20 subjects per group. For 16 consecutive weeks, subjects participated in Tai Chi, proprioception exercise, or no structured exercise. Primary outcome measures included joint position sense and muscle strength of ankle. Subjects completed a satisfaction questionnaire upon study completion in Tai Chi and proprioception groups. Results. (1 Both Tai Chi group and proprioception exercise group were significantly better than control group in joint position sense of ankle, and there were no significant differences in joint position sense of ankle between TC group and PE group. (2 There were no significant differences in muscle strength of ankle among groups. (3 Subjects expressed more satisfaction with Tai Chi than with proprioception exercise program. Conclusions. None of the outcome measures on neuromuscular function at the ankle showed significant change posttraining in the two structured exercise groups. However, the subjects expressed more interest in and satisfaction with Tai Chi than proprioception exercise.

  7. "Proprioceptive signature" of cursive writing in humans: a multi-population coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Jean-Pierre; Albert, Frédéric; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith; Bergenheim, Mikael

    2004-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the firing behavior of populations of muscle spindle afferents in all the muscles acting on the ankle while this joint was being subjected to "writing-like" movements. First it was proposed to determine whether the ensemble of muscle spindles give rise to a unique, specific, and reproducible feedback information characterizing each letter, number or short word. Secondly, we analyzed how the proprioceptive feedback on the whole encodes the spatial and temporal characteristics of writing movements using the "vector population model". The unitary activity of 51 primary and secondary muscle spindle afferents was recorded in the tibial and common peroneal nerves at the level of the popliteal fossea, using the microneurographic method. The units recorded from belonged to the tibialis anterior, the extensor digitorum longus, the extensor hallucis longus, the peroneus lateralis, the gastrocnemius-soleus and the tibialis posterior muscles. The "writing-like" movements were randomly imposed at a "natural" velocity via a computer-controlled machine in a two-dimensional space. In general, muscle spindle afferents from any of the six muscles responded according to the tuning properties of the parent muscle, i.e. increasing their discharge rate during the phases where the direction of movement was within the preferred sensory sector of the parent muscle. The whole trajectory of the writing movements was coded in turn by the activity of Ia afferents arising from all the muscles acting on the joint. Both single afferent responses and population responses were found to be highly specific and reproducible with each graphic sign. The complex multi-muscle afferent pattern involved, with its timing and distribution in the muscle space, seems to constitute a true "proprioceptive signature" for each graphic symbol. The ensemble of muscle spindle afferents were therefore found to encode the instantaneous direction and velocity of writing

  8. Proprioceptive versus Visual Control in Autistic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterton, B. A.; Biederman, G. B.

    1983-01-01

    The autistic children's presumed preference for proximal over distal sensory input was studied by requiring that "autistic," retarded, and "normal" children (7-15 years old) adapt to lateral displacement of the visual field. Only autistic Ss demonstrated transfer of adaptation to the nonadapted hand, indicating reliance on proprioception rather…

  9. Assessing Proprioception: A Systematic Review of Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; Immink, Maarten; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Proprioception is a vital aspect of motor control and when degraded or lost can have a profound impact on function in diverse clinical populations. This systematic review aimed to identify clinically related tools to measure proprioceptive acuity, to classify the construct(s) underpinning the tools, and to report on the clinimetric properties of the tools. We searched key databases with the pertinent search terms, and from an initial list of 935 articles, we identified 57 of relevance. These articles described 32 different tools or methods to quantify proprioception. There was wide variation in methods, the joints able to be tested, and the populations sampled. The predominant construct was active or passive joint position detection, followed by passive motion detection and motion direction discrimination. The clinimetric properties were mostly poorly evaluated or reported. The Rivermead Assessment of Somatosensory Perception was generally considered to be a valid and reliable tool but with low precision; other tools with higher precision are potentially not clinically feasible. Clinicians and clinical researchers can use the summary tables to make more informed decisions about which tool to use to match their predominant requirements. Further discussion and research is needed to produce measures of proprioception that have improved validity and utility.

  10. Cooling does not affect knee proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmun, J C; Thieme, H A; Ingersoll, C D; Knight, K L

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90 degrees to 60 degrees , 60 degrees to 30 degrees , and 30 degrees to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception.

  11. Role of proprioception and vision in handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Chakarov, Vihren; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Huethe, Frank; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2009-08-14

    The objective of this study is to better understand the role of proprioception in handwriting and test earlier conclusions stating that the automated shaping of letters was not impaired by the removal of visual control in deafferentation. To this aim we compared the performance of the deafferented patient GL, who suffers from a complete loss of cutaneous and proprioceptive sensation, with that of eight healthy age- and sex-matched subjects. The word "Parallele", written within a short sentence with and without visual control, was quantified using a digital writing tablet. Three of the 13 analyzed parameters were strikingly different in patient GL compared to healthy subjects, both with and without vision: increase of number of pen touches, increase in number of inversions in velocity, and decrease of mean stroke frequency. The changes in these three parameters indicate a strong impairment in automated behaviour in the absence of proprioception and touch. This impairment is also supported by the significantly longer movement duration, which is also significantly increased by the removal of visual control. The present study provides for the first time a quantification of handwriting in a completely deafferented patient and reveals the central role of proprioception for the storage, updating, and maintenance of skilled motor programs. The fact that the deficits are already present with visual feedback suggests that the role of vision in handwriting is only secondary.

  12. Adaptive Staircase Measurement of Hand Proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Najmeh; Sexton, Brandon M; Kurtz, Karl; Liu, Yang; Block, Hannah J

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians and researchers often need to measure proprioception (position sense), for example to monitor the progress of disease, to identify the cause of movement or balance problems, or to ascertain the effects of an intervention. While researchers can use sophisticated equipment to estimate proprioceptive acuity with good precision, clinicians lack this option and must rely on the subjective and imprecise methods currently available in the clinic. Here we describe a novel technique that applies psychometric adaptive staircase procedures to hand proprioception with a simple tablet-style apparatus that could easily be adapted for the clinic. We report test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity of the adaptive staircase method vs. two other methods that are commonly used in clinical settings: passive motion direction discrimination (PMDD) and matching. As a first step, we focus on healthy adults. Subjects ages 18-82 had their proprioception measured with each of the three techniques, at the metacarpophalangeal joint in the second finger of the right hand. A subset completed a second session in which the measures were repeated, to assess test-retest reliability. Another subset had the measurements done by two different testers to assess inter-rater reliability. Construct validity was assessed using stepwise regression on age and activity level, and correlations calculated across the three methods. Results suggest that of the three methods, the adaptive staircase method yields the best test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity. The adaptive staircase method may prove to be a valuable clinical tool where more accurate assessment of proprioception is needed.

  13. Effects of 12-week proprioception training program on postural stability, gait, and balance in older adults: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Caballero-Martínez, Isabel; Alvarez, Pablo J; Martínez-López, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 12-week-specific proprioceptive training program on postural stability, gait, balance, and fall prevention in adults older than 65 years. The present study was a controlled clinical trial. Forty-four community dwelling elderly subjects (61-90 years; mean age, 78.07 ± 5.7 years) divided into experimental (n = 20) and control (n = 24) groups. The participants performed the Berg balance test before and after the training program, and we assessed participants' gait, balance, and the risk of falling, using the Tinetti scale. Medial-lateral plane and anterior-posterior plane displacements of the center of pressure, Sway area, length and speed, and the Romberg quotient about surface, speed, and distance were calculated in static posturography analysis (EPS pressure platform) under 2 conditions: eyes open and eyes closed. After a first clinical evaluation, patients were submitted to 12 weeks proprioception training program, 2 sessions of 50 minutes every week. This program includes 6 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to program proprioceptive training. The training program improved postural balance of older adults in mediolateral plane with eyes open (p 0.05). After proprioception training, gait (Tinetti), and balance (Berg) test scores improved 14.66% and 11.47% respectively. These results show that 12 weeks proprioception training program in older adults is effective in postural stability, static, and dynamic balance and could lead to an improvement in gait and balance capacity, and to a decrease in the risk of falling in adults aged 65 years and older.

  14. Inspiratory augmentation during asphyxic hyperpnoea and gasping: proprioceptive influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, G; Nail, B

    1986-04-01

    The relative inspiratory augmentations of sternomastoid, scalene, external intercostal, interchondral and diaphragmatic electromyographic activities were examined during the progressive asphyxia induced by rebreathing in pentobarbitone/urethane anaesthetized rabbits. Diaphragmatic activity augmented significantly less than that of the scalene, intercostal and interchondral muscles in response to the asphyxic increase in inspiratory drive (hyperpnoea). Cervical vagotomy significantly increased the levels of inspiratory activity during the asphyxic hyperpnoea but did not abolish these relations. Dorsal rhizotomy at levels appropriate for the respective recording sites significantly limited the intercostal and interchondral augmentations, and depressed diaphragmatic activity to a less pronounced extent, but did not affect scalene activity. The asphyxic apnoea succeeding the hyperpnoea was terminated by gasping respiration. Excepting the interchondrals each muscle exhibited significantly greater electromyographic amplitudes during gasping than during the terminal hyperpnoeic efforts. Only during gasping were the sternomastoid muscles recruited. The intercostal and scalene gasps were significantly greater than those exhibited by either the interchondrals or the diaphragm. Such disproportionate responses were not affected by vagotomy or dorsal rhizotomy. The disparate inspiratory contributions during progressive asphyxia can therefore only be partially accounted for by differences in proprioceptive control.

  15. Balance Ability and Proprioception after Single-Bundle, Single-Bundle Augmentation, and Double-Bundle ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubao Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study sought to determine the influences of single-bundle (SB, single-bundle augmentation (SBA, and double-bundle (DB reconstructions on balance ability and proprioceptive function. Methods. 67 patients who underwent a single- or double-bundle ACL reconstruction or a SBA using multistranded autologous hamstring tendons were included in this study with a 1-year follow-up. Body sway and knee kinesthesia (using the threshold to detect passive motion test (TTDPM were measured to indicate balance ability and proprioceptive function, respectively. Additionally, within-subject differences in anterior-posterior stability of the tibia and lower extremity muscle strength were evaluated before and after surgery. Results. At 6 and 12 months after surgery, DB reconstruction resulted in better balance and proprioceptive function than SB reconstruction (P<0.05. Although no significant difference was observed in balance ability or proprioceptive function between the SBA and DB reconstructions, knee stability was significantly better with SBA and DB reconstructions than SB reconstruction (P<0.05. No significant differences were found in quadriceps and hamstrings strength among the three reconstruction techniques. Conclusions. Our findings consider that joint stability, proprioceptive function, and balance ability were superior with SBA and DB reconstructions compared to SB reconstruction at 6 and 12 months after surgery.

  16. Impaired varus-valgus proprioception and neuromuscular stabilization in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alison H; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-22

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The objectives of the study were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08±0.59° vs. 0.69±0.49°, pproprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint).

  17. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  18. Role of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus in rat whisker pad proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Ombretta; Stanzani, Stefania; Mulliri, Gabriele; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Caria, Marcello A; Russo, Antonella; De Riu, Pierluigi

    2010-11-15

    Trigeminal proprioception related to rodent macrovibrissae movements is believed to involve skin receptors on the whisker pad because pad muscles operate without muscle spindles. This study was aimed to investigate in rats whether the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (TMnu), which provides proprioceptive feedback for chewing muscles, may be also involved in whisker pad proprioception. Two retrograde tracers, Dil and True Blue Chloride, were injected into the mystacial pad and the masseter muscle on the same side of deeply anesthetized rats to label the respective projecting sensory neurons. This double-labeling technique was used to assess the co-innervation of both structures by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (TMnu).In a separate group of anesthetized animals, the spontaneous electrical activities of TMnu neurons were analyzed by extracellular recordings during spontaneous movements of the macrovibrissae. Mesencephalic neurons (TMne) were previously identified by their responses to masseter muscle stretching. Changes in TMne spontaneous electrical activities, analyzed under baseline conditions and during whisking movements, were statistically evaluated using Student's t-test for paired observations. Neuroanatomical experiments revealed different subpopulations of trigeminal mesencephalic neurons: i) those innervating the neuromuscular spindles of the masseter muscle, ii) those innervating the mystacial pad, and iii) those innervating both structures. Extracellular recordings made during spontaneous movements of the macrovibrisae showed that whisking neurons similar to those observed in the trigeminal ganglion were located in the TMnu. These neurons had different patterns of activation, which were dependent on the type of spontaneous macrovibrissae movement. In particular, their spiking activity tonically increased during fan-like movements of the vibrissae and showed phasic bursting during rhythmic whisking. Furthermore, the same neurons may also respond to

  19. Role of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus in rat whisker pad proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Antonella

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal proprioception related to rodent macrovibrissae movements is believed to involve skin receptors on the whisker pad because pad muscles operate without muscle spindles. This study was aimed to investigate in rats whether the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (TMnu, which provides proprioceptive feedback for chewing muscles, may be also involved in whisker pad proprioception. Methods Two retrograde tracers, Dil and True Blue Chloride, were injected into the mystacial pad and the masseter muscle on the same side of deeply anesthetized rats to label the respective projecting sensory neurons. This double-labeling technique was used to assess the co-innervation of both structures by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (TMnu. In a separate group of anesthetized animals, the spontaneous electrical activities of TMnu neurons were analyzed by extracellular recordings during spontaneous movements of the macrovibrissae. Mesencephalic neurons (TMne were previously identified by their responses to masseter muscle stretching. Changes in TMne spontaneous electrical activities, analyzed under baseline conditions and during whisking movements, were statistically evaluated using Student's t-test for paired observations. Results Neuroanatomical experiments revealed different subpopulations of trigeminal mesencephalic neurons: i those innervating the neuromuscular spindles of the masseter muscle, ii those innervating the mystacial pad, and iii those innervating both structures. Extracellular recordings made during spontaneous movements of the macrovibrisae showed that whisking neurons similar to those observed in the trigeminal ganglion were located in the TMnu. These neurons had different patterns of activation, which were dependent on the type of spontaneous macrovibrissae movement. In particular, their spiking activity tonically increased during fan-like movements of the vibrissae and showed phasic bursting during rhythmic whisking

  20. Athletic background is related to superior trunk proprioceptive ability, postural control, and neuromuscular responses to sudden perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glofcheskie, Grace O; Brown, Stephen H M

    2017-01-28

    Trunk motor control is essential for athletic performance, and inadequate trunk motor control has been linked to an increased risk of developing low back and lower limb injury in athletes. Research is limited in comparing relationships between trunk neuromuscular control, postural control, and trunk proprioception in athletes from different sporting backgrounds. To test for these relationships, collegiate level long distance runners and golfers, along with non-athletic controls were recruited. Trunk postural control was investigated using a seated balance task. Neuromuscular control in response to sudden trunk loading perturbations was measured using electromyography and kinematics. Proprioceptive ability was examined using active trunk repositioning tasks. Both athlete groups demonstrated greater trunk postural control (less centre of pressure movement) during the seated task compared to controls. Athletes further demonstrated faster trunk muscle activation onsets, higher muscle activation amplitudes, and less lumbar spine angular displacement in response to sudden trunk loading perturbations when compared to controls. Golfers demonstrated less absolute error and variable error in trunk repositioning tasks compared to both runners and controls, suggestive of greater proprioceptive ability. This suggests an interactive relationship between neuromuscular control, postural control, and proprioception in athletes, and that differences exist between athletes of various training backgrounds.

  1. Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye > Facts About Dry Eye Facts About Dry Eye This information was developed by the National Eye ... the best person to answer specific questions. Dry Eye Defined What is dry eye? Dry eye occurs ...

  2. Eye Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Allergies Sections What Are Eye Allergies? Eye Allergy Symptoms ... allergy diagnosis Eye allergy treatment What Are Eye Allergies? Written by: David Turbert Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan- ...

  3. Proprioceptive event related potentials: gating and task effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M

    2005-01-01

    The integration of proprioception with vision, touch or audition is considered basic to the developmental formation of perceptions, conceptual objects and the creation of cognitive schemes. Thus, mapping of proprioceptive information processing is important in cognitive research. A stimulus...... of a brisk change of weight on a hand held load elicit a proprioceptive evoked potential (PEP). Here this is used to examine early and late information processing related to weight discrimination by event related potentials (ERP)....

  4. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmchen, Christoph; Kirchhoff, Jan-Birger; Göttlich, Martin; Sprenger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia. Objectives The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects. Methods Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements) and postural (postural sway speed) parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM). Results Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg’s ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg’s ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII) correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients. Conclusions Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive) inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia. PMID:28056109

  5. Proprioceptive movement illusions due to prolonged stimulation: reversals and aftereffects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Seizova-Cajic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adaptation to constant stimulation has often been used to investigate the mechanisms of perceptual coding, but the adaptive processes within the proprioceptive channels that encode body movement have not been well described. We investigated them using vibration as a stimulus because vibration of muscle tendons results in a powerful illusion of movement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied sustained 90 Hz vibratory stimulation to biceps brachii, an elbow flexor and induced the expected illusion of elbow extension (in 12 participants. There was clear evidence of adaptation to the movement signal both during the 6-min long vibration and on its cessation. During vibration, the strong initial illusion of extension waxed and waned, with diminishing duration of periods of illusory movement and occasional reversals in the direction of the illusion. After vibration there was an aftereffect in which the stationary elbow seemed to move into flexion. Muscle activity shows no consistent relationship with the variations in perceived movement. CONCLUSION: We interpret the observed effects as adaptive changes in the central mechanisms that code movement in direction-selective opponent channels.

  6. Can sensory attention focused exercise facilitate the utilization of proprioception for improved balance control in PD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaivre, Shannon C; Almeida, Quincy J

    2015-02-01

    Impaired sensory processing in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been argued to contribute to balance deficits. Exercises aimed at improving sensory feedback and body awareness have the potential to ameliorate balance deficits in PD. Recently, PD SAFEx™, a sensory and attention focused rehabilitation program, has been shown to improve motor deficits in PD, although balance control has never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to measure the effects of PD SAFEx™ on balance control in PD. Twenty-one participants with mild to moderate idiopathic PD completed 12 weeks of PD SAFEx™ training (three times/week) in a group setting. Prior to training, participants completed a pre-assessment evaluating balance in accordance with an objective, computerized test of balance (modified clinical test of sensory integration and balance (m-CTSIB) and postural stability testing (PST)) protocols. The m-CTSIB was our primary outcome measure, which allowed assessment of balance in both eyes open and closed conditions, thus enabling evaluation of specific sensory contributions to balance improvement. At post-test, a significant interaction between time of assessment and vision condition (p=.014) demonstrated that all participants significantly improved balance control, specifically when eyes were closed. Balance control did not change from pre to post with eyes open. These results provide evidence that PD SAFEx™ is effective at improving the ability to utilize proprioceptive information, resulting in improved balance control in the absence of vision. Enhancing the ability to utilize proprioception for individuals with PD is an important intermediary to improving balance deficits.

  7. Impact of proprioception during the oral phase on initiating the swallowing reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Saitoh, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that proprioceptive signals during the oral phase play a pivotal role in the initiation of pharyngeal phase during volitional swallowing. Therefore, we tested if swallowing could be modified by changing the amount of proprioceptive feedback from a number of different receptors while holding a food bolus in the mouth and clenching. Basic research. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings of the masticatory muscles were obtained during volitional swallowing movements from seven healthy adults with no clinical history of swallowing difficulties. The swallowing procedure involved holding 5 ml of jelly on the tongue before swallowing it completely, according to visual cues on a computer display. Initiation of the swallowing reflex was detected by an anterior shift of the thyroid cartilage using a laser displacement sensor and by submental sEMG signals. To vary the proprioceptive input, the participants were instructed to occlude their teeth at various intensities (weak, intermediate, and strong) while holding the 5-ml jelly bolus on the tongue. Rectified and integrated sEMG (iEMG) signals obtained from the submental area showed two upward deflections. Contractile forces of the masseter muscles showed significant negative values for Pearson correlation coefficient against time intervals from the onset of the second submental iEMG deflection to the onset of the anterior shift of the thyroid cartilage in six of the seven participants (average -0.534, standard deviation 0.176). Contractile forces of the masseter muscles during occlusion tended to correlate negatively with electromechanical delays on suprahyoid muscle contraction. NA Laryngoscope, 126:1595-1599, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Robot-aided assessment of wrist proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo eCappello

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Impaired proprioception severely affects the control of gross and fine motor function. However, clinical assessment of proprioceptive deficits and its impact on motor function has been difficult to elucidate. Recent advances in haptic robotic interfaces designed for sensorimotor rehabilitation enabled the use of such devices for the assessment of proprioceptive function.Purpose. This study evaluated the feasibility of a wrist robot system to determine proprioceptive discrimination thresholds for two different DoFs of the wrist. Specifically, we sought to accomplish three aims: first, to establish data validity; second, to show that the system is sensitive to detect small differences in acuity; third, to establish test-retest reliability over repeated testing.Methodology. Eleven healthy adult subjects experienced two passive wrist movements and had to verbally indicate which movement had the larger amplitude. Based on a subject’s response data a psychometric function was fitted and the wrist acuity threshold was established at the 75% correct response level. A subset of five subjects repeated the experimentation three times (T1, T2 and T3 to determine the test-retest reliability.Results. Mean threshold for wrist flexion was 2.15°± 0.43° and 1.52°± 0.36° for abduction. Encoder resolutions were 0.0075° (flexion-extension and 0.0032° (abduction-adduction. Motor resolutions were 0.2° (flexion-extension and 0.3° (abduction-adduction. Reliability coefficients were rT2-T1=0.986 and rT3-T2=0.971.Conclusions. We currently lack established norm data on the proprioceptive acuity of the wrist to establish direct validity. However, the magnitude of our reported thresholds are physiological plausible and well in line with available threshold data obtained at the elbow joint. Moreover, system has high resolution and is sensitive enough to detect small differences in acuity. Finally, the system produces reliable data over repeated

  9. How to make rapid eye movements “rapid”: the role of growth factors for muscle contractile properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Feng, Cheng-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Different muscle functions require different muscle contraction properties. Saccade-generating extraocular muscles (EOMs) are the fastest muscles in the human body, significantly faster than limb skeletal muscles. Muscle contraction speed is subjected to plasticity, i.e., contraction speed can be adjusted to serve different demands, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control contraction speed. Therefore, we examined whether myogenic growth factors modulate contractile properties, including twitch contraction time (onset of force to peak force) and half relaxation time (peak force to half relaxation). We examined effects of three muscle-derived growth factors: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), cardiotrophin-1 (CT1), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In gain-of-function experiments, CT1 or GDNF injected into the orbit shortened contraction time, and IGF1 or CT1 shortened half relaxation time. In loss-of-function experiments with binding proteins or neutralizing antibodies, elimination of endogenous IGFs prolonged both contraction time and half relaxation time, while eliminating endogenous GDNF prolonged contraction time, with no effect on half relaxation time. Elimination of endogenous IGFs or CT1, but not GDNF, significantly reduced contractile force. Thus, IGF1, CT1, and GDNF have partially overlapping but not identical effects on muscle contractile properties. Expression of these three growth factors was measured in chicken and/or rat EOMs by real-time PCR. The “fast” EOMs express significantly more message encoding these growth factors and their receptors than skeletal muscles with slower contractile properties. Taken together, these findings indicate that EOM contractile kinetics is regulated by the amount of myogenic growth factors available to the muscle. PMID:21279379

  10. Ankle proprioceptive acuity is associated with objective as well as self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Nandini; Simonsick, Eleanor; Metter, E Jeffrey; Ko, Seunguk; Ferrucci, Luigi; Studenski, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Ankle proprioceptive information is integrated by the central nervous system to generate and modulate muscle contractions for maintaining standing balance. This study evaluated the association of ankle joint proprioception with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function across the adult life span. Seven hundred and ninety participants (age range 24-97 years, 362 women) who completed ankle proprioception assessment between 2010 and 2014 were included in the present study from the population-based cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), USA. Outcome measures included ankle joint proprioception measured as threshold for perception of passive movement (TPPM); single leg stance time; perceived difficulty for standing balance; usual, fastest, and narrow-path gait speed; walking index; short physical performance battery score; and self-reported activity restriction due to fear of falling. Descriptive variables included age, sex, body mass index, education, strength, and cognition. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) in general linear model (GLM) or multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed, as appropriate, to test the hypothesis that balance, mobility, and physical function were significantly different according to TPPM quintiles even after adjusting for relevant covariates. Those with TPPM >2.2° consistently demonstrated poor balance, mobility, and physical function. However, with increase in challenge (single leg stance, fastest walking speed, and SPPB), TPPM >1.4° was associated with significantly worse performance. In conclusion, ankle proprioceptive acuity has an overall graded relationship with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function. However, the cutoff proprioceptive acuity associated with substantial decline or inability to perform could depend on the challenge induced.

  11. Proprioceptive deficit in patients with complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Godinho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To investigate the existence of proprioceptive deficits between the injured limb and the uninjured (i.e. contralateral normal limb, in individuals who suffered complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, using a strength reproduction test.Methods:Sixteen patients with complete tearing of the ACL participated in the study. A voluntary maximum isometric strength test was performed, with reproduction of the muscle strength in the limb with complete tearing of the ACL and the healthy contralateral limb, with the knee flexed at 60°. The meta-intensity was used for the procedure of 20% of the voluntary maximum isometric strength. The proprioceptive performance was determined by means of absolute error, variable error and constant error values.Results:Significant differences were found between the control group and ACL group for the variables of absolute error (p = 0.05 and constant error (p = 0.01. No difference was found in relation to variable error (p = 0.83.Conclusion:Our data corroborate the hypothesis that there is a proprioceptive deficit in subjects with complete tearing of the ACL in an injured limb, in comparison with the uninjured limb, during evaluation of the sense of strength. This deficit can be explained in terms of partial or total loss of the mechanoreceptors of the ACL.

  12. Effect of parafunctional clenching on temporomandibular disorder pain and proprioceptive awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaros, A G; Forbes, M; Shanker, J; Glass, E G

    2000-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that parafunctional clenching increases pain, can lead to a diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain, and can produce reductions in proprioceptive awareness. Twenty individuals participated in EMG biofeedback training sessions on the left and right temporalis and masseter muscles. No subjects had TMD prior to training. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a Decrease group, who were instructed to maintain EMG activity below 2 microV during training, or an increase group, who were instructed to maintain EMG activity above 10 microV. To test the impact of parafunctional clenching on proprioceptive awareness, all subjects were instructed to barely touch their teeth together while EMG activity was recorded pre- and post-training. Three subjects assigned to the Increase group and no subjects assigned to the Decrease group were diagnosed with TMD pain following training. Self-reported pain post-training was significantly higher for the Increase group. Parafunctional clenching did not affect performance in the proprioceptive test.

  13. 踝关节本体感觉的测量方法研究与应用%Development and application of measurement methods for ankle proprioception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秋霞; 花秀琴; 施永健

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The loss of the ankle proprioception is an important reason for ankle sprain. But there is no standard in themeasurement methods of the ankle proprioception.OBJECTIVE: To review the measurement methods of the ankle proprioception.METHODS: This study was retrived by the author with the key words of “joint position sense, muscle force sense; balancecapacity; proprioception; ankle joint” in English and “proprioception; balance capacity; ankle joint” in Chinese from PubMeddatabaseand VIP database. Articles related with the measurement methods of ankl e proprioception were included. The duplicatedarticles were excluded. A total of 53 articles, 2 in Chinese and 51 in English, were included in the final analysis.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: There are such measurement methods of proprioception, as joint position sense, muscle forcesense, threshold to detect passive motion, joint movement sense, balance measurement. The selection of measurement methodsof the ankle proprioception should be based on actual needs.%背景:踝关节本体感觉能力的降低可能是踝关节容易反复损伤的一个重要原因,而对于踝关节本体感觉的定量评定方法一直没有一个标准化的测试方法.目的:通过查阅大量资料并进行分析总结,对踝关节本体感觉的测量方法的研究现状进行综述.方法:由作者检索PubMed数据库及维普数据库的相关文章.英文检索词为"joint position sense,muscle force sense;balance capacity;proprioception;ankle joint";中文检索词为"本体感觉,平衡能力,踝关节".共入选53篇文献进行归纳总结.结果与结论:踝关节本体感觉的测量方法包括关节位置觉、肌肉力觉、侦测被动运动变化阈值、关节运动觉、平衡能力等,在实际应用中应根据实际情况需要来确定选用哪种方法作为踝关节本体感觉的测量方法.

  14. Vestibular and proprioceptive influences on trunk movements during quiet standing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, C.G.; Kung, U.M.; Honegger, F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Alfen, N. van; Bloem, B.R.; Allum, J.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We characterized upper trunk and pelvis motion in normal subjects and in subjects with vestibular or proprioceptive loss, to document upper body movement modes in the pitch and roll planes during quiet stance. Six bilateral vestibular loss (VL), six bilateral lower-leg proprioceptive loss (PL) and 2

  15. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, H.E.; van der Worp, H.; Nijenbanning, L.; Diercks, R.L.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study w

  16. Evaluation of Knee Proprioception and Factors Related to Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltz, Giovana Duarte; Torman, Vanessa Bielefeldt Leotti

    2016-01-01

    Background. Changes in proprioception may contribute to postural instability in individuals with neurological disorders. Objectives. Evaluate proprioception in the lower limbs of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and the association between proprioception and cognitive ability, motor symptoms, postural instability, and disease severity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional, controlled study that evaluated proprioception in PD patients and healthy age- and sex-matched individuals. Kinetic postural proprioception of the knee was evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex® Multi-Joint System 4 Pro). Participants were evaluated using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Hoehn and Yahr rating scale and postural instability (pull test and stabilometric analysis), and motor function (UPDRS-III) tests. Results. A total of 40 individuals were enrolled in the study: 20 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (CG). The PD patients had higher angular errors on the proprioceptive ratings than the CG participants (p = 0.002). Oscillations of the center of pressure (p = 0.002) were higher in individuals with PD than in the controls. Proprioceptive errors in the PD patients were associated with the presence of tremors as the dominant symptom and more impaired motor performance. Conclusion. These findings show that individuals with PD have proprioceptive deficits, which are related to decreased cognitive ability and impaired motor symptoms. PMID:27672650

  17. Visual-Proprioceptive Intermodal Perception Using Point Light Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuckler, Mark A.; Fairhall, Jennifer L.

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments explored 5- and 7-month-olds' intermodal coordination of proprioceptive information produced by leg movements and visual movement information specifying these same motions. Results suggested that coordination of visual and proprioceptive inputs is constrained by infants' information processing of the displays and have…

  18. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, H. E.; van der Worp, H.; Nijenbanning, L.; Diercks, R. L.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study w

  19. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, H.E.; van der Worp, H.; Nijenbanning, L.; Diercks, R.L.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study

  20. Right Temporoparietal Cortex Activation during Visuo-proprioceptive Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Paulson, Olaf B.

    2005-01-01

    of visual and proprioceptive information and are therefore impaired when these modalities disagree. With fMRI in healthy subjects we compared brain activity across two conditions with similar visual and proprioceptive stimulation and similar task demands that differed by the congruence of movement showed...

  1. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, H.E.; van der Worp, H.; Nijenbanning, L.; Diercks, R.L.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study w

  2. Proprioceptive control of wrist extensor motor units in humans: dependence on handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimonetti, J M; Morin, D; Schmied, A; Vedel, J P; Pagni, S

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of the monosynaptic proprioceptive assistance to the wrist extensor motoneurone activity was investigated during voluntary contraction in relation to the subjects' handedness. The reflex responses of 411 single motor units to homonymous tendon taps were recorded in the wrist extensor carpi radialis muscles in both arms of five right-handed and five left-handed subjects. In the right-handed subjects, the motor unit reflex responses were clearly lateralized in favour of their right arm, whereas no side-related differences were observed in the left-handed subjects, whatever the motor units' mechanical properties and firing rates. When the muscle spindle sensitivity was by-passed by electrically stimulating the primary afferents in both arms of three right-handed and three left-handed subjects, no side-related differences were observed in the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) amplitude in either of the two lateralization groups. The effectiveness of the primary afferent synapses on to the motoneurones therefore does not seem to depend on the subject's handedness. Without excluding the possibility of structural changes being involved at the periphery, the comparisons carried out on the data obtained using electrical vs mechanical stimulation suggest that the asymmetrical effectiveness of the proprioceptive assistance observed in favour of the right arm in the right-handed subjects might result from either the gamma or beta drive being more efficient. This asymmetry might result from the preferential use of the right hand in skilled movements. In a predominantly right-handed world, however, left-handed people might tend to develop the ability to use their right arm almost as skillfully as their preferred left arm, which could explain the symmetrical effectiveness of the proprioceptive assistance observed here in the left-handers' wrist extensor muscles.

  3. Clinical interest of postural and vestibulo-ocular reflex changes induced by cervical muscles and skull vibration in compensated unilateral vestibular lesion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Gauchard, Gérome C; Herpin, Guillaume; Magnusson, Måns; Perrin, Philippe P

    2013-01-01

    Skull vibration induces nystagmus in unilateral vestibular lesion (UVL) patients. Vibration of skull, posterior cervical muscles or inferior limb muscles alters posture in recent UVL patients. This study aimed to investigate the postural effect of vibration in chronic compensated UVL patients. Vibration was applied successively to vertex, each mastoid, each side of posterior cervical muscles and of triceps surae in 12 UVL patients and 9 healthy subjects. Eye movements were recorded with videonystagmography. Postural control was evaluated in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. Sway area, sway path, anteroposterior and medio-lateral sways were recorded.A vibration induced nystagmus (VIN) beating toward the healthy side was obtained for each UVL patient during mastoid vibration. In EO, only sway path was higher in UVL group during vibration of mastoids and posterior cervical muscles.The EO postural impairments of UVL patients could be related to the eye movements or VIN, leading to visual perturbations, or to a proprioceptive error signal, providing an erroneous representation of head position. The vibration-induced sway was too small to be clinically useful. Vestibulo-ocular reflex observed with videonystagmography during mastoid vibration seems more relevant to reveal chronic UVL than vestibulo-spinal reflex observed with posturography.

  4. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  5. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Cutfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz and low level (30 Hz control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution

  6. Proprioceptive Actuation Design for Dynamic Legged locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangbae; Wensing, Patrick; Biomimetic Robotics Lab Team

    Designing an actuator system for highly-dynamic legged locomotion exhibited by animals has been one of the grand challenges in robotics research. Conventional actuators designed for manufacturing applications have difficulty satisfying challenging requirements for high-speed locomotion, such as the need for high torque density and the ability to manage dynamic physical interactions. It is critical to introduce a new actuator design paradigm and provide guidelines for its incorporation in future mobile robots for research and industry. To this end, we suggest a paradigm called proprioceptive actuation, which enables highly- dynamic operation in legged machines. Proprioceptive actuation uses collocated force control at the joints to effectively control contact interactions at the feet under dynamic conditions. In the realm of legged machines, this paradigm provides a unique combination of high torque density, high-bandwidth force control, and the ability to mitigate impacts through backdrivability. Results show that the proposed design provides an impact mitigation factor that is comparable to other quadruped designs with series springs to handle impact. The paradigm is shown to enable the MIT Cheetah to manage the application of contact forces during dynamic bounding, with results given down to contact times of 85ms and peak forces over 450N. As a result, the MIT Cheetah achieves high-speed 3D running up to 13mph and jumping over an 18-inch high obstacle. The project is sponsored by DARPA M3 program.

  7. Eye-tracking dysfunctions in schizophrenic patients and their relatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzman, P.S.; Proctor, L.R.; Levy, D.L.; Yasillo, N.J.; Meltzer, H.Y.; Hurt, S.W.

    1974-08-01

    A simple test of smooth-pursuit eye movements disclosed a striking association between deviant eye tracking and clinically diagnosed schizophrenia. A high proportion of the schizophrenic patients' first-degree relatives who were not themselves clinically schizophrenic also showed deviant eye-tracking behavior. The relationship of poor eye tracking and schizophrenia is even stronger when specific psychological test evidence of thought disorder is used operationally to classify patients. The eye-tracking dysfunction may thus represent a genetic marker that can prove highly useful for studying the transmission of a vulnerability to schizophrenia. The findings suggest proprioceptive and interoceptive involvement in schizophrenic pathology. (auth)

  8. Eye torsion and the apparent horizon under head tilt and visual field rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, B. H.; Held, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two different experimental manipulations, namely head tilt and the viewing of a visual display rotating around the line of sight, induce torsional displacements of the eyes and a tilting of the apparent horizon. The present study examines the routes by which visual (field rotation) and otolith-proprioceptive (head tilt) sources of afference influence horizon judgments. In particular, the relationship between torsional eye movements and horizon estimates is addressed. The results indicate that visual and otolith-proprioceptive information sum directly in their influence on eye torsion, but interact more complexly in horizon estimates, indicating a dissociation of their central determinants.

  9. Mapping proprioception across a 2D horizontal workspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth T; Wong, Jeremy; Gribble, Paul L

    2010-07-29

    Relatively few studies have been reported that document how proprioception varies across the workspace of the human arm. Here we examined proprioceptive function across a horizontal planar workspace, using a new method that avoids active movement and interactions with other sensory modalities. We systematically mapped both proprioceptive acuity (sensitivity to hand position change) and bias (perceived location of the hand), across a horizontal-plane 2D workspace. Proprioception of both the left and right arms was tested at nine workspace locations and in 2 orthogonal directions (left-right and forwards-backwards). Subjects made repeated judgments about the position of their hand with respect to a remembered proprioceptive reference position, while grasping the handle of a robotic linkage that passively moved their hand to each judgement location. To rule out the possibility that the memory component of the proprioceptive testing procedure may have influenced our results, we repeated the procedure in a second experiment using a persistent visual reference position. Both methods resulted in qualitatively similar findings. Proprioception is not uniform across the workspace. Acuity was greater for limb configurations in which the hand was closer to the body, and was greater in a forward-backward direction than in a left-right direction. A robust difference in proprioceptive bias was observed across both experiments. At all workspace locations, the left hand was perceived to be to the left of its actual position, and the right hand was perceived to be to the right of its actual position. Finally, bias was smaller for hand positions closer to the body. The results of this study provide a systematic map of proprioceptive acuity and bias across the workspace of the limb that may be used to augment computational models of sensory-motor control, and to inform clinical assessment of sensory function in patients with sensory-motor deficits.

  10. Mapping proprioception across a 2D horizontal workspace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth T Wilson

    Full Text Available Relatively few studies have been reported that document how proprioception varies across the workspace of the human arm. Here we examined proprioceptive function across a horizontal planar workspace, using a new method that avoids active movement and interactions with other sensory modalities. We systematically mapped both proprioceptive acuity (sensitivity to hand position change and bias (perceived location of the hand, across a horizontal-plane 2D workspace. Proprioception of both the left and right arms was tested at nine workspace locations and in 2 orthogonal directions (left-right and forwards-backwards. Subjects made repeated judgments about the position of their hand with respect to a remembered proprioceptive reference position, while grasping the handle of a robotic linkage that passively moved their hand to each judgement location. To rule out the possibility that the memory component of the proprioceptive testing procedure may have influenced our results, we repeated the procedure in a second experiment using a persistent visual reference position. Both methods resulted in qualitatively similar findings. Proprioception is not uniform across the workspace. Acuity was greater for limb configurations in which the hand was closer to the body, and was greater in a forward-backward direction than in a left-right direction. A robust difference in proprioceptive bias was observed across both experiments. At all workspace locations, the left hand was perceived to be to the left of its actual position, and the right hand was perceived to be to the right of its actual position. Finally, bias was smaller for hand positions closer to the body. The results of this study provide a systematic map of proprioceptive acuity and bias across the workspace of the limb that may be used to augment computational models of sensory-motor control, and to inform clinical assessment of sensory function in patients with sensory-motor deficits.

  11. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  12. Right Temporoparietal Cortex Activation during Visuo-proprioceptive Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Paulson, Olaf B.

    2005-01-01

    of visual and proprioceptive information and are therefore impaired when these modalities disagree. With fMRI in healthy subjects we compared brain activity across two conditions with similar visual and proprioceptive stimulation and similar task demands that differed by the congruence of movement showed...... with congruent movement activated the premotor area bilaterally and the right temporoparietal junction. These brain areas have previously been associated with shifts in the attended location in the visual space. These findings suggest an interaction between vision and proprioception in orienting to spatial...

  13. Effect of Time after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears on Proprioception and Postural Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hee Lee

    Full Text Available This study was designed to compare proprioception and postural stability in patients with acute (time from injury ≤ 3 months and chronic (time from injury > 3 months ACL tears, and to evaluate the correlation between time interval after ACL injury and proprioception. Thigh muscle strength, postural stability, and joint position sense were compared in 48 patients with acute ACL tears and in 28 with chronic ACL tears. Maximal torque (60°/sec of the quadriceps and hamstring was evaluated using an isokinetic testing device. Postural stability was determined from the anterior-posterior (APSI, medial-lateral (MLSI, and overall (OSI stability indices using stabilometry. Joint position sense was also tested by reproduction of passive positioning (RPP. Muscle strengths and stability indices on both the involved and uninvolved sides were similar in the acute and chronic ACL tear groups. RPP on the involved side was significantly greater in the chronic than in the acute ACL tear group (7.8° vs. 5.6°, P = 0.041. Two of three stability indices (APSI, OSI and RPP were significantly greater on the involved than the uninvolved side in the chronic ACL tear group.

  14. Proprioceptive use and sit-to-stand-to-sit after lumbar microdiscectomy: The effect of surgical approach and early physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Lotte; Brumagne, Simon; Claeys, Kurt; Pijnenburg, Madelon; Goossens, Nina; Rummens, Sofie; Depreitere, Bart

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with non-specific low back pain show decreased reliance on lumbosacral proprioceptive signals and slower sit-to-stand-to-sit performance. However, little is known in patients after lumbar microdiscectomy. Patients were randomly assigned into transmuscular (n=12) or paramedian lumbar surgery (n=13). After surgery, the same patients were randomly assigned into individualized active physiotherapy starting 2 weeks after surgery (n=12) or usual care (n=13). Primary outcomes were center of pressure displacement during ankle and back muscles vibration (to evaluate proprioceptive use), and the duration of five sit-to-stand-to-sit movements, evaluated at 2 (baseline), 8 and 24 weeks after surgery. Two weeks after surgery, all patients showed smaller responses to back compared to ankle muscles vibration (P0.05). Already 8 weeks after surgery, the physiotherapy group needed significantly less time to perform five sit-to-stand-to-sit movements compared to the usual care group (Psit-to-stand-to-sit performance. Transmuscular lumbar surgery favoured recovery of lumbosacral proprioception 6 months after surgery. NCT01505595. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proprioceptive deafferentation slows down the processing of visual hand feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    During visually guided movements both vision and proprioception inform the brain about the position of the hand, so interaction between these two modalities is presumed. Current theories suggest that this interaction occurs by sensory information from both sources being fused into a more reliable...... proprioception facilitates the processing of visual information during motor control. Subjects used a computer mouse to move a cursor to a screen target. In 28% of the trials, pseudorandomly, the cursor was rotated or the target jumped. Reaction time for the trajectory correction in response to this perturbation...... was compared under conditions with normal and reduced proprioception after 1-Hz rTMS over the hand-contralateral somatosensory cortex. Proprioceptive deafferentation slowed down the reaction time for initiating a motor correction in response to a visual perturbation in hand position, but not to a target jump...

  16. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  17. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  18. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5±6.7 years underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice, and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0±6.7 years received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P=0.007 in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9% differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P=0.033. For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P=0.002. Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  19. Comparison of Ankle Proprioception Between Pregnant and Non Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Preetha R; John Solomon M

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant women report falls especially during their third trimester. Physiological changes along with ligament laxity can affect the joint proprioception in this population. This study was conducted to compare the ankle proprioception between pregnant and non pregnant women. Thirty pregnant and 30 non pregnant women were included in the study and the position of ankles were recorded by a digital camera placed 60 cms away from the feet of the subject. UTHSCSA Image tool software version 3.0. w...

  20. Proprioception in Above-the-Knee Amputees with Artificial Limbs

    OpenAIRE

    Latanioti, E. P.; Angoules, A. G.; Boutsikari, E. C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the lower limb proprioceptive sensation in patients with femoral amputation who received an artificial joint. Materials and Methods. 22 patients (18 men, 4 women), 24–65 years old (mean: 42), who had undergone above-the-knee joint amputation and underwent evaluation of proprioception using joint reposition in a predetermined angle of 15° knee flexion. The measurements were applied using a conventional goniometer to both amputated and healthy knees. The last ones were u...

  1. Influência da freqüência de alongamento utilizando facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva na flexibilidade dos músculos isquiotibiais Influencia de la frecuencia de alongamiento utilizando facilitación neuromuscular propioceptiva en la flexibilidad de los músculos isquio tibiales Influence of the stretching frequency using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in the flexibility of the hamstring muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenewton André da Silva Gama

    2007-02-01

    maniobras por sesión. Un análisis de varianza (ANOVA se usó para las medidas iniciales y finales (p Stretching techniques are one of the most used devices in rehabilitation practice. However, some parameters such as frequency have not been studied when proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF techniques are used. The purpose of this study was to analyze in the short and middle-terms the optimal frequency to increase hamstring muscle flexibility, measured by knee extension range of motion (ROM. Thirty-six female subjects were selected, (mean (SD age 21.7 (1.9 years with limited hamstring muscle flexibility. The subjects were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 9. The three stretching groups received the intervention five days a week for two consecutive weeks. The three PNF stretching groups alternated concerning frequency with one, three, and six maneuvers per session. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was used for the first and final measures (< 0.05. A post hoc analysis using the Tukey test (< 0.05 was performed. Data indicated that the PNF stretching groups had a statistically significant ROM gain in relation to the control group, but not among themselves. Concerning gain velocity, the groups that used three and six maneuvers had faster stretching gains (p < 0.05 than the one that used only one maneuver. The results showed that there was no difference in relation to delayed gains when one, three or six stretching maneuvers were used with the hold-relax technique on hamstring muscles.

  2. Visuo-proprioceptive interactions in degenerative cervical spine diseases requiring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freppel, S; Bisdorff, A; Colnat-Coulbois, S; Ceyte, H; Cian, C; Gauchard, G; Auque, J; Perrin, P

    2013-01-01

    Cervical proprioception plays a key role in postural control, but its specific contribution is controversial. Postural impairment was shown in whiplash injuries without demonstrating the sole involvement of the cervical spine. The consequences of degenerative cervical spine diseases are underreported in posture-related scientific literature in spite of their high prevalence. No report has focused on the two different mechanisms underlying cervicobrachial pain: herniated discs and spondylosis. This study aimed to evaluate postural control of two groups of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases with or without optokinetic stimulation before and after surgical treatment. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy were recruited and divided into two groups according to the spondylotic or discal origin of the nerve compression. All patients and a control population of 31 healthy individuals underwent a static posturographic test with 12 recordings; the first four recordings with the head in 0° position: eyes closed, eyes open without optokinetic stimulation, with clockwise and counter clockwise optokinetic stimulations. These four sensorial situations were repeated with the head rotated 30° to the left and to the right. Patients repeated these 12 recordings 6weeks postoperatively. None of the patients reported vertigo or balance disorders before or after surgery. Prior to surgery, in the eyes closed condition, the herniated disc group was more stable than the spondylosis group. After surgery, the contribution of visual input to postural control in a dynamic visual environment was reduced in both cervical spine diseases whereas in a stable visual environment visual contribution was reduced only in the spondylosis group. The relative importance of visual and proprioceptive inputs to postural control varies according to the type of pathology and surgery tends to reduce visual contribution mostly in the spondylosis group.

  3. Prism adaptation changes the subjective proprioceptive localization of the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpina, Federica; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Nijboer, Tanja Cornelia Wilhelmina; Dijkerman, Hendrik Christiaan

    2015-03-01

    Prism adaptation involves a proprioceptive, a visual and a motor component. As the existing paradigms are not able to distinguish between these three components, the contribution of the proprioceptive component remains unclear. In the current study, a proprioceptive judgement task, in the absence of motor responses, was used to investigate how prism adaptation would specifically influences the felt position of the hands in healthy participants. The task was administered before and after adaptation to left and right displacing prisms using either the left or the right hand during the adaptation procedure. The results appeared to suggest that the prisms induced a drift in the felt position of the hands, although the after-effect depended on the combination of the pointing hand and the visual deviation induced by prisms. The results are interpreted as in line with the hypothesis of an asymmetrical neural architecture of somatosensory processing. Moreover, the passive proprioception of the hand position revealed different effects of proprioceptive re-alignment compared to active pointing straight ahead: different mechanisms about how visuo-proprioceptive discrepancy is resolved were hypothesized.

  4. Motor sequence learning occurs despite disrupted visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd Lara A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has demonstrated the importance of proprioception for the development of internal representations of the forces encountered during a task. Evidence also exists for a significant role for proprioception in the execution of sequential movements. However, little work has explored the role of proprioceptive sensation during the learning of continuous movement sequences. Here, we report that the repeated segment of a continuous tracking task can be learned despite peripherally altered arm proprioception and severely restricted visual feedback regarding motor output. Methods Healthy adults practiced a continuous tracking task over 2 days. Half of the participants experienced vibration that altered proprioception of shoulder flexion/extension of the active tracking arm (experimental condition and half experienced vibration of the passive resting arm (control condition. Visual feedback was restricted for all participants. Retention testing was conducted on a separate day to assess motor learning. Results Regardless of vibration condition, participants learned the repeated segment demonstrated by significant improvements in accuracy for tracking repeated as compared to random continuous movement sequences. Conclusion These results suggest that with practice, participants were able to use residual afferent information to overcome initial interference of tracking ability related to altered proprioception and restricted visual feedback to learn a continuous motor sequence. Motor learning occurred despite an initial interference of tracking noted during acquisition practice.

  5. Extraocular muscle function testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye ...

  6. Proprioceptive reaction times and long-latency reflexes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C D; Tolhurst, S A; Bawa, P

    2012-08-01

    The stretch of upper limb muscles results in two electromyographic (EMG) peaks, M1 and M2. The amplitude of M2 peak can generally be modified by giving prior instruction to the subject on how to react to the applied perturbation. The unresolved question is whether the amplitude modulation results from change in the gain of the reflex pathway contributing to M2, or by superposition of reaction time (RT) activity. The following study attempted to resolve this question by examining the overlap between proprioceptive RT and M2 activities. Subject's right wrist flexors were stretched, and he/she was instructed either (1) not to intervene (passive task) or (2) to react as fast as possible by simultaneously flexing both wrists (active or compensate task). Under passive and active conditions, M1 and M2 were observed from EMG of right wrist flexors, and during the active condition, RT activities were additionally observed from both sides. The onset and offset of M2 (M1(onset), M2(offset)) were measured from the passive averages, while the RT was measured from the averaged EMG response of the left wrist flexors. For between-subject correlations, the data were divided into two sets: (1) subjects with RT shorter than M2(offset) (fast group) and (2) subjects with RT more than 10 ms longer than their M2(offset) (slow group). Modulation during M2 period was large for the fast group, and it was almost zero for the slow group. These results indicate that the superimposition of RT activity mainly contributes to the instruction-dependent modulation of M2 peak.

  7. Motor Training: Comparison of Visual and Auditory Coded Proprioceptive Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Jepson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-perception of body posture and movement is achieved through multi-sensory integration, particularly the utilisation of vision, and proprioceptive information derived from muscles and joints. Disruption to these processes can occur following a neurological accident, such as stroke, leading to sensory and physical impairment. Rehabilitation can be helped through use of augmented visual and auditory biofeedback to stimulate neuro-plasticity, but the effective design and application of feedback, particularly in the auditory domain, is non-trivial. Simple auditory feedback was tested by comparing the stepping accuracy of normal subjects when given a visual spatial target (step length and an auditory temporal target (step duration. A baseline measurement of step length and duration was taken using optical motion capture. Subjects (n=20 took 20 ‘training’ steps (baseline ±25% using either an auditory target (950 Hz tone, bell-shaped gain envelope or visual target (spot marked on the floor and were then asked to replicate the target step (length or duration corresponding to training with all feedback removed. Visual cues (mean percentage error=11.5%; SD ± 7.0%; auditory cues (mean percentage error = 12.9%; SD ± 11.8%. Visual cues elicit a high degree of accuracy both in training and follow-up un-cued tasks; despite the novelty of the auditory cues present for subjects, the mean accuracy of subjects approached that for visual cues, and initial results suggest a limited amount of practice using auditory cues can improve performance.

  8. Cervical range of motion and proprioception in rugby players versus non-rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Sally D; McCarthy, Peter W

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of number of years of playing rugby on neck function. Active cervical spine range of motion and proprioception were assessed in 14 non-rugby-playing but trained sportsmen (mean age 28 years, s = 7) and 46 rugby players (26 rugby forwards: mean age 26 years, s = 5; mean years played 14 years; 20 backs: mean age 24 years, s = 5; mean years played 14 years). Active cervical range of motion in flexion, extension, left and right lateral flexion, plus left and right rotation were measured using a cervical range of motion device. The ability to reposition the head in a central position with eyes closed was taken as a measure of proprioception. Results show that rugby forwards generally had the least active cervical range of motion, particularly neck extension (forwards, 43 degrees ; backs, 55 degrees ; controls, 58 degrees ), with the decrement correlating with the number of years played. In addition, repositioning was significantly worse in rugby players after neck extension than non-rugby players (6 degrees vs. 3 degrees ). The active cervical range of motion of rugby forwards is similar to that of whiplash patients, suggesting that participation in rugby can have an effect on neck range of motion that is equivalent to chronic disability. Reduced active cervical range of motion could also increase the likelihood of injury and exacerbate age-related neck problems.

  9. [The influence of proprioceptive insoles (Bourdiol) on the sagittal curvature and inclination of the trunk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Gliemann, C; Drerup, B; Osada, N; Wetz, H H

    2006-11-01

    Proprioceptive insoles rely on the concept of Réné-Jaques Bourdiol, a French neurologist. The aim is to modulate plantar surface sensibility and to influence posture and statics of patients: it is hypothesized that the effect of modified afferent sensory input through proprioceptive stimulation of terminal muscle chains will have either a relaxing or stimulating effect on the whole body, which may be realized by affecting the posture. Small pads with a thickness of typically 1-3 mm are embedded into the insole to provide a specific stimulation. In fitting the insoles selectively to the individual patient the effect of the insoles on the trunk posture is taken as a feedback. This study investigates the influence of proprioceptive insoles on the sagittal curve in 20 selected patients. The protocol used a repeated measures research design. The measures of the sagittal curve were obtained using raster stereography. The four different conditions were: (1) barefoot, (2) convenient shoes without the insoles, (3) the same shoes with a placebo insole, and (4) the same shoes with neurological insoles. Evaluation of raster stereographs provided the kyphotic angle between T4 and T12 and lordotic angle between T12 and S1. Statistical evaluation was performed with the t-test for paired measurements. No significant differences were found in the sagittal profile. Only trunk inclination in normal posture was found to yield a significant difference (0.38 degrees) between placebo and neurological insoles. However, no clear statement on the efficiency of neurological insoles can be made.

  10. Recovery of Proprioception in the Upper Extremity by Robotic Mirror Therapy: a Clinical Pilot Study for Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Koh, Sukgyu; Beom, Jaewon; Kim, Yoon Jae; Park, Jang Woo; Koh, Eun Sil; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2017-10-01

    A novel robotic mirror therapy system was recently developed to provide proprioceptive stimulus to the hemiplegic arm during a mirror therapy. Validation of the robotic mirror therapy system was performed to confirm its synchronicity prior to the clinical study. The mean error angle range between the intact arm and the robot was 1.97 to 4.59 degrees. A 56-year-old male who had right middle cerebral artery infarction 11 months ago received the robotic mirror therapy for ten 30-minute sessions during 2 weeks. Clinical evaluation and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies were performed before and after the intervention. At the follow-up evaluation, the thumb finding test score improved from 2 to 1 for eye level and from 3 to 1 for overhead level. The Albert's test score on the left side improved from 6 to 11. Improvements were sustained at 2-month follow-up. The fMRI during the passive motion revealed a considerable increase in brain activity at the lower part of the right superior parietal lobule, suggesting the possibility of proprioception enhancement. The robotic mirror therapy system may serve as a useful treatment method for patients with supratentorial stroke to facilitate recovery of proprioceptive deficit and hemineglect. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  11. Healthy Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... los Ojos Cómo hablarle a su oculista Healthy Eyes Having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is one ... or contact lenses. What is a comprehensive dilated eye exam? A comprehensive dilated eye exam is a ...

  12. The effects of comprehensive warm-up programs on proprioception, static and dynamic balance on male soccer players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Daneshjoo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The study investigated the effects of FIFA 11+ and HarmoKnee, both being popular warm-up programs, on proprioception, and on the static and dynamic balance of professional male soccer players. METHODS: Under 21 year-old soccer players (n = 36 were divided randomly into 11+, HarmoKnee and control groups. The programs were performed for 2 months (24 sessions. Proprioception was measured bilaterally at 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion using the Biodex Isokinetic Dynamometer. Static and dynamic balances were evaluated using the stork stand test and Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT, respectively. RESULTS: The proprioception error of dominant leg significantly decreased from pre- to post-test by 2.8% and 1.7% in the 11+ group at 45° and 60° knee flexion, compared to 3% and 2.1% in the HarmoKnee group. The largest joint positioning error was in the non-dominant leg at 30° knee flexion (mean error value = 5.047, (p<0.05. The static balance with the eyes opened increased in the 11+ by 10.9% and in the HarmoKnee by 6.1% (p<0.05. The static balance with eyes closed significantly increased in the 11+ by 12.4% and in the HarmoKnee by 17.6%. The results indicated that static balance was significantly higher in eyes opened compared to eyes closed (p = 0.000. Significant improvements in SEBT in the 11+ (12.4% and HarmoKnee (17.6% groups were also found. CONCLUSION: Both the 11+ and HarmoKnee programs were proven to be useful warm-up protocols in improving proprioception at 45° and 60° knee flexion as well as static and dynamic balance in professional male soccer players. Data from this research may be helpful in encouraging coaches or trainers to implement the two warm-up programs in their soccer teams.

  13. AN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC STUDY OF WHETHER THE DIGASTRIC MUSCLES ARE CONTROLLED BY JAW-CLOSING PROPRIOCEPTORS IN MAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWILLIGEN, JD; MORIMOTO, T; BROEKHUIJSEN, ML; BIJL, GK; INOUE, T

    1993-01-01

    Whether in the oral system the digastric muscles (which lack muscle spindles) are under the control of proprioceptive information from the masseter muscles (which contain muscle spindles) was investigated by analysing whether and how the masseters and digastrics showed coordinated behaviour during a

  14. The effect of kinesiology tape on knee proprioception in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rui; Trindade, Raquel; Gonçalves, Rui Soles

    2016-10-01

    Kinesiology tape can improve athletic performance; however, due to cutaneous stimulation its application can have an influence on proprioception. To determine the effects of kinesiology tape on knee proprioception applied to quadriceps, namely in the joint position sense (JPS) and in the threshold to detect passive movement (TTDPM), both immediately after and 24 h after its application. Thirty young healthy participants were randomly divided into experimental and control group. In the experimental group, a kinesiology tape on the quadriceps muscle was applied. The JPS and the TTDPM of the knee was assessed before, immediately after and 24 h after the kinesiology tape intervention. No significant differences were found in the assessment made before intervention. The Friedman Test showed that kinesiology tape had no influence on JPS in either group over time (p > 0.05). However, the TTDPM decreased significantly immediately after and 24 h after its application (p < 0.05). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identified proprioceptive afferents and motor rhythm entrainment in the crayfish walking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, R C; Sillar, K T; Bush, B M

    1992-03-01

    1. In crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, remotion of a walking leg stretches the thoraco-coxal (TC) muscle receptor organ (TCMRO), located at the leg's articulation with the thorax. In vitro, alternate stretch and release of the fourth leg's TCMRO entrained the centrally generated rhythmic motor output to that leg, with the remotor phase of the rhythm entraining to TCMRO stretch, the promoter phase to release. This coordination of motor bursts to afferent input corresponds to that of active, rhythmic movements in vivo. 2. Entrainment was rapid in onset (stable coordination resulting within the first or second stimulus cycle) and was relatively phase-constant (whatever the stimulus frequency, during 1:1 entrainment, remotor bursts began near the onset of stretch and promotor bursts began near the onset of release). Outside the range of 1:1 entrainment, 2:1, 1:2, and 1:3 coordination ratios (rhythm:stimulus) were encountered. Resetting by phasic stimulation of the TCMRO was complete and probabilistic: effective stimuli triggered rapid transitions between the two burst phases. 3. The TCMRO is innervated by two afferents, the nonspiking S and T fibers, which generate graded depolarizing receptor potentials in response to stretch. During proprioceptive entrainment, the more phasic T fiber depolarized and hyperpolarized more rapidly or in advance of the more tonic S fiber. These receptor potentials were modified differently in the two afferents by interaction with central synaptic inputs that were phase-locked to the entrained motor rhythm. 4. Injecting slow sinusoidal current into either afferent alone could entrain motor rhythms: promoter phase bursts were entrained to depolarization of the S fiber or hyperpolarization of the T fiber, whereas the converse response was obtained for remotor phase bursts. 5. During proprioceptive entrainment, tonic hyperpolarization of the S fiber weakened entrained promotor bursts and allowed remotor burst durations to increase

  16. Wrist proprioceptive acuity: A comprehensive robot-aided assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Leonardo; Contu, Sara; Konczak, Juergen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Proprioception is the sense of the body awareness. Proprioceptive deficits represent frequent consequences of several neurological conditions like stroke, Parkinson's disease and others. The assessment of such somatosensory function is crucial, although the available clinical tests are not sensitive enough. The human wrist is a crucial joint for many activities of daily living and to address the lack of its characterization in terms of proprioceptive acuity the authors in previous studies proposed a novel method that combined the use of a 3-DoF robot and a threshold haunting paradigm. Further experiments were performed to characterize the proprioceptive acuity of the dominant wrist for adduction, extension, pronation and supination by using a 2-alternative-forced-choice test. The acuity thresholds obtained from six subjects (mean values ± standard deviation of 1.65±0.39 for extension, 1.13±0.34 for adduction, 1.90±0.58 for pronation and 1.70±0.30 for supination) were finally combined with the ones harvested in the previous studies for flexion and abduction in order to build the first comprehensive database of human wrist proprioceptive acuity.

  17. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, H E; van der Worp, H; Nijenbanning, L; Diercks, R L; Zwerver, J; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2016-03-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study was to determine differences in proprioception, by measuring threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM) between recreational athletes diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy and healthy controls. The TTDPM as measure of proprioception was determined in 22 recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and 22 healthy recreational athletes using a validated instrument. Amount of knee flexion and extension before the movement was noticed by the subject was determined. 80 measurements per athlete (left and right leg, towards extension and flexion and with two starting angles of 20° and 40° flexion) were performed. Mean TTDPM was compared between groups and among the injured recreational athletes between the affected and unaffected knee. No significant difference in TTDPM was found between recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and healthy controls. We did find a significant difference between the injured and non-injured knee in recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy; mean TTDPM was 0.02° higher in the injured knee (p=0.044). No difference was found in proprioception between recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and healthy recreational athletes. It is unclear whether such a small difference in TTDPM between affected and unaffected knee is important in clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proprioceptive Localization Deficits in People With Cerebellar Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Heidi M; Therrien, Amanda S; Bastian, Amy J

    2017-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that an important function of the cerebellum is predicting the state of the body during movement. Yet, the extent of cerebellar involvement in perception of limb state (i.e., proprioception, specifically limb position sense) has yet to be determined. Here, we investigated whether patients with cerebellar damage have deficits when trying to locate their hand in space (i.e., proprioceptive localization), which is highly important for everyday movements. By comparing performance during passive robot-controlled and active self-made multi-joint movements, we were able to determine that some cerebellar patients show improved precision during active movement (i.e., active benefit), comparable to controls, whereas other patients have reduced active benefit. Importantly, the differences in patient performance are not explained by patient diagnosis or clinical ratings of impairment. Furthermore, a subsequent experiment confirmed that active deficits in proprioceptive localization occur during both single-joint and multi-joint movements. As such, it is unlikely that localization deficits can be explained by the multi-joint coordination deficits occurring after cerebellar damage. Our results suggest that cerebellar damage may cause varied impairments to different elements of proprioceptive sense. It follows that proprioceptive localization should be adequately accounted for in clinical testing and rehabilitation of people with cerebellar damage.

  19. Postural control in strabismic children: importance of proprioceptive information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia eLIONS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo examine the effect of proprioceptive information during postural control in strabismic children.MethodsPostural stability was recorded with a platform (Techno Concept® in twelve strabismic children aged from 4.9 to 10 years and data were compared to that of twelve control age-matched children. Two postural positions were performed: Romberg and Tandem. Two postural conditions: without and with foam pad. We analyzed the surface area, the length, the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP and the effect of proprioceptive information. ResultsStrabismic children are more instable than control age-matched children. The surface, the length and the mean speed of CoP are significantly higher in strabismic children than in control age-matched children. Both groups are more instable in Tandem position than in Romberg position. Finally, strabismic children use more proprioceptive information than control age-matched children. ConclusionFor both Romberg and Tandem position, strabismic children are more instable than control age-matched children. Strabismic children use proprioceptive information more than control age-matched children to control their posture.SignificanceProprioceptive inputs are important for control posture particularly for strabismic population.

  20. Fatigue effects on tracking performance and muscle activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.A.; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Looze, M.P. de; Dieën, J.H. van

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that fatigue affects proprioception and consequently movement accuracy, the effects of which may be counteracted by increased muscle activity. To determine the effects of fatigue on tracking performance and muscle activity in the M. extensor carpi radialis (ECR), 11 female

  1. Fatigue effects on tracking performance and muscle activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.A.; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Looze, M.P. de; Dieën, J.H. van

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that fatigue affects proprioception and consequently movement accuracy, the effects of which may be counteracted by increased muscle activity. To determine the effects of fatigue on tracking performance and muscle activity in the M. extensor carpi radialis (ECR), 11 female part

  2. FORWARD HEAD POSTURE CORRECTION VERSUS SHOULDER STABILIZATION EXERCISES EFFECT ON SCAPULAR DYSKINESIA AND SHOULDER PROPRIOCEPTION IN ATHLETES AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepmala Thakur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forward head posture (FHP, the most common deviation from the normal curvature in cervical spine. Craniocervical flexor muscle strengthening is frequently used treatment for FHP. Scapular dykinesia (SD is the alteration in the normal static or dynamic motion of the scapula during coupled scapulohumeral movements. Shoulder stabilization exercises are an effective treatment for SD. As both FHP and SD are related to each other, the objective of the study was to find and compare the effect of FHP correction and shoulder stabilization exercises on SD and shoulder proprioception. Methods: 40 athletes (18-30yrs were recruited. Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups. Group A received deep neck flexor strengthening and anterior scalene stretch, group B received shoulder stabilizing exercises. Paired t test and chi-square test were used to judge the statistical significant difference. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. All data was analyzed using SPSS program version 12. Result: No statistical significant difference was found between the groups for the 4 outcome variables, but significant improvement was seen within the groups. Shoulder proprioception was found to be significant between the groups where group B (p =<0.001 showed better improvement than group A (p = <0.017. Conclusion: Both FHP correction as well as shoulder stabilization exercises were equally effective in correction of scapular dyskinesia and shoulder proprioception. Shoulder stabilization exercises showed slightly better improvement than FHP correction group in reducing proprioception errors. Also neck strength values were found to be clinically significant for deep neck strengthening group.

  3. Tactile and proprioceptive temporal discrimination are impaired in functional tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tinazzi

    Full Text Available In order to obtain further information on the pathophysiology of functional tremor, we assessed tactile discrimination threshold and proprioceptive temporal discrimination motor threshold values in 11 patients with functional tremor, 11 age- and sex-matched patients with essential tremor and 13 healthy controls.Tactile discrimination threshold in both the right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional tremor than in the other groups. Proprioceptive temporal discrimination threshold for both right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional and essential tremor than in healthy controls. No significant correlation between discrimination thresholds and duration or severity of tremor was found.Temporal processing of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli is impaired in patients with functional tremor. The mechanisms underlying this impaired somatosensory processing and possible ways to apply these findings clinically merit further research.

  4. Interactions between tactile and proprioceptive representations in haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon-Gonzalez, L; Naufel, S N; Santos, V J; Helms Tillery, S

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic limbs, regardless of their sophisticated motor control, require sensory feedback to viably interact with the environment. Toward that aim, the authors examined interrelationships between tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Through human psychophysics experiments, they evaluated error patterns of subjects estimating hand location in a horizontal 2-dimensional workspace under 3 tactile conditions. While tactile cues did not significantly affect the structure of the pattern of errors, touching the workspace reduced estimation errors. During neurophysiological experiments, a macaque grasped textured objects using 2 hand postures. Sensory coding showed dependence on both roughness of the manipulandum and posture. In summary, the authors suggest that tactile sensations underlying haptics are processed in a stable spatial reference frame provided by a proprioceptive system, and that tactile and proprioceptive inputs can be encoded simultaneously by individual cells. Such insights will be useful for providing stable, adaptive sensory feedback for neuroprosthetics.

  5. Proprioceptive target matching asymmetries in left-handed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Noble, Brittany C; Brown, Susan H

    2009-08-01

    In right-handers, the ability to reproduce proprioceptive targets has been shown to be asymmetric, favoring the non-preferred left arm. The present study sought to determine whether a similar arm/hemisphere asymmetry exists for left-handers. Ten strong left-handed adults used the left or right arm to perform proprioceptive target matching tasks that varied in processing demands (i.e., need for memory, interhemispheric transfer) and target amplitude (20, 40 degrees). Similar to right-handers, left-handed individuals had smaller total errors when matching with the non-preferred arm. This asymmetry was greatest in conditions with increased processing demands and larger amplitude targets. These results provide the first evidence to date of right arm/left hemisphere dominance for proprioceptive target matching in left-handers that is the "mirror image" of right-handers.

  6. Proprioceptive coupling within motor neurons drives C. elegans forward locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Quan; Po, Michelle; Hulme, Elizabeth; Chen, Sway; Liu, Xinyu; Kwok, Sen Wai; Gershow, Marc; Leifer, Andrew M; Butler, Victoria; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kawano, Taizo; Schafer, William R; Whitesides, George

    2012-01-01

    Summary Locomotion requires coordinated motor activity throughout an animal’s body. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, chains of coupled Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) are commonly evoked to explain local rhythmic behaviors. In C. elegans, we report that proprioception within the motor circuit is responsible for propagating and coordinating rhythmic undulatory waves from head to tail during forward movement. Proprioceptive coupling between adjacent body regions transduces rhythmic movement initiated near the head into bending waves driven along the body by a chain of reflexes. Using optogenetics and calcium imaging to manipulate and monitor motor circuit activity of moving C. elegans held in microfluidic devices, we found that the B-type cholinergic motor neurons transduce the proprioceptive signal. In C. elegans, a sensorimotor feedback loop operating within a specific type of motor neuron both drives and organizes body movement. PMID:23177960

  7. Validation of a method to measure the proprioception of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, A. L.; Huizinga, M. R.; Kaan, W. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Hof, A. L.; Bulstra, S. K.; Diercks, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Proprioception is an important mechanism in knee stability and function. After an injury like an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture changes appear in knee proprioception which play a major role in rehabilitation. There are several methods to measure proprioception; the threshold

  8. Validation of a method to measure the proprioception of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, A. L.; Huizinga, M. R.; Kaan, W. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Hof, A. L.; Bulstra, S. K.; Diercks, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Proprioception is an important mechanism in knee stability and function. After an injury like an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture changes appear in knee proprioception which play a major role in rehabilitation. There are several methods to measure proprioception; the threshold

  9. Development of a Protocol to Test Proprioceptive Utilization as a Predictor for Sensorimotor Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Caldwell, E. E.; Peters, B. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oddsson, L. I. E.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight show significant inter-subject variations in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment because of their innate sensory weighting. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which each individual astronaut will be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We hypothesize participant's ability to utilize individual sensory information (vision, proprioception and vestibular) influences adaptation in sensorimotor performance after space flight. The goal of this study is to develop a reliable protocol to test proprioceptive utilization in a functional postural control task. Subjects "stand" in a supine position while strapped to a backpack frame holding a friction-free device using air-bearings that allow the subject to move freely in the frontal plane, similar to when in upright standing. The frame is attached to a pneumatic cylinder, which can provide different levels of a gravity-like force that the subject must balance against to remain "upright". The supine posture with eyes closed ensures reduced vestibular and visual contribution to postural control suggesting somatosensory and/or non-otolith vestibular inputs will provide relevant information for maintaining balance control in this task. This setup is called the gravity bed. Fourteen healthy subjects carried out three trials each with eyes open alternated with eyes closed, "standing" on their dominant leg in the gravity bed environment while loaded with 60 percent of their body weight. Subjects were instructed to: "use your sense of sway about the ankle and pressure changes under the foot to maintain balance." Maximum length of a trial was 45 seconds. A force plate underneath the foot recorded forces and moments during the trial and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) attached on the backpack's frame near the center of mass of the subject recorded upper body postural

  10. Upper and lower extremity proprioceptive inputs modulate EMG activity of the trapezius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Kuçuk, Fatma Kursad; Ozkul, Ayca

    2011-02-01

    Axial muscles like the trapezius have different reflexive and functional properties. The aim of this study was to analyze the long latency reflexes obtained from the trapezius by the electrical stimulation of upper and lower extremity peripheral nerves. Thirty-one healthy volunteers were included in the study. Surface EMG activity of both trapezius muscles was recorded and averaged after electrical stimulation of the median and peroneal mixed nerves. The recordings were performed during supine and erect posture in nine subjects to evaluate of the effect of postural differences on reflex response. Reflex recordings were also performed in six subjects from some other muscles together with the trapezius by the stimulation of the peroneal nerve. Reflex responses including three components were recorded from the trapezius muscle (unilateral or bilateral) by electrical stimulation of the peroneal nerve. The most stable of them was the second component (23/31) which had a latency of 72.6 ± 7.9 ms for the ipsilateral, and 74.2 ± 8.5 ms for the contralateral trapezius (15/31). For median stimulation, the first component recorded at 32.0 ± 6.7 ms was the most stable (25/31). The second component was more frequently recorded on the contralateral side (14/31). Erect posture increased the amplitude of these components. Upper and lower extremity proprioceptive inputs modulate the EMG activity of the trapezius. This modulation probably related with postural adjustments.

  11. The contribution of proprioceptive information to postural control in elderly and patients with Parkinson's disease with a history of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkers, Esther M J; Dockx, Kim; Heremans, Elke; Vercruysse, Sarah; Verschueren, Sabine M P; Mirelman, Anat; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Proprioceptive deficits negatively affect postural control but their precise contribution to postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We investigated if proprioceptive manipulations differentially affect balance, measured by force plates, during quiet standing in 13 PD patients and 13 age-matched controls with a history of falls. Perceived limits of stability (LoS) were derived from the differences between maximal center of pressure (CoP) displacement in anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) direction during a maximal leaning task. Task conditions comprised standing with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC): (1) on a stable surface; (2) an unstable surface; and (3) with Achilles tendon vibration. CoP displacements were calculated as a percentage of their respective LoS. Perceived LoS did not differ between groups. PD patients showed greater ML CoP displacement than elderly fallers (EF) across all conditions (p = 0.043) and tended to have higher postural sway in relation to the LoS (p = 0.050). Both groups performed worse on an unstable surface and during tendon vibration compared to standing on a stable surface with EO and even more so with EC. Both PD and EF had more AP sway in all conditions with EC compared to EO (p postural control in fallers with and without PD. PD fallers showed higher ML sway after sensory manipulations, as a result of which these values approached their perceived LoS more closely than in EF. We conclude that despite a similar fall history, PD patients showed more ML instability than EF, irrespective of sensory manipulation, but had a similar reliance on ankle proprioception. Hence, we recommend that rehabilitation and fall prevention for PD should focus on motor rather than on sensory aspects.

  12. Age-based model for metacarpophalangeal joint proprioception in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinderknecht MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mike D Rinderknecht,1 Olivier Lambercy,1 Vanessa Raible,2 Joachim Liepert,2 Roger Gassert1 1Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Department of Neurorehabilitation, Kliniken Schmieder, Allensbach, Germany Abstract: Neurological injuries such as stroke can lead to proprioceptive impairment. For an informed diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning, it is essential to be able to distinguish between healthy performance and deficits following the neurological injury. Since there is some evidence that proprioception declines with age and stroke occurs predominantly in the elderly population, it is important to create a healthy reference model in this specific age group. However, most studies investigate age effects by comparing young and elderly subjects and do not provide a model within a target age range. Moreover, despite the functional relevance of the hand in activities of daily living, age-based models of distal proprioception are scarce. Here, we present a proprioception model based on the assessment of the metacarpophalangeal joint angle difference threshold in 30 healthy elderly subjects, aged 55–80 years (median: 63, interquartile range: 58–66, using a robotic tool to apply passive flexion–extension movements to the index finger. A two-alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with an adaptive algorithm to define stimulus magnitude was used. The mixed-effects model analysis revealed that aging has a significant, increasing effect on the difference threshold at the metacarpophalangeal joint, whereas other predictors (eg, tested hand or sex did not show a significant effect. The adaptive algorithm allowed reaching an average assessment duration <15 minutes, making its clinical applicability realistic. This study provides further evidence for an age-related decline in proprioception at the level of the hand

  13. The effect of weight-bearing exercise with low frequency, whole body vibration on lumbosacral proprioception: a pilot study on normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Tania L; Richardson, Carolyn A; Stanton, Warren R

    2005-01-01

    Patients with low back pain (LBP) often present with impaired proprioception of the lumbopelvic region. For this reason, proprioception training usually forms part of the rehabilitation protocols. New exercise equipment that produces whole body, low frequency vibration (WBV) has been developed to improve muscle function, and reportedly improves proprioception. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether weightbearing exercise given in conjunction with WBV would affect lumbosacral position sense in healthy individuals. For this purpose, twenty-five young individuals with no LBP were assigned randomly to an experimental or control group. The experimental group received WBV for five minutes while holding a static, semi-squat position. The control group adopted the same weightbearing position for equal time but received no vibration. A two-dimensional motion analysis system measured the repositioning accuracy of pelvic tilting in standing. The experimental (WBV) group demonstrated a significant improvement in repositioning accuracy over time (mean 0.78 degrees) representing 39% improvement. It was concluded that WBV may induce improvements in lumbosacral repositioning accuracy when combined with a weightbearing exercise. Future studies with WBV should focus on evaluating its effects with different types of exercise, the exercise time needed for optimal outcomes, and the effects on proprioception deficits in LBP patients.

  14. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  15. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  16. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  17. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  18. STRATEGY OF VISUAL PROPRIOCEPTIVE CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH INJURY TO THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE AND HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS (SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Piontek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Knee joint dysfunction resulting from injury to the anterior crucial ligament (ACL is associated not only with mechanical joint instability but also with damage of ligamentous receptors responsible for the joint proprioception. It was found that disturbances of signals from the damaged joint produce disorders in movement perception and position of the analogous joint in the normal limb. This study is aimed at evaluating the control strategy in patients with an injury to the anterior crucial ligament.Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Subjects/Patients- 84 men, aged 15 to 55 years (mean age 27 years were included in this study. Methods- Patients were divided into two groups: those with unilateral injury to the ACL (33 patients and a control group of healthy volunteers (soccer players; 51 men. Anterior crucial ligament damage was confirmed with arthroscopic knee joint examination in every patient. The way of visual proprioceptive control was assessed with both dynamic (DRT and static (SRT Riva tests standing on one leg. Tests were performed with the Delos Postural Proprioceptive System (Delos s.r.l., Corso Lecce, Torino, Italy in the biomechanical evaluation laboratory at Rehasport Clinic in Poznań. Results: A statistically significant difference for deviations from the averaged axis in SRT (static Riva test with closed eyes was found between the limb with a damaged ACL and the normal limb in the group of patients with injury to the ACL (p=0.006 and between the limb with a damaged ACL and normal limbs in healthy volunteers (p=0.022. A statistically significant difference for deviations from the averaged axis in SRT with closed eyes was also found between the dominant and non-dominant limb in healthy volunteers (p=0.013. No significant differences in the results of tests with open eyes were noted. Conclusions: The results of systems and their contribution to the visual proprioceptive control suggest an important role of the

  19. Plantar pressure distribution in elderly subjec Ts after proprioceptive exercises

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    Fábio Marcon Alfieri

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes related to aging limit cutaneous plantar perception, interfering in postural control. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of a regular program of proprioceptive intervention on plantar pressure distribution in older adults. Plantar pressure distribution was evaluated in 29 volunteers (63.06 ±2.84 years standing on both feet with eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC. After baropodometric evaluation, the subjects attended 3 weekly proprioceptive intervention sessions of 1 hour’s duration for 3 months. Results: Prior to the intervention, participants exhibited mean EO values of 0.29 ±0.044 Kg/cm² for the right foot and 0.31 ±0.04 Kg/cm² for the left foot (p=0.0078 and post-intervention these were 0.28±0.04 Kg/cm² and 0.30±0.04 Kg/cm², respectively. Pre-intervention EC values were 0.30 ±0.044 Kg/cm² for the right and 0.31 ±0.05 Kg/cm² for the left foot and post-intervention these figures were 0.28 ±0.04 Kg/cm² and 0.29 ±0.049 Kg/cm², respectively. The results of MANOVA indicated significant differences in contact pressure between pre-intervention and post-intervention measurements. Conclusions: The intervention used here reduced the participants’ plantar pressure, but was unable to improve the distribution of plantar pressure between the right and left feet. Resumo Alterações decorrentes do envelhecimento limitam a percepção cutâneo-plantar, interferindo no controle postural. O objetivo deste trabalho foi de verificar os efeitos de um programa regular de intervenção proprioceptiva sobre a distribuição da pressão plantar em idosos. Avaliou-se a distribuição da pressão plantar em 29 indivíduos (63,06 ±2,84 anos em apoio bipodal com olhos abertos (BA e fechados (BF. Após avaliação baropodométrica, iniciou-se intervenção proprioceptiva (3 sessões semanais de 1 hora durante 3 meses. No apoio BA, os indivíduos apresentaram valor médio de 0,29±0,044 Kg/cm² no pé direito e de 0,31± 0,04 Kg

  20. Proprioceptive rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction in movement disorders: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Trompetto, Carlo; Mori, Laura; Pelosin, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders (MDs) are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson's disease) and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia), suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with MDs, and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using "task-intrinsic" or "augmented feedback." This perspective article reviews the available evidence on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with MDs and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception.

  1. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport.

  2. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport.

  3. Proprioceptive rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction in movement disorders: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eAbbruzzese

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson’s disease and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with movement disorders and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using task intrinsic or augmented feedback. This perspective article reviews the available evidences on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with movement disorders and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception.

  4. Differences in Sensorimotor Processing of Visual and Proprioceptive Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Gary and Morris, Harold H.

    1988-01-01

    A paradox in studying sensory perception is that people often attend to a stimulus which provides the least optimal information. Usually, this is a visual stimulus. The study sought to lessen this reliance on vision by training subjects to respond to proprioceptive stimuli. Results are discussed. (Author/JL)

  5. Proprioceptive precision is impaired in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Holly A; Jones, Stephanie A H; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), or other similar connective tissue disorders, may have proprioceptive impairments, the reason for which is still unknown. We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference locations, and that this deficit was positively correlated with the severity of joint hypermobility. We further explore proprioceptive abilities in EDS by having patients localize their non-dominant left hand at a greater number of workspace locations than in our previous study. Additionally, we explore the relationship between chronic pain and proprioceptive sensitivity. We found that, although patients were just as accurate as controls, they were not as precise. Patients showed twice as much scatter than controls at all locations, but the degree of scatter did not positively correlate with chronic pain scores. This further supports the idea that a proprioceptive impairment pertaining to precision is present in EDS, but may not relate to the magnitude of chronic pain.

  6. Proprioceptive recalibration arises slowly compared to reach adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbib, Basel; Henriques, Denise Y P; Cressman, Erin K

    2016-08-01

    When subjects reach in a novel visuomotor environment (e.g. while viewing a cursor representing their hand that is rotated from their hand's actual position), they typically adjust their movements (i.e. bring the cursor to the target), thus reducing reaching errors. Additionally, research has shown that reaching with altered visual feedback of the hand results in sensory changes, such that proprioceptive estimates of hand position are shifted in the direction of the visual feedback experienced (Cressman and Henriques in J Neurophysiol 102:3505-3518, 2009). This study looked to establish the time course of these sensory changes. Additionally, the time courses of implicit sensory and motor changes were compared. Subjects reached to a single visual target while seeing a cursor that was either aligned with their hand position (50 trials) or rotated 30° clockwise relative to their hand (150 trials). Reach errors and proprioceptive estimates of felt hand position were assessed following the aligned reach training trials and at seven different times during the rotated reach training trials by having subjects reach to the target without visual feedback, and provide estimates of their hand relative to a visual reference marker, respectively. Results revealed a shift in proprioceptive estimates throughout the rotated reach training trials; however, significant sensory changes were not observed until after 70 trials. In contrast, results showed a greater change in reaches after a limited number of reach training trials with the rotated cursor. These findings suggest that proprioceptive recalibration arises more slowly than reach adaptation.

  7. Measurement of active shoulder proprioception: dedicated system and device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Wojtaszek, Marcin; Kaniewski, Ryszard; Stefaniak, Jakub; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2013-02-01

    Proprioception is an essential part of shoulder stability and neuromuscular control. The purpose of the study was the development of a precise system of shoulder proprioception assessment in the active mode (Propriometr). For that purpose, devices such as the electronic goniometer and computer software had been designed. A pilot study was carried out on a control group of 27 healthy subjects, the average age being 23.8 (22-29) in order to test the system. The result of the assessment was the finding of the error of active reproduction of the joint position (EARJP). EARJP was assessed for flexion, abduction, external and internal rotation. For every motion, reference positions were used at three different angles. The results showed EARJP to range in 3-6.1°. The proprioception evaluation system (propriometr) allows a precise measurement of active joint position sense. The designed system can be used to assess proprioception in both shoulder injuries and treatment. In addition, all achieved results of normal shoulders may serve as reference to be compared with the results of forthcoming studies.

  8. Proprioception in Above-the-Knee Amputees with Artificial Limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Latanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the lower limb proprioceptive sensation in patients with femoral amputation who received an artificial joint. Materials and Methods. 22 patients (18 men, 4 women, 24–65 years old (mean: 42, who had undergone above-the-knee joint amputation and underwent evaluation of proprioception using joint reposition in a predetermined angle of 15° knee flexion. The measurements were applied using a conventional goniometer to both amputated and healthy knees. The last ones were used as internal control. All patients performed an active knee flexion from hyperextension to 15° in a closed kinetic chain in order to evaluate proprioceptive sensation of the knee joint using the joint position sense (JPS method during specific controllable circumstances very close to normal gait. Results. JPS at 15° flexion for the amputated knee was calculated to be equal to 13.91 (SD = ±4.74, and for the healthy side it was equal to 14.15 (SD = ±2.61. No statistically significant differences were detected between the amputated and the healthy limb (. Conclusions. The proprioceptive information of the stumps did not appear to be affected significantly after thigh amputation and application of artificial prosthesis when JPS at 15° was evaluated. It seems that these patients compensate the loss of the knee sensory receptors via alternative mechanisms.

  9. Proprioceptive Ability of Fencing and Table Tennis Practioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bańkosz Ziemowit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to compare the spatial component of proprioceptive ability by reproducing a upper limb movement typical in table tennis and fencing. Methods. The research comprised 41 young males of which 12 were table tennis players, 14 fencers, and 15 not involved in any competitive sports as a control. The experiment was based on assessing the precision of pronation and supination of the forearm at the elbow joint in recreating a set movement range by use of a goniometer. Results and conclusions. The results point to a higher level of proprioceptive ability in fencers and table tennis players than the control group but only in respect to the tasks executed with the dominant limb. This is inferred to be the result from the specific character of both sports (i.e. the intensive use of one limb and the consequent laterality of that limb causing higher sensitivity and proprioception. This may provide a link between swordplay, table tennis, and the level of proprioception. The research methodology used herein may be useful in monitoring fencing training. Although not unequivocally statistically significant, the results indicate the potential for further research in this area.

  10. Proprioceptive deficits after ACL injury : are they clinically relevant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lephart, Scott M.; Engebretsen, Lars; Ageberg, Eva; Engelhardt, Martin; Arnold, Markus P.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Egbert; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish the clinical relevance of proprioceptive deficits reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Material and methods A literature search was done in electronic databases from January 1990 to June 2009. Inclusion criteria for studies were ACL deficient (ACL-D) and ACL

  11. Proprioceptive control of posture : a review of new concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allum, JHJ; Carpenter, MG; Hulliger, M; Hadders-Algra, M; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    1998-01-01

    The assumption that proprioceptive inputs from the lower legs are used to trigger balance and gait movements is questioned in this review (an outgrowth of discussions initiated during the Neural Control of Movement Satellite meeting held in Cozumel, Mexico, April 1997). Recent findings presented her

  12. Cerebro-afferent vessel and pupillary basal diameter variation induced by stomatognathic trigeminal proprioception: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cicco Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A patient affected by asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent duplex color scanner investigations in occlusal proprioceptive un- and rebalance conditions. Pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to spot connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere on sympathetic autonomic activity. The aim of this case report is to verify if involuntary jaw closing during swallowing, executed in unbalance and rebalance myoelectric activity, would be able to modify cerebral hemodynamics. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian Italian woman affected by asymmetric blood flow of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent an electromyographic investigation of her occlusal muscles in order to assess their occlusal functional balance. The extreme asymmetry of myoelectric activity in dental occlusion evidenced by electromyographic values suggested the rebalancing of the functions of occlusal muscles through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supra- and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allowed the detection of a symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch: called orthotic-syntropic bite for its peculiar use of electrostimulation. A few days later, the patient underwent a duplex color scanner investigation and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal unbalance and rebalance conditions. Conclusions A comparative data analysis showed that an unbalanced dental occlusal function may represent an interferential pattern on cerebral hemodynamics velocity and pupillometric evaluations have proved useful both in the analysis of locus coeruleus functional modalities and as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of pathologies involving locus coeruleus and autonomic systems. The inclusion of myoelectric masseter examinations can be

  13. Cerebro-afferent vessel and pupillary basal diameter variation induced by stomatognathic trigeminal proprioception: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, Vincenzo

    2012-09-03

    A patient affected by asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent duplex color scanner investigations in occlusal proprioceptive un- and rebalance conditions. Pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to spot connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere on sympathetic autonomic activity. The aim of this case report is to verify if involuntary jaw closing during swallowing, executed in unbalance and rebalance myoelectric activity, would be able to modify cerebral hemodynamics. A 56-year-old Caucasian Italian woman affected by asymmetric blood flow of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent an electromyographic investigation of her occlusal muscles in order to assess their occlusal functional balance. The extreme asymmetry of myoelectric activity in dental occlusion evidenced by electromyographic values suggested the rebalancing of the functions of occlusal muscles through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supra- and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allowed the detection of a symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch: called orthotic-syntropic bite for its peculiar use of electrostimulation. A few days later, the patient underwent a duplex color scanner investigation and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal unbalance and rebalance conditions. A comparative data analysis showed that an unbalanced dental occlusal function may represent an interferential pattern on cerebral hemodynamics velocity and pupillometric evaluations have proved useful both in the analysis of locus coeruleus functional modalities and as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of pathologies involving locus coeruleus and autonomic systems. The inclusion of myoelectric masseter examinations can be useful in patients with asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro

  14. A physiologically based hypothesis for learning proprioception and in approximating inverse kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Matt

    2016-05-01

    A long-standing problem in muscle control is the "curse of dimensionality". In part, this problem relates to the fact that coordinated movement is only achieved through the simultaneous contraction and extension of multitude muscles to specific lengths. Couched in robotics terms, the problem includes the determination of forward and inverse kinematics. Of the many neurophysiological discoveries in cortex is the existence of position gradients. Geometrically, position gradients are described by planes in Euclidean space whereby neuronal activity increases as the hand approaches locations that lie in a plane. This work demonstrates that position gradients, when coupled with known physiology in the spinal cord, allows for a way to approximate proprioception (forward kinematics) and to specify muscle lengths for goal-directed postures (inverse kinematics). Moreover, position gradients provide a means to learn and adjust kinematics as animals learn to move and grow. This hypothesis is demonstrated using computer simulation of a human arm. Finally, experimental predictions are described that might confirm or falsify the hypothesis.

  15. Genome-wide association study for rib eye muscle area in a Large White×Minzhu F2 pig resource population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yun-yan; ZHANG Long-chao; WANG Li-xian; LIU Wen-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Rib eye muscle area (REMA) is an economicaly important trait and one of the main selection criteria for breeding in the swine industry. In the genome-wide association study (GWAS), the Ilumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip containing 62163 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was used to genotype 557 pigs from a porcine Large White×Minzhu intercross population. The REMA (at the 5th–6th, 10th–11th and the last ribs) was measured after slaughtered at the age of (240±7) d for each animal. Association tests between REMA trait and SNPs were performedvia the Genome-Wide Rapid Asso-ciation using the Mixed Model and Regression-Genomic Control (GRAMMAR-GC) approach. From the Ensembl porcine database, SNP annotation was implemented usingSus scrofa Build 10.2. Thirty-three SNPs on SSC12 and 3 SNPs on SSC2 showed signiifcant association with REMA at the last rib at the chromosome-wide signiifcance level. None of the SNPs of REMA at the 5th–6th rib and only a few numbers of the SNPs of REMA at the 10th–11th ribs were found in this study. The Haploview V3.31 program and the Haplo.Stats R package were used to detect and visualize haplotype blocks and to analyze the association of the detected haplotype blocks with REMA at the last rib. A linkage analysis revealed that 4 haplotype blocks contained 4, 4, 2, and 4 SNPs, respectively. Annotations from pig reference genome suggested 2 genes (NOS2,NLK) in block 1 (266 kb), one gene (TMIGD1) in block 2 (348 kb), and one gene (MAP2K4) in block 3 (453 kb). A functional analysis indicated thatMYH3andMYH13 genes are the potential genes controling REMA at the last rib. We screened several candidate intervals and genes based on the SNPs location and the gene function, and inferred thatNOS2 and NLK genes maybe the main genes of REMA at the last ribs.

  16. The role of vestibular and support-tactile-proprioceptive inputs in visual-manual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, Ludmila; Naumov, Ivan; Glukhikh, Dmitriy; Khabarova, Ekaterina; Pavlova, Aleksandra; Ekimovskiy, Georgiy; Sagalovitch, Viktor; Smirnov, Yuriy; Kozlovskaya, Inesa

    of the VT and MT, between characteristics of the VF and VT and no correlation between VF and MT. It was found that removal of the support and minimization of the proprioceptive afferentation has a greater impact upon accuracy of the VT then accuracy of the MT. Hand tracking accuracy was higher than the eyes for all subjects. The hand’ motor coordination was more stable to changes in support-proprioceptive afferentation then visual tracking. The observed changes in and after immersion are similar but less pronounced with changes observed on cosmonauts after prolonged spaceflight. Keywords: visual-manual tracking, vestibular function, weightlessness, immersion.

  17. Multisensory Tracking of Objects in Darkness: Capture of Positive Afterimages by the Tactile and Proprioceptive Senses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Stone

    Full Text Available This paper reports on three experiments investigating the contribution of different sensory modalities to the tracking of objects moved in total darkness. Participants sitting in the dark were exposed to a brief, bright flash which reliably induced a positive visual afterimage of the scene so illuminated. If the participants subsequently move their hand in the darkness, the visual afterimage of that hand fades or disappears; this is presumably due to conflict between the illusory visual afterimage (of the hand in its original location and other information (e.g., proprioceptive from a general mechanism for tracking body parts. This afterimage disappearance effect also occurs for held objects which are moved in the dark, and some have argued that this represents a case of body schema extension, i.e. the rapid incorporation of held external objects into the body schema. We demonstrate that the phenomenon is not limited to held objects and occurs in conditions where incorporation into the body schema is unlikely. Instead, we propose that the disappearance of afterimages of objects moved in darkness comes from a general mechanism for object tracking which integrates input from multiple sensory systems. This mechanism need not be limited to tracking body parts, and thus we need not invoke body schema extension to explain the afterimage disappearance. In this series of experiments, we test whether auditory feedback of object movement can induce afterimage disappearance, demonstrate that the disappearance effect scales with the magnitude of proprioceptive feedback, and show that tactile feedback alone is sufficient for the effect. Together, these data demonstrate that the visual percept of a positive afterimage is constructed not just from visual input of the scene when light reaches the eyes, but in conjunction with input from multiple other senses.

  18. Evidence of wrist proprioceptive reflexes elicited after stimulation of the scapholunate interosseous ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, Elisabet; Persson, Jonas K E; Werner, Michael; Ljung, Björn-Ove

    2009-04-01

    Recent publications on the sensory innervation of wrist ligaments have challenged our understanding of ligaments as mere passive restraints in wrist stability. Mechanoreceptors in ligaments have a role in signaling joint perturbations, in which the afferent information is believed to influence periarticular muscles. The scapholunate interosseous ligament is one of the most richly innervated ligaments in the wrist. The purpose of our study was to investigate the possible existence of a wrist proprioceptive reflex, by which afferent information elicited in the scapholunate interosseous ligament was hypothesized to influence the muscles moving the wrist joint. Nine volunteers (4 women and 5 men; mean age, 26 years; range, 21-28 years) participated in this study. Using ultrasound guidance, a fine-wire electrode was inserted into the dorsal scapholunate interosseous ligament and stimulated with four 1-ms pulses at 200 Hz. Electromyographic activities in extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles were recorded using surface electrodes with the wrist actively positioned in isometric extension, flexion, and radial and ulnar deviation. The average EMGs from 30 consecutive stimulations were rectified and analyzed using the Student's t-test to compare the prestimulus (t(1)) and poststimulus (t(2)) EMG activities. Statistically significant changes in poststimulus EMG activity (t(1)- t(2)) were observed at various time intervals. Within 20 ms, an excitation was seen in the flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris in extension, radial and ulnar deviation, and in extensor carpi radialis brevis in flexion. Co-contractions between agonist and antagonist muscles were observed, with peaks around 150 ms after stimulus. We present evidence of wrist ligamento-muscular reactions. The early-onset reactions may serve in a joint-protective manner, and later co-contractions indicate a supraspinal control of wrist

  19. Development of proprioceptive acuity in typically developing children: normative data on forearm position sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mae Holst-Wolf

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5-17 y/o; M/F = 127/181 and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18-25 y/o; M/F = 12/14 using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE, calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation (SDPdiff indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured as PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90º target: -2.85º in early childhood; -2.28º in adolescence; 1.30º in adults. Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90º target: 9.66º in early childhood; 5.30º in late adolescence; 3.97º in adults. The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed proprioceptive development include changes in the tuning of muscle spindles at the

  20. Central syntropic effects elicited by trigeminal proprioceptive equilibrium in Alzheimer’s disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cicco Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presented patient, affected by Alzheimer’s disease, underwent neuropsychological evaluation and functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation under occlusal proprioceptive un-balance and re-balance conditions. Saccadic and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to detect connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere with reticular formation cerebellum functions linked to visual and procedural processes prematurely altered in Alzheimer’s disease. Case presentation A 66-year-old Caucasian man, affected by Alzheimer’s disease and with a neuropsychological evaluation issued by the Alzheimer’s Evaluation Unit, underwent an electromyographic investigation of the masseter muscles in order to assess their functional balance. The patient showed a bilateral lack of all inferior molars. The extreme myoelectric asymmetry in dental occlusion suggested the rebalancing of masseter muscular functions through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supramandibular and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allows detection of symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch, called orthotic-syntropic bite. A few days later, the patient underwent a new neuropsychological investigation, together with a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, and saccadic, pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal un-balance and re-balance conditions. Conclusions Comparative data analysis has shown that a re-balanced occlusal condition can improve a patient’s cognitive-attentive functions. Moreover, the saccadic and pupillometric video-oculographic investigations have proven useful both in analyzing reticulo-cerebellar subcortical systems, prematurely altered in Alzheimer’s disease, and in implementing neurological evaluations.

  1. Muscle reaction function of individuals with intellectual disabilities may be improved through therapeutic use of a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Kellis, Eleftherios; Liga, Maria; Karra, Chrisanthi; Amiridis, Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    Reaction time and muscle activation deficits might limit the individual's autonomy in activities of daily living and in participating in recreational activities. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a 14-week hippotherapy exercise program on movement reaction time and muscle activation in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either to an experimental group (n=10) or a control group (n=9). The experimental group attended a hippotherapy exercise program, consisting of two 30-min sessions per week for 14 weeks. Reaction time, time of maximum muscle activity and electromyographic activity (EMG) of rectus femoris and biceps femoris when standing up from a chair under three conditions: in response to audio, visual and audio with closed eyes stimuli were measured. Analysis of variance designs showed that hippotherapy intervention program resulted in significant improvements in reaction time and a reduction in time to maximum muscle activity of the intervention group comparing to the control group in all 3 three conditions that were examined (phippotherapy training. Hippotherapy probably creates a changing environment with a variety of stimuli that enhance deep proprioception as well as other sensory inputs. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that hippotherapy can improve functional task performance by enhancing reaction time.

  2. Proprioceptive-Visual Integration and Embodied Cognition: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoel, Edison de J; Viana Felicio, Pedro Fernando; Makida-Dionísio, Cristiane; Nascimento Soares, Rafael Do; Freitas, Alessandro; Gimenez, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The present study addressed whether a spatial matching task relying on inter-sensory judgments might be influenced by the transition between egocentric and decentered mode of thinking. Thirty-six children aged 5, 7, or 9 years performed a paramedian correspondence task with conditions requiring inter-sensory integration (visual-proprioceptive) and a problem-solving task. The visual information was given through a mirror that perturbed the sensory judgments in the paramedian correspondence task. The results did not corroborate the hypotheses; nevertheless, the increasing importance of proprioception in the perceptual judgments for older children suggests that although younger children may be body centered (egocentric mode of thinking), older children seemed more able to use body to mediate their perceptual judgments.

  3. Visual and proprioceptive recognition of cursive letters in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinter, Annie; Chartrel, Estelle

    2008-09-01

    Two experiments investigated visual and proprioceptive recognition of cursive letters in young children. In Experiment 1, children aged 3-5 years were asked to recognize a visually presented target letter after a 3s inspection time, from among two distracters: a highly and a moderately similar letter. Visual letter recognition improved rapidly between 3 and 5 years and was a function of the "uniqueness" of letter shape and of letter frequency. In Experiment 2, children aged 4-6 years were asked to recognize a target letter from among 2 distracters, after having traced over the letter in a "blind" condition, with their hand guided by the experimenter. Proprioceptive recognition developed more slowly than visual recognition, and was not a function of letter frequency. The results are discussed in terms of integration versus differentiation of perceptual information, and of the tendency to base recognition on local rather than global similarity.

  4. Mapping and localization using GPS, lane markings and proprioceptive sensors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Estimating the pose in real-time is a primary function for intelligent vehicle navigation. Whilst different solutions exist, most of them rely on the use of high-end sensors. This paper proposes a solution that exploits an automotive type L1-GPS receiver, features extracted by low-cost perception sensors and vehicle proprioceptive information. A key idea is to use the lane detection function of a video camera to retrieve accurate lateral and orientation information wit...

  5. Postural control in strabismic children: importance of proprioceptive information

    OpenAIRE

    Lions, Cynthia; Bui Quoc, Emmanuel; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Bucci, Maria P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of proprioceptive information during postural control in strabismic children. Methods: Postural stability was recorded with a platform (Techno Concept®) in 12 strabismic children aged from 4.9 to 10 years and data were compared to that of 12 control age-matched children. Two postural positions were performed: Romberg and Tandem. Two postural conditions: without and with foam pad. We analyzed the surface area, the length, the mean speed of the center of pres...

  6. Effect of 4-Horizontal Rectus Muscle Tenotomy on Visual Function and Eye Movement Records in Patients with Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome without Abnormal Head Posture and Strabismus: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ameri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tenotomy on visual function and eye movement records in patients with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS without abnormal head posture (AHP and strabismusMethods: A prospective interventional case-series of patients with INS with no AHP or strabismus. Patients underwent 4-horizontal muscle tenotomy. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and eye movement recordings were compared pre and postoperatively.Results: Eight patients were recruited in this study with 3 to 15.5 months of follow-up. Patients showed significant improvement in their visual function. Overall nystagmus amplitude and velocity was decreased 30.7% and 19.8%, respectively. Improvements were more marked at right and left gazes. Conclusion: Tenotomy improves both visual function and eye movement records in INS with no strabismus and eccentric null point. The procedure has more effect on lateral gazes with worse waveforms, thus can broaden area with better visual function. We recommend this surgery in patients with INS but no associated AHP or strabismus.

  7. Eye Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  8. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... will invariably lead to lid swelling, making the examination far more difficult. ... protect the eye with a pad or shield, give tetanus prophylaxis and refer. ... A study on penetrating eye injuries in South African children found.

  9. Extending human proprioception to cyber-physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin; Robinson, Ethan; Dickstein, Leah; Hahn, Heidi A.; Cattaneo, Alessandro; Mascareñas, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in computational cognition, there are many cyber-physical systems where human supervision and control is desirable. One pertinent example is the control of a robot arm, which can be found in both humanoid and commercial ground robots. Current control mechanisms require the user to look at several screens of varying perspective on the robot, then give commands through a joystick-like mechanism. This control paradigm fails to provide the human operator with an intuitive state feedback, resulting in awkward and slow behavior and underutilization of the robot's physical capabilities. To overcome this bottleneck, we introduce a new human-machine interface that extends the operator's proprioception by exploiting sensory substitution. Humans have a proprioceptive sense that provides us information on how our bodies are configured in space without having to directly observe our appendages. We constructed a wearable device with vibrating actuators on the forearm, where frequency of vibration corresponds to the spatial configuration of a robotic arm. The goal of this interface is to provide a means to communicate proprioceptive information to the teleoperator. Ultimately we will measure the change in performance (time taken to complete the task) achieved by the use of this interface.

  10. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine.

  11. A prospective study on knee proprioception after meniscal allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Y; Witvrouw, E; Evens, B; Coorevits, P; Almqvist, F; Verdonk, R

    2007-06-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in the proprioceptive ability of the knee joint. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the short-term influence of a meniscus replacement on the proprioception of the knee. Fourteen patients who had undergone a fresh meniscal allograft transplantation between May 2001 and June 2003 were tested pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Disability regarding pain, stiffness and functionality of the affected knee during daily activities was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) scale. The knee joint position sense was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. The results of the WOMAC scale showed no significant differences concerning pain, stiffness or knee function between the pre- and post-operative condition of the knee. Assessment of the knee joint position sense at a reference point of 70 degrees of knee flexion revealed a significant improvement of the proprioception of the operated knee at 6 months after surgery compared with the pre-operative condition. The results of this study suggest that although no significant improvement of pain and functionality of the operated knee occurred at this short-term follow-up period, a meniscal allograft transplantation seems to have a significant positive effect on the joint position sense of the previously meniscectomised knee.

  12. EFFECT OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE EXERCISES IN OSTEOARTHRITIC AND REPLACED KNEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Metgud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease involving thinning or destruction of the smooth cartilage that covers the ends of bones and changes to the bone. Joint arthroplasty is an intervention for those patients who have severe disease, with severe pain and radiographic evidence. Objective: To compare the effect of proprioceptive exercises in osteoarthritic and total replaced knees using the Knee Society Score and Joint Position Sense. Design: A randomised clinical trial. Subjects: A total of 95 subjects were selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Intervention: Participants were divided into two groups; Group A comprised of the Total Knee Replacement and Group B was the osteoarthritic group. Group A was given exercises along with ambulation and static and resistance cycling and training of functional activities. Group B was given exercises and seven proprioceptive exercises followed by continuous short wave diathermy cross-fire method for 15 minutes. Outcome measure: Pain Intensity, Functional Outcome and Joint Position Sense (JPS were measured by using Visual Analog Scale (VAS, Knee Society Score (KSS and Absolute angle of error, respectively. Results: The results show a significant difference between the two groups using VAS and JPS whereas showed no significant difference between the two groups on using the KSS. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it was observed that proprioceptive exercises are beneficial in improving the joint position sense in patients with osteoarthritis as well as total knee replacements.

  13. The Role of Proprioception in the Sagittal Setting of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments During Gait Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Marcelo P.; Pelicioni Paulo H. Silva; Gobbi Lilian T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies have studied the role of proprioception on the setting of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) during gait initiation. However, these studies did not investigate the role of proprioception in the sagittal APA setting. We aimed to investigate the role of proprioception manipulation to induce APA sagittal adaptations on gait initiation. Methods. Fourteen healthy adults performed gait initiation without, and with, vibration applied before movement onset, and during m...

  14. Proprioceptive neuropathy affects normalization of the H-reflex by exercise after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Keeler, Benjamin E; Siegfried, Rachel; Houlé, John D; Lemay, Michel A

    2010-01-01

    The H-reflex habituates at relatively low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation in the intact spinal cord, but loss of descending inhibition resulting from spinal cord transection reduces this habituation. There is a return towards a normal pattern of low-frequency habituation in the reflex activity with cycling exercise of the affected hind limbs. This implies that repetitive passive stretching of the muscles in spinalized animals and the accompanying stimulation of large (Group I and II) proprioceptive fibers has modulatory effects on spinal cord reflexes after injury. To test this hypothesis, we induced pyridoxine neurotoxicity that preferentially affects large dorsal root ganglia neurons in intact and spinalized rats. Pyridoxine or saline injections were given twice daily (IP) for 6 weeks and half of the spinalized animals were subjected to cycling exercise during that period. After 6 weeks, the tibial nerve was stimulated electrically and recordings of M and H waves were made from interosseous muscles of the hind paw. Results show that pyridoxine treatment completely eliminated the H-reflex in spinal intact animals. In contrast, transection paired with pyridoxine treatment resulted in a reduction of the frequency-dependent habituation of the H-reflex that was not affected by exercise. These results indicate that normal Group I and II afferent input is critical to achieve exercise-based reversal of hyper-reflexia of the H-reflex after spinal cord injury.

  15. Comparisons of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing tests of knee proprioception performed by patients with patello-femoral pain syndrome and asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, J; Handfield, T; Kiefer, G; Forwell, L; Birmingham, T

    1997-04-01

    To compare non-weight-bearing (sitting) and weight-bearing (standing, with approximately 95% of body weight on the test leg) tests of knee proprioception performed by patients with patello-femoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and asymptomatic individuals. A repeated measures design, repeated on two occasions. Athletic injuries clinic. Seven men and 17 women with PFPS, and age- and sex-matched asymptomatic individuals. With their eyes closed, subjects extended their knee in sitting, or flexed their knees in standing, attempting to replicate target angles (15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees knee flexion) measured using an electrogoniometer. Observed angle of knee flexion during joint angle replication tests. Test-retest reliability coefficients (0.17-0.79) and between-session measurement error (+/-2.0 degrees to +/-6.4 degrees) varied widely. There was a tendency for reliability coefficients to be greater and between-session measurement error to be lower, for PFPS subjects, and for sitting tests. No significant differences were observed between the scores of the PFPS and asymptomatic subjects, at any of the four target knee angles. Scores in sitting should not be compared with those in standing. Clinically, the low reliability coefficients, large between-session measurement error, and finding of no statistically significant difference between PFPS and asymptomatic subjects suggest that the diagnostic value of the proprioceptive tests used is questionable. Further research is required to develop more precise tests of knee proprioception and to determine if the present results are applicable to other pathologies.

  16. Shoulder proprioception is not related to throwing speed or accuracy in elite adolescent male baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeston, Jonathan; Adams, Roger D; Rooney, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence throwing speed and accuracy is critical to performance in baseball. Shoulder proprioception has been implicated in the injury risk of throwing athletes, but no such link has been established with performance outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe any relationship between shoulder proprioception acuity and throwing speed or accuracy. Twenty healthy elite adolescent male baseball players (age, 19.6 ± 2.6 years), who had represented the state of New South Wales in the past 18 months, were assessed for bilateral active shoulder proprioception (shoulder rotation in 90° of arm abduction moving toward external rotation using the active movement extent discrimination apparatus), maximal throwing speed (MTS, meters per second measured via a radar gun), and accuracy (total error in centimeters determined by video analysis) at 80 and 100% of MTS. Although proprioception in the dominant and nondominant arms was significantly correlated with each other (r = 0.54, p proprioception and performance. Shoulder proprioception was not a significant determinant of throwing performance such that high levels of speed and accuracy were achieved without a high degree of proprioception. There is no evidence to suggest therefore that this particular method of shoulder proprioception measurement should be implemented in clinical practice. Consequently, clinicians are encouraged to consider proprioception throughout the entire kinetic chain rather than the shoulder joint in isolation as a determining factor of performance in throwing athletes.

  17. Effects of short-term cycling on knee joint proprioception in ACL-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David; Ageberg, Eva; Andersson, Gert; Fridén, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    It has previously been shown that knee injuries with ACL ruptures may lead to decreased proprioception and that exercise in a normal population, uninjured individuals, may reduce the proprioceptive ability. How proprioception is affected by exercise in patients with ACL deficiency has, to our knowledge, not been studied before. Knee joint proprioception was estimated in 36 patients, 18 males and 18 females, with ACL deficiency by measuring thresholds for detection of slow passive motion before and after a short period of exercise on an ergometer bicycle. In addition, the results were compared with a control group of 24 individuals of the same age. We found trends of enhanced proprioception towards extension in the patient group after cycling, but not in the control group. Towards flexion, both groups showed poorer proprioception after cycling. When difference scores of proprioceptive change in each group were compared, a trend towards different reaction upon cycling between the groups was seen in measurement towards extension from 20 degrees where the patients seemed to improve proprioception, which the controls did not. The results are not conclusive in this pilot study, but the possibility that ACL-deficient patients and controls may not react likewise to cycling, as regards their proprioceptive ability, is discussed.

  18. Muscle spindles in the human bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikert, Kevin; May, Christian Albrecht

    2015-07-01

    Muscle spindles are crucial for neuronal regulation of striated muscles, but their presence and involvement in the superficial perineal muscles is not known. Bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscle specimens were obtained from 31 human cadavers. Serial sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Sirius red, antibodies against Podocalyxin, myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC-slow tonic, S46; MyHC-2a/2x, A4.74), and neurofilament for the purpose of muscle spindle screening, counting, and characterization. A low but consistent number of spindles were detected in both muscles. The muscles contained few intrafusal fibers, but otherwise showed normal spindle morphology. The extrafusal fibers of both muscles were small in diameter. The presence of muscle spindles in bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles supports physiological models of pelvic floor regulation and may provide a basis for further clinical observations regarding sexual function and micturition. The small number of muscle spindles points to a minor level of proprioceptive regulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Desensitizing the posterior interosseous nerve alters wrist proprioceptive reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, Elisabet; Persson, Jonas K E

    2010-07-01

    The presence of wrist proprioceptive reflexes after stimulation of the dorsal scapholunate interosseous ligament has previously been described. Because this ligament is primarily innervated by the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) we hypothesized altered ligamento-muscular reflex patterns following desensitization of the PIN. Eight volunteers (3 women, 5 men; mean age, 26 y; range 21-28 y) participated in the study. In the first study on wrist proprioceptive reflexes (study 1), the scapholunate interosseous ligament was stimulated through a fine-wire electrode with 4 1-ms bipolar pulses at 200 Hz, 30 times consecutively, while EMG activity was recorded from the extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris, with the wrist in extension, flexion, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation. After completion of study 1, the PIN was anesthetized in the radial aspect of the fourth extensor compartment using 2-mL lidocaine (10 mg/mL) infiltration anesthesia. Ten minutes after desensitization, the experiment was repeated as in study 1. The average EMG results from the 30 consecutive stimulations were rectified and analyzed using Student's t-test. Statistically significant changes in EMG amplitude were plotted along time lines so that the results of study 1 and 2 could be compared. Dramatic alterations in reflex patterns were observed in wrist flexion, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation following desensitization of the PIN, with an average of 72% reduction in excitatory reactions. In ulnar deviation, the inhibitory reactions of the extensor carpi ulnaris were entirely eliminated. In wrist extension, no differences in the reflex patterns were observed. Wrist proprioception through the scapholunate ligament in flexion, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation depends on an intact PIN function. The unchanged reflex patterns in wrist extension suggest an alternate proprioceptive pathway for this position. Routine excision of

  20. Evaluation of effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands using joint proprioception and writing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Hu, Yue; Rongming, Xia; Li, Zhou; Xiaojiao, Fu; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine immediate effects of strength training and NJF distal resistance training in wrist joints by using writing time and evaluation of proprioception using the JPE test. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 young healthy people (24.2 ± 3.1 y, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: wrist joint extension muscle strength training (MST) and the wrist joint extension pattern of NJF. The uppercase English alphabet writing time and joint position errors of the left upper limb were measured before and after one intervention session of MST and NJF. [Results] The decrease in errors in wrist extension angle repetition and the writing time represented the improvement resulting from NJF. [Conclusion] This result suggests that the subdominant hands wrist joint proprioception and writing function can be improved by NJF together with proximal resistance training.

  1. Proprioception: where are we now? A commentary on clinical assessment, changes across the life course, functional implications and future interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetterlin, Karen Joan; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2014-05-01

    Proprioception, the sense of where one is in space, is essential for effective interaction with the environment. A lack of or reduction in proprioceptive acuity has been directly correlated with falls and with reduced functional independence in older people. Proprioceptive losses have also been shown to negatively correlate with functional recovery post stroke and play a significant role in other conditions such as Parkinson's disease. However, despite its central importance to many geriatric syndromes, the clinical assessment of proprioception has remained remarkably static. We look at approaches to the clinical assessment of proprioception, changes in proprioception across the life course, functional implications of proprioception in health and disease and the potential for targeted interventions in the future such as joint taping, and proprioception-specific rehabilitation and footwear.

  2. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability...

  3. Spontaneous locomotor activity in late-stage chicken embryos is modified by stretch of leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Nina S; Ryu, Young U; Yeseta, Marie C

    2014-03-15

    Chicks initiate bilateral alternating steps several days before hatching and adaptively walk within hours of hatching, but emergence of precocious walking skills is not well understood. One of our aims was to determine whether interactions between environment and movement experience prior to hatching are instrumental in establishing precocious motor skills. However, physiological evidence of proprioceptor development in the chick has yet to be established; thus, one goal of this study was to determine when in embryogenesis proprioception circuits can code changes in muscle length. A second goal was to determine whether proprioception circuits can modulate leg muscle activity during repetitive limb movements for stepping (RLMs). We hypothesized that proprioception circuits code changes in muscle length and/or tension, and modulate locomotor circuits producing RLMs in anticipation of adaptive locomotion at hatching. To this end, leg muscle activity and kinematics were recorded in embryos during normal posture and after fitting one ankle with a restraint that supported the limb in an atypical posture. We tested the hypotheses by comparing leg muscle activity during spontaneous RLMs in control posture and ankle extension restraint. The results indicated that proprioceptors detect changes in muscle length and/or muscle tension 3 days before hatching. Ankle extension restraint produced autogenic excitation of the ankle flexor and reciprocal inhibition of the ankle extensor. Restraint also modified knee extensor activity during RLMs 1 day before hatching. We consider the strengths and limitations of these results and propose that proprioception contributes to precocious locomotor development during the final 3 days before hatching.

  4. Muscle involvement during intermittent contraction patterns with different target force feedback modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, G; Jørgensen, L V; Ekner, D

    2000-01-01

    feedback) or a weight to be held in position (proprioceptive feedback) both corresponding to 30% maximal voluntary contraction. Contraction and relaxation timing of 6 and 4 s, respectively, was shown on a VDU screen as colour code identical in both conditions. RESULTS: Test contractions performed before...... and following 30 min of intermittent contractions showed larger fatigue development with proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. Also rating of perceived exertion increased more during proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. This may in part be explained by small differences in the mechanics during...... the two different feedback modes. In line with this, EMG recorded from four shoulder/arm muscles analyzed for amplitude and frequency showed similar activity initially; but later, during the 30 min contraction larger amplitudes were attained during proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. CONCLUSIONS...

  5. [Delayed post effort muscle soreness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudreuse, J M; Dupont, P; Nicol, C

    2004-08-01

    Muscle intolerance to exercise may result from different processes. Diagnosis involves confirming first the source of pain, then potential pathological myalgia. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), commonly referred as tiredness, occurs frequently in sport. DOMS usually develops 12-48 h after intensive and/or unusual eccentric muscle action. Symptoms usually involve the quadriceps muscle group but may also affect the hamstring and triceps surae groups. The muscles are sensitive to palpation, contraction and passive stretch. Acidosis, muscle spasm and microlesions in both connective and muscle tissues may explain the symptoms. However, inflammation appears to be the most common explanation. Interestingly, there is strong evidence that the progression of the exercise-induced muscle injury proceeds no further in the absence of inflammation. Even though unpleasant, DOMS should not be considered as an indicator of muscle damage but, rather, a sign of the regenerative process, which is well known to contribute to the increased muscle mass. DOMS can be associated with decreased proprioception and range of motion, as well as maximal force and activation. DOMS disappears 2-10 days before complete functional recovery. This painless period is ripe for additional joint injuries. Similarly, if some treatments are well known to attenuate DOMS, none has been demonstrated to accelerate either structural or functional recovery. In terms of the role of the inflammatory process, these treatments might even delay overall recovery.

  6. No Proprioceptive Deficits in Autism despite Movement-Related Sensory and Execution Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Christina T.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often involves sensory and motor problems, yet the proprioceptive sense of limb position has not been directly assessed. We used three tasks to assess proprioception in adolescents with ASD who had motor and sensory perceptual abnormalities, and compared them to age- and IQ-matched controls. Results showed no group…

  7. Use of a robotic device to measure age-related decline in finger proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemanson, Morgan L; Rowe, Justin B; Chan, Vicky; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in proprioception are known to affect postural stability, yet the extent to which such changes affect the finger joints is poorly understood despite the importance of finger proprioception in the control of skilled hand movement. We quantified age-related changes in finger proprioception in 37 healthy young, middle-aged, and older adults using two robot-based tasks wherein participants' index and middle fingers were moved by an exoskeletal robot. The first task assessed finger position sense by asking participants to indicate when their index and middle fingers were directly overlapped during a passive crisscross movement; the second task assessed finger movement detection by asking participants to indicate the onset of passive finger movement. When these tasks were completed without vision, finger position sense errors were 48 % larger in older adults compared to young participants (p proprioceptive reaction time was 78 % longer in older adults compared to young adults (p proprioception, these age-related differences were no longer apparent. No difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance was found for either proprioception task. These findings demonstrate that finger proprioception is impaired in older adults, and visual feedback can be used to compensate for this deficit. The findings also support the feasibility and utility of the FINGER robot as a sensitive tool for detecting age-related decline in proprioception.

  8. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.; Brumagne, S.; Dieen, J. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Vanhees, L.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from

  9. Evaluation of Knee Proprioception and Factors Related to Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Ribeiro Artigas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Changes in proprioception may contribute to postural instability in individuals with neurological disorders. Objectives. Evaluate proprioception in the lower limbs of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD and the association between proprioception and cognitive ability, motor symptoms, postural instability, and disease severity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional, controlled study that evaluated proprioception in PD patients and healthy age- and sex-matched individuals. Kinetic postural proprioception of the knee was evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex® Multi-Joint System 4 Pro. Participants were evaluated using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, the Hoehn and Yahr rating scale and postural instability (pull test and stabilometric analysis, and motor function (UPDRS-III tests. Results. A total of 40 individuals were enrolled in the study: 20 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (CG. The PD patients had higher angular errors on the proprioceptive ratings than the CG participants (p=0.002. Oscillations of the center of pressure (p=0.002 were higher in individuals with PD than in the controls. Proprioceptive errors in the PD patients were associated with the presence of tremors as the dominant symptom and more impaired motor performance. Conclusion. These findings show that individuals with PD have proprioceptive deficits, which are related to decreased cognitive ability and impaired motor symptoms.

  10. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.; Brumagne, S.; Dieen, J. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Vanhees, L.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from

  11. Deficits in the Ability to Use Proprioceptive Feedback in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J.; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Brown, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with motor impairment in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), less attention has been paid to sensory feedback processing deficits. This includes, especially, proprioceptive information regarding arm position. This study examined the ability of children with hemiplegic CP to use proprioceptive feedback during a goal-directed…

  12. Upper extremity proprioception in healthy aging and stroke populations, and the effects of therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation therapies on proprioceptive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmayne Mary Lee Hughes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research.

  13. Upper extremity proprioception in healthy aging and stroke populations, and the effects of therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation therapies on proprioceptive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world's population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research.

  14. Upper Extremity Proprioception in Healthy Aging and Stroke Populations, and the Effects of Therapist- and Robot-Based Rehabilitation Therapies on Proprioceptive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research. PMID:25784872

  15. NEURAL PATHWAYS OF TRIGEMINAL PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENTS COORDINATE ORAL MOTOR BEHAVIORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Pifu; Zhang Jingdong; Li Jishuo

    2003-01-01

    Neural pathways and synaptic connections from the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vme) neurons to the cranial motor nuclei were studied in the rat using double labelling methodologies of intracellular Neurobiotin staining combined with retrograde horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport, anterograde biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) tracing combined with retrograde HRP transport, and a dual fluorescent labelling of BDA anterograde combined tracing with Cholera Toxin B (CTB) retrograde transport. Direct projections and synapses were demonstrated from Vme neuronal boutons to motoneurons (MNs) of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo), the hypoglossal nucleus (Ⅻ) and the ambiguus nucleus (Amb). Indirect projections and pathways from Vme neurons to the cranial motor nuclei including Vmo, Ⅻ, the facial nucleus (Ⅶ) and the cervical spinal cord (C1~5) were seen to relay on their premotor neurons. The premotor neurons of above cranial motor nuclei were overlapped in bilateral premotor neuronal pool including the parvocellular reticular formation (PCRt) and its alpha division (PCRtA), the dorsomedial part of the spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis (Vodm), and interpolaris (Vidm), the medullary reticular nucleus dorsal division (MdD), the supratrigeminal region (Vsup) and the dorsomedial part of the principal trigeminal sensory nucleus (Vpdm).Synapses between Vme neuronal boutons and Vmo and Ⅻ MNs and Ⅻ premotor neurons were predominantly asymmetric.There were four types of synaptic organizations, i.e. synaptic convergence; synaptic divergence presynaptic inhibition and afferent feedforward inhibition seen between Vme boutons and Vmno, Ⅻ MNs and between Vme boutons and Ⅻ premotor neurons.The results of present studies have demonstrated direct pathways from the trigeminal proprioceptive afferents to Vmo, Ⅻ and Amb MNs, and indirect pathways from the trigeminal proprioceptive afferents to bilateral Vmno, Ⅻ, Ⅶ and C1~s via their premotor neurons. It provides

  16. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain.

  17. Head-controlled assistive telerobot with extended physiological proprioception capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salganicoff, Marcos; Rahman, Tariq; Mahoney, Ricardo; Pino, D.; Jayachandran, Vijay; Kumar, Vijay; Chen, Shoupu; Harwin, William S.

    1995-12-01

    People with disabilities such as quadriplegia can use mouth-sticks and head-sticks as extension devices to perform desired manipulations. These extensions provide extended proprioception which allows users to directly feel forces and other perceptual cues such as texture present at the tip of the mouth-stick. Such devices are effective for two principle reasons: because of their close contact with the user's tactile and proprioceptive sensing abilities; and because they tend to be lightweight and very stiff, and can thus convey tactile and kinesthetic information with high-bandwidth. Unfortunately, traditional mouth-sticks and head-sticks are limited in workspace and in the mechanical power that can be transferred because of user mobility and strength limitations. We describe an alternative implementation of the head-stick device using the idea of a virtual head-stick: a head-controlled bilateral force-reflecting telerobot. In this system the end-effector of the slave robot moves as if it were at the tip of an imaginary extension of the user's head. The design goal is for the system is to have the same intuitive operation and extended proprioception as a regular mouth-stick effector but with augmentation of workspace volume and mechanical power. The input is through a specially modified six DOF master robot (a PerForceTM hand-controller) whose joints can be back-driven to apply forces at the user's head. The manipulation tasks in the environment are performed by a six degree-of-freedom slave robot (the Zebra-ZEROTM) with a built-in force sensor. We describe the prototype hardware/software implementation of the system, control system design, safety/disability issues, and initial evaluation tasks.

  18. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI based neuroprostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Ramos-Murguialday

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1 motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2 motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3 passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery and (4 active (overt movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants. Group 1 (n = 9 received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements, group 2 (n = 8 contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements and group 3 (n = 7 sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements. We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and

  19. Postural control in strabismic children: importance of proprioceptive information

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia eLIONS; Emmanuel eBui Quoc; Sylvette eWiener-Vacher; Maria Pia eBucci

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo examine the effect of proprioceptive information during postural control in strabismic children.MethodsPostural stability was recorded with a platform (Techno Concept®) in twelve strabismic children aged from 4.9 to 10 years and data were compared to that of twelve control age-matched children. Two postural positions were performed: Romberg and Tandem. Two postural conditions: without and with foam pad. We analyzed the surface area, the length, the mean speed of the center of pres...

  20. Right Temporoparietal Cortex Activation during Visuo-proprioceptive Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Paulson, Olaf B.

    2005-01-01

    by the two modalities. Subjects felt the passive movement of the right index finger on a rectangular field and watched a cursor moving on a computer screen. Cursor and finger locations either mapped onto each other (congruent condition) or did not (incongruent condition). Monitoring incongruent compared...... with congruent movement activated the premotor area bilaterally and the right temporoparietal junction. These brain areas have previously been associated with shifts in the attended location in the visual space. These findings suggest an interaction between vision and proprioception in orienting to spatial...

  1. Right Temporoparietal Cortex Activation during Visuo-proprioceptive Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Paulson, Olaf B.;

    2005-01-01

    by the two modalities. Subjects felt the passive movement of the right index finger on a rectangular field and watched a cursor moving on a computer screen. Cursor and finger locations either mapped onto each other (congruent condition) or did not (incongruent condition). Monitoring incongruent compared...... with congruent movement activated the premotor area bilaterally and the right temporoparietal junction. These brain areas have previously been associated with shifts in the attended location in the visual space. These findings suggest an interaction between vision and proprioception in orienting to spatial...

  2. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  3. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: ... your eyes do not produce enough tears, it is called dry eye. Dry eye is also when ...

  4. Facts About Pink Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis) > Facts About Pink Eye Facts About Pink Eye Pink eye is one of ... for preventing eye infections. Last Reviewed: November 2015 Fact Sheet Blurb The National Eye Institute (NEI) is ...

  5. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  6. Associations between Proprioceptive Neural Pathway Structural Connectivity and Balance in People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fling, Brett W; Dutta, Geetanjali Gera; Schlueter, Heather; Cameron, Michelle H; Horak, Fay B

    2014-01-01

    Mobility and balance impairments are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting nearly half of patients at presentation and resulting in decreased activity and participation, falls, injuries, and reduced quality of life. A growing body of work suggests that balance impairments in people with mild MS are primarily the result of deficits in proprioception, the ability to determine body position in space in the absence of vision. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of balance disturbances in MS is needed to develop evidence-based rehabilitation approaches. The purpose of the current study was to (1) map the cortical proprioceptive pathway in vivo using diffusion-weighted imaging and (2) assess associations between proprioceptive pathway white matter microstructural integrity and performance on clinical and behavioral balance tasks. We hypothesized that people with MS (PwMS) would have reduced integrity of cerebral proprioceptive pathways, and that reduced white matter microstructure within these tracts would be strongly related to proprioceptive-based balance deficits. We found poorer balance control on proprioceptive-based tasks and reduced white matter microstructural integrity of the cortical proprioceptive tracts in PwMS compared with age-matched healthy controls (HC). Microstructural integrity of this pathway in the right hemisphere was also strongly associated with proprioceptive-based balance control in PwMS and controls. Conversely, while white matter integrity of the right hemisphere's proprioceptive pathway was significantly correlated with overall balance performance in HC, there was no such relationship in PwMS. These results augment existing literature suggesting that balance control in PwMS may become more dependent upon (1) cerebellar-regulated proprioceptive control, (2) the vestibular system, and/or (3) the visual system.

  7. Associations between proprioceptive neural pathway structural connectivity and balance in people with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett W Fling

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobility and balance impairments are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS, affecting nearly half of patients at presentation and resulting in decreased activity and participation, falls, injuries, and reduced quality of life. A growing body of work suggests that balance impairments in people with mild MS are primarily the result of deficits in proprioception, the ability to determine body position in space in the absence of vision. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of balance disturbances in MS is needed to develop evidence-based rehabilitation approaches. The purpose of the current study was to 1 map the cortical proprioceptive pathway in-vivo using diffusion weighted imaging and 2 assess associations between proprioceptive pathway white matter microstructural integrity and performance on clinical and behavioral balance tasks. We hypothesized that people with MS (PwMS would have reduced integrity of cerebral proprioceptive pathways, and that reduced white matter microstructure within these tracts would be strongly related to proprioceptive-based balance deficits. We found poorer balance control on proprioceptive-based tasks and reduced white matter microstructural integrity of the cortical proprioceptive tracts in PwMS compared with age-matched healthy controls. Microstructural integrity of this pathway in the right hemisphere was also strongly associated with proprioceptive-based balance control in PwMS and controls. Conversely, while white matter integrity of the right hemisphere’s proprioceptive pathway was significantly correlated with overall balance performance in healthy controls, there was no such relationship in PwMS. These results augment existing literature suggesting that balance control in PwMS may become more dependent upon 1 cerebellar-regulated proprioceptive control, 2 the vestibular system, and/or 3 the visual system.

  8. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes to see millions of colors. Helping You See It All Rods and cones process the light to give you the total picture. You're ... get cloudy, causing a cataract . A cataract prevents light from reaching the retina and makes it difficult to see. The eyes you have will be yours forever — ...

  9. Eyes - bulging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emotional support is important. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if: You have bulging eyes and the cause has not yet been diagnosed. Bulging eyes are accompanied by other symptoms. ... The provider will ask about your medical history and do a physical exam. Some questions ...

  10. Consider neuromusculoskeletal redundancy and extended proprioception when designing smart structures to interface with humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Jack M.

    1996-05-01

    Despite many well-intentioned attempts to utilize state-of-the-art advanced control systems technology to design contact devices such as powered orthoses, there have been more failures than successes. In part this is due to our limited understanding of neuromechanical function, and of how to optimally design human-technology interfaces. This paper develops a theoretical foundation for mechanical impedance and postural stability for large-scale human systems, and for the analysis and design of human-technology contact interfaces. We start with four basic presuppositions: redundancy is a fundamental feature of biosystem design, muscle actuators possess intrinsic nonlinear stiffness which can be modulated, mechanical interaction between the human and an environment is fundamentally bicausal, and objects with certain properties can become almost a natural extension of the human body. We then develop the key concepts of intimate contact and extended proprioception, and provide examples of how these principles can be applied to practical problems in orthotics, focusing on posture-assist technologies. Finally, suggestions are put forward for applying smart materials and structures to innovative orthotic design.

  11. Whole-body vibration does not influence knee joint neuromuscular function or proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, R; Minshull, C; Folland, J P

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on knee joint position sense and indices of neuromuscular function, specifically strength, electromechanical delay and the rate of force development. Electromyography and electrically evoked contractions were used to investigate neural and contractile responses to WBV. Fourteen healthy males completed two treatment conditions on separate occasions: (1) 5 × 1 min of unilateral isometric squat exercise on a synchronous vibrating platform [30 Hz, 4 mm peak-to-peak amplitude] (WBV) and (2) a control condition (CON) of the same exercise without WBV. Knee joint position sense (joint angle replication task) and quadriceps neuromuscular function were assessed pre-, immediately-post and 1 h post-exercise. During maximum voluntary knee extensions, the peak force (PF(V)), electromechanical delay (EMD(V)), rate of force development (RFD(V)) and EMG of the quadriceps were measured. Twitch contractions of the knee extensors were electrically evoked to assess EMD(E) and RFD(E). The results showed no influence of WBV on knee joint position, EMD(V), PF(V) and RFD(V) during the initial 50, 100 or 150 ms of contraction. Similarly, electrically evoked neuromuscular function and neural activation remained unchanged following the vibration exercise. A single session of unilateral WBV did not influence any indices of thigh muscle neuromuscular performance or knee joint proprioception.

  12. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yutetsu; Naito, Hisashi; Ogura, Yuji; Katamoto, Shizuo; Aoki, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Thirteen male university students (age, 20 ± 1 years; height, 172.2 ± 4.6 cm; weight, 68.4 ± 6.7 kg; mean ± SD) completed 3 different conditions on 3 nonconsecutive days in randomized order: static stretching (SS), PNF stretching (PNF), and no stretching (control, CON). Each condition consisted of a 5-minute rest accompanied by one of the following activities: (a) control, (b) SS, or (c) PNF stretching. The hip flexion range of motion (ROM) was evaluated immediately before and after the activity. The MVC of knee flexion was then measured. Surface electromyography was recorded from the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles during MVC tests and stretching. Although increases in ROM were significantly greater after PNF than after SS (p stretching increases ROM more than SS, PNF stretching and SS is detrimental to isometric maximal strength.

  13. Proprioceptive body illusions modulate the visual perception of reaching distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Petroni

    Full Text Available The neurobiology of reaching has been extensively studied in human and non-human primates. However, the mechanisms that allow a subject to decide-without engaging in explicit action-whether an object is reachable are not fully understood. Some studies conclude that decisions near the reach limit depend on motor simulations of the reaching movement. Others have shown that the body schema plays a role in explicit and implicit distance estimation, especially after motor practice with a tool. In this study we evaluate the causal role of multisensory body representations in the perception of reachable space. We reasoned that if body schema is used to estimate reach, an illusion of the finger size induced by proprioceptive stimulation should propagate to the perception of reaching distances. To test this hypothesis we induced a proprioceptive illusion of extension or shrinkage of the right index finger while participants judged a series of LEDs as reachable or non-reachable without actual movement. Our results show that reach distance estimation depends on the illusory perceived size of the finger: illusory elongation produced a shift of reaching distance away from the body whereas illusory shrinkage produced the opposite effect. Combining these results with previous findings, we suggest that deciding if a target is reachable requires an integration of body inputs in high order multisensory parietal areas that engage in movement simulations through connections with frontal premotor areas.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF KINESIO TAPING ON PROPRIOCEPTION AT THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark DeBeliso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to determine if KinesioTM taping the anterior and lateral portion of the ankle would enhance ankle proprioception compared to the untaped ankle. 30 subjects, 15 men, 15 women, ages 18-30 participated in this study. Exclusion criteria: Ankle injury < 6 months prior to testing, significant ligament laxity as determined through clinical evaluation by an ATC, or any severe foot abnormality. Experiment utilized a single group, pretest and posttest. Plantar flexion and inversion with 20° of plantar flexion reproduction of joint position sense (RJPS was determined using an ankle RJPS apparatus. Subjects were barefooted, blindfolded, and equipped with headphones playing white noise to eliminate auditory cues. Subjects had five trials in both plantar flexion and inversion with 20° plantar flexion before and after application of the KinesioTM tape to the anterior/lateral portion of the ankle. Constant error and absolute error were determined from the difference between the target angle and the trial angle produced by the subject. The treatment group (KinesioTM taped subjects showed no change in constant and absolute error for ankle RJPS in plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion when compared to the untaped results using the same motions. The application of KinesioTM tape does not appear to enhance proprioception (in terms of RJPS in healthy individuals as determined by our measures of RJPS at the ankle in the motions of plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion.

  15. Proprioceptive Body Illusions Modulate the Visual Perception of Reaching Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, Agustin; Carbajal, M. Julia; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiology of reaching has been extensively studied in human and non-human primates. However, the mechanisms that allow a subject to decide—without engaging in explicit action—whether an object is reachable are not fully understood. Some studies conclude that decisions near the reach limit depend on motor simulations of the reaching movement. Others have shown that the body schema plays a role in explicit and implicit distance estimation, especially after motor practice with a tool. In this study we evaluate the causal role of multisensory body representations in the perception of reachable space. We reasoned that if body schema is used to estimate reach, an illusion of the finger size induced by proprioceptive stimulation should propagate to the perception of reaching distances. To test this hypothesis we induced a proprioceptive illusion of extension or shrinkage of the right index finger while participants judged a series of LEDs as reachable or non-reachable without actual movement. Our results show that reach distance estimation depends on the illusory perceived size of the finger: illusory elongation produced a shift of reaching distance away from the body whereas illusory shrinkage produced the opposite effect. Combining these results with previous findings, we suggest that deciding if a target is reachable requires an integration of body inputs in high order multisensory parietal areas that engage in movement simulations through connections with frontal premotor areas. PMID:26110274

  16. A microstructural study of sleep instability in drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: sleep spindles, rapid eye movements, and muscle atonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénolé, Fabian; Chevrier, Elyse; Stip, Emmanuel; Godbout, Roger

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at characterizing the functional stability of sleep in schizophrenia by quantifying dissociated stages of sleep (DSS), and to explore their correlation with psychopathology. The sleep of 10 first-break, drug-naive young adults with schizophrenia and 10 controls was recorded. Four basic DSS patterns were scored: 1) the transitional EEG-mixed intermediate stage (EMIS); 2) Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep without rapid eye movement (RSWR); 3) REM sleep without atonia (RSWA); and 4) non-REM sleep with rapid eye movements. An intermediate sleep (IS) score was calculated by summing EMIS and RSWR scores, and the durations of intra-REM sleep periods IS (IRSPIS) and IS scored "at the expense" of REM sleep (ISERS) were determined. Patients were administered the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) at the time of recording. Proportions of each DSS variables over total sleep time and proportions of IRSPIS and ISERS over REM sleep duration were compared between patients and controls. Correlation coefficients between DSS variables and BPRS total scores were calculated. The proportion of total DSS did not differ between patients and controls. Among DSS subtypes, RSWA was significantly increased in patients while other comparisons showed no significant differences. Significant positive correlations were found between BPRS scores and proportions of DSS, IS, RSWR, IRSPIS and ISERS over total sleep and REM sleep durations. These results demonstrate the functional instability of REM sleep in first-break, drug naive young adults with schizophrenia and unveil a pattern reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorder. The significant correlation suggests that schizophrenia and REM sleep share common neuronal control mechanisms.

  17. Interaction between the premotor processes of eye and hand movements: possible mechanism underlying eye-hand coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Koichi; Kurata, Naoatsu; Sakaguchi, Masato; Nonaka, Kengo; Matsumoto, Naoto

    2014-03-01

    Interaction between the execution process of eye movement and that of hand movement must be indispensable for eye-hand coordination. The present study investigated corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles during the premotor processes of eye and/or hand movement to elucidate interaction between these processes. Healthy humans performed a precued reaction task of eye and/or finger movement and motor-evoked potentials in the hand muscles were evoked in the reaction time. Leftward eye movement suppressed corticospinal excitability in the right abductor digiti minimi muscle only when little finger abduction was simultaneously executed. Corticospinal excitability in the first dorsal interosseous muscle was not suppressed by eye movement regardless of whether or not it was accompanied by finger movement. Suppression of corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles induced by eye movement in the premotor period depends on the direction of eye movement, the muscle tested, and the premotor process of the tested muscle. The suppression may reflect interaction between the motor process of eye movement and that of hand movement particularly active during eye-hand coordination tasks during which both processes proceed.

  18. Transient Reversal of a Face Turn (an Abnormal Head Posture, AHP) due to Manifest Latent Nystagmus, after Eye Muscle Strabismus Surgery for the Associated Infantile Esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, R; Vrushali, D; Vijayalakshmi, P; Jeyanthan, S

    2011-01-01

    Patients with infantile esotropia and manifest latent nystagmus adopt a face turn towards the fixing eye as a nystagmus dampening mechanism. The surgical plan should aim to correct both the face turn and the strabismus. Reversal of the face turn after surgery for the strabismus can be (i.e. was) distressing for both the surgeon and the patient and has not been reported previously to the best of our knowledge. We report our patient with a transient reversal of face turn after surgery.

  19. Contributions of visual and proprioceptive information to travelled distance estimation during changing sensory congruencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Jennifer L; Butler, John S; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-10-01

    Recent research has provided evidence that visual and body-based cues (vestibular, proprioceptive and efference copy) are integrated using a weighted linear sum during walking and passive transport. However, little is known about the specific weighting of visual information when combined with proprioceptive inputs alone, in the absence of vestibular information about forward self-motion. Therefore, in this study, participants walked in place on a stationary treadmill while dynamic visual information was updated in real time via a head-mounted display. The task required participants to travel a predefined distance and subsequently match this distance by adjusting an egocentric, in-depth target using a game controller. Travelled distance information was provided either through visual cues alone, proprioceptive cues alone or both cues combined. In the combined cue condition, the relationship between the two cues was manipulated by either changing the visual gain across trials (0.7×, 1.0×, 1.4×; Exp. 1) or the proprioceptive gain across trials (0.7×, 1.0×, 1.4×; Exp. 2). Results demonstrated an overall higher weighting of proprioception over vision. These weights were scaled, however, as a function of which sensory input provided more stable information across trials. Specifically, when visual gain was constantly manipulated, proprioceptive weights were higher than when proprioceptive gain was constantly manipulated. These results therefore reveal interesting characteristics of cue-weighting within the context of unfolding spatio-temporal cue dynamics.

  20. Effect of proprioception cross training on repositioning accuracy and balance among healthy individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Tarek Mohamed; Khaled, Osama Ahmed; Ibrahim, Sameh R; Alshenqiti, Abdullah M; Ibrahim, Mahmoud I

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate possible cross effects of proprioception training on proprioception repositioning accuracy of the knee joint and on balance in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty healthy college students and faculty members from faculty of physical therapy, Cairo University were recruited to participate. Participants were randomly assigned to training group (n=30) and control group (n=30). The training group received proprioceptive training program only for the dominant leg while the control group did not receive any kind of training. Outcome measures were twofold: (1) proprioception repositioning accuracy quantified through the active repositioning test for the non-dominant knee; and (2) balance stability indices determined through using Biodex balance system. Measurements were recorded before and after 8 weeks of proprioception training. [Results] There were significant decrease in the error of repositioning accuracy and the stability indices including anterposterior stability index, mediolateral stability index, and overall stability index of training group, measured post training, compared with control group. [Conclusion] Proprioception training has significant cross training effects on proprioception repositioning accuracy of the knee joint and on balance among healthy subjects. PMID:27942145

  1. Proprioceptive sensibility in the elderly: degeneration, functional consequences and plastic-adaptive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Coxon, James P; Wenderoth, Nicole; Van Impe, Annouchka; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2009-03-01

    As the percentage of individuals over the age of 60 years continues to rise, determining the extent and functional significance of age-related declines in sensorimotor performance is of increasing importance. This review examines the specific contribution of proprioceptive feedback to sensorimotor performance in older adults. First, a global perspective of proprioceptive acuity is provided assimilating information from studies where only one of several aspects of proprioceptive function (e.g. sense of position, motion or dynamic position) was quantified, and/or a single joint or limb segment tested. Second, the consequences of proprioceptive deficits are established with particular emphasis placed on postural control. Lastly, the potential for plastic changes in the aging proprioceptive system is highlighted, including studies which relate physical activity to enhanced proprioceptive abilities in older adults. Overall, this review provides a foundation for future studies regarding the proprioceptive feedback abilities of elderly individuals. Such studies may lead to greater advances in the treatment and prevention of the sensorimotor deficits typically associated with the aging process.

  2. Brain-actuated gait trainer with visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Weihai; Lee, Kyuhwa; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Bouri, Mohamed; Pei, Zhongcai; Millán, José del R.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have been proposed in closed-loop applications for neuromodulation and neurorehabilitation. This study describes the impact of different feedback modalities on the performance of an EEG-based BMI that decodes motor imagery (MI) of leg flexion and extension. Approach. We executed experiments in a lower-limb gait trainer (the legoPress) where nine able-bodied subjects participated in three consecutive sessions based on a crossover design. A random forest classifier was trained from the offline session and tested online with visual and proprioceptive feedback, respectively. Post-hoc classification was conducted to assess the impact of feedback modalities and learning effect (an improvement over time) on the simulated trial-based performance. Finally, we performed feature analysis to investigate the discriminant power and brain pattern modulations across the subjects. Main results. (i) For real-time classification, the average accuracy was 62.33 +/- 4.95 % and 63.89 +/- 6.41 % for the two online sessions. The results were significantly higher than chance level, demonstrating the feasibility to distinguish between MI of leg extension and flexion. (ii) For post-hoc classification, the performance with proprioceptive feedback (69.45 +/- 9.95 %) was significantly better than with visual feedback (62.89 +/- 9.20 %), while there was no significant learning effect. (iii) We reported individual discriminate features and brain patterns associated to each feedback modality, which exhibited differences between the two modalities although no general conclusion can be drawn. Significance. The study reported a closed-loop brain-controlled gait trainer, as a proof of concept for neurorehabilitation devices. We reported the feasibility of decoding lower-limb movement in an intuitive and natural way. As far as we know, this is the first online study discussing the role of feedback modalities in lower-limb MI decoding. Our results suggest that

  3. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang;

    2004-01-01

    When performing visually guided actions under conditions of perturbed visual feedback, e.g., in a mirror or a video camera, there is a spatial conflict between visual and proprioceptive information. Recent studies have shown that subjects without proprioception avoid this conflict and show......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  4. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang

    2004-01-01

    When performing visually guided actions under conditions of perturbed visual feedback, e.g., in a mirror or a video camera, there is a spatial conflict between visual and proprioceptive information. Recent studies have shown that subjects without proprioception avoid this conflict and show......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  5. Pilates and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Methods Induce Similar Strength Gains but Different Neuromuscular Adaptations in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Carvalho, Fabiana; de Andrade Mesquita, Laiana Sepúlveda; Pereira, Rafael; Neto, Osmar Pinto; Amaro Zangaro, Renato

    2017-09-26

    Background/Study Context: The aging process is associated with a decline in muscle mass, strength, and conditioning. Two training methods that may be useful to improve muscle function are Pilates and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). Thus, the present study aimed to compare the influence of training programs using Pilates and PNF methods with elderly women. Sixty healthy elderly women were randomly divided into three groups: Pilates group, PNF group, and control group. Pilates and PNF groups underwent 1-month training programs with Pilates and PNF methods, respectively. The control group received no intervention during the 1 month. The maximal isometric force levels from knee extension and flexion, as well as the electromyography (EMG) signals from quadriceps and biceps femoris, were recorded before and after the 1-month intervention period. A two-way analysis of variance revealed that the Pilates and PNF methods induced similar strength gains from knee flexors and extensors, but Pilates exhibited greater low-gamma drive (i.e., oscillations in 30-60 Hz) in the EMG power spectrum after the training period. These results support use of both Pilates and PNF methods to enhance lower limb muscle strength in older groups, which is very important for gait, postural stability, and performance of daily life activities.

  6. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-12-22

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness.

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Brenda Pagan- ...

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  9. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd ... your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  11. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, ...

  12. THE EFFECT OF WEARING HEADSCARVES ON CERVICAL SPINE PROPRIOCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiah F. Alqabbani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proprioception plays an important role in sensorimotor control of posture and movement. Impairments in cervical proprioception have been demonstrated in subjects with whiplash-associated disorder, patients with age-related degeneration, and patients with articular diseases or spondylosis. The joint position error test is widely used to measure head repositioning accuracy. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cervical spine joint position error in females who routinely wear headscarves to females that do not wear headscarves. Methods: Twelve females with mean age 27.5±4.0 years were divided into two groups: females who routinely wear headscarves (n=6, and females who never wear headscarves (n=6. Joint position error was measured using a head-mounted laser while subjects were seated. The tasks involved relocating the head to neutral after flexion, extension, right rotation, and left rotation. A total of six trials were done for each direction. Results: The joint position error was higher in females wearing headscarves compared to females who do not wear them in the cumulative joint position error score (8.2±1.0 vs. 4.4±1.0, p=0.06 as well as during head rotation to the right (9.3±1.6 vs. 3.1±1.6, p=0.06. Conclusion: Wearing headscarves may increase the cervical joint position error and can negatively impact postural control. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  13. Proprioceptive bimanual test in intrinsic and extrinsic coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iandolo, Riccardo; Squeri, Valentina; De Santis, Dalia; Giannoni, Psiche; Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Is there any difference between matching the position of the hands by asking the subjects to move them to the same spatial location or to mirror-symmetric locations with respect to the body midline? If the motion of the hands were planned in the extrinsic space, the mirror-symmetric task would imply an additional challenge, because we would need to flip the coordinates of the target on the other side of the workspace. Conversely, if the planning were done in intrinsic coordinates, in order to move both hands to the same spot in the workspace, we should compute different joint angles for each arm. Even if both representations were available to the subjects, the two tasks might lead to different results, providing some cue on the organization of the "body schema". In order to answer such questions, the middle fingertip of the non-dominant hand of a population of healthy subjects was passively moved by a manipulandum to 20 different target locations. Subjects matched these positions with the middle fingertip of their dominant hand. For most subjects, the matching accuracy was higher in the extrinsic modality both in terms of systematic error and variability, even for the target locations in which the configuration of the arms was the same for both modalities. This suggests that the matching performance of the subjects could be determined not only by proprioceptive information but also by the cognitive representation of the task: expressing the goal as reaching for the physical location of the hand in space is apparently more effective than requiring to match the proprioceptive representation of joint angles.

  14. Can textured insoles improve ankle proprioception and performance in dancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Begg, Rezaul; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-08-01

    With the aim of determining both the acute and the chronic effects of textured insoles on the ankle discrimination and performance ability of dancers, 60 ballet dancers from the Australian Ballet School, aged 14-19 years, were divided into three groups (two intervention groups and a control group), age- and level-matched. In the first 5 weeks (weeks 1 to 5), the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their ballet shoes and the second intervention group (GRP2) was not given textured insoles to wear. In the next 5 weeks (weeks 6 to 10), GRP2 was asked to wear the same type of textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. The control group (CTRL) did not wear textured insoles during the whole 10 weeks. All participants were tested preintervention, after 5 weeks and after 10 weeks for ankle discrimination score (AUC scores). Dance performance was assessed by 5-7 dance teachers. Pre-to-post change in AUC scores was significantly greater for the groups wearing insoles than for the controls (P = .046) and the size of pre-to-post changes did not differ between the two intervention groups (P = .834). Significant correlation was found between ankle discrimination score and performance scores, using the textured insoles (r = .412; P = .024). In conclusion, the stimulation to the proprioceptive system arising from textured insoles worn for five weeks was sufficient to improve the proprioceptive ability and performance ability of ballet dancers.

  15. The Right Supramarginal Gyrus Is Important for Proprioception in Healthy and Stroke-Affected Participants: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shabat, Ettie; Matyas, Thomas A.; Pell, Gaby S.; Brodtmann, Amy; Carey, Leeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Human proprioception is essential for motor control, yet its central processing is still debated. Previous studies of passive movements and illusory vibration have reported inconsistent activation patterns related to proprioception, particularly in high-order sensorimotor cortices. We investigated brain activation specific to proprioception, its laterality, and changes following stroke. Twelve healthy and three stroke-affected individuals with proprioceptive deficits participated. Proprioception was assessed clinically with the Wrist Position Sense Test, and participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. An event-related study design was used, where each proprioceptive stimulus of passive wrist movement was followed by a motor response of mirror ­copying with the other wrist. Left (LWP) and right (RWP) wrist proprioception were tested separately. Laterality indices (LIs) were calculated for the main cortical regions activated during proprioception. We found proprioception-related brain activation in high-order sensorimotor cortices in healthy participants especially in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG LWP z = 4.51, RWP z = 4.24) and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd LWP z = 4.10, RWP z = 3.93). Right hemispheric dominance was observed in the SMG (LI LWP mean 0.41, SD 0.22; RWP 0.29, SD 0.20), and to a lesser degree in the PMd (LI LWP 0.34, SD 0.17; RWP 0.13, SD 0.25). In stroke-affected participants, the main difference in proprioception-related brain activation was reduced laterality in the right SMG. Our findings indicate that the SMG and PMd play a key role in proprioception probably due to their role in spatial processing and motor control, respectively. The findings from stroke-­affected individuals suggest that decreased right SMG function may be associated with decreased proprioception. We recommend that clinicians pay particular attention to the assessment and rehabilitation of proprioception following right hemispheric

  16. Horizontal space misrepresentation in unilateral brain damage. II. Eye-head centered modulation of visual misrepresentation in hemianopia without neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doricchi, Fabrizio; Onida, Alessandra; Guariglia, Paola

    2002-01-01

    We used a visual distance reproduction task (endpoint task) to evaluate horizontal space representation in two left brain damaged (LBD) and three right brain damaged (RBD) patients with contralateral homonymous hemianopia and no neglect. All patients were examined in the chronic phase of the stroke and were aware of their visual field defect. Along with contralesional deviation in the line bisection task, all patients estimated size (Landmark task) and distances in the contralesional space as being longer than equivalent size and distances located in the ipsilesional space. Misreproduction of distances was abolished or reduced when the task was performed in the ipsilesional head-centred space with the head turned contralesionally. This finding points out that misrepresentation of horizontal space linked to hemianopia can be modulated by combined proprioceptive input from eye and neck muscles. The pattern of misrepresentation found in chronic hemianopic patients is opposite to the one described in chronic neglect patients with concomitant hemianopia. These different patterns of space misrepresentation are the likely consequence of the presence, in hemianopics, and the absence, in neglect patients with hemianopia, of compensatory strategies based on the non-retinotopic and multimodal coding of spatial positions falling in the retinotopically organised blind field.

  17. Changes in sensory reweighting of proprioceptive information during standing balance with age and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasma, J.H.; Engelhart, D.; Maier, A.B.; Schouten, A.C.; Kooij, van der H.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    With sensory reweighting, reliable sensory information is selected over unreliable information during balance by dynamically combining this information. We used system identification techniques to show the weight and the adaptive process of weight change of proprioceptive information during standing

  18. The importance of proprioception in the diagnosis of cases thought to be Munchausen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Nazim Karalezli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Munchausen Syndrome is known as a condition where individuals who seek attention for themselves present at healthcare institutions with exaggerated complaints. Diagnosis can be difficult in some cases. In this paper are presented two cases of Munchausen Syndrome diagnosis by removing finger proprioception with local anesthetic based on incompatibility between trauma history and clinical findings. Evaluation of the resting position of the hand is primarily associated with proprioception. Sight and touch are important for proprioception. In patients thought to be potentially faking symptoms in areas where local anesthesia can be applied easily, such as the fingers, removing proprioception in the physical examination is important in diagnosing these individuals. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 160-163

  19. Changes in sensory reweighting of proprioceptive information during standing balance with age and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasma, Jantsje; Pasma, J.H.; Engelhart, Denise; Maier, A.B.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Kooij, Herman; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    With sensory reweighting, reliable sensory information is selected over unreliable information during balance by dynamically combining this information. We used system identification techniques to show the weight and the adaptive process of weight change of proprioceptive information during standing

  20. Proprioceptive acuity assessment via joint position matching: from basic science to general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J

    2010-08-01

    Over the past several decades, studies of use-dependent plasticity have demonstrated a critical role for proprioceptive feedback in the reorganization, and subsequent recovery, of neuromotor systems. As such, an increasing emphasis has been placed on tests of proprioceptive acuity in both the clinic and the laboratory. One test that has garnered particular interest is joint position matching, whereby individuals must replicate a reference joint angle in the absence of vision (ie, using proprioceptive information). On the surface, this test might seem straightforward in nature. However, the present perspective article informs therapists and researchers alike of multiple insights gained from a recent series of position matching studies by the author and colleagues. In particular, 5 factors are outlined that can assist clinicians in developing well-informed opinions regarding the outcomes of tests of position matching abilities. This information should allow for enhanced diagnosis of proprioceptive deficits within clinical settings in the future.

  1. Arm-eye coordination test to objectively quantify motor performance and muscles activation in persons after stroke undergoing robot-aided rehabilitation training: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-Yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Li, Le; Sun, Rui

    2013-09-01

    This study designed an arm-eye coordination test to investigate the effectiveness of the robot-aided rehabilitation for persons after stroke. Six chronic poststroke subjects were recruited to attend a 20-session robot-aided rehabilitation training of elbow joint. Before and after the training program, subjects were asked to perform voluntary movements of elbow flection and extension by following sinusoidal trajectories at different velocities with visual feedback on their joint positions. The elbow angle and the electromyographic signal of biceps and triceps as well as clinical scores were evaluated together with the parameters. Performance was objectively quantified by root mean square error (RMSE), root mean square jerk (RMSJ), range of motion (ROM), and co-contraction index (CI). After 20 sessions, RMSE and ROM improved significantly in both the affected and the unaffected side based on two-way ANOVA (P effects of different types of treatment and design progress-based training method to accelerate the processes of recovery.

  2. A robotic test of proprioception within the hemiparetic arm post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Lucia; Botzer, Lior; Ghez, Claude; Scheidt, Robert A

    2014-04-30

    Proprioception plays important roles in planning and control of limb posture and movement. The impact of proprioceptive deficits on motor function post-stroke has been difficult to elucidate due to limitations in current tests of arm proprioception. Common clinical tests only provide ordinal assessment of proprioceptive integrity (eg. intact, impaired or absent). We introduce a standardized, quantitative method for evaluating proprioception within the arm on a continuous, ratio scale. We demonstrate the approach, which is based on signal detection theory of sensory psychophysics, in two tasks used to characterize motor function after stroke. Hemiparetic stroke survivors and neurologically intact participants attempted to detect displacement- or force-perturbations robotically applied to their arm in a two-interval, two-alternative forced-choice test. A logistic psychometric function parameterized detection of limb perturbations. The shape of this function is determined by two parameters: one corresponds to a signal detection threshold and the other to variability of responses about that threshold. These two parameters define a space in which proprioceptive sensation post-stroke can be compared to that of neurologically-intact people. We used an auditory tone discrimination task to control for potential comprehension, attention and memory deficits. All but one stroke survivor demonstrated competence in performing two-alternative discrimination in the auditory training test. For the remaining stroke survivors, those with clinically identified proprioceptive deficits in the hemiparetic arm or hand had higher detection thresholds and exhibited greater response variability than individuals without proprioceptive deficits. We then identified a normative parameter space determined by the threshold and response variability data collected from neurologically intact participants. By plotting displacement detection performance within this normative space, stroke survivors

  3. Premotor cortex modulates somatosensory cortex during voluntary movements without proprioceptive feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Geertsen, Svend Sparre;

    2007-01-01

    Movement perception relies on sensory feedback, but the involvement of efference copies remains unclear. We investigated movements without proprioceptive feedback using ischemic nerve block during fMRI in healthy humans, and found preserved activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. This act......Movement perception relies on sensory feedback, but the involvement of efference copies remains unclear. We investigated movements without proprioceptive feedback using ischemic nerve block during fMRI in healthy humans, and found preserved activation of the primary somatosensory cortex...

  4. Disruption in proprioception from long-term thalamic deep brain stimulation: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Semrau

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an excellent treatment for tremor and is generally thought to be reversible by turning off stimulation. For tremor, DBS is implanted in the ventrointermedius (Vim nucleus of the thalamus, a region that relays proprioceptive information for movement sensation (kinaesthesia. Gait disturbances have been observed with bilateral Vim DBS, but the long-term effects on proprioceptive processing are unknown. We aimed to determine whether Vim DBS surgical implantation or stimulation leads to proprioceptive deficits in the upper limb. We assessed two groups of tremor subjects on measures of proprioception (kinaesthesia, position sense and motor function using a robotic exoskeleton. In the first group (Surgery, we tested patients before and after implantation of Vim DBS, but before DBS was turned on to determine if proprioceptive deficits were inherent to tremor or caused by DBS implantation. In the second group (Stim, we tested subjects with chronically implanted Vim DBS ON and OFF stimulation. Compared to controls, there were no proprioceptive deficits before or after DBS implantation in the Surgery group. Surprisingly, those that received chronic long-term stimulation (LT-stim, 3-10 years displayed significant proprioceptive deficits ON and OFF stimulation not present in subjects with chronic short-term stimulation (ST-stim, 0.5-2 years. LT-stim had significantly larger variability and reduced workspace area during the position sense assessment. During the kinesthetic assessment, LT-stim made significantly larger directional errors and consistently underestimated the speed of the robot, despite generating normal movement speeds during motor assessment. Chronic long-term Vim DBS may potentially disrupt proprioceptive processing, possibly inducing irreversible plasticity in the Vim nucleus and/or its network connections. Our findings in the upper limb may help explain some of the gait disturbances seen by others following Vim

  5. Disruption in proprioception from long-term thalamic deep brain stimulation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrau, Jennifer A; Herter, Troy M; Kiss, Zelma H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an excellent treatment for tremor and is generally thought to be reversible by turning off stimulation. For tremor, DBS is implanted in the ventrointermedius (Vim) nucleus of the thalamus, a region that relays proprioceptive information for movement sensation (kinaesthesia). Gait disturbances have been observed with bilateral Vim DBS, but the long-term effects on proprioceptive processing are unknown. We aimed to determine whether Vim DBS surgical implantation or stimulation leads to proprioceptive deficits in the upper limb. We assessed two groups of tremor subjects on measures of proprioception (kinaesthesia, position sense) and motor function using a robotic exoskeleton. In the first group (Surgery), we tested patients before and after implantation of Vim DBS, but before DBS was turned on to determine if proprioceptive deficits were inherent to tremor or caused by DBS implantation. In the second group (Stim), we tested subjects with chronically implanted Vim DBS ON and OFF stimulation. Compared to controls, there were no proprioceptive deficits before or after DBS implantation in the Surgery group. Surprisingly, those that received chronic long-term stimulation (LT-stim, 3-10 years) displayed significant proprioceptive deficits ON and OFF stimulation not present in subjects with chronic short-term stimulation (ST-stim, 0.5-2 years). LT-stim had significantly larger variability and reduced workspace area during the position sense assessment. During the kinesthetic assessment, LT-stim made significantly larger directional errors and consistently underestimated the speed of the robot, despite generating normal movement speeds during motor assessment. Chronic long-term Vim DBS may potentially disrupt proprioceptive processing, possibly inducing irreversible plasticity in the Vim nucleus and/or its network connections. Our findings in the upper limb may help explain some of the gait disturbances seen by others following Vim DBS.

  6. Proprioception rehabilitation training system for stroke patients using virtual reality technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun I; Song, In-Ho; Cho, Sangwoo; Kim, In Young; Ku, Jeonghun; Kang, Youn Joo; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated a virtual reality (VR) proprioceptive rehabilitation system that could manipulate the visual feedback of upper-limb during training and could do training by relying on proprioception feedback only. Virtual environments were designed in order to switch visual feedback on/off during upper-limb training. Two types of VR training tasks were designed for evaluating the effect of the proprioception focused training compared to the training with visual feedback. In order to evaluate the developed proprioception feedback virtual environment system, we recruited ten stroke patients (age: 54.7± 7.83years, on set: 3.29± 3.83 years). All patients performed three times PFVE task in order to check the improvement of proprioception function just before training session, after one week training, and after all training. In a comparison between FMS score and PFVE, the FMS score had a significant relationship with the error distance(r = -.662, n=10, p = .037) and total movement distance(r = -.726, n=10, p = .018) in PFVE. Comparing the training effect between in virtual environment with visual feedback and with proprioception, the click count, error distance and total error distance was more reduced in PFVE than VFVE. (Click count: p = 0.005, error distance: p = 0.001, total error distance: p = 0.007). It suggested that the proprioception feedback rather than visual feedback could be effective means to enhancing motor control during rehabilitation training. The developed VR system for rehabilitation has been verified in that stroke patients improved motor control after VR proprioception feedback training.

  7. The effects of stochastic resonance electrical stimulation and neoprene sleeve on knee proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcott Chris W

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of knee injuries and pathologies may cause a deficit in knee proprioception which may increase the risk of reinjury or the progression of disease. Stochastic resonance stimulation is a new therapy which has potential benefits for improving proprioceptive function. The objective of this study was to determine if stochastic resonance (SR stimulation applied with a neoprene sleeve could improve knee proprioception relative to a no-stimulation/no-sleeve condition (control or a sleeve alone condition in the normal, healthy knee. We hypothesized that SR stimulation when applied with a sleeve would enhance proprioception relative to the control and sleeve alone conditions. Methods Using a cross-over within subject design, twenty-four healthy subjects were tested under four combinations of conditions: electrical stimulation/sleeve, no stimulation/sleeve, no stimulation/no sleeve, and stimulation/no sleeve. Joint position sense (proprioception was measured as the absolute mean difference between a target knee joint angle and the knee angle reproduced by the subject. Testing was conducted during both partial-weight bearing (PWB and non-weight bearing (NWB tasks. Differences in joint position sense between the conditions were evaluated by repeated-measures analysis of variance testing. Results Joint position sense error during the stimulation/sleeve condition (2.48° ± 1.32° was found to be more accurate (P Conclusion These results suggest that SR electrical stimulation when combined with a neoprene sleeve is an effective modality for enhancement of joint proprioception in the PWB knee. We believe these results suggest the need for further study of the potential of SR stimulation to correct proprioceptive deficits in a clinical population with knee injury/pathology or in subjects at risk of injury because of a proprioceptive deficit.

  8. COMPARISON OF PROPRIOCEPTION IN INJURED AND UNINJURED KNEE JOINTS AMONG MALE PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M S Nagarajan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Football is the world's most popular sport. There are over 240 million registered players worldwide and many more recreational footballers. The knee is a complex joint with many components making it vulnerable to a variety of injuries. The study has investigated the effect of knee proprioception error on injured and uninjured male professional footballers. Methods: This was a cross sectional comparative study with hundred and six (106 male professional footballers were selected for the study as per the selection criteria. Hundred and eighteen injured and ninety four uninjured knee samples were analysed for this study. Photographic analysis method was used to evaluate proprioception error at inner, middle and outer range of knee joint. Proprioception error of knee joint was measured at inner range, middle range and outer range for injured and uninjured groups. Data analysis found that there is significant difference in proprioception error between the groups. Result: Comparative study was performed using independent t’ test for proprioception error between knee injured and uninjured groups. P<0.05 were considered as significant difference in effect for this study. The means of knee injured and uninjured groups were 6.08 and 5.55 respectively with t’ value 2.21 and degree of freedom 634. The study found that proprioception error has significant difference in effect on knee injury, with P< 0.03*. Conclusion: The study concluded that proprioception error was varied between knee injured and uninjured groups. Proprioception error of knee joint was more among injured male professional footballers compared to the uninjured footballers.

  9. The Rubber Hand Illusion: feeling of ownership and proprioceptive drift do not go hand in hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Marieke; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O

    2011-01-01

    In the Rubber Hand Illusion, the feeling of ownership of a rubber hand displaced from a participant's real occluded hand is evoked by synchronously stroking both hands with paintbrushes. A change of perceived finger location towards the rubber hand (proprioceptive drift) has been reported to correlate with this illusion. To measure the time course of proprioceptive drift during the Rubber Hand Illusion, we regularly interrupted stroking (performed by robot arms) to measure perceived finger location. Measurements were made by projecting a probe dot into the field of view (using a semi-transparent mirror) and asking participants if the dot is to the left or to the right of their invisible hand (Experiment 1) or to adjust the position of the dot to that of their invisible hand (Experiment 2). We varied both the measurement frequency (every 10 s, 40 s, 120 s) and the mode of stroking (synchronous, asynchronous, just vision). Surprisingly, with frequent measurements, proprioceptive drift occurs not only in the synchronous stroking condition but also in the two control conditions (asynchronous stroking, just vision). Proprioceptive drift in the synchronous stroking condition is never higher than in the just vision condition. Only continuous exposure to asynchronous stroking prevents proprioceptive drift and thus replicates the differences in drift reported in the literature. By contrast, complementary subjective ratings (questionnaire) show that the feeling of ownership requires synchronous stroking and is not present in the asynchronous stroking condition. Thus, subjective ratings and drift are dissociated. We conclude that different mechanisms of multisensory integration are responsible for proprioceptive drift and the feeling of ownership. Proprioceptive drift relies on visuoproprioceptive integration alone, a process that is inhibited by asynchronous stroking, the most common control condition in Rubber Hand Illusion experiments. This dissociation implies that

  10. The Rubber Hand Illusion: feeling of ownership and proprioceptive drift do not go hand in hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Rohde

    Full Text Available In the Rubber Hand Illusion, the feeling of ownership of a rubber hand displaced from a participant's real occluded hand is evoked by synchronously stroking both hands with paintbrushes. A change of perceived finger location towards the rubber hand (proprioceptive drift has been reported to correlate with this illusion. To measure the time course of proprioceptive drift during the Rubber Hand Illusion, we regularly interrupted stroking (performed by robot arms to measure perceived finger location. Measurements were made by projecting a probe dot into the field of view (using a semi-transparent mirror and asking participants if the dot is to the left or to the right of their invisible hand (Experiment 1 or to adjust the position of the dot to that of their invisible hand (Experiment 2. We varied both the measurement frequency (every 10 s, 40 s, 120 s and the mode of stroking (synchronous, asynchronous, just vision. Surprisingly, with frequent measurements, proprioceptive drift occurs not only in the synchronous stroking condition but also in the two control conditions (asynchronous stroking, just vision. Proprioceptive drift in the synchronous stroking condition is never higher than in the just vision condition. Only continuous exposure to asynchronous stroking prevents proprioceptive drift and thus replicates the differences in drift reported in the literature. By contrast, complementary subjective ratings (questionnaire show that the feeling of ownership requires synchronous stroking and is not present in the asynchronous stroking condition. Thus, subjective ratings and drift are dissociated. We conclude that different mechanisms of multisensory integration are responsible for proprioceptive drift and the feeling of ownership. Proprioceptive drift relies on visuoproprioceptive integration alone, a process that is inhibited by asynchronous stroking, the most common control condition in Rubber Hand Illusion experiments. This dissociation implies

  11. Plastic changes in hand proprioception following force-field motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Anguera, Joaquin A

    2010-09-01

    Motor neurophysiologists are placing greater emphasis on sensory feedback processing than ever before. In line with this shift, a recent article by Ostry and colleagues provided timely new evidence that force-field motor learning influences not only motor output, but also proprioceptive sense. In this Neuro Forum, the merits and limitations of Ostry and colleagues are explored in the context of recent work on proprioceptive function, including several recent studies from this journal.

  12. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF): Its Mechanisms and Effects on Range of Motion and Muscular Function

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Kayla B.; Whitcomb, Tyler J.; Briggs, Wyatt O.; Hong, Junggi

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is common practice for increasing range of motion, though little research has been done to evaluate theories behind it. The purpose of this study was to review possible mechanisms, proposed theories, and physiological changes that occur due to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. Four theoretical mechanisms were identified: autogenic inhibition, reciprocal inhibition, stress relaxation, and the gate control theory. The studies s...

  13. Functional sparing of intrafusal muscle fibers in muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith; Rossi-Durand, Christiane; Attarian, Shahram; Pouget, Jean; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2005-07-01

    In a previous study, we showed that patients with muscular dystrophies (MDs) perceive passive movements, experience sensations of illusory movement induced by muscle tendon vibration, and have proprioceptive-regulated sways in response to vibratory stimulation applied to the neck and ankle muscle tendons. These findings argue for preserved proprioceptive functions of muscle spindles. However, it is unclear whether the function of intrafusal muscle fibers is spared, i.e., whether they retain their ability to contract when submitted to a fusimotor drive. To answer this question, we analyzed the effects of reinforcement maneuvers (mental computation and the Jendrassik maneuver) that are known to increase muscle spindle sensitivity via fusimotor drive in healthy subjects. Nine patients with different MDs participated in the study. Reinforcement maneuvers increased both the mean amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex (187 +/- 52.9% of the mean control amplitude) and the sensitivity of muscle spindle afferents to imposed movements of the ankle. The same reinforcement maneuvers failed to alter the amplitude of the Hoffmann reflex in the triceps surae muscle. These results suggest that the intrafusal muscle fibers preserve their contractile abilities in slowly progressive MDs. The reasons for a differential impairment of intrafusal and extrafusal muscle fibers and the clinical implications of the present results are discussed.

  14. Reversal of alcohol-induced effects on response control due to changes in proprioceptive information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Mückschel, Moritz; Beste, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has drawn interest to the effects of binge drinking on response selection. However, choosing an appropriate response is a complex endeavor that usually requires us to process and integrate several streams of information. One of them is proprioceptive information about the position of limbs. As to now, it has however remained elusive how binge drinking affects the processing of proprioceptive information during response selection and control in healthy individuals. We investigated this question using neurophysiological (EEG) techniques in a response selection task, where we manipulated proprioceptive information. The results show a reversal of alcohol-induced effects on response control due to changes in proprioceptive information processing. The most likely explanation for this finding is that proprioceptive information does not seem to be properly integrated in response selection processes during acute alcohol intoxication as found in binge drinking. The neurophysiological data suggest that processes related to the preparation and execution of the motor response, but not upstream processes related to conflict monitoring and spatial attentional orienting, underlie these binge drinking-dependent modulations. Taken together, the results show that even high doses of alcohol have very specific effects within the cascade of neurophysiological processes underlying response control and the integration of proprioceptive information during this process. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  16. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments.

  17. Preliminary analysis of non-dominant proprioceptive acuity and interlimb asymmetry in the human wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contu, Sara; Cappello, Leonardo; Konczak, Jurgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Proprioception provides information about limb configuration which are essential for planning and controlling its posture and movement. Asymmetries in the way dominant and non-dominant limbs exploit proprioceptive information have been previously evaluated, with contradictory results due to the difference in the employed methodology. A measure of proprioceptive acuity that does not reflect the influence of one limb on the other consists in the evaluation of the psychophysical threshold. This metric, evaluated separately for each limb and involving only passive movements, reflects a reliable measure of proprioceptive acuity. The aim of this work is to first evaluate the proprioceptive acuity of the non-dominant wrist joint in flexion/extension and adduction/abduction and to compare these results to the acuity of the dominant wrist. Data were collected during a unidirectional 2-alternative-forcedchoice test performed by six right-handed subjects. We found acuity of 1.31°, 1.26°, 1.33° and 1.63° respectively for abduction, adduction, extension and flexion of the non-dominant wrist. Acuity of the dominant wrist was assessed for five of the subjects for abduction and flexion and resulted lower (mean values were respectively 1.64° and 2.14°). The preliminary results suggest a leading role of the non-dominant wrist in the processing of the proprioceptive feedback.

  18. A task-dependent effect of memory and hand-target on proprioceptive localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie A H; Fiehler, Katja; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2012-06-01

    We examine whether the task goal affects the accuracy and precision with which participants can localize an unseen hand. Proprioceptive localization was measured using three different tasks: two goal-directed movement tasks (reaching to and reproducing final hand-target location) and a perceptual estimation task in which participants judged the location of the hand-target relative to visual references. We also assessed whether proprioceptive localization in these different tasks is affected by localization from memory, the hand-target being localized (left or right) or the movement path of the proprioceptive target (9 paths, derived from combinations of starting and final hand-target positions). We found that participants were less precise when reaching from memory, but not when reproducing or estimating remembered final hand-target location. Participants also misperceived the felt location of their hands, judging their left hand to be more leftward and their right hand to be more rightward when reaching to and when estimating final hand-target location, but not when reproducing hand-target location. The movement path of the proprioceptive target did not affect localization, regardless of the task goal. Overall, localization seems poorer when proprioception is used to guide a reach with the opposite hand, particularly from memory, and best when merely reproducing the proprioceptive target site. This may have an important application in neuro-rehabilitation, whereby one task may better establish or re-establish important or failing sensory connections.

  19. The role of differential delays in integrating transient visual and proprioceptive information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Brendan D.; de la Malla, Cristina; López-Moliner, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Many actions involve limb movements toward a target. Visual and proprioceptive estimates are available online, and by optimally combining (Ernst and Banks, 2002) both modalities during the movement, the system can increase the precision of the hand estimate. The notion that both sensory modalities are integrated is also motivated by the intuition that we do not consciously perceive any discrepancy between the felt and seen hand's positions. This coherence as a result of integration does not necessarily imply realignment between the two modalities (Smeets et al., 2006). For example, the two estimates (visual and proprioceptive) might be different without either of them (e.g., proprioception) ever being adjusted after recovering the other (e.g., vision). The implication that the felt and seen positions might be different has a temporal analog. Because the actual feedback from the hand at a given instantaneous position reaches brain areas at different times for proprioception and vision (shorter for proprioception), the corresponding instantaneous unisensory position estimates will be different, with the proprioceptive one being ahead of the visual one. Based on the assumption that the system integrates optimally and online the available evidence from both senses, we introduce a temporal mechanism that explains the reported overestimation of hand positions when vision is occluded for active and passive movements (Gritsenko et al., 2007) without the need to resort to initial feedforward estimates (Wolpert et al., 1995). We set up hypotheses to test the validity of the model, and we contrast simulation-based predictions with empirical data. PMID:24550870

  20. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people you know — like your grandparents — probably wear glasses. To the Brain! Think of the optic nerve as the great messenger in the back of your eye. The rods and cones of the retina change the colors and shapes you see into millions of nerve ...

  1. EFFICACY OF MODIFIED PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION STRETCHING WITH CRYOTHERAPY OVER MANUAL PASSIVE STRETCHING WITH CRYOTHERAPY ON HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamik Bhattacharjee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthy individuals, to ease and accomplish their activities of daily living they need flexible body without any tightness in the muscles, particularly those used for a definite function. Cooling soft tissues in a lengthened position after stretching has been shown to promote more lasting increases in soft tissue length and minimize post stretch muscle soreness. There are less documented studies which compared modified proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretch over passive manual stretch with cold application commonly after the interventions. Methods: Thirty high school going healthy students were divided into two groups- Group I received Passive Manual stretching (n=15 and Group II received modified PNF stretching (n=15 and both groups received cold application after the interventions for 10 minutes commonly for 5 days. ROM was taken on day 1, day 5 and day 7. Results: After day 7, Group II with Modified PNF stretching along with cold application showed a significant increase in range of motion tested with active knee extension test (AKET. Conclusion: Modified PNF stretching is considered to be the effective intervention in increasing and maintaining ROM in AKET over passive manual stretching with cold applications commonly after the interventions.

  2. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  3. A pilot study of the effect of Kinesiology tape on knee proprioception after physical activity in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, Simona; Bottoni, Giuliamarta; Heinrich, Dieter; Kofler, Philipp; Hasler, Michael; Nachbauer, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Kinesiology tape has gained significant popularity in recent years and is widely used as an adjunct for treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal injuries. However, evidence regarding its influence on knee proprioception is scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Kinesiology tape on knee proprioception after physical activity in healthy women. It was hypothesized that Kinesiology tape enhances knee proprioception. Longitudinal analysis, pretest-posttest design. Twelve young women with healthy knees were tested for knee proprioception without the use of Kinesiology tape and wearing Kinesiology tape at the knee. The joint position sense was measured at the start and after a 30-min uphill walking protocol on a treadmill. Outcome was the knee angle deviation. No significant difference of proprioceptive performance between the application with Kinesiology tape and without Kinesiology tape was found after uphill walking (p > 0.05). However, when the participants' results for knee angle deviation were graded into good ( 6.1°), Kinesiology tape significantly enhanced those with poor proprioceptive ability after uphill walking, compared to the untaped knee (p = 0.002). This study has shown that the application of Kinesiology tape did not improve knee proprioception in a group of healthy young women. However, it also has demonstrated that Kinesiology tape provided significant proprioceptive enhancement at the knee joint after uphill walking in healthy women with poor proprioceptive ability. This may support its use in sports medicine for preventing knee injuries. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of proprioceptive information on space orientation on the ground and in orbital weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Baumgarten, R.; Kass, J.; Vogel, H.; Wetzig, J.

    Conscious space orientation depends on afferent information from different sense organs including the labyrinth, the eyes, tactile cues from the skin, joint receptors, muscle spindles, tendon organs and possibly viscera. An important role is played by impulses from the cervical position receptors in interaction with concomitant information from the otolith system. In order to isolate the effect of cervical position receptors from that of the otolith system, space experiments in orbital weightlessness and in parabolic aircraft flight were performed. It was found that stimulation of the neck receptors in weightlessness markedly influences the perception of the subjective vertical and horizontal and in addition has a weak effect on ocular torsion.

  5. Robot-Assisted Proprioceptive Training with Added Vibro-Tactile Feedback Enhances Somatosensory and Motor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppone, Anna Vera; Squeri, Valentina; Semprini, Marianna; Masia, Lorenzo; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the trainability of the proprioceptive sense and explored the relationship between proprioception and motor learning. With vision blocked, human learners had to perform goal-directed wrist movements relying solely on proprioceptive/haptic cues to reach several haptically specified targets. One group received additional somatosensory movement error feedback in form of vibro-tactile cues applied to the skin of the forearm. We used a haptic robotic device for the wrist and implemented a 3-day training regimen that required learners to make spatially precise goal-directed wrist reaching movements without vision. We assessed whether training improved the acuity of the wrist joint position sense. In addition, we checked if sensory learning generalized to the motor domain and improved spatial precision of wrist tracking movements that were not trained. The main findings of the study are: First, proprioceptive acuity of the wrist joint position sense improved after training for the group that received the combined proprioceptive/haptic and vibro-tactile feedback (VTF). Second, training had no impact on the spatial accuracy of the untrained tracking task. However, learners who had received VTF significantly reduced their reliance on haptic guidance feedback when performing the untrained motor task. That is, concurrent VTF was highly salient movement feedback and obviated the need for haptic feedback. Third, VTF can be also provided by the limb not involved in the task. Learners who received VTF to the contralateral limb equally benefitted. In conclusion, somatosensory training can significantly enhance proprioceptive acuity within days when learning is coupled with vibro-tactile sensory cues that provide feedback about movement errors. The observable sensory improvements in proprioception facilitates motor learning and such learning may generalize to the sensorimotor control of the untrained motor tasks. The implications of these findings for

  6. Quantifying Proprioceptive Reflexes During Position Control of the Human Arm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.; De Vlugt, E.; Van Hilten, J.J.; Van der Helm, F.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the dynamic properties of the muscle spindle feedback system of shoulder muscles during a posture task. External continuous force disturbances were applied at the hand while subjects had to minimize their hand displacements. The results were analysed using two frequency r

  7. Why Do Eyes Water?

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    ... Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  8. Why Do Eyes Water?

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    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? A ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  9. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to ... of the eye. It regulates the amount of light entering the eye through the pupil. Pupil (PYOO- ...

  10. Recommended Sports Eye Protectors

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    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  11. Eye Safety at Home

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    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  12. Eye Safety at Work

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    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  13. Eye Movement Disorders

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    ... work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder in ... the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over time ...

  14. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to ... of the eye. It regulates the amount of light entering the eye through the pupil. Pupil (PYOO- ...

  15. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

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    ... that can be embedded on web pages. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) One-Page Overview Pink, itchy eyes? Conjunctivitis – ... protect yourself from getting and spreading pink eye . Pink Eye: What To Do Discusses causes and treatment, ...

  16. Eye Disease Simulations

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    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  17. Eye Involvement in TSC

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    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Eyes Campbell (1905) first described the eye involvement in ... some form of eye involvement. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may involve the eyelids of ...

  18. Eye Complications in IBD

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    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  19. 2-D contact detection and localization using proprioceptive information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, M.; Grupen, R.A. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1994-02-01

    This paper employs proprioceptive information (joint angles and torques) to estimate properties of the contact between a planar robot and an unknown object without specifically requiring strategic manipulator motions. The algorithm presented tackles this task in two stages; a contact localization analysis is followed by a force domain contact detection analysis. In the former, the Cartesian endpoint velocities are used for each link to obtain an estimate of the location of a hypothetical contact point on the link surface. A second observer, based on the displacement between two consecutive postures of the manipulator, provides an estimate of the error associated with this location. This data is fused over time by tracking the contact location using a linear observer and results in a hypothetical contact location, an associated uncertainty region, and a surface normal estimate. The detection phase uses torque domain evidence and the location estimates to verify the existence of each of the contacts. This process allows the detection of one contact per link and provides estimates of contact location, velocity, surface normal, and contact force.

  20. Sensorimotor Control of the Shoulder in Professional Volleyball Players with Isolated Infraspinatus Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contemori, Samuele; Biscarini, Andrea; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Busti, Daniele; Panichi, Roberto; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2017-06-12

    Isolated infraspinatus muscle atrophy (IIMA) only affects the hitting shoulder of overhead-activity athletes, and is caused by suprascapular nerve neuropathy. No study has assessed the static and dynamic stability of the shoulder in overhead professional athletes with IIMA to reveal possible shoulder sensorimotor alterations. To assess the shoulder static stability, dynamic stability, and strength in professional volleyball players with IIMA and in healthy control players. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Twenty-four male professional volleyball players (12 players with diagnosed IIMA and 12 healthy players) recruited from local volleyball teams. Static stability was evaluated with two independent force platforms and dynamic stability was assessed with the "Upper Quarter Y Balance Test". The static stability assessment was conducted in different support (single hand and both hand) and vision (open and closed eyes) conditions. Data from each test were analyzed with ANOVA and paired t-test models, to highlight statistical differences within and between groups. In addition to reduced abduction and external rotation strength, athletes with IIMA consistently demonstrated significant less static (P functional use of the shoulder and predispose it to acute or overuse injuries. The results of this study may help athletic trainers and physical/physiotherapists to prevent shoulder injuries and create specific proprioceptive and neuromuscular training programs.

  1. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons?

  2. Muscle involvement during intermittent contraction patterns with different target force feedback modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, G; Jørgensen, L V; Ekner, D

    2000-01-01

    and following 30 min of intermittent contractions showed larger fatigue development with proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. Also rating of perceived exertion increased more during proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. This may in part be explained by small differences in the mechanics during...... timing and force level is generally not specified. DESIGN: Repeated measure design in which six subjects in randomized order performed two experimental conditions only differing in feedback mode. METHODS: Intermittent static elbow flexion was performed against either a fixed-force transducer (visual...... and consequently the development muscle fatigue and disorders....

  3. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva; Anderson Luiz Bezerra da Silveira; Fabrízio Di Masi; Cláudio Melibeu Bentes; Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa; Jefferson da Silva Novaes

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4025/actascihealthsci.v36i1.15581 This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on the static muscle strength (SMS). Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a) hand grip without stretching; b) hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexor...

  4. Manual aiming in healthy aging: does proprioceptive acuity make the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Werner F; Van Halewyck, Florian; Levin, Oron; Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Lavrysen, Ann; Elliott, Digby

    2016-04-01

    The present study examines whether non-active older adults are more dependent on visual information when executing aiming movements and whether age-related declines in proprioception play a mediating role herein. Young (N = 40) and older adults (N = 38) were divided into physically active and non-active subgroups based on self-reported sports participation levels. In experiment 1, participants executed wrist-aiming movements with and without visual feedback. In experiment 2, passive proprioceptive acuity was assessed using wrist motion detection and position matching tests. Results showed similar aiming accuracy across age groups both with and without visual feedback, but older adults exhibited longer movement times, prolonged homing-in phase, and made more corrective submovements. Passive proprioceptive acuity was significantly affected by physical activity level and age, with participants in the active group scoring better than their non-active peers. However, these declines did not predict performance changes on the aiming task. Taken together, our observations suggest that decline in proprioceptive acuity did not predict performance changes on the aiming task and older adults were able to compensate for their decreased motion and position sense when allowed sufficient time. In line with these observations, we proposed that older adults are able to compensate for their decline in proprioception by increasing their reliance on predictive models.

  5. Proprioception in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees and its relevance in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL not only causes mechanical instability but also leads to a functional deficit in the form of diminished proprioception of the knee joint. "Functional" recovery is often incomplete even after "anatomic" arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, as some patients with a clinically satisfactory repair and good ligament tension continue to complain of a feeling of instability and giving way, although the knee does not sublux on clinical testing. Factors that may play a role could be proprioceptive elements, as the intact ACL has been shown to have significant receptors. Significant data have come to light demonstrating proprioceptive differences between normal and injured knees, and often between injured and reconstructed knees. ACL remnants have been shown to have proprioceptive fibers that could enhance functional recovery if they adhere to or grow into the reconstructed ligament. Conventionally the torn remnants are shaved off from the knee before graft insertion; modern surgical techniques, with remnant sparing methods have shown better outcomes and functional recovery, and this could be an avenue for future research and development. This article analyzes and reviews our understanding of the sensory element of ACL deficiency, with specific reference to proprioception as an important component of functional knee stability. The types of mechanoreceptors, their distribution and presence in ACL remnants is reviewed, and suggestions are made to minimize soft tissue shaving during ACL reconstruction to ensure a better functional outcome in the reconstructed knee.

  6. Proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia: from experimental evidence to rehabilitation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAvanzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception.We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, that is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: i processing of vibratory input, ii temporal discrimination of two passive movements, iii multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs and, iv motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input.

  7. A QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE FUNCTION IMPROVEMENT AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ACL RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the deficit in proprioceptive function in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL deficiency and to quantify the improvement after Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction . Type of Study : Prospective cohort study . METHOD S : The study included 73 patients (49 men , 24 women ; mean age 26 . 8 years ; range 21 to 40 years who underwent Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction . Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction was performed using either a patellar tendon or a hamstring auto graft . All patients followed a standard rehabilitation program . Proprioceptive function in the form of (B . I Balance Index Score was tested using Kinesthetic Ability Trainer (SPORT KAT 1750 preoperatively and at the end of third and sixth months after su rgery . Their contralateral knees served as control . Results were statistically analyzed by Paired t - test using SPSS 16 . 0 . RESULTS: Mean B . I Score in ACL insufficient limb was 2203 . 19 and of normal contralateral limb was1573 . 01 at the time of presentation , with a mean deficit of 630 . 18 (p<0 . 001 . The injured limb showed significant improvement in proprioception from preoperative B . I Score of 2203 . 19 to B . I Score of 1221 . 95 at the end of 6 months after Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction (p<0 . 001 . CONCLUSION: There is a significant deficit in proprioceptive function in the ACL insufficient limb compared to the normal contralateral limb . Proprioceptive function improves significantly after Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction .

  8. Task-dependent asymmetries in the utilization of proprioceptive feedback for goal-directed movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Brown, Susan H

    2007-07-01

    Whereas the majority of studies regarding upper limb asymmetries in motor performance have focused on preferred arm dominance for producing motor output, studies exploring the role of sensory feedback have suggested that the preferred and non-preferred arms are specialized for different aspects of movement. A recent study by Goble et al. (2006) found evidence of a non-preferred left arm (and presumably right hemisphere) proprioceptive dominance for a target matching task that required subjects to both memorize and transfer across hemispheres proprioceptive target information. This paradigm contrasted previous studies of proprioceptive matching asymmetry that explored only memory-based matching and produced equivocal results. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to examine task-dependent asymmetries in proprioceptive matching performance, including differences related to active versus passive presentation of the matching target. It was found that the non-preferred left arm of right handers matched target elbow angles more accurately than the preferred arm, but only in the matching condition that required both memory and interhemispheric transfer. Task-dependent asymmetries were not affected by the mode of target presentation and assessment of matching kinematics revealed differences in strategy for both the speed and smoothness of targeted movements. Taken together, these results suggest that the non-preferred arm/hemisphere system is specialized for the processing of movement-related proprioceptive feedback.

  9. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  10. A quantitative and standardized robotic method for the evaluation of arm proprioception after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Lucia S; Ghez, Claude; Botzer, Lior; Scheidt, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Stroke often results in both motor and sensory deficits, which may interact in the manifested functional impairment. Proprioception is known to play important roles in the planning and control of limb posture and movement; however, the impact of proprioceptive deficits on motor function has been difficult to elucidate due in part to the qualitative nature of available clinical tests. We present a quantitative and standardized method for evaluating proprioception in tasks directly relevant to those used to assess motor function. Using a robotic manipulandum that exerted controlled displacements of the hand, stroke participants were evaluated, and compared with a control group, in their ability to detect such displacements in a 2-alternative, forced-choice paradigm. A psychometric function parameterized the decision process underlying the detection of the hand displacements. The shape of this function was determined by a signal detection threshold and by the variability of the response about this threshold. Our automatic procedure differentiates between participants with and without proprioceptive deficits and quantifies functional proprioceptive sensation on a magnitude scale that is meaningful for ongoing studies of degraded motor function in comparable horizontal movements.

  11. Upper limb asymmetries in the matching of proprioceptive versus visual targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Brown, Susan H

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the extent to which "sensory dominance" exists in right-handers with respect to the utilization of proprioceptive versus visual feedback. Thirteen right-handed adults performed two target-matching tasks using instrumented manipulanda. In the proprioceptive matching task, the left or right elbow of blindfolded subjects was passively extended by a torque motor system to a target position and held for 3 s before being returned to the start position. The target angle was then matched with either the ipsilateral or contralateral arm. In the second task, visual matching, circular targets were briefly projected to either side of a visual fixation point located in front of the subject. Subjects then matched the target positions with a laser pointer by moving either the ipsilateral or contralateral arm. Overall, marked arm differences in accuracy were seen based on the type of sensory feedback used for target presentation. For the proprioceptive matching task errors were smaller for the nonpreferred left arm, whereas during the visual matching task smaller errors were found for the preferred right arm. These results suggest a left arm/right hemisphere advantage for proprioceptive feedback processing and a right arm/left hemisphere advantage for visual information processing. Such asymmetries may reflect fundamental differences between the two arm/hemisphere systems during the performance of bimanual tasks where the preferred arm requires visual guidance to manipulate an object, whereas the nonpreferred stabilizes that object on the basis of proprioceptive feedback.

  12. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Seemingly effortless, we adjust our movements to continuously changing environments. After initiation of a goal-directed movement, the motor command is under constant control of sensory feedback loops. The main sensory signals contributing to movement control are vision and proprioception. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive feedback for online reaching control, and demonstrate that distinct cortical areas process proprioceptive-only and multi-sensory information for fast feedback corrections.

  13. The Role of Proprioception in the Sagittal Setting of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments During Gait Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Marcelo P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Previous studies have studied the role of proprioception on the setting of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA during gait initiation. However, these studies did not investigate the role of proprioception in the sagittal APA setting. We aimed to investigate the role of proprioception manipulation to induce APA sagittal adaptations on gait initiation. Methods. Fourteen healthy adults performed gait initiation without, and with, vibration applied before movement onset, and during movement. In addition, the effects of two different vibration frequencies (80 and 120Hz were tested. Vibration was applied bilaterally on the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and trapezius superior. The first step characteristics, ground reaction forces and CoP behaviour were assessed. Results. Vibration improved gait initiation performance regardless of the moment it was applied. CoP velocity during the initial phase of APA was increased by vibration only when it was applied before movement. When vibration was applied to disturb the movement, no effects on the CoP behaviour were observed. Manipulation of vibration frequency had no effects. Conclusions. Rather than proprioception manipulation, the results suggest that post-vibratory effects and attentional mechanisms were responsible for our results. Taken together, the results show that sagittal APA setting is robust to proprioception manipulation.

  14. Preserved motor learning after stroke is related to the degree of proprioceptive deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd Lara A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most motor learning theories posit that proprioceptive sensation serves an important role in acquiring and performing movement patterns. However, we recently demonstrated that experimental disruption of proprioception peripherally altered motor performance but not motor learning in humans. Little work has considered humans with central nervous system damage. The purpose of the present study was to specifically consider the relationship between proprioception and motor learning at the level of the central nervous system in humans. Methods Individuals with chronic (> 6mo stroke and similarly aged healthy participants performed a continuous tracking task with an embedded repeating segment over two days and returned on a third day for retention testing. A limb-position matching task was used to quantify proprioception. Results Individuals with chronic stroke demonstrated the ability to learn to track a repeating segment; however, the magnitude of behavioral change associated with repeated segment-specific learning was directly related to the integrity of central proprioceptive processing as indexed by our limb-position matching task. Conclusion These results support the importance of central sensory processing for motor learning. The confirmation of central sensory processing dependent motor learning in humans is discussed in the context of our prior report of preserved motor learning when sensation is disrupted peripherally.

  15. Breaches of the pial basement membrane and disappearance of the glia limitans during development underlie the cortical lamination defect in the mouse model of muscle-eye-brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huaiyu; Yang, Yuan; Eade, Amber; Xiong, Yufang; Qi, Yue

    2007-05-10

    Neuronal overmigration is the underlying cellular mechanism of cerebral cortical malformations in syndromes of congenital muscular dystrophies caused by defects in O-mannosyl glycosylation. Overmigration involves multiple developmental abnormalities in the brain surface basement membrane, Cajal-Retzius cells, and radial glia. We tested the hypothesis that breaches in basement membrane and the underlying glia limitans are the key initial events of the cellular pathomechanisms by carrying out a detailed developmental study with a mouse model of muscle-eye-brain disease, mice deficient in O-mannose beta1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1). The pial basement membrane was normal in the knockout mouse at E11.5. It was breached during rapid cerebral cortical expansion at E13.5. Radial glial endfeet, which comprise glia limitans, grew out of the neural boundary. Neurons moved out of the neural boundary through these breaches. The overgrown radial glia and emigrated neurons disrupted the overlying pia mater. The overmigrated neurons did not participate in cortical plate (CP) development; rather they formed a diffuse cell zone (DCZ) outside the original cortical boundary. Together, the DCZ and the CP formed the knockout cerebral cortex, with disappearance of the basement membrane and the glia limitans. These results suggest that disappearance of the basement membrane and the glia limitans at the cerebral cortical surface during development underlies cortical lamination defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and a cellular mechanism of cortical malformation distinct from that of the reeler mouse, double cortex syndrome, and periventricular heterotopia.

  16. A study on correlation of proprioception and strength between left and right ankles of elder people%老年人两侧踝关节本体感觉及其与肌力的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪强; 俞卓伟; 刘静; 郑洁皎; 曾德铭; 陈千红

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the difference of proprioception and peak torque between left and right ankles of elder people,and analyse its' correlation.Method:Proprioception ankle joints of fifty-three healthy elder people(23 male and 30 female; average age 66.2 ± 5.1 year) were measured for two tests on Biodex system 3 dynamometer. The absolute error ankle in passive replication test was used to assess ankle proprioceptive function. The ankle flexor muscle, extensor muscle isokinetic concentric peak torque were measured on Biodex system 3 dynamometer at the speed of 30°/s. The main measurement indexes were concentric peak torque and relative peak torque of ankle flexor muscle and extensor muscles. Result:The absolute error angles of passive replication test on left ankels were less than that on right ankles(P= 0.011). Concentric peak torques of flexor muscle and extensor muscle of left ankles were less ankles than that of right ankle(P0.05). Conclusion: Proprioception of left ankle is better than that of right ankle, but concentric peak torque and relative peak torque of flexor muscle and extensor muscle of left ankle is less than that of right ankle. There was no significant correlation between the proprioception and muscle strength in the elderly.%目的:对比老年人左右两侧踝关节本体感觉的差异和左右两侧峰力矩之间的差异,分析踝关节本体感觉与其肌力的相关性。方法:在Biodex System 3等速系统上用被动复位测试法测试53名正常老年人(其中男23名、女30名;平均年龄66.2±5.1岁)的踝关节本体感觉,本研究以被动复位绝对误差角度作为个体本体感觉能力优劣的代表。同时采用Biodex Svstem 3等速系统对踝关节屈肌、伸肌肌群在30°/s的角速度下进行向心测试,主要观察指标为各肌群的峰力矩与相对峰力矩。结果:①左侧踝关节复位的绝对误差角度小于有侧踝关节(P=0.011);②左侧踝关节屈肌、伸肌的峰力

  17. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wade

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Icons are eye-cons: they provide a distillation of a complex object or idea into a simple pictorial shape. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimension of distance or depth is missing from the icon, and this alone introduces all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as an exploration of the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons are more honest—they are tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is presented. They are visual allusions rather than visual illusions, although they can display illusory effects. At its broadest, icon can be equated with image. The concept of image has thrived on its vagueness, and so attempts have been made to refine it. An icon corresponds to an optical image: it shares some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional rather than spatialised and projective. Words and images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte (1898-1967 in a series of pipe paintings, and he also played on the theme of the arbitrariness of the verbal labels assigned to objects. What is surprising is that Magritte did not apply his painterly skills to transforming the word shapes he used. A similar reluctance to transform the typefaces pervades visual poetry. My interests are in the visual rather than the poetic dimension, and I will present a range of my own eye contricks which play with letter and word shapes in a variety of ways.

  18. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  19. Spatially valid proprioceptive cues improve the detection of a visual stimulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Carl P T; Miall, R Chris; Balslev, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    , which has been demonstrated for other modality pairings. The aim of this study was to test whether proprioceptive signals can spatially cue a visual target to improve its detection. Participants were instructed to use a planar manipulandum in a forward reaching action and determine during this movement...... whether a near-threshold visual target appeared at either of two lateral positions. The target presentation was followed by a masking stimulus, which made its possible location unambiguous, but not its presence. Proprioceptive cues were given by applying a brief lateral force to the participant's arm......, either in the same direction (validly cued) or in the opposite direction (invalidly cued) to the on-screen location of the mask. The d' detection rate of the target increased when the direction of proprioceptive stimulus was compatible with the location of the visual target compared to when...

  20. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing...... of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception...... was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive...

  1. Pyridoxine treatment alters embryonic motility in chicks: Implications for the role of proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Andrew A; Bekoff, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Somatosensory feedback is important for the modulation of normal locomotion in adult animals, but we do not have a good understanding of when somatosensory information is first used to modulate motility during embryogenesis or how somatosensation is first used to regulate motor output. We used pyridoxine administration (vitamin B6 ), which is known to mostly kill proprioceptive neurons in adult mammals and embryonic chicks, to explore the role of proprioceptive feedback during early embryonic motility in the chick. Injection of pyridoxine on embryonic day 7 (E7) and E8 reduced the amplitude of leg movements recorded on E9 and the number of large, healthy neurons in the ventral-lateral portion of the DRGs. We conclude that proprioception is initially used during embryogenesis to modulate the strength of motor output, but that it is not incorporated into other aspects of pattern generation until later in development as poly-synaptic pathways develop.

  2. Posing for awareness: proprioception modulates access to visual consciousness in a continuous flash suppression task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Roy; Lim, Melanie; Herbelin, Bruno; Hesselmann, Guido; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-06-03

    The rules governing the selection of which sensory information reaches consciousness are yet unknown. Of our senses, vision is often considered to be the dominant sense, and the effects of bodily senses, such as proprioception, on visual consciousness are frequently overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that the position of the body influences visual consciousness. We induced perceptual suppression by using continuous flash suppression. Participants had to judge the orientation a target stimulus embedded in a task-irrelevant picture of a hand. The picture of the hand could either be congruent or incongruent with the participants' actual hand position. When the viewed and the real hand positions were congruent, perceptual suppression was broken more rapidly than during incongruent trials. Our findings provide the first evidence of a proprioceptive bias in visual consciousness, suggesting that proprioception not only influences the perception of one's own body and self-consciousness, but also visual consciousness.

  3. Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Muscle Strength and Power Output

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, Sarah M; Cramer, Joel T; Fincher, A. Louise; Massey, Laurie L; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M; Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fitz, Kristi A; Culbertson, Julie Y

    2005-01-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical setting. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help clinicians make decisions for rehabilitation progression and return to play.

  4. Proprioception contributes to the sense of agency during visual observation of hand movements: evidence from temporal judgments of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Cole, Jonathan; Miall, R Chris

    2007-01-01

    The ability to recognize visually one's own movement is important for motor control and, through attribution of agency, for social interactions. Agency of actions may be decided by comparisons of visual feedback, efferent signals, and proprioceptive inputs. Because the ability to identify one's own...... visual feedback from passive movements is decreased relative to active movements, or in some cases is even absent, the role of proprioception in self-recognition has been questioned. Proprioception during passive and active movements may, however, differ, and so to address any role for proprioception...... synchronously or asynchronously with a random delay, and reported whether or not they felt they controlled the cursor. Movement accuracy was matched between groups. In the absence of proprioception, I.W. was less able than the control group to discriminate self- from computer-produced cursor movement based...

  5. Changes in sensory reweighting of proprioceptive information during standing balance with age and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasma, J H; Engelhart, D; Maier, A B; Schouten, A C; van der Kooij, H; Meskers, C G M

    2015-12-01

    With sensory reweighting, reliable sensory information is selected over unreliable information during balance by dynamically combining this information. We used system identification techniques to show the weight and the adaptive process of weight change of proprioceptive information during standing balance with age and specific diseases. Ten healthy young subjects (aged between 20 and 30 yr) and 44 elderly subjects (aged above 65 yr) encompassing 10 healthy elderly, 10 with cataract, 10 with polyneuropathy, and 14 with impaired balance, participated in the study. During stance, proprioceptive information of the ankles was disturbed by rotation of the support surface with specific frequency content where disturbance amplitude increased over trials. Body sway and reactive ankle torque were measured to determine sensitivity functions of these responses to the disturbance amplitude. Model fits resulted in a proprioceptive weight (changing over trials), time delay, force feedback, reflexive stiffness, and damping. The proprioceptive weight was higher in healthy elderly compared with young subjects and higher in elderly subjects with cataract and with impaired balance compared with healthy elderly subjects. Proprioceptive weight decreased with increasing disturbance amplitude; decrease was similar in all groups. In all groups, the time delay was higher and the reflexive stiffness was lower compared with young or healthy elderly subjects. In conclusion, proprioceptive information is weighted more with age and in patients with cataract and impaired balance. With age and specific diseases the time delay was higher and reflexive stiffness was lower. These results illustrate the opportunity to detect the underlying cause of impaired balance in the elderly with system identification.

  6. Reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration following terminal visual feedback of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eBarkley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that when subjects reach with continuous, misaligned visual feedback of their hand, their reaches are adapted and proprioceptive sense of hand position is recalibrated to partially match the visual feedback (Salomonczyk et al., 2011. It is unclear if similar changes arise after reaching with visual feedback that is provided only at the end of the reach (i.e., terminal feedback, when there are shorter temporal intervals for subjects to experience concurrent visual and proprioceptive feedback. Subjects reached to targets with an aligned hand-cursor that provided visual feedback at the end of each reach movement across a 99-trial training block, and with a rotated cursor over 3 successive blocks of 99 trials each. After each block, no cursor reaches, to measure aftereffects, and felt hand positions were measured. Felt hand position was determined by having subjects indicate the position of their unseen hand relative to a reference marker. We found that subjects adapted their reaches following training with rotated terminal visual feedback, yet slightly less (i.e., reach aftereffects were smaller, than subjects from a previous study who experienced continuous visual feedback. Nonetheless, current subjects recalibrated their sense of felt hand position in the direction of the altered visual feedback, but this proprioceptive change increased incrementally over the three rotated training blocks. Final proprioceptive recalibration levels were comparable to our previous studies in which subjects performed the same task with continuous visual feedback. Thus, compared to reach training with continuous, but altered visual feedback, subjects who received terminal altered visual feedback of the hand produced significant but smaller reach aftereffects and similar changes in hand proprioception when given extra training. Taken together, results suggest that terminal feedback of the hand is sufficient to drive motor adaptation, and also

  7. The role of internal forward models and proprioception in hand position estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Fatemeh; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Ahmadi-Pajouh, Mohammad-Ali; Darainy, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Our ability to properly move and react in different situations is largely dependent on our perception of our limbs' position. At least three sources - vision, proprioception, and internal forward models (FMs) - seem to contribute to this perception. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of each source has not been studied individually. Specifically, role of FM has been ignored in some previous studies. We hypothesized that FM has a critical role in subjects' perception which needs to be considered in the relevant studies to obtain more reliable results. Therefore, we designed an experiment with the goal of investigating FM and proprioception role in subjects' perception of their hand's position. Three groups of subjects were recruited in the study. Based on the experiment design, it was supposed that subjects in different groups relied on proprioception, FM, and both of them for estimating their unseen hand's position. Comparing the results of three groups revealed significant difference between their estimation' errors. FM provided minimum estimation error, while proprioception had a bias error in the tested region. Integrating proprioception with FM decreased this error. Integration of two Gaussian functions, fitted to the error distribution of FM and proprioception groups, was simulated and created a mean error value almost similar to the experimental observation. These results suggest that FM role needs to be considered when studying the perceived position of the limbs. This can lead to gain better insights into the mechanisms underlying the perception of our limbs' position which might have potential clinical and rehabilitation applications, e.g., in the postural control of elderly which are at high risk of falls and injury because of deterioration of their perception with age.

  8. The role of differential delays in integrating transient visual and proprioceptive information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Daniel Cameron

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many actions involve limb movements towards a target. Visual and proprioceptive estimates are available online, and by optimally combining (Ernst and Banks, 2002 both modalities during the movement, the system can increase the precision of the hand estimate. The notion that both sensory modalities are integrated is also motivated by the intuition that we do not consciously perceive any discrepancy between the felt and seen hand’s positions. This coherence as a result of integration does not necessarily imply realignment between the two modalities (Smeets et al., 2006. For example, the two estimates (visual and proprioceptive might be different without either of them (e.g. proprioception ever being adjusted after recovering the other (e.g. vision. The implication that the felt and seen positions might be different has a temporal analog. Because the actual feedback from the hand at a given instantaneous position reaches brain areas at different times for proprioception and vision (shorter for proprioception, the corresponding instantaneous unisensory position estimates will be different, with the proprioceptive one being ahead of the visual one. Based on the assumption that the system integrates optimally and online the available evidence from both senses, we introduce a temporal mechanism that explains the reported overestimation of hand positions when vision is occluded for active and passive movements (Gritsenko et al., 2007 without the need to resort to initial feedforward estimates (Wolpert et al., 1995. We set up hypotheses to test the validity of the model, and we contrast simulation-based predictions with empirical data.

  9. Short-term adaptation of joint position sense occurs during and after sustained vibration of antagonistic muscle pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas I Gonzales

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception is critical for the control of many goal-directed activities of daily living. While contributions from skin and joint receptors exist, the muscle spindle is thought to play a critical role in allowing accurate judgments of limb position and movement to occur. The discharges elicited from muscle spindles can be degraded by simultaneous agonist-antagonist tendon vibration, causing proprioception to be distorted. Despite this, changes in limb perception that may result from sensory adaptation to this stimulus remain misunderstood. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to investigate proprioceptive adaptation resulting from vibration of antagonistic muscle pairs. We measured elbow joint position sense in twenty healthy young adults while 80Hz vibration was applied simultaneously to the distal tendons of the elbow flexor and extensor muscles. Matching errors were analyzed during early and late adaptation phases to assess short-term adaption to the vibration stimuli. Participants committed significant undershoot errors during the early adaptation phase, but were comparable to baseline measurements during the late adaptation phase. When we removed the vibration stimuli and conducted a second joint position matching task, matching variability increased significantly and participants committed overshoot errors. These results bring into question the efficacy of simultaneous agonist-antagonist tendon vibration to degrade proprioceptive acuity.

  10. Proprioceptive Training and Injury Prevention in a Professional Men's Basketball Team: A Six-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Bianchi, Roberto; Rocca, Flavio; Mamo, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Single limb stance instability is a risk factor for lower extremity injuries. Therefore, the development of proprioception may play an important role in injury prevention. This investigation considered a professional basketball team for 6 years, integrating systematic proprioceptive activity in the training routine. The purpose was to assess the effectiveness of proprioceptive training programs based on quantifiable instability, to reduce ankle sprains, knee sprains, and low back pain through developing refined and long-lasting proprioceptive control. Fifty-five subjects were studied. In the first biennium (2004-2006), the preventive program consisted of classic proprioceptive exercises. In the second biennium (2006-2008), the proprioceptive training became quantifiable and interactive by means of electronic proprioceptive stations. In the third biennium (2008-2010), the intensity and the training volume increased while the session duration became shorter. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the differences in proprioceptive control between groups, years, and bienniums. Injury rates and rate ratios of injury during practices and games were estimated. The results showed a statistically significant reduction in the occurrence of ankle sprains by 81% from the first to the third biennium (p < 0.001). Low back pain showed similar results with a reduction of 77.8% (p < 0.005). The reduction in knee sprains was 64.5% (not significant). Comparing the third biennium with the level of all new entry players, proprioceptive control improved significantly by 72.2% (p < 0.001). These findings indicate that improvements in proprioceptive control in single stance may be a key factor for an effective reduction in ankle sprains, knee sprains, and low back pain.

  11. Observational Study on the Occurrence of Muscle Spindles in Human Digastric and Mylohyoideus Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Saverino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the occurrence of muscle spindles (MS is quite high in most skeletal muscles of humans, few MS, or even absence, have been reported in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. Even if this condition is generally accepted and quoted in many papers and books, observational studies are scarce and based on histological sections of a low number of specimens. The aim of the present study is to confirm previous data, assessing MS number in a sample of digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. We investigated 11 digastric and 6 mylohyoideus muscles from 13 donors. Muscle samples were embedded in paraffin wax, cross-sectioned in a rostrocaudal direction, and stained using haematoxylin-eosin. A mean of 5.1 ± 1.1 (range 3–7 MS was found in digastric muscles and mean of 0.5 ± 0.8 (range 0–2 in mylohyoideus muscles. A significant difference (P<0.001 was found with the control sample, confirming the correctness of the histological procedure. Our results support general belief that the absolute number of spindles is sparse in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. External forces, such as food resistance during chewing or gravity, do not counteract jaw-opening muscles. It is conceivable that this condition gives them a limited proprioceptive importance and a reduced need for having specific receptors as MS.

  12. Degeneration of rapid eye movement sleep circuitry underlies rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dillon; Peever, John

    2017-05-01

    During healthy rapid eye movement sleep, skeletal muscles are actively forced into a state of motor paralysis. However, in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder-a relatively common neurological disorder-this natural process is lost. A lack of motor paralysis (atonia) in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder allows individuals to actively move, which at times can be excessive and violent. At first glance this may sound harmless, but it is not because rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients frequently injure themselves or the person they sleep with. It is hypothesized that the degeneration or dysfunction of the brain stem circuits that control rapid eye movement sleep paralysis is an underlying cause of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The link between brain stem degeneration and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder stems from the fact that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder precedes, in the majority (∼80%) of cases, the development of synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy, which are known to initially cause degeneration in the caudal brain stem structures where rapid eye movement sleep circuits are located. Furthermore, basic science and clinical evidence demonstrate that lesions within the rapid eye movement sleep circuits can induce rapid eye movement sleep-specific motor deficits that are virtually identical to those observed in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review examines the evidence that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is caused by synucleinopathic neurodegeneration of the core brain stem circuits that control healthy rapid eye movement sleep and concludes that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is not a separate clinical entity from synucleinopathies but, rather, it is the earliest symptom of these disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and

  13. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  14. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  15. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  16. Influence of proprioceptive training of hemiplegic stroke patients on their visually-dependent compensatory strategy%脑卒中偏瘫患者本体感觉训练对视觉代偿依赖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志强; 武俊英; 吴亚文; 荣蓉; 原奎

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨脑卒中偏瘫患者本体感觉训练对视觉代偿依赖的影响及其在立位平衡功能中的作用.方法 对20例无前庭功能病变且具有10 m步行能力的脑卒中偏瘫患者进行4周康复训练,并于人院时和训练4周对所有患者进行静态站立平衡测试.对重心左右偏移体重百分比(左右偏移)、重心前后偏移时间百分比(前后偏移)、重心分布(A%时间)进行训练前、后对比和睁、闭眼对比,采用t检验和多元线性回归分析进行统计学分析比较.结果 视觉对前后偏移没有影响,同时训练前后经统计学分析比较,差异亦无统计学意义(P>0.05);视觉对左右偏移有影响(P<0.05),同时睁眼状态的左右偏移在训练前后的差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),在闭眼状态差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);视觉在训练前对重心分布的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),在训练后随着本体感觉功能改善,视觉对重心分布有影响(P<0.05),且在睁、闭眼状态训练后与训练前比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 视觉代偿对具有步行能力但未经过训练的偏瘫患者的左右偏移有影响,但不能改善患者的重心摆动幅度,不利于患者步行;本体感觉训练可以改善立位平衡对视觉代偿的依赖,提高患者平衡功能.%Objective To investigate the influence of proprioceptive training of hemiplegic stroke patients on their visually compensatory dependence.Methods Twenty stroke patients without vestibular abnormalities were recruited.They were able to walk for 10 meters.All the patients underwent 4 weeks of rehabilitation training including proprioceptive training,treadmill exercises and isometric muscle strengthening.Static standing balance test was performed before and after 4 weeks of treatment.The parameters such as the anteroposterior and mediolateral sway of the center of gravity,center of gravity distribution were analyzed before and after the treatment

  17. A wearable proprioceptive stabilizer (Equistasi® for rehabilitation of postural instability in Parkinson's disease: a phase II randomized double-blind, double-dummy, controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Volpe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle spindles endings are extremely sensitive to externally applied vibrations, and under such circumstances they convey proprioceptive inflows to the central nervous system that modulate the spinal reflexes excitability or the muscle responses elicited by postural perturbations. The aim of this pilot study is to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a balance training program in association with a wearable proprioceptive stabilizer (Equistasi that emits focal mechanical vibrations in patients with PD. METHODS: Forty patients with PD were randomly divided in two groups wearing an active or inactive device. All the patients received a 2-month intensive program of balance training. Assessments were performed at baseline, after the rehabilitation period (T1, and two more months after (T2. Posturographic measures were used as primary endpoint; secondary measures of outcome included the number of falls and several clinical scales for balance and quality of life. RESULTS: Both groups improved at the end of the rehabilitation period and we did not find significant between-group differences in any of the principal posturographic measures with the exception of higher sway area and limit of stability on the instrumental functional reach test during visual deprivation at T1 in the Equistasi group. As for the secondary outcome, we found an overall better outcome in patients enrolled in the Equistasi group: 1 significant improvement at T1 on Berg Balance Scale (+45.0%, p = .026, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (+83.7, p = .004, Falls Efficacy Scale (-33.3%, p = .026 and PDQ-39 (-48.8%, p = .004; 2 sustained improvement at T2 in terms of UPDRS-III, Berg Balance Scales, Time Up and Go and PDQ-39; 3 significant and sustained reduction of the falls rate. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot trial shows that a physiotherapy program for training balance in association with focal mechanical vibration exerted by a wearable proprioceptive

  18. EyeGENE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The eyeGENE® Biorepository and corresponding Database contain family history and clinical eye exam data from subjects enrolled in eyeGENE® Program coupled to...

  19. Eye Injuries in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Sports Which sports cause the most eye injuries?Sports cause more than 40,000 eye injuries each ... and racquet sports.When it comes to eye injuries, sports can be classified as low risk, high risk ...

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  2. Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have allergic conjunctivitis. Preventing the spread of pink eye Practice good hygiene to control the spread ... can return to school or child care. Preventing pink eye in newborns Newborns' eyes are susceptible to ...

  3. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  4. About the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  5. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Eye Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > Eye Injuries Print A ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  6. Coculture of rat embryonic proprioceptive sensory neurons and myotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, S; Liem, R; MantinghOtter, [No Value; Brouwer, N

    1996-01-01

    With the aim to study the cellular mechanisms underlying the process of muscle spindle (re)generation, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons derived from 16-day rat embryos were cocultured with developing myotubes in a compartmentalized culture device. To accomplish the selective survival and neurite fo

  7. Development of muscle fatigue as assessed by electromyography and mechanomyography during continuous and intermittent low-force contractions: effects of the feedback mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Jørgensen, Lars Vincents; Søgaard, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the significance of low-force continuous or intermittent static contraction and feedback mode (visual or proprioceptive) on the development of muscle fatigue as assessed by electromyography (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG). Visual (force control......) and proprioceptive (displacement control) feedback was investigated during intermittent (6 s contraction, 4 s rest) and continuous static contractions at 10% and 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Mean force, force fluctuation, rating of perceived exertion and root mean square (RMS) and mean power...... and MPF values versus time were observed with proprioceptive feedback compared with visual feedback. The findings suggest that (1) the EMG and MMG signals give complementary information about localised muscle fatigue at low-level contraction: they responded differently in terms of changes in the time...

  8. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  9. Influence of proprioceptive insoles on spinal curvature in patients with slight idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Christine; Steitz, Vanessa; Daentzer, Dorothea

    2017-01-01

    Proprioceptive insoles are known to influence the functions of posture and gait by modulations of the sensory structures at the sole of the foot. Literature has shown that they could improve the position of the upper-body in patients with postural complaints of the musculoskeletal system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of proprioceptive insoles on the spinal curvature in patients with slight idiopathic scoliosis. Eighteen patients were included in this prospective, single-centre, randomized study. All patients needed to have a relevant growth potential and suffered from a slight idiopathic scoliosis. Two groups were used, where group 1 performed physiotherapy twice a week, whereas group 2 was additionally supplied with proprioceptive insoles. Patients underwent three-dimensional rasterstereography for back-shape analysis. Furthermore, a conventional x-ray imaging of the spine was performed at the beginning and 1 year later to document the curvatures. There was no statistical difference in the Cobb angles, and in almost all parameters of the rasterstereography, there was no statistically significant change between and within both groups. According to the results of this study, there was no evidence of any statistical significant effect of proprioceptive insoles on spinal curvature in patients with slight idiopathic scoliosis.

  10. Ankle Proprioception Pattern in Women Across Various Trimesters of Pregnancy and Postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Ankle foot complex is the part of the body which is in contact with the ground and it is important to have an intact proprioceptive system in order to maintain postural control. Previous study has established that there is significant difference between ankle proprioception in pregnant women in their third trimester and non-pregnant women. There is lack of literature regarding when the ankle does the ankle proprioception gets affected during pregnancy and whether this change reverts back during postpartum and hence this study. Method: A cohort of 70 primiparous women were included in the study and the women were followed through 12th week, 24th week, 32nd week , immediate postpartum and 6 weeks postpartum. The ankle repositioning error was measured using photography method and was analyzed using UTHSCSA Image tool software. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to measure the differences across various time periods. Results: It was found that there was a significant differences (p<0.001 in ankle repositioning error in pregnant women across the trimesters and in the postpartum period and the value did not reach the first trimester value even after six weeks postpartum. Conclusion: Ankle proprioception was significantly affected across the various trimesters of pregnancy with the peak variability observed in the third trimester and the value did not reach back to the first trimester value even after 6 weeks postpartum.

  11. The mirror illusion: does proprioceptive drift go hand in hand with sense of agency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eTAJIMA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vection can be regarded as the illusion of ‘whole-body’ position perception. In contrast, the mirror illusion is that of ‘body-part’ position perception. When participants viewed their left hands in a mirror positioned along the midsaggital axis while moving both hands synchronously, they hardly noticed the spatial offset between the hand in the mirror and the obscured real right hand. This illusion encompasses two phenomena: proprioceptive drift and sense of agency. Proprioceptive drift represented a perceptual change in the position of the obscured hand relative to that of the hand in the mirror. Sense of agency referred to the participants’ subjective sense of controlling body image as they would their own bodies. We examined the spatial offset between these two phenomena. Participants responded to a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC question regarding the subjective position of their right hands and questionnaires regarding sense of agency at various positions of the right hand. We analysed the 2AFC data using a support vector machine and compared its classification result and the questionnaire results. Our data analysis suggested that the two phenomena were observed in concentric space, but the estimated range of the proprioceptive drift was slightly narrower than the range of agency. Although this outcome can be attributed to differences in measurement or analysis, to our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that proprioceptive drift and sense of agency are concentric and almost overlap.

  12. Differential effects of motor efference copies and proprioceptive information on response evaluation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Wascher, Edmund; Beste, Christian

    2013-01-01

    It is well-kown that sensory information influences the way we execute motor responses. However, less is known about if and how sensory and motor information are integrated in the subsequent process of response evaluation. We used a modified Simon Task to investigate how these streams of information are integrated in response evaluation processes, applying an in-depth neurophysiological analysis of event-related potentials (ERPs), time-frequency decomposition and sLORETA. The results show that response evaluation processes are differentially modulated by afferent proprioceptive information and efference copies. While the influence of proprioceptive information is mediated via oscillations in different frequency bands, efference copy based information about the motor execution is specifically mediated via oscillations in the theta frequency band. Stages of visual perception and attention were not modulated by the interaction of proprioception and motor efference copies. Brain areas modulated by the interactive effects of proprioceptive and efference copy based information included the middle frontal gyrus and the supplementary motor area (SMA), suggesting that these areas integrate sensory information for the purpose of response evaluation. The results show how motor response evaluation processes are modulated by information about both the execution and the location of a response.

  13. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Flexibility Techniques: Acute Effects on Arterial Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, William L.; Craft-Hamm, Kelley

    1988-01-01

    The effects of stretching techniques on arterial blood pressure (ABP) were studied in three groups of 20 men each. Each group performed one of three proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. Results are presented. The study indicates that the benefits of stretching may outweigh the risk of elevated ABP. (JL)

  14. Infant Reactivity to Redundant Proprioceptive and Auditory Stimulation: A Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Daele, Leland D.

    The role of genetic factors in infant response to redundancy was evaluated through observation of the behavior of three sets of same-sex fraternal twins and six sets of same-sex identical twins to combinations of redundant proprioceptive and auditory stimulation. The twins ranged in age from 6 weeks to 24 weeks. One member of each twin set was…

  15. Developmental changes in the visual-proprioceptive integration threshold of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Mark; Longard, Julie; Moore, Chris

    2014-09-01

    The ability to detect artificially induced visual-proprioceptive asynchrony reflects an awareness of the first-person experience of self-generated movement. The current study assessed children's (5- to 8-year-olds) and adults' ability to integrate asynchronous visual and proprioceptive stimulation by delaying the visual feedback of self-generated action in videos. Children and adults observed a monitor showing their movements of a joystick at varying delay durations and were then asked to make judgments on whether their movements appeared to be delayed or live. Children demonstrated age-related differences in their reporting of delay judgments across all delay conditions. Adults' performances on the same task exceeded those of children. The results of this study provide a mapping of visual-proprioceptive integration abilities in 5 to 8 year old children. The age-related increase in sensitivity to visual-proprioceptive asynchrony is suggestive of increasing sensitivity to the temporal properties of multisensory feedback of self-generated movement with development.

  16. The mirror illusion: does proprioceptive drift go hand in hand with sense of agency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Daisuke; Mizuno, Tota; Kume, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Takako

    2015-01-01

    Vection can be regarded as the illusion of "whole-body" position perception. In contrast, the mirror illusion is that of "body-part" position perception. When participants viewed their left hands in a mirror positioned along the midsaggital axis while moving both hands synchronously, they hardly noticed the spatial offset between the hand in the mirror and the obscured real right hand. This illusion encompasses two phenomena: proprioceptive drift and sense of agency. Proprioceptive drift represented a perceptual change in the position of the obscured hand relative to that of the hand in the mirror. Sense of agency referred to the participants' subjective sense of controlling body image as they would their own bodies. We examined the spatial offset between these two phenomena. Participants responded to a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) question regarding the subjective position of their right hands and questionnaires regarding sense of agency at various positions of the right hand. We analyzed the 2AFC data using a support vector machine and compared its classification result and the questionnaire results. Our data analysis suggested that the two phenomena were observed in concentric space, but the estimated range of the proprioceptive drift was slightly narrower than the range of agency. Although this outcome can be attributed to differences in measurement or analysis, to our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that proprioceptive drift and sense of agency are concentric and almost overlap.

  17. Do Ankle Orthoses Improve Ankle Proprioceptive Thresholds or Unipedal Balance in Older Persons with Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Design Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance with and without the ankle orthoses, in 11 older diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy (8 men; age 72 ± 7.1 years) using a foot cradle system which presented a series of 100 rotational stimuli. Results The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with versus without the orthoses (1.06 ± 0.56 versus 1.13 ± 0.39 degrees, respectively; p = 0.955 and 6.1 ± 6.5 versus 6.2 ± 5.4 seconds, respectively; p = 0.922). Conclusion Ankle orthoses which provide medial-lateral support do not appear to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically-induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function. PMID:20407302

  18. Sensory reweighting of proprioceptive input during balance control as function of age and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasma, Jantsje; Pasma, Jantsje; Engelhart, Denise; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Maier, Andrea; Meskers, Carel; van der Kooij, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Sensory (re)weighting is the automated and unconscious process of dynamically combining sensory inputs, e.g. proprioception, graviception and vision, during balance control. Typically, reliable sensory inputs are weighted more than unreliable and noisy sensory inputs, to prevent

  19. Upper Limb Asymmetries in the Perception of Proprioceptively Determined Dynamic Position Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J.; Brown, Susan H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of position-related proprioceptive sense have provided evidence of a nonpreferred left arm advantage in right-handed individuals. The present study sought to determine whether similar asymmetries might exist in "dynamic position" sense. Thirteen healthy, right-handed adults were blindfolded and seated with arms placed on…

  20. Different effects of numerical magnitude on visual and proprioceptive reference frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvio eBlini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether numerical magnitude affects the setting of basic spatial coordinates and reference frames, namely the subjective straight ahead. Three tasks were given to 24 right-handed healthy participants: a proprioceptive and a visuo-proprioceptive task, requiring pointing to the subjective straight ahead, and a visual task, requiring a perceptual judgment about the straight ahead position of a light moving left-to-right, or right-to-left. A control task, requiring the bisection of rods of different lengths, was also given. The four tasks were performed under conditions of passive auditory numerical (i.e., listening to small, 2, and large, 8, numbers, and neutral auditory-verbal (blah stimulation. Numerical magnitude modulates the participants’ deviations in the visual straight ahead task, when the movement of the light is from left to right, with the small number bringing about a leftward deviation, the large number a rightward deviation. This result suggests that the spatial effects induced by the activation of the mental number line extend to an egocentric frame of reference. A similar directional modulation was found in the rod bisection task, in line with previous evidence. No effects of numerical magnitude were found on the proprioceptive and visuo-proprioceptive straight ahead tasks. These results suggest that the spatial effects induced by the activation of the mental number line extend to an egocentric frame of reference but only when a portion of horizontal space has to be actively explored.

  1. THE EFFECT OF PATELLAR TAPING ON KNEE JOINT PROPRIOCEPTION IN PATIENTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME

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    H. Mokhtarinia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception has been found to have a relation to subjective knee function and patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS seem to have larger deficits than asymptomatic individuals little is known about whether taping can restore defects in proprioception or by which mechanisms it can improve anterior knee pain. To determine the effect of patellar taping on knee joint proprioception a pre and post intervention repeated measures design was conducted on 25 male with PFPS (23.6 ± 3.04 years and 25 healthy male (23.5 ± 3.1 years. Active angle reproduction, passive angle reproduction, and threshold to detection of passive movement tests were measured. Each of the tests was done under taped and no-taped conditions in 20 and 60 degree of knee flexion. We found significant difference between taped and no-taped conditions in active angle reproduction test for both groups (P < 0.05. The other tests did not show any significant difference (P > 0.05. Obtained results suggest that patellar taping may improve knee proprioception during active angle reproduction. Two groups could benefit from taping but further researches are needed to determine whether the present results are applicable to other situations or not.

  2. Integrated intensive proprioceptive and visuomotor rehabilitation program for treatment of spastic diplegic Children

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    Fathy A. Elshazly

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although so many rehabilitation programs have been addressed for rehabilitation of diplegic children, it still a challenging task to attain a satisfactory functional recovery. The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of an intensive proprioceptive and visuomotor training program in the treatment of diplegic children in term of spatiotemporal gait parameters, postural stability, and quality of life. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, convenient sample of forty ambulant diplegic children were randomly distributed to either control (n=20 or study (n=20 groups; the control group received a traditional rehabilitation program for 1 hour, 5 times/week for 3 successive months, while the study group received the same program with intensive proprioceptive and visuomotor integration. Vicon 3D motion analysis system, Technobody balance system and Pediatric Quality of life Inventory were used to measure spatiotemporal gait parameters, stability indices and quality of life respectively. all parameters were similar in both groups at inception (p˃0.05. Children within both groups showed improvement of gait function, postural stability and quality of life (p˂0.05 and the integrated proprioceptive and visuomotor rehabilitation program achieved better gain (p˂0.05. Integrated proprioceptive and visuomotor rehabilitation might improve gait function, postural stability, and quality of life in diplegic children.

  3. The Rubber Hand Illusion Reveals Proprioceptive and Sensorimotor Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Bryan; Hohwy, Jakob; Enticott, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by differences in unimodal and multimodal sensory and proprioceptive processing, with complex biases towards local over global processing. Many of these elements are implicated in versions of the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which were therefore studied in high-functioning individuals with ASD and a…

  4. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thoracic manipulation group, and only stability training was conducted for the cervical stability training group. The intervention period was six weeks, and consisted of three sessions a week, each of which lasted for 30 minutes. For proprioception measurement, an electro-goniometer was used to measure reposition sense before and after the intervention. The visual analogue scale was used to assess pain. [Results] After the intervention, the error angle was significantly smaller in flexion and right left side-bending, and pain was significantly reduced in the upper thoracic manipulation group. According to the post intervention comparison of the two groups, there were significant differences in the proprioception and pain values. [Conclusion] Conducting both cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain was more helpful for the improvement of proprioception and pain than cervical stability training alone.

  5. Self-Disorder and Brain Processing of Proprioception in Schizophrenia Spectrum Patients: A Re-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M.; Raballo, Andrea; Mørup, Morten

    2015-01-01

    proprioceptive evoked potentials and interviewed with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) scale. Results : Higher EASE scores (i.e. increased SD) were associated with lower peak parietal gamma frequencies and higher peak beta amplitudes over frontal and parietal electrodes in the left hemisphere...

  6. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

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    Quentin Mourcou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM. Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS. Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home.

  7. Sex-Dependent Individual Differences and the Correlational Relationship Between Proprioceptive and Verbal Tests

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    Liutsko Liudmila

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between proprioceptive and verbal tests on personality in both sexes separately due to existing proprioceptive differences in fine motor behavior between men and women in our previous studies [1, 2, 3]. Material and methods. 114 middle-aged participants from Belarus completed verbal tests (personality: Eysenck's EPQ, Big Five in Hromov's Russian adaptation, and Rosenberg's Self-esteem together with Proprioceptive Diagnostics of Temperament and Character (by Tous. Complementary information, such as tests of time perception, was collected and used in correlative and ANOVA analyses with the use of SPSS v.19. Results. The relationship between proprioceptive variables in personality and individual differences, time perception and the results of verbal tests were determined for each sex subgroup and discussed. ANOVA results reflected the corresponding differences and similarities between men and women in the variables of each test. Time perception was found to be significantly correlated to all five dimensions of the Big Five Test in both sexes, and both had a significant relationship to the same variables of the DP-TC test. Conclusions. Time perception can be used as an indirect indicator of personality. Existing individual and personality differences should be taken into account in coaching and education to obtain more effective results.

  8. Does kinesiology taping of the ankles affect proprioceptive control in professional football (soccer) players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel; Firth, Paul

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether the bilateral application of kinesiology tape (KT) to professional footballers' ankles can improve their lower limb proprioception. A single blind randomised crossover study. Participants were randomly assigned to complete a proprioception test in either a taped or not taped condition first. Following a wash out period, participants were then re-tested in the alternate condition. A UK Championship League Football Club, mid-season. Twenty male professional football players over the age of 18, currently match fit with no injuries. Proprioception was assessed by participants undertaking the moving target program on the balance module attached to a Kin-Com 125AP isokinetic dynamometer. A paired sample two tailed t-test was used to assess whether there was a significant difference between the participants test scores in the not taped and taped conditions. The bilateral application of KT to professional footballers' ankles did not bring about a significant change in participants' scores when tested with a fine movement and balance control test. Percentage accuracy score mean difference 4.2 (p = 0.285). The results of this study do not support the use of KT when applied to the ankles of healthy footballers as a method of improving proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Palisade endings of extraocular muscles in eyes with congenital nystagmus%先天性眼球震颤眼外肌栅栏状终末结构的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚艳峰; 张静; 宫华青; 陈霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the morphology,distribution and function of palisade endings (PE) in human extraocular muscles (EOM),and observe the alterations in eyes with congenital nystagmus (CN).The etiology and pathogenesis of CN were also investigated.Methods It was a experimental study.The distal myotendinous junctions of the EOM were obtained during operation for CN ( CN group) and concomitant strabismus ( control group). The samples from patients with similar age and same extraction sites in the two groups were compared.The muscles cut during operation were immediately put into 4% glutaraldehyde fixative solution.And 1 - 2 transverse bands of tissue were cut every 1 mm from tendon insertion for specimens processing.The ultrastructure of EOM and PE in the two groups was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The distal parts of EOM cut during operation were put into 4% paraformaldehyde promptly.Myotendinous junction region whole mounts were labeled with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT).Muscle fibers were counterstained with phalloidin.And longitudinal and transverse cryostat serial sections were cut at 25 μm and analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy.The ChAT expression,morphology and distribution of PE were observed.The same fragment of myotendinous junction in the two groups was selected.After the total protein was extracted,ChAT was detected by western blot.The expression level of ChAT was analyzed.Results Compared with the controls,the ultrastructure in the CN group had considerable variations.The axon of PE was swelled and deformed partly.The electron density was increased and presented as addicted to osmic acid. In the muscle cells,mitochondria was swelled,and sarcoplasmic reticulum was dilated.All PE exhibited ChAT immunoreactivity in human EOM.In the longitudinal section,nerve fibers extended from the muscle into the tendon,looped back and divided into several terminal arborizations (palisade endings) around the muscle

  10. Development of an Interactive Anatomical Three-Dimensional Eye Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lauren K.; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    The discrete anatomy of the eye's intricate oculomotor system is conceptually difficult for novice students to grasp. This is problematic given that this group of muscles represents one of the most common sites of clinical intervention in the treatment of ocular motility disorders and other eye disorders. This project was designed to develop a…

  11. Do people with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) have reduced joint proprioception? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Jerman, Emma; Easton, Victoria; Bacon, Holly; Armon, Kate; Poland, Fiona; Macgregor, Alex J

    2013-11-01

    Joint proprioceptive deficit is documented in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions including osteoarthritis, ligament and meniscal injuries, and individuals with increased joint hypermobility, such as those with Ehlers-Danlos. No systematic reviews have assessed joint proprioception in people with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS). This study addresses this to determine whether people with BJHS exhibit reduced joint proprioception, and, if so, whether this is evident in all age groups. The search strategy was conducted on 31st January 2013. The published literature was assessed using the databases: AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Unpublished literature and trial registries were assessed including: OpenGrey, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Current Controlled Trials, the UK National Research Register Archive. All studies comparing the proprioceptive capability of people with and without BJHS were included. Study methodological quality was assessed using the CASP appraisal tool. Meta-analysis techniques were used when study homogeneity permitted. Five studies including 254 people were identified. People with BJHS demonstrated statistically significantly poorer lower limb joint position sense (JPS) (p proprioceptive difference was less clear, with no statistically significant difference between the cohorts for shoulder JPS (p = 0.10), but a statistically significant difference in finger JPS (p proprioceptive capability in those with BJHS (p proprioception is reduced in those with BJHS compared to non-BJHS cohorts, whilst unclear in the upper limb.

  12. Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation of Ankle Plantar Flexors Spasticity: A Three-Month Study with Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihao Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to investigate the effect of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF based rehabilitation for ankle plantar flexors spasticity by using a Robotic Ankle-foot Rehabilitation System (RARS. A modified robot-assisted system was proposed and seven post-stroke patients with hemiplegic spastic ankles participated a three-month of robotic PNF training. Their impaired sides were used as the experimental group while their unimpaired sides as the control group. A robotic intervention for the experimental group generally started from a two minutes passive stretching to warm-up or relax the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle and also ended with the same one. Then a PNF training session included 30 trails was activated between them. The rehabilitation trainings were carried out three times a week as an addition of their regular rehabilitation exercise. Passive ankle joint range of motion, resistance torque and stiffness were measured in both ankles before and after the intervention. The changes in Achilles' tendon length, walking speed, and lower limb function were also evaluated by the same physician or physiotherapist for each participant. Biomechanical measurements before interventions showed significant difference between the experimental group and the control group due to ankle spasticity. For the control group, there was no significant difference in the three months with no robotic intervention. But for the experimental group, passive dorsiflexion range of motion increased ( p0.05 . The robotic rehabilitation also improved the muscle strength ( p0.05 and fast walking speed ( p<0.05 . These results indicated that PNF based robotic intervention could significantly alleviate lower limb spasticity and improve the motor function in chronic stroke participant. The robotic system could potentially be used as an effective tool in post-stroke rehabilitation training.

  13. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  14. The effect of visuomotor adaptation on proprioceptive localization: the contributions of perceptual and motor changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Holly A; Cressman, Erin K; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2014-07-01

    Reaching movements are rapidly adapted following training with rotated visual feedback of the hand (motor recalibration). Our laboratory has also found that visuomotor adaptation results in changes in estimates of felt hand position (proprioceptive recalibration) in the direction of the visuomotor distortion (Cressman and Henriques 2009, 2010; Cressman et al. 2010). In the present study, we included an additional method for measuring hand proprioception [specifically, proprioceptive-guided reaches of the unadapted (left) hand to the robot-guided adapted (right) hand-target] and compared this with our original perceptual task (estimating the felt hand position of the adapted hand relative to visual reference markers/the body midline), as well as to no-cursor reaches with the adapted hand (reaching to visual and midline-targets), to better identify whether changes in reaching following adaptation to a 50° rightward-rotated cursor reflect sensory or motor processes. Results for the proprioceptive estimation task were consistent with previous findings; subjects felt their hand to be aligned with a reference marker when it was shifted approximately 4° more in the direction of the visuomotor distortion following adaptation compared with baseline conditions. Moreover, we found similar changes in the proprioceptive-guided reaching task such that subjects misreached 5° in the direction of the cursor rotation. However, these results were true only for proprioceptive-guided reaches to the adapted hand, as reaches to the body midline were not affected by adaptation. This suggests that proprioceptive recalibration is restricted to the adapted hand and does not generalize to the rest of the body; this truly reflects a change in the sensory representation of the hand rather than changes in the motor program. This is in contrast to no-cursor reaches made with the adapted hand, which show reach after-effects for both visual targets and the midline, suggesting that reaches with

  15. Optimizing ankle performance when taped: Effects of kinesiology and athletic taping on proprioception in full weight-bearing stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhi; Wang, Renwei; Han, Jia; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Anson, Judith

    2017-03-01

    To explore the effects of kinesiology taping (KT) and athletic taping (AT) on ankle proprioception when tested in functional, full weight-bearing stance. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-four healthy university students participated. Proprioception was measured using the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus (AMEDA). The three testing conditions: no-taping, KT, AT, and foot tested were randomly assigned. Perceived comfort, support and proprioceptive performance under two taping conditions were recorded. Proprioceptive discrimination scores with 95% CIs for no-taping, KT and AT were 0.81 (0.79-0.84), 0.81 (0.79-0.83), and 0.79 (0.77-0.81). Repeated measures ANOVA showed neither any significant difference associated with taping compared with no-taping (p=0.30), nor any difference between KT and AT (p=0.19). The group was then divided, according to their no-taping scores, into two sub-groups: with scores below the no-taping mean (n=13), and above the mean (n=11). ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p=0.008) indicating that above-average no-taping performers proprioception scores were worse when taped, whereas below-average performers improved. For both KT and AT, only ratings of perceived comfort when taped were significantly associated with actual proprioceptive performance (both r>0.44, p≤0.03). Other perception ratings (support and performance) were significantly inter-correlated (both r>0.42, p0.31). Taping of the foot and ankle may amplify sensory input in a way that enhances proprioception of poor performers but produces an input overload that impairs proprioception in those who originally performed well when no-taping. Screening of ankle proprioception may identify those who would benefit most from taping. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Multipulse control of saccadic eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, S. L.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    We present three conclusions regarding the neural control of saccadic eye movements, resulting from comparisons between recorded movements and computer simulations. The controller signal to the muscles is probably a multipulse-step. This kind of signal drives the fastest model trajectories. Finally, multipulse signals explain differences between model and electrophysiological results.

  17. Muscle Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  18. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur ... minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  19. Relative contributions of spatial weighting, explicit knowledge and proprioception to hand localisation during positional ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Valeria; Gilpin, Helen R; Stanton, Tasha R; Dagsdóttir, Lilja K; Gallace, Alberto; Lorimer Moseley, G

    2017-02-01

    When vision and proprioception are rendered incongruent during a hand localisation task, vision is initially weighted more than proprioception in determining location, and proprioception gains more weighting over time. However, it is not known whether, under these incongruency conditions, particular areas of space are also weighted more heavily than others, nor whether explicit knowledge of the sensory incongruence (i.e. disconfirming the perceived location of the hand) modulates the effect. Here, we hypothesised that both non-informative inputs coming from one side of space and explicit knowledge of sensory incongruence would modulate perceived location of the limb. Specifically, we expected spatial weighting to shift hand localisation towards the weighted area of space, and we expected greater weighting of proprioceptive input once perceived location was demonstrated to be inaccurate. We manipulated spatial weighting using an established auditory cueing paradigm (Experiment 1, n = 18) and sensory incongruence using the 'disappearing hand trick' (Experiment 2, n = 9). Our first hypothesis was not supported-spatial weighting did not modulate hand localisation. Our second hypothesis was only partially supported-disconfirmation of hand position did lead to more accurate localisations, even if participants were still unaware of their hand position. This raised the possibility that rather than disconfirmation, a simple movement of the hand in view could update the sensory-motor system, by immediately increasing the weighting of proprioceptive input relative to visual input. This third hypothesis was then confirmed (Experiment 3, n = 9). These results suggest that hand localisation is robust in the face of differential weighting of space, but open to modulation in a modality-specific manner, when one sense (vision) is rendered inaccurate.

  20. Reliable and Rapid Robotic Assessment of Wrist Proprioception Using a Gauge Position Matching Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, Mike D.; Popp, Werner L.; Lambercy, Olivier; Gassert, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessments of position sense are essential for the investigation of proprioception, as well as for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning for patients with somatosensory deficits. Despite the development and use of various paradigms and robotic tools, their clinimetric properties are often poorly evaluated and reported. A proper evaluation of the latter is essential to compare results between different studies and to identify the influence of possible confounds on outcome measures. The aim of the present study was to perform a comprehensive evaluation of a rapid robotic assessment of wrist proprioception using a passive gauge position matching task. Thirty-two healthy subjects undertook six test-retests of proprioception of the right wrist on two different days. The constant error (CE) was 0.87°, the absolute error (AE) was 5.87°, the variable error (VE) was 4.59° and the total variability (E) was 6.83° in average for the angles presented in the range from 10° to 30°. The intraclass correlation analysis provided an excellent reliability for CE (0.75), good reliability for AE (0.68) and E (0.68), and fair reliability for VE (0.54). Tripling the assessment length had negligible effects on the reliabilities. Additional analysis revealed significant trends of larger overestimation (constant errors), as well as larger absolute and variable errors with increased flexion angles. No proprioceptive learning occurred, despite increased familiarity with the task, which was reflected in significantly decreased assessment duration by 30%. In conclusion, the proposed automated assessment can provide sensitive and reliable information on proprioceptive function of the wrist with an administration time of around 2.5 min, demonstrating the potential for its application in research or clinical settings. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of reporting the complete set of errors (CE, AE, VE, and E) in a matching experiment for the identification of

  1. Testing the limits of optimal integration of visual and proprioceptive information of path trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschel, Johanna; Rösler, Frank; Henriques, Denise Y P; Fiehler, Katja

    2011-04-01

    Many studies provide evidence that information from different modalities is integrated following the maximum likelihood estimation model (MLE). For instance, we recently found that visual and proprioceptive path trajectories are optimally combined (Reuschel et al. in Exp Brain Res 201:853-862, 2010). However, other studies have failed to reveal optimal integration of such dynamic information. In the present study, we aim to generalize our previous findings to different parts of the workspace (central, ipsilateral, or contralateral) and to different types of judgments (relative vs. absolute). Participants made relative judgments by judging whether an angular path was acute or obtuse, or they made absolute judgments by judging whether a one-segmented straight path was directed to left or right. Trajectories were presented in the visual, proprioceptive, or combined visual-proprioceptive modality. We measured the bias and the variance of these estimates and predicted both parameters using the MLE. In accordance with the MLE model, participants linearly combined and weighted the unimodal angular path information by their reliabilities irrespective of the side of workspace. However, the precision of bimodal estimates was not greater than that for unimodal estimates, which is inconsistent with the MLE. For the absolute judgment task, participants' estimates were highly accurate and did not differ across modalities. Thus, we were unable to test whether the bimodal percept resulted as a weighted average of the visual and proprioceptive input. Additionally, participants were not more precise in the bimodal compared with the unimodal conditions, which is inconsistent with the MLE. Current findings suggest that optimal integration of visual and proprioceptive information of path trajectory only applies in some conditions.

  2. A MULTI-STATION PROPRIOCEPTIVE EXERCISE PROGRAM IN PATIENTS WITH BILATERAL KNEE OSTEOARTHROSIS: FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY, PAIN AND SENSORIOMOTOR FUNCTION. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Sekir

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of a multi-station proprioceptive exercise program on functional capacity, perceived knee pain, and sensoriomotor function. Twenty-two patients (aged 41-75 years with grade 2-3 bilateral knee osteoarthrosis were randomly assigned to two groups: treatment (TR; n = 12 and non-treatment (NONTR; n = 10. TR performed 11 different balance/coordination and proprioception exercises, twice a week for 6 weeks. Functional capacity and perceived knee pain during rest and physical activity was measured. Also knee position sense, kinaesthesia, postural control, isometric and isokinetic knee strength (at 60, 120 and 180°·s-1 measures were taken at baseline and after 6 weeks of training. There was no significant difference in any of the tested variables between TR and NONTR before the intervention period. In TR perceived knee pain during daily activities and functional tests was lessened following the exercise program (p < 0.05. Perceived knee pain was also lower in TR vs. NONTR after training (p < 0.05. The time for rising from a chair, stair climbing and descending improved in TR (p < 0.05 and these values were faster compared with NONTR after training (p < 0.05. Joint position sense (degrees for active and passive tests and for weight bearing tests improved in TR (p < 0.05 and the values were lower compared with NONTR after training (p < 0.05. Postural control ('eyes closed' also improved for single leg and tandem tests in TR (p < 0.01 and these values were higher compared with NONTR after training. The isometric quadriceps strength of TR improved (p < 0.05 but the values were not significantly different compared with NONTR after training. There was no change in isokinetic strength for TR and NONTR after the training period. The results suggest that using a multi-station proprioceptive exercise program it is possible to improve postural control, functional capacity and decrease perceived knee pain in patients with bilateral knee

  3. Recruitment in a heterogeneous population of motor neurons that innervates the depressor muscle of the crayfish walking leg muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew A V; Cattaert, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    According to the size principle the fine control of muscle tension depends on the orderly recruitment of motor neurons from a heterogeneous pool. We took advantage of the small number of excitatory motor neurons (about 12) that innervate the depressor muscle of the crayfish walking leg to determine if the size principle applies to this muscle. We found that in accordance with the size principle, when stimulated by proprioceptive input, neurons with small extracellular spikes were recruited before neurons with medium or large spikes. Because only a small fraction of the motor neurons responded strongly enough to sensory input to be recruited in this way, we extended our analysis to all neurons by characterizing properties that have classically been associated with recruitment order such as speed of axonal conduction and extracellular spike amplitude. Through a combination of physiological and anatomical criteria we were able to identify seven classes of excitatory depressor motor neurons. The majority of these classes responded to proprioceptive input with a resistance reflex, while a few responded with an assistance reflex, and yet others did not respond. Our results are in general agreement with the size principle. However, we found qualitative differences between neuronal classes in terms of synaptic input and neuronal structure that would in theory be unnecessary, according to a strict interpretation of the size principle. We speculate that the qualitative heterogeneity observed may be due to the fact that the depressor is a complex muscle, consisting of two muscle bundles that share a single insertion but have multiple origins.

  4. Eating for Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  5. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the eye nausea or vomiting after an eye injury Think Prevention! Kids who play sports should wear protective goggles or unbreakable glasses as needed. Keep chemicals and other potentially dangerous objects out of the reach of children. Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, ... (Conjunctivitis) Eyes Corneal Abrasions Styes Activity: Eyes ...

  6. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  7. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c—interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  8. Striatal and thalamic GABA level concentrations play differential roles for the modulation of response selection processes by proprioceptive information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; Ma, Ruoyun; Yeh, Chien-Lin; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Snyder, Sandy; Zauber, S Elizabeth; Dydak, Ulrike; Beste, Christian

    2015-10-15

    The selection of appropriate responses is a complex endeavor requiring the integration of many different sources of information in fronto-striatal-thalamic circuits. An often neglected but relevant piece of information is provided by proprioceptive inputs about the current position of our limbs. This study examines the importance of striatal and thalamic GABA levels in these processes using GABA-edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy (GABA-MRS) and a Simon task featuring proprioception-induced interference in healthy subjects. As a possible model of deficits in the processing of proprioceptive information, we also included Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in this study. The results show that proprioceptive information about unusual postures complicates response selection processes in controls, but not in PD patients. The well-known deficits of PD patients in processing proprioceptive information can turn into a benefit when altered proprioceptive information would normally complicate response selection processes. Striatal and thalamic GABA levels play dissociable roles in the modulation of response selection processes by proprioceptive information: Striatal GABA levels seem to be important for the general speed of responding, most likely because striatal GABA promotes response selection. In contrast, the modulation of response conflict by proprioceptive information is closely related to thalamic GABA concentrations with higher concentration being related to a smaller response conflict effect. The most likely explanation for this finding is that the thalamus is involved in the integration of sensorimotor, attentional, and cognitive information for the purpose of response formation. Yet, this effect in the thalamus vanishes when controls and PD patients were analyzed separately.

  9. Knee-Joint Proprioception During 30-Day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily log proprioceptive training, would influence log proprioceptive tracking responses during Bed Rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a NO-Exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and IsoTanic Exercise (ITE, n = 7) and IsoKinetic Exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min period / d, 5 d /week. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a now isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pro-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p less than 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9 +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.50, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both lsotonic exercise training (without additional propriaceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  10. Assessment of Knee Proprioception in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Position in Healthy Subjects: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Talebian, Saeed; Naseri, Nasrin; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Knee joint proprioception combines sensory input from a variety of afferent receptors that encompasses the sensations of joint position and motion. Poor proprioception is one of the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Most studies have favored testing knee joint position sense in the sagittal plane and non-weight-bearing position. One of the most common mechanisms of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury is dynamic knee valgus. No study has measured joint posit...

  11. A Prosthesis to Train the Proprioceptive Capabilities of the Residual Limb of Military Personnel Recovering from Lower Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    feedback from the ankle and foot poses challenge. To compensate for the lack of afferent feedback, amputees look down at the prosthesis to sense...10-1-0573 TITLE: A prosthesis to train the proprioceptive capabilities of the residual limb of military personnel recovering from lower limb...To) 1September2011-31August2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Prosthesis to Train the Proprioceptive Capabilities of the 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  12. Where was my arm again? Memory-based matching of proprioceptive targets is enhanced by increased target presentation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Noble, Brittany C; Brown, Susan H

    2010-08-30

    Our sense of proprioception is vital for the successful performance of most activities of daily living, and memory-based joint position matching (JPM) tasks are often utilized to quantify such proprioceptive abilities. In the present study we sought to determine if matching a remembered proprioceptive target angle was influenced significantly by the length of time given to develop a neural representation of that position. Thirteen healthy adult subjects performed active matching of passively determined elbow joint angles (amplitude = 20 degrees or 40 degrees extension) in the absence of vision, with either a relatively "short" (3 s) or "long" (12 s) target presentation time. In the long condition, where subjects had a greater opportunity to develop an internal representation of the target elbow joint angle, matching movements had significantly smaller variable errors and were associated with smoother matching movement trajectories of a shorter overall duration. Taken together, these findings provide an important proprioceptive corollary for previous results obtained in studies of visually-guided reaching suggesting that increased exposure to target sensory stimuli can improve the accuracy of matching performance. Further, these results appear to be of particular importance with respect to the estimation of proprioceptive function in individuals with disability, who typically have increased noise in their proprioceptive systems.

  13. Contractile properties of extraocular muscle in Siamese cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerstrand, G

    1979-01-01

    Siamese cats are albinos with poor visual resolution and severely impaired binocular vision. Eey muscle phyiology was studied in Siamese cats as a part of a more extensive project on eye muscle properties in cats with deficient binocular vision. Isometric contractions of the inferior oblique muscle were recorded in response to single and repetitive muscle nerve stimulation. Speed of contraction, measured as twitch contraction time, fusion frequency and rate of tetanic tension rise, was lower in Siamese than in normal cats. Eye muscles of Siamese cats fatiqued more easily to continuous activation than normal cat eye mucle. These functional changes have also been found in cats with binocular defects from monocular lid suture, but were much more marked in Siamese cats. It is suggested that the eye muscle changes represent muscular adaptations to genetically caused impairments of binocular vision and visual resolution in Siamese cats.

  14. Treatment of muscle injuries in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueblacker, Peter; Haensel, Lutz; Mueller-Wohlfahrt, Hans-Wilhelm

    2016-12-01

    Muscle injuries are frequent and represent one of the most substantial medical problems in professional football. They can have both traumatic and overuse causes with direct practical consequence due to differences in terms of the post-primary care regimen and prognosis. An accurate diagnosis is the first step towards a specific treatment and usually allows to predict return to play (RTP). Current treatment principles have no firm scientific basis; they are practiced largely as empirical medicine due to a lack of prospective randomised studies. Immediate treatment usually follows the PRICE-principle (protection, rest, ice, compression, elevation). Depending on the type of the muscle injury, specific physical and physiotherapeutical procedures as well as rehabilitative exercises and gradual training therapy are used to recondition the injured structure, to restore coordination and proprioception, and to normalise movement patterns. Injection therapy with various substances is frequently used, with positive results empirically, but evidence in form of prospective randomised studies is lacking. A precise rehabilitation plan should be developed for every muscle injury, including recommendations for sport-specific training with increasing intensity. Since there are no guidelines regarding safe RTP, regular follow-up examinations on the current muscle status are crucial to evaluate the progress made in terms of healing and to determine when the injured muscle can be exposed to the next step of load. This narrative review describes the various factors that a medical team should consider during assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of a muscle injury with particular focus on professional football.

  15. Skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  16. In Graves' disease, increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles is primarily caused by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn three patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia, while the other eye looked ahead, into the field of action, or out of the field of action of the muscle that was measured. The affected muscles

  17. In Graves' disease, increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles is primarily caused by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn three patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia, while the other eye looked ahead, into the field of action, or out of the field of action of the muscle that was measured. The affected muscles we

  18. Channel Modeling of Human Somatosensory Nanonetwork: Body Discriminative Touch and Proprioception Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Ray

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanonetwork design and analysis has become a very interesting topic in recent years. Though this area of research is in its formative stage, it definitely posses a strong integrity in finding out numerous applications in medical and allied sciences. Nanonetworking is indeed a nature built foundation which comprises human intra body communications. Somatosensory system is the one of the critical and must have systems of human body. This literature concentrates on the body discriminative touch and proprioception mechanism of somatosensory system. This particular system is well architecture by medial lemniscal pathway, in human body for transduction of touch and proprioceptive information. This paper seeks out the novel communication channel model of somatosensory system. The working principle of the channel model is established by an equivalent Moore machine. A novel algorithm MLP is proposed after its name, medial lemniscal pathway. A novel naomachine and appropriate processing unit are also devised, based on the automaton.

  19. Defensive activation during the rubber hand illusion: Ownership versus proprioceptive drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Martin; Bublatzky, Florian; Trojan, Jörg; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-07-01

    A strong link between body perception and emotional experience has been proposed. To examine the interaction between body perception and anticipatory anxiety, two well-established paradigms were combined: The rubber hand illusion (RHI) and the threat-of-shock paradigm. An artificial hand and the participants' own hand (hidden from sight) were touched synchronously or asynchronously, while either threat-of-shock or safety was cued. Potentiated startle reflexes and enhanced skin conductance responses were observed during threat as compared to safety conditions, but threat conditions did not interact with illusory body perceptions. Thus, defense system activation was not modulated by altered body representations. Physiological responses increased with the sense of ownership for the artificial limb, but not with proprioceptive drift towards its location. The results indicate that ownership ratings and proprioceptive drift capture different aspects of the RHI. The study presents a new approach to investigate the relationship between body representations and emotional states.

  20. Remodelling of spared proprioceptive circuit involving a small number of neurons supports functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Edmund R; Ishiko, Nao; Pessian, Maysam; Tolentino, Kristine; Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Calcutt, Nigel A; Zou, Yimin

    2015-01-19

    Studies show that limited functional recovery can be achieved by plasticity and adaptation of the remaining circuitry in partial injuries in the central nervous system, although the new circuits that arise in these contexts have not been clearly identified or characterized. We show here that synaptic contacts from dorsal root ganglions to a small number of dorsal column neurons, a caudal extension of nucleus gracilis, whose connections to the thalamus are spared in a precise cervical level 1 lesion, underwent remodeling over time. These connections support proprioceptive functional recovery in a conditioning lesion paradigm, as silencing or eliminating the remodelled circuit completely abolishes the recovered proprioceptive function of the hindlimb. Furthermore, we show that blocking repulsive Wnt signalling increases axon plasticity and synaptic connections that drive greater functional recovery.