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Sample records for eye fixation patterns

  1. Eye spy: the predictive value of fixation patterns in detecting subtle and extreme emotions from faces.

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    Vaidya, Avinash R; Jin, Chenshuo; Fellows, Lesley K

    2014-11-01

    Successful social interaction requires recognizing subtle changes in the mental states of others. Deficits in emotion recognition are found in several neurological and psychiatric illnesses, and are often marked by disturbances in gaze patterns to faces, typically interpreted as a failure to fixate on emotionally informative facial features. However, there has been very little research on how fixations inform emotion recognition in healthy people. Here, we asked whether fixations predicted detection of subtle and extreme emotions in faces. We used a simple model to predict emotion detection scores from participants' fixation patterns. The best fit of this model heavily weighted fixations to the eyes in detecting subtle fear, disgust and surprise, with less weight, or zero weight, given to mouth and nose fixations. However, this model could not successfully predict detection of subtle happiness, or extreme emotional expressions, with the exception of fear. These findings argue that detection of most subtle emotions is best served by fixations to the eyes, with some contribution from nose and mouth fixations. In contrast, detection of extreme emotions and subtle happiness appeared to be less dependent on fixation patterns. The results offer a new perspective on some puzzling dissociations in the neuropsychological literature, and a novel analytic approach for the study of eye gaze in social or emotional settings.

  2. Eye movement patterns during the recognition of three-dimensional objects: preferential fixation of concave surface curvature minima.

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    Leek, E Charles; Cristino, Filipe; Conlan, Lina I; Patterson, Candy; Rodriguez, Elly; Johnston, Stephen J

    2012-01-11

    This study used eye movement patterns to examine how high-level shape information is used during 3D object recognition. Eye movements were recorded while observers either actively memorized or passively viewed sets of novel objects, and then during a subsequent recognition memory task. Fixation data were contrasted against different algorithmically generated models of shape analysis based on: (1) regions of internal concave or (2) convex surface curvature discontinuity or (3) external bounding contour. The results showed a preference for fixation at regions of internal local features during both active memorization and passive viewing but also for regions of concave surface curvature during the recognition task. These findings provide new evidence supporting the special functional status of local concave discontinuities in recognition and show how studies of eye movement patterns can elucidate shape information processing in human vision.

  3. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia.

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    Shaikh, Aasef G; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2016-01-01

    Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity.

  4. Maxwellian Eye Fixation during Natural Scene Perception

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    Jean Duchesne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When we explore a visual scene, our eyes make saccades to jump rapidly from one area to another and fixate regions of interest to extract useful information. While the role of fixation eye movements in vision has been widely studied, their random nature has been a hitherto neglected issue. Here we conducted two experiments to examine the Maxwellian nature of eye movements during fixation. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to perform free viewing of natural scenes displayed on a computer screen while their eye movements were recorded. For each participant, the probability density function (PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed the law established by Maxwell for describing molecule velocity in gas. Only the mean amplitude of eye movements varied with expertise, which was lower in experts than novice participants. In Experiment 2, two participants underwent fixed time, free viewing of natural scenes and of their scrambled version while their eye movements were recorded. Again, the PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed Maxwell’s law for each participant and for each scene condition (normal or scrambled. The results suggest that eye fixation during natural scene perception describes a random motion regardless of top-down or of bottom-up processes.

  5. Control and Functions of Fixational Eye Movements

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    Rucci, Michele; Poletti, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Humans and other species explore a visual scene by rapidly shifting their gaze 2-3 times every second. Although the eyes may appear immobile in the brief intervals in between saccades, microscopic (fixational) eye movements are always present, even when attending to a single point. These movements occur during the very periods in which visual information is acquired and processed and their functions have long been debated. Recent technical advances in controlling retinal stimulation during normal oculomotor activity have shed new light on the visual contributions of fixational eye movements and their degree of control. The emerging body of evidence, reviewed in this article, indicates that fixational eye movements are important components of the strategy by which the visual system processes fine spatial details, enabling both precise positioning of the stimulus on the retina and encoding of spatial information into the joint space-time domain.

  6. Fixational eye movements predict visual sensitivity.

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    Scholes, Chris; McGraw, Paul V; Nyström, Marcus; Roach, Neil W

    2015-10-22

    During steady fixation, observers make small fixational saccades at a rate of around 1-2 per second. Presentation of a visual stimulus triggers a biphasic modulation in fixational saccade rate-an initial inhibition followed by a period of elevated rate and a subsequent return to baseline. Here we show that, during passive viewing, this rate signature is highly sensitive to small changes in stimulus contrast. By training a linear support vector machine to classify trials in which a stimulus is either present or absent, we directly compared the contrast sensitivity of fixational eye movements with individuals' psychophysical judgements. Classification accuracy closely matched psychophysical performance, and predicted individuals' threshold estimates with less bias and overall error than those obtained using specific features of the signature. Performance of the classifier was robust to changes in the training set (novel subjects and/or contrasts) and good prediction accuracy was obtained with a practicable number of trials. Our results indicate a tight coupling between the sensitivity of visual perceptual judgements and fixational eye control mechanisms. This raises the possibility that fixational saccades could provide a novel and objective means of estimating visual contrast sensitivity without the need for observers to make any explicit judgement.

  7. Directional eye fixation sensor using birefringence-based foveal detection

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    Gramatikov, Boris I.; Zalloum, Othman H. Y.; Wu, Yi Kai; Hunter, David G.; Guyton, David L.

    2007-04-01

    We recently developed and reported an eye fixation monitor that detects the fovea by its radial orientation of birefringent nerve fibers. The instrument used a four-quadrant photodetector and a normalized difference function to check for a best match between the detector quadrants and the arms of the bow-tie pattern of polarization states surrounding the fovea. This function had a maximum during central fixation but could not tell where the subject was looking relative to the center. We propose a linear transformation to obtain horizontal and vertical eye position coordinates from the four photodetector signals, followed by correction based on a priori calibration information. The method was verified on both a computer model and on human eyes. The major advantage of this new eye-tracking method is that it uses true information coming from the fovea, rather than reflections from other structures, to identify the direction of foveal gaze.

  8. Fixations to the eyes aids in facial encoding; covertly attending to the eyes does not.

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    Laidlaw, Kaitlin E W; Kingstone, Alan

    2017-02-01

    When looking at images of faces, people will often focus their fixations on the eyes. It has previously been demonstrated that the eyes convey important information that may improve later facial recognition. Whether this advantage requires that the eyes be fixated, or merely attended to covertly (i.e. while looking elsewhere), is unclear from previous work. While attending to the eyes covertly without fixating them may be sufficient, the act of using overt attention to fixate the eyes may improve the processing of important details used for later recognition. In the present study, participants were shown a series of faces and, in Experiment 1, asked to attend to them normally while avoiding looking at either the eyes or, as a control, the mouth (overt attentional avoidance condition); or in Experiment 2 fixate the center of the face while covertly attending to either the eyes or the mouth (covert attention condition). After the first phase, participants were asked to perform an old/new face recognition task. We demonstrate that a) when fixations to the eyes are avoided during initial viewing then subsequent face discrimination suffers, and b) covert attention to the eyes alone is insufficient to improve face discrimination performance. Together, these findings demonstrate that fixating the eyes provides an encoding advantage that is not availed by covert attention alone.

  9. eSeeTrack--visualizing sequential fixation patterns.

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    Tsang, Hoi Ying; Tory, Melanie; Swindells, Colin

    2010-01-01

    We introduce eSeeTrack, an eye-tracking visualization prototype that facilitates exploration and comparison of sequential gaze orderings in a static or a dynamic scene. It extends current eye-tracking data visualizations by extracting patterns of sequential gaze orderings, displaying these patterns in a way that does not depend on the number of fixations on a scene, and enabling users to compare patterns from two or more sets of eye-gaze data. Extracting such patterns was very difficult with previous visualization techniques. eSeeTrack combines a timeline and a tree-structured visual representation to embody three aspects of eye-tracking data that users are interested in: duration, frequency and orderings of fixations. We demonstrate the usefulness of eSeeTrack via two case studies on surgical simulation and retail store chain data. We found that eSeeTrack allows ordering of fixations to be rapidly queried, explored and compared. Furthermore, our tool provides an effective and efficient mechanism to determine pattern outliers. This approach can be effective for behavior analysis in a variety of domains that are described at the end of this paper.

  10. Emotion Words Affect Eye Fixations during Reading

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    Scott, Graham G.; O'Donnell, Patrick J.; Sereno, Sara C.

    2012-01-01

    Emotion words are generally characterized as possessing high arousal and extreme valence and have typically been investigated in paradigms in which they are presented and measured as single words. This study examined whether a word's emotional qualities influenced the time spent viewing that word in the context of normal reading. Eye movements…

  11. Fixational eye movements in the earliest stage of metazoan evolution.

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    Jan Bielecki

    Full Text Available All known photoreceptor cells adapt to constant light stimuli, fading the retinal image when exposed to an immobile visual scene. Counter strategies are therefore necessary to prevent blindness, and in mammals this is accomplished by fixational eye movements. Cubomedusae occupy a key position for understanding the evolution of complex visual systems and their eyes are assumedly subject to the same adaptive problems as the vertebrate eye, but lack motor control of their visual system. The morphology of the visual system of cubomedusae ensures a constant orientation of the eyes and a clear division of the visual field, but thereby also a constant retinal image when exposed to stationary visual scenes. Here we show that bell contractions used for swimming in the medusae refresh the retinal image in the upper lens eye of Tripedalia cystophora. This strongly suggests that strategies comparable to fixational eye movements have evolved at the earliest metazoan stage to compensate for the intrinsic property of the photoreceptors. Since the timing and amplitude of the rhopalial movements concur with the spatial and temporal resolution of the eye it circumvents the need for post processing in the central nervous system to remove image blur.

  12. Improved eye-fixation detection using polarization-modulated retinal birefringence scanning, immune to corneal birefringence.

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    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved method for remote eye-fixation detection, using a polarization-modulated approach to retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), without the need for individual calibration or separate background measurements and essentially independent of corneal birefringence. Polarization-modulated RBS detects polarization changes generated in modulated polarized light passing through a unique pattern of nerve fibers identifying and defining the retinal region where fixation occurs (the fovea). A proof-of-concept demonstration in human eyes suggests that polarization-modulated RBS has the potential to reliably detect true foveal fixation on a specified point with an accuracy of at least ± 0.75°, and that it can be applied to the general population, including individuals with sub-optimal eyes and young children, where early diagnosis of visual problems can be critical. As could be employed in an eye-controlled display or in other devices, polarization-modulated RBS also enables and paves the way for new and reliable eye-fixation-evoked human-machine interfaces.

  13. Prediction of human eye fixations using symmetry

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    Kootstra, Gert; Schomaker, Lambert

    2009-01-01

    Humans are very sensitive to symmetry in visual patterns. Reaction time experiments show that symmetry is detected and recognized very rapidly. This suggests that symmetry is a highly salient feature. Existing computational models of saliency, however, have mainly focused on contrast as a measure of

  14. Fixational eye movements during viewing of dynamic natural scenes.

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    Roberts, James A; Wallis, Guy; Breakspear, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Even during periods of fixation our eyes undergo small amplitude movements. These movements are thought to be essential to the visual system because neural responses rapidly fade when images are stabilized on the retina. The considerable recent interest in fixational eye movements (FEMs) has thus far concentrated on idealized experimental conditions with artificial stimuli and restrained head movements, which are not necessarily a suitable model for natural vision. Natural dynamic stimuli, such as movies, offer the potential to move beyond restrictive experimental settings to probe the visual system with greater ecological validity. Here, we study FEMs recorded in humans during the unconstrained viewing of a dynamic and realistic visual environment, revealing that drift trajectories exhibit the properties of a random walk with memory. Drifts are correlated at short time scales such that the gaze position diverges from the initial fixation more quickly than would be expected for an uncorrelated random walk. We propose a simple model based on the premise that the eye tends to avoid retracing its recent steps to prevent photoreceptor adaptation. The model reproduces key features of the observed dynamics and enables estimation of parameters from data. Our findings show that FEM correlations thought to prevent perceptual fading exist even in highly dynamic real-world conditions.

  15. Fixational eye movements during viewing of dynamic natural scenes

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    James A. Roberts

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even during periods of fixation our eyes undergo small amplitude movements. These movements are thought to be essential to the visual system because neural responses rapidly fade when images are stabilized on the retina. The considerable recent interest in fixational eye movements (FEMs has thus far concentrated on idealized experimental conditions with artificial stimuli and restrained head movements, which are not necessarily a suitable model for natural vision. Natural dynamic stimuli, such as movies, offer the potential to move beyond restrictive experimental settings to probe the visual system with greater ecological validity. Here, we study FEMs recorded in humans during the unconstrained viewing of a dynamic and realistic visual environment, revealing that drift trajectories exhibit the properties of a random walk with memory. Drifts are correlated at short time scales such that the gaze position diverges from the initial fixation more quickly than would be expected for an uncorrelated random walk. We propose a simple model based on the premise that the eye tends to avoid retracing its recent steps to prevent photoreceptor adaptation. The model reproduces key features of the observed dynamics and enables estimation of parameters from data. Our findings show that FEM correlations thought to prevent perceptual fading exist even in highly dynamic real-world conditions.

  16. Effects of Reading Goal and Reading Task on Eye Fixation Patterns%阅读目标和阅读任务对读者眼动的影响

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    Jukka Hyona; Johanna K. Kaakinen

    2011-01-01

    @@ We review two studies examining task effects on eye guidance during reading.The first study investigated effects of reading perspective on eye behavior in reading.It demonstrated that both the initial encoding of words as well as the later integration stage of wrapping up the sentence meaning are influenced by the reading perspective.Early effects of reading perspective were observed both in saccadic programming and in fixation times and were primarily seen when reading a text of familiar content.In the second study, effects of reading task were examined by comparing eye movements between proofreading and reading for comprehension.Task effects appeared very early in the processing time line; both temporal and spatial aspects of eye movements were affected.Taking together, the two studies demonstrate that readers make a global adjustment to eye behavior on the basis of reading task or goal.

  17. What eye fixations tell us about phonological recoding during reading.

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    Daneman, M; Reingold, E

    1993-06-01

    Evidence for phonological recoding during reading has depended on paradigms requiring readers to make some response in addition to reading (e.g., proofreading, concurrent speaking). Our subjects simply read text for comprehension, and their eye movements were monitored for spontaneous disruptions when encountering homophonic errors (e.g., He wore blew jeans.) versus nonhomophonic errors (e.g., He wore blow jeans.). Eye fixation behaviour revealed that readers initially experienced as much difficulty when encountering a homophonic error as a nonhomophonic one; however homophony facilitated the recovery process, at least for homophones that shared the same length as their context correct mates (e.g., blew/blue but not war/wore). The results support a theory of lexical access in which phonological sources of activation and influence are delayed relative to orthographic sources, rather than a theory in which phonological codes predominate.

  18. Eye-movement patterns are associated with communicative competence in autistic spectrum disorders.

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    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Brock, Jon; Cragg, Lucy; Einav, Shiri; Griffiths, Helen; Nation, Kate

    2009-07-01

    Investigations using eye-tracking have reported reduced fixations to salient social cues such as eyes when participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) view social scenes. However, these studies have not distinguished different cognitive phenotypes. The eye-movements of 28 teenagers with ASD and 18 typically developing peers were recorded as they watched videos of peers interacting in familiar situations. Within ASD, we contrasted the viewing patterns of those with and without language impairments. The proportion of time spent viewing eyes, mouths and other scene details was calculated, as was latency of first fixation to eyes. Finally, the association between viewing patterns and social-communicative competence was measured. Individuals with ASD and age-appropriate language abilities spent significantly less time viewing eyes and were slower to fixate the eyes than typically developing peers. In contrast, there were no differences in viewing patterns between those with language impairments and typically developing peers. Eye-movement patterns were not associated with social outcomes for either language phenotype. However, increased fixations to the mouth were associated with greater communicative competence across the autistic spectrum. Attention to both eyes and mouths is important for language development and communicative competence. Differences in fixation time to eyes may not be sufficient to disrupt social competence in daily interactions. A multiple cognitive deficit model of ASD, incorporating different language phenotypes, is advocated.

  19. Fixating on the size-speed illusion of approaching railway trains: What we can learn from our eye movements.

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    Clark, Helen E; Perrone, John A; Isler, Robert B; Charlton, Samuel G

    2017-02-01

    Railway level crossing collisions have recently been linked to a size-speed illusion where larger objects such as trains appear to move slower than smaller objects such as cars. An explanation for this illusion has centred on observer eye movements - particularly in relation to the larger, longer train. A previous study (Clark et al., 2016) found participants tend to make initial fixations to locations around the visual centroid of a moving vehicle; however individual eye movement patterns tended to be either fixation-saccade-fixation type, or smooth pursuit. It is therefore unknown as to which type of eye movement contributes to the size-speed illusion. This study isolated fixation eye movements by requiring participants to view computer animated sequences in a laboratory setting, where a static fixation square was placed in the foreground at one of two locations on a train (front and centroid). Results showed that even with the square placed around the front location of a vehicle, participants still underestimated the speed of the train relative to the car and underestimation was greater when the square was placed around the visual centroid of the train. Our results verify that manipulation of eye movement behaviour can be effective in reducing the magnitude of the size-speed illusion and propose that interventions based on this manipulation should be designed and tested for effectiveness.

  20. The potency of people in pictures: evidence from sequences of eye fixations.

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    Humphrey, Katherine; Underwood, Geoffrey

    2010-08-19

    Does the presence of people in a natural scene affect the way that we inspect that picture? Previous research suggests that we have a natural tendency to look at the social information before other items in a scene. There is also evidence that accuracy of visual memory and the way we move our eyes are related. This experiment investigated whether eye movements differed when participants correctly and incorrectly identified stimuli at recognition, and how this is affected by the presence of people. Eye movements were recorded from 15 participants while they inspected photographs at encoding and during a recognition memory test. Half of the pictures contained people and half did not. The presence of people increased recognition accuracy and affected average fixation duration and average saccadic amplitude. Accuracy was not affected by the size of the Region of Interest (RoI), the number of people in the picture, or the distance of the person from the center. Analyses of the order and pattern of fixations showed a high similarity between encoding and recognition in all conditions, but the lack of relationship between string similarity and recognition accuracy challenges the idea that the reproduction of eye movements alone is enough to create a memory advantage.

  1. The categories, frequencies, and stability of idiosyncratic eye-movement patterns to faces.

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    Arizpe, Joseph; Walsh, Vincent; Yovel, Galit; Baker, Chris I

    2016-12-16

    The spatial pattern of eye-movements to faces considered typical for neurologically healthy individuals is a roughly T-shaped distribution over the internal facial features with peak fixation density tending toward the left eye (observer's perspective). However, recent studies indicate that striking deviations from this classic pattern are common within the population and are highly stable over time. The classic pattern actually reflects the average of these various idiosyncratic eye-movement patterns across individuals. The natural categories and respective frequencies of different types of idiosyncratic eye-movement patterns have not been specifically investigated before, so here we analyzed the spatial patterns of eye-movements for 48 participants to estimate the frequency of different kinds of individual eye-movement patterns to faces in the normal healthy population. Four natural clusters were discovered such that approximately 25% of our participants' fixation density peaks clustered over the left eye region (observer's perspective), 23% over the right eye-region, 31% over the nasion/bridge region of the nose, and 20% over the region spanning the nose, philthrum, and upper lips. We did not find any relationship between particular idiosyncratic eye-movement patterns and recognition performance. Individuals' eye-movement patterns early in a trial were more stereotyped than later ones and idiosyncratic fixation patterns evolved with time into a trial. Finally, while face inversion strongly modulated eye-movement patterns, individual patterns did not become less distinct for inverted compared to upright faces. Group-averaged fixation patterns do not represent individual patterns well, so exploration of such individual patterns is of value for future studies of visual cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Globe-fixation system for animal eye practice.

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    Mohammadi, S Farzad; Mazouri, Arash; Rahman-A, Nazanin; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Peyman, Gholam A

    2011-01-01

    We designed a globe-fixation system for use with animal eyes for surgical skills training. The system core is a cup with an adjustable aperture. Vacuum is exerted through the cup to capture the globe at the preequatorial region. The cup rides over a hollow base, sliding on its opening spurs. A ballast is screwed to the end of the thread of the cup to create tactile feedback and create a tendency to return to the primary position. The system provides optimum versatility for the practice of anterior segment procedures, namely stability, rotation, a tendency to return to the primary position, globe pressure adjustability, and a modifiable orbit size. Disclosures are found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Are you really looking? Finding the answer through fixation patterns and EEG

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    Brouwer, A.-M.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Herman, P.; Kooi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Eye movement recordings do not tell us whether observers are 'really looking' or whether they are paying attention to something else than the visual environment. We want to determine whether an observer's main current occupation is visual or not by investigating fixation patterns and EEG. Subjects w

  4. Decision-making in information seeking on texts: an Eye-Fixation-Related Potentials investigation

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    Aline eFREY

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reading on a web page is known to be not linear and people need to make fast decisions about whether they have to stop or not reading. In such context, reading and decision-making processes are intertwined and this experiment attempts to separate them through electrophysiological patterns provided by the Eye-Fixation-Related Potentials technique (EFRPs. We conducted an experiment in which EFRPs were recorded while participants read blocks of text that were semantically highly related, moderately related and unrelated to a given goal. Participants had to decide as fast as possible whether the text was related or not to the semantic goal given at a prior stage. Decision making (stopping information search may occur when the paragraph is highly related to the goal (positive decision or when it is unrelated to the goal (negative decision. EFRPs were analyzed on and around typical eye fixations: either on words belonging to the goal (target, subjected to a high rate of positive decisions, or on low frequency unrelated words (incongruent, subjected to a high rate of negative decisions. In both cases, we found EFRPs specific patterns (amplitude peaking between 51-120ms after fixation onset spreading out on the next words following the goal word and the second fixation after an incongruent word, in parietal and occipital areas. We interpreted these results as delayed late components (P3b and N400, reflecting the decision to stop information searching. Indeed, we show a clear spill-over effect showing that the effect on word N spread out on word N+1 and N+2.

  5. Involuntary Eye Movement during Fixation is Influenced by Spatio-Temporal Frequency of Visual Stimuli

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    Masae Yokota

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary eye movement during fixation is essential for visual information acquisition. Previous studies have suggested that such eye movement depends on the attributes of visual stimuli (e.g. Yokota, APCV2010. In this study, we focus on spatio-temporal frequency, as an attribute of visual stimuli in order to understand spatio-temporal frequency property in the pathway of human vision. We measured eye movement during fixation for three subjects when 16 random-dot dynamic textures that have various frequency bands in spatially and temporally, are presented to the subjects as visual stimuli. The result shows that eye movement depends on the spatio-temporal frequency of visual stimuli. The eye movement includes higher frequency components, in other words, higher velocity components, when visual stimulus has higher spatial frequency and/or higher temporal frequency. Future detailed experiments will show that involuntary eye movement during fixation might be influenced by spatio-temporal frequency sensitivity in vision.

  6. Working memory and inferences: evidence from eye fixations during reading.

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    Calvo, M G

    2001-01-01

    Eye fixations during reading were monitored to examine the relationship between individual differences in working memory capacity-as assessed by the reading span task-and inferences about predictable events. Context sentences predicting likely events, or non-predicting control sentences, were presented. They were followed by continuation sentences in which a target word represented an event to be inferred (inferential word) or an unlikely event (non-predictable word). A main effect of reading span showed that high working memory capacity was related to shorter gaze durations across sentence regions. More specific findings involved an interaction between context, target, and reading span on late processing measures and regions. Thus, for high- but not for low-span readers, the predicting condition, relative to the control condition, facilitated reanalysis of the continuation sentence that represented the inference concept. This effect was revealed by a reduction in regression-path reading time in the last region of the sentence, involving less time reading that region and fewer regressions from it. These results indicate that working memory facilitates elaborative inferences during reading, but that this occurs at late text-integration processes, rather than at early lexical-access processes.

  7. Right Visual Field Advantage in Parafoveal Processing: Evidence from Eye-Fixation-Related Potentials

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    Simola, Jaana; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Lindgren, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Readers acquire information outside the current eye fixation. Previous research indicates that having only the fixated word available slows reading, but when the next word is visible, reading is almost as fast as when the whole line is seen. Parafoveal-on-foveal effects are interpreted to reflect that the characteristics of a parafoveal word can…

  8. Callus patterns in femur lengthening using a monolateral external fixator

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    Isaac, Dileep; Fernandez, Harry; Song, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Tae-Young; Kumar Shyam, Ashok [Korea University Medical Centre, Guro Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rare Diseases Institute, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Seok-Hyun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ilsan (Korea); Lee, Jong-Chan [Korea University, Department of Statistics, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    We studied the callus pattern seen in femoral lengthening using monolateral external fixator to determine whether callus types and shapes can predict the final outcome of the procedure. The radiographs of 41 cases of femoral lengthening (33 unilateral and 8 bilateral) in 33 patients with a mean age 11.9 years (range 4-22 years) were retrospectively analysed by four observers and classified into different shapes and types in concordance with the Ru Li classification. The classification was tested for concurrence and reproducibility by inter-observer studies. An average of 6.2 cm of lengthening (range 3-10.8) was achieved with an external fixator index of 36.5 (range 20.9-55.3). The fusiform type of callus (fixator index 32.04, maturation index 21.6) showed the best result followed by the cylinder type of callus (fixator index 35.7, maturation index 22.3) and the lateral type of callus (fixator index 33.2, maturation index 21.5). However, the concave type of callus showed poor results with a fixator index of 49.4 and a maturation index of 37.1. The homogeneous path showed the best results (fixator index 30.4, maturation index 18.6). The heterogeneous path also showed good results (fixator index 36.4, maturation index 23.9). The mixed path (fixator index 42.5, maturation index 30.8) and the lucent path (fixator index 45.1, maturation index 32.8) showed poor results. Analysis of the callus pattern helps the surgeon to predict the outcome of the procedure and guide him in planning any additional interventions if necessary. (orig.)

  9. Capture of fixation by rotational flow; a deterministic hypothesis regarding scaling and stochasticity in fixational eye movements

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    Nicholas Mansel Wilkinson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual scan paths exhibit complex, stochastic dynamics. Even during visual fixation, the eye is in constant motion. Fixational drift and tremor are thought to reflect fluctuations in the persistent neural activity of neural integrators in the oculomotor brainstem, which integrate sequences of transient saccadic velocity signals into a short term memory of eye position. Despite intensive research and much progress, the precise mechanisms by which oculomotor posture is maintained remain elusive. Drift exhibits a stochastic statistical profile which has been modelled using random walk formalisms. Tremor is widely dismissed as noise. Here we focus on the dynamical profile of fixational tremor, and argue that tremor may be a signal which usefully reflects the workings of the oculomotor postural control. We identify signatures reminiscent of a certain flavour of transient neurodynamics; toric travelling waves which rotate around a central phase singularity. Spiral waves play an organisational role in dynamical systems at many scales throughout nature, though their potential functional role in brain activity remains a matter of educated speculation. Spiral waves have a repertoire of functionally interesting dynamical properties, including persistence, which suggest that they could in theory contribute to persistent neural activity in the oculomotor postural control system. Whilst speculative, the singularity hypothesis of oculomotor postural control implies testable predictions, and could provide the beginnings of an integrated dynamical framework for eye movements across scales.

  10. Characteristic visuomotor influences on eye-movement patterns to faces and other high level stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Michael Arizpe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Eye-movement patterns are often utilized in studies of visual perception as indices of the specific information extracted to efficiently process a given stimulus during a given task. Our prior work, however, revealed that not only the stimulus and task influence eye-movements, but that visuomotor (start position factors also robustly and characteristically influence eye-movement patterns to faces (Arizpe, et al, 2012. Here we manipulated lateral starting side and distance from the midline of face and line-symmetrical control (butterfly stimuli in order to further investigate the nature and generality of such visuomotor influences. First we found that increasing starting distance from midline (4, 8, 12, 16 degrees visual angle strongly and proportionately increased the distance of the first ordinal fixation from midline. We did not find influences of starting distance on subsequent fixations, however, suggesting that eye-movement plans are not strongly affected by starting distance following an initial orienting fixation. Further, we replicated our prior effect of starting side (left, right to induce a spatially contralateral tendency of fixations after the first ordinal fixation. However, we also established that these visuomotor influences did not depend upon the predictability of the location of the upcoming stimulus, and were present not only for face stimuli but also for our control stimulus category (butterflies. We found a correspondence in overall left-lateralized fixation tendency between faces and butterflies. Finally, for faces, we found a relationship between left starting side (right sided fixation pattern tendency and increased recognition performance, which likely reflects a cortical right hemisphere (left visual hemifield advantage for face perception. These results further indicate the importance of considering and controlling for visuomotor influences in the design, analysis, and interpretation of eye-movement studies.

  11. FEATURES OF THE MACULA AND CENTRAL VISUAL FIELD AND FIXATION PATTERN IN PATIENTS WITH RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayman Muslubas, Isil; Karacorlu, Murat; Arf, Serra; Hocaoglu, Mumin; Ersoz, Mehmet Giray

    2017-02-07

    To evaluate macular features and fixation pattern in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) compared with healthy controls, using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and MP-1 microperimetry. Eighty-one eyes of 81 patients with RP and 90 eyes of 90 healthy subjects were assessed. The central foveal thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, ellipsoid zone length, and the mean retinal sensitivities and fixation characteristics were evaluated by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and MP-1 microperimetry. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with central macular thinning had lower best corrected visual acuity, central foveal thickness, ellipsoid zone length, retinal sensitivity, and visual field than patients with cystoid macular edema or no macular change (all P central foveal thickness, ellipsoid zone length, retinal sensitivity, and visual field were statistically significant (all P centralized and stabilized fixation than patients with central foveal thinning and cystoid macular edema. The spectrum of macular features from the nearly normal retina to complete chorioretinal atrophy can be seen in RP patients without associations with age or duration of symptoms. Unlike other macular degenerations, most patients with RP obtained at least a central 2° of visual field, with foveal and stable fixation.

  12. The analysis of the influence of fractal structure of stimuli on fractal dynamics in fixational eye movements and EEG signal

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    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Akrami, Amin

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in vision research is to analyze the effect of visual stimuli on human vision. However, no relationship has been yet discovered between the structure of the visual stimulus, and the structure of fixational eye movements. This study reveals the plasticity of human fixational eye movements in relation to the ‘complex’ visual stimulus. We demonstrated that the fractal temporal structure of visual dynamics shifts towards the fractal dynamics of the visual stimulus (image). The results showed that images with higher complexity (higher fractality) cause fixational eye movements with lower fractality. Considering the brain, as the main part of nervous system that is engaged in eye movements, we analyzed the governed Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during fixation. We have found out that there is a coupling between fractality of image, EEG and fixational eye movements. The capability observed in this research can be further investigated and applied for treatment of different vision disorders. PMID:27217194

  13. The analysis of the influence of fractal structure of stimuli on fractal dynamics in fixational eye movements and EEG signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Akrami, Amin

    2016-05-01

    One of the major challenges in vision research is to analyze the effect of visual stimuli on human vision. However, no relationship has been yet discovered between the structure of the visual stimulus, and the structure of fixational eye movements. This study reveals the plasticity of human fixational eye movements in relation to the ‘complex’ visual stimulus. We demonstrated that the fractal temporal structure of visual dynamics shifts towards the fractal dynamics of the visual stimulus (image). The results showed that images with higher complexity (higher fractality) cause fixational eye movements with lower fractality. Considering the brain, as the main part of nervous system that is engaged in eye movements, we analyzed the governed Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during fixation. We have found out that there is a coupling between fractality of image, EEG and fixational eye movements. The capability observed in this research can be further investigated and applied for treatment of different vision disorders.

  14. The effects of crowding on eye movement patterns in reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricolo, Emanuela; Salvi, Carola; Martelli, Marialuisa; Arduino, Lisa S; Daini, Roberta

    2015-09-01

    Crowding is a phenomenon that characterizes normal periphery limiting letter identification when other letters surround the signal. We investigated the nature of the reading limitation of crowding by analyzing eye-movement patterns. The stimuli consisted of two items varying across trials for letter spacing (spaced, unspaced and increased size), lexicality (words or pseudowords), number of letters (4, 6, 8), and reading modality (oral and silent). In Experiments 1 and 2 (oral and silent reading, respectively) the results show that an increase in letter spacing induced an increase in the number of fixations and in gaze duration, but a reduction in the first fixation duration. More importantly, increasing letter size (Experiment 3) produced the same first fixation duration advantage as empty spacing, indicating that, as predicted by crowding, only center-to-center letter distance, and not spacing per se, matters. Moreover, when the letter size was enlarged the number of fixations did not increase as much as in the previous experiments, suggesting that this measure depends on visual acuity rather than on crowding. Finally, gaze duration, a measure of word recognition, did not change with the letter size enlargement. No qualitative differences were found between oral and silent reading experiments (1 and 2), indicating that the articulatory process did not influence the outcome. Finally, a facilitatory effect of lexicality was found in all conditions, indicating an interaction between perceptual and lexical processing. Overall, our results indicate that crowding influences normal word reading by means of an increase in first fixation duration, a measure of word encoding, which we interpret as a modulatory effect of attention on critical spacing.

  15. Eye movements during saccadic and fixation tasks in patients with homonymous hemianopia.

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    Reinhard, Jens I; Damm, Ingelene; Ivanov, Iliya V; Trauzettel-Klosinski, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our study was to quantify ocular motor performance in patients with homonymous hemianopia and in healthy controls during saccadic and fixation tasks and to detect potential spontaneous adaptive mechanisms in the hemianopic patients. Eye movements were recorded in 33 hemianopic patients (15 right, 18 left; disease duration, 0.2-29 years) and 14 healthy subjects by scanning laser ophthalmoscope allowing determination of the absolute fovea position relative to the stimulus without calibration. Landing accuracy of saccades was determined for 5° saccades, indicated by the number of dysmetric saccades (DS), and fixation stability (FS) after landing. In addition, during continuous fixation of a central cross, FS, and distribution of fixational eye movements (FEMs) were measured. Size of macular sparing was determined using custom microperimetry software (stimulus grid, 0.5°). Compared with controls, landing accuracy was decreased in hemianopic patients, indicated by significantly more DS (hypometric and hypermetric) to the blind side compared with the seeing side. The number of DS was greater in patients with macular sparing of FEM during continuous fixation was asymmetrically shifted to the blind side, especially in cases of macular sparing of FEMs during continuous fixation indicate an advantageous adaptive mechanism to shift the visual field border towards the hemianopic side.

  16. Automatic Detection of Attention Shifts in Infancy: Eye Tracking in the Fixation Shift Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulke, Louisa; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study measured changes in switches of attention between 1 and 9 months of age in 67 typically developing infants. Remote eye-tracking (Tobii X120) was used to measure saccadic latencies, related to switches of fixation, as a measure of shifts of attention, from a central stimulus to a peripheral visual target, measured in the Fixation Shift Paradigm. Fixation shifts occur later if the central fixation stimulus stays visible when the peripheral target appears (competition condition), than if the central stimulus disappears as the peripheral target appears (non-competition condition). This difference decreases with age. Our results show significantly faster disengagement in infants over 4 months than in the younger group, and provide more precise measures of fixation shifts, than behavioural observation with the same paradigm. Reduced saccadic latencies in the course of a test session indicate a novel learning effect. The Fixation Shift Paradigm combined with remote eye-tracking measures showed improved temporal and spatial accuracy compared to direct observation by a trained observer, and allowed an increased number of trials in a short testing time. This makes it an infant-friendly non-invasive procedure, involving minimal observational training, suitable for use in future studies of clinical populations to detect early attentional abnormalities in the first few months of life.

  17. Automatic Detection of Attention Shifts in Infancy: Eye Tracking in the Fixation Shift Paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa Kulke

    Full Text Available This study measured changes in switches of attention between 1 and 9 months of age in 67 typically developing infants. Remote eye-tracking (Tobii X120 was used to measure saccadic latencies, related to switches of fixation, as a measure of shifts of attention, from a central stimulus to a peripheral visual target, measured in the Fixation Shift Paradigm. Fixation shifts occur later if the central fixation stimulus stays visible when the peripheral target appears (competition condition, than if the central stimulus disappears as the peripheral target appears (non-competition condition. This difference decreases with age. Our results show significantly faster disengagement in infants over 4 months than in the younger group, and provide more precise measures of fixation shifts, than behavioural observation with the same paradigm. Reduced saccadic latencies in the course of a test session indicate a novel learning effect. The Fixation Shift Paradigm combined with remote eye-tracking measures showed improved temporal and spatial accuracy compared to direct observation by a trained observer, and allowed an increased number of trials in a short testing time. This makes it an infant-friendly non-invasive procedure, involving minimal observational training, suitable for use in future studies of clinical populations to detect early attentional abnormalities in the first few months of life.

  18. Covert tracking: a combined ERP and fixational eye movement study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis D J Makin

    Full Text Available Attention can be directed to particular spatial locations, or to objects that appear at anticipated points in time. While most work has focused on spatial or temporal attention in isolation, we investigated covert tracking of smoothly moving objects, which requires continuous coordination of both. We tested two propositions about the neural and cognitive basis of this operation: first that covert tracking is a right hemisphere function, and second that pre-motor components of the oculomotor system are responsible for driving covert spatial attention during tracking. We simultaneously recorded event related potentials (ERPs and eye position while participants covertly tracked dots that moved leftward or rightward at 12 or 20°/s. ERPs were sensitive to the direction of target motion. Topographic development in the leftward motion was a mirror image of the rightward motion, suggesting that both hemispheres contribute equally to covert tracking. Small shifts in eye position were also lateralized according to the direction of target motion, implying covert activation of the oculomotor system. The data addresses two outstanding questions about the nature of visuospatial tracking. First, covert tracking is reliant upon a symmetrical frontoparietal attentional system, rather than being right lateralized. Second, this same system controls both pursuit eye movements and covert tracking.

  19. Covert tracking: a combined ERP and fixational eye movement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Alexis D J; Poliakoff, Ellen; Ackerley, Rochelle; El-Deredy, Wael

    2012-01-01

    Attention can be directed to particular spatial locations, or to objects that appear at anticipated points in time. While most work has focused on spatial or temporal attention in isolation, we investigated covert tracking of smoothly moving objects, which requires continuous coordination of both. We tested two propositions about the neural and cognitive basis of this operation: first that covert tracking is a right hemisphere function, and second that pre-motor components of the oculomotor system are responsible for driving covert spatial attention during tracking. We simultaneously recorded event related potentials (ERPs) and eye position while participants covertly tracked dots that moved leftward or rightward at 12 or 20°/s. ERPs were sensitive to the direction of target motion. Topographic development in the leftward motion was a mirror image of the rightward motion, suggesting that both hemispheres contribute equally to covert tracking. Small shifts in eye position were also lateralized according to the direction of target motion, implying covert activation of the oculomotor system. The data addresses two outstanding questions about the nature of visuospatial tracking. First, covert tracking is reliant upon a symmetrical frontoparietal attentional system, rather than being right lateralized. Second, this same system controls both pursuit eye movements and covert tracking.

  20. Insights into numerical cognition: considering eye-fixations in number processing and arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, J; Huber, S; Klein, E; Moeller, K

    2016-05-01

    Considering eye-fixation behavior is standard in reading research to investigate underlying cognitive processes. However, in numerical cognition research eye-tracking is used less often and less systematically. Nevertheless, we identified over 40 studies on this topic from the last 40 years with an increase of eye-tracking studies on numerical cognition during the last decade. Here, we review and discuss these empirical studies to evaluate the added value of eye-tracking for the investigation of number processing. Our literature review revealed that the way eye-fixation behavior is considered in numerical cognition research ranges from investigating basic perceptual aspects of processing non-symbolic and symbolic numbers, over assessing the common representational space of numbers and space, to evaluating the influence of characteristics of the base-10 place-value structure of Arabic numbers and executive control on number processing. Apart from basic results such as reading times of numbers increasing with their magnitude, studies revealed that number processing can influence domain-general processes such as attention shifting-but also the other way round. Domain-general processes such as cognitive control were found to affect number processing. In summary, eye-fixation behavior allows for new insights into both domain-specific and domain-general processes involved in number processing. Based thereon, a processing model of the temporal dynamics of numerical cognition is postulated, which distinguishes an early stage of stimulus-driven bottom-up processing from later more top-down controlled stages. Furthermore, perspectives for eye-tracking research in numerical cognition are discussed to emphasize the potential of this methodology for advancing our understanding of numerical cognition.

  1. Recognition memory strength is predicted by pupillary responses at encoding while fixation patterns distinguish recollection from familiarity.

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    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2011-10-01

    Thirty-five healthy participants incidentally encoded a set of man-made and natural object pictures, while their pupil response and eye movements were recorded. At retrieval, studied and new stimuli were rated as novel, familiar (strong, moderate, or weak), or recollected. We found that both pupil response and fixation patterns at encoding predict later recognition memory strength. The extent of pupillary response accompanying incidental encoding was found to be predictive of subsequent memory. In addition, the number of fixations was also predictive of later recognition memory strength, suggesting that the accumulation of greater visual detail, even for single objects, is critical for the creation of a strong memory. Moreover, fixation patterns at encoding distinguished between recollection and familiarity at retrieval, with more dispersed fixations predicting familiarity and more clustered fixations predicting recollection. These data reveal close links between the autonomic control of pupil responses and eye movement patterns on the one hand and memory encoding on the other. Moreover, the data illustrate quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the incidental visual processing of stimuli, which are differentially predictive of the strength and the kind of memory experienced at recognition.

  2. Effect of different fixative solutions on eyes with experimental proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

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    Nassar, Khaled; Lüke, Julia; Lüke, Matthias; Kamal, Mahmoud; Soliman, Mahmoud M; Grisanti, Salvatore; Grisanti, Swaantje

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of different fixatives on the reliability of histopathological changes in a rabbit model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Twenty eyes from 10 rabbits were divided into four groups. The right eyes were used in two experimental groups (each n = 5), and the left, in two control groups (each n = 5). Using a newly developed scleral incision marker, an oblique scleral incision was standardized in the experimental groups, followed by intravitreal injection of 0.4 ml autologous blood and the left for wound repair for four weeks. Eyes were enucleated at four weeks. The groups differed in the type of used fixative solution (formaldehyde 4% vs. 1% buffered formaldehyde and 1.25% glutaraldehyde). The eyes were evaluated for the development of fibrosis, retinal detachment (RD), and processed for histopathology. Fibrous ingrowth of a variable degree was present in the experimental groups originating from the trauma site. Experimental eyes fixed with formaldehyde 4% had RD extension that was greater than that fixed in formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde mixture; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.15). This difference was not fully explained by the fibrosis which developed. In addition, in control groups, formaldehyde 4% induced a fixative-dependent retinal separation that was absent in eyes fixed with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde mixture (P = 0.03). In conclusion, a mixture of buffered formaldehyde 1% and glutaraldehyde 1.25% combined with standardized scleral incision resulted in consistent pathological changes. A reliable PVR model is a condition sine qua non to evaluate antifibrotic treatment strategies.

  3. Clinical outcomes of glued transscleral fixated intraocular lens in functionally one-eyed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok Kumar, Dhivya; Agarwal, Amar; Agarwal, Athiya; Chandrasekar, Radhika

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the indications, visual outcome, mental status, and quality of life after glued transscleral fixated intraocular lens (IOL) in functionally one-eyed individuals. Dr Agarwal's Eye Hospital and Eye Research Centre, Chennai, India. Prospective observational comparative case series. Patients with one functioning eye with surgical indications (aphakia, luxated IOL, or dislocated lens) and the fellow eye with no perception of light were included. Indications, uncorrected distant visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distant visual acuity (CDVA), mental status (Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale) and quality of life (visual function scoring VF-14) were assessed. Outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical management were evaluated and compared. Of 22 patients, 10 (45.4%) patients underwent glued IOL (group A) and 12 (54.5%) wore spectacles (group B). There was a strong association between the initial clinical presentation and management (χ, P=0.000). Subluxated cataract and dislocated lens (or IOL) required surgical treatment. Postoperative aphakia with adequate spectacle correction were conservatively treated. There was change (P=0.005) in UDVA and CDVA after glued IOL surgery. There was no loss of CDVA. There was difference between the 2 groups in reading small prints (P=0.021), sporting activities (P=0.000), and night driving (P=0.000). Surgical anxiety was higher in group B (P=0.014). Females were more anxious than the males (P=0.014). There was an association of increasing age and the decision for nonsurgical management (χ, P=0.005). Glued transscleral fixated IOL can be safely performed in one-eyed patients for specific indications to provide good functional results.

  4. Retropupillary fixation of iris-claw lens in visual rehabilitation of aphakic eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Jayamadhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Surgical outcome of retropupillary fixation of iris claw lens. Aims: To evaluate the various indications, intra and post-operative complications, and visual outcome of retropupillary fixation of iris claw lens in aphakic eyes. Settings and Design: The study design is a retrospective study at a tertiary eye care center. Methods: Review of medical records of 61 aphakic eyes of 61 patients, who were rehabilitated with retropupillary fixation of an iris claw lens, with a follow-up duration of at least 1 year. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed using paired t-test and Chi-square test. Results: Mean preoperative uncorrected visual acuity was 1.66 ± 0.3 LogMAR and postoperative acuity at 1 year was 0.53 ± 0.5 LogMAR (P = 0.00001. Preoperative distant best-corrected visual acuity was 0.30 ± 0.48 LogMAR and postoperative acuity at 1 year was 0.27 ± 0.46 LogMAR (P = 0.07. Mean preoperative astigmatism was 1.43 ± 1.94 D and postoperatively was 1.85 ± 2.16 D (P = 0.0127. Mean endothelial cell count was 2353.52 ± 614 cells/mm2 preoperatively which decreased to 2200 ± 728 cells/mm2 at 1 year follow-up (P = 0.006. There was no significant difference in central macular thickness and intraocular pressure pre and post-surgery. Complications included ovalization of pupil in 9.83%, hypotony in 1.63%, toxic anterior segment syndrome in 1.63%, cystoid macular edema in 11.47%, epiretinal membrane in 3.27%, and iris atrophy in 6.55%. Conclusion: Iris claw is a safe and an effective method of rehabilitating aphakic eyes.

  5. A critical eye: praise directed toward traits increases children's eye fixations on errors and decreases motivation.

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    Zentall, Shannon R; Morris, Bradley J

    2012-12-01

    Although there is evidence that praise of different types (i.e., generic vs. nongeneric) influences motivation, it is unclear how this occurs. Generic praise (e.g., "You are smart") conveys that a child possesses a trait responsible for their performance, whereas nongeneric praise (e.g., "You worked hard") conveys that performance is effort-based. Because praise conveys the basis for success, praise may change the interpretation and salience of errors. Specifically, generic praise may highlight the threatening nature of error (i.e., the child does not possess this trait). Because attention is drawn to threats in the environment, we expected generic praise to increase attention to error. We used eyetracking to measure implicit responses to errors (i.e., visual attention: fixation counts and durations) in order to determine the relation between visual attention and verbal reports of motivation (persistence and self-evaluations) in 30 four- to seven-year-old children. Children first saw pictures attributed to them, for which they received either generic or nongeneric praise. The children then saw pictures attributed to them that contained errors--that is, missing features. As a pretest and posttest, the children saw pictures that were "drawn by other children," half of which contained errors. The results indicated that children who received generic praise ("you are a good drawer") produced more and longer fixations on errors, both their "own" and on "other children's," than did children who received nongeneric praise ("you did a good job drawing"). More fixations on errors were related to lower persistence and lower self-evaluations. These results suggest that generic praise increases attention to errors because error threatens the possession of a positive trait.

  6. Correlations between psychometric schizotypy, scan path length, fixations on the eyes and face recognition.

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    Hills, Peter J; Eaton, Elizabeth; Pake, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Psychometric schizotypy in the general population correlates negatively with face recognition accuracy, potentially due to deficits in inhibition, social withdrawal, or eye-movement abnormalities. We report an eye-tracking face recognition study in which participants were required to match one of two faces (target and distractor) to a cue face presented immediately before. All faces could be presented with or without paraphernalia (e.g., hats, glasses, facial hair). Results showed that paraphernalia distracted participants, and that the most distracting condition was when the cue and the distractor face had paraphernalia but the target face did not, while there was no correlation between distractibility and participants' scores on the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Schizotypy was negatively correlated with proportion of time fixating on the eyes and positively correlated with not fixating on a feature. It was negatively correlated with scan path length and this variable correlated with face recognition accuracy. These results are interpreted as schizotypal traits being associated with a restricted scan path leading to face recognition deficits.

  7. A no-moving-parts sensor for the detection of eye fixation using polarised light and retinal birefringence information.

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    Gramatikov, Boris I; Guyton, David L

    2017-05-01

    Polarised near-infra-red light is reflected from the foveal area in a detectable bow-tie pattern of polarisation states, offering the opportunity for eye tracking. A coaxial optical transducer was developed, consisting of a laser diode, a polariser, a filter, and a photodetector. Several such transducers may be used to interrogate different spots on the retina, thus eliminating the requirement for scanning systems with moving parts. To test the signal quality obtainable, using just one transducer, a test subject was asked to fixate successively on twelve targets located on a circle around the transducer, to simulate the retina's being interrogated by twelve sensors placed on a 3(0) diameter circle surrounding the projection of the fovea. The resulting signal is close to the "ideal" sine wave that would have been recorded from a propeller-type birefringence pattern from a human fovea. The transducer can be used in the detection of fixation for medical and other purposes. It does not require calibration, strict restrictions on head position, or head-mounted appliances.

  8. Measuring dwell time percentage from head-mounted eye-tracking data--comparison of a frame-by-frame and a fixation-by-fixation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenkiste, Pieter; Cardon, Greet; Philippaerts, Renaat; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Although analysing software for eye-tracking data has significantly improved in the past decades, the analysis of gaze behaviour recorded with head-mounted devices is still challenging and time-consuming. Therefore, new methods have to be tested to reduce the analysis workload while maintaining accuracy and reliability. In this article, dwell time percentages to six areas of interest (AOIs), of six participants cycling on four different roads, were analysed both frame-by-frame and in a 'fixation-by-fixation' manner. The fixation-based method is similar to the classic frame-by-frame method but instead of assigning frames, fixations are assigned to one of the AOIs. Although some considerable differences were found between the two methods, a Pearson correlation of 0.930 points out a good validity of the fixation-by-fixation method. For the analysis of gaze behaviour over an extended period of time, the fixation-based approach is a valuable and time-saving alternative for the classic frame-by-frame analysis.

  9. The eye of the beholder: Can patterns in eye movement reveal aptitudes for spatial reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Victoria A; Fraser, Graham M; Kryklywy, James H; Mitchell, Derek G V; Wilson, Timothy D

    2016-07-08

    Mental rotation ability (MRA) is linked to academic success in the spatially complex Science, Technology, Engineering, Medicine, and Mathematics (STEMM) disciplines, and anatomical sciences. Mental rotation literature suggests that MRA may manifest in the movement of the eyes. Quantification of eye movement data may serve to distinguish MRA across individuals, and serve as a consideration when designing visualizations for instruction. It is hypothesized that high-MRA individuals will demonstrate fewer eye fixations, conduct shorter average fixation durations (AFD), and demonstrate shorter response times, than low-MRA individuals. Additionally, individuals with different levels of MRA will attend to different features of the block-figures presented in the electronic mental rotations test (EMRT). All participants (n = 23) completed the EMRT while metrics of eye movement were collected. The test required participants view pairs of three-dimensional (3D) shapes, and identify if the pair is rotated but identical, or two different structures. Temporal analysis revealed no significant correlations between response time, average fixation durations, or number of fixations and mental rotation ability. Further analysis of within-participant variability yielded a significant correlation for response time variability, but no correlation between AFD variability and variability in the number of fixations. Additional analysis of salience revealed that during problem solving, individuals of differing MRA attended to different features of the block images; suggesting that eye movements directed at salient features may contribute to differences in mental rotations ability, and may ultimately serve to predict success in anatomy. Anat Sci Educ 9: 357-366. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Microscopy of the Drosophila facet eye: vademecum for standardized fixation, embedding, and sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Hampölz, Bernhard; Longato, Stefano; Teis, David; Flörl, Angelika; Gutleben, Karin; Huber, Lukas A

    2006-02-01

    We describe here a standardized method for histological processing of the Drosophila compound eye. Primary fixation with 2.5% glutaraldehyde, obligatorily supplemented with 0.1% household detergent regularly yielded the best structural preservation, as compared with that of other, more complicated fixation protocols tested. Notably, it proved indispensable not only to cut off the fly's head to facilitate the penetration of the reagents but also to open the chitinous head capsule. For this, we locally pierced the cuticle between the eyes, leaving the head structurally almost intact, a prerequisite for precisely aligning the head for microtomy. We developed a two-step re-embedding procedure allowing for exact and reproducible orientation of the fly heads. Thus, highly comparable series of cross sections through a representative number of ommatidia were obtained. The feasibility of our embedding and sectioning approach is finally demonstrated by three-dimensional reconstructions of the middle segments of the R1, R7, and R8 photoreceptor cells. We present reconstructions from structurally modified ommatidia, as seen after RNAi-mediated depletion of the endosomal adaptor protein p14, and from normal ommatidia corresponding to the wildtype.

  11. Different fixational eye movements mediate the prevention and the reversal of visual fading.

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    McCamy, Michael B; Macknik, Stephen L; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2014-10-01

    Fixational eye movements (FEMs; including microsaccades, drift and tremor) are thought to improve visibility during fixation by thwarting neural adaptation to unchanging stimuli, but how the different FEM types influence this process is a matter of debate. Attempts to answer this question have been hampered by the failure to distinguish between the prevention of fading (where fading is blocked before it happens in the first place) and the reversal of fading (where vision is restored after fading has already occurred). Because fading during fixation is a detriment to clear vision, the prevention of fading, which avoids visual degradation before it happens, is a more desirable scenario than improving visibility after fading has occurred. Yet previous studies have not examined the role of FEMs in the prevention of fading, but have focused on visual restoration instead. Here we set out to determine the differential contributions and efficacies of microsaccades and drift to preventing fading in human vision. Our results indicate that both microsaccades and drift mediate the prevention of visual fading. We also found that drift is a potentially larger contributor to preventing fading than microsaccades, although microsaccades are more effective than drift. Microsaccades moreover prevented foveal and peripheral fading in an equivalent fashion, and their efficacy was independent of their size, number, and direction. Our data also suggest that faster drift may prevent fading better than slower drift. These findings may help to reconcile the long-standing controversy concerning the comparative roles of microsaccades and drift in visibility during fixation. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  12. Slow fluctuations in eye position and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging brain activity during visual fixation.

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    Fransson, Peter; Flodin, Pär; Seimyr, Gustaf Öqvist; Pansell, Tony

    2014-12-01

    The neuronal circuitry that supports voluntary changes in eye position in tasks that require attention-driven oculo-motor control is well known. However, less is known about the neuronal basis for eye control during visual fixation. This, together with the fact that visual fixation is one of the most commonly used baseline conditions in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, prompted us to conduct a study in which we employed resting-state fMRI and concurrent recordings of eye gaze to investigate the relationship between spontaneous changes in eye position during passive visual fixation and intrinsic brain activity. As a control experiment, we recorded fMRI brain activity related to cued voluntary vertical and horizontal changes in eye position in a block-related task-evoked fMRI experiment. Our results for the voluntarily performed changes in eye position elicited brain activity in the bilateral occipitotemporal cortex, supplementary motor cortex and frontal eye fields. In contrast, we show that slow fluctuations in eye position during passive visual fixation are linked to intrinsic brain activity, foremost in midline cortical brain regions located in the posteromedial parietal cortex and the medial prefrontal cortex, brain regions that act as core cortical hubs in the brain's default mode network. Our results suggest that subconscious and sustained changes in behavior are tied to intrinsic brain activity on a moment-by-moment basis. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Microbial community shifts influence patterns in tropical forest nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sasha C; Townsend, Alan R; Cleveland, Cory C; Nemergut, Diana R

    2010-10-01

    The role of biodiversity in ecosystem function receives substantial attention, yet despite the diversity and functional relevance of microorganisms, relationships between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remain largely unknown. We used tropical rain forest fertilization plots to directly compare the relative abundance, composition and diversity of free-living nitrogen (N)-fixer communities to in situ leaf litter N fixation rates. N fixation rates varied greatly within the landscape, and 'hotspots' of high N fixation activity were observed in both control and phosphorus (P)-fertilized plots. Compared with zones of average activity, the N fixation 'hotspots' in unfertilized plots were characterized by marked differences in N-fixer community composition and had substantially higher overall diversity. P additions increased the efficiency of N-fixer communities, resulting in elevated rates of fixation per nifH gene. Furthermore, P fertilization increased N fixation rates and N-fixer abundance, eliminated a highly novel group of N-fixers, and increased N-fixer diversity. Yet the relationships between diversity and function were not simple, and coupling rate measurements to indicators of community structure revealed a biological dynamism not apparent from process measurements alone. Taken together, these data suggest that the rain forest litter layer maintains high N fixation rates and unique N-fixing organisms and that, as observed in plant community ecology, structural shifts in N-fixing communities may partially explain significant differences in system-scale N fixation rates.

  14. Retropupillary Fixation of Iris-Claw Intraocular Lens for Aphakic Eyes in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Brandner

    Full Text Available To report outcome, complications and safety of retropupillary fixated iris-claw intraocular lenses in a pediatric population.Retrospective study.Ten consecutive pediatric patients (15 eyes underwent placement of retropupillary fixated iris-claw intraocular lenses between October 2007 and July 2013 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Graz and General Hospital Klagenfurt, Austria. Postoperative visual acuity and complications were analyzed.Median final best-corrected visual acuity improved by 0.12 logMAR from preoperative baseline. Mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.05 ± 1.76 D. No serious complications were observed intra- or postoperatively during the entire follow-up period of up to 40 months. One patient experienced a haptic disenclavation with IOL subluxation immediately after a car accident.Our study demonstrates that iris-claw intraocular lens implantation behind the iris is safe in children with lack of capsular support and yields excellent visual outcome with low complication rate.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2011-01-01

    using antibodies against COX-2 was performed on paraffin sections of normal human eyes and selected eye tumours arising from cells expressing COX-2. Results: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression was found in various structures of the normal eye. Abundant expression was seen in the cornea, iris, ciliary body......Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in neoplastic processes. The purpose of the present study is to investigate COX-2 expression in the normal human eye and the expression pattern in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining...... and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  16. Emotion modulates eye movement patterns and subsequent memory for the gist and details of movie scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramanathan; Shankar, Divya; Sebe, Nicu; Melcher, David

    2014-03-26

    A basic question in vision research regards where people look in complex scenes and how this influences their performance in various tasks. Previous studies with static images have demonstrated a close link between where people look and what they remember. Here, we examined the pattern of eye movements when participants watched neutral and emotional clips from Hollywood-style movies. Participants answered multiple-choice memory questions concerning visual and auditory scene details immediately upon viewing 1-min-long neutral or emotional movie clips. Fixations were more narrowly focused for emotional clips, and immediate memory for object details was worse compared to matched neutral scenes, implying preferential attention to emotional events. Although we found the expected correlation between where people looked and what they remembered for neutral clips, this relationship broke down for emotional clips. When participants were subsequently presented with key frames (static images) extracted from the movie clips such that presentation duration of the target objects (TOs) corresponding to the multiple-choice questions was matched and the earlier questions were repeated, more fixations were observed on the TOs, and memory performance also improved significantly, confirming that emotion modulates the relationship between gaze position and memory performance. Finally, in a long-term memory test, old/new recognition performance was significantly better for emotional scenes as compared to neutral scenes. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that emotional content draws eye fixations and strengthens memory for the scene gist while weakening encoding of peripheral scene details.

  17. Visual and linguistic determinants of the eyes' initial fixation position in reading development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Stéphanie; Pynte, Joël; Ghio, Alain; Lété, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Two eye-movement experiments with one hundred and seven first- through fifth-grade children were conducted to examine the effects of visuomotor and linguistic factors on the recognition of words and pseudowords presented in central vision (using a variable-viewing-position technique) and in parafoveal vision (shifted to the left or right of a central fixation point). For all groups of children, we found a strong effect of stimulus location, in both central and parafoveal vision. This effect corresponds to the children's apparent tendency, for peripherally located targets, to reach a position located halfway between the middle and the left edge of the stimulus (preferred viewing location, PVL), whether saccading to the right or left. For centrally presented targets, refixation probability and lexical-decision time were the lowest near the word's center, suggesting an optimal viewing position (OVP). The viewing-position effects found here were modulated (1) by print exposure, both in central and parafoveal vision; and (2) by the intrinsic qualities of the stimulus (lexicality and word frequency) for targets in central vision but not for parafoveally presented targets.

  18. Attention to irrelevant contexts decreases as training increases: Evidence from eye-fixations in a human predictive learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizabal, José A; Ramos-Álvarez, Manuel M; Callejas-Aguilera, José E; Rosas, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    Participants were trained in a human predictive learning task in which they had to predict whether the ingestion of a given food (cue) by the imaginary customer of an imaginary restaurant (context) was followed by gastric malaise (outcome). One food was always followed by gastric malaise in one of the contexts, while other foods were not followed by gastric malaise in the same, or in an alternative context. Predictive responses and eye-fixations were recorded throughout the 48 training trials with each cue involved in the task. In agreement with the predictions of the Attentional Theory of Context Processing, attention to the contexts measured through eye-fixations decreased while attention to the cues increased as training progressed. The results of this study give support to the idea that contexts are actively processed at the beginning of acquisition, and that this processing decreases as training increases.

  19. Eye-Movement Patterns Are Associated with Communicative Competence in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Brock, Jon; Cragg, Lucy; Einav, Shiri; Griffiths, Helen; Nation, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Background: Investigations using eye-tracking have reported reduced fixations to salient social cues such as eyes when participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) view social scenes. However, these studies have not distinguished different cognitive phenotypes. Methods: The eye-movements of 28 teenagers with ASD and 18 typically developing…

  20. Eye-Movement Patterns Are Associated with Communicative Competence in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Brock, Jon; Cragg, Lucy; Einav, Shiri; Griffiths, Helen; Nation, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Background: Investigations using eye-tracking have reported reduced fixations to salient social cues such as eyes when participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) view social scenes. However, these studies have not distinguished different cognitive phenotypes. Methods: The eye-movements of 28 teenagers with ASD and 18 typically developing…

  1. Effect of glaucoma on eye movement patterns and laboratory-based hazard detection ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samantha Sze-Yee; Black, Alex A; Wood, Joanne M

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the elevated crash rates of older drivers with glaucoma are poorly understood. A key driving skill is timely detection of hazards; however, the hazard detection ability of drivers with glaucoma has been largely unexplored. This study assessed the eye movement patterns and visual predictors of performance on a laboratory-based hazard detection task in older drivers with glaucoma. Participants included 30 older drivers with glaucoma (71±7 years; average better-eye mean deviation (MD) = -3.1±3.2 dB; average worse-eye MD = -11.9±6.2 dB) and 25 age-matched controls (72±7 years). Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual fields, useful field of view (UFoV; processing speeds), and motion sensitivity were assessed. Participants completed a computerised Hazard Perception Test (HPT) while their eye movements were recorded using a desk-mounted Tobii TX300 eye-tracking system. The HPT comprises a series of real-world traffic videos recorded from the driver's perspective; participants responded to road hazards appearing in the videos, and hazard response times were determined. Participants with glaucoma exhibited an average of 0.42 seconds delay in hazard response time (p = 0.001), smaller saccades (p = 0.010), and delayed first fixation on hazards (p<0.001) compared to controls. Importantly, larger saccades were associated with faster hazard responses in the glaucoma group (p = 0.004), but not in the control group (p = 0.19). Across both groups, significant visual predictors of hazard response times included motion sensitivity, UFoV, and worse-eye MD (p<0.05). Older drivers with glaucoma had delayed hazard response times compared to controls, with associated changes in eye movement patterns. The association between larger saccades and faster hazard response time in the glaucoma group may represent a compensatory behaviour to facilitate improved performance.

  2. Looking for a face in the crowd: fixation-related potentials in an eye-movement visual search task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunitz, Lisandro N; Kamienkowski, Juan E; Varatharajah, Alexander; Sigman, Mariano; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Ison, Matias J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the compelling contribution of the study of event related potentials (ERPs) and eye movements to cognitive neuroscience, these two approaches have largely evolved independently. We designed an eye-movement visual search paradigm that allowed us to concurrently record EEG and eye movements while subjects were asked to find a hidden target face in a crowded scene with distractor faces. Fixation event-related potentials (fERPs) to target and distractor stimuli showed the emergence of robust sensory components associated with the perception of stimuli and cognitive components associated with the detection of target faces. We compared those components with the ones obtained in a control task at fixation: qualitative similarities as well as differences in terms of scalp topography and latency emerged between the two. By using single trial analyses, fixations to target and distractors could be decoded from the EEG signals above chance level in 11 out of 12 subjects. Our results show that EEG signatures related to cognitive behavior develop across spatially unconstrained exploration of natural scenes and provide a first step towards understanding the mechanisms of target detection during natural search.

  3. Incidence and pattern of dry eye after cataract surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngamjit Kasetsuwan

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence and severity pattern of dry eye after phacoemulsification. SETTING: King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. DESIGN: Prospective descriptive study. METHODS: Samples were collected from ninety-two uncomplicated cataract patients who were 18 years old or older. Dry eye incidence and pattern were analyzed at days 0, 7, 30 and 90 after phacoemulsification using (1 Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI questionnaire, (2 tear break up time (TBUT, (3 Oxford ocular surface staining system, and (4 Schirmer I test without anesthesia. RESULTS: Seven days after phacoemulsification, the incidence of dry eye was 9.8% (95% confidence interval; 3.6-16.0%. The severity of dry eye peaked seven days post-phacoemulsification and was measured by OSDI questionnaire and all three clinical tests. Within thirty days and 3 months post-surgery, both the symptoms and signs showed rapid and gradual improvements, respectively. However, dry eye post-phacoemulsification was not significantly associated with sex and systemic hypertension (P = 0.26, 0.17 and 0.73, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of dry eye after phacoemulsification was 9.8%. Symptoms and signs of dry eye occurred as early as seven days post-phacoemulsification and the severity pattern improved over time. We recommend that ophthalmologists should evaluate patients both before and after phacoemulsification to prevent further damage to the ocular surface and able to manage the patient promptly and effectively so the patient will not have a poor quality of life and vision due to dry eye syndrome.

  4. Computer simulation of cellular patterning within the Drosophila pupal eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Larson

    Full Text Available We present a computer simulation and associated experimental validation of assembly of glial-like support cells into the interweaving hexagonal lattice that spans the Drosophila pupal eye. This process of cell movements organizes the ommatidial array into a functional pattern. Unlike earlier simulations that focused on the arrangements of cells within individual ommatidia, here we examine the local movements that lead to large-scale organization of the emerging eye field. Simulations based on our experimental observations of cell adhesion, cell death, and cell movement successfully patterned a tracing of an emerging wild-type pupal eye. Surprisingly, altering cell adhesion had only a mild effect on patterning, contradicting our previous hypothesis that the patterning was primarily the result of preferential adhesion between IRM-class surface proteins. Instead, our simulations highlighted the importance of programmed cell death (PCD as well as a previously unappreciated variable: the expansion of cells' apical surface areas, which promoted rearrangement of neighboring cells. We tested this prediction experimentally by preventing expansion in the apical area of individual cells: patterning was disrupted in a manner predicted by our simulations. Our work demonstrates the value of combining computer simulation with in vivo experiments to uncover novel mechanisms that are perpetuated throughout the eye field. It also demonstrates the utility of the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg model (GGH for modeling the links between local cellular interactions and emergent properties of developing epithelia as well as predicting unanticipated results in vivo.

  5. Preferred retinal locus of eccentric fixation in eyes with high myopia%高度近视偏心注视优势位置的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾亚丁; 栗改云; 张棉花

    2009-01-01

    binocular eccentric fixation, 13 had the same fixation pattern in both eyes, including lower-field PRL in 7 (50.00 %), left-field PRL in 5 (35.71 %), and upper-field PRL in 1 patient (7.14%). The difference of visual acuity between lower- and left-field PRL group and right- and upper-field undesirable PRL group was not statistically significant (F=0.144, P > 0.05). Conclusions The eccentric fixation in eyes with high myopia is usually situated as near as possible to the fovea. The optimal PRL is inferior visual field.

  6. Simulation of airbag impact on eyes with different axial lengths after transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens by using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Huang,1 Eiichi Uchio,1 Satoru Goto2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, 2Nihon ESI KK Technical Division, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To determine the biomechanical response of an impacting airbag on eyes with different axial lengths with transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL.Materials and methods: Simulations in a model human eye were performed with a computer using a finite element analysis program created by Nihon, ESI Group. The airbag was set to be deployed at five different velocities and to impact on eyes with three different axial lengths. These eyes were set to have transsclerally fixated PC IOL by a 10-0 polypropylene possessing a tensile force limit of 0.16 N according to the United States Pharmacopeia XXII.Results: The corneoscleral opening was observed at a speed of 40 m/second or more in all model eyes. Eyes with the longest axial length of 25.85 mm had the greatest extent of deformity at any given impact velocity. The impact force exceeded the tensile force of 10-0 polypropylene at an impact velocity of 60 m/second in all eyes, causing breakage of the suture. Conclusion: Eyes with transsclerally fixated PC IOL could rupture from airbag impact at high velocities. Eyes with long axial lengths experienced a greater deformity upon airbag impact due to a thinner eye wall. Further basic research on the biomechanical response for assessing eye injuries could help in developing a better airbag and in the further understanding of ocular traumas. Keywords: airbag, ocular trauma, computer simulation, transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens, finite element analysis

  7. Visual exploration patterns of human figures in action: an eye tracker study with art paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Daniela; Morganti, Francesca; Cipresso, Pietro; Ruggi, Simona; Riva, Giuseppe; Gilli, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Art exploration is a complex process conditioned by factors at different levels and includes both basic visual principles and complex cognitive factors. The human figure is considered a critical factor attracting the attention in art painting. Using an eye-tracking methodology, the goal of this study was to explore different elements of the human figure performing an action (face and body parts in action) in complex social scenes characterized by different levels of social interaction between agents depicted in scenes (individual vs. social). The sample included 44 laypersons, and the stimuli consisted of 10 fine art paintings representing the figurative style of classical art. The results revealed different scanning patterns of the human figure elements related to the level of social interaction of agents depicted in the scene. The agents' face attracted eye movements in social interaction scenes while the agents' body parts attracted eye movements only when the agents were involved in individual actions. These processes were confirmed specifically in participants with high empathic abilities who became immediately fixated on faces to develop a mimetic engagement with other agents. Future studies integrating other measures would help confirm the results obtained and strengthen their implication for embodiment processes.

  8. Pattern of blood vessels in eyes with coloboma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Lingam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Choroidal coloboma, especially with optic disc involvement affects the blood vessel (BV pattern in the fundus. Aim: The aim of this study was to report the observations on the pattern of retinal BVs in eyes with fundus coloboma. Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty four eyes of 19 patients with fundus coloboma and the disc involvement in the coloboma was classified according to a previous publication. Results: Four varieties of BVs were identified in the area of coloboma - BVs that were continuous with those arising from the optic disc; vessels emanating from the floor of coloboma whose continuity with central retinal artery or its branches could be indirectly established; and those emanating from the floor of coloboma whose continuity with central retinal artery could not be established. In addition, extraocular BVs were visible through the thinned sclera. The retinal BVs often traversed the coloboma to reach the normal retina. The disc itself was found to be small and had no physiological cup (if not colobomatous. Conclusions: One should be aware of the major BVs transgressing the coloboma while performing relaxing cuts in the intercalary membrane, during the surgery for retinal detachments in eyes with coloboma. Physiological cup is usually absent (when the disc is not colobomatous. Hence, any cupping in such eyes should be viewed with suspicion.

  9. The Relation between Reading Skills and Eye Movement Patterns in Adolescent Readers: Evidence from a Regular Orthography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieber, Magdalena; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Pokorny, Florian B; Einspieler, Christa; Langmann, Andrea; Körner, Christof; Falck-Ytter, Terje; Marschik, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, the relation between reading skills and eye movement behavior has been well documented in English-speaking cohorts. As English and German differ substantially with regard to orthographic complexity (i.e. grapheme-phoneme correspondence), we aimed to delineate specific characteristics of how reading speed and reading comprehension interact with eye movements in typically developing German-speaking (Austrian) adolescents. Eye movements of 22 participants (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months) were tracked while they were performing three tasks, namely silently reading words, texts, and pseudowords. Their reading skills were determined by means of a standardized German reading speed and reading comprehension assessment (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6-12). We found that (a) reading skills were associated with various eye movement parameters in each of the three reading tasks; (b) better reading skills were associated with an increased efficiency of eye movements, but were primarily linked to spatial reading parameters, such as the number of fixations per word, the total number of saccades and saccadic amplitudes; (c) reading speed was a more reliable predictor for eye movement parameters than reading comprehension; (d) eye movements were highly correlated across reading tasks, which indicates consistent reading performances. Contrary to findings in English-speaking cohorts, the reading skills neither consistently correlated with temporal eye movement parameters nor with the number or percentage of regressions made while performing any of the three reading tasks. These results indicate that, although reading skills are associated with eye movement patterns irrespective of language, the temporal and spatial characteristics of this association may vary with orthographic consistency.

  10. The Relation between Reading Skills and Eye Movement Patterns in Adolescent Readers: Evidence from a Regular Orthography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Krieber

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, the relation between reading skills and eye movement behavior has been well documented in English-speaking cohorts. As English and German differ substantially with regard to orthographic complexity (i.e. grapheme-phoneme correspondence, we aimed to delineate specific characteristics of how reading speed and reading comprehension interact with eye movements in typically developing German-speaking (Austrian adolescents. Eye movements of 22 participants (14 females; mean age = 13;6 years;months were tracked while they were performing three tasks, namely silently reading words, texts, and pseudowords. Their reading skills were determined by means of a standardized German reading speed and reading comprehension assessment (Lesegeschwindigkeits- und -verständnistest für Klassen 6-12. We found that (a reading skills were associated with various eye movement parameters in each of the three reading tasks; (b better reading skills were associated with an increased efficiency of eye movements, but were primarily linked to spatial reading parameters, such as the number of fixations per word, the total number of saccades and saccadic amplitudes; (c reading speed was a more reliable predictor for eye movement parameters than reading comprehension; (d eye movements were highly correlated across reading tasks, which indicates consistent reading performances. Contrary to findings in English-speaking cohorts, the reading skills neither consistently correlated with temporal eye movement parameters nor with the number or percentage of regressions made while performing any of the three reading tasks. These results indicate that, although reading skills are associated with eye movement patterns irrespective of language, the temporal and spatial characteristics of this association may vary with orthographic consistency.

  11. Cultural and Species Differences in Gazing Patterns for Marked and Decorated Objects: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlenbeck, Cordelia; Jacobsen, Thomas; Pritsch, Carla; Liebal, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Objects from the Middle Paleolithic period colored with ochre and marked with incisions represent the beginning of non-utilitarian object manipulation in different species of the Homo genus. To investigate the visual effects caused by these markings, we compared humans who have different cultural backgrounds (Namibian hunter–gatherers and German city dwellers) to one species of non-human great apes (orangutans) with respect to their perceptions of markings on objects. We used eye-tracking to analyze their fixation patterns and the durations of their fixations on marked and unmarked stones and sticks. In an additional test, humans evaluated the objects regarding their aesthetic preferences. Our hypotheses were that colorful markings help an individual to structure the surrounding world by making certain features of the environment salient, and that aesthetic appreciation should be associated with this structuring. Our results showed that humans fixated on the marked objects longer and used them in the structural processing of the objects and their background, but did not consistently report finding them more beautiful. Orangutans, in contrast, did not distinguish between object and background in their visual processing and did not clearly fixate longer on the markings. Our results suggest that marking behavior is characteristic for humans and evolved as an attention-directing rather than aesthetic benefit. PMID:28167923

  12. Cultural and Species Differences in Gazing Patterns for Marked and Decorated Objects: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlenbeck, Cordelia; Jacobsen, Thomas; Pritsch, Carla; Liebal, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Objects from the Middle Paleolithic period colored with ochre and marked with incisions represent the beginning of non-utilitarian object manipulation in different species of the Homo genus. To investigate the visual effects caused by these markings, we compared humans who have different cultural backgrounds (Namibian hunter-gatherers and German city dwellers) to one species of non-human great apes (orangutans) with respect to their perceptions of markings on objects. We used eye-tracking to analyze their fixation patterns and the durations of their fixations on marked and unmarked stones and sticks. In an additional test, humans evaluated the objects regarding their aesthetic preferences. Our hypotheses were that colorful markings help an individual to structure the surrounding world by making certain features of the environment salient, and that aesthetic appreciation should be associated with this structuring. Our results showed that humans fixated on the marked objects longer and used them in the structural processing of the objects and their background, but did not consistently report finding them more beautiful. Orangutans, in contrast, did not distinguish between object and background in their visual processing and did not clearly fixate longer on the markings. Our results suggest that marking behavior is characteristic for humans and evolved as an attention-directing rather than aesthetic benefit.

  13. How Hearing Impairment Affects Sentence Comprehension: Using Eye Fixations to Investigate the Duration of Speech Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Dorothea; Kollmeier, Birger; Brand, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the extent to which hearing impairment influences the duration of sentence processing. An eye-tracking paradigm is introduced that provides an online measure of how hearing impairment prolongs processing of linguistically complex sentences; this...

  14. Formation of white-eye pattern with microdischarge in an air dielectric barrier discharge system

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yafeng; Liu, Weili; Wang, Hongfang; Zhao, Zengchao; Fan, Weili

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first observation of white-eye pattern in an air dielectric barrier discharge. The patterned discharges undergo a development as following: random spots - quasihexagonal pattern - hexagonal pattern (type I) - hexagonal pattern (type II) - white-eye pattern - chaos as the voltage is increased. The spatiotemporal characteristics of patterned discharges are investigated by using an optical method. Results show that the two discharge modes, uniform mode and filamentary mode, are actually two different spatial presentations of the same origin: the microdischarge. From the viewpoint of pattern dynamics, the white-eye pattern results from a 3-wave resonance interaction.

  15. Eye Tracking: Pattern, Technology and Application%眼球追踪:模式、技术和应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈庆荣; 周曦; 韩静; 安静

    2012-01-01

    眼球追踪技术是当代心理学研究的重要技术,广泛运用于实验心理学、应用心理学、工程心理学、认知神经科学等领域.采用文献分析的方法,阐述了3种眼球运动的基本模式:注视、眼跳和追随运动;界定了眼球运动的测量指标,如眼动轨迹图、眼动时间(注视时间、眼跳时间、回视时间等)、眼动方向和距离、瞳孔直径.特别探讨了眼动技术和神经电生理技术的结合,如眼动和ERP单独记录、ERP结合EOG分析、眼动和ERP同步记录,以及不同记录技术的优点和缺陷.在此基础上,阐述了眼动追踪技术在心理学不同领域中的应用,如发展心理学、教育心理学、消费心理学、交通心理学等.%Eye tracking, an important technology in the current psychological research, has been widely used in experimental psychology, applied psychology, engineering psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology. This paper introduced the basic eye-tracking patterns such as fixation, saccade, and pursuit movement, and different measure indexes of eye movements. These eye tracing measures include scan path, duration ( e, g. Fixation duration, saccade duration, regression duration), the direction and amplitude of eye movement, pupil diameter. Additionally, it introduced three ways of combing eye movement with ERP (event-related potential) : eye movement separately combined with ERP, eye movement combined with EOG analysis and eye movement simultaneously combined with ERPs. Further, it made a comparison between these three methods and provided some typical applications in many psychological fields, such as developmental psychology, educational psychology, consumer psychology, traffic psychology, and so on.

  16. Using the eye fixation speculum as an adjunct to pterygium surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulhern, M G

    2012-02-03

    A technique is described that overcomes the two biggest problems facing the surgeon when dissecting a pterygium from the cornea-bleeding and eye movement. Our technique however, requires only minimal anesthesia (topical and subconjunctival) and the use of a disposable speculum and suction ring. An added advantage is this particular speculum gives good exposure of the superior bulbar conjunctiva; this facilitates harvesting a conjunctival autograft.

  17. Fixation patterns, not clinical diagnosis, predict body size over‐estimation in eating disordered women and healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Katri K.; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Hancock, Peter J. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A core feature of anorexia nervosa (AN) is an over‐estimation of body size. Women with AN have a different pattern of eye‐movements when judging bodies, but it is unclear whether this is specific to their diagnosis or whether it is found in anyone over‐estimating body size. Method To address this question, we compared the eye movement patterns from three participant groups while they carried out a body size estimation task: (i) 20 women with recovering/recovered anorexia (rAN) who had concerns about body shape and weight and who over‐estimated body size, (ii) 20 healthy controls who had normative levels of concern about body shape and who estimated body size accurately (iii) 20 healthy controls who had normative levels of concern about body shape but who did over‐estimate body size. Results Comparisons between the three groups showed that: (i) accurate body size estimators tended to look more in the waist region, and this was independent of clinical diagnosis; (ii) there is a pattern of looking at images of bodies, particularly viewing the upper parts of the torso and face, which is specific to participants with rAN but which is independent of accuracy in body size estimation. Discussion Since the over‐estimating controls did not share the same body image concerns that women with rAN report, their over‐estimation cannot be explained by attitudinal concerns about body shape and weight. These results suggest that a distributed fixation pattern is associated with over‐estimation of body size and should be addressed in treatment programs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:507–518). PMID:26996142

  18. Finite element analysis of three patterns of internal fixation of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Peter; Chamoli, Uphar; Parr, William C H; Clausen, Philip D; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    The most stable pattern of internal fixation for fractures of the mandibular condyle is a matter for ongoing discussion. In this study we investigated the stability of three commonly used patterns of plate fixation, and constructed finite element models of a simulated mandibular condylar fracture. The completed models were heterogeneous in the distribution of bony material properties, contained about 1.2 million elements, and incorporated simulated jaw-adducting musculature. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. This model was considerably larger and more complex than previous finite element models that have been used to analyse the biomechanical behaviour of differing plating techniques. The use of two parallel 2.0 titanium miniplates gave a more stable configuration with lower mean element stresses and displacements over the use of a single miniplate. In addition, a parallel orientation of two miniplates resulted in lower stresses and displacements than did the use of two miniplates in an offset pattern. The use of two parallel titanium plates resulted in a superior biomechanical result as defined by mean element stresses and relative movement between the fractured fragments in these finite element models.

  19. Observations concerning different patterns of bone healing using the Point Contact Fixator (PC-Fix) as a new technique for fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, H P; Wildburger, R; Szyszkowitz, R

    2001-09-01

    The recent trend in all surgical disciplines has been the development of techniques in minimally invasive surgery and the optimal maintenance of the blood supply to the bone fragments during osteosynthesis. Currently, the Point Contact Fixator (PC-Fix) has been introduced as a new implant for the stabilization of forearm bones. This plate-like splint and screw fixation system, which actually acts as an internal fixator, is characterized by minimized isolated contacts to the bone and proven angular stability of the monocortically locked screws. By using the PC-Fix, a further reduction of damage to the blood supply to the bone is achieved. Since 1994, 38 patients have been treated with this new device; we have reviewed the radiographs of 52 consolidated forearm fractures/osteotomies in accordance with the patterns of bone healing associated with the different methods of implant application according to the fracture type. In the groups in which traditionally precise reduction, interfragmentary compression and stable fixation was achieved (N=31), we found in 71% an absence of periosteal callus (direct bone healing). In the groups in which compression and adaptation were combined, or even main fragments adapted without compression, with wedges remaining unreduced in soft tissue connection (N=21), we found a visible external callus in 81% (indirect healing) (P = 0.002). Indirect healing after internal fixation is no longer regarded as a disturbance to healing, but is a goal in itself. The appearance of callus is a welcome sign indicating a prompt and positive reaction in the course of bone union which will lead to progressive fracture immobilization. When using the PC-Fix in a "biological way", callus formation and solid union take place earlier than in conventional plating. The new internal fixator offers substantial technical and mechanical advantages in fracture treatment. Therefore, it is an ideal implant to satisfy the requirements of modern biological

  20. A Further Look at Postview Effects in Reading: An Eye-Movements Study of Influences from the Left of Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Timothy R.; McGowan, Victoria A.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Paterson, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    When reading from left to right, useful information acquired during each fixational pause is widely assumed to extend 14 to 15 characters to the right of fixation but just 3 to 4 characters to the left, and certainly no further than the beginning of the fixated word. However, this leftward extent is strikingly small and seems inconsistent with…

  1. A two-step patterning process increases the robustness of periodic patterning in the fly eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Avishai; Barkai, Naama

    2016-06-01

    Complex periodic patterns can self-organize through dynamic interactions between diffusible activators and inhibitors. In the biological context, self-organized patterning is challenged by spatial heterogeneities ('noise') inherent to biological systems. How spatial variability impacts the periodic patterning mechanism and how it can be buffered to ensure precise patterning is not well understood. We examine the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the periodic patterning of the fruit fly eye, an organ composed of ∼800 miniature eye units (ommatidia) whose periodic arrangement along a hexagonal lattice self-organizes during early stages of fly development. The patterning follows a two-step process, with an initial formation of evenly spaced clusters of ∼10 cells followed by a subsequent refinement of each cluster into a single selected cell. Using a probabilistic approach, we calculate the rate of patterning errors resulting from spatial heterogeneities in cell size, position and biosynthetic capacity. Notably, error rates were largely independent of the desired cluster size but followed the distributions of signaling speeds. Pre-formation of large clusters therefore greatly increases the reproducibility of the overall periodic arrangement, suggesting that the two-stage patterning process functions to guard the pattern against errors caused by spatial heterogeneities. Our results emphasize the constraints imposed on self-organized patterning mechanisms by the need to buffer stochastic effects. Author summary Complex periodic patterns are common in nature and are observed in physical, chemical and biological systems. Understanding how these patterns are generated in a precise manner is a key challenge. Biological patterns are especially intriguing, as they are generated in a noisy environment; cell position and cell size, for example, are subject to stochastic variations, as are the strengths of the chemical signals mediating cell-to-cell communication. The need

  2. Pattern transfer during deposition and fixation of oligomeric bisphenol A on pre-structured copper surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szillat, Florian; Fechner, Renate; Mayr, Stefan G

    2013-09-01

    Pattern transfer during deposition of oligomeric bisphenol A (OBA) on pre-structured Cu surfaces is investigated by means of a combined experimental-computational approach. Aiming for quantitative prediction of experiments, as characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), we explore the capabilities of stochastic rate equations to quantitatively account for the spatio-temporal evolution of surface topography. While surface diffusion and deposition noise constitute the main mechanisms, pattern transfer is affected by the inclusion of retardation in the interface potential, which appears to be necessary beyond a critical initial surface slope. In addition, routes for successful surface fixation by cross-linking are also demonstrated, which may pave the way for further technological use.

  3. Accurate eye center location through invariant isocentric patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, R.; Gevers, T.

    2012-01-01

    Locating the center of the eyes allows for valuable information to be captured and used in a wide range of applications. Accurate eye center location can be determined using commercial eye-gaze trackers, but additional constraints and expensive hardware make these existing solutions unattractive and

  4. Eye size at birth in prosimian primates: life history correlates and growth patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Cummings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primates have large eyes relative to head size, which profoundly influence the ontogenetic emergence of facial form. However, growth of the primate eye is only understood in a narrow taxonomic perspective, with information biased toward anthropoids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured eye and bony orbit size in perinatal prosimian primates (17 strepsirrhine taxa and Tarsius syrichta to infer the extent of prenatal as compared to postnatal eye growth. In addition, multiple linear regression was used to detect relationships of relative eye and orbit diameter to life history variables. ANOVA was used to determine if eye size differed according to activity pattern. In most of the species, eye diameter at birth measures more than half of that for adults. Two exceptions include Nycticebus and Tarsius, in which more than half of eye diameter growth occurs postnatally. Ratios of neonate/adult eye and orbit diameters indicate prenatal growth of the eye is actually more rapid than that of the orbit. For example, mean neonatal transverse eye diameter is 57.5% of the adult value (excluding Nycticebus and Tarsius, compared to 50.8% for orbital diameter. If Nycticebus is excluded, relative gestation age has a significant positive correlation with relative eye diameter in strepsirrhines, explaining 59% of the variance in relative transverse eye diameter. No significant differences were found among species with different activity patterns. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The primate developmental strategy of relatively long gestations is probably tied to an extended period of neural development, and this principle appears to apply to eye growth as well. Our findings indicate that growth rates of the eye and bony orbit are disassociated, with eyes growing faster prenatally, and the growth rate of the bony orbit exceeding that of the eyes after birth. Some well-documented patterns of orbital morphology in adult primates, such as the enlarged orbits

  5. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RETINAL HEMORRHAGIC PATTERNS AND PERFUSION STATUS IN EYES WITH ACUTE CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral retinal hemorrhagic patterns in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion, and to explore their clinical relevance in differentiating for the retinal perfusion status, through a prospective, and cross-sectional study. Fifty eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion were included. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator and retinal perfusion status were evaluated by ultra-wide field fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Retinal perfusion was categorized as nonischemic in 29 eyes, ischemic in 18 eyes, and undeterminable in 3 eyes. None of the examined eyes had flame-shaped retinal hemorrhages in the periphery. All hemorrhages were rounded-dot or blot and were variable in size. Particle analysis was performed to quantify hemorrhage size, and showed higher values in eyes having larger blot hemorrhages, and lower values in eyes having dot or smaller blot hemorrhages. Mean size of maximum peripheral dot or blot hemorrhage was larger in eyes classified as ischemic (10,763.0 ± 5,946.3 pixels) than as nonischemic (2,839.9 ± 1,153.6 pixels, P retinal perfusion status, which was 0.963 (P retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion using particle analysis. The resulting hemorrhage size measurement was considered to be often useful in determining retinal perfusion status. Because they can be noninvasively evaluated with readily available equipment, peripheral hemorrhagic patterns might be good clinical markers of retinal perfusion.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2011-01-01

    and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  7. Frequent Pattern Mining of Eye-Tracking Records Partitioned into Cognitive Chunks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Matsuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that scenes would be visually scanned by chunking information, we partitioned fixation sequences of web page viewers into chunks using isolate gaze point(s as the delimiter. Fixations were coded in terms of the segments in a 5×5 mesh imposed on the screen. The identified chunks were mostly short, consisting of one or two fixations. These were analyzed with respect to the within- and between-chunk distances in the overall records and the patterns (i.e., subsequences frequently shared among the records. Although the two types of distances were both dominated by zero- and one-block shifts, the primacy of the modal shifts was less prominent between chunks than within them. The lower primacy was compensated by the longer shifts. The patterns frequently extracted at three threshold levels were mostly simple, consisting of one or two chunks. The patterns revealed interesting properties as to segment differentiation and the directionality of the attentional shifts.

  8. Face and eye scanning in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), orangutans (Pongo abelii), and humans (Homo sapiens): unique eye-viewing patterns in humans among hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Fumihiro; Call, Josep; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2012-11-01

    Because the faces and eyes of primates convey a rich array of social information, the way in which primates view faces and eyes reflects species-specific strategies for facial communication. How are humans and closely related species such as great apes similar and different in their viewing patterns for faces and eyes? Following previous studies comparing chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) with humans (Homo sapiens), this study used the eye-tracking method to directly compare the patterns of face and eye scanning by humans, gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), and orangutans (Pongo abelii). Human and ape participants freely viewed pictures of whole bodies and full faces of conspecifics and allospecifics under the same experimental conditions. All species were strikingly similar in that they viewed predominantly faces and eyes. No particular difference was identified between gorillas and orangutans, and they also did not differ from the chimpanzees tested in previous studies. However, humans were somewhat different from apes, especially with respect to prolonged eye viewing. We also examined how species-specific facial morphologies, such as the male flange of orangutans and the black-white contrast of human eyes, affected viewing patterns. Whereas the male flange of orangutans affected viewing patterns, the color contrast of human eyes did not. Humans showed prolonged eye viewing independently of the eye color of presented faces, indicating that this pattern is internally driven rather than stimulus dependent. Overall, the results show general similarities among the species and also identify unique eye-viewing patterns in humans.

  9. Eye movements and visuoverbal descriptions exhibit heterogeneous and dissociated patterns before and after prismatic adaptation in unilateral spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datié, A-M; Paysant, J; Destainville, S; Sagez, A; Beis, J-M; André, J-M

    2006-07-01

    This prospective study examined the effects of prismatic adaptation on visual exploration strategies in patients with left unilateral spatial neglect (USN). Photo-oculographic gaze recordings were obtained, as the subjects (28 brain-damaged; 15 control) performed a free visual exploration task before and after a session of prismatic adaptation. (i) Before prismatic adaptation, the pattern of visual exploration described two subgroups of patients (symmetrical exploration of hemispaces - similar to the control subjects, deficient exploration of left hemispace). Twelve of 20 patients failed to describe significant elements in the left part of the displayed image. Several visuoverbal patterns were observed, some dissociating visual exploration and verbal description. (ii) Immediately after prismatic adaptation, patients with asymmetrical visual exploration presented a significant increase in the number of point fixations and saccades in the left hemispace. Patients with symmetrical exploration presented the opposite pattern. Improved pattern of visual exploration contrasted with an absence of improved verbal description. Eye movements and visuoverbal descriptions exhibit heterogeneous and dissociated patterns before and after prismatic adaptation. This results demonstrate that prismatic adaptation has no effect in certain patients, suggesting that therapeutic indications and evaluation of prismatic test results should take into consideration the heterogeneous nature of USN.

  10. Distal radioulnar joint instability (Galeazzi type injury) after internal fixation in relation to the radius fracture pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korompilias, Anastasios V; Lykissas, Marios G; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis P; Beris, Alexandros E; Soucacos, Panayiotis N

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to classify Galeazzi type injuries and determine the association of residual instability after rigid fixation with the fracture pattern of the shaft of the radius, using a system that is based on anatomic landmarks of the radial shaft. The clinical records of 95 patients (72 men and 23 women) with Galeazzi type injuries requiring open reduction and internal fixation of the fractures were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up was 6.8 years (range, 18 mo to 11 y) after injury. Sixty-nine fractures occurred in the distal third of the radial shaft (type I), 17 fractures were in the middle third (type II), and 9 fractures were in the proximal third of the shaft of the radius (type III). Gross instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) was determined intraoperatively by manipulation after radial fixation as compared to the uninjured side. Forty patients had DRUJ instability after internal fixation and were treated with temporary pinning with a K-wire placed transversely proximal to the sigmoid notch. Distal radioulnar joint instability after internal fixation was recorded in 37 type I fractures, 2 type II fractures, and 1 type III fracture. Distal radioulnar joint instability following radial shaft fracture fixation is significantly higher in patients with type I fractures than in patients with type II or type III fractures. The location of the radius fracture can be sufficiently used for preoperative estimation of percentage chance of potential DRUJ instability after fracture fixation. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring the Eye-Movement Patterns as Chinese Children Read Texts: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minglei; Ko, Hwawei

    2011-01-01

    This study was to investigate Chinese children's eye patterns while reading different text genres from a developmental perspective. Eye movements were recorded while children in the second through sixth grades read two expository texts and two narrative texts. Across passages, overall word frequency was not significantly different between the two…

  12. An eye tracking system for monitoring face scanning patterns reveals the enhancing effect of oxytocin on eye contact in common marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Manato; Shimono, Kohei; Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Nakako, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Kenji; Ogi, Yuji; Konoike, Naho; Nakamura, Katsuki; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2017-09-01

    Eye tracking systems are used to investigate eyes position and gaze patterns presumed as eye contact in humans. Eye contact is a useful biomarker of social communication and known to be deficient in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Interestingly, the same eye tracking systems have been used to directly compare face scanning patterns in some non-human primates to those in human. Thus, eye tracking is expected to be a useful translational technique for investigating not only social attention and visual interest, but also the effects of psychiatric drugs, such as oxytocin, a neuropeptide that regulates social behavior. In this study, we report on a newly established method for eye tracking in common marmosets as unique New World primates that, like humans, use eye contact as a mean of communication. Our investigation was aimed at characterizing these primates face scanning patterns and evaluating the effects of oxytocin on their eye contact behavior. We found that normal common marmosets spend more time viewing the eyes region in common marmoset's picture than the mouth region or a scrambled picture. In oxytocin experiment, the change in eyes/face ratio was significantly greater in the oxytocin group than in the vehicle group. Moreover, oxytocin-induced increase in the change in eyes/face ratio was completely blocked by the oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899. These results indicate that eye tracking in common marmosets may be useful for evaluating drug candidates targeting psychiatric conditions, especially ASDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Macular sensitivity and fixation patterns in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    of fixation stability and fixation location. RESULTS: The average (± standard deviation) sensitivity was significantly reduced in ADOA patients compared with controls, 14.9 (± 4.4) dB versus 19.7 (± 0.4) dB (p projection, the largest relative sensitivity deficits in ADOA were seen...

  14. Macular sensitivity and fixation patterns in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to test macular sensitivity, fixation stability and fixation location using microperimetry in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and mutation-free relatives. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 43 patients...

  15. Comparison of eye movements over faces in photographic positives and negatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Saul M; Strauss, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Eye movements were recorded while subjects viewed ordinary portraits and photographic negatives of those portraits. Under both conditions they first studied sixteen portraits and then tried to decide which of forty-eight portraits they had just seen. They made more errors of recognition while viewing negatives, and their fixation patterns were significantly altered: there was a decrease in the percentage of fixations directed to the eyes, nose, and mouth, and an increase for such details as the ears, cheeks, chin, cap, and necktie. There was also a decrease in the ratio of fixations to the most fixated detail compared to the least fixated detail.

  16. CUE: counterfeit-resistant usable eye movement-based authentication via oculomotor plant characteristics and complex eye movement patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komogortsev, Oleg V.; Karpov, Alexey; Holland, Corey D.

    2012-06-01

    The widespread use of computers throughout modern society introduces the necessity for usable and counterfeit-resistant authentication methods to ensure secure access to personal resources such as bank accounts, e-mail, and social media. Current authentication methods require tedious memorization of lengthy pass phrases, are often prone to shouldersurfing, and may be easily replicated (either by counterfeiting parts of the human body or by guessing an authentication token based on readily available information). This paper describes preliminary work toward a counterfeit-resistant usable eye movement-based (CUE) authentication method. CUE does not require any passwords (improving the memorability aspect of the authentication system), and aims to provide high resistance to spoofing and shoulder-surfing by employing the combined biometric capabilities of two behavioral biometric traits: 1) oculomotor plant characteristics (OPC) which represent the internal, non-visible, anatomical structure of the eye; 2) complex eye movement patterns (CEM) which represent the strategies employed by the brain to guide visual attention. Both OPC and CEM are extracted from the eye movement signal provided by an eye tracking system. Preliminary results indicate that the fusion of OPC and CEM traits is capable of providing a 30% reduction in authentication error when compared to the authentication accuracy of individual traits.

  17. Pattern of pediatric eye injuries in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, Mehdi; Rahmanikhah, Elham; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2013-06-01

    Childhood ocular trauma is a preventable cause of visual impairment and blindness worldwide. This prospective study was conducted to explore the profile of eye injuries in pediatric patients referring to a tertiary eye center in Tehran, Iran. Six hundred consecutive pediatric patients aged 17 or less who presented to emergency department of Farabi Hospital were enrolled. Age and sex of pediatric patients, time of trauma, time between trauma and presentation, place of injury, etiology of eye injury, visual acuity, and type of injury based on Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology were collected. Mean (±SD) age of cases was 7.9 ± 4.8. Male to female ratio was 2.3:1. More than 70 % of the patients presented less than 12 h after ocular trauma. Most injuries occurred at home (57.7 %) followed by street (20.3 %). Twelve patients had visual acuity lower than 0.1 at initial visit. Projectile trauma was the most common cause (35.8 %) followed by blunt trauma (33.3 %). 86.3 % of traumatic events consisted in closed globe injuries. Parents should be involved more effectively in care and supervision of their children especially for boys, at home and on holidays.

  18. Eye Gaze Patterns in Conversations: There is More to Conversational Agents Than Meets the Eyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vertegaal, R.P.H.; Slagter, R.; Veer, van der G.C.; Nijholt, A.; Jacko, J.; Sears, A.; Beaudouin-Lafon, M.; Jacob, R.J.K.

    2001-01-01

    In multi-agent, multi-user environments, users as well as agents should have a means of establishing who is talking to whom. In this paper, we present an experiment aimed at evaluating whether gaze directional cues of users could be used for this purpose. Using an eye tracker, we measured subject ga

  19. Hidden Markov model analysis reveals the advantage of analytic eye movement patterns in face recognition across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Tim; Crookes, Kate; Hayward, William G; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2017-12-01

    It remains controversial whether culture modulates eye movement behavior in face recognition. Inconsistent results have been reported regarding whether cultural differences in eye movement patterns exist, whether these differences affect recognition performance, and whether participants use similar eye movement patterns when viewing faces from different ethnicities. These inconsistencies may be due to substantial individual differences in eye movement patterns within a cultural group. Here we addressed this issue by conducting individual-level eye movement data analysis using hidden Markov models (HMMs). Each individual's eye movements were modeled with an HMM. We clustered the individual HMMs according to their similarities and discovered three common patterns in both Asian and Caucasian participants: holistic (looking mostly at the face center), left-eye-biased analytic (looking mostly at the two individual eyes in addition to the face center with a slight bias to the left eye), and right-eye-based analytic (looking mostly at the right eye in addition to the face center). The frequency of participants adopting the three patterns did not differ significantly between Asians and Caucasians, suggesting little modulation from culture. Significantly more participants (75%) showed similar eye movement patterns when viewing own- and other-race faces than different patterns. Most importantly, participants with left-eye-biased analytic patterns performed significantly better than those using either holistic or right-eye-biased analytic patterns. These results suggest that active retrieval of facial feature information through an analytic eye movement pattern may be optimal for face recognition regardless of culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding controls of diel patterns of biological CO2 fixation in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Helmuth; Craig, Susanne E.; Greenan, Blair W.; Burt, William; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Higginson, Simon; Salt, Lesley; Shadwick, Elizabeth H.; Urrego-Blanco, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Much of the variability in the surface ocean's carbon cycle can be attributed to the availability of sunlight, through processes such as surface heat flux and photosynthesis, which regulate carbon flux over a wide range of time scales. The critical processes occurring on timescales of a day or less, however, have undergone few investigations, and most of these have been limited time spans of several days to months. Optical methods have helped to infer short-term biological variability, but corresponding investigations of the oceanic CO2 system are lacking. We employ high-frequency CO2 and optical observations covering the full seasonal cycle on the Scotian Shelf, Northwestern Atlantic Ocean, in order to unravel diel periodicity of the surface ocean carbon cycle and its effects on annual budgets. Significant diel periodicity ion the surface CO2 system occurs only if the water column is sufficiently stable as observed during seasonal warming. During that time biological CO2 drawdown, or net community production (NCP), are delayed for several hours relative to the onset of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), due to diel cycles in Chlorophyll a concentration and to grazing. In summer, NCP decreases by more than 90%, coinciding with the seasonal minimum of the mixed layer depth and resulting in the disappearance of the diel CO2 periodicity in the surface waters. Ongoing work focuses on the transfer of these patterns to the individual -ideally remotely detectable- biological species, responsible for the CO2 fixation at the seasonal scale in order to predict vulnerability of the system due to climate change.

  1. A Clinic-based Survey of Clinical Characteristics and Practice Pattern of Dry Eye in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Yamada, Masakazu; Suwaki, Kazuhisa; Shigeyasu, Chika; Uchino, Miki; Hiratsuka, Yoshimune; Yokoi, Norihiko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and practice pattern of patients with dry eye disease (DED) in eye clinics across Japan. A multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with DED who visited eye clinics in Japan. Subjective symptoms, patient's background, ocular surface features, and tear function were evaluated. Main outcome measures were tear break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer I value, kerato-conjunctival staining score, and dry eye symptom questionnaire score. Initially, 463 subjects were enrolled, and 449 cases (63 male and 386 female; mean age, 62.6 ± 15.7 years) were included in the final analysis. Overall, 94.9% of patients had a shortened TBUT (≤5 s), and 54.6% had an aqueous tear deficiency (Schirmer I value ≤5 mm). The most prevalent subtype of dry eye was aqueous-deficient dry eye, which was present in 35.0% of all patients, followed by short-BUT-type dry eye, which was seen in 26.7%. The two most common DED subtypes were aqueous-deficient and short-BUT-type dry eye. Shortened TBUT is the most common feature of dry eye, regardless of subtype. The current treatment choice mainly consisted of hyaluronic acid, two novel mucin secretagogues, diquafosol and rebamipide, and steroidal eye drops. University Hospital Medical Information Network: UMIN (registries no. UMIN 000015890). Japan Dry Eye Society, Tokyo, Japan, and Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan.

  2. Temporal and spatial expression pattern of Nnat during mouse eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Saadettin; Patzel, Eva; Poggi, Lucia; Kaiser, Delia; Kalinski, Thomas; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Nass, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Neuronatin (Nnat) was initially identified as a highly expressed gene in neonatal mammalian brain. In this study, we analyze the spatial and temporal expression pattern of Nnat during mouse eye development as well as in the adult. The expression of Nnat was analyzed on mRNA as well as protein level. The presence of Nnat transcripts in the adult retina was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nnat protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry during eye development at embryonic day (E) 12, 15, 16 and postnatal day (P) 7, 14, 30 and 175 (adult). Immunohistochemical studies of the developing mouse eye revealed Nnat expression in embryonic and adult neuroretina as well as in corneal epithelial, stromal, endothelial cells and in lens epithelium. Expression of Nnat was detected from E12 onwards and was also present in adult eyes. The expression pattern suggests that Nnat may play an important role during eye development and in the maintenance of mature eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Plasma temperature of white-eye hexagonal pattern in dielectric barrier discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Li-fang; Fu, Hong-yan

    2015-01-01

    By using the water-electrode discharge experimental setup, the white-eye hexagonal pattern is firstly observed and investigated in the dielectric barrier discharge with the mixture of argon and air whose content can be varied whenever necessary, and the study shows that the white-eye cell is an interleaving of three different hexagonal sub-structures: the spot, the ring, and the halo. The white-eye hexagonal pattern has the excellent discharge stability and sustainability during the experiment. Pictures recorded by ordinary camera with long exposure time in the same argon content condition show that the spot, the ring, and the halo of the white-eye hexagonal pattern have different brightness, which may prove that their plasma states are different. And, it is worth noting that there are obvious differences not only on the brightness but also on the color of the white-eye cell in conditions of different argon content, which shows that its plasma state also changed with the variation of the argon content. The white-eye hexagonal pattern is observed at a lower applied voltage so that the temperature of the water electrodes almost keeps unchanged during the whole experiment, which is advantageous for the long term stable measurement. The plasma state will not be affected by the temperature of the electrodes during the continuous discharge. Based on the above phenomena, plasma temperatures of the spot, the ring, and the halo in white-eye hexagonal pattern including molecule vibrational temperature and variations of electron density at different argon content are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The emission spectra of the N2 second positive band(C3Πu-->B3Πg)are measured, and the molecule vibrational temperature of the spot, the ring, and the halo of the white-eye hexagonal pattern are calculated by the emission intensities. Furthermore, emission spectra of Ar I (2P2-->1S5)is collected and the changes of its width with different argon

  4. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation proceeds normally following disruption of patterned spontaneous retinal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Colenso M; Sun, Chao; Liets, Lauren C; Stafford, Ben K; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2014-11-07

    Spontaneous retinal activity (SRA) is important during eye-specific segregation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), but the feature(s) of activity critical for retinogeniculate refinement are controversial. Pharmacologically or genetically manipulating cholinergic signaling during SRA perturbs correlated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spiking and disrupts eye-specific retinofugal refinement in vivo, consistent with an instructive role for SRA during visual system development. Paradoxically, ablating the starburst amacrine cells (SACs) that generate cholinergic spontaneous activity disrupts correlated RGC firing without impacting retinal activity levels or eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. Such experiments suggest that patterned SRA during retinal waves is not critical for eye-specific refinement and instead, normal activity levels are permissive for retinogeniculate development. Here we revisit the effects of ablating the cholinergic network during eye-specific segregation and show that SAC ablation disrupts, but does not eliminate, retinal waves with no concomitant impact on normal eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. We induced SAC ablation in postnatal ferret pups beginning at birth by intraocular injection of a novel immunotoxin selective for the ferret vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Ferret VAChT-Sap). Through dual-patch whole-cell and multi-electrode array recording we found that SAC ablation altered SRA patterns and led to significantly smaller retinal waves compared with controls. Despite these defects, eye-specific segregation was normal. Further, interocular competition for target territory in the dLGN proceeded in cases where SAC ablation was asymmetric in the two eyes. Our data demonstrate normal eye-specific retinogeniculate development despite significant abnormalities in patterned SRA. Comparing our current results with earlier studies suggests that defects in retinal wave size, absolute levels of SRA, correlations between RGC

  5. Longitudinal strain bull's eye plot patterns in patients with cardiomyopathy and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Weidemann, Frank

    2016-05-10

    Despite substantial advances in the imaging techniques and pathophysiological understanding over the last decades, identification of the underlying causes of left ventricular hypertrophy by means of echocardiographic examination remains a challenge in current clinical practice. The longitudinal strain bull's eye plot derived from 2D speckle tracking imaging offers an intuitive visual overview of the global and regional left ventricular myocardial function in a single diagram. The bull's eye mapping is clinically feasible and the plot patterns could provide clues to the etiology of cardiomyopathies. The present review summarizes the longitudinal strain, bull's eye plot features in patients with various cardiomyopathies and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and the bull's eye plot features might serve as one of the cardiac workup steps on evaluating patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.

  6. Detection of differential viewing patterns to erotic and non-erotic stimuli using eye-tracking methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykins, Amy D; Meana, Marta; Kambe, Gretchen

    2006-10-01

    As a first step in the investigation of the role of visual attention in the processing of erotic stimuli, eye-tracking methodology was employed to measure eye movements during erotic scene presentation. Because eye-tracking is a novel methodology in sexuality research, we attempted to determine whether the eye-tracker could detect differences (should they exist) in visual attention to erotic and non-erotic scenes. A total of 20 men and 20 women were presented with a series of erotic and non-erotic images and tracked their eye movements during image presentation. Comparisons between erotic and non-erotic image groups showed significant differences on two of three dependent measures of visual attention (number of fixations and total time) in both men and women. As hypothesized, there was a significant Stimulus x Scene Region interaction, indicating that participants visually attended to the body more in the erotic stimuli than in the non-erotic stimuli, as evidenced by a greater number of fixations and longer total time devoted to that region. These findings provide support for the application of eye-tracking methodology as a measure of visual attentional capture in sexuality research. Future applications of this methodology to expand our knowledge of the role of cognition in sexuality are suggested.

  7. Eye-Movement Patterns of Readers with Down Syndrome during Sentence-Processing: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenck-Mestre, Cheryl; Zardan, Nathalie; Colas, Annie; Ghio, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Eye movements were examined to determine how readers with Down syndrome process sentences online. Participants were 9 individuals with Down syndrome ranging in reading level from Grades 1 to 3 and a reading-level-matched control group. For syntactically simple sentences, the pattern of reading times was similar for the two groups, with longer…

  8. Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Tropical Forests: Ecosystem-Level Patterns and Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Cusack, Daniela F.; Silver, Whendee; McDowell, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Humid tropical forests are often characterized by large nitrogen (N) pools, and are known to have large potential N losses. Although rarely measured, tropical forests likely maintain considerable biological N fixation (BNF) to balance N losses. We estimated inputs of N via BNF by free-living microbes for two tropical forests in Puerto Rico, and assessed the response to increased N availability using an on-going N fertilization experiment. Nitrogenase activity was measured across forest strata...

  9. Modulations of eye movement patterns by spatial filtering during the learning and testing phases of an old/new face recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Chantal L; Collin, Charles A; Nelson, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    In two experiments, we examined the effects of varying the spatial frequency (SF) content of face images on eye movements during the learning and testing phases of an old/new recognition task. At both learning and testing, participants were presented with face stimuli band-pass filtered to 11 different SF bands, as well as an unfiltered baseline condition. We found that eye movements varied significantly as a function of SF. Specifically, the frequency of transitions between facial features showed a band-pass pattern, with more transitions for middle-band faces (≈5-20 cycles/face) than for low-band (≈20 cpf) ones. These findings were similar for the learning and testing phases. The distributions of transitions across facial features were similar for the middle-band, high-band, and unfiltered faces, showing a concentration on the eyes and mouth; conversely, low-band faces elicited mostly transitions involving the nose and nasion. The eye movement patterns elicited by low, middle, and high bands are similar to those previous researchers have suggested reflect holistic, configural, and featural processing, respectively. More generally, our results are compatible with the hypotheses that eye movements are functional, and that the visual system makes flexible use of visuospatial information in face processing. Finally, our finding that only middle spatial frequencies yielded the same number and distribution of fixations as unfiltered faces adds more evidence to the idea that these frequencies are especially important for face recognition, and reveals a possible mediator for the superior performance that they elicit.

  10. Comparison of eye-movement patterns in schizophrenic and normal adults during examination of facial affect displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Shimizu, A; Yamashita, K; Iwase, M; Kajimoto, O; Kawasaki, T

    2000-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia are known to have deficits in facial affect recognition. Subjects were 25 schizophrenic patients and 25 normal subjects who were shown pairs of slides of laughing faces and asked to compare the intensity of laughter in the two slides. Eye movements were recorded using an infrared scleral reflection technique. Normal subjects efficiently compared the same facial features in the two slides, examining the eyes and mouth, important areas for recognizing laughter, for a longer time than other regions of the face. Schizophrenic patients spent less time ex amining the eyes and mouth and often examined other regions of the face or areas other than the face. Similar results were obtained for the number of fixation points. That schizophrenic patients may have employed an inefficient strategy with few effective eye movements in facial comparison and recognition may help to explain the deficits in facial recognition observed in schizophrenic patients.

  11. Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Menge, Duncan N.L.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    New techniques have identified a wide range of organisms with the capacity to carry out biological nitrogen fixation (BNF)—greatly expanding our appreciation of the diversity and ubiquity of N fixers—but our understanding of the rates and controls of BNF at ecosystem and global scales has not advanced at the same pace. Nevertheless, determining rates and controls of BNF is crucial to placing anthropogenic changes to the N cycle in context, and to understanding, predicting and managing many aspects of global environmental change. Here, we estimate terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information on N fluxes with 15N relative abundance data for terrestrial ecosystems. Our estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58 (range of 40–100) Tg N fixed yr−1; adding conservative assumptions for geological N reduces our best estimate to 44 Tg N yr−1. This approach yields substantially lower estimates than most recent calculations; it suggests that the magnitude of human alternation of the N cycle is substantially larger than has been assumed.

  12. Eye movement monitoring of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer D; Riggs, Lily; McQuiggan, Douglas A; McQuiggan, Doug

    2010-08-15

    Explicit (often verbal) reports are typically used to investigate memory (e.g. "Tell me what you remember about the person you saw at the bank yesterday."), however such reports can often be unreliable or sensitive to response bias, and may be unobtainable in some participant populations. Furthermore, explicit reports only reveal when information has reached consciousness and cannot comment on when memories were accessed during processing, regardless of whether the information is subsequently accessed in a conscious manner. Eye movement monitoring (eye tracking) provides a tool by which memory can be probed without asking participants to comment on the contents of their memories, and access of such memories can be revealed on-line. Video-based eye trackers (either head-mounted or remote) use a system of cameras and infrared markers to examine the pupil and corneal reflection in each eye as the participant views a display monitor. For head-mounted eye trackers, infrared markers are also used to determine head position to allow for head movement and more precise localization of eye position. Here, we demonstrate the use of a head-mounted eye tracking system to investigate memory performance in neurologically-intact and neurologically-impaired adults. Eye movement monitoring procedures begin with the placement of the eye tracker on the participant, and setup of the head and eye cameras. Calibration and validation procedures are conducted to ensure accuracy of eye position recording. Real-time recordings of X,Y-coordinate positions on the display monitor are then converted and used to describe periods of time in which the eye is static (i.e. fixations) versus in motion (i.e., saccades). Fixations and saccades are time-locked with respect to the onset/offset of a visual display or another external event (e.g. button press). Experimental manipulations are constructed to examine how and when patterns of fixations and saccades are altered through different types of prior

  13. Projections of Biofuel Growth Patterns Reveal the Potential Importance of Nitrogen Fixation for Miscanthus Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. C.; Parton, W. J.; Dohleman, F. G.; Gottel, N. R.; Smith, C. M.; Kent, A. D.; Delucia, E. H.

    2008-12-01

    Demand for liquid biofuels is increasing because of the disparity between fuel demand and supply. Relative to grain crops, the more intensive harvest required for second generation liquid biofuel production leads to the removal of significantly more carbon and nitrogen from the soil. These elements are conventionally litter products of crops that are returned to the soil and can accumulate over time. This loss of organic matter represents a management challenge because the energy cost associated with fertilizers or external sources of organic matter reduce the net energy value of the biofuel crops. Plants that have exceptional strategies for exploiting nutrients may be the most viable options for sustainable biofuel yields because of low management and energy cost. Miscanthus x giganteus has high N retranslocation rates, maintains high photosynthetic rates over a large temperature range, exploits a longer-than-average growing season, and yields at least twice the biomass of other candidate biofuel grass crops (i.e. switchgrass). We employed the DAYCENT model to project potential productivity of Miscanthus, corn, switchgrass, and mixed prairie communities based on our current knowledge of these species. Ecosystem process descriptions that have been validated for many crop species did not accurately predict Miscanthus yields and lead to new hypotheses about unknown N cycling mechanisms for this species. We tested the hypothesis that Miscanthus hosts N-fixing bacteria in several ways. First, we used enrichment culture and molecular methods to detect N-fixing bacteria in Miscanthus. Then, we demonstrated the plant-growth promoting effect of diazotrophs isolated from Miscanthus rhizomes on a model grass. And finally, we applied 15N2 to the soil and rooting zone of field grown Miscanthus plants to determine if atmospheric N2 was incorporated into plant tissue, a process that requires N-fixation. These experiments are the first tests of N-fixation in Miscanthus x

  14. Eye-Tracking Reveals that the Strength of the Vertical-Horizontal Illusion Increases as the Retinal Image Becomes More Stable with Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Philippe A.; Peel, Hayden J.; Landry, Oriane

    2017-01-01

    The closer a line extends toward a surrounding frame, the longer it appears. This is known as a framing effect. Over 70 years ago, Teodor Künnapas demonstrated that the shape of the visual field itself can act as a frame to influence the perceived length of lines in the vertical-horizontal illusion. This illusion is typically created by having a vertical line rise from the center of a horizontal line of the same length creating an inverted T figure. We aimed to determine if the degree to which one fixates on a spatial location where the two lines bisect could influence the strength of the illusion, assuming that the framing effect would be stronger when the retinal image is more stable. We performed two experiments: the visual-field and vertical-horizontal illusion experiments. The visual-field experiment demonstrated that the participants could discriminate a target more easily when it was presented along the horizontal vs. vertical meridian, confirming a framing influence on visual perception. The vertical-horizontal illusion experiment determined the effects of orientation, size and eye gaze on the strength of the illusion. As predicted, the illusion was strongest when the stimulus was presented in either its standard inverted T orientation or when it was rotated 180° compared to other orientations, and in conditions in which the retinal image was more stable, as indexed by eye tracking. Taken together, we conclude that the results provide support for Teodor Künnapas’ explanation of the vertical-horizontal illusion.

  15. Eye-Tracking Reveals that the Strength of the Vertical-Horizontal Illusion Increases as the Retinal Image Becomes More Stable with Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Philippe A; Peel, Hayden J; Landry, Oriane

    2017-01-01

    The closer a line extends toward a surrounding frame, the longer it appears. This is known as a framing effect. Over 70 years ago, Teodor Künnapas demonstrated that the shape of the visual field itself can act as a frame to influence the perceived length of lines in the vertical-horizontal illusion. This illusion is typically created by having a vertical line rise from the center of a horizontal line of the same length creating an inverted T figure. We aimed to determine if the degree to which one fixates on a spatial location where the two lines bisect could influence the strength of the illusion, assuming that the framing effect would be stronger when the retinal image is more stable. We performed two experiments: the visual-field and vertical-horizontal illusion experiments. The visual-field experiment demonstrated that the participants could discriminate a target more easily when it was presented along the horizontal vs. vertical meridian, confirming a framing influence on visual perception. The vertical-horizontal illusion experiment determined the effects of orientation, size and eye gaze on the strength of the illusion. As predicted, the illusion was strongest when the stimulus was presented in either its standard inverted T orientation or when it was rotated 180° compared to other orientations, and in conditions in which the retinal image was more stable, as indexed by eye tracking. Taken together, we conclude that the results provide support for Teodor Künnapas' explanation of the vertical-horizontal illusion.

  16. Photonic Crystals with an Eye Pattern Similar to Peacock Tail Feathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A facile fabrication of photonic crystals (PCs with an eye pattern similar to peacock tail feathers has been demonstrated by self-assembly of colloidal particles in a sandwich mode. The sandwich mode is formed by superhydrophilic flat substrate sandwiching the poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-arylic acid (Poly(St-MMA-AA latex suspension (2 wt% by the hydrophobic one. The patterns are characterized by optical microscopy images, reflection spectra, and the relative scanning electronic microscope images. This work will provide beneficial help for the understanding of the self-assembly process of colloidal crystals.

  17. Is having similar eye movement patterns during face learning and recognition beneficial for recognition performance? Evidence from hidden Markov modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Tim; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2017-05-04

    The hidden Markov model (HMM)-based approach for eye movement analysis is able to reflect individual differences in both spatial and temporal aspects of eye movements. Here we used this approach to understand the relationship between eye movements during face learning and recognition, and its association with recognition performance. We discovered holistic (i.e., mainly looking at the face center) and analytic (i.e., specifically looking at the two eyes in addition to the face center) patterns during both learning and recognition. Although for both learning and recognition, participants who adopted analytic patterns had better recognition performance than those with holistic patterns, a significant positive correlation between the likelihood of participants' patterns being classified as analytic and their recognition performance was only observed during recognition. Significantly more participants adopted holistic patterns during learning than recognition. Interestingly, about 40% of the participants used different patterns between learning and recognition, and among them 90% switched their patterns from holistic at learning to analytic at recognition. In contrast to the scan path theory, which posits that eye movements during learning have to be recapitulated during recognition for the recognition to be successful, participants who used the same or different patterns during learning and recognition did not differ in recognition performance. The similarity between their learning and recognition eye movement patterns also did not correlate with their recognition performance. These findings suggested that perceptuomotor memory elicited by eye movement patterns during learning does not play an important role in recognition. In contrast, the retrieval of diagnostic information for recognition, such as the eyes for face recognition, is a better predictor for recognition performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential gaze patterns on eyes and mouth during audiovisual speech segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laina G. Lusk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Speech is inextricably multisensory: both auditory and visual components provide critical information for all aspects of speech processing, including speech segmentation, the visual components of which have been the target of a growing number of studies. In particular, a recent study (Mitchel & Weiss, 2014 established that adults can utilize facial cues (i.e. visual prosody to identify word boundaries in fluent speech. The current study expanded upon these results, using an eye tracker to identify highly attended facial features of the audiovisual display used in Mitchel and Weiss (2014. Subjects spent the most time watching the eyes and mouth. A significant trend in gaze durations was found with the longest gaze duration on the mouth, followed by the eyes and then the nose. In addition, eye-gaze patterns changed across familiarization as subjects learned the word boundaries, showing decreased attention to the mouth in later blocks while attention on other facial features remained consistent. These findings highlight the importance of the visual component of speech processing and suggest that the mouth may play a critical role in visual speech segmentation.

  19. Differential Gaze Patterns on Eyes and Mouth During Audiovisual Speech Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Laina G; Mitchel, Aaron D

    2016-01-01

    Speech is inextricably multisensory: both auditory and visual components provide critical information for all aspects of speech processing, including speech segmentation, the visual components of which have been the target of a growing number of studies. In particular, a recent study (Mitchel and Weiss, 2014) established that adults can utilize facial cues (i.e., visual prosody) to identify word boundaries in fluent speech. The current study expanded upon these results, using an eye tracker to identify highly attended facial features of the audiovisual display used in Mitchel and Weiss (2014). Subjects spent the most time watching the eyes and mouth. A significant trend in gaze durations was found with the longest gaze duration on the mouth, followed by the eyes and then the nose. In addition, eye-gaze patterns changed across familiarization as subjects learned the word boundaries, showing decreased attention to the mouth in later blocks while attention on other facial features remained consistent. These findings highlight the importance of the visual component of speech processing and suggest that the mouth may play a critical role in visual speech segmentation.

  20. Processing rhythmic pattern during Chinese sentence reading: An eye movement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingyi eLuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosodic constraints play a fundamental role during both spoken sentence comprehension and silent reading. In Chinese, the rhythmic pattern of the verb-object (V-O combination has been found to rapidly affect the semantic access/integration process during sentence reading (Luo and Zhou, 2010. Rhythmic pattern refers to the combination of words with different syllabic lengths, with certain combinations disallowed (e.g., [2+1]; numbers standing for the number of syllables of the verb and the noun respectively and certain combinations preferred (e.g., [1+1] or [2+2]. This constraint extends to the situation in which the combination is used to modify other words. A V-O phrase could modify a noun by simply preceding it, forming a V-O-N compound; when the verb is disyllabic, however, the word order has to be O-V-N and the object is preferred to be disyllabic. In this study, we investigated how the reader processes the rhythmic pattern and word order information by recording the reader’s eye-movements. We created four types of sentences by crossing rhythmic pattern and word order in compounding. The compound, embedding a disyllabic verb, could be in the correct O-V-N or the incorrect V-O-N order; the object could be disyllabic or monosyllabic. We found that the reader spent more time and made more regressions on and after the compounds when either type of anomaly was detected during the first pass reading. However, during re-reading (after all the words in the sentence have been viewed, less regressive eye movements were found for the anomalous rhythmic pattern, relative to the correct pattern; moreover, only the abnormal rhythmic pattern, not the violated word order, influenced the regressive eye movements. These results suggest that while the processing of rhythmic pattern and word order information occurs rapidly during the initial reading of the sentence, the process of recovering from the rhythmic pattern anomaly may ease the reanalysis

  1. Investigating eye movement patterns, language, and social ability in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Steven D; Linnell, Karina J; Heaton, Pamela

    2014-05-01

    Although all intellectually high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) display core social and communication deficits, some develop language within a normative timescale and others experience significant delays and subsequent language impairment. Early attention to social stimuli plays an important role in the emergence of language, and reduced attention to faces has been documented in infants later diagnosed with ASD. We investigated the extent to which patterns of attention to social stimuli would differentiate early and late language onset groups. Children with ASD (mean age = 10 years) differing on language onset timing (late/normal) and a typically developing comparison group completed a task in which visual attention to interacting and noninteracting human figures was mapped using eye tracking. Correlations on visual attention data and results from tests measuring current social and language ability were conducted. Patterns of visual attention did not distinguish typically developing children and ASD children with normal language onset. Children with ASD and late language onset showed significantly reduced attention to salient social stimuli. Associations between current language ability and social attention were observed. Delay in language onset is associated with current language skills as well as with specific eye-tracking patterns.

  2. Dynamic Eye Tracking Based Metrics for Infant Gaze Patterns in the Face-Distractor Competition Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtola, Eero; Stjerna, Susanna; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Nelson, Charles A.; Leppänen, Jukka M.; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop new standardized eye tracking based measures and metrics for infants’ gaze dynamics in the face-distractor competition paradigm. Method Eye tracking data were collected from two samples of healthy 7-month-old (total n = 45), as well as one sample of 5-month-old infants (n = 22) in a paradigm with a picture of a face or a non-face pattern as a central stimulus, and a geometric shape as a lateral stimulus. The data were analyzed by using conventional measures of infants’ initial disengagement from the central to the lateral stimulus (i.e., saccadic reaction time and probability) and, additionally, novel measures reflecting infants gaze dynamics after the initial disengagement (i.e., cumulative allocation of attention to the central vs. peripheral stimulus). Results The results showed that the initial saccade away from the centrally presented stimulus is followed by a rapid re-engagement of attention with the central stimulus, leading to cumulative preference for the central stimulus over the lateral stimulus over time. This pattern tended to be stronger for salient facial expressions as compared to non-face patterns, was replicable across two independent samples of 7-month-old infants, and differentiated between 7 and 5 month-old infants. Conclusion The results suggest that eye tracking based assessments of infants’ cumulative preference for faces over time can be readily parameterized and standardized, and may provide valuable techniques for future studies examining normative developmental changes in preference for social signals. Significance Standardized measures of early developing face preferences may have potential to become surrogate biomarkers of neurocognitive and social development. PMID:24845102

  3. Dynamic eye tracking based metrics for infant gaze patterns in the face-distractor competition paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Ahtola

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop new standardized eye tracking based measures and metrics for infants' gaze dynamics in the face-distractor competition paradigm. METHOD: Eye tracking data were collected from two samples of healthy 7-month-old (total n = 45, as well as one sample of 5-month-old infants (n = 22 in a paradigm with a picture of a face or a non-face pattern as a central stimulus, and a geometric shape as a lateral stimulus. The data were analyzed by using conventional measures of infants' initial disengagement from the central to the lateral stimulus (i.e., saccadic reaction time and probability and, additionally, novel measures reflecting infants gaze dynamics after the initial disengagement (i.e., cumulative allocation of attention to the central vs. peripheral stimulus. RESULTS: The results showed that the initial saccade away from the centrally presented stimulus is followed by a rapid re-engagement of attention with the central stimulus, leading to cumulative preference for the central stimulus over the lateral stimulus over time. This pattern tended to be stronger for salient facial expressions as compared to non-face patterns, was replicable across two independent samples of 7-month-old infants, and differentiated between 7 and 5 month-old infants. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that eye tracking based assessments of infants' cumulative preference for faces over time can be readily parameterized and standardized, and may provide valuable techniques for future studies examining normative developmental changes in preference for social signals. SIGNIFICANCE: Standardized measures of early developing face preferences may have potential to become surrogate biomarkers of neurocognitive and social development.

  4. Productivity patterns and N-fixation associated with Pliocene-Holocene sapropels: paleoceanographic and paleoecological significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gallego-Torres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sapropels are organic matter enriched sediments cyclically deposited in the Eastern Mediterranean. We have studied a suite of 35 sapropel sequences from a transect of four ODP sites across the basin to explore for paleoproductivity patterns and their relationship to ecological changes in the region during their deposition. We assessed paleoproductivity variations using TOC and Babio mass accumulation rates and δ15Ntotal and δ13Corg values. Elevated Ba/Al and TOC mass accumulation rates record periods of basin-wide amplified productivity. δ15N values are dramatically lower in the sapropels than in TOC-poor background sediments indicating a major contribution from nitrogen-fixing bacteria to the higher productivity during sapropel deposition. Different degrees of denitrification occurred as a function of water column oxygen depletion. The evolution of sapropel deposition over the past 3 My is characterized by increased productivity together with enhanced preservation of organic matter during the late Pliocene, peaks in primary and export production and sedimentation rates during the middle Pleistocene, and a relatively weak increase in productivity during formation of the Holocene sapropel accompanied by high sedimentation rates. We conclude that sapropels were formed by cyclic increases in primary production of marine organic matter largely sustained by N-fixing bacteria that led to depletion of deepwater dissolved oxygen and consequently improved organic matter preservation. The increase in primary production was helped by nutrient input from continental sources climatically induced.

  5. The relationship between the lizard eye and associated bony features: a cautionary note for interpreting fossil activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Margaret I

    2009-06-01

    Activity pattern, the time of day when an animal is active, is associated with ecology. There are two major activity patterns: diurnal (awake during the day in a photopic environment) and nocturnal (awake at night in a scotopic environment). Lizards exhibit characteristic eye shapes associated with activity pattern, with scotopic-adapted lizard eyes optimized for visual sensitivity with large corneal diameters relative to their eye axial lengths, and photopic-adapted lizards optimized for visual acuity, with larger axial lengths of the eye relative to their corneal diameters. This study: (1) quantifies the relationship between the lizard eye and its associated bony anatomy (the orbit, sclerotic ring, and associated skull widths); (2) investigates how activity pattern is reflected in that bony anatomy; and (3) determines if it is possible to reliably interpret activity pattern for a lizard that does not have the soft tissue available for study, specifically, for a fossil. Knowledge of extinct lizards' activity patterns would be useful in making paleoecological interpretations. Here, 96 scotopic- and photopic-adapted lizard species are analyzed in a phylogenetic context. Although there is a close relationship between the lepidosaur eye and associated bony anatomy, based on these data activity pattern cannot be reliably interpreted for bony-only specimens, such as a fossil, possibly because of the limited ossification of the lepidosaur skull. Caution should be exercised when utilizing lizard bony anatomy to interpret light-level adaptation, either for a fossil lizard or as part of an extant phylogenetic bracket to interpret other extinct animals with sclerotic rings, such as dinosaurs.

  6. Understanding eye movements in face recognition using hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Tim; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2014-09-16

    We use a hidden Markov model (HMM) based approach to analyze eye movement data in face recognition. HMMs are statistical models that are specialized in handling time-series data. We conducted a face recognition task with Asian participants, and model each participant's eye movement pattern with an HMM, which summarized the participant's scan paths in face recognition with both regions of interest and the transition probabilities among them. By clustering these HMMs, we showed that participants' eye movements could be categorized into holistic or analytic patterns, demonstrating significant individual differences even within the same culture. Participants with the analytic pattern had longer response times, but did not differ significantly in recognition accuracy from those with the holistic pattern. We also found that correct and wrong recognitions were associated with distinctive eye movement patterns; the difference between the two patterns lies in the transitions rather than locations of the fixations alone.

  7. Nutrient composition of culture media induces different patterns of CO2 fixation from biogas and biomass production by the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus U169.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; Polster, Elena; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2017-08-11

    Microalgae are considered as a promising biotechnological strategy to capture CO2 from biogas, producing biomass with valuable energetic compounds. This study has evaluated the biotechnological potential to fix CO2 from biogas and biomass production by Scenedesmus obliquus cultured in four different formulations of culture media, C30, Bristol, Bold 3N, and C30+M, as well as the effect of methane (CH4) of biogas during CO2 fixation and biomass production. The results obtained showed that different nutrient composition and concentration of culture media, mainly micronutrient and vitamin concentrations, induced different patterns of CO2 fixation from biogas and biomass production in S. obliquus. The highest CO2 fixation (23.03 ± 0.24%) and biomass production (4.63 ± 0.31 g L(-1)) were attained in the microalgae growing in C30+M medium, accumulating mainly proteins. Moreover, these results demonstrated that the CH4 of biogas did not affect CO2 fixation from biogas and biomass production by S. obliquus. Overall, these results demonstrated that a culture medium with a balanced nutrient supply is crucial to increasing the biotechnological potential of microalgae to fix CO2 from biogas.

  8. 不同注视性质弱视治愈前后立体视的变化%CHANGES OF STEREOPSIS IN PATIENTS WITH AMBLYOPIA OF DIFFERENT FIXATION PATTERN BEFORE AND AFTER THE CURE OF VISUAL ACUITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞凤; 刘桂香

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the changes of stereopsis in patients with amblyopia of different fixation pattern (ADFP) before and after the cure and the association between fixation pattern and the recovery of stereopsis. Methods YAN's near stereoscopic chart and random dot synoptophore stereogram were used to examine the near and far stereoacuity, respectively, in 281 children with ADFP before and after the cure of the disease. Results After the cure, both near and far stereoacuity were significantly improved (x2 = 6.116-40.772, P<0.01 ) ; both before and after the cure, the detection rate of far stereoacuity was higher than that of the near stereoacuity (x2 = 9.599, 20. 894;P<0.05). The difference of recovery of near and far atereoacuity among different ADFP was not significant (x2 =0. 350,0. 096;P>0. 05). Conclusion During the course of therapy for patients with ADFP, functional exercise for both eyes should be carried out, the prognosis of stereoacuity was not obviously different among different fixation pattern.%目的 探讨不同注视性质的弱视治愈前后立体视变化以及注视性质与立体视恢复关系.方法 采用颜少明和同视机随机点立体视图片(定性画片),检测281例不同注视性质弱视病儿治愈前后近立体视和远立体视.结果 弱视治愈后近、远立体视均有明显的改善(X2=6.116~40.772,P0.05).结论 不同注视性质的弱视在治疗过程中均需积极进行双眼视功能锻炼.其立体视觉预后没有明显不同.

  9. Eye Tracking in the Cockpit: a Review of the Relationships between Eye Movements and the Aviators Cognitive State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    frequency. In particular, Spady (1978) examined eye movements during simulated landing approach under instrument flight rules ( IFR ). Simulated turbulence...al. (2007) found that NNI varied across phases of simulated IFR flight, showing the least random (most clustered) distribution of fixations during...decreased for visually demanding flight segments ( IFR vs. VFR, landing vs. cruise). This general pattern has been replicated across several studies

  10. Eye-gaze patterns as students study worked-out examples in mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H. Ross

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores what introductory physics students actually look at when studying worked-out examples. Our classroom experiences indicate that introductory physics students neither discuss nor refer to the conceptual information contained in the text of worked-out examples. This study is an effort to determine to what extent students incorporate the textual information into the way they study. Student eye-gaze patterns were recorded as they studied the examples to aid them in solving a target problem. Contrary to our expectations from classroom interactions, students spent 40±3% of their gaze time reading the textual information. Their gaze patterns were also characterized by numerous jumps between corresponding mathematical and textual information, implying that they were combining information from both sources. Despite this large fraction of time spent reading the text, student recall of the conceptual information contained therein remained very poor. We also found that having a particular problem in mind had no significant effects on the gaze-patterns or conceptual information retention.

  11. Eye-tracking study of inanimate objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ković Vanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the animate objects, where participants were consistent in their looking patterns, for inanimates it was difficult to identify both consistent areas of fixations and a consistent order of fixations. Furthermore, in comparison to animate objects, in animates received significantly shorter total looking time, shorter longest looks and a smaller number of overall fixations. However, as with animates, looking patterns did not systematically differ between the naming and non-naming conditions. These results suggested that animacy, but not labelling, impacts on looking behavior in this paradigm. In the light of feature-based accounts of semantic memory organization, one could interpret these findings as suggesting that processing of the animate objects is based on the saliency/diagnosticity of their visual features (which is then reflected through participants eye-movements towards those features, whereas processing of the inanimate objects is based more on functional features (which cannot be easily captured by looking behavior in such a paradigm.

  12. Host defense skin peptides vary with color pattern in the highly polymorphic red-eyed treefrog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Rivero Davis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of phenotypic variation across a geographic range provide important insights into evolutionary processes underlying diversification and speciation. Most evolutionary studies use putatively neutral markers to examine evolutionary diversification. However, functional phenotypes such as gene-encoded host-defense polypeptides (HDPs could provide key insights into the processes of population differentiation, yet they are rarely included in population analyses. The red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas (Cope, 1862, exhibits regional variation in multiple traits, including color pattern and body size across a narrow geographic range. This treefrog produces bioactive peptides exuded onto the skin surface, presumably for pathogen and predator defense. However, the geographic patterns of variation in peptides and the factors that mediate intraspecific peptide variation across the range of this species remain untested. Here, we examine the roles of phylogenetic history, geographic barriers, geographic distance, and color-pattern variation as determinants of skin peptide diversity in 54 individuals among 11 populations across Costa Rica and Panama. Each of the five distinct Agalychnis color morphs are represented in our sample. We performed peptide mass fingerprinting and compared mass spectral data from skin peptide secretions to quantify divergence in peptide profiles among individuals, both within and among regions. We used two metrics to estimate genetic variation: genetic distance estimated from microsatellites and patristic distance estimated from mtDNA haplotype diversity. Matrix correspondence tests revealed that skin peptide variation is best predicted by differences in leg color pattern across all regions. In addition, we found that flank color pattern and phylogeny also explain differences in peptide diversity. Patterns of peptide differentiation and phylogenetic topology were incongruent in two regions, indicating a possible role of

  13. Pattern of Uveitis in a Referral Eye Clinic in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ramandeep

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the pattern of uveitis in a north Indian tertiary eye center. Methods: A retrospective study was done to identify the pattern of uveitis in a uveitis clinic population of a major referral center in north India from January 1996 to June 2001. A standard clinical protocol, the "naming and meshing" approach with tailored laboratory investigations, was used for the final diagnosis. Results: 1233 patients were included in the study; 641 (51.98% were males and 592 (48.01% females ranging in age from 1.5 to 75 years. The anterior uveitis was seen in 607 patients (49.23% followed by posterior uveitis (247 patients, 20.23%, intermediate uveitis (198 patients, 16.06% and panuveitis (181 patients, 14.68%. A specific diagnosis could be established in 602 patients (48.82%. The infective aetiology was seen in 179 patients, of which tuberculosis was the commonest cause in 125 patients followed by toxoplasmosis (21 patients, 11.7%. Non-infectious aetiology was seen in 423 patients, of which ankylosing spondylitis was the commonest cause in 80 patients followed by sepigionous choroidopathy (62 patients, 14.65% . Conclusion: Tuberculosis and toxoplasmosis were the commonest form of infective uveitis, while ankylosing spondylitis and serpiginous choroidopathy were commonly seen as the non-infective causes of uveitis in North India.

  14. Risk and Ambiguity in Information Seeking: Eye Gaze Patterns Reveal Contextual Behavior in Dealing with Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Peter; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Darányi, Sándor; Gedeon, Tom; Lim, Ik Soo

    2016-01-01

    Information foraging connects optimal foraging theory in ecology with how humans search for information. The theory suggests that, following an information scent, the information seeker must optimize the tradeoff between exploration by repeated steps in the search space vs. exploitation, using the resources encountered. We conjecture that this tradeoff characterizes how a user deals with uncertainty and its two aspects, risk and ambiguity in economic theory. Risk is related to the perceived quality of the actually visited patch of information, and can be reduced by exploiting and understanding the patch to a better extent. Ambiguity, on the other hand, is the opportunity cost of having higher quality patches elsewhere in the search space. The aforementioned tradeoff depends on many attributes, including traits of the user: at the two extreme ends of the spectrum, analytic and wholistic searchers employ entirely different strategies. The former type focuses on exploitation first, interspersed with bouts of exploration, whereas the latter type prefers to explore the search space first and consume later. Our findings from an eye-tracking study of experts' interactions with novel search interfaces in the biomedical domain suggest that user traits of cognitive styles and perceived search task difficulty are significantly correlated with eye gaze and search behavior. We also demonstrate that perceived risk shifts the balance between exploration and exploitation in either type of users, tilting it against vs. in favor of ambiguity minimization. Since the pattern of behavior in information foraging is quintessentially sequential, risk and ambiguity minimization cannot happen simultaneously, leading to a fundamental limit on how good such a tradeoff can be. This in turn connects information seeking with the emergent field of quantum decision theory.

  15. Risk and Ambiguity in Information Seeking: Eye Gaze Patterns Reveal Contextual Behaviour in Dealing with Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wittek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information foraging connects optimal foraging theory in ecology withhow humans search for information. The theory suggests that, followingan information scent, the information seeker must optimize the tradeoffbetween exploration by repeated steps in the search space vs.exploitation, using the resources encountered. We conjecture that thistradeoff characterizes how a user deals with uncertainty and its twoaspects, risk and ambiguity in economic theory. Risk is related to theperceived quality of the actually visited patch of information, and canbe reduced by exploiting and understanding the patch to a better extent.Ambiguity, on the other hand, is the opportunity cost of having higherquality patches elsewhere in the search space. The aforementionedtradeoff depends on many attributes, including traits of the user: atthe two extreme ends of the spectrum, analytic and wholistic searchersemploy entirely different strategies. The former type focuses onexploitation first, interspersed with bouts of exploration, whereas thelatter type prefers to explore the search space first and consume later.Our findings from an eye-tracking study of experts' interactions withnovel search interfaces in the biomedical domain suggest that usertraits of cognitive styles and perceived search task difficultyare significantly correlated with eye gaze and search behaviour. Wealso demonstrate that perceived risk shifts the balance betweenexploration and exploitation in either type of users, tilting it againstvs. in favour of ambiguity minimization. Since the pattern of behaviourin information foraging is quintessentially sequential, risk andambiguity minimization cannot happen simultaneously, leading to afundamental limit on how good such a tradeoff can be. This in turnconnects information seeking with the emergent field of quantum decisiontheory.

  16. A methodological framework for capturing relative eyetracking coordinate data to determine gaze patterns and fixations from two or more observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurr, Joanna C; Page, Jenny; Lunt, Heather

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have published methodologies that can be used to analyze simultaneous gaze behaviors and recurrent fixations while multiple observers are viewing dynamic scenes and moving their heads. In this study, we aimed to develop a methodological framework to assess simultaneous gaze behaviors and recurrent fixations in predetermined areas of interest, while accounting for head movement and nonstandard observer positioning. Gaze coordinates were recorded during six trials in which a single participant focused on the center of a video image and moved his head in six degrees of freedom. Markers were positioned at the image corners. Eyetracking equipment recorded the video image and gaze behaviors (crosshair), which were then uploaded to SIMI Motion Analysis software. The corner markers were digitized in order to determine image position as the head moved, and were used to calculate new gaze coordinates relative to this head movement. Calculations accounted for the perspective error due to nonstandard participant positioning. Across all trials, the error between the measured and calculated coordinates was acceptable (areas of interest are reported, and they compared well to manual calculations. This methodology was then assessed using participant dyads (N = 5), each simultaneously observing the same images. Recurrent fixations were determined using a hierarchical model, and these also compared well to manual analysis. This article presents a valid and reliable methodological framework for determining fixation frequency, duration, and location from multiple observers, while accounting for head movement and nonstandard positioning. This framework facilitates the analysis of simultaneous oculomotor variables, improving ecological validity and reducing environmental constraints.

  17. Eye movement as a biomarker of schizophrenia: Using an integrated eye movement score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kentaro; Miura, Kenichiro; Fujimoto, Michiko; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Iwase, Masao; Kasai, Kiyoto; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2017-02-01

    Studies have shown that eye movement abnormalities are possible neurophysiological biomarkers for schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of eye movement abnormalities in identifying patients with schizophrenia from healthy controls. Eighty-five patients with schizophrenia and 252 healthy controls participated in this study. Eye movement measures were collected from free viewing, fixation stability, and smooth pursuit tests. In an objective and stepwise method, eye movement measures were extracted to create an integrated eye movement score. The discriminant analysis resulted in three eye movement measures; the scanpath length during the free viewing test, the horizontal position gain during the fast Lissajous paradigm of the smooth pursuit test, and the duration of fixations during the far distractor paradigm of the fixation stability test. An integrated score using these variables can distinguish patients with schizophrenia from healthy controls with 82% accuracy. The integrated score was correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition full scale IQ, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores, and chlorpromazine equivalents, with different correlation patterns in the three eye movement measures used. The discriminant analysis in subgroups matched for age, sex, years of education, and premorbid IQ revealed a sustained classification rate. We established an integrated eye movement score with high classification accuracy between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls, although there was a significant effect of medication. This study provides further evidence of the utility of eye movement abnormalities in schizophrenia pathology and treatment. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. Rhythmic alternating patterns of brain activity distinguish rapid eye movement sleep from other states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ho Ming; Horovitz, Silvina G; Carr, Walter S; Picchioni, Dante; Coddington, Nate; Fukunaga, Masaki; Xu, Yisheng; Balkin, Thomas J; Duyn, Jeff H; Braun, Allen R

    2013-06-18

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep constitutes a distinct "third state" of consciousness, during which levels of brain activity are commensurate with wakefulness, but conscious awareness is radically transformed. To characterize the temporal and spatial features of this paradoxical state, we examined functional interactions between brain regions using fMRI resting-state connectivity methods. Supporting the view that the functional integrity of the default mode network (DMN) reflects "level of consciousness," we observed functional uncoupling of the DMN during deep sleep and recoupling during REM sleep (similar to wakefulness). However, unlike either deep sleep or wakefulness, REM was characterized by a more widespread, temporally dynamic interaction between two major brain systems: unimodal sensorimotor areas and the higher-order association cortices (including the DMN), which normally regulate their activity. During REM, these two systems become anticorrelated and fluctuate rhythmically, in reciprocally alternating multisecond epochs with a frequency ranging from 0.1 to 0.01 Hz. This unique spatiotemporal pattern suggests a model for REM sleep that may be consistent with its role in dream formation and memory consolidation.

  19. Patterned cortical tension mediated by N-cadherin controls cell geometric order in the Drosophila eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eunice HoYee; Chavadimane Shivakumar, Pruthvi; Clément, Raphaël; Laugier, Edith; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion molecules hold cells together but also couple cell membranes to a contractile actomyosin network, which limits the expansion of cell contacts. Despite their fundamental role in tissue morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, how adhesion molecules control cell shapes and cell patterns in tissues remains unclear. Here we address this question in vivo using the Drosophila eye. We show that cone cell shapes depend little on adhesion bonds and mostly on contractile forces. However, N-cadherin has an indirect control on cell shape. At homotypic contacts, junctional N-cadherin bonds downregulate Myosin-II contractility. At heterotypic contacts with E-cadherin, unbound N-cadherin induces an asymmetric accumulation of Myosin-II, which leads to a highly contractile cell interface. Such differential regulation of contractility is essential for morphogenesis as loss of N-cadherin disrupts cell rearrangements. Our results establish a quantitative link between adhesion and contractility and reveal an unprecedented role of N-cadherin on cell shapes and cell arrangements. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22796.001 PMID:28537220

  20. Patterns of uveitis in children presenting at a tertiary eye care centre in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Kannan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the patterns of uveitis in the paediatric age group in a referral eye care centre in south India. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients 15 years or younger with uveitis, examined in the year 2000, were included in this study. The uveitis was classified according to the anatomical site of ocular involvement and the most probable aetiological factor. The final diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations and results of specific laboratory investigations. Results: A total 31 (6.29% paediatric uveitis cases were seen among the 493 uveitic cases in the year 2000. The male: female ratio was 17:14. Anterior (9 cases, intermediate (9 cases and posterior uveitis (9 cases were seen in equal number. Four patients had panuveitis. Twenty-seven patients had visual acuity of 6/36 or better at presentation. Approximately 25% (8 of 31 patients had cataract secondary to inflammation. Immunosuppressives were administered in 4 patients and one patient required cataract surgery. Conclusion: Uveitis in children comprises approximately 6% of uveitis cases in a referral practice in south India. Anterior, intermediate and posterior uveitis are seen in equal numbers. We recommend that intermediate uveitis be ruled out in all cases of anterior uveitis by careful clinical evaluation including examination under anesthesia (EUA when required.

  1. ten-a overexpression causes abnormal pattern in the Drosophila compound eye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LERTLUK NGERNSIRI; NORA FASCETTI; SUPPALUK ROMRATANAPAN; STEFAN BAUMGARTNER

    2006-01-01

    Ten-a is one of the two Drosophila proteins that belong to the Ten M protein family. This protein is a type Ⅱ transmembrane protein and is expressed mainly in the embryonic CNS, in the larval eye imaginal disc and in the compound eye of the pupa. Here,we investigate the role of ten-a during development of the compound eye by using the Gal4/UAS system to induce ten-a overexpression in the developing eye. We found that overexpression of ten-a can perturb eye development during all stages examined. In an early stage, overexpression of ten-a in eye primordial cells caused small and rough eyes and interfered with photoreceptor cell recruitment, resulting in some ommatidia having fewer or extra photoreceptor cells. Conversely, ten-a overexpression during ommatidial formation caused severe eye defects due to absence of many cellular components. Interestingly,overexpression of ten-a in the late stage developing ommatidial cluster affected the number of pigment cells, caused cone cells proliferation in many ommatidia, and caused some photoreceptor cell defects. These results suggest that ten-a may be a novel gene required for normal eye morphogenesis.

  2. How Were Eye Movements Recorded Before Yarbus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Yarbus introduced a new dimension of precision in recording how the eyes moved, either when attempts were made to keep them stationary or when scanning pictures. Movements of the eyes had been remarked upon for millennia, but recording how they move is a more recent preoccupation. Emphasis was initially placed on abnormalities of oculomotor function (like strabismus) before normal features were considered. The interest was in where the eyes moved to rather than determining how they got there. The most venerable technique for examining ocular stability involved comparing the relative motion between an afterimage and a real image. In the late 18th century, Wells compared afterimages generated before body rotation with real images observed following it when dizzy; he described both lateral and torsional nystagmus, thereby demonstrating the directional discontinuities in eye velocities. At around the same time Erasmus Darwin used afterimages as a means of demonstrating ocular instability when attempting to fixate steadily. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Thus, the characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare (working in Javal's laboratory) in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening (with tubes placed over the eyelids) to the sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. Eye movements over pictures were examined by Stratton and later by Buswell, who drew attention to the effects of instructions on the pattern of eye movements. In midcentury, attention shifted back to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The suction cap methods developed by Yarbus were applied

  3. Facial expression discrimination varies with presentation time but not with fixation on features: A backward masking study using eye-tracking

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of presentation time and fixation to expression-specific diagnostic features on emotion discrimination performance, in a backward masking task. While no differences were found when stimuli were presented for 16.67 ms, differences between facial emotions emerged beyond the happy-superiority effect at presentation times as early as 50 ms. Happy expressions were best discriminated, followed by neutral and disgusted, then surprised, and finally fearful e...

  4. Visual Data Mining: An Exploratory Approach to Analyzing Temporal Patterns of Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen; Yurovsky, Daniel; Xu, Tian

    2012-01-01

    Infant eye movements are an important behavioral resource to understand early human development and learning. But the complexity and amount of gaze data recorded from state-of-the-art eye-tracking systems also pose a challenge: how does one make sense of such dense data? Toward this goal, this article describes an interactive approach based on…

  5. Visual Data Mining: An Exploratory Approach to Analyzing Temporal Patterns of Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen; Yurovsky, Daniel; Xu, Tian

    2012-01-01

    Infant eye movements are an important behavioral resource to understand early human development and learning. But the complexity and amount of gaze data recorded from state-of-the-art eye-tracking systems also pose a challenge: how does one make sense of such dense data? Toward this goal, this article describes an interactive approach based on…

  6. Differences in the visual perception of symmetric patterns in orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii and two human cultural groups: a comparative eye-tracking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordelia eMühlenbeck

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetric structures are of importance in relation to aesthetic preference. To investigate whether the preference for symmetric patterns is unique to humans, independent of their cultural background, we compared two human populations with distinct cultural backgrounds (Namibian hunter-gatherers and German town dwellers with one species of non-human great apes (orangutans in their viewing behavior regarding symmetric and asymmetric patterns in two levels of complexity. In addition, the human participants were asked to give their aesthetic evaluation of a subset of the presented patterns. The results showed that humans of both cultural groups fixated on symmetric patterns for a longer period of time, regardless of the pattern’s complexity. On the contrary, orangutans did not clearly differentiate between symmetric and asymmetric patterns, but were much faster in processing the presented stimuli and scanned the complete screen, while both human groups rested on the symmetric pattern after a short scanning time. The aesthetic evaluation test revealed that the fixation preference for symmetric patterns did not match with the aesthetic evaluation in the Hai//om group, whereas in the German group aesthetic evaluation was in accordance with the fixation preference in 60 percent of the cases. It can be concluded that humans prefer well-ordered structures in visual processing tasks, most likely because of a positive processing bias for symmetry, which orangutans did not show in this task, and that, in humans, an aesthetic preference does not necessarily accompany the fixation preference.

  7. A Hh-driven gene network controls specification, pattern and size of the Drosophila simple eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Domínguez-Cejudo, María A; Amore, Gabriele; Brockmann, Anette; Lemos, María C; Córdoba, Antonio; Casares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    During development, extracellular signaling molecules interact with intracellular gene networks to control the specification, pattern and size of organs. One such signaling molecule is Hedgehog (Hh). Hh is known to act as a morphogen, instructing different fates depending on the distance to its source. However, how Hh, when signaling across a cell field, impacts organ-specific transcriptional networks is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate this issue during the development of the Drosophila ocellar complex. The development of this sensory structure, which is composed of three simple eyes (or ocelli) located at the vertices of a triangular patch of cuticle on the dorsal head, depends on Hh signaling and on the definition of three domains: two areas of eya and so expression--the prospective anterior and posterior ocelli--and the intervening interocellar domain. Our results highlight the role of the homeodomain transcription factor engrailed (en) both as a target and as a transcriptional repressor of hh signaling in the prospective interocellar region. Furthermore, we identify a requirement for the Notch pathway in the establishment of en maintenance in a Hh-independent manner. Therefore, hh signals transiently during the specification of the interocellar domain, with en being required here for hh signaling attenuation. Computational analysis further suggests that this network design confers robustness to signaling noise and constrains phenotypic variation. In summary, using genetics and modeling we have expanded the ocellar gene network to explain how the interaction between the Hh gradient and this gene network results in the generation of stable mutually exclusive gene expression domains. In addition, we discuss some general implications our model may have in some Hh-driven gene networks.

  8. Cognitive context detection in UAS operators using eye-gaze patterns on computer screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannaru, Pujitha; Balasingam, Balakumar; Pattipati, Krishna; Sibley, Ciara; Coyne, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of eye-gaze metrics of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) operators as effective indices of their cognitive workload. Our analyses are based on an experiment where twenty participants performed pre-scripted UAS missions of three different difficulty levels by interacting with two custom designed graphical user interfaces (GUIs) that are displayed side by side. First, we compute several eye-gaze metrics, traditional eye movement metrics as well as newly proposed ones, and analyze their effectiveness as cognitive classifiers. Most of the eye-gaze metrics are computed by dividing the computer screen into "cells". Then, we perform several analyses in order to select metrics for effective cognitive context classification related to our specific application; the objective of these analyses are to (i) identify appropriate ways to divide the screen into cells; (ii) select appropriate metrics for training and classification of cognitive features; and (iii) identify a suitable classification method.

  9. Robust Eye Center Localization through Face Alignment and Invariant Isocentric Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Dongdong; Chen, Dihu; Tan, Hongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The localization of eye centers is a very useful cue for numerous applications like face recognition, facial expression recognition, and the early screening of neurological pathologies. Several methods relying on available light for accurate eye-center localization have been exploited. However, despite the considerable improvements that eye-center localization systems have undergone in recent years, only few of these developments deal with the challenges posed by the profile (non-frontal face). In this paper, we first use the explicit shape regression method to obtain the rough location of the eye centers. Because this method extracts global information from the human face, it is robust against any changes in the eye region. We exploit this robustness and utilize it as a constraint. To locate the eye centers accurately, we employ isophote curvature features, the accuracy of which has been demonstrated in a previous study. By applying these features, we obtain a series of eye-center locations which are candidates for the actual position of the eye-center. Among these locations, the estimated locations which minimize the reconstruction error between the two methods mentioned above are taken as the closest approximation for the eye centers locations. Therefore, we combine explicit shape regression and isophote curvature feature analysis to achieve robustness and accuracy, respectively. In practical experiments, we use BioID and FERET datasets to test our approach to obtaining an accurate eye-center location while retaining robustness against changes in scale and pose. In addition, we apply our method to non-frontal faces to test its robustness and accuracy, which are essential in gaze estimation but have seldom been mentioned in previous works. Through extensive experimentation, we show that the proposed method can achieve a significant improvement in accuracy and robustness over state-of-the-art techniques, with our method ranking second in terms of accuracy

  10. Robust Eye Center Localization through Face Alignment and Invariant Isocentric Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhiyong; Wei, Chuansheng; Teng, Dongdong; Chen, Dihu; Tan, Hongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The localization of eye centers is a very useful cue for numerous applications like face recognition, facial expression recognition, and the early screening of neurological pathologies. Several methods relying on available light for accurate eye-center localization have been exploited. However, despite the considerable improvements that eye-center localization systems have undergone in recent years, only few of these developments deal with the challenges posed by the profile (non-frontal face). In this paper, we first use the explicit shape regression method to obtain the rough location of the eye centers. Because this method extracts global information from the human face, it is robust against any changes in the eye region. We exploit this robustness and utilize it as a constraint. To locate the eye centers accurately, we employ isophote curvature features, the accuracy of which has been demonstrated in a previous study. By applying these features, we obtain a series of eye-center locations which are candidates for the actual position of the eye-center. Among these locations, the estimated locations which minimize the reconstruction error between the two methods mentioned above are taken as the closest approximation for the eye centers locations. Therefore, we combine explicit shape regression and isophote curvature feature analysis to achieve robustness and accuracy, respectively. In practical experiments, we use BioID and FERET datasets to test our approach to obtaining an accurate eye-center location while retaining robustness against changes in scale and pose. In addition, we apply our method to non-frontal faces to test its robustness and accuracy, which are essential in gaze estimation but have seldom been mentioned in previous works. Through extensive experimentation, we show that the proposed method can achieve a significant improvement in accuracy and robustness over state-of-the-art techniques, with our method ranking second in terms of accuracy

  11. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation proceeds normally following disruption of patterned spontaneous retinal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Speer, Colenso M.; Sun, Chao; Liets, Lauren C.; Stafford, Ben K; CHAPMAN, BARBARA; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous retinal activity (SRA) is important during eye-specific segregation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), but the feature(s) of activity critical for retinogeniculate refinement are controversial. Pharmacologically or genetically manipulating cholinergic signaling during SRA perturbs correlated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spiking and disrupts eye-specific retinofugal refinement in vivo, consistent with an instructive role for SRA during visual system dev...

  12. Biometric recognition via fixation density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Ioannis; Komogortsev, Oleg V.

    2014-05-01

    This work introduces and evaluates a novel eye movement-driven biometric approach that employs eye fixation density maps for person identification. The proposed feature offers a dynamic representation of the biometric identity, storing rich information regarding the behavioral and physical eye movement characteristics of the individuals. The innate ability of fixation density maps to capture the spatial layout of the eye movements in conjunction with their probabilistic nature makes them a particularly suitable option as an eye movement biometrical trait in cases when free-viewing stimuli is presented. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the method is evaluated on three different datasets containing a wide gamut of stimuli types, such as static images, video and text segments. The obtained results indicate a minimum EER (Equal Error Rate) of 18.3 %, revealing the perspectives on the utilization of fixation density maps as an enhancing biometrical cue during identification scenarios in dynamic visual environments.

  13. Blink patterns and lid-contact times in dry-eye and normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousler GW 3rd

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available George W Ousler 3rd,1 Mark B Abelson,1,2 Patrick R Johnston,1 John Rodriguez,1 Keith Lane,1 Lisa M Smith11Ora, Andover, MA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: To classify blinks in dry eye and normal subjects into six subtypes, and to define the blink rate and duration within each type of blink, as well as the total lid-contact time/minute.Materials and methods: This was a single-centered, prospective, double-blind study of eleven dry-eye and ten normal subjects. Predefined subjects watched a video while blinks were recorded for 10 minutes. Partial blinks were classified by percentage closure of maximal palpebral fissure opening: 25%, 50%, 75%. Complete blinks were characterized as full (>0 seconds, extended (>0.1 seconds, or superextended (>0.5 seconds. The mean duration of each type of blink was determined and standardized per minute as total lid-contact time.Results: Total blinks observed were 4,990 (1,414 normal, 3,756 dry eye: 1,809 (50.59% partial and 1,767 (49.41% complete blinks among dry-eye subjects versus 741 (52.90% partial and 673 (47.60% complete blinks among normal subjects. Only superextended blinks of ≥0.5-second duration were significantly more frequent in dry-eye subjects than normals (2.3% versus 0.2%, respectively; P=0.023. Total contact time was seven times higher in dry-eye subjects than normals (0.565 versus 0.080 seconds, respectively; P<0.001. Isolating only extended blinks (>0.1 second, the average contact time (seconds was four times longer in dry-eye versus normal subjects (2.459 in dry eye, 0.575 in normals; P=0.003. Isolating only superextended blinks (>0.5 seconds, average contact time was also significantly different (7.134 in dry eye, 1.589 in normals; P<0.001. The contact rate for all full closures was 6.4 times longer in dry-eye (0.045 versus 0.007, P<0.001 than normal subjects.Conclusion: Dry-eye subjects spent 4.5% of a

  14. Tracking down the path of memory: eye scanpaths facilitate retrieval of visuospatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochynska, Agata; Laeng, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Recent research points to a crucial role of eye fixations on the same spatial locations where an item appeared when learned, for the successful retrieval of stored information (e.g., Laeng et al. in Cognition 131:263-283, 2014. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2014.01.003 ). However, evidence about whether the specific temporal sequence (i.e., scanpath) of these eye fixations is also relevant for the accuracy of memory remains unclear. In the current study, eye fixations were recorded while looking at a checkerboard-like pattern. In a recognition session (48 h later), animations were shown where each square that formed the pattern was presented one by one, either according to the same, idiosyncratic, temporal sequence in which they were originally viewed by each participant or in a shuffled sequence although the squares were, in both conditions, always in their correct positions. Afterward, participants judged whether they had seen the same pattern before or not. Showing the elements serially according to the original scanpath's sequence yielded a significantly better recognition performance than the shuffled condition. In a forced fixation condition, where the gaze was maintained on the center of the screen, the advantage of memory accuracy for same versus shuffled scanpaths disappeared. Concluding, gaze scanpaths (i.e., the order of fixations and not simply their positions) are functional to visual memory and physical reenacting of the original, embodied, perception can facilitate retrieval.

  15. Modeling fixation locations using spatial point processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmé, Simon; Trukenbrod, Hans; Engbert, Ralf; Wichmann, Felix

    2013-10-01

    Whenever eye movements are measured, a central part of the analysis has to do with where subjects fixate and why they fixated where they fixated. To a first approximation, a set of fixations can be viewed as a set of points in space; this implies that fixations are spatial data and that the analysis of fixation locations can be beneficially thought of as a spatial statistics problem. We argue that thinking of fixation locations as arising from point processes is a very fruitful framework for eye-movement data, helping turn qualitative questions into quantitative ones. We provide a tutorial introduction to some of the main ideas of the field of spatial statistics, focusing especially on spatial Poisson processes. We show how point processes help relate image properties to fixation locations. In particular we show how point processes naturally express the idea that image features' predictability for fixations may vary from one image to another. We review other methods of analysis used in the literature, show how they relate to point process theory, and argue that thinking in terms of point processes substantially extends the range of analyses that can be performed and clarify their interpretation.

  16. Practice Patterns Among Eye Care Providers at US Teaching Hospitals With Regard to Assessing and Educating Patients About Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Zachary C; Rolius, Ramunas; Scott, Ingrid U

    2017-08-01

    To investigate practice patterns of eye care providers at academic medical centers in the United States (US) with regard to assessing patients' smoking status and exposure, educating patients regarding ocular risks of smoking, and counseling patients about smoking cessation. Cross-sectional survey. An anonymous survey including multiple choice and Likert-style questions was constructed on http://www.surveymonkey.com and emailed to the coordinators of all 113 US ophthalmology residency programs, with a request to forward to all faculty, fellows, residents, and optometrists at their institution. Main outcome measures include proportion of eye care providers who assess patients' smoking status, educate patients regarding ocular risks of smoking, and discuss with patients smoking cessation options. Of the 292 respondents, 229 (78%) "always" or "periodically" ask patients about their smoking status, 251 (86%) "seldom" or "never" ask patients about secondhand smoke exposure, 245 (84%) "always" or "periodically" educate patients about ocular diseases associated with smoking, 142 (49%) "seldom" or "never" ask patients who smoke about their willingness to quit smoking, and 249 (85%) "seldom" or "never" discuss potential methods and resources to assist with smoking cessation. Most eye care providers assess patients' smoking status and educate patients regarding ocular risks of smoking. However, approximately half do not ask, or seldom ask, about patients' willingness to quit smoking, and most do not discuss smoking cessation options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissecting patterns of preparatory activity in the frontal eye fields during pursuit target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramanujan T; Joshua, Mati

    2017-07-19

    We investigated the composition of preparatory activity of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons in monkeys performing a pursuit target selection task. In response to the orthogonal motion of a large and a small reward target, monkeys initiated pursuit biased towards the direction of large reward target motion. FEF neurons exhibited robust preparatory activity preceding movement initiation in this task. Preparatory activity consisted of two components, ramping activity that was constant across target selection conditions and a flat offset in firing rates that signaled the target selection condition. Ramping activity accounted for 50% of the variance in the preparatory activity and was linked most strongly, on a trial-by-trial basis, to pursuit eye movement latency rather than to its direction or gain. The offset in firing rates that discriminated target selection conditions accounted for 25% of the variance in the preparatory activity, and was commensurate with a winner-take-all representation signaling the direction of large reward target motion rather than a representation that matched the parameters of the upcoming movement. These offer new insights into the role the frontal eye fields play in target selection and pursuit control. They show that preparatory activity in the FEF signals more strongly when to move rather than where or how to move, and suggest that structures outside the FEF augment its contributions to the target selection process. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  18. Eye Movement Disorders in Dyslexia. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Leon; And Others

    Eye movements of 18 male and seven female dyslexic children and 10 normal children were evaluated to determine if eye movement disorders may be the cause of some of the symptoms associated with dyslexia. Data on eye movements were collected while Ss moved their eyes from one fixation point to another in a nonreading situation. Errors in vertical…

  19. Eye Movement Patterns during Locomotion in Real-World and Simulated Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements in a search-and-count walking task were compared between a simulated (SE and real-world environment (RE. Eye movements were recorded using the mobile WearCam in either RE or the StroMoHab locomotion simulator, a treadmill-based system for gait mobility rehabilitation. For Experiment 1, a RE was prepared with objects (coloured balls and occluding barriers placed along a 38 m long corridor. A video was captured from a walker's viewpoint at 1.3 km/hr. Fifteen subjects per environment reported the total object count after completing a walk while viewing the video in the SE (at 0, 1.3, or 2.5 km/h and RE (at 1.3 km/h. Examining the number of eye transitions (TotET between objects in relation to walking speed in SE, revealed significant increases between 0 and 2.5 km/h (F3, 56 =20.62, p = .02 and 1.3 and 2.5 km/h (F3, 56 =20.62, p = .039, despite no change in video speed; no significant difference was found between 0 and 1.3 km/h. In Experiment 2, 15 subjects viewed a static checkered screen and were instructed to ‘view the screen’ while walking. TotET decreased significantly, between 1.3 km/h and 5.2 km/h (F2, 27 =3.437, p = .014; no significant differences were observed between 2.6 km/h and either 1.3 km/h or 5.2 km/h. In real-world conditions, walking faster increases the difficulty of search tasks, with a likely correlated increase in eye movements. Apparently, the expectation of increased difficulty carries over to SE, even if the visual task is not more difficult. The findings point to physiological and perceptual correlations between locomotion and eye movements.

  20. Immaturity of Visual Fixations in Dyslexic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiadi, Aimé; Gérard, Christophe-Loïc; Peyre, Hugo; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, behavioral studies recording visual fixations abilities in dyslexic children are scarce. The object of this article is to explore further the visual fixation ability in dyslexics compared to chronological age-matched and reading age-matched non-dyslexic children. Fifty-five dyslexic children from 7 to 14 years old, 55 chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children and 55 reading age-matched non-dyslexic children participated to this study. Eye movements from both eyes were recorded horizontally and vertically by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain(®) T2). The fixation task consisted in fixating a white-filled circle appearing in the center of the screen for 30 s. Results showed that dyslexic children produced a significantly higher number of unwanted saccades than both groups of non-dyslexic children. Moreover, the number of unwanted saccades significantly decreased with age in both groups of non-dyslexic children, but not in dyslexics. Furthermore, dyslexics made more saccades during the last 15 s of fixation period with respect to both groups of non-dyslexic children. Such poor visual fixation capability in dyslexic children could be due to impaired attention abilities, as well as to an immaturity of the cortical areas controlling the fixation system.

  1. Immaturity of Visual Fixations in Dyslexic Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIADI eBi Kuyami Guy Aimé

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, behavioral studies recording visual fixations abilities in dyslexic children are scarce. The object of this paper is to explore further the visual fixation ability in dyslexics compared to chronological age-matched and reading age-matched non-dyslexic children. Fifty-five dyslexic children from 7 to 14 years old, fifty-five chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children and fifty-five reading age-matched non-dyslexic children participated to this study. Eye movements from both eyes were recorded horizontally and vertically by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain® T2. The fixation task consisted in fixating a white-filled circle appearing in the centre of the screen for 30 seconds. Results showed that dyslexic children produced a significantly higher number of unwanted saccades than both groups of non-dyslexic children. Moreover, the number of unwanted saccades significantly decreased with age in both groups of non-dyslexic children, but not in dyslexics. Furthermore, dyslexics made more saccades during the last 15 sec of fixation period with respect to both groups of non-dyslexic children. Such poor visual fixation capability in dyslexic children could be due to impaired attention abilities, as well as to an immaturity of the cortical areas controlling the fixation system.

  2. An eye-tracking method to reveal the link between gazing patterns and pragmatic abilities in high functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Nadel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The present study illustrates the potential advantages of an eye-tracking method for exploring the association between visual scanning of faces and inferences of mental states. Participants watched short videos involving social interactions and had to explain what they had seen. The number of cognition verbs (e.g., think, believe, know) in their answers were counted. Given the possible use of peripheral vision that could confound eye-tracking measures, we added a condition using a gaze-contingent viewing window: the entire visual display is blurred, expect for an area that moves with the participant's gaze. Eleven typical adults and eleven high functioning adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were recruited. The condition employing the viewing window yielded strong correlations between the average duration of fixations, the ratio of cognition verbs and standard measures of social disabilities.

  3. An eye-tracking method to reveal the link between gazing patterns and pragmatic abilities in high functioning autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouriel eGrynszpan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study illustrates the potential advantages of an eye-tracking method for exploring the association between visual scanning of faces and inferences of mental states. Participants watched short videos involving social interactions and had to explain what they had seen. The number of cognition verbs (e.g. think, believe, know in their answers were counted. Given the possible use of peripheral vision that could confound eye-tracking measures, we added a condition using a gaze-contingent viewing window: the entire visual display is blurred, expect for an area that moves with the participant’s gaze. Eleven typical adults and eleven high functioning adults with ASD were recruited. The condition employing the viewing window yielded strong correlations between the average duration of fixations, the ratio of cognition verbs and standard measures of social disabilities.

  4. Reverse design of a bull's eye structure based on the plasmonic far-field pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akira; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2013-09-09

    We present a novel concept on designing a bull's eye structure for a single-wavelength optical source. The plasmonic far-field around a subwavelength aperture on a thin gold film is calculated by finite-difference time-domain method. Based on the annular field intensity distribution on the film surface, we present a method for determining a fairly optimal first groove radius and a periodicity of the grooves that show enhanced transmission. By additionally fine-tuning groove width and groove depth, we have achieved a transmission factor of 9.74. Our novel method has high potential in applications such as silicon infrared sensors.

  5. Familiarity and Recollection Produce Distinct Eye Movement, Pupil and Medial Temporal Lobe Responses when Memory Strength Is Matched

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments explored eye measures (fixations and pupil response patterns) and brain responses (BOLD) accompanying the recognition of visual object stimuli based on familiarity and recollection. In both experiments, the use of a modified remember/know procedure led to high confidence and matched accuracy levels characterising strong familiarity…

  6. Picture perception in Chinese dyslexic children: an eye-movement study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiu-hong; JING Jin; ZOU Xiao-bing; HUANG Xu; JIN Yu; WANG Qing-xiong; CHEN Xue-bin; YANG Bin-rang; YANG Si-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Currently, whether or not there is visuospatial impairments in Chinese dyslexic children is still a matter of discussion. The relatively recent application of an eye-tracking paradigm may offer an opportunity to address this issue. In China, in comparison with reading studies, there have not been nearly as many eye movement studies dealing with nonreading tasks such as picture identification and whether Chinese children with dyslexia have a picture processing deficit is not clear. The purposes of the present study were to determine whether or not there is visuospatial impairments in Chinese dyslexic children. Moreover, we attempted to discuss whether or not the abnormal eye movement pattern that dyslexic subjects show during reading of text appropriate for their age is a consequence of their linguistic difficulties.Methods An eye-link Ⅱ High-Speed Eye Tracker was used to track the series of eye-movement of 19 Chinese dyslexic children and 19 Chinese normal children. All of the subjects were presented with three pictures for this eye-tracking task and 6 relative eye-movement parameters, first fixation duration, average fixation duration, average saccade amplitude, mean saccade distance, fixation frequency and saccade frequency were recorded for analysis.Results Analyzing the relative parameter among three pictures, except for the fixation frequency and the saccade frequency, other eye-movement parameters were significantly different among the three pictures (P 0.05).Conclusions The characteristics of the pictures can significantly influence the visuospatial cognitive processing capability of the Chinese children. There is a detectable disability for the Chinese dyslexic children in the visuospatial cognitive processing: their saccade amplitude and mean saccade distance are shorter, which may be interpreted as specific for their reading disability.

  7. Pattern mimicry of host eggs by the common cuckoo, as seen through a bird's eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Stevens, Martin

    2010-05-07

    Cuckoo-host interactions provide classical examples of coevolution. Cuckoos place hosts under selection to detect and reject foreign eggs, while host defences result in the evolution of host-egg mimicry in cuckoos. Despite a long history of research, egg pattern mimicry has never been objectively quantified, and so its coevolution with host defences has not been properly assessed. Here, we use digital image analysis and modelling of avian vision to quantify the level of pattern mimicry in eight host species of the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus and their respective cuckoo host-races. We measure a range of pattern attributes, including marking size, diversity in size, contrast, coverage and dispersion. This new technique reveals hitherto unnoticed sophistication in egg pattern mimicry. We show that various features of host egg pattern are mimicked by the eggs of their respective cuckoo host-races, and that cuckoos have evolved better pattern mimicry for host species that exhibit stronger egg rejection. Pattern differs relatively more between eggs of different host species than between their respective cuckoo host-races. We suggest that cuckoos may have more 'average' markings in order to be able to use subsidiary hosts. Our study sheds new light on cuckoo-host coevolution and illustrates a new technique for quantifying animal markings with respect to the relevant animal visual system.

  8. Reading strategies in mild to moderate strabismic amblyopia: an eye movement investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanonidou, Evgenia; Proudlock, Frank A; Gottlob, Irene

    2010-07-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate oculomotor strategies in strabismic amblyopia and evaluate abnormalities during monocular and binocular reading. METHODS. Eye movements were recorded with a head-mounted infrared video eye-tracker (250 Hz, <0.01 degrees resolution) in 20 strabismic amblyopes (mean age, 44.9 +/- 10.7 years) and 20 normal control subjects (mean age, 42.8 +/- 10.9 years) while they silently read paragraphs of text. Monocular reading comparisons were made between the amblyopic eye and the nondominant eye of control subjects and the nonamblyopic eye and the dominant eye of the control subjects. Binocular reading between the amblyopic and control subjects was also compared. RESULTS. Mean reading speed, number of progressive and regressive saccades per line, saccadic amplitude (of progressive saccades), and fixation duration were estimated. Inter- and intrasubject statistical comparisons were made. Reading speed was significantly slower in amblyopes than in control subjects during monocular reading with amblyopic (13.094 characters/s vs. 22.188 characters/s; P < 0.0001) and nonamblyopic eyes (16.241 characters/s vs. 22.349 characters/s, P < 0.0001), and binocularly (15.698 characters/s vs. 23.425 characters/s, P < 0.0001). In amblyopes, reading was significantly slower with the amblyopic eye than with the nonamblyopic eye in binocular viewing (P < 0.05). These differences were associated with significantly more regressive saccades and longer fixation durations, but not with changes in saccadic amplitudes. CONCLUSIONS. In strabismic amblyopia, reading is impaired, not only during monocular viewing with the amblyopic eye, but also with the nonamblyopic eye and binocularly, even though normal visual acuity pertains to the latter two conditions. The impaired reading performance is associated with differences in both the saccadic and fixational patterns, most likely as adaptation strategies to abnormal sensory experiences such as crowding and suppression.

  9. Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye > Facts About Dry Eye Facts About Dry Eye This information was developed by the National Eye ... the best person to answer specific questions. Dry Eye Defined What is dry eye? Dry eye occurs ...

  10. Eye Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Allergies Sections What Are Eye Allergies? Eye Allergy Symptoms ... allergy diagnosis Eye allergy treatment What Are Eye Allergies? Written by: David Turbert Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan- ...

  11. Cue Recognition and Integration - Eye Tracking Evidence of Processing Differences in Sentence Comprehension in Aphasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel Schumacher

    Full Text Available We aimed at further elucidating whether aphasic patients' difficulties in understanding non-canonical sentence structures, such as Passive or Object-Verb-Subject sentences, can be attributed to impaired morphosyntactic cue recognition, and to problems in integrating competing interpretations.A sentence-picture matching task with canonical and non-canonical spoken sentences was performed using concurrent eye tracking. Accuracy, reaction time, and eye tracking data (fixations of 50 healthy subjects and 12 aphasic patients were analysed.Patients showed increased error rates and reaction times, as well as delayed fixation preferences for target pictures in non-canonical sentences. Patients' fixation patterns differed from healthy controls and revealed deficits in recognizing and immediately integrating morphosyntactic cues.Our study corroborates the notion that difficulties in understanding syntactically complex sentences are attributable to a processing deficit encompassing delayed and therefore impaired recognition and integration of cues, as well as increased competition between interpretations.

  12. Rett syndrome: basic features of visual processing-a pilot study of eye-tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Aleksandra; Valicenti McDermott, Maria; Mavrommatis, Kathleen; Martins, Cristina L

    2012-07-01

    Consistently observed "strong eye gaze" has not been validated as a means of communication in girls with Rett syndrome, ubiquitously affected by apraxia, unable to reply either verbally or manually to questions during formal psychologic assessment. We examined nonverbal cognitive abilities and basic features of visual processing (visual discrimination attention/memory) by analyzing patterns of visual fixation in 44 girls with Rett syndrome, compared with typical control subjects. To determine features of visual fixation patterns, multiple pictures (with the location of the salient and presence/absence of novel stimuli as variables) were presented on the screen of a TS120 eye-tracker. Of the 44, 35 (80%) calibrated and exhibited meaningful patterns of visual fixation. They looked longer at salient stimuli (cartoon, 2.8 ± 2 seconds S.D., vs shape, 0.9 ± 1.2 seconds S.D.; P = 0.02), regardless of their position on the screen. They recognized novel stimuli, decreasing the fixation time on the central image when another image appeared on the periphery of the slide (2.7 ± 1 seconds S.D. vs 1.8 ± 1 seconds S.D., P = 0.002). Eye-tracking provides a feasible method for cognitive assessment and new insights into the "hidden" abilities of individuals with Rett syndrome.

  13. The fixation and saccade P3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, Sangita; Ding, Jian; Privitera, Claudio; Carney, Thom; Klein, Stanley A

    2012-01-01

    Although most instances of object recognition during natural viewing occur in the presence of saccades, the neural correlates of objection recognition have almost exclusively been examined during fixation. Recent studies have indicated that there are post-saccadic modulations of neural activity immediately following eye movement landing; however, whether post-saccadic modulations affect relatively late occurring cognitive components such as the P3 has not been explored. The P3 as conventionally measured at fixation is commonly used in brain computer interfaces, hence characterizing the post-saccadic P3 could aid in the development of improved brain computer interfaces that allow for eye movements. In this study, the P3 observed after saccadic landing was compared to the P3 measured at fixation. No significant differences in P3 start time, temporal persistence, or amplitude were found between fixation and saccade trials. Importantly, sensory neural responses canceled in the target minus distracter comparisons used to identify the P3. Our results indicate that relatively late occurring cognitive neural components such as the P3 are likely less sensitive to post saccadic modulations than sensory neural components and other neural activity occurring shortly after eye movement landing. Furthermore, due to the similarity of the fixation and saccade P3, we conclude that the P3 following saccadic landing could possibly be used as a viable signal in brain computer interfaces allowing for eye movements.

  14. How do we see art: an eye-tracker study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eQuian Quiroga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the pattern of fixations of subjects looking at figurative and abstract paintings from different artists (Molina, Mondrian, Rembrandt, della Francesca and at modified versions in which different aspects of these art pieces were altered with simple digital manipulations. We show that the fixations of the subjects followed some general common principles (e.g. being attracted to saliency regions but with a large variability for the figurative paintings, according to the subject’s personal appreciation and knowledge. In particular, we found different gazing patterns depending on whether the subject saw the original or the modified version of the painting first. We conclude that the study of gazing patterns obtained by using the eye-tracker technology give a useful approach to quantify how subjects observe art.

  15. Pattern of uveitis in North East India: A tertiary eye care center study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Bhattacharyya, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Lokesh; Panicker, M J; Das, Kalyan; Deka, Akshay C

    2009-01-01

    We conducted an institutional-based retrospective study on 308 uveitic patients and analyzed the pattern of uveitis in Northeastern India. Anterior uveitis was the most common type (47.07%) followed by posterior (29.87%), intermediate (12.98%) and panuveitis (10.06%). Toxoplasmosis (40.21%) had the highest incidence among posterior uveitis cases. Harada's form of Vogt Koyanagi Harada's disease is a frequent occurrence in this subset of the population. PMID:19237790

  16. Learning to Predict Sequences of Human Visual Fixations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Boix, Xavier; Roig, Gemma; Xu, Juan; Van Gool, Luc; Zhao, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Most state-of-the-art visual attention models estimate the probability distribution of fixating the eyes in a location of the image, the so-called saliency maps. Yet, these models do not predict the temporal sequence of eye fixations, which may be valuable for better predicting the human eye fixations, as well as for understanding the role of the different cues during visual exploration. In this paper, we present a method for predicting the sequence of human eye fixations, which is learned from the recorded human eye-tracking data. We use least-squares policy iteration (LSPI) to learn a visual exploration policy that mimics the recorded eye-fixation examples. The model uses a different set of parameters for the different stages of visual exploration that capture the importance of the cues during the scanpath. In a series of experiments, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using LSPI for combining multiple cues at different stages of the scanpath. The learned parameters suggest that the low-level and high-level cues (semantics) are similarly important at the first eye fixation of the scanpath, and the contribution of high-level cues keeps increasing during the visual exploration. Results show that our approach obtains the state-of-the-art performances on two challenging data sets: 1) OSIE data set and 2) MIT data set.

  17. I spy with my little eye: Analysis of airline pilots' gaze patterns in a manual instrument flight scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Andreas; Zhang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze pilots' visual scanning in a manual approach and landing scenario. Manual flying skills suffer from increasing use of automation. In addition, predominantly long-haul pilots with only a few opportunities to practice these skills experience this decline. Airline pilots representing different levels of practice (short-haul vs. long-haul) had to perform a manual raw data precision approach while their visual scanning was recorded by an eye-tracking device. The analysis of gaze patterns, which are based on predominant saccades, revealed one main group of saccades among long-haul pilots. In contrast, short-haul pilots showed more balanced scanning using two different groups of saccades. Short-haul pilots generally demonstrated better manual flight performance and within this group, one type of scan pattern was found to facilitate the manual landing task more. Long-haul pilots tend to utilize visual scanning behaviors that are inappropriate for the manual ILS landing task. This lack of skills needs to be addressed by providing specific training and more practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of expertise on eye movement behaviour in medical image perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Bertram

    Full Text Available The present eye-movement study assessed the effect of expertise on eye-movement behaviour during image perception in the medical domain. To this end, radiologists, computed-tomography radiographers and psychology students were exposed to nine volumes of multi-slice, stack-view, axial computed-tomography images from the upper to the lower part of the abdomen with or without abnormality. The images were presented in succession at low, medium or high speed, while the participants had to detect enlarged lymph nodes or other visually more salient abnormalities. The radiologists outperformed both other groups in the detection of enlarged lymph nodes and their eye-movement behaviour also differed from the other groups. Their general strategy was to use saccades of shorter amplitude than the two other participant groups. In the presence of enlarged lymph nodes, they increased the number of fixations on the relevant areas and reverted to even shorter saccades. In volumes containing enlarged lymph nodes, radiologists' fixation durations were longer in comparison to their fixation durations in volumes without enlarged lymph nodes. More salient abnormalities were detected equally well by radiologists and radiographers, with both groups outperforming psychology students. However, to accomplish this, radiologists actually needed fewer fixations on the relevant areas than the radiographers. On the basis of these results, we argue that expert behaviour is manifested in distinct eye-movement patterns of proactivity, reactivity and suppression, depending on the nature of the task and the presence of abnormalities at any given moment.

  19. Effects of size, fixation location, and inversion on face identification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sekuler, Allison; Pachai, Matthew; Hashemi, Ali; Bennett, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    One possible explanation for the face inversion effect (FIE) is that inversion swaps the eye and mouth locations relative to fixation, and attention typically is directed to the top of a stimulus for faces...

  20. Eye movements during object recognition in visual agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Leek, E; Patterson, Candy; Paul, Matthew A; Rafal, Robert; Cristino, Filipe

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports the first ever detailed study about eye movement patterns during single object recognition in visual agnosia. Eye movements were recorded in a patient with an integrative agnosic deficit during two recognition tasks: common object naming and novel object recognition memory. The patient showed normal directional biases in saccades and fixation dwell times in both tasks and was as likely as controls to fixate within object bounding contour regardless of recognition accuracy. In contrast, following initial saccades of similar amplitude to controls, the patient showed a bias for short saccades. In object naming, but not in recognition memory, the similarity of the spatial distributions of patient and control fixations was modulated by recognition accuracy. The study provides new evidence about how eye movements can be used to elucidate the functional impairments underlying object recognition deficits. We argue that the results reflect a breakdown in normal functional processes involved in the integration of shape information across object structure during the visual perception of shape.

  1. What Do Eye Gaze Metrics Tell Us about Motor Imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Poiroux

    Full Text Available Many of the brain structures involved in performing real movements also have increased activity during imagined movements or during motor observation, and this could be the neural substrate underlying the effects of motor imagery in motor learning or motor rehabilitation. In the absence of any objective physiological method of measurement, it is currently impossible to be sure that the patient is indeed performing the task as instructed. Eye gaze recording during a motor imagery task could be a possible way to "spy" on the activity an individual is really engaged in. The aim of the present study was to compare the pattern of eye movement metrics during motor observation, visual and kinesthetic motor imagery (VI, KI, target fixation, and mental calculation. Twenty-two healthy subjects (16 females and 6 males, were required to perform tests in five conditions using imagery in the Box and Block Test tasks following the procedure described by Liepert et al. Eye movements were analysed by a non-invasive oculometric measure (SMI RED250 system. Two parameters describing gaze pattern were calculated: the index of ocular mobility (saccade duration over saccade + fixation duration and the number of midline crossings (i.e. the number of times the subjects gaze crossed the midline of the screen when performing the different tasks. Both parameters were significantly different between visual imagery and kinesthesic imagery, visual imagery and mental calculation, and visual imagery and target fixation. For the first time we were able to show that eye movement patterns are different during VI and KI tasks. Our results suggest gaze metric parameters could be used as an objective unobtrusive approach to assess engagement in a motor imagery task. Further studies should define how oculomotor parameters could be used as an indicator of the rehabilitation task a patient is engaged in.

  2. Visual processing and social cognition in schizophrenia: relationships among eye movements, biological motion perception, and empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukiko; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients have impairments at several levels of cognition including visual attention (eye movements), perception, and social cognition. However, it remains unclear how lower-level cognitive deficits influence higher-level cognition. To elucidate the hierarchical path linking deficient cognitions, we focused on biological motion perception, which is involved in both the early stage of visual perception (attention) and higher social cognition, and is impaired in schizophrenia. Seventeen schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy controls participated in the study. Using point-light walker stimuli, we examined eye movements during biological motion perception in schizophrenia. We assessed relationships among eye movements, biological motion perception and empathy. In the biological motion detection task, schizophrenia patients showed lower accuracy and fixated longer than healthy controls. As opposed to controls, patients exhibiting longer fixation durations and fewer numbers of fixations demonstrated higher accuracy. Additionally, in the patient group, the correlations between accuracy and affective empathy index and between eye movement index and affective empathy index were significant. The altered gaze patterns in patients indicate that top-down attention compensates for impaired bottom-up attention. Furthermore, aberrant eye movements might lead to deficits in biological motion perception and finally link to social cognitive impairments. The current findings merit further investigation for understanding the mechanism of social cognitive training and its development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid eye movements during sleep in mice: High trait-like stability qualifies rapid eye movement density for characterization of phenotypic variation in sleep patterns of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulda Stephany

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, rapid eye movements (REM density during REM sleep plays a prominent role in psychiatric diseases. Especially in depression, an increased REM density is a vulnerability marker for depression. In clinical practice and research measurement of REM density is highly standardized. In basic animal research, almost no tools are available to obtain and systematically evaluate eye movement data, although, this would create increased comparability between human and animal sleep studies. Methods We obtained standardized electroencephalographic (EEG, electromyographic (EMG and electrooculographic (EOG signals from freely behaving mice. EOG electrodes were bilaterally and chronically implanted with placement of the electrodes directly between the musculus rectus superior and musculus rectus lateralis. After recovery, EEG, EMG and EOG signals were obtained for four days. Subsequent to the implantation process, we developed and validated an Eye Movement scoring in Mice Algorithm (EMMA to detect REM as singularities of the EOG signal, based on wavelet methodology. Results The distribution of wakefulness, non-REM (NREM sleep and rapid eye movement (REM sleep was typical of nocturnal rodents with small amounts of wakefulness and large amounts of NREM sleep during the light period and reversed proportions during the dark period. REM sleep was distributed correspondingly. REM density was significantly higher during REM sleep than NREM sleep. REM bursts were detected more often at the end of the dark period than the beginning of the light period. During REM sleep REM density showed an ultradian course, and during NREM sleep REM density peaked at the beginning of the dark period. Concerning individual eye movements, REM duration was longer and amplitude was lower during REM sleep than NREM sleep. The majority of single REM and REM bursts were associated with micro-arousals during NREM sleep, but not during REM sleep. Conclusions Sleep

  4. Latarjet Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  5. Smooth pursuit eye movements improve temporal resolution for color perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Terao

    Full Text Available Human observers see a single mixed color (yellow when different colors (red and green rapidly alternate. Accumulating evidence suggests that the critical temporal frequency beyond which chromatic fusion occurs does not simply reflect the temporal limit of peripheral encoding. However, it remains poorly understood how the central processing controls the fusion frequency. Here we show that the fusion frequency can be elevated by extra-retinal signals during smooth pursuit. This eye movement can keep the image of a moving target in the fovea, but it also introduces a backward retinal sweep of the stationary background pattern. We found that the fusion frequency was higher when retinal color changes were generated by pursuit-induced background motions than when the same retinal color changes were generated by object motions during eye fixation. This temporal improvement cannot be ascribed to a general increase in contrast gain of specific neural mechanisms during pursuit, since the improvement was not observed with a pattern flickering without changing position on the retina or with a pattern moving in the direction opposite to the background motion during pursuit. Our findings indicate that chromatic fusion is controlled by a cortical mechanism that suppresses motion blur. A plausible mechanism is that eye-movement signals change spatiotemporal trajectories along which color signals are integrated so as to reduce chromatic integration at the same locations (i.e., along stationary trajectories on the retina that normally causes retinal blur during fixation.

  6. What interests them in the pictures?--differences in eye-tracking between rhesus monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying-Zhou; Jiang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Ci-Rong; Wang, Jian-Hong; Yu, Cheng-Yang; Carlson, Synnöve; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Rizak, Joshua D; Tian, Xiao-Guang; Tan, Hen; Chen, Zhu-Yue; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2013-10-01

    Studies estimating eye movements have demonstrated that non-human primates have fixation patterns similar to humans at the first sight of a picture. In the current study, three sets of pictures containing monkeys, humans or both were presented to rhesus monkeys and humans. The eye movements on these pictures by the two species were recorded using a Tobii eye-tracking system. We found that monkeys paid more attention to the head and body in pictures containing monkeys, whereas both monkeys and humans paid more attention to the head in pictures containing humans. The humans always concentrated on the eyes and head in all the pictures, indicating the social role of facial cues in society. Although humans paid more attention to the hands than monkeys, both monkeys and humans were interested in the hands and what was being done with them in the pictures. This may suggest the importance and necessity of hands for survival. Finally, monkeys scored lower in eye-tracking when fixating on the pictures, as if they were less interested in looking at the screen than humans. The locations of fixation in monkeys may provide insight into the role of eye movements in an evolutionary context.

  7. Eye Movements and Road Hazard Detection: Effects of Blur and Distractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samantha Sze-Yee; Black, Alex A; Lacherez, Philippe; Wood, Joanne M

    2016-09-01

    To examine the effects of optical blur, auditory distractors, and age on eye movement patterns while performing a driving hazard perception test (HPT). Twenty young (mean age 27.1 ± 4.6 years) and 20 older (73.3 ± 5.7 years) drivers with normal vision completed a HPT in a repeated-measures counterbalanced design while their eye movements were recorded. Testing was performed under two visual (best-corrected vision and with +2.00DS blur) and two distractor (with and without auditory distraction) conditions. Participants were required to respond to road hazards appearing in the HPT videos of real-world driving scenes and their hazard response times were recorded. Blur and distractors each significantly delayed hazard response time by 0.42 and 0.76 s, respectively (p < 0.05). A significant interaction between age and distractors indicated that older drivers were more affected by distractors than young drivers (response with distractors delayed by 0.96 and 0.60 s, respectively). There were no other two- or three-way interaction effects on response time. With blur, for example, both groups fixated significantly longer on hazards before responding compared to best-corrected vision. In the presence of distractors, both groups exhibited delayed first fixation on the hazards and spent less time fixating on the hazards. There were also significant differences in eye movement characteristics between groups, where older drivers exhibited smaller saccades, delayed first fixation on hazards, and shorter fixation duration on hazards compared to the young drivers. Collectively, the findings of delayed hazard response times and alterations in eye movement patterns with blur and distractors provide further evidence that visual impairment and distractors are independently detrimental to driving safety given that delayed hazard response times are linked to increased crash risk.

  8. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  9. Computing eye gaze metrics for the automatic assessment of radiographer performance during X-ray image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Laura; Bond, Raymond; Hughes, Ciara; McConnell, Jonathan; McFadden, Sonyia

    2017-09-01

    To investigate image interpretation performance by diagnostic radiography students, diagnostic radiographers and reporting radiographers by computing eye gaze metrics using eye tracking technology. Three groups of participants were studied during their interpretation of 8 digital radiographic images including the axial and appendicular skeleton, and chest (prevalence of normal images was 12.5%). A total of 464 image interpretations were collected. Participants consisted of 21 radiography students, 19 qualified radiographers and 18 qualified reporting radiographers who were further qualified to report on the musculoskeletal (MSK) system. Eye tracking data was collected using the Tobii X60 eye tracker and subsequently eye gaze metrics were computed. Voice recordings, confidence levels and diagnoses provided a clear demonstration of the image interpretation and the cognitive processes undertaken by each participant. A questionnaire afforded the participants an opportunity to offer information on their experience in image interpretation and their opinion on the eye tracking technology. Reporting radiographers demonstrated a 15% greater accuracy rate (p≤0.001), were more confident (p≤0.001) and took a mean of 2.4s longer to clinically decide on all features compared to students. Reporting radiographers also had a 15% greater accuracy rate (p≤0.001), were more confident (p≤0.001) and took longer to clinically decide on an image diagnosis (p=0.02) than radiographers. Reporting radiographers had a greater mean fixation duration (p=0.01), mean fixation count (p=0.04) and mean visit count (p=0.04) within the areas of pathology compared to students. Eye tracking patterns, presented within heat maps, were a good reflection of group expertise and search strategies. Eye gaze metrics such as time to first fixate, fixation count, fixation duration and visit count within the areas of pathology were indicative of the radiographer's competency. The accuracy and confidence of

  10. Eye movements of patients with schizophrenia in a natural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowiasch, Stefan; Backasch, Bianca; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Leube, Dirk; Kircher, Tilo; Bremmer, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Alterations of eye movements in schizophrenia patients have been widely described for laboratory settings. For example, gain during smooth tracking is reduced, and fixation patterns differ between patients and healthy controls. The question remains, whether such results are related to the specifics of the experimental environment, or whether they transfer to natural settings. Twenty ICD-10 diagnosed schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study, each performing four different oculomotor tasks corresponding to natural everyday behavior in an indoor environment: (I) fixating stationary targets, (II) sitting in a hallway with free gaze, (III) walking down the hallway, and (IV) visually tracking a target on the floor while walking straight-ahead. In all conditions, eye movements were continuously recorded binocularly by a mobile lightweight eye tracker (EyeSeeCam). When patients looked at predefined targets, they showed more fixations with reduced durations than controls. The opposite was true when participants were sitting in a hallway with free gaze. During visual tracking, patients showed a significantly greater root-mean-square error (representing the mean deviation from optimal) of retinal target velocity. Different from previous results on smooth-pursuit eye movements obtained in laboratory settings, no such difference was found for velocity gain. Taken together, we have identified significant differences in fundamental oculomotor parameters between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls during natural behavior in a real environment. Moreover, our data provide evidence that in natural settings, patients overcome some impairments, which might be present only in laboratory studies, by as of now unknown compensatory mechanisms or strategies.

  11. Infant Visual Assessment: Using Eye Tracking to Measure Visual Acuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Burton

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A technique commonly used to assess infants' visual acuity is forced-choice preferential looking, which relies on the propensity of infants to look at patterned stimuli over uniform grey. Existing tests use trained examiners to judge where an infant fixates; however, eye trackers offer the opportunity to measure eye movements quickly and automatically. In the present study infants' visual acuity was measured using a remote Tobii eye tracker (Tobii T120. Thirteen infants aged 4–8 months were seated before a screen and presented with a preferential looking task. On each trial a black and white chequerboard of variable spatial frequency was displayed on half of the screen, while uniform grey was displayed elsewhere. Eye tracking data were used to determine whether the infant fixated the chequerboard and to update the spatial frequency on subsequent trials according to a weighted up-down staircase targeting the 75% threshold. This initial study showed data in line with age norms are consistent across two testing sessions for some infants. Others yielded poor data or inconsistent performance. Future modifications will aim to make the test more engaging and to optimise its power and speed. These will provide a basis for a full assessment of the test's accuracy and reliability.

  12. Keeping an eye on pain: investigating visual attention biases in individuals with chronic pain using eye-tracking methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashler, Samantha R; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Attentional biases to painful stimuli are evident in individuals with chronic pain, although the directional tendency of these biases (ie, toward or away from threat-related stimuli) remains unclear. This study used eye-tracking technology, a measure of visual attention, to evaluate the attentional patterns of individuals with and without chronic pain during exposure to injury-related and neutral pictures. Individuals with (N=51) and without chronic pain (N=62) completed a dot-probe task using injury-related and neutral pictures while their eye movements were recorded. Mixed-design analysis of variance evaluated the interaction between group (chronic pain, pain-free) and picture type (injury-related, neutral). Reaction time results showed that regardless of chronic pain status, participants responded faster to trials with neutral stimuli in comparison to trials that included injury-related pictures. Eye-tracking measures showed within-group differences whereby injury-related pictures received more frequent fixations and visits, as well as longer average visit durations. Between-group differences showed that individuals with chronic pain had fewer fixations and shorter average visit durations for all stimuli. An examination of how biases change over the time-course of stimulus presentation showed that during the late phase of attention, individuals with chronic pain had longer average gaze durations on injury pictures relative to pain-free individuals. The results show the advantage of incorporating eye-tracking methodology when examining attentional biases, and suggest future avenues of research.

  13. One-Year Post-Operative Stability of Lefort I Osteotomies Using Resorbable Fixation: A Retrospective Analysis of Diverse Facial Patterns on Skeletal Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    osteosynthesis material for stabilization of midface fractures: experimental investigation in sheep . J Cranio-Maxillofac Surg 27 (1):51-57. Bailey L...1952). Treatment of developmental malformations of the jaws. Plast Reconstr Surg. 10: 473. Costa F, Robiony M, Politi M. (1999). Stability of Le Fort...fixation for congenital pediatric craniofacial surgery. J Craniofac Surg. 8 (2): 110-115. Habal M. (1997). Absorbable, invisible, and flexible

  14. Early sensitivity for eyes within faces: a new neuronal account of holistic and featural processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemrodov, Dan; Anderson, Thomas; Preston, Frank F; Itier, Roxane J

    2014-08-15

    Eyes are central to face processing however their role in early face encoding as reflected by the N170 ERP component is unclear. Using eye tracking to enforce fixation on specific facial features, we found that the N170 was larger for fixation on the eyes compared to fixation on the forehead, nasion, nose or mouth, which all yielded similar amplitudes. This eye sensitivity was seen in both upright and inverted faces and was lost in eyeless faces, demonstrating it was due to the presence of eyes at fovea. Upright eyeless faces elicited largest N170 at nose fixation. Importantly, the N170 face inversion effect (FIE) was strongly attenuated in eyeless faces when fixation was on the eyes but was less attenuated for nose fixation and was normal when fixation was on the mouth. These results suggest the impact of eye removal on the N170 FIE is a function of the angular distance between the fixated feature and the eye location. We propose the Lateral Inhibition, Face Template and Eye Detector based (LIFTED) model which accounts for all the present N170 results including the FIE and its interaction with eye removal. Although eyes elicit the largest N170 response, reflecting the activity of an eye detector, the processing of upright faces is holistic and entails an inhibitory mechanism from neurons coding parafoveal information onto neurons coding foveal information. The LIFTED model provides a neuronal account of holistic and featural processing involved in upright and inverted faces and offers precise predictions for further testing.

  15. Movimentos oculares e padrões de busca visual em tarefas de rotação mental Eye movements and scan patterns in mental rotation tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Covre

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é identificar as estratégias utilizadas nas tarefas de rotação mental pela análise dos traçados dos movimentos oculares. Foi analisado o desempenho de 40 participantes na comparação de pares de objetos tridimensionais rotacionados no eixo y, com diferenças de angulação de 0o a 180o. Foi utilizado um sistema computacional de rastreamento dos movimentos oculares (eyetracking durante a visualização de figuras. Os resultados mostram que tempo de julgamento, duração média das fixações do olho, número de fixações nos objetos e número de alternâncias entre os dois objetos aumentam em função da diferença de angulação. Análise dos traçados oculares, com base na inspeção visual, indica o uso de dois tipos de estratégias: rotação mental em torno dos eixos padrões e comparação independente da orientação. O uso dessas estratégias é discutido com relação ao desempenho dos participantes e à memória de trabalho.The purpose of this paper is to identify the strategies used on mental rotation tasks by analyzing ocular movements. The performance of 40 participants on comparison of pairs of three-dimensional objects, rotated on the y-axis, from 0o to 180o was analyzed. An eye-tracking computerized system was used to track eye movements during scene visualization. Results showed that judgment time, fixation duration, number of fixations and number of switches between the objects increased with rotation angle. Analysis by visual inspection indicates the use of two kinds of strategies: Mental rotation around the standard axis and comparison of orientation-free descriptions. The use of the strategies is discussed with regard to performance and working memory.

  16. Healthy Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... los Ojos Cómo hablarle a su oculista Healthy Eyes Having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is one ... or contact lenses. What is a comprehensive dilated eye exam? A comprehensive dilated eye exam is a ...

  17. Effects of Different Multimedia Presentations on Viewers' Information-Processing Activities Measured by Eye-Tracking Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Han-Chin

    2011-05-01

    This study implemented eye-tracking technology to understand the impact of different multimedia instructional materials, i.e., five successive pages versus a single page with the same amount of information, on information-processing activities in 21 non-science-major college students. The findings showed that students demonstrated the same number of eye fixations during information searching and spent the same amount of time on the overall instructional materials regardless of format. However, the total number of eye fixations on the picture areas was significantly greater for the multiple-page than for the single-page presentation. A significant difference was found in the duration of students' eye fixation durations on the picture areas under the two conditions, with students spending more time on the picture area of the multiple-page than of the single-page presentation. Greater pupil size was found when participants viewed the multiple-page presentation, implying that this presentation format was associated with a higher cognitive load. The participants' eye-movement data for specific areas was recorded and analyzed to determine students' information processing patterns and strategies and for triangulation with the quantitative findings. Discussion of the research findings and suggestions for future research are provided.

  18. Storyline Visualizations of Eye Tracking of Movie Viewing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, John T.; Arendt, Dustin L.; Blaha, Leslie M.

    2016-12-16

    Storyline visualizations offer an approach that promises to capture the spatio-temporal characteristics of individual observers and simultaneously illustrate emerging group behaviors. We develop a visual analytics approach to parsing, aligning, and clustering fixation sequences from eye tracking data. Visualization of the results captures the similarities and differences across a group of observers performing a common task. We apply our storyline approach to visualize gaze patterns of people watching dynamic movie clips. Storylines mitigate some of the shortcomings of existent spatio-temporal visualization techniques and, importantly, continue to highlight individual observer behavioral dynamics.

  19. The eye-voice span during reading aloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eLaubrock

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although eye movements during reading are modulated by cognitive processing demands, they also reflect visual sampling of the input, and possibly preparation of output for speech or the inner voice. By simultaneously recording eye movements and the voice during reading aloud, we obtained an output measure that constrains the length of time spent on cognitive processing. Here we investigate the dynamics of the eye-voice span (EVS, the distance between eye and voice. We show that the EVS is regulated immediately during fixation of a word by either increasing fixation duration or programming a regressive eye movement against the reading direction. EVS size at the beginning of a fixation was positively correlated with the likelihood of regressions and refixations. Regression probability was further increased if the EVS was still large at the end of a fixation: if adjustment of fixation duration did not sufficiently reduce the EVS during a fixation, then a regression rather than a refixation followed with high probability. We further show that the EVS can help understand cognitive influences on fixation duration during reading: in mixed model analyses, the EVS was a stronger predictor of fixation durations than either word frequency or word length. The EVS modulated the influence of several other predictors on single fixation durations. For example, word-N frequency effects were larger with a large EVS, especially when word N-1 frequency was low. Finally, a comparison of single fixation durations during oral and silent reading showed that reading is governed by similar principles in both reading modes, although EVS maintenance and articulatory processing also cause some differences. In summary, the eye-voice span is regulated by adjusting fixation duration and/or by programming a regressive eye movement when the eye-voice span gets too large. Overall, the EVS appears to be directly related to updating of the working memory buffer during reading.

  20. Bull's eye dermatoscopy pattern at bacillus Calmette-Guérin inoculation site correlates with systemic involvements in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Han-Chi; Ho, Ji-Chen; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Lo, Mao-Hung; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Tsai, Wen-Chien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-09-01

    For the past decades, although the rash at the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) inoculation site has been recognized as a diagnostic clue in Kawasaki disease, the present study is the first known one attempting to characterize BCG inoculation by dermatoscopy in Kawasaki disease and correlate the grade of BCG reaction with systemic involvement. Thirty-four patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease by pediatric specialists were enrolled. We performed detailed history taking, laboratory examination, physical examination and dermatoscopy examinations. Based on the BCG reaction pattern by dermatoscopy, we were able to characterize three patterns: (A) Bull's eye pattern in 18 patients; (B) faint homogenous erythema in nine; and (C) central white patch in seven. Patients from group A exhibited the highest elevation of blood aspartate aminotransferase levels (P Kawasaki disease. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Can We "Read" the Eye-Movement Patterns of Readers? Unraveling the Relationship between Reading Profiles and Processing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koornneef, Arnout; Mulders, Iris

    2017-01-01

    In an eye-tracking experiment we examined the risky reading hypothesis, in which long saccades and many regressions are considered to be indicative of a proactive reading style (Rayner et al. in "Psychol Aging" 21(3):448, 2006; "Psychol Aging" 24(3):755, 2009). We did so by presenting short texts--that confirmed or disconfirmed…

  2. Eye-Movement Patterns and Reader Characteristics of Students with Good and Poor Performance When Reading Scientific Text with Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yu-Cin

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the cognitive processes and reader characteristics of sixth graders who had good and poor performance when reading scientific text with diagrams. We first measured the reading ability and reading self-efficacy of sixth-grade participants, and then recorded their eye movements while they were reading an illustrated…

  3. Decreased fixation stability of the preferred retinal location in juvenile macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A I Bethlehem

    Full Text Available Macular degeneration is the main cause for diminished visual acuity in the elderly. The juvenile form of macular degeneration has equally detrimental consequences on foveal vision. To compensate for loss of foveal vision most patients with macular degeneration adopt an eccentric preferred retinal location that takes over tasks normally performed by the healthy fovea. It is unclear however, whether the preferred retinal locus also develops properties typical for foveal vision. Here, we investigated whether the fixation characteristics of the preferred retinal locus resemble those of the healthy fovea. For this purpose, we used the fixation-offset paradigm and tracked eye-position using a high spatial and temporal resolution infrared eye-tracker. The fixation-offset paradigm measures release from fixation under different fixation conditions and has been shown useful to distinguish between foveal and non-foveal fixation. We measured eye-movements in nine healthy age-matched controls and five patients with juvenile macular degeneration. In addition, we performed a simulation with the same task in a group of five healthy controls. Our results show that the preferred retinal locus does not adopt a foveal type of fixation but instead drifts further away from its original fixation and has overall increased fixation instability. Furthermore, the fixation instability is most pronounced in low frequency eye-movements representing a slow drift from fixation. We argue that the increased fixation instability cannot be attributed to fixation under an unnatural angle. Instead, diminished visual acuity in the periphery causes reduced oculomotor control and results in increased fixation instability.

  4. Comparison of Trans-scleral Fixation of PMMA and Foldable Intraocular Lens in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuping Zou; Zhende Lin; Bo Feng; Shaozhen Li

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the difference of the effects of PMMA and foldable intraocular lenses (IOLs) trans-sclerally fixed in pediatric eyes. Methods: Thirty-two children (43 eyes) who had undergone trans-scleral fixation of IOL were retrospected, of whom 5 children were implanted PMMA IOL in both eyes, 6children were implanted PMMA IOL in one eye and foldable IOL in the other eye, 12children were implanted foldable IOL in one eye and 9 chilrden were implanted PMMA IOL in one eye. Mean age was 5.3 years ( range 2.5 ~ 12 years ). Twelve children had traumatic cataract and the others congenital cataract before lens extraction. Results: Foldable group (18 eyes ): Mean follow-up was 12.1 months. Visual acuity (VA): compared with the best corrected VA before IOL fixation, postoperative best corrected VA improved in 16 eyes, remained unchanged in 2 eyes. In 14 eyes, one or two stitches were needed to seal the incision. Complications: Severe anterior chamber reaction was seen in 3 eyes. Intraocular bleeding was found in 3 eyes. IOL decentration was detected in 1 eye. Iris capture of IOL was seen in one eye. PMMA group (25 eyes ):Mean follow-up was 20.3 months. Visual acuity (VA): compared with the best corrected VA before IOL fixation, postoperative best corrected VA improved in 19 eyes,remained unchanged in 5 eyes and got worse in one eye. In 24 eyes, one to three stitches were needed to seal the incision. Complications: Severe anterior chamber reaction was seen in 5 eyes. Intraocular bleeding was found in 4 eyes. IOL decentration was seen in one eye. Iris capture of IOL was seen in 3 eyes. Intraocular pressure elevated in one eye. Conclusion: Our study shows that trans-scleral fixation of IOL is a safe procedure in pediatric eyes. Foldable IOL showed similar effect compared with PMMA IOL in pediatric trans-scleral fixation. Eye Science 2001; 17:61 ~ 64.

  5. Word-initial letters influence fixation durations during fluent reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Hand

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined how word-initial letters influence lexical access during reading. Eye movements were monitored as participants read sentences containing target words. Three factors were independently manipulated. First, target words had either high or low constraining word-initial letter sequences (e.g., dwarf or clown, respectively. Second, targets were either high or low in frequency of occurrence (e.g., train or stain, respectively. Third, targets were embedded in either biasing or neutral contexts (i.e., targets were high or low in their predictability. This 2 (constraint × 2 (frequency × 2 (context design allowed us to examine the conditions under which a word’s initial letter sequence could facilitate processing. Analyses of fixation duration data revealed significant main effects of constraint, frequency, and context. Moreover, in measures taken to reflect early lexical processing (i.e., first and single fixation duration, there was a significant interaction between constraint and context. The overall pattern of findings suggests lexical access is facilitated by highly constraining word-initial letters. Results are discussed in comparison to recent studies of lexical features involved in word recognition during reading.

  6. Photographic fixative poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photographic developer poisoning; Hydroquinone poisoning; Quinone poisoning; Sulfite poisoning ... Quinones Sodium thiosulfate Sodium sulfite/bisulfite Boric acid Photographic fixative can also break down (decompose) to form ...

  7. Eye tracking social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Ting; Potters, Jan; Funaki, Yukihiko

    We hypothesize that if people are motivated by a particular social preference, then choosing in accordance with this preference will lead to an identifiable pattern of eye movements. We track eye movements while subjects make choices in simple three-person distribution experiments. We characterize

  8. Eye movement-invariant representations in the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Huth, Alexander G; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Gallant, Jack L

    2017-01-01

    During natural vision, humans make frequent eye movements but perceive a stable visual world. It is therefore likely that the human visual system contains representations of the visual world that are invariant to eye movements. Here we present an experiment designed to identify visual areas that might contain eye-movement-invariant representations. We used functional MRI to record brain activity from four human subjects who watched natural movies. In one condition subjects were required to fixate steadily, and in the other they were allowed to freely make voluntary eye movements. The movies used in each condition were identical. We reasoned that the brain activity recorded in a visual area that is invariant to eye movement should be similar under fixation and free viewing conditions. In contrast, activity in a visual area that is sensitive to eye movement should differ between fixation and free viewing. We therefore measured the similarity of brain activity across repeated presentations of the same movie within the fixation condition, and separately between the fixation and free viewing conditions. The ratio of these measures was used to determine which brain areas are most likely to contain eye movement-invariant representations. We found that voxels located in early visual areas are strongly affected by eye movements, while voxels in ventral temporal areas are only weakly affected by eye movements. These results suggest that the ventral temporal visual areas contain a stable representation of the visual world that is invariant to eye movements made during natural vision.

  9. Individual Differences in Eye-Movements During Reading: Working Memory and Speed-of-Processing Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Matthew J; Long, Debra L; Tooley, Kristen M; Johns, Clinton L; Zirnstein, Megan; Jonathan, Eunike

    Theories of eye-movement control in reading should ultimately describe how differences in knowledge and cognitive abilities affect reading and comprehension. Current mathematical models of eye-movement control do not yet incorporate individual differences as a source of variation in reading, although developmental and group-difference effects have been studied. These models nonetheless provide an excellent foundation for describing and explaining how and why patterns of eye-movements differ across readers (e.g., Rayner, Chace, & Ashby, 2006). Our focus in this article is on two aspects of individual variation: global processing speed (e.g., Salthouse, 1996) and working-memory capacity (e.g., Just & Carpenter, 1992). Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2001), we tested the extent to which overall reading speed and working-memory capacity moderate the degree to which syntactic and semantic information affect fixation times. Previous published data (Traxler et al., 2005) showed that working memory capacity and syntactic complexity interacted to determine fixation times in an eye-movement monitoring experiment. In a new set of models based on this same data set, we found that working-memory capacity interacted with sentence-characteristic variables only when processing speed was not included in the model. We interpret these findings with respect to current accounts of sentence processing and suggest how they might be incorporated into eye-movement control models.

  10. Reading during the composition of multi-sentence texts: an eye-movement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Mark; Johansson, Roger; Johansson, Victoria; Wengelin, Åsa

    2016-09-01

    Writers composing multi-sentence texts have immediate access to a visual representation of what they have written. Little is known about the detail of writers' eye movements within this text during production. We describe two experiments in which competent adult writers' eye movements were tracked while performing short expository writing tasks. These are contrasted with conditions in which participants read and evaluated researcher-provided texts. Writers spent a mean of around 13 % of their time looking back into their text. Initiation of these look-back sequences was strongly predicted by linguistically important boundaries in their ongoing production (e.g., writers were much more likely to look back immediately prior to starting a new sentence). 36 % of look-back sequences were associated with sustained reading and the remainder with less patterned forward and backward saccades between words ("hopping"). Fixation and gaze durations and the presence of word-length effects suggested lexical processing of fixated words in both reading and hopping sequences. Word frequency effects were not present when writers read their own text. Findings demonstrate the technical possibility and potential value of examining writers' fixations within their just-written text. We suggest that these fixations do not serve solely, or even primarily, in monitoring for error, but play an important role in planning ongoing production.

  11. Detecting central fixation by means of artificial neural networks in a pediatric vision screener using retinal birefringence scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatikov, Boris I

    2017-04-27

    Reliable detection of central fixation and eye alignment is essential in the diagnosis of amblyopia ("lazy eye"), which can lead to blindness. Our lab has developed and reported earlier a pediatric vision screener that performs scanning of the retina around the fovea and analyzes changes in the polarization state of light as the scan progresses. Depending on the direction of gaze and the instrument design, the screener produces several signal frequencies that can be utilized in the detection of central fixation. The objective of this study was to compare artificial neural networks with classical statistical methods, with respect to their ability to detect central fixation reliably. A classical feedforward, pattern recognition, two-layer neural network architecture was used, consisting of one hidden layer and one output layer. The network has four inputs, representing normalized spectral powers at four signal frequencies generated during retinal birefringence scanning. The hidden layer contains four neurons. The output suggests presence or absence of central fixation. Backpropagation was used to train the network, using the gradient descent algorithm and the cross-entropy error as the performance function. The network was trained, validated and tested on a set of controlled calibration data obtained from 600 measurements from ten eyes in a previous study, and was additionally tested on a clinical set of 78 eyes, independently diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. In the first part of this study, a neural network was designed around the calibration set. With a proper architecture and training, the network provided performance that was comparable to classical statistical methods, allowing perfect separation between the central and paracentral fixation data, with both the sensitivity and the specificity of the instrument being 100%. In the second part of the study, the neural network was applied to the clinical data. It allowed reliable separation between normal subjects

  12. The Pattern of Sexual Interest of Female-to-Male Transsexual Persons With Gender Identity Disorder Does Not Resemble That of Biological Men: An Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Akira; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Soda, Tetsuji; Takezawa, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Iwasa, Atsushi; Nonomura, Norio; Miyagawa, Yasushi

    2017-09-01

    Very little has been elucidated about sexual interest in female-to-male (FtM) transsexual persons. To investigate the sexual interest of FtM transsexual persons vs that of men using an eye-tracking system. The study included 15 men and 13 FtM transsexual subjects who viewed three sexual videos (clip 1: sexy clothed young woman kissing the region of the male genitals covered by underwear; clip 2: naked actor and actress kissing and touching each other; and clip 3: heterosexual intercourse between a naked actor and actress) in which several regions were designated for eye-gaze analysis in each frame. The designation of each region was not visible to the participants. Visual attention was measured across each designated region according to gaze duration. For clip 1, there was a statistically significant sex difference in the viewing pattern between men and FtM transsexual subjects. Longest gaze time was for the eyes of the actress in men, whereas it was for non-human regions in FtM transsexual subjects. For clip 2, there also was a statistically significant sex difference. Longest gaze time was for the face of the actress in men, whereas it was for non-human regions in FtM transsexual subjects, and there was a significant difference between regions with longest gaze time. The most apparent difference was in the gaze time for the body of the actor: the percentage of time spent gazing at the body of the actor was 8.35% in FtM transsexual subjects, whereas it was only 0.03% in men. For clip 3, there were no statistically significant differences in viewing patterns between men and FtM transsexual subjects, although longest gaze time was for the face of the actress in men, whereas it was for non-human regions in FtM transsexual subjects. We suggest that the characteristics of sexual interest of FtM transsexual persons are not the same as those of biological men. Tsujimura A, Kiuchi H, Soda T, et al. The Pattern of Sexual Interest of Female-to-Male Transsexual Persons

  13. Eye movement analysis for activity recognition using electrooculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulling, Andreas; Ward, Jamie A; Gellersen, Hans; Tröster, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we investigate eye movement analysis as a new sensing modality for activity recognition. Eye movement data were recorded using an electrooculography (EOG) system. We first describe and evaluate algorithms for detecting three eye movement characteristics from EOG signals-saccades, fixations, and blinks-and propose a method for assessing repetitive patterns of eye movements. We then devise 90 different features based on these characteristics and select a subset of them using minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) feature selection. We validate the method using an eight participant study in an office environment using an example set of five activity classes: copying a text, reading a printed paper, taking handwritten notes, watching a video, and browsing the Web. We also include periods with no specific activity (the NULL class). Using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier and person-independent (leave-one-person-out) training, we obtain an average precision of 76.1 percent and recall of 70.5 percent over all classes and participants. The work demonstrates the promise of eye-based activity recognition (EAR) and opens up discussion on the wider applicability of EAR to other activities that are difficult, or even impossible, to detect using common sensing modalities.

  14. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  15. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  16. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  17. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  18. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  19. An initial investigation of radiologist eye movements in vascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, R. J.; Hodgins, S.; Evanoff, M. E.; Rainford, L. A.

    2013-03-01

    Eye tracking has been used by many researchers to try to shed light on the perceptual processes involved in medical image perception. Despite a large volume of data having been published regarding radiologist viewing patterns for static images, and more recently for stacked imaging modalities, little has been produced concerning angiographic images, which commonly have substantially different characteristics. A study was performed in which 7 expert radiologists viewed a range of digital subtraction angiograms of the peripheral vascular system. Initial results are presented. The observers were free to control the rate at which they viewed the images. Eye position data was recorded for each participant using Tobii TX300 eyetrackers. Analysis was performed in Tobii Studio software and included qualitative analysis of gaze pattern and analysis of metrics including first and total fixation duration etc. for areas of clinical interest. Early results indicate that experts briefly fixate on lesions but do not dwell in the area, rather continuing to inspect the more distal vascular segments before returning. Some individual variation was noted. Further research is required and ongoing.

  20. Pars plana vitrectomy and artisan iris fixated intraocular lens for aphakia in complicated vitreoretinal referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lolly Pattnaik

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Artisan iris fixated IOL's are a safe and effective option in eyes with concomitant poor capsular support and vitreoretinal complications requiring PPV. The postoperative visual acuity depends on the underlying pathological features present preoperatively.

  1. Early visual evoked potentials are modulated by eye position in humans induced by whole body rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petit Laurent

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reach and grasp an object in space on the basis of its image cast on the retina requires different coordinate transformations that take into account gaze and limb positioning. Eye position in the orbit influences the image's conversion from retinotopic (eye-centered coordinates to an egocentric frame necessary for guiding action. Neuroimaging studies have revealed eye position-dependent activity in extrastriate visual, parietal and frontal areas that is along the visuo-motor pathway. At the earliest vision stage, the role of the primary visual area (V1 in this process remains unclear. We used an experimental design based on pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEP recordings to study the effect of eye position on V1 activity in humans. Results We showed that the amplitude of the initial C1 component of VEP, acknowledged to originate in V1, was modulated by the eye position. We also established that putative spontaneous small saccades related to eccentric fixation, as well as retinal disparity cannot explain the effects of changing C1 amplitude of VEP in the present study. Conclusions The present modulation of the early component of VEP suggests an eye position-dependent activity of the human primary visual area. Our findings also evidence that cortical processes combine information about the position of the stimulus on the retinae with information about the location of the eyes in their orbit as early as the stage of primary visual area.

  2. Anticipatory Eye Movements in Congkak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl Chong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Congkak is a traditional Malaysian board game involving two players taking turns to pick up marbles from a series of holes on the board. We used this game as a model to explore the role of anticipatory eye movements during natural actions (in this case serially picking up/putting marbles as novices learnt the game. Prior work on eye and hand movements in natural behaviour shows that much of the demand on the visual system is computed at the moment it is needed and doesn't depend on information acquired from previous fixations. Vision is driven by the task demands. However, anticipatory fixations to upcoming targets of manipulation have recently been shown to confer spatial accuracy and influence the eye-hand latency. We find that experience with the game also influences the deployment of these anticipatory “look-ahead” fixations, and that their influence on eye-hand latency varies with experience. Results suggest that as our experience in Congkak grows, so does our knowledge of the space relationships necessary for task success.

  3. Anticipatory Eye Movements While Watching Continuous Action Across Shots in Video Sequences: A Developmental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkorian, Heather L; Anderson, Daniel R

    2017-07-01

    Eye movements were recorded as 12-month-olds (n = 15), 4-year-olds (n = 17), and adults (n = 19) watched a 15-min video with sequences of shots conveying continuous motion. The central question was whether, and at what age, viewers anticipate the reappearance of objects following cuts to new shots. Adults were more likely than younger viewers to make anticipatory eye movements. Four-year-olds responded to transitions more slowly and tended to fixate the center of the screen. Infants' eye movement patterns reflected a tendency to react rather than anticipate. Findings are consistent with the hypothesis that adults integrate content across shots and understand how space is represented in edited video. Results are interpreted with respect to a developing understanding of film editing due to experience and cognitive maturation. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  4. Eye tracking reveals a crucial role for facial motion in recognition of faces by infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Naiqi G; Quinn, Paul C; Liu, Shaoying; Ge, Liezhong; Pascalis, Olivier; Lee, Kang

    2015-06-01

    Current knowledge about face processing in infancy comes largely from studies using static face stimuli, but faces that infants see in the real world are mostly moving ones. To bridge this gap, 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old Asian infants (N = 118) were familiarized with either moving or static Asian female faces, and then their face recognition was tested with static face images. Eye-tracking methodology was used to record eye movements during the familiarization and test phases. The results showed a developmental change in eye movement patterns, but only for the moving faces. In addition, the more infants shifted their fixations across facial regions, the better their face recognition was, but only for the moving faces. The results suggest that facial movement influences the way faces are encoded from early in development.

  5. Detecting cognitive impairment by eye movement analysis using automatic classification algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagun, Dmitry; Manzanares, Cecelia; Zola, Stuart M; Buffalo, Elizabeth A; Agichtein, Eugene

    2011-09-30

    The Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task is a recognition memory test that has shown promise for the detection of memory impairments associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Because patients with MCI often progress to Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the VPC may be useful in predicting the onset of AD. VPC uses noninvasive eye tracking to identify how subjects view novel and repeated visual stimuli. Healthy control subjects demonstrate memory for the repeated stimuli by spending more time looking at the novel images, i.e., novelty preference. Here, we report an application of machine learning methods from computer science to improve the accuracy of detecting MCI by modeling eye movement characteristics such as fixations, saccades, and re-fixations during the VPC task. These characteristics are represented as features provided to automatic classification algorithms such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Using the SVM classification algorithm, in tandem with modeling the patterns of fixations, saccade orientation, and regression patterns, our algorithm was able to automatically distinguish age-matched normal control subjects from MCI subjects with 87% accuracy, 97% sensitivity and 77% specificity, compared to the best available classification performance of 67% accuracy, 60% sensitivity, and 73% specificity when using only the novelty preference information. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of applying machine-learning techniques to the detection of MCI, and suggest a promising approach for detection of cognitive impairments associated with other disorders.

  6. Automatic Convergence Adjustment for Stereoscopy using Eye Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Martin; Gram, Kristoffer; Kronborg Thomsen, Kasper

    When using stereoscopic displays, decoupling between convergence and accommodation can cause eyestrain. This paper proposes an adjustment method to automatically fit convergence at user fixation depth to accommodation by using eye tracking. Two different adjustment methods are proposed: one...

  7. Attention attraction in an ophthalmic diagnostic device using sound-modulated fixation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatikov, Boris I; Rangarajan, Shreya; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L

    2016-08-01

    This study relates to eye fixation systems with combined optical and audio systems. Many devices for eye diagnostics and some devices for eye therapeutics require the patient to fixate on a small target for a certain period of time, during which the eyes do not move and data from substructures of one or both eyes are acquired and analyzed. With young pediatric patients, a monotonously blinking target is not sufficient to retain attention steadily. We developed a method for modulating the intensity of a point fixation target using sounds appropriate to the child's age and preference. The method was realized as a subsystem of a Pediatric Vision Screener which employs retinal birefringence scanning for detection of central fixation. Twenty-one children, age 2-18, were studied. Modulation of the fixation target using sounds ensured the eye fixated on the target, and with appropriate choice of sounds, performed significantly better than a monotonously blinking target accompanied by a plain beep. The method was particularly effective with children of ages up to 10, after which its benefit disappeared. Typical applications of target modulation would be as supplemental subsystems in pediatric ophthalmic diagnostic devices, such as scanning laser ophthalmoscopes, optical coherence tomography units, retinal birefringence scanners, fundus cameras, and perimeters. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Posterior fixation suture and convergence excess esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen; Auffarth; Kolling

    1998-09-01

    The present study investigates the results of Cuppers' 'Fadenoperation' in patients with non-accommodative convergence excess esotropia. Particular attention is given to postoperative eye alignment at distance fixation. Group 1 (n=96) included patients with a 'normal' convergence excess. The manifest near angles (mean ET 16.73 degrees +/- 6.33 degrees, range 4 degrees -33 degrees ) were roughly twice the size of the distance angles (mean ET 6.50 degrees +/- 3.62 degrees, range 0 degrees -14 degrees ). These patients were treated with a bilateral fadenoperation of the medial recti without additional eye muscle surgery. Three months after surgery, the mean postoperative angles were XT 0.5 degrees +/- 3.3 degrees (range XT 11 degrees -ET 5 degrees ) for distance fixation, and ET 2.7 degrees +/- 3.6 degrees (range XT 5 degrees -ET 14 degrees ) for near fixation, respectively. Postoperative convergent angles at near fixation >ET 10 degrees were present in two patients (1.9%). Group 2 (n=21) included patients with a mean preoperative distance angle of ET 9.2 degrees +/- 3.7 degrees (range 6 degrees -16 degrees ) and a mean preoperative near angle of ET 23.4 degrees +/- 3.1 degrees (range 16 degrees -31 degrees ). These patients were operated on with a bilateral fadenoperation of the medial recti and a simultaneous recession of one or both medial rectus muscles. Mean postoperative angles were XT 0.5 degrees +/- 4.6 degrees (range XT 12 degrees -ET 7 degrees ) for distance fixation and ET 1.4 degrees +/- 4.5 degrees (range XT 8 degrees -ET 13 degrees ) for near fixation, respectively. In this group, 2 patients (10.6%) had a postoperative exotropia >XT 5 degrees at distance fixation, and two patients had residual esotropia>ET 10 degrees at near fixation. Group 3 (n=17) included patients with a pronounced non-accommodative convergence excess. Near angle values (mean of 17.8 degrees +/- 5.3 degrees, range ET 7 degrees -26 degrees ) were several times higher than the distance

  9. Fixation-related potentials : Foveal versus parafoveal target identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Brinkhuis, M.A.B.; Reuderink, B.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2014-01-01

    The P300 event-related potential (ERP) can be used to infer whether an observer is looking at a target or not. Common practice in P300 BCIs and experiments is that observers are asked to fixate their eyes while stimuli are presented. First studies have shown that it is also possible to distinguish

  10. Keeping our eyes on the eyes: the case of Arcimboldo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubic, Andreja; Susac, Ana; Palmovic, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    While contemporaries often viewed his reversible composite heads as scherzi (jokes) and modem art connoisseurs as creative masterpieces, Giuseppe Arcimboldo's ingenious paintings served as inspiring stimuli for the present eye-tracking experiment. One group of participants viewed three chosen paintings in an upright, and another in an upside-down, orientation. We compared how participants viewed three selected areas of interest (AOIs) within the painting when these could, and could not, be identified as a face or distinct facial element (eyes and mouth). The obtained results indicate that the participants fixated the parts of the painting which represent faces more in the upright than in the inverted orientation. Furthermore, in the upright orientation the participants focused more on the upper AOls (eyes) than the lower AOIs (mouth). This was not the case for the inverted orientation of two paintings. In conclusion, the face inversion effect occurs even in this artistic context, and the gaze often goes where the eyes are.

  11. Isolation of Crb1, a mouse homologue of Drosophila crumbs, and analysis of its expression pattern in eye and brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Ghiani, M.; Kok, Y.J.M. de; Wijnholds, J.; Ballabio, A.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Broccoli, V.

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the human Crumbs homologue 1 (CRB1) gene cause severe retinal dystrophies. CRB1 is homologous to Drosophila Crumbs, a protein essential for establishing and maintaining epithelial polarity. We have isolated the mouse orthologue, Crb1, and analyzed its expression pattern in embryonic and

  12. Quantifying patterns of dynamics in eye movement to measure goodness in organization of design elements in interior architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkia, Hasti; Sangari, Arash; Nelson, Mark; Assadi, Amir H.

    2013-03-01

    Architecture brings together diverse elements to enhance the observer's measure of esthetics and the convenience of functionality. Architects often conceptualize synthesis of design elements to invoke the observer's sense of harmony and positive affect. How does an observer's brain respond to harmony of design in interior spaces? One implicit consideration by architects is the role of guided visual attention by observers while navigating indoors. Prior visual experience of natural scenes provides the perceptual basis for Gestalt of design elements. In contrast, Gestalt of organization in design varies according to the architect's decision. We outline a quantitative theory to measure the success in utilizing the observer's psychological factors to achieve the desired positive affect. We outline a unified framework for perception of geometry and motion in interior spaces, which integrates affective and cognitive aspects of human vision in the context of anthropocentric interior design. The affective criteria are derived from contemporary theories of interior design. Our contribution is to demonstrate that the neural computations in an observer's eye movement could be used to elucidate harmony in perception of form, space and motion, thus a measure of goodness of interior design. Through mathematical modeling, we argue the plausibility of the relevant hypotheses.

  13. Eye tracking and the translation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Eye tracking has become increasingly popular as a quantitative research method in translation research. This paper discusses some of the major methodological issues involved in the use of eye tracking in translation research. It focuses specifically on challenges in the analysis and interpretation...... of eye-tracking data as reflections of cognitive processes during translation. Four types of methodological issues are discussed in the paper. The first part discusses the preparatory steps that precede the actual recording of eye-tracking data. The second part examines critically the general assumptions...... linking eye movements to cognitive processing in the context of translation research. The third part of the paper discusses two popular eye-tracking measures often used in translation research, fixations and pupil size, while the fourth part proposes a method to evaluate the quality of eye-tracking data....

  14. Eye tracking and the translation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Eye tracking has become increasingly popular as a quantitative research method in translation research. This paper discusses some of the major methodological issues involved in the use of eye tracking in translation research. It focuses specifically on challenges in the analysis and interpretation...... of eye-tracking data as reflections of cognitive processes during translation. Four types of methodological issues are discussed in the paper. The first part discusses the preparatory steps that precede the actual recording of eye-tracking data. The second part examines critically the general assumptions...... linking eye movements to cognitive processing in the context of translation research. The third part of the paper discusses two popular eye-tracking measures often used in translation research, fixations and pupil size, while the fourth part proposes a method to evaluate the quality of eye-tracking data....

  15. Inferences about predictable events: eye movements during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M G; Meseguer, E; Carreiras, M

    2001-01-01

    Eye fixations were recorded to assess whether, how, and when readers draw inferences about predictable events. Predicting context sentences, or non-predicting control sentences, were presented, followed by continuation sentences in which a target word referred to a predictable event (inferential word) or an unlikely event (non-predictable word). There were no effects on initial target word processing measures, such as launch and landing sites, fixation probability, first-fixation duration, or first-pass reading time. However, relative to the control condition, the predicting context (1) speeded up reanalysis of the inferential word, as revealed by a reduction in second-pass reading time and regressions, and (2) interfered with processing of the non-predictable word, as shown by an increase in regressions. These results indicate that predictive inferences are active at late text integration processes, rather than at early lexical-access processes. The pattern of findings suggests that these inferences involve initial activation of rather general concepts following the inducing context, and that they are completed or refined with delay, after the inferential target word is read.

  16. Driving experience and special skills reflected in eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Atvars, Aigars

    2011-10-01

    When driving a vehicle, people use the central vision both to plan ahead and monitor their performance feedback (research by Donges, 1978 [1], and after). Discussion is ongoing if making eye movements do more than gathering information. Moving eyes may also prepare the following body movements like steering. Different paradigms exist to explore vision in driving. Our perspective was to quantify eye movements and fixation patterns of different proficiency individuals, a driving learner, a novice, an experienced driver and a European level car racer. Thus for safety reasons we started by asking them to follow a video tour through a known city, remote from an infrared eye tracker sampling at 250 Hz. We report that gaze strategy of an experienced driver differs qualitatively from that of an automobile sports master. Quantitative differences only were found between the latter and a driving learner or a novice driver. Experience in a motor action provides skills different from sports training. We are aiming at testing this finding in real world driving.

  17. Disentangling the initiation from the response in joint attention: an eye-tracking study in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeci, L; Narzisi, A; Campatelli, G; Crifaci, G; Calderoni, S; Gagliano, A; Calzone, C; Colombi, C; Pioggia, G; Muratori, F

    2016-05-17

    Joint attention (JA), whose deficit is an early risk marker for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), has two dimensions: (1) responding to JA and (2) initiating JA. Eye-tracking technology has largely been used to investigate responding JA, but rarely to study initiating JA especially in young children with ASD. The aim of this study was to describe the differences in the visual patterns of toddlers with ASD and those with typical development (TD) during both responding JA and initiating JA tasks. Eye-tracking technology was used to monitor the gaze of 17 children with ASD and 15 age-matched children with TD during the presentation of short video sequences involving one responding JA and two initiating JA tasks (initiating JA-1 and initiating JA-2). Gaze accuracy, transitions and fixations were analyzed. No differences were found in the responding JA task between children with ASD and those with TD, whereas, in the initiating JA tasks, different patterns of fixation and transitions were shown between the groups. These results suggest that children with ASD and those with TD show different visual patterns when they are expected to initiate joint attention but not when they respond to joint attention. We hypothesized that differences in transitions and fixations are linked to ASD impairments in visual disengagement from face, in global scanning of the scene and in the ability to anticipate object's action.

  18. Can't Look Away: An Eye-Tracking Based Attentional Disengagement Training for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Gina R A; Möbius, Martin; van Opdorp, Amras; Becker, Eni S; Rinck, Mike

    To address shortcomings of purely reaction-time based attentional bias modification (ABM) paradigms, we developed an ABM task that is controlled by eye-tracking. This task allows to assess and train both disengagement from negative pictures and maintained attention to positive pictures. As a proof-of-principle study with an unselected student sample, this positive training (PT; N = 44) was compared to a negative training (NT; N = 42), which reinforced the opposite attentional pattern. Importantly, training trials were completed only if participants performed the correct gaze patterns. Results showed that higher depression levels were associated with slower disengagement from negative stimuli at baseline. As expected, the PT induced longer fixations on positive pictures and faster disengagement from negative pictures. The NT showed no changes in attentional processes. The groups did not differ in mood reactivity and recovery from a stressor. Advantages of using eye-tracking in ABM and potential applications of the training are discussed.

  19. Eye Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  20. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... will invariably lead to lid swelling, making the examination far more difficult. ... protect the eye with a pad or shield, give tetanus prophylaxis and refer. ... A study on penetrating eye injuries in South African children found.

  1. Transient cortical excitation at the onset of visual fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkai, Csaba; Lakatos, Peter; Chen, Chi-Ming; Pincze, Zsuzsa; Karmos, Gyorgy; Schroeder, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Primates actively examine the visual world by rapidly shifting gaze (fixation) over the elements in a scene. Despite this fact, we typically study vision by presenting stimuli with gaze held constant. To better understand the dynamics of natural vision, we examined how the onset of visual fixation affects ongoing neuronal activity in the absence of visual stimulation. We used multiunit activity and current source density measurements to index neuronal firing patterns and underlying synaptic processes in macaque V1. Initial averaging of neural activity synchronized to the onset of fixation suggested that a brief period of cortical excitation follows each fixation. Subsequent single-trial analyses revealed that 1) neuronal oscillation phase transits from random to a highly organized state just after the fixation onset, 2) this phase concentration is accompanied by increased spectral power in several frequency bands, and 3) visual response amplitude is enhanced at the specific oscillatory phase associated with fixation. We hypothesize that nonvisual inputs are used by the brain to increase cortical excitability at fixation onset, thus "priming" the system for new visual inputs generated at fixation. Despite remaining mechanistic questions, it appears that analysis of fixation-related responses may be useful in studying natural vision.

  2. Oxytocin increases eye contact during a real-time, naturalistic social interaction in males with and without autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, B; Lombardo, M V; Heinrichs, M; Chakrabarti, B; Sule, A; Deakin, J B; Bethlehem, R A I; Dickens, L; Mooney, N; Sipple, J A N; Thiemann, P; Baron-Cohen, S

    2015-02-10

    Autism spectrum conditions (autism) affect ~1% of the population and are characterized by deficits in social communication. Oxytocin has been widely reported to affect social-communicative function and its neural underpinnings. Here we report the first evidence that intranasal oxytocin administration improves a core problem that individuals with autism have in using eye contact appropriately in real-world social settings. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design is used to examine how intranasal administration of 24 IU of oxytocin affects gaze behavior for 32 adult males with autism and 34 controls in a real-time interaction with a researcher. This interactive paradigm bypasses many of the limitations encountered with conventional static or computer-based stimuli. Eye movements are recorded using eye tracking, providing an objective measurement of looking patterns. The measure is shown to be sensitive to the reduced eye contact commonly reported in autism, with the autism group spending less time looking to the eye region of the face than controls. Oxytocin administration selectively enhanced gaze to the eyes in both the autism and control groups (transformed mean eye-fixation difference per second=0.082; 95% CI:0.025-0.14, P=0.006). Within the autism group, oxytocin has the most effect on fixation duration in individuals with impaired levels of eye contact at baseline (Cohen's d=0.86). These findings demonstrate that the potential benefits of oxytocin in autism extend to a real-time interaction, providing evidence of a therapeutic effect in a key aspect of social communication.

  3. Posterior Iris Fixated Intraocular Lens for Pediatric Traumatic Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, V.; Balasubramanian, Preethi; Heralgi, Mallikarjun M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the postoperative visual outcomes and complications of posterior iris fixated intraocular lens (IFIOL) implantation for pediatric traumatic cataract. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was performed of all the pediatric traumatic cataract patients who underwent lens removal and iris fixated lens implantation due to inadequate capsular support with or without corneal tear repair between January 2009 and December 2013. Data were collected and analyzed on the preoperative and postoperative visual outcomes and complications. Results: Twenty-five children (25 eyes; 21 males and 4 females) were enrolled with the mean age of 11 ± 4.0 years. There were 72% of eyes that underwent primary cataract removal with IFIOL implantation. Twenty-eight percent of eyes underwent corneal tear repair prior to intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand motion in 32% eyes, counting fingers in 24%, and perception of light in 44%. Postoperative BCVA of 0-0.2 logarithm of minimum angle of resolution was reported in the 64% of eyes. One eye developed secondary glaucoma, one eye underwent re-enclavation, and none developed retinal complications. Conclusion: Posterior IFIOL implantation resulted in an improved visual outcome, low incidence of postoperative complications, and is a good alternative to other IOL, in the cases of pediatric traumatic cataract without adequate capsular support. PMID:27162456

  4. Eye movements and information geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Reiner

    2016-08-01

    The human visual system uses eye movements to gather visual information. They act as visual scanning processes and can roughly be divided into two different types: small movements around fixation points and larger movements between fixation points. The processes are often modeled as random walks, and recent models based on heavy tail distributions, also known as Levý flights, have been used in these investigations. In contrast to these approaches we do not model the stochastic processes, but we will show that the step lengths of the movements between fixation points follow generalized Pareto distributions (GPDs). We will use general arguments from the theory of extreme value statistics to motivate the usage of the GPD and show empirically that the GPDs provide good fits for measured eye tracking data. In the framework of information geometry the GPDs with a common threshold form a two-dimensional Riemann manifold with the Fisher information matrix as a metric. We compute the Fisher information matrix for the GPDs and introduce a feature vector describing a GPD by its parameters and different geometrical properties of its Fisher information matrix. In our statistical analysis we use eye tracker measurements in a database with 15 observers viewing 1003 images under free-viewing conditions. We use Matlab functions with their standard parameter settings and show that a naive Bayes classifier using the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix provides a high classification rate identifying the 15 observers in the database.

  5. Iris-fixated anterior chamber phakic intraocular lens for myopia moves posteriorly with mydriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, L.P.J.; Doors, M.; Berendschot, T.T.; Brabander, J. De; Webers, C.A.; Nuijts, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elucidate the physiological characteristics of eyes implanted with iris-fixated anterior chamber phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs), which are increasingly being used for the correction of higher myopic and hyperopic refractive errors. METHODS: In a case series of 20 patients (39 eyes), t

  6. Assessment of Macular Sensitivity and Fixation Stability by MP-1 Microperimetry in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Küsbeci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate macular light sensitivity and fixation stability in subjects with clinically significant macular edema (CSME related to diabetes mellitus. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Thirty eyes of 22 patients with CSME, as defined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study, and 32 eyes of 32 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Microperimetry was performed with the Micro Perimeter MP-1 in both groups. The mean retinal sensitivities at central 4°, at central 12° and at central 20° were measured. The mean extent of preferred retinal locus (PRL, fixation stability and fixation location were calculated using fixation test in MP-1 microperimeter. Statistical analysis was performed using student t-test and chisquare test. Re sults: The mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was significantly lower in the CSME group than the control group (p<0.001. The mean retinal sensitivities at central 4°, 12° and 20° areas were significantly lower in the CSME group compared to the control group (p<0.001, for each central degrees. In subjects with CSME, fixation stability was detected as stable in 8 (26.7% eyes, relatively unstable in 21 (70% eyes and unstable in 1 (3.3% eye. Significant decrease was found in fixation stability and fixation location scores in eyes with CSME compared to control subjects (p<0.001. The difference of mean extent in PRL between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.001. Dis cus si on: The macular light sensitivity and fixation stability are affected in patients with CSME. MP-1 micropeimetry might be helpful to evaluate the extent of PRL and useful for evaluation of severity and progression of diabetic macular edema. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 310-5

  7. The effect of suture-button fixation on simulated syndesmotic malreduction: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Robert W; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Goetz, Jessica E; Femino, John; Amendola, Annunziato; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2014-10-15

    The accuracy of reduction of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruptions has been associated with the clinical outcome. Suture-button fixation of the syndesmosis is a dynamic alternative mode of fixation. We hypothesized that with deliberate clamp-induced malreduction, suture-button fixation of the syndesmosis would allow a more anatomic post-fixation position compared with screw fixation. Forty-eight syndesmotic fixations were performed on twelve through-knee cadaveric specimens. The syndesmosis was destabilized and off-axis clamping was used to produce both anterior and posterior malreduction patterns. In twelve scenarios (six anterior and six posterior malreductions), syndesmotic screw fixation was used, followed by computed tomography. With tenacula holding the malreduction, the syndesmosis screws were exchanged for a suture-button construct and the specimens underwent a subsequent computed tomography scan. In the other twelve scenarios, the suture-button fixation was achieved first, followed by screw fixation. Standardized measurements of anterior-posterior and medial-lateral fibular displacement were performed by two observers blinded to the method of fixation. With anterior off-axis clamping, the mean sagittal malreduction was 2.7 ± 2.0 mm with screw fixation and 1.0 ± 1.0 mm with suture-button fixation (p = 0.02). With posterior off-axis clamping, the sagittal malreduction was 7.2 ± 2.3 mm with screw fixation and 0.5 ± 1.4 mm with suture-button fixation (p button fixation of the syndesmosis results in less post-fixation displacement compared with screw fixation. The suture button's ability to allow for natural correction of deliberate malreduction was greatest with posterior off-axis clamping. Although the clinical relevance is unknown, dynamic syndesmotic fixation may mitigate clamp-induced malreduction. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  8. Sulcus Fixation of Foldable Intraocular Lenses Guided by Ultrasound Biomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shasha; Qin, Tingyu; Wang, Shengnan; Lu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of suture fixation of foldable intraocular lens (IOL) in ciliary sulcus guided by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Thirty-five eyes of 32 cases needing suture fixation of foldable IOL in ciliary sulcus in our hospital were collected and divided into two groups: group A and group B. In group A, UBM was performed on 19 eyes of 17 cases before surgery to locate the projection position of ciliary sulcus in iris surface. In group B, the traditional sulcus fixation of IOL was performed on 16 eyes of 15 cases. The inserting position of needles, the haptics position of IOL and the IOL tilt, and decentration were observed by UBM examination 3 months after the surgery. Meanwhile, the vision and contrast sensitivity were analysed. Results. The differences in inserting position of the needle, the IOL tilt and decentration, the ratio of IOL haptics in sulcus, and uncorrected visual acuity were statistically significant (P 0.05). Conclusions. Sulcus fixation of foldable IOL aided by UBM can increase the accuracy of IOL haptics implanted into ciliary sulcus and reduce the IOL tilt and decentration.

  9. Intraocular lens iris fixation. Clinical and macular OCT outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Rojas Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the efficacy, clinical outcomes, visual acuity (VA, incidence of adverse effects, and complications of peripheral iris fixation of 3-piece acrylic IOLs in eyes lacking capsular support. Thirteen patients who underwent implantation and peripheral iris fixation of a 3-piece foldable acrylic PC IOL for aphakia in the absence of capsular support were followed after surgery. Clinical outcomes and macular SD-OCT (Cirrus OCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Germany were analyzed. Findings The final CDVA was 20/40 or better in 8 eyes (62%, 20/60 or better in 12 eyes (92%, and one case of 20/80 due to corneal astigmatism and mild persistent edema. No intraoperative complications were reported. There were seven cases of medically controlled ocular hypertension after surgery due to the presence of viscoelastic in the AC. There were no cases of cystoid macular edema, chronic iridocyclitis, IOL subluxation, pigment dispersion, or glaucoma. Macular edema did not develop in any case by means of SD-OCT. Conclusions We think that this technique for iris suture fixation provides safe and effective results. Patients had substantial improvements in UDVA and CDVA. This surgical strategy may be individualized however; age, cornea status, angle structures, iris anatomy, and glaucoma are important considerations in selecting candidates for an appropriate IOL fixation method.

  10. Sulcus Fixation of Foldable Intraocular Lenses Guided by Ultrasound Biomicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of suture fixation of foldable intraocular lens (IOL in ciliary sulcus guided by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM. Methods. Thirty-five eyes of 32 cases needing suture fixation of foldable IOL in ciliary sulcus in our hospital were collected and divided into two groups: group A and group B. In group A, UBM was performed on 19 eyes of 17 cases before surgery to locate the projection position of ciliary sulcus in iris surface. In group B, the traditional sulcus fixation of IOL was performed on 16 eyes of 15 cases. The inserting position of needles, the haptics position of IOL and the IOL tilt, and decentration were observed by UBM examination 3 months after the surgery. Meanwhile, the vision and contrast sensitivity were analysed. Results. The differences in inserting position of the needle, the IOL tilt and decentration, the ratio of IOL haptics in sulcus, and uncorrected visual acuity were statistically significant (P0.05. Conclusions. Sulcus fixation of foldable IOL aided by UBM can increase the accuracy of IOL haptics implanted into ciliary sulcus and reduce the IOL tilt and decentration.

  11. Visual attention to emotional face in schizophrenia: an eye tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mania Asgharpour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in the processing of facial emotions have been reported extensively in patients with schizophrenia. To explore whether restricted attention is the cause of impaired emotion processing in these patients, we examined visual attention through tracking eye movements in response to emotional and neutral face stimuli in a group of patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. We also examined the correlation between visual attention allocation and symptoms severity in our patient group.Thirty adult patients with schizophrenia and 30 matched healthy controls participated in this study. Visual attention data were recorded while participants passively viewed emotional-neutral face pairs for 500 ms. The relationship between the visual attention and symptoms severity were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS in the schizophrenia group. Repeated Measures ANOVAs were used to compare the groups.Comparing the number of fixations made during face-pairs presentation, we found that patients with schizophrenia made fewer fixations on faces, regardless of the expression of the face. Analysis of the number of fixations on negative-neutral pairs also revealed that the patients made fewer fixations on both neutral and negative faces. Analysis of number of fixations on positive-neutral pairs only showed more fixations on positive relative to neutral expressions in both groups. We found no correlations between visual attention pattern to faces and symptom severity in schizophrenic patients.The results of this study suggest that the facial recognition deficit in schizophrenia is related to decreased attention to face stimuli. Finding of no difference in visual attention for positive-neutral face pairs between the groups is in line with studies that have shown increased ability to positive emotional perception in these patients.

  12. Chromatic contrast sensitivity during optokinetic nystagmus, visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex, and smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Alexander C; Braun, Doris I; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2009-05-01

    Recently we showed that sensitivity for chromatic- and high-spatial frequency luminance stimuli is enhanced during smooth-pursuit eye movements (SPEMs). Here we investigated whether this enhancement is a general property of slow eye movements. Besides SPEM there are two other classes of eye movements that operate in a similar range of eye velocities: the optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) is a reflexive pattern of alternating fast and slow eye movements elicited by wide-field visual motion and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes the gaze during head movements. In a natural environment all three classes of eye movements act synergistically to allow clear central vision during self- and object motion. To test whether the same improvement of chromatic sensitivity occurs during all of these eye movements, we measured human detection performance of chromatic and luminance line stimuli during OKN and contrast sensitivity during VOR and SPEM at comparable velocities. For comparison, performance in the same tasks was tested during fixation. During the slow phase of OKN we found a similar enhancement of chromatic detection rate like that during SPEM, whereas no enhancement was observable during VOR. This result indicates similarities between slow-phase OKN and SPEM, which are distinct from VOR.

  13. Genome-wide DNA binding pattern of the homeodomain transcription factor Sine oculis (So in the developing eye of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Jusiak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eye of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a highly tractable genetic model system for the study of animal development, and many genes that regulate Drosophila eye formation have homologs implicated in human development and disease. Among these is the homeobox gene sine oculis (so, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor (TF that is both necessary for eye development and sufficient to reprogram a subset of cells outside the normal eye field toward an eye fate. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of So binding to DNA prepared from developing Drosophila eye tissue in order to identify candidate direct targets of So-mediated transcriptional regulation, as described in our recent article [20]. The data are available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE52943. Here we describe the methods, data analysis, and quality control of our So ChIP-seq dataset.

  14. Posterior transodontoid fixation: A new fixation (Kotil technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Kotil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior odontoid screw fixation or posterior C1-2 fusion techniques are routinely used in the treatment of Type II odontoid fractures, but these techniques may be inadequate in some types of odontoid fractures. In this new technique (Kotil technique, through a posterior bilateral approach, transarticular screw fixation was performed at the non-dominant vertebral artery (VA side and posterior transodontoid fixation technique was performed at the dominant VA side. C1-2 complex fusion was aimed with unilateral transarticular fixation and odontoid fixation with posterior transodontoid screw fixation. Cervical spinal computed tomography (CT of a 40-year-old male patient involved in a motor vehicle accident revealed an anteriorly dislocated Type II oblique dens fracture, not reducible by closed traction. Before the operation, the patient was found to have a dominant right VA with Doppler ultrasound. He was operated through a posterior approach. At first, transarticular screw fixation was performed at the non-dominant (left side, and then fixation of the odontoid fracture was achieved by directing the contralateral screw (supplemental screw medially and toward the apex. Cancellous autograft was scattered for fusion without the need for structural bone graft or wiring. Postoperative cervical spinal CT of the patient revealed that stabilization was maintained with transarticular screw fixation and reduction and fixation of the odontoid process was achieved completely by posterior transodontoid screw fixation. The patient is at the sixth month of follow-up and complete fusion has developed. With this new surgical technique, C1-2 fusion is maintained with transarticular screw fixation and odontoid process is fixed by concomitant contralateral posterior transodontoid screw (supplemental screw fixation; thus, this technique both stabilizes the C1-2 complex and fixes the odontoid process and the corpus in atypical odontoid fractures, appearing as an

  15. Gaze shifts and fixations dominate gaze behavior of walking cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Trevor J.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Guttentag, Andrew I.; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri A.; Shah, Neet A.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2014-01-01

    Vision is important for locomotion in complex environments. How it is used to guide stepping is not well understood. We used an eye search coil technique combined with an active marker-based head recording system to characterize the gaze patterns of cats walking over terrains of different complexity: (1) on a flat surface in the dark when no visual information was available, (2) on the flat surface in light when visual information was available but not required, (3) along the highly structured but regular and familiar surface of a horizontal ladder, a task for which visual guidance of stepping was required, and (4) along a pathway cluttered with many small stones, an irregularly structured surface that was new each day. Three cats walked in a 2.5 m corridor, and 958 passages were analyzed. Gaze activity during the time when the gaze was directed at the walking surface was subdivided into four behaviors based on speed of gaze movement along the surface: gaze shift (fast movement), gaze fixation (no movement), constant gaze (movement at the body’s speed), and slow gaze (the remainder). We found that gaze shifts and fixations dominated the cats’ gaze behavior during all locomotor tasks, jointly occupying 62–84% of the time when the gaze was directed at the surface. As visual complexity of the surface and demand on visual guidance of stepping increased, cats spent more time looking at the surface, looked closer to them, and switched between gaze behaviors more often. During both visually guided locomotor tasks, gaze behaviors predominantly followed a repeated cycle of forward gaze shift followed by fixation. We call this behavior “gaze stepping”. Each gaze shift took gaze to a site approximately 75–80 cm in front of the cat, which the cat reached in 0.7–1.2 s and 1.1–1.6 strides. Constant gaze occupied only 5–21% of the time cats spent looking at the walking surface. PMID:24973656

  16. Unilateral Amblyopia Affects Two Eyes: Fellow Eye Deficits in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Kimberly; Giaschi, Deborah

    2017-03-01

    Unilateral amblyopia is a visual disorder that arises after selective disruption of visual input to one eye during critical periods of development. In the clinic, amblyopia is understood as poor visual acuity in an eye that was deprived of pattern vision early in life. By its nature, however, amblyopia has an adverse effect on the development of a binocular visual system and the interactions between signals from two eyes. Visual functions aside from visual acuity are impacted, and many studies have indicated compromised sensitivity in the fellow eye even though it demonstrates normal visual acuity. While these fellow eye deficits have been noted, no overarching theory has been proposed to describe why and under what conditions the fellow eye is impacted by amblyopia. Here, we consider four explanations that may account for decreased fellow eye sensitivity: the fellow eye is adversely impacted by treatment for amblyopia; the maturation of the fellow eye is delayed by amblyopia; fellow eye sensitivity is impacted for visual functions that rely on binocular cortex; and fellow eye deficits reflect an adaptive mechanism that works to equalize the sensitivity of the two eyes. To evaluate these ideas, we describe five visual functions that are commonly reported to be deficient in the amblyopic eye (hyperacuity, contrast sensitivity, spatial integration, global motion, and motion-defined form), and unify the current evidence for fellow eye deficits. Further research targeted at exploring fellow eye deficits in amblyopia will provide us with a broader understanding of normal visual development and how amblyopia impacts the developing visual system.

  17. Feasibility of eye-tracking technology to quantify expertise in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kou, Alex; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R; Howard, Steven K

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) requires an advanced procedural skill set that incorporates both sonographic knowledge of relevant anatomy as well as technical proficiency in needle manipulation in order to achieve a successful outcome. Understanding how to differentiate a novice from an expert in UGRA using a quantifiable tool may be useful for comparing educational interventions that could improve the rate at which one develops expertise. Exploring the gaze pattern of individuals performing a task has been used to evaluate expertise in many different disciplines, including medicine. However, the use of eye-tracking technology has not been previously applied to UGRA. The purpose of this preliminary study is to establish the feasibility of applying such technology as a measurement tool for comparing procedural expertise in UGRA. eye-tracking data were collected from one expert and one novice utilizing Tobii Glasses 2 while performing a simulated ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in a gel phantom model. Area of interest fixations were recorded and heat maps of gaze fixations were created. Results suggest a potential application of eye-tracking technology in the assessment of UGRA learning and performance.

  18. Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of the Drosophila eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oros, Sarah M.; Tare, Meghana; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Axial patterning is crucial for organogenesis. During Drosophila eye development, dorso-ventral (DV) axis determination is the first lineage restriction event. The eye primordium begins with a default ventral fate, on which the dorsal eye fate is established by expression of the GATA-1 transcription factor pannier (pnr). Earlier, it was suggested that loss of pnr function induces enlargement in the dorsal eye due to ectopic equator formation. Interestingly, we found that in addition to regulating DV patterning, pnr suppresses the eye fate by downregulating the core retinal determination genes eyes absent (eya), sine oculis (so) and dacshund (dac) to define the dorsal eye margin. We found that pnr acts downstream of Ey and affect the retinal determination pathway by suppressing eya. Further analysis of the “eye suppression” function of pnr revealed that this function is likely mediated through suppression of the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) and is independent of homothorax (hth), a negative regulator of eye. Pnr expression is restricted to the peripodial membrane on the dorsal eye margin, which gives rise to head structures around the eye, and pnr is not expressed in the eye disc proper that forms the retina. Thus, pnr has dual function, during early developmental stages pnr is involved in axial patterning whereas later it promotes the head specific fate. These studies will help in understanding the developmental regulation of boundary formation of the eye field on the dorsal eye margin. PMID:20691679

  19. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: ... your eyes do not produce enough tears, it is called dry eye. Dry eye is also when ...

  1. Facts About Pink Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis) > Facts About Pink Eye Facts About Pink Eye Pink eye is one of ... for preventing eye infections. Last Reviewed: November 2015 Fact Sheet Blurb The National Eye Institute (NEI) is ...

  2. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  3. Comparing the fixational and functional preferred retinal location in a pointing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brian; Walker, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Patients with central vision loss (CVL) typically adopt eccentric viewing strategies using a preferred retinal locus (PRL) in peripheral retina. Clinically, the PRL is defined monocularly as the area of peripheral retina used to fixate small stimuli. It is not clear if this fixational PRL describes the same portion of peripheral retina used during dynamic binocular eye-hand coordination tasks. We studied this question with four participants each with a unique CVL history. Using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope, we measured participants' monocular visual fields and the location and stability of their fixational PRLs. Participants' monocular and binocular visual fields were also evaluated using a computer monitor and eye tracker. Lastly, eye-hand coordination was tested over several trials where participants pointed to and touched a small target on a touchscreen monitor. Trials were blocked and carried out monocularly and binocularly, with a target appearing at 5° or 15° from screen center, in one of 8 locations. During pointing, our participants often exhibited long movement durations, an increased number of eye movements and impaired accuracy, especially in monocular conditions. However, these compensatory changes in behavior did not consistently worsen when loci beyond the fixational PRL were used. While fixational PRL size, location and fixation stability provide a necessary description of behavior, they are not sufficient to capture the pointing PRL used in this task. Generally, patients use a larger portion of peripheral retina than one might expect from measures of the fixational PRL alone, when pointing to a salient target without time constraints. While the fixational and pointing PRLs often overlap, the fixational PRL does not predict the large area of peripheral retina that can be used.

  4. Visual memory for fixated regions of natural images dissociates attraction and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Ian; Rajashekar, Umesh; Bovik, Alan C; Cormack, Lawrence K

    2009-01-01

    Recognition memory for fixated regions from briefly viewed full-screen natural images is examined. Low-level image statistics reveal that observers fixated, on average (pooled across images and observers), image regions that possessed greater visual saliency than non-fixated regions, a finding that is robust across multiple fixation indices. Recognition-memory performance indicates that, of the fixation loci tested, observers were adept at recognising those with a particular profile of image statistics; visual saliency was found to be attenuated for unrecognised loci, despite that all regions were freely fixated. Furthermore, although elevated luminance was the local image statistic found to discriminate least between human and random image locations, it was the greatest predictor of recognition-memory performance, demonstrating a dissociation between image features that draw fixations and those that support visual memory. An analysis of corresponding eye movements indicates that image regions fixated via short-distance saccades enjoyed better recognition-memory performance, alluding to a focal rather than ambient mode of processing. Recognised image regions were more likely to have originated from areas evaluated (a posteriori) to have higher fixation density, a numerical metric of local interest. Surprisingly, memory for image regions fixated later in the viewing period exhibited no recency advantage, despite (typically) also being longer in duration, a finding for which a number of explanations are posited.

  5. Individual Differences in Spatial Orientation Performances: An Eye Tracking Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacide Güzin Mazman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes two studies. In study 1, the computerized version of Spatial Orientation Test (Kozhevnikov & Hegarty, 2001 was standardized for determining the norm values for Turkish undergraduate students as well as demonstrating the reliability and validity of the test. In Study 1, 101 undergraduate students from two different departments were recruited and the data were collected with computerized spatial orientation test together with a demographic information form. Descriptive statistics, independent sample t test and one way ANOVA were used in data analysis. Statistical analyses revealed out that gender and years of computer experience have significant effect on spatial orientation ability scores. Test-retest reliability coefficient was found for total accuracy score as r= .778 and r=.634 for total reaction time. As a result of discriminant validity study, the correlation between the spatial orientation and mental rotation test scores was found to be very low and not significant. In study 2, individual differences between low and high spatial orientation ability groups during performing “Spatial Orientation Test” were examined through eye movements. Five high and five low spatial orientation ability level students were asked to participate in the second study. While performing Spatial Orientation Test, their eye movements were recorded. The findings indicated that there were significant differences in eye movements between different spatial orientation ability levels in terms of fixation duration. Furthermore it was found that high and low level spatial orientation level groups solved problems with different solution patterns.

  6. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes to see millions of colors. Helping You See It All Rods and cones process the light to give you the total picture. You're ... get cloudy, causing a cataract . A cataract prevents light from reaching the retina and makes it difficult to see. The eyes you have will be yours forever — ...

  7. Eyes - bulging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emotional support is important. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if: You have bulging eyes and the cause has not yet been diagnosed. Bulging eyes are accompanied by other symptoms. ... The provider will ask about your medical history and do a physical exam. Some questions ...

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  9. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ducat, Daniel C.; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing...

  10. Synthetic biology for CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals is a potential approach to reduce CO2 emission and fossil-fuel consumption. Autotrophic microbes can utilize energy from light, hydrogen, or sulfur to assimilate atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds at ambient temperature and pressure. This provides a feasible way for biological production of fuels and chemicals from CO2 under normal conditions. Recently great progress has been made in this research area, and dozens of CO2-derived fuels and chemicals have been reported to be synthesized by autotrophic microbes. This is accompanied by investigations into natural CO2-fixation pathways and the rapid development of new technologies in synthetic biology. This review first summarizes the six natural CO2-fixation pathways reported to date, followed by an overview of recent progress in the design and engineering of CO2-fixation pathways as well as energy supply patterns using the concept and tools of synthetic biology. Finally, we will discuss future prospects in biological fixation of CO2.

  11. Viewpoint Consistency: An Eye Movement Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Cristino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements have been widely studied, using images and videos in laboratories or portable eye trackers in the real world. Although a good understanding of the saccadic system and extensive models of gaze have been developed over the years, only a few studies have focused on the consistency of eye movements across viewpoints. We have developed a new technique to compute and map the depth of collected eye movements on stimuli rendered from 3D mesh objects using a traditional corneal reflection eye tracker (SR Eyelink 1000. Having eye movements mapped into 3D space (and not on an image space allowed us to compare fixations across viewpoints. Fixation sequences (scanpaths were also studied across viewpoints using the ScanMatch method (Cristino et al 2010, Behavioural and Research Methods 42, 692–700, extended to work with 3D eye movements. In a set of experiments where participants were asked to perform a recognition task on either a set of objects or faces, we recorded their gaze while performing the task. Participants either viewed the stimuli in 2D or using anaglyph glasses. The stimuli were shown from different viewpoints during the learning and testing phases. A high degree of gaze consistency was found across the different viewpoints, particularly between learning and testing phases. Scanpaths were also similar across viewpoints, suggesting not only that the gazed spatial locations are alike, but also their temporal order.

  12. Vestibulo-Cervico-Ocular Responses and Tracking Eye Movements after Prolonged Exposure to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Naumov, I. A.; Azarov, K. A.; Sagalovitch, S. V.; Reschke, Millard F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-01-01

    The vestibular function and tracking eye movements were investigated in 12 Russian crew members of ISS missions on days 1(2), 4(5-6), and 8(9-10) after prolonged exposure to microgravity (126 to 195 days). The spontaneous oculomotor activity, static torsional otolith-cervico-ocular reflex, dynamic vestibulo-cervico-ocular responses, vestibular reactivity, tracking eye movements, and gaze-holding were studied using videooculography (VOG) and electrooculography (EOG) for parallel eye movement recording. On post-flight days 1-2 (R+1-2) some cosmonauts demonstrated: - an increased spontaneous oculomotor activity (floating eye movements, spontaneous nystagmus of the typical and atypical form, square wave jerks, gaze nystagmus) with the head held in the vertical position; - suppressed otolith function (absent or reduced by one half amplitude of torsional compensatory eye counter-rolling) with the head inclined statically right- or leftward by 300; - increased vestibular reactivity (lowered threshold and increased intensity of the vestibular nystagmus) during head turns around the longitudinal body axis at 0.125 Hz; - a significant change in the accuracy, velocity, and temporal characteristics of the eye tracking. The pattern, depth, dynamics, and velocity of the vestibular function and tracking eye movements recovery varied with individual participants in the investigation. However, there were also regular responses during readaptation to the normal gravity: - suppression of the otolith function was typically accompanied by an exaggerated vestibular reactivity; - the structure of visual tracking (the accuracy of fixational eye rotations, smooth tracking, and gaze-holding) was disturbed (the appearance of correcting saccades, the transition of smooth tracking to saccadic tracking) only in those cosmonauts who, in parallel to an increased reactivity of the vestibular input, also had central changes in the oculomotor system (spontaneous nystagmus, gaze nystagmus).

  13. Feasibility of utilizing a commercial eye tracker to assess electronic health record use during patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jeffrey Allen; Stephenson, Laurel E; Gorsuch, Adriel; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Mohan, Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    Numerous reports describe unintended consequences of electronic health record implementation. Having previously described physicians' failures to recognize patient safety issues within our electronic health record simulation environment, we now report on our use of eye and screen-tracking technology to understand factors associated with poor error recognition during an intensive care unit-based electronic health record simulation. We linked performance on the simulation to standard eye and screen-tracking readouts including number of fixations, saccades, mouse clicks and screens visited. In addition, we developed an overall Composite Eye Tracking score which measured when, where and how often each safety item was viewed. For 39 participants, the Composite Eye Tracking score correlated with performance on the simulation (p = 0.004). Overall, the improved performance was associated with a pattern of rapid scanning of data manifested by increased number of screens visited (p = 0.001), mouse clicks (p = 0.03) and saccades (p = 0.004). Eye tracking can be successfully integrated into electronic health record-based simulation and provides a surrogate measure of cognitive decision making and electronic health record usability.

  14. Online webcam-based eye tracking in cognitive science: A first look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmelmann, Kilian; Weigelt, Sarah

    2017-06-07

    Online experimentation is emerging in many areas of cognitive psychology as a viable alternative or supplement to classical in-lab experimentation. While performance- and reaction-time-based paradigms are covered in recent studies, one instrument of cognitive psychology has not received much attention up to now: eye tracking. In this study, we used JavaScript-based eye tracking algorithms recently made available by Papoutsaki et al. (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 2016) together with consumer-grade webcams to investigate the potential of online eye tracking to benefit from the common advantages of online data conduction. We compared three in-lab conducted tasks (fixation, pursuit, and free viewing) with online-acquired data to analyze the spatial precision in the first two, and replicability of well-known gazing patterns in the third task. Our results indicate that in-lab data exhibit an offset of about 172 px (15% of screen size, 3.94° visual angle) in the fixation task, while online data is slightly less accurate (18% of screen size, 207 px), and shows higher variance. The same results were found for the pursuit task with a constant offset during the stimulus movement (211 px in-lab, 216 px online). In the free-viewing task, we were able to replicate the high attention attribution to eyes (28.25%) compared to other key regions like the nose (9.71%) and mouth (4.00%). Overall, we found web technology-based eye tracking to be suitable for all three tasks and are confident that the required hard- and software will be improved continuously for even more sophisticated experimental paradigms in all of cognitive psychology.

  15. A neural computation for visual acuity in the presence of eye movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaq Pitkow

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans can distinguish visual stimuli that differ by features the size of only a few photoreceptors. This is possible despite the incessant image motion due to fixational eye movements, which can be many times larger than the features to be distinguished. To perform well, the brain must identify the retinal firing patterns induced by the stimulus while discounting similar patterns caused by spontaneous retinal activity. This is a challenge since the trajectory of the eye movements, and consequently, the stimulus position, are unknown. We derive a decision rule for using retinal spike trains to discriminate between two stimuli, given that their retinal image moves with an unknown random walk trajectory. This algorithm dynamically estimates the probability of the stimulus at different retinal locations, and uses this to modulate the influence of retinal spikes acquired later. Applied to a simple orientation-discrimination task, the algorithm performance is consistent with human acuity, whereas naive strategies that neglect eye movements perform much worse. We then show how a simple, biologically plausible neural network could implement this algorithm using a local, activity-dependent gain and lateral interactions approximately matched to the statistics of eye movements. Finally, we discuss evidence that such a network could be operating in the primary visual cortex.

  16. Developing a Novel Eye Tracking Paradigm to Assess Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Feasibility Study of the Bethesda Eye and Attention Measure (BEAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    voluntary and involuntary fixation mechanisms ( Guyton & Hall, 2006, 2011). Voluntary fixation movements allow a person to willfully move their eyes...onto a given object, and they are controlled in bilateral cortical fields in the premotor cortex of the frontal lobes ( Guyton & Hall, 2006, 2011...controlled by secondary visual areas in the occipital cortex ( Guyton & Hall, 2006, 2011). Involuntary and voluntary fixation movements work in concert

  17. SR and LR Union Suture for the Treatment of Myopic Strabismus Fixus: Is Scleral Fixation Necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol P. S. Lam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of scleral fixation SR and LR union suture and nonscleral fixation union suture for the treatment of myopic strabismus fixus. Methods. Retrospective review of 32 eyes of 22 patients with myopic strabismus fixus who had undergone union suture of superior rectus (SR and lateral rectus (LR with or without scleral fixation, and follow-up longer than 6 months at Hong Kong Eye Hospital from 2006 to 2013. Surgical techniques and outcomes in terms of ocular alignment are analyzed. Results. There is significant overall improvement both in postoperative angle of esodeviation (P0.05. Conclusions. Union suture of SR and LR is an effective procedure in correcting myopic strabismus fixus. Fixation of the union suture to the sclera does not improve surgical outcome.

  18. Searching and fixating: scale-invariance vs. characteristic timescales in attentional processes

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, D P; Mishra, R K

    2011-01-01

    In an experiment involving semantic search, the visual movements of sample populations subjected to visual and aural input were tracked in a taskless paradigm. The probability distributions of saccades and fixations were obtained and analyzed. Scale-invariance was observed in the saccadic distributions, while the fixation distributions revealed the presence of a characteristic (attentional) time scale for literate subjects. A detailed analysis of our results suggests that saccadic eye motions are an example of Levy, rather than Brownian, dynamics.

  19. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory.

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Brenda Pagan- ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  2. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd ... your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  3. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, ...

  4. External fixators in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, V; Srivastava, A; PalaniKumar, C; Daniel, A J; Mathews, V; Babu, N; Chandy, M; Sundararaj, G D

    2004-01-01

    External fixators (EF) are not commonly used for patients with haemophilia. We describe the use of EF (Ilizarov, AO- uni- and bi-planar fixators and Charnley clamp) in nine patients (mean age: 19.2 years; range: 9-37) with haemophilia for the following indications - arthrodesis of infected joints, treatment of open fractures and osteoclasis. EF required an average of nine skin punctures [range: 4-17 were maintained for a period of 15 weeks (range: 8-29.5), without regular factor replacement, till bone healing was adequate and were removed with a single dose of factor infusion]. The mean preoperative factor level achieved was 85% (range: 64-102%). Much lower levels were subsequently maintained till wound healing. The average total factor consumption was 430 IU kg(-1) (range: 240-870), administered over a period of 17 days (range: 9-44). There were no major complications related to EF except in a patient who developed inhibitors. In conclusion, EF can be used safely in haemophilic patients who do not have inhibitors and does not require prolonged factor replacement.

  5. Saccades and fixations in children with delayed reading skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuela-Navarro, Valldeflors; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Williams, Cathy; Woodhouse, J Margaret

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have reported that eye movements differ between good/average and poor readers. However, these studies have been limited to investigating eye movements during reading related tasks, and thus, the differences found could arise from deficits in higher cognitive processes involved in reading rather than oculomotor performance. The purpose of the study is to determine the extent to which eye movements in children with delayed reading skills are different to those obtained from children with good/average reading skills in non-reading related tasks. After a screening optometric assessment, eye movement recordings were obtained from 120 children without delayed reading skills and 43 children with delayed reading skills (4 to 11 years) using a Tobii TX300 eye tracker. Cartoon characters were presented horizontally from -20° to +20° in steps of 5° to study saccades. An animated stimulus in the centre of the screen was presented for 8 seconds to study fixation stability. Saccadic main sequences, and the number and amplitude of the saccades during fixation were obtained for each participant. Children with delayed reading skills (n = 43) were unmasked after data collection was completed. Medians and quartiles were calculated for each eye movement parameter for children without (n = 120) and with (n = 43) delayed reading skills. Independent t-tests with Bonferroni correction showed no significant differences in any of the saccadic main sequence parameters (Slope, Intercept, A, n and Q ratio) between children without and with delayed reading (p > 0.01). Similarly, no significant differences were found in the number of saccades and their amplitude during the fixation task between the two groups (p > 0.05). Further, none of the gross optometric parameters assessed (visual acuity, refractive error, ocular alignment, convergence, stereopsis and accommodation accuracy) were found to be associated with delayed reading skills (p > 0.05). Eye movements in

  6. Patterns of uveitis at the Apex Institute for Eye Care in India: Results from a prospectively enrolled patient data base (2011-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Gogia, Varun; Shah, Bhavin; Gupta, Shikha; Sagar, Pradeep; Garg, Satpal

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the clinical and etiological profile of uveitis at the apex institute for eye care in India. This is a prospective, prevalence study. 980 consecutive patients with uveitis referred to uvea clinic, Dr. RP Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences (Ophthalmology division, All India Institute of Medical Sciences). Demographic data of each patient were noted and a thorough ocular examination including slit lamp examination and dilated fundus evaluation was carried out. OCT and fluorescein angiography were undertaken whenever indicated. Uveitis was classified based on the anatomic location of inflammation (IUSG classification). Relevant serological and radiological investigations were obtained based on systemic symptomatology, and if the uveitis was recurrent (even in the absence of systemic symptoms). The presence of a systemic disease was confirmed by obtaining an internist consultation. The main outcome measures include pattern of uveitis according to anatomical classification and the etiology. Out of 980 patients with uveitis, 413 (42.14 %) patients had anterior uveitis, 131 (13.36 %) had intermediate uveitis, 165 (16.83 %) had posterior uveitis, 91 (9.2 %) had panuveitis, 47 (4.7 %) had retinal vasculitis, 22 (2.24 %) had scleritis, 17 (1.7 %) had masquerade syndromes, 8 (0.8 %) had keratouveitis, 22 (2.24 %) had sclerokeratouveitis, 19 (1.9 %) had endophthalmitis and 45 (4.5 %) had other causes of inflammation including trauma and intraocular surgery. Out of all uveitic patients definite etiological correlation could be made out in 225 (23 %) patients; thus 77 % were categorised as idiopathic. Only 9 % of all patients were found to have uveitis with an infectious etiology. Amongst infectious causes of uveitis tuberculosis was the leading cause, accounting for sixty percent of all infectious uveitis (approximately 5 % of overall uveitis). Non-infectious uveitis etiology accounted for more than 90 % of all cases with

  7. Effects of strabismic amblyopia and strabismus without amblyopia on visuomotor behavior: III. Temporal eye-hand coordination during reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Goltz, Herbert C; Chandrakumar, Manokaraananthan; Wong, Agnes M F

    2014-11-11

    To examine the effects of strabismic amblyopia and strabismus only, without amblyopia, on the temporal patterns of eye-hand coordination during both the planning and execution stages of visually-guided reaching. Forty-six adults (16 with strabismic amblyopia, 14 with strabismus only, and 16 visually normal) executed reach-to-touch movements toward targets presented randomly 5° or 10° to the left or right of central fixation. Viewing conditions were binocular, monocular viewing with the amblyopic eye, and monocular viewing with the fellow eye (dominant and nondominant viewing for participants without amblyopia). Temporal coordination between eye and hand movements was examined during reach planning (interval between the initiation of saccade and reaching, i.e., saccade-to-reach planning interval) and reach execution (interval between the initiation of saccade and reach peak velocity [PV], i.e., saccade-to-reach PV interval). The frequency and dynamics of secondary reach-related saccades were also examined. The temporal patterns of eye-hand coordination prior to reach initiation were comparable among participants with strabismic amblyopia, strabismus only, and visually normal adults. However, the reach acceleration phase of participants with strabismic amblyopia and those with strabismus only were longer following target fixation (saccade-to-reach PV interval) than that of visually normal participants (P amblyopia with different levels of acuity and stereo acuity loss. Participants with strabismic amblyopia and strabismus only initiated secondary reach-related saccades significantly more frequently than visually normal participants. The amplitude and peak velocity of these saccades were significantly greater during amblyopic eye viewing in participants with amblyopia who also had negative stereopsis. Adults with strabismic amblyopia and strabismus only showed an altered pattern of temporal eye-hand coordination during the reach acceleration phase, which might

  8. Art expertise reduces influence of visual salience on fixation in viewing abstract-paintings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Koide

    Full Text Available When viewing a painting, artists perceive more information from the painting on the basis of their experience and knowledge than art novices do. This difference can be reflected in eye scan paths during viewing of paintings. Distributions of scan paths of artists are different from those of novices even when the paintings contain no figurative object (i.e. abstract paintings. There are two possible explanations for this difference of scan paths. One is that artists have high sensitivity to high-level features such as textures and composition of colors and therefore their fixations are more driven by such features compared with novices. The other is that fixations of artists are more attracted by salient features than those of novices and the fixations are driven by low-level features. To test these, we measured eye fixations of artists and novices during the free viewing of various abstract paintings and compared the distribution of their fixations for each painting with a topological attentional map that quantifies the conspicuity of low-level features in the painting (i.e. saliency map. We found that the fixation distribution of artists was more distinguishable from the saliency map than that of novices. This difference indicates that fixations of artists are less driven by low-level features than those of novices. Our result suggests that artists may extract visual information from paintings based on high-level features. This ability of artists may be associated with artists' deep aesthetic appreciation of paintings.

  9. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  10. Flexible fixation and fracture healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Strohm, Peter C; Jaeger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to the bone surface than external fixator bars. External fixators have the advantage of being less expensive, highly flexible, and technically less demanding. They remain an integral part of orthopaedic surgery for emergent stabilization, for pediatric fractures, for definitive osteosynthesis in certain...

  11. Eye-movements in a two-dimensional plane: A method for calibration and analysis using the vertical and horizontal EOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, J.L.; Woestenburg, J.C.; Verbaten, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    A method for calibration, orthogonalization and standardization of eye movements is described. The method is based on linear transformation of the horizontal and vertical EOG. With this method it is possible to measure the locus of eye fixation on a TV screen and its associated fixation time.

  12. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  13. A knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses: one-year results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pipat; Kongsap

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the results of a modified technique for scleral fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens(IOL) in eyes which had deficient of posterior capsular support.METHODS: This retrospective study was comprised of ten patients with deficient posterior capsular support who underwent one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs, between February 2010 and October 2011. IOL as implanted with one haptic supported on the capsular remnant and the other haptic drawn into the sulcus by anchoring suture without a knot. All patients were evaluated for pre- and postoperative visual acuity, lens centration, intra-and postoperative complications.RESULTS: A knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs has successfully been performed on ten eyes. All cases had inadequate capsular support(i.e. a capsular tear ranged from 5 to 7 clock hours). The average age was 74.25 ±8.87y(SD). The average postoperative uncorrected visual acuity was 0.51 log MAR.Complications included hyphema in one eye, a mild inflammatory reaction in the anterior chamber in two eyes, and a transient rise in IOP in one eye. Neither IOL tilt nor dislocation was observed and there were no later complications.CONCLUSION: In the presence of insufficient capsular support, a knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs is a safe and viable option which reduces the operation time, and minimizes postoperative suture-related complications.

  14. A knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses: one-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsap, Pipat

    2015-01-01

    To assess the results of a modified technique for scleral fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes which had deficient of posterior capsular support. This retrospective study was comprised of ten patients with deficient posterior capsular support who underwent one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs, between February 2010 and October 2011. IOL as implanted with one haptic supported on the capsular remnant and the other haptic drawn into the sulcus by anchoring suture without a knot. All patients were evaluated for pre- and postoperative visual acuity, lens centration, intra-and postoperative complications. A knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs has successfully been performed on ten eyes. All cases had inadequate capsular support (i.e. a capsular tear ranged from 5 to 7 clock hours). The average age was 74.25±8.87y (SD). The average postoperative uncorrected visual acuity was 0.51 logMAR. Complications included hyphema in one eye, a mild inflammatory reaction in the anterior chamber in two eyes, and a transient rise in IOP in one eye. Neither IOL tilt nor dislocation was observed and there were no later complications. In the presence of insufficient capsular support, a knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs is a safe and viable option which reduces the operation time, and minimizes postoperative suture-related complications.

  15. Sutureless intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with lamellar dissection of scleral tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaji T

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Kawaji,1,2 Tomoki Sato,2 Hidenobu Tanihara11Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, 2Sato Eye & Internal Medicine Clinic, Kumamoto, JapanPurpose: To report the results of sutureless scleral fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL by using our developed simple technique.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 48 eyes of 47 patients who underwent sutureless intrascleral IOL fixation by using our modified technique. A 25-gauge microvitreoretinal knife was used to perform sclerotomies and create limbus-parallel scleral tunnels with lamellar dissection in which the haptics were fixed.Results: The IOLs were fixed and centered well. The mean follow-up period was 26.7 months. Postoperative complications included smooth vitreous hemorrhage in four eyes (8.3%, cystoid macular edema in two eyes (4.2%, and iris capture of the IOL in two eyes (4.2%. No other complications, such as breakage of the IOL, spontaneous IOL dislocation, or retinal detachment, were detected during the follow-up period.Conclusion: The lamellar dissection of the limbus-parallel scleral tunnel can simplify the forceps-assisted introduction of the haptics into the scleral tunnel, and this technique seemed to be safe.Keywords: intraocular lenses, ophthalmologic surgical procedures, intrascleral fixation, sutureless fixation

  16. The effect of visual field defects on eye movements and practical fitness to drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, TRM; Cornelissen, FW; Brouwer, WH; Kooijman, AC

    Eye movements Of Subjects with visual field defects due to ocular pathology were monitored while performing a dot counting task and a visual search task. Subjects with peripheral field defects required more fixations, longer search times, made more errors. and had shorter fixation durations than

  17. Dogs Evaluate Threatening Facial Expressions by Their Biological Validity--Evidence from Gazing Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanni Somppi

    Full Text Available Appropriate response to companions' emotional signals is important for all social creatures. The emotional expressions of humans and non-human animals have analogies in their form and function, suggesting shared evolutionary roots, but very little is known about how animals other than primates view and process facial expressions. In primates, threat-related facial expressions evoke exceptional viewing patterns compared with neutral or positive stimuli. Here, we explore if domestic dogs (Canis familiaris have such an attentional bias toward threatening social stimuli and whether observed emotional expressions affect dogs' gaze fixation distribution among the facial features (eyes, midface and mouth. We recorded the voluntary eye gaze of 31 domestic dogs during viewing of facial photographs of humans and dogs with three emotional expressions (threatening, pleasant and neutral. We found that dogs' gaze fixations spread systematically among facial features. The distribution of fixations was altered by the seen expression, but eyes were the most probable targets of the first fixations and gathered longer looking durations than mouth regardless of the viewed expression. The examination of the inner facial features as a whole revealed more pronounced scanning differences among expressions. This suggests that dogs do not base their perception of facial expressions on the viewing of single structures, but the interpretation of the composition formed by eyes, midface and mouth. Dogs evaluated social threat rapidly and this evaluation led to attentional bias, which was dependent on the depicted species: threatening conspecifics' faces evoked heightened attention but threatening human faces instead an avoidance response. We propose that threatening signals carrying differential biological validity are processed via distinctive neurocognitive pathways. Both of these mechanisms may have an adaptive significance for domestic dogs. The findings provide a novel

  18. Dogs Evaluate Threatening Facial Expressions by Their Biological Validity--Evidence from Gazing Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somppi, Sanni; Törnqvist, Heini; Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M; Vainio, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate response to companions' emotional signals is important for all social creatures. The emotional expressions of humans and non-human animals have analogies in their form and function, suggesting shared evolutionary roots, but very little is known about how animals other than primates view and process facial expressions. In primates, threat-related facial expressions evoke exceptional viewing patterns compared with neutral or positive stimuli. Here, we explore if domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have such an attentional bias toward threatening social stimuli and whether observed emotional expressions affect dogs' gaze fixation distribution among the facial features (eyes, midface and mouth). We recorded the voluntary eye gaze of 31 domestic dogs during viewing of facial photographs of humans and dogs with three emotional expressions (threatening, pleasant and neutral). We found that dogs' gaze fixations spread systematically among facial features. The distribution of fixations was altered by the seen expression, but eyes were the most probable targets of the first fixations and gathered longer looking durations than mouth regardless of the viewed expression. The examination of the inner facial features as a whole revealed more pronounced scanning differences among expressions. This suggests that dogs do not base their perception of facial expressions on the viewing of single structures, but the interpretation of the composition formed by eyes, midface and mouth. Dogs evaluated social threat rapidly and this evaluation led to attentional bias, which was dependent on the depicted species: threatening conspecifics' faces evoked heightened attention but threatening human faces instead an avoidance response. We propose that threatening signals carrying differential biological validity are processed via distinctive neurocognitive pathways. Both of these mechanisms may have an adaptive significance for domestic dogs. The findings provide a novel perspective on

  19. The Eyes Have It: Hippocampal Activity Predicts Expression of Memory in Eye Movements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hannula, Deborah E; Ranganath, Charan

    2009-01-01

    ...) with concurrent indirect, eye-movement-based memory measures, we obtained evidence that hippocampal activity predicted expressions of relational memory in subsequent patterns of viewing, even when...

  20. Self-Face Recognition in Schizophrenia: An Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolon, Catherine; Capdevielle, Delphine; Salesse, Robin N; Raffard, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Self-face recognition has been shown to be impaired in schizophrenia (SZ), according to studies using behavioral tasks implicating cognitive demands. Here, we employed an eye-tracking methodology, which is a relevant tool to understand impairments in self-face recognition deficits in SZ because it provides a natural, continuous and online record of face processing. Moreover, it allows collecting the most relevant and informative features each individual looks at during the self-face recognition. These advantages are especially relevant considering the fundamental role played by the patterns of visual exploration on face processing. Thus, this paper aims to investigate self-face recognition deficits in SZ using eye-tracking methodology. Visual scan paths were monitored in 20 patients with SZ and 20 healthy controls. Self, famous, and unknown faces were morphed in steps of 20%. Location, number, and duration of fixations on relevant areas were recorded with an eye-tracking system. Participants performed a passive exploration task (no specific instruction was provided), followed by an active decision making task (individuals were explicitly requested to recognize the different faces). Results showed that patients with SZ had fewer and longer fixations compared to controls. Nevertheless, both groups focused their attention on relevant facial features in a similar way. No significant difference was found between groups when participants were requested to recognize the faces (active task). In conclusion, using an eye tracking methodology and two tasks with low levels of cognitive demands, our results suggest that patients with SZ are able to: (1) explore faces and focus on relevant features of the face in a similar way as controls; and (2) recognize their own face.

  1. ETRAN--R Extension Package for Eye Tracking Results Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhegallo, Alexander V; Marmalyuk, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Novel open source R extension package for general-purpose eye tracking results analysis proposed. Now supported features are data loading from SMI eye trackers, different methods of fixations detection, various imaging techniques for raw data, and detected fixations (time sequence, scanpath, heatmap, and dynamic visualization). The modular structure of the package and a detailed description of each function provide a convenient way to further extend the functionality. Effective use of package requires knowledge of R programming language and environment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Relationship between eye preference and binocular rivalry, and between eye-hand preference and reading ability in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagard, J; Monzalvo-Lopez, K; Mamassian, P

    2008-12-01

    One goal of the experiment presented here was to check, in children, the relationship between eye preference when sighting at different angles and eye dominance in binocular rivalry. In addition, since it is sometimes argued that a crossed pattern of eye-hand preference might put children at risk of difficulties in learning to read, we evaluated the relationship between this pattern and reading achievement in first and sixth graders. Results showed that a majority of children are right-eyed for monosighting, and that intrinsic preference and spatial factor influence the choice of eye. As many children were right- or left-eye dominant, and eye dominance was not related to eye preference. We found no relationship between eye-hand preference and reading proficiency, thus not confirming that a crossed pattern of eye-hand preference might put children at risk of difficulties in learning to read. Consistent handers were more advanced in reading than inconsistent handers.

  3. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people you know — like your grandparents — probably wear glasses. To the Brain! Think of the optic nerve as the great messenger in the back of your eye. The rods and cones of the retina change the colors and shapes you see into millions of nerve ...

  4. Operative Cost Comparison: Plating Versus Intramedullary Fixation for Clavicle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, Andrew E; Murphy, Timothy R; Bal, George K; McDonough, E Barry

    2016-09-01

    Although clavicle fractures often heal well with nonoperative management, current literature has shown improved outcomes with operative intervention for specific fracture patterns in specific patient types. The 2 most common methods of midshaft clavicle fracture fixation are intramedullary and plate devices. Through retrospective analysis, this study performed a direct cost comparison of these 2 types of fixation at a single institution over a 5-year period. Outcome measures included operative costs for initial surgery and any hardware removal surgeries. This study reviewed 154 patients (157 fractures), and of these, 99 had intramedullary fixation and 58 had plate fixation. A total of 80% (79 of 99) of intramedullary devices and 3% (2 of 58) of plates were removed. Average cost for initial intramedullary placement was $2955 (US dollars) less than that for initial plate placement (Pcost for removal was $1874 less than that for plate removal surgery (P=.2). Average total cost for all intramedullary surgeries was $1392 less than the average cost for all plating surgeries (Pcost for all intramedullary surgeries requiring plate placement and removal was $653 less than the average cost for all plating surgeries that involved only placement (P=.04). Intramedullary fixation of clavicle fractures resulted in a statistically significant cost reduction compared with plate fixation, despite the incidence of more frequent removal surgeries. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e877-e882.].

  5. Tear film lipid layer pattern in office dry eye%办公室干眼泪膜脂质层形态分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓博; 陈绮; 王耀增

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the tear film lipid layer pattern in office dry eye (ODE) with a Keeler tearscope and to determine its relationship to clinical tests.Methods Cross-sectional study.Thirty-three ODE patients and 28 control subjects participated in this study.Subjects were evaluated with the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI),which was followed by measurements of the total tear meniscus volume (TTMV),tear film lipid layer thickness (TFLLT) grading,non-invasive tear breakup time (NITBUT),fluorescein tear breakup time (FTBUT),corneal fluorescein staining (CFS) and Schirmer I test (SIT).All the measurements were performed on one eye selected at random for each subject.A paired t test or Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the difference in each variable between the two groups.Spearman's rank correlation was used to indicate the relationship between TFLLT and other variables in the ODE group.Results TFLLT grading was significantly lower in the ODE group [2(1~3)] compared to the control group [3(3~4)] (U=250,P<0.01).High sensitivity and specificity of TFLLT grading (0.545 and 0.857,respectively) were found in the diagnosis of ODE,the cut-off value of which was grade 2.TFLLT grading was correlated with TTMV (r=0.349,P<0.05) and NITBUT (r=0.485,P<0.05),while it was not correlated with the OSDI score,FTBUT,CFS or SIT.Conclusion A Keeler tearscope may effectively evaluate tear film lipid layer in ODE.Tear film lipid layer can also reflect the tear meniscus volume and tear film stability in ODE.%目的 应用Keeler泪膜镜评估办公室干眼泪膜脂质层形态的变化,并分析泪膜脂质层与其他干眼检测方法之间的相关性.方法 横断面研究.本研究共纳入61例办公室工作人员(干眼患者33例,正常者28例).所有受检者采用随机数字表法选择一眼按照以下顺序进行检查:干眼症状问卷表(OSDI)、泪新月容量、泪膜脂质层形态、非侵入性泪膜破裂时间、荧光素泪膜破裂时间、

  6. Fixations on objects in natural scenes: dissociating importance from salience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Marius e’t Hart

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The relation of selective attention to understanding of natural scenes has been subject to intense behavioral research and computational modeling, and gaze is often used as a proxy for such attention. The probability of an image region to be fixated typically correlates with its contrast. However, this relation does not imply a causal role of contrast. Rather, contrast may relate to an object’s importance for a scene, which in turn drives attention. Here we operationalize importance by the probability that an observer names the object as characteristic for a scene. We modify luminance contrast of either a frequently named (common/important or a rarely named (rare/unimportant object, track the observers’ eye movements during scene viewing and ask them to provide keywords describing the scene immediately after.When no object is modified relative to the background, important objects draw more fixations than unimportant ones. Increases of contrast make an object more likely to be fixated, irrespective of whether it was important for the original scene, while decreases in contrast have little effect on fixations. Any contrast modification makes originally unimportant objects more important for the scene. Finally, important objects are fixated more centrally than unimportant objects, irrespective of contrast.Our data suggest a dissociation between object importance (relevance for the scene and salience (relevance for attention. If an object obeys natural scene statistics, important objects are also salient. However, when natural scene statistics are violated, importance and salience are differentially affected. Object salience is modulated by the expectation about object properties (e.g., formed by context or gist, and importance by the violation of such expectations. In addition, the dependence of fixated locations within an object on the object’s importance suggests an analogy to the effects of word frequency on landing positions in reading.

  7. Reduced eye gaze explains "fear blindness" in childhood psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadds, Mark R; El Masry, Yasmeen; Wimalaweera, Subodha; Guastella, Adam J

    2008-04-01

    Damage to the amygdala produces deficits in the ability to recognize fear due to attentional neglect of other people's eyes. Interestingly, children with high psychopathic traits also show problems recognizing fear; however, the reasons for this are not known. This study tested whether psychopathic traits are associated with reduced attention to the eye region of other people's faces. Adolescent males (N = 100; age mean 12.4 years, SD 2.2) were stratified by psychopathic traits and assessed using a Tobii eye tracker to measure primacy, number, and duration of fixations to the eye and mouth regions of emotional faces presented via the UNSW Facial Emotion Task. High psychopathic traits predicted poor fear recognition (1.21 versus 1.35; p eye fixations, and fewer first foci to the eye region (1.01 versus 2.01; p region. All indices of gaze to the eye region correlated positively with accurate recognition of fear for the high psychopathy group, especially the number of times that subjects looked at the eyes first (r = .50; p eyes is reduced in young people with high psychopathic traits, thus accounting for their problems with fear recognition, and is consistent with amygdala dysfunction failing to promote attention to emotional salience in the environment.

  8. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task.

  9. Computer vision enhances mobile eye-tracking to expose expert cognition in natural-scene visual-search tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Tommy P.; Cahill, Nathan D.; Tarduno, John A.; Jacobs, Robert A.; Pelz, Jeff B.

    2014-02-01

    Mobile eye-tracking provides the fairly unique opportunity to record and elucidate cognition in action. In our research, we are searching for patterns in, and distinctions between, the visual-search performance of experts and novices in the geo-sciences. Traveling to regions resultant from various geological processes as part of an introductory field studies course in geology, we record the prima facie gaze patterns of experts and novices when they are asked to determine the modes of geological activity that have formed the scene-view presented to them. Recording eye video and scene video in natural settings generates complex imagery that requires advanced applications of computer vision research to generate registrations and mappings between the views of separate observers. By developing such mappings, we could then place many observers into a single mathematical space where we can spatio-temporally analyze inter- and intra-subject fixations, saccades, and head motions. While working towards perfecting these mappings, we developed an updated experiment setup that allowed us to statistically analyze intra-subject eye-movement events without the need for a common domain. Through such analyses we are finding statistical differences between novices and experts in these visual-search tasks. In the course of this research we have developed a unified, open-source, software framework for processing, visualization, and interaction of mobile eye-tracking and high-resolution panoramic imagery.

  10. Skipped words and fixated words are processed differently during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskenazi, Michael A; Folk, Jocelyn R

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether words are processed differently when they are fixated during silent reading than when they are skipped. According to a serial processing model of eye movement control (e.g., EZ Reader) skipped words are fully processed (Reichle, Rayner, Pollatsek, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 26(04):445-476, 2003), whereas in a parallel processing model (e.g., SWIFT) skipped words do not need to be fully processed (Engbert, Nuthmann, Richter, Kliegl, Psychological Review, 112(4):777-813, 2005). Participants read 34 sentences with target words embedded in them while their eye movements were recorded. All target words were three-letter, low-frequency, and unpredictable nouns. After the reading session, participants completed a repetition priming lexical decision task with the target words from the reading session included as the repetition prime targets, with presentation of those same words during the reading task acting as the prime. When participants skipped a word during the reading session, their reaction times on the lexical decision task were significantly longer (M = 656.42 ms) than when they fixated the word (M = 614.43 ms). This result provides evidence that skipped words are sometimes not processed to the same degree as fixated words during reading.

  11. Persistence in eye movement during visual search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Tatiana A.; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-02-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search.

  12. Plasma Temperature of White-Eye Hexagonal Pattern in Dielectric Barrier Discharge%介质阻挡放电白眼六边形斑图等离子体温度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵杨; 董丽芳; 付宏艳

    2015-01-01

    利用水电极介质阻挡放电装置,在不同氩气含量的气体放电中,首次观察到了白眼六边形斑图,此斑图的白眼晶胞都是由点、环和晕三层结构组成的,且其放电稳定性和持续性极好。从照片中可以观察到这三种结构有明显的亮度差异,说明白眼晶胞中点、环和晕可能处于不同的等离子体状态,同时在不同氩气含量下,白眼晶胞的颜色和亮度都有明显的差异,说明白眼晶胞的等离子体状态也有所不同。由于此次研究的白眼六边形斑图是在较低的电压下得到的,使得水电极的温度没有升高且放电现象没有发生变化,因此在实验过程中长时间的放电没有影响该斑图的等离子体状态。为此,本小组采用发射光谱法,研究了此斑图的白眼晶胞中的点、环和晕的两种等离子体参数:分子振动温度和电子密度随氩气含量的变化关系。利用氮分子第二正带系( C3Πu → B3Πg )的发射谱线,计算了白眼晶胞中的点、环和晕的分子振动温度;实验采集了Ar Ⅰ(2P2→1S5)的发射谱线,通过白眼晶胞中的点、环和晕的谱线展宽随氩气含量的变化,来反映白眼晶胞的三层结构的电子密度的变化。实验发现:在同一氩气含量条件下,白眼晶胞中点、环和晕的分子振动温度从大到小为:晕、环、点,而电子密度从大到小为:点、环、晕;随着氩气含量从70%增大到90%,点的分子振动温度及电子密度均增加;环的分子振动温度基本保持不变,而其电子密度减小;晕的分子振动温度及电子密度均减小。实验结果说明白眼晶胞中的点、环和晕的等离子体状态不同。本工作结果,对于研究介质阻挡放电中具有多层结构的自组织斑图有重要意义。%By using the water-electrode discharge experimental setup ,the white-eye hexagonal pattern is firstly observed and

  13. Why Do Eyes Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  14. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  15. Why Do Eyes Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? A ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  16. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to ... of the eye. It regulates the amount of light entering the eye through the pupil. Pupil (PYOO- ...

  17. Recommended Sports Eye Protectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  18. Eye Safety at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  19. Eye Safety at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  20. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder in ... the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over time ...

  1. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to ... of the eye. It regulates the amount of light entering the eye through the pupil. Pupil (PYOO- ...

  2. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that can be embedded on web pages. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) One-Page Overview Pink, itchy eyes? Conjunctivitis – ... protect yourself from getting and spreading pink eye . Pink Eye: What To Do Discusses causes and treatment, ...

  3. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  4. Eye Involvement in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Eyes Campbell (1905) first described the eye involvement in ... some form of eye involvement. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may involve the eyelids of ...

  5. Eye Complications in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  6. Neurons in the monkey amygdala detect eye contact during naturalistic social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Clayton P; Zimmerman, Prisca E; Gothard, Katalin M

    2014-10-20

    Primates explore the visual world through eye-movement sequences. Saccades bring details of interest into the fovea, while fixations stabilize the image. During natural vision, social primates direct their gaze at the eyes of others to communicate their own emotions and intentions and to gather information about the mental states of others. Direct gaze is an integral part of facial expressions that signals cooperation or conflict over resources and social status. Despite the great importance of making and breaking eye contact in the behavioral repertoire of primates, little is known about the neural substrates that support these behaviors. Here we show that the monkey amygdala contains neurons that respond selectively to fixations on the eyes of others and to eye contact. These "eye cells" share several features with the canonical, visually responsive neurons in the monkey amygdala; however, they respond to the eyes only when they fall within the fovea of the viewer, either as a result of a deliberate saccade or as eyes move into the fovea of the viewer during a fixation intended to explore a different feature. The presence of eyes in peripheral vision fails to activate the eye cells. These findings link the primate amygdala to eye movements involved in the exploration and selection of details in visual scenes that contain socially and emotionally salient features.

  7. Pathologic comparison of asymmetric or sulcus fixation of 3-piece intraocular lenses with square versus round anterior optic edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Andrew; Werner, Liliana; Strenk, Susan; Strenk, Lawrence; Leishman, Lisa; Bodnar, Zachary; Kirk, Kevin R; Michelson, Jennifer; Mamalis, Nick

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the pathologic findings of 3-piece intraocular lenses (IOLs) with asymmetric or sulcus fixation in pseudophakic cadaver eyes, comparing IOLs with square or round edges on the anterior optic surface. Comparative case series with pathology. A total of 661 pseudophakic cadaver eyes, obtained from eye banks within the United States, implanted with different IOLs. Anterior segment scanning of whole eyes with a high-frequency ultrasound system or high-resolution anterior segment magnetic resonance imaging followed by gross examination. Selected eyes were processed for complete histopathologic analysis. Findings from imaging, gross, and histopathologic evaluation that could be related to out-of-the-bag fixation of the lenses. Of 661 pseudophakic cadaver eyes obtained, 13 had 3-piece hydrophobic acrylic IOLs with anterior and posterior square optic edges, and 14 had 3-piece lenses with anterior round edges (13 silicone lenses and 1 hydrophobic acrylic lens) without symmetric in-the-bag fixation. These 27 selected eyes were processed for complete histopathologic analysis. Gross findings in both groups were composed of IOL decentration and tilt, pigmentary dispersion within the anterior segment and on the IOL surface, and iris transillumination defects. Histopathology of the 14 eyes with 3-piece IOLs with round anterior optic edges showed mild focal disruption of the iris pigmented layer and loop protrusion/erosion in the ciliary sulcus. Additional changes observed in the 13 eyes with square anterior optic edge IOLs included iris changes, such as vacuolization, disruption and loss of the pigmented epithelial layers, iris thinning and atrophy, synechiae, and pigmentary dispersion within the trabecular meshwork. One eye also exhibited initial signs of optic nerve disc cupping. In this series, pathologic findings were more severe in eyes implanted with 3-piece IOLs with square anterior optic edges, suggesting that IOLs with round anterior edges are more suitable for

  8. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  9. Relative peripheral refraction in children: twelve-month changes in eyes with different ametropias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsui-Tsui; Cho, Pauline

    2013-05-01

    To determine the peripheral refraction of children with different types of ametropias and to evaluate the relationship between central refractive changes, baseline relative peripheral refraction (RPR) and changes in RPR over a 12-month monitoring period. Cycloplegic central and peripheral refraction were performed biannually on the right eyes of children aged 6-9 for 12 months, using an open-view autorefractor. Peripheral refraction were measured along 10°, 20° and 30° from central fixation in both nasal and temporal fields. Refractive data were transposed into M, J0 and J45 vectors for analyses. RPR was determined by subtracting the central measurement from each peripheral measurement. Hyperopic eyes showed relative peripheral myopia while myopic eyes had relative hyperopia across the central 60° horizontal field at baseline. Emmetropic eyes had relative myopia within but showed relative hyperopia beyond the central 30° field. However, there was no significant correlation between central refractive changes and baseline RPR or between changes in central refraction and RPR over twelve months in any refractive groups. Correlations between changes in PR and central myopic shift were found mainly in the nasal field in different groups. In the subgroup analysis on the initially emmetropic and the initially myopic groups, the subgroups with faster myopic progression did not have significantly different RPR from the subgroups with slower progression. The RPR pattern of the initially emmetropic and the initially myopic groups became more asymmetric at the end of the study period with a larger increase in relative hyperopia in the temporal field. RPR patterns were different among hyperopic, emmetropic and myopic eyes. However, baseline RPR and changes in RPR cannot predict changes in central refraction over time. Our results did not provide evidence to support the hypothesis of RPR as a causative factor for myopic central refractive changes in children. Ophthalmic

  10. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons?

  11. Studying the role of vision in cycling : critique on restricting research to fixation behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.P. Brinker, B.P.L.M. den Waard, D. de Twisk, D.A.M. Schwab, D.A.M. & Smeets, J.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study published in Accident Analysis & Prevention, Vansteenkiste et al. (2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2012.11.025) – as one of the first in this field – investigated the visual control of bicycle steering. They undertook the interesting task of testing cyclists’ eye fixation beh

  12. Eye movements characteristics of Chinese dyslexic children in picture searching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xu; JING Jin; ZOU Xiao-bing; WANG Meng-long; LI Xiu-hong; LIN Ai-hua

    2008-01-01

    Background Reading Chinese,a kind of ideogram,relies more on visual cognition.The visuospatial cognitive deficit of Chinese dyslexia is an interesting topic that has received much attention.The purpose of current research was to explore the visuopatial cognitive characteristics of Chinese dyslexic children by studying their eye movements via a picture searching test.Methods According to the diagnostic criteria defined by ICD-10,twenty-eight dyslexic children (mean age (10.12+1.42)years) were enrolled from the Clinic of Children Behavioral Disorder in the third affiliated hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.And 28 normally reading children (mean age (10.06±1.29) years),1:1 matched by age,sex,grade and family condition were chosen from an elementary school in Guangzhou as a control group.Four groups of pictures (cock,accident,canyon,meditate) from Picture Vocabulary Test were chosen as eye movement experiment targets.All the subjects carried out the picture searching task and their eye movement data were recorded by an Eyelink Ⅱ High-Speed Eye Tracker.The duration time,average fixation duration,average saccade amplitude,fixation counts and saccade counts were compared between the two groups of children.Results The dyslexic children had longer total fixation duration and average fixation duration (F=7.711,P<0.01;F=4.520,P<0.05),more fixation counts and saccade counts (F=7.498,P<0.01;F=11.040,P<0.01),and a smaller average saccade amplitude (F=29.743,P<0.01) compared with controls.But their performance in the picture vocabulary test was the same as those of the control group.The eye movement indexes were affected by the difficulty of the pictures and words,all eye movement indexes,except saccade amplitude,had a significant difference within groups (P<0.05).Conclusions Chinese dyslexic children have abnormal eye movements in picture searching,applying slow fixations,more fixations and small and frequent saccades.Their abnormal eye movement mode reflects the

  13. Haptic Breakage after Transscleral Fixation of a Single-Piece Acrylic Intraocular Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the case of a patient with a damaged haptic of an acrylic intraocular lens (IOL after transscleral IOL fixation. Methods: This is a retrospective and descriptive case report. Results: A 40-year-old man presented with sudden visual loss in the left eye. He had undergone phacoemulsification/aspiration and IOL implantation 3 years previously and IOL repositioning with transscleral fixation 2 years before the initial visit. His visual acuity was 0.3 in the left eye due to corneal edema caused by a foreign body, i.e., the severed haptic tip of the single-piece acrylic IOL, which was surgically removed. The IOL itself was tilted and therefore explanted. The surface of the tip of the haptic suggested that the monofilament suture thread had exerted continuous force across the haptic. Conclusions: The haptics of acrylic IOLs can be damaged after transscleral fixation.

  14. Modeling and minimizing interference from corneal birefringence in retinal birefringence scanning for foveal fixation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2011-07-01

    Utilizing the measured corneal birefringence from a data set of 150 eyes of 75 human subjects, an algorithm and related computer program, based on Müller-Stokes matrix calculus, were developed in MATLAB for assessing the influence of corneal birefringence on retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) and for converging upon an optical/mechanical design using wave plates ("wave-plate-enhanced RBS") that allows foveal fixation detection essentially independently of corneal birefringence. The RBS computer model, and in particular the optimization algorithm, were verified with experimental human data using an available monocular RBS-based eye fixation monitor. Fixation detection using wave-plate-enhanced RBS is adaptable to less cooperative subjects, including young children at risk for developing amblyopia.

  15. Modeling and minimizing interference from corneal birefringence in retinal birefringence scanning for foveal fixation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing the measured corneal birefringence from a data set of 150 eyes of 75 human subjects, an algorithm and related computer program, based on Müller-Stokes matrix calculus, were developed in MATLAB for assessing the influence of corneal birefringence on retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) and for converging upon an optical/mechanical design using wave plates (“wave-plate-enhanced RBS”) that allows foveal fixation detection essentially independently of corneal birefringence. The RBS computer model, and in particular the optimization algorithm, were verified with experimental human data using an available monocular RBS-based eye fixation monitor. Fixation detection using wave-plate-enhanced RBS is adaptable to less cooperative subjects, including young children at risk for developing amblyopia. PMID:21750772

  16. Do common systems control eye movements and motion extrapolation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Alexis D J; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2011-07-01

    People are able to judge the current position of occluded moving objects. This operation is known as motion extrapolation. It has previously been suggested that motion extrapolation is independent of the oculomotor system. Here we revisited this question by measuring eye position while participants completed two types of motion extrapolation task. In one task, a moving visual target travelled rightwards, disappeared, then reappeared further along its trajectory. Participants discriminated correct reappearance times from incorrect (too early or too late) with a two-alternative forced-choice button press. In the second task, the target travelled rightwards behind a visible, rectangular occluder, and participants pressed a button at the time when they judged it should reappear. In both tasks, performance was significantly different under fixation as compared to free eye movement conditions. When eye movements were permitted, eye movements during occlusion were related to participants' judgements. Finally, even when participants were required to fixate, small changes in eye position around fixation (<2°) were influenced by occluded target motion. These results all indicate that overlapping systems control eye movements and judgements on motion extrapolation tasks. This has implications for understanding the mechanism underlying motion extrapolation.

  17. Assessing computerized eye tracking technology for gaining insight into expert interpretation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram: an objective quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R R; Zhu, T; Finlay, D D; Drew, B; Kligfield, P D; Guldenring, D; Breen, C; Gallagher, A G; Daly, M J; Clifford, G D

    2014-01-01

    ), the rhythm strip (3.47s), II (2.74s), V3 (2.63s), I (2.53s), aVL (2.45s), V5 (2.27s), aVF (1.74s), aVR (1.63s), V6 (1.39s), III (1.32s) and V4 (1.19s). It was also found that on average the annotator spends an equal amount of time studying leads in the frontal plane (15.89s) when compared to leads in the transverse plane (15.70s). It was found that on average the annotators fixated on lead I first followed by leads V2, aVL, V1, II, aVR, V3, rhythm strip, III, aVF, V5, V4 and V6. We found a strong correlation (r=0.67) between time to first fixation on a lead and the total fixation duration on each lead. This indicates that leads studied first are studied the longest. There was a weak negative correlation between duration and accuracy (r=-0.2) and a strong correlation between age and accuracy (r=0.67). Eye tracking facilitated a deeper insight into how expert annotators interpret the 12-lead ECG. As a result, the authors recommend ECG annotators to adopt an initial first impression/pattern recognition approach followed by a conventional systematic protocol to ECG interpretation. This recommendation is based on observing misdiagnoses given due to first impression only. In summary, this research presents eye gaze results from expert ECG annotators and provides scope for future work that involves exploiting computerized eye tracking technology to further the science of ECG interpretation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Eye movement identification based on accumulated time feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baobao; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Jiande; Yan, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Eye movement is a new kind of feature for biometrical recognition, it has many advantages compared with other features such as fingerprint, face, and iris. It is not only a sort of static characteristics, but also a combination of brain activity and muscle behavior, which makes it effective to prevent spoofing attack. In addition, eye movements can be incorporated with faces, iris and other features recorded from the face region into multimode systems. In this paper, we do an exploring study on eye movement identification based on the eye movement datasets provided by Komogortsev et al. in 2011 with different classification methods. The time of saccade and fixation are extracted from the eye movement data as the eye movement features. Furthermore, the performance analysis was conducted on different classification methods such as the BP, RBF, ELMAN and SVM in order to provide a reference to the future research in this field.

  19. Recording three-dimensional eye movements: scleral search coils versus video-oculography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.M.J.; Goumans, J.; Steen, J. van der

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE. This study compared the performance of a videobased infrared three-dimensional eye tracker device (Chronos) with the scleral search coil method. METHODS. Three-dimensional eye movements were measured simultaneously with both systems during fixation, saccades, optokinetic stimulation, and ve

  20. Evaluation of the Tobii EyeX Eye tracking controller and Matlab toolkit for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibaldi, Agostino; Vanegas, Mauricio; Bex, Peter J; Maiello, Guido

    2016-07-11

    The Tobii Eyex Controller is a new low-cost binocular eye tracker marketed for integration in gaming and consumer applications. The manufacturers claim that the system was conceived for natural eye gaze interaction, does not require continuous recalibration, and allows moderate head movements. The Controller is provided with a SDK to foster the development of new eye tracking applications. We review the characteristics of the device for its possible use in scientific research. We develop and evaluate an open source Matlab Toolkit that can be employed to interface with the EyeX device for gaze recording in behavioral experiments. The Toolkit provides calibration procedures tailored to both binocular and monocular experiments, as well as procedures to evaluate other eye tracking devices. The observed performance of the EyeX (i.e. accuracy < 0.6°, precision < 0.25°, latency < 50 ms and sampling frequency ≈55 Hz), is sufficient for some classes of research application. The device can be successfully employed to measure fixation parameters, saccadic, smooth pursuit and vergence eye movements. However, the relatively low sampling rate and moderate precision limit the suitability of the EyeX for monitoring micro-saccadic eye movements or for real-time gaze-contingent stimulus control. For these applications, research grade, high-cost eye tracking technology may still be necessary. Therefore, despite its limitations with respect to high-end devices, the EyeX has the potential to further the dissemination of eye tracking technology to a broad audience, and could be a valuable asset in consumer and gaming applications as well as a subset of basic and clinical research settings.

  1. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wade

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Icons are eye-cons: they provide a distillation of a complex object or idea into a simple pictorial shape. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimension of distance or depth is missing from the icon, and this alone introduces all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as an exploration of the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons are more honest—they are tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is presented. They are visual allusions rather than visual illusions, although they can display illusory effects. At its broadest, icon can be equated with image. The concept of image has thrived on its vagueness, and so attempts have been made to refine it. An icon corresponds to an optical image: it shares some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional rather than spatialised and projective. Words and images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte (1898-1967 in a series of pipe paintings, and he also played on the theme of the arbitrariness of the verbal labels assigned to objects. What is surprising is that Magritte did not apply his painterly skills to transforming the word shapes he used. A similar reluctance to transform the typefaces pervades visual poetry. My interests are in the visual rather than the poetic dimension, and I will present a range of my own eye contricks which play with letter and word shapes in a variety of ways.

  2. Development of Text Reading in Japanese: An Eye Movement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jincho, Nobuyuki; Feng, Gary; Mazuka, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    This study examined age-group differences in eye movements among third-grade, fifth-grade, and adult Japanese readers. In Experiment 1, Japanese children, but not adults, showed a longer fixation time on logographic kanji words than on phonologically transparent hiragana words. Further, an age-group difference was found in the first fixation…

  3. Blur, eye movements and performance on a driving visual recognition slide test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samantha Sze-Yee; Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alexander A

    2015-09-01

    Optical blur and ageing are known to affect driving performance but their effects on drivers' eye movements are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of optical blur and age on eye movement patterns and performance on the DriveSafe slide recognition test which is purported to predict fitness to drive. Twenty young (27.1 ± 4.6 years) and 20 older (73.3 ± 5.7 years) visually normal drivers performed the DriveSafe under two visual conditions: best-corrected vision and with +2.00 DS blur. The DriveSafe is a Visual Recognition Slide Test that consists of brief presentations of static, real-world driving scenes containing different road users (pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles). Participants reported the types, relative positions and direction of travel of the road users in each image; the score was the number of correctly reported items (maximum score of 128). Eye movements were recorded while participants performed the DriveSafe test using a Tobii TX300 eye tracking system. There was a significant main effect of blur on DriveSafe scores (best-corrected: 114.9 vs blur: 93.2; p < 0.001). There was also a significant age and blur interaction on the DriveSafe scores (p < 0.001) such that the young drivers were more negatively affected by blur than the older drivers (reductions of 22% and 13% respectively; p < 0.001): with best-corrected vision, the young drivers performed better than the older drivers (DriveSafe scores: 118.4 vs 111.5; p = 0.001), while with blur, the young drivers performed worse than the older drivers (88.6 vs 95.9; p = 0.009). For the eye movement patterns, blur significantly reduced the number of fixations on road users (best-corrected: 5.1 vs blur: 4.5; p < 0.001), fixation duration on road users (2.0 s vs 1.8 s; p < 0.001) and saccade amplitudes (7.4° vs 6.7°; p < 0.001). A main effect of age on eye movements was also found where older drivers made smaller saccades than the young drivers (6.7° vs 7.4°; p < 0.001). Blur reduced

  4. Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with cow-hitch knot in posterior chamber intraocular lens decentration

    OpenAIRE

    Ertugrul Can; Nurullah Koçak; Özlem Eski Yücel; Adem Gül; Hilal Eser Öztürk; Osman Sayin

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: To describe a simplified ab-interno cow-hitch suture fixation technique for repositioning decentered posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL). Materials and Methods: Two cases are presented with the surgical correction of decentered and subluxated IOL. Ab-interno scleral suture fixation technique with hitch-cow knot in the eye was performed with a ciliary sulcus guide instrument and 1 year follow-up was completed. Results: Both of the patients had well centered lenses postope...

  5. How Life History Can Sway the Fixation Probability of Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Kurokawa, Shun; Giaimo, Stefano; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we study the effects of demographic structure on evolutionary dynamics when selection acts on reproduction, survival, or both. In contrast to the previously discovered pattern that the fixation probability of a neutral mutant decreases while the population becomes younger, we show that a mutant with a constant selective advantage may have a maximum or a minimum of the fixation probability in populations with an intermediate fraction of young individuals. This highlights the importance of life history and demographic structure in studying evolutionary dynamics. We also illustrate the fundamental differences between selection on reproduction and selection on survival when age structure is present. In addition, we evaluate the relative importance of size and structure of the population in determining the fixation probability of the mutant. Our work lays the foundation for also studying density- and frequency-dependent effects in populations when demographic structures cannot be neglected.

  6. Femoral Reconstruction Using External Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy Palatnik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of an external fixator for the purpose of distraction osteogenesis has been applied to a wide range of orthopedic problems caused by such diverse etiologies as congenital disease, metabolic conditions, infections, traumatic injuries, and congenital short stature. The purpose of this study was to analyze our experience of utilizing this method in patients undergoing a variety of orthopedic procedures of the femur. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed our experience of using external fixation for femoral reconstruction. Three subgroups were defined based on the primary reconstruction goal lengthening, deformity correction, and repair of nonunion/bone defect. Factors such as leg length discrepancy (LLD, limb alignment, and external fixation time and complications were evaluated for the entire group and the 3 subgroups. Results. There was substantial improvement in the overall LLD, femoral length discrepancy, and limb alignment as measured by mechanical axis deviation (MAD and lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA for the entire group as well as the subgroups. Conclusions. The Ilizarov external fixator allows for decreased surgical exposure and preservation of blood supply to bone, avoidance of bone grafting and internal fixation, and simultaneous lengthening and deformity correction, making it a very useful technique for femoral reconstruction.

  7. Are watershed and lacustrine controls on planktonic N2 fixation hierarchically structured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J Thad; Doyle, Robert D; Prochnow, Shane J; White, Joseph D

    2008-04-01

    N2 fixation can be an important source of N to limnetic ecosystems and can influence the structure of phytoplankton communities. However, watershed-scale conditions that favor N2 fixation in lakes and reservoirs have not been well studied. We measured N2 fixation and lacustrine variables monthly over a 19-month period in Waco Reservoir, Texas, USA, and linked these data with nutrient-loading estimates from a physically based watershed model. Readily available topographic, soil, land cover, effluent discharge, and climate data were used in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to derive watershed nutrient-loading estimates. Categorical and regression tree (CART) analysis revealed that lacustrine and watershed correlates of N2 fixation were hierarchically structured. Lacustrine conditions showed greater predictive capability temporally. For instance, low NO3(-) concentration (27 degrees C) in the reservoir were correlated with the initiation of N2 fixation seasonally. When lacustrine conditions were favorable for N2 fixation, watershed conditions appeared to influence spatial patterns of N2 fixation within the reservoir. For example, spatially explicit patterns of N2 fixation were correlated with the ratio of N:P in nutrient loadings and the N loading rate, which were driven by anthropogenic activity in the watershed and periods of low stream flow, respectively. Although N2 fixation contributed <5% of the annual N load to the reservoir, 37% of the N load was derived from atmospheric N2 fixation during summertime when stream flow in the watershed was low. This study provides evidence that watershed anthropogenic activity can exert control on planktonic N2 fixation, but that temporality is controlled by lacustrine conditions. Furthermore, this study also supports suggestions that reduced inflows may increase the propensity of N2-fixing cyanobacterial blooms in receiving waters of anthropogenically modified landscapes.

  8. Eye tracking disturbances in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Pradeep

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the frequency of different types of eye tracking disturbances in schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: Smooth pursuit eye movements were studied by electro-oculography (EOG in 22 schizophrenic patients (ICD-10 criteria and 15 age and sex-matched controls. The studied parameters included average pursuit gain, number of saccades, the frequency of different types of saccades (catch-up, back-up, anticipatory saccades, and disturbances during fixation. The results were analysed statistically. Results: The average pursuit gain was significantly affected in patients for target velocity of 30°/sec (p=0.007. The catch-up and back-up saccades were more common in cases than controls but the difference was not significant (p=0.39 and 0.36 respectively. The anticipatory saccades were significantly more frequent in cases than controls (p<0.0001 for both 15°/sec and 30°/sec target velocities. This was also correlated with the duration of illness. Conclusion: Anticipatory saccades are significantly more frequent during eye tracking in schizophrenia and appear to be an objective marker for the disease.

  9. Nitrogen fixation in Clear Lake, California. 4. Diel studies on Aphanizomenon and Anabaena blooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Day and night measurements of N/sub 2/ fixation (as acetylene reduction) were made during spring blooms of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and two autumn blooms of Anabaena spp. From 9 to 23% of the 24-h fixation occurred between 1100 and 1300 hours. Nitrogen fixation in spring showed complex, physically shallow but optically deep and mobile subsurface peaks of nitrogenase activity, which were totally unrelated to Aphanizomenon biomass but may have been due to diel changes in light penetrating the relatively clear water. Nocturnal fixation was uniformly distributed with depth and accounted for 1/5 to 1/3 of daylight fixation. In more turbid autumn waters, the pattern of N/sub 2/ fixation for Anabaena blooms was simpler, with a surface (or near-surface) peak decreasing with depth. Nocturnal fixation was more uniformly distributed with depth. The difference in fixation patterns between the two species is attributable to the interactions of oxygen with the nitrogenase enzyme system. The diel changes in nitrogenase activity suggest a need to establish whether the precursors of nitrogenase accumulate in an oxygen-stable form.

  10. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  11. Early recognition of apical ballooning syndrome by global longitudinal strain using speckle tracking imaging--the evil eye pattern, a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Sualy; Banchs, Jose

    2015-07-01

    We report 4 cases of patients diagnosed with stress-induced cardiomyopathy and the pattern of typical apical ballooning syndrome (ABS), who presented to our institution with chest pain, mildly elevated cardiac enzymes and ischemic electrocardiographic changes, found to have severe hypokinesis or akinesis of the mid to apical segments with dynamic basal segments on two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography along with a global longitudinal strain (GLS) pattern markedly different from the typical left anterior descending artery (LAD) myocardial infarction pattern. All of them had a similar GLS pattern on presentation, which was easy to recognize on the polar map the day of the event. Three of the patients underwent left heart catheterization and found to have nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). We discuss the usefulness of early recognition of ABS using GLS images. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparing eye tracking with electrooculography for measuring individual sentence comprehension duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Jana Annina; Wendt, Dorothea; Kollmeier, Birger;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a procedure for performing the audio-visual paradigm introduced by Wendt et al. (2015) with reduced practical challenges. The original paradigm records eye fixations using an eye tracker and calculates the duration of sentence comprehension based on a bootstr...... in recent studies analyzing eye tracking data. The results of the growth curve analysis were compared with the results of the bootstrap procedure. Both analysis methods show similar processing durations....

  13. Colour in the eyes of insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    Many insect species have darkly coloured eyes, but distinct colours or patterns are frequently featured. A number of exemplary cases of flies and butterflies are discussed to illustrate our present knowledge of the physical basis of eye colours, their functional background, and the implications for

  14. Colour in the eyes of insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    Many insect species have darkly coloured eyes, but distinct colours or patterns are frequently featured. A number of exemplary cases of flies and butterflies are discussed to illustrate our present knowledge of the physical basis of eye colours, their functional background, and the implications for

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  16. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  17. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  18. Looking, seeing and believing in autism: Eye movements reveal how subtle cognitive processing differences impact in the social domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Valerie; Castelhano, Monica S; Howard, Philippa L; Latif, Nida; Rayner, Keith

    2016-08-01

    Adults with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) viewed scenes with people in them, while having their eye movements recorded. The task was to indicate, using a button press, whether the pictures were normal, or in some way weird or odd. Oddities in the pictures were categorized as violations of either perceptual or social norms. Compared to a Typically Developed (TD) control group, the ASD participants were equally able to categorize the scenes as odd or normal, but they took longer to respond. The eye movement patterns showed that the ASD group made more fixations and revisits to the target areas in the odd scenes compared with the TD group. Additionally, when the ASD group first fixated the target areas in the scenes, they failed to initially detect the social oddities. These two findings have clear implications for processing difficulties in ASD for the social domain, where it is important to detect social cues on-line, and where there is little opportunity to go back and recheck possible cues in fast dynamic interactions. Autism Res 2016, 9: 879-887. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Learning-induced changes in attentional allocation during categorization: a sizable catalog of attention change as measured by eye movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn M McColeman

    Full Text Available Learning how to allocate attention properly is essential for success at many categorization tasks. Advances in our understanding of learned attention are stymied by a chicken-and-egg problem: there are no theoretical accounts of learned attention that predict patterns of eye movements, making data collection difficult to justify, and there are not enough datasets to support the development of a rich theory of learned attention. The present work addresses this by reporting five measures relating to the overt allocation of attention across 10 category learning experiments: accuracy, probability of fixating irrelevant information, number of fixations to category features, the amount of change in the allocation of attention (using a new measure called Time Proportion Shift - TIPS, and a measure of the relationship between attention change and erroneous responses. Using these measures, the data suggest that eye-movements are not substantially connected to error in most cases and that aggregate trial-by-trial attention change is generally stable across a number of changing task variables. The data presented here provide a target for computational models that aim to account for changes in overt attentional behaviors across learning.

  20. Biomechanical analysis of fracture fixation with external fixator in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the different ways of measuring the main axial strain during treatment with an external fixator and to find the suitable compression loaded by the external fixator at an early stage.Methods: Eighteen healthy big-ear rabbits were randomly divided into two groups according to different measuring methods: Group A and Group B. In Group A,a strain gauge was affixed to the external tibial cortex with 502 glue, and in Group B, a bone cement-coated strain gauge was installed on the internal tibial cortex. Groups A and B were divided into two subgroups A1, A2 and B1,B2, respectively, according to the pressure of half of and the same as the body weight. A Z-shaped left mid-shaft tibial osteotomy was performed and fixed by an external fixator. Results: The scaler curves of Group A changed dramatically during the early stage. The trendlines of the internal and external cortex went consistently after reaching the stable stage while the latter strain value was higher than the former. The time for Group B reaching the stable stage was short, but its absolute strain value was less than that of Group A. Before they were pressed to the stable stage, the declined speed of Subgroup A1 was more slowly than that of Subgroup A2 while the results of Subgroups B1 and B2 were same. Group A had an ascending trend after it declined while Group B didn't have. After they reached the stable stage, both Subgroups A1 and A2 had a declining trend while Subgroup A2 was more quickly than Subgroup Al, Subgroup B1 was kept at a definite level while Subgroup B2 fluctuated.Conclusions: The axial strain under external fixator can be measured by bone cement coated-strain gauge in vivo. The data may suggest that half of the body weight load was suitable for external fixator.

  1. First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis: current fixation options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jared L; McGlamry, Michael C

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews the current literature on first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis rates using various forms of fixation, as well as reviewing biomechanical studies comparing the strengths of the different fixation options that are available.

  2. EyeGENE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The eyeGENE® Biorepository and corresponding Database contain family history and clinical eye exam data from subjects enrolled in eyeGENE® Program coupled to...

  3. Eye Injuries in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Sports Which sports cause the most eye injuries?Sports cause more than 40,000 eye injuries each ... and racquet sports.When it comes to eye injuries, sports can be classified as low risk, high risk ...

  4. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  5. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  6. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  7. Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have allergic conjunctivitis. Preventing the spread of pink eye Practice good hygiene to control the spread ... can return to school or child care. Preventing pink eye in newborns Newborns' eyes are susceptible to ...

  8. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  9. About the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  10. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Eye Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > Eye Injuries Print A ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  11. Complications of rigid internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chris A; Lin, Kant Y

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as "open internal fixation" of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery.

  12. The "hypnotic state" and eye movements: Less there than meets the eye?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhjem, Barbara; Marcusson-Clavertz, David; Holmqvist, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Responsiveness to hypnotic procedures has been related to unusual eye behaviors for centuries. Kallio and collaborators claimed recently that they had found a reliable index for "the hypnotic state" through eye-tracking methods. Whether or not hypnotic responding involves a special state of consciousness has been part of a contentious debate in the field, so the potential validity of their claim would constitute a landmark. However, their conclusion was based on 1 highly hypnotizable individual compared with 14 controls who were not measured on hypnotizability. We sought to replicate their results with a sample screened for High (n = 16) or Low (n = 13) hypnotizability. We used a factorial 2 (high vs. low hypnotizability) x 2 (hypnosis vs. resting conditions) counterbalanced order design with these eye-tracking tasks: Fixation, Saccade, Optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), Smooth pursuit, and Antisaccade (the first three tasks has been used in Kallio et al.'s experiment). Highs reported being more deeply in hypnosis than Lows but only in the hypnotic condition, as expected. There were no significant main or interaction effects for the Fixation, OKN, or Smooth pursuit tasks. For the Saccade task both Highs and Lows had smaller saccades during hypnosis, and in the Antisaccade task both groups had slower Antisaccades during hypnosis. Although a couple of results suggest that a hypnotic condition may produce reduced eye motility, the lack of significant interactions (e.g., showing only Highs expressing a particular eye behavior during hypnosis) does not support the claim that eye behaviors (at least as measured with the techniques used) are an indicator of a "hypnotic state.” Our results do not preclude the possibility that in a more spontaneous or different setting the experience of being hypnotized might relate to specific eye behaviors. PMID:28846696

  13. Options for acetabular fixation surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klika, Alison K; Murray, Trevor G; Darwiche, Hussein; Barsoum, Wael K

    2007-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the most common cause for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). Due to poor long-term results with cemented acetabular components, cementless implants that rely on biologic fixation became popular in the United States for both primary and revision procedures in the early 1980s. Cementless acetabular components used in THA have been reported to have superior radiographic performance compared with cemented fixation, although the optimal method of acetabular fixation remains controversial. Cementless acetabular components require initial implant stability to allow for bone ingrowth and remodeling into the acetabular shell, providing long-term durability of the prosthesis. Many improved implant materials are available to facilitate bone growth and remodeling, including the 3 most common surface treatments; fibermesh, sintered beads, and plasma spray coatings. Recently added to these are porous metal surfaces, which have increased porosity and optimal pore sizes when compared with titanium fibermesh. The most studied of these materials is the titanium fibermesh fixation surface, which has demonstrated a mechanical failure rate of 1% at 10 to 15 years. This technology utilizes the diffusion bonding process to attach fiber metal pads to a titanium substrate using heat and pressure. The sintered bead fixation surface offers a porous coating of various sizes of spherical beads, achieved by the sintering process, and has been shown to provide long-term fixation. While there are less long-term published data regarding the titanium plasma spray surface, its early results have provided evidence of its durability, even in the face of significant osteolysis. The most recently added alternative fixation surface is porous tantalum metal, which offers potentially greater bone ingrowth and bone graft incorporation due to its high porosity (80%) and low modulus of elasticity (3 MPa). Porous tantalum implants have shown early favorable clinical results and have

  14. Perhaps correlational but not causal: no effect of dyslexic readers' magnocellular system on their eye movements during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Florian; Kronbichler, Martin; Jacobs, Arthur M; Wimmer, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    During reading, dyslexic readers exhibit more and longer fixations and a higher percentage of regressions than normal readers. It is still a matter of debate, whether these divergent eye movement patterns of dyslexic readers reflect an underlying problem in word processing or whether they are - as the proponents of the magnocellular deficit hypothesis claim - associated with deficient visual perception that is causal for dyslexia. To overcome problems in the empirical linkage of the magnocellular theory with reading, a string processing task is presented that poses similar demands on visual perception (in terms of letter identification) and oculomotor control as reading does. Two experiments revealed no differences in the eye movement patterns of dyslexic and control readers performing this task. Furthermore, no relationship between the functionality of the participants' magnocellular system assessed by the coherent motion task and string processing were found. The perceptual and oculomotor demands required during string processing were functionally equivalent to those during reading and the presented consonant strings had similar visual characteristics as reading material. Thus, a strong inference can be drawn: Dyslexic readers do not seem to have difficulties with the accurate perception of letters and the control of their eye movements during reading - their reading difficulties therefore cannot be explained in terms of oculomotor and visuo-perceptual problems.

  15. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  16. Persistence of the dark-background-contingent gaze upshift during visual fixations of rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Oleg; Thier, Peter; Barash, Shabtai

    2014-10-15

    During visual fixations, the eyes are directed so that the image of the target (object of interest) falls on the fovea. An exception to this rule was described in macaque monkeys (though not in humans): dark background induces a gaze shift upwards, sometimes large enough to shift the target's image off the fovea. In this article we address an aspect not previously rigorously studied, the time course of the upshift. The time course is critical for determining whether the upshift is indeed an attribute of visual fixation or, alternatively, of saccades that precede the fixation. These alternatives lead to contrasting predictions regarding the time course of the upshift (durable if the upshift is an attribute of fixation, transient if caused by saccades). We studied visual fixations with dark and bright background in three monkeys. We confined ourselves to a single upshift-inducing session in each monkey so as not to study changes in the upshift caused by training. Already at their first sessions, all monkeys showed clear upshift. During the first 0.5 s after the eye reached the vicinity of the target, the upshift was on average larger, but also more variable, than later in the trial; this initial high value 1) strongly depended on target location and was maximal at locations high on the screen, and 2) appears to reflect mostly the intervals between the primary and correction saccades. Subsequently, the upshift stabilized and remained constant, well above zero, throughout the 2-s fixation interval. Thus there is a persistent background-contingent upshift genuinely of visual fixation.

  17. Eye contact elicits bodily self-awareness in human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, Matias; Hazem, Nesrine; Vilarem, Emma; Beaucousin, Virginie; Picq, Jean-Luc; Conty, Laurence

    2014-10-01

    Eye contact is a typical human behaviour known to impact concurrent or subsequent cognitive processing. In particular, it has been suggested that eye contact induces self-awareness, though this has never been formally proven. Here, we show that the perception of a face with a direct gaze (that establishes eye contact), as compared to either a face with averted gaze or a mere fixation cross, led adult participants to rate more accurately the intensity of their physiological reactions induced by emotional pictures. Our data support the view that bodily self-awareness becomes more acute when one is subjected to another's gaze. Importantly, this effect was not related to a particular arousal state induced by eye contact perception. Rejecting the arousal hypothesis, we suggest that eye contact elicits a self-awareness process by enhancing self-focused attention in humans. We further discuss the implications of this proposal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  19. Preliminary experience with biodegradable implants for fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhillon Mandeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biodegradable implants were designed to overcome the disadvantages of metal-based internal fixation devices. Although they have been in use for four decades internationally, many surgeons in India continue to be skeptical about the mechanical strength of biodegradable implants, hence this study. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done to assess the feasibility and surgeon confidence level with biodegradable implants over a 12-month period in an Indian hospital. Fifteen fractures (intra-articular, metaphyseal or small bone fractures were fixed with biodegradable implants. The surgeries were randomly scheduled so that different surgeons with different levels of experience could use the implants for fixation. Results: Three fractures (one humeral condyle, two capitulum, were supplemented by additional K-wires fixation. Trans-articular fixator was applied in two distal radius and two pilon fractures where bio-pins alone were used. All fractures united, but in two cases the fracture displaced partially during the healing phase; one fibula due to early walking, and one radius was deemed unstable even after bio-pin and external fixator. Conclusions: Biodegradable -implants are excellent for carefully selected cases of intra-articular fractures and some small bone fractures. However, limitations for use in long bone fractures persist and no great advantage is gained if a "hybrid" composite is employed. The mechanical properties of biopins and screws in isolation are perceived to be inferior to those of conventional metal implants, leading to low confidence levels regarding the stability of reduced fractures; these implants should be used predominantly in fracture patterns in which internal fixation is subjected to minimal stress.

  20. Configural processing in body posture recognition: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weidong; Sun, Hongjin

    2013-11-13

    The body inversion effect is the finding that inverted body posture pictures are more difficult to recognize than upright body posture pictures are. The present study reinvestigated the body inversion effect in human observers using behavioral and eye movement measures to explore whether the body inversion effect correlates with specific eye movement features. Results showed that body postures elicited a robust and stable body inversion effect in reaction time throughout the experimental sessions. Eye-tracking data showed that the body inversion effect was robust only in the first fixation duration, but not in the second fixation duration. The analysis of the regions of interest showed that most fixations were located in the upper body for both the upright and the inverted body postures. Compared with inverted body postures, the upright postures led to a shorter reaction time and a shorter first fixation duration, but a larger portion of time to fixate on the head region, suggesting that participants tended to use head as a reference point to process upright body postures. For both the behavioral and the eye movement measures, the body inversion effect was robust for biomechanically possible body postures. However, for biomechanically impossible body postures (with angular manipulation of two joints), the effect was mixed. Although the error rate failed to show the body inversion effect, the reaction time measure and most eye movement measures, however, showed a body inversion effect. Overall, these results suggested that upright body postures are processed in expertise recognition and are processed configurally by human observers.

  1. Post-saccadic oscillations in eye movement data recorded with pupil-based eye trackers reflect motion of the pupil inside the iris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Marcus; Hooge, Ignace; Holmqvist, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Current video eye trackers use information about the pupil center to estimate orientation and movement of the eye. While dual Purkinje eye trackers suffer from lens wobble and scleral search coils may be influenced by contact lens slippage directly after saccades, it is not known whether pupil-based eye trackers produces similar artifacts in the data. We recorded eye movements from participants making repetitive, horizontal saccades and compared the movement in the data with pupil- and iris movements extracted from the eye images. Results showed that post-saccadic instabilities clearly exist in data recorded with a pupil-based eye tracker. They also exhibit a high degree of reproducibility across saccades and within participants. While the recorded eye movement data correlated well with the movement of the pupil center, the iris center showed only little post-saccadic movement. This means that the pupil moves relative to the iris during post-saccadic eye movements, and that the eye movement data reflect pupil movement rather than eyeball rotation. Besides introducing inaccuracies and additional variability in the data, the pupil movement inside the eyeball influences the decision of when a saccade should end and the subsequent fixation should begin, and consequently higher order analyses based on fixations and saccades.

  2. Eye movements during the handwriting of words: Individually and within sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sita, Jodi C; Taylor, Katelyn A

    2015-10-01

    Handwriting, a complex motor process involves the coordination of both the upper limb and visual system. The gaze behavior that occurs during the handwriting process is an area that has been little studied. This study investigated the eye-movements of adults during writing and reading tasks. Eye and handwriting movements were recorded for six different words over three different tasks. The results compared reading and handwriting the same words, a between condition comparison and a comparison between the two handwriting tasks. Compared to reading, participants produced more fixations during handwriting tasks and the average fixation durations were longer. When reading fixations were found to be mostly around the center of word, whereas fixations when writing appear to be made for each letter in a written word and were located around the base of letters and flowed in a left to right direction. Between the two writing tasks more fixations were made when words were written individually compared to within sentences, yet fixation durations were no different. Correlation of the number of fixations made to kinematic variables revealed that horizontal size and road length held a strong correlation with the number of fixations made by participants.

  3. Combining EEG and eye tracking: Identification, characterization and correction of eye movement artifacts in electroencephalographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePlöchl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements introduce large artifacts to electroencephalographic recordings (EEG and thus render data analysis difficult or even impossible. Trials contaminated by eye movement and blink artifacts have to be discarded, hence in standard EEG-paradigms subjects are required to fixate on the screen. To overcome this restriction, several correction methods including regression and blind source separation have been proposed. Yet, there is no automated standard procedure established. By simultaneously recording eye movements and 64-channel-EEG during a guided eye movement paradigm, we show that eye movement artifacts consist of several components, which arise from different sources. These include corneo-retinal dipole changes, saccadic spike potentials and eyelid movements. Moreover, we demonstrate that depending on electrode site, gaze direction and choice of reference these components contribute differently to the measured signal. Therefore they cannot be removed by regression-based correction methods, as these inevitably over- or under-correct individual artifact components. Finally we propose a correction procedure based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA. This procedure uses eye tracker information to reliably and objectively identify eye-artifact related ICA-components in an automated manner. We demonstrate that this approach allows removing or substantially reducing ocular artifacts including microsaccades without affecting the signal originating from brain sources. In conclusion the proposed method does not only provide a tool for detecting and correcting eye artifacts in standard EEG-paradigms but it also permits to study EEG-activity during eye tracking experiments and thus to investigate neural mechanisms of eye movement control and visual attention under natural conditions.

  4. [Bilateral eye injuries by external transversal force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geidel, K; Schob, S; Unterlauft, J D; Wiedemann, P; Meier, P

    2016-12-14

    A 49-year-old female victim of violent crime with an acute bilateral loss of vision was referred to our hospital. The ophthalmological evaluation showed complete subconjunctival hemorrhage of both eyes, bilateral hemophthalmos and hypotonia of the left eye. These raised the suspicion of an occult scleral rupture. We immediately performed exploratory surgery and found a perforating scleral lesion of the left eye and a penetrating scleral lesion of the right eye. Furthermore, a small, cruciform wound was detected on the left temple. In cooperation with the department of radiology, the extraordinary injury pattern was reconstructed: a horizontal stab wound with perforation of the left eye and penetration of the right eye caused by a screwdriver. Visual rehabilitation necessitated further surgical interventions. Besides the intraoperative approach, immediate primary wound management within 100 h of trauma plays a pivotal role for long-term outcome.

  5. A simple algorithm for the offline recalibration of eye-tracking data through best-fitting linear transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Street, Chris N H; Beesley, Tom; Shanks, David R

    2015-12-01

    Poor calibration and inaccurate drift correction can pose severe problems for eye-tracking experiments requiring high levels of accuracy and precision. We describe an algorithm for the offline correction of eye-tracking data. The algorithm conducts a linear transformation of the coordinates of fixations that minimizes the distance between each fixation and its closest stimulus. A simple implementation in MATLAB is also presented. We explore the performance of the correction algorithm under several conditions using simulated and real data, and show that it is particularly likely to improve data quality when many fixations are included in the fitting process.

  6. Fixation to features and neural processing of facial expressions in a gender discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neath, Karly N; Itier, Roxane J

    2015-10-01

    Early face encoding, as reflected by the N170 ERP component, is sensitive to fixation to the eyes. Whether this sensitivity varies with facial expressions of emotion and can also be seen on other ERP components such as P1 and EPN, was investigated. Using eye-tracking to manipulate fixation on facial features, we found the N170 to be the only eye-sensitive component and this was true for fearful, happy and neutral faces. A different effect of fixation to features was seen for the earlier P1 that likely reflected general sensitivity to face position. An early effect of emotion (∼120 ms) for happy faces was seen at occipital sites and was sustained until ∼350 ms post-stimulus. For fearful faces, an early effect was seen around 80 ms followed by a later effect appearing at ∼150 ms until ∼300 ms at lateral posterior sites. Results suggests that in this emotion-irrelevant gender discrimination task, processing of fearful and happy expressions occurred early and largely independently of the eye-sensitivity indexed by the N170. Processing of the two emotions involved different underlying brain networks active at different times.

  7. Fixation and saliency during search of natural scenes: the case of visual agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulsham, Tom; Barton, Jason J S; Kingstone, Alan; Dewhurst, Richard; Underwood, Geoffrey

    2009-07-01

    Models of eye movement control in natural scenes often distinguish between stimulus-driven processes (which guide the eyes to visually salient regions) and those based on task and object knowledge (which depend on expectations or identification of objects and scene gist). In the present investigation, the eye movements of a patient with visual agnosia were recorded while she searched for objects within photographs of natural scenes and compared to those made by students and age-matched controls. Agnosia is assumed to disrupt the top-down knowledge available in this task, and so may increase the reliance on bottom-up cues. The patient's deficit in object recognition was seen in poor search performance and inefficient scanning. The low-level saliency of target objects had an effect on responses in visual agnosia, and the most salient region in the scene was more likely to be fixated by the patient than by controls. An analysis of model-predicted saliency at fixation locations indicated a closer match between fixations and low-level saliency in agnosia than in controls. These findings are discussed in relation to saliency-map models and the balance between high and low-level factors in eye guidance.

  8. Late dislocation of in-the-bag intraocular lenses in uveitic eyes: An analysis of management and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha K Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An analysis of late in-the-bag dislocation of intraocular lenses (IOL, in uveitic eyes. Setting: Referral uveitis clinic. Design: Retrospective case series. Materials and Methods: All case records of eyes with chronic uveitis that had phacoemulsification with IOL implantation, at a referral uveitis clinic between February 1997 and January 2015 were retrieved and analyzed. Only those eyes with no documented intraoperative complication and no predisposing risks to IOL dislocation, such as pseudoexfoliation, high myopia, trauma, and prior VR surgery were included in this study. Results: A total of 581 eyes with chronic uveitis underwent phacoemulsification with IOL implantation under steroid cover from February 1997 to December 2015. Out of these 581 eyes, 10 patients (11 eyes had experienced late in-the-bag IOL dislocation (1.89%. All 11 eyes had chronic intermediate uveitis. The mean duration from the time of cataract surgery to IOL dislocation was 11.24 years. 5 out of 11 eyes had pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with IOL removal with 4-point sutured scleral fixated IOL. Two out of 11 eyes had PPV with in-the-bag IOL re-fixation. Out of 11, 2 eyes had PPV with IOL removal only. Remaining 2 eyes of 2 patients did not opt for surgery. Out of 11, 8 eyes had improved vision at last follow-up. Conclusions: In-the-bag dislocation of IOL is a rare late complication in uveitic eyes. With tight perioperative inflammatory control, scleral-fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens or IOL re-fixation are good options of restoring vision in these high-risk eyes.

  9. The eyes of man as a photic bisensor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, F.J.; Fingal, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Non-patterned photic stimulation of the eyes of human subjects was obtained by homogeneous illumination of the closed eyes. The subjects perceived a difference between the stimulation intensity of the left and of the right eye as a field of view consisting of a bright and a dark half, adjoined acros

  10. The eyes of man as a photic bisensor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, F.J.; Fingal, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Non-patterned photic stimulation of the eyes of human subjects was obtained by homogeneous illumination of the closed eyes. The subjects perceived a difference between the stimulation intensity of the left and of the right eye as a field of view consisting of a bright and a dark half, adjoined acros

  11. Effect of Task Information Accessibility on Visual Imagery Eye-movement%任务信息通达对视觉表象眼动的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何立国; 周爱保; 郭田友; 鲍旭辉

    2012-01-01

    通过两个实验探讨了视觉表象任务信息的通达对表象加工眼动的影响.结果表明,在低通达条件下,表象任务的眼动复制了知觉任务的眼动;随着表象任务信息通达水平的提高,眼动的注视点平均持续时间、平均眼跳距离和平均眼跳时间会发生规律性变化;眼动控制与任务信息通达水平对表象眼动的影响存在不同的机制.实验结果佐证了眼动在视觉表象中起机能性作用的观点.%Visual imagery is an important visuo-spatial representation, which has the same mental storage characteristics with visual perception (Romke, Kosslyn & Hamel, 1997), sharing the same brain mechanisms with visual perception (Kosslyn, Thompson & Alpert, 1997; Ganis, Thompson & Kosslyn, 2004). As is known to all, fixation is the primary source of visual perception information, and eye movement is very important to visual perception. So, does eye movement also play an important role in the visual imagery processing? There are two contrasting accounts for the phenomenon. The functional account hypothesizes that the encoding of each eye fixation during perception process participates, as an index in the location of the space in the subsequent image generation. In contrast, the epiphenomenal account views eye movements during imagery processing as the passive "spill over" from covert shifts of attention during the stage of image inspection, subsequently to its generation (Laeng & Teodorescu, 2002). Early studies (Jacobson, 1932; Lorens & Darrow, 1962) reported increased oculomotor activity during visualization and during mental arithmetic. Recently, researchers found that subjects who fixed their gaze centrally during perception did the same spontaneously during imagery. The subjects who are free to explore during perception, but maintaining central fixation during imagery, showed decreased ability to recall the pattern. They concluded that the eye scan paths during visual imagery reenact

  12. Aniseikonia, metamorphopsia and perceived entoptic pattern: some effects of a macular epiretinal membrane, and the subsequent spontaneous separation of the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, J M; Schwartz, A; Chang, D; Hirose, H

    1995-07-01

    Following cryo surgery for retinal hole repair, visual effects in the senior author's eyes were caused by an epiretinal membrane. Subjectively, metamorphopsia was noted, and entoptically perceived radial striae were observed centred near fixation. After subsequent cataract surgery, metamorphopsia was not detectable. Several months later, the centre of the striate entoptic pattern was observed to be centered several degrees from fixation. Concurrently, loss of contrast in the central visual field was noted. In time, both the entoptic pattern and the contrast effects became less visible (contrast improved much faster). The epiretinal membrane had spontaneously separated from the fovea. Repeated measurements of aniseikonia were obtained before cataract surgery, and after cataract surgery both prior to, and after the separation of the epiretinal membrane. Inferences are drawn.

  13. Fetal eye movements on magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Ramona Woitek

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. METHODS: Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17-40 GW, three age groups [17-23 GW, 24-32 GW, 33-40 GW]. Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981: Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. RESULTS: In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%. Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03, Type Ia (p = 0.031, and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033. Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3-45%. CONCLUSIONS: In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations.

  14. Fetal eye movements on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitek, Ramona; Kasprian, Gregor; Lindner, Christian; Stuhr, Fritz; Weber, Michael; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Furtner, Julia; Bettelheim, Dieter; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17-40 GW, three age groups [17-23 GW, 24-32 GW, 33-40 GW]). Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981): Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%). Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03), Type Ia (p = 0.031), and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033). Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3-45%. In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations.

  15. Fetal Eye Movements on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitek, Ramona; Kasprian, Gregor; Lindner, Christian; Stuhr, Fritz; Weber, Michael; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C.; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Furtner, Julia; Bettelheim, Dieter; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. Methods Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17–40 GW, three age groups [17–23 GW, 24–32 GW, 33–40 GW]). Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981): Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. Results In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%). Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03), Type Ia (p = 0.031), and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033). Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3–45%. Conclusions In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations. PMID:24194885

  16. Mechanical Comparison of Headless Screw Fixation and Locking Plate Fixation for Talar Neck Fractures.

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    Karakasli, Ahmet; Hapa, Onur; Erduran, Mehmet; Dincer, Cemal; Cecen, Berivan; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    For talar neck fractures, open reduction and internal fixation have been thought to facilitate revascularization and prevent osteonecrosis. Newer screw systems allow for placement of cannulated headless screws, which provide compression by virtue of a variable pitch thread. The present study compared the biomechanical fixation strength of cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation and locking plate fixation. A reproducible talar neck fracture was created in 14 fresh cadaver talar necks. Talar head fixation was then performed using 2 cannulated headless variable-pitch 4-mm/5-mm diameter (4/5) screws (Acutrak; Acumed, Hillsboro, OR) and locking plate fixation. Headless variable-pitch screw fixation had lower failure displacement than did locking plate fixation. No statistically significant differences were found in failure stiffness, yield stiffness (p = .655), yield load (p = .142), or ultimate load between the 2 fixation techniques. Cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation resulted in better failure displacement than locking plate fixation in a cadaveric talus model and could be considered a viable option for talus fracture fixation. Headless, fully threaded, variable-pitch screw fixation has inherent advantages compared with locking plate fixation, because it might cause less damage to the articular surface and can compress the fracture for improved reduction. Additionally, plate fixation can increase the risk of avascular necrosis owing to the wider incision and dissection of soft tissues.

  17. Effect of induced aniseikonia on fixation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remole, A

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine to what extent induced aniseikonia affects fixation performance. Aniseikonia was induced in the vertical meridian only, whereas fixation alignment was monitored in the horizontal meridian. A previously developed technique based on the dependency of border enhancement bandwidth on fixation eccentricity was used to monitor deviations from central fixation during fusion. Stress on the fusion mechanism was supplied by controlled increments of forced horizontal vergence. It was found that deviation from central fixation in the horizontal meridian generally increases with increasing amounts of vertical aniseikonia. The effect is particularly pronounced for small amounts of aniseikonia.

  18. Infants’ Looking to Surprising Events: When Eye-Tracking Reveals More than Looking Time

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    Yeung, H. Henny; Denison, Stephanie; Johnson, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    Research on infants’ reasoning abilities often rely on looking times, which are longer to surprising and unexpected visual scenes compared to unsurprising and expected ones. Few researchers have examined more precise visual scanning patterns in these scenes, and so, here, we recorded 8- to 11-month-olds’ gaze with an eye tracker as we presented a sampling event whose outcome was either surprising, neutral, or unsurprising: A red (or yellow) ball was drawn from one of three visible containers populated 0%, 50%, or 100% with identically colored balls. When measuring looking time to the whole scene, infants were insensitive to the likelihood of the sampling event, replicating failures in similar paradigms. Nevertheless, a new analysis of visual scanning showed that infants did spend more time fixating specific areas-of-interest as a function of the event likelihood. The drawn ball and its associated container attracted more looking than the other containers in the 0% condition, but this pattern was weaker in the 50% condition, and even less strong in the 100% condition. Results suggest that measuring where infants look may be more sensitive than simply how much looking there is to the whole scene. The advantages of eye tracking measures over traditional looking measures are discussed. PMID:27926920

  19. Toward FRP-Based Brain-Machine Interfaces-Single-Trial Classification of Fixation-Related Potentials.

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    Andrea Finke

    Full Text Available The co-registration of eye tracking and electroencephalography provides a holistic measure of ongoing cognitive processes. Recently, fixation-related potentials have been introduced to quantify the neural activity in such bi-modal recordings. Fixation-related potentials are time-locked to fixation onsets, just like event-related potentials are locked to stimulus onsets. Compared to existing electroencephalography-based brain-machine interfaces that depend on visual stimuli, fixation-related potentials have the advantages that they can be used in free, unconstrained viewing conditions and can also be classified on a single-trial level. Thus, fixation-related potentials have the potential to allow for conceptually different brain-machine interfaces that directly interpret cortical activity related to the visual processing of specific objects. However, existing research has investigated fixation-related potentials only with very restricted and highly unnatural stimuli in simple search tasks while participant's body movements were restricted. We present a study where we relieved many of these restrictions while retaining some control by using a gaze-contingent visual search task. In our study, participants had to find a target object out of 12 complex and everyday objects presented on a screen while the electrical activity of the brain and eye movements were recorded simultaneously. Our results show that our proposed method for the classification of fixation-related potentials can clearly discriminate between fixations on relevant, non-relevant and background areas. Furthermore, we show that our classification approach generalizes not only to different test sets from the same participant, but also across participants. These results promise to open novel avenues for exploiting fixation-related potentials in electroencephalography-based brain-machine interfaces and thus providing a novel means for intuitive human-machine interaction.

  20. Celestial polarization patterns sufficient for Viking navigation with the naked eye: detectability of Haidinger's brushes on the sky versus meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Gábor; Takács, Péter; Kretzer, Balázs; Szilasi, Szilvia; Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Barta, András

    2017-02-01

    If a human looks at the clear blue sky from which light with high enough degree of polarization d originates, an 8-shaped bowtie-like figure, the yellow Haidinger's brush can be perceived, the long axis of which points towards the sun. A band of high d arcs across the sky at 90° from the sun. A person can pick two points on that band, observe the yellow brushes and triangulate the position of the sun based on the orientation of the two observed brushes. This method has been suggested to have been used on the open sea by Viking navigators to determine the position of the invisible sun occluded by cloud or fog. Furthermore, Haidinger's brushes can also be used to locate the sun when it is below the horizon or occluded by objects on the horizon. To determine the position of the sun using the celestial polarization pattern, the d of the portion of the sky used must be greater than the viewer's degree of polarization threshold d* for perception of Haidinger's brushes. We studied under which sky conditions the prerequisite d > d* is satisfied. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we measured the d-pattern of skylight in the blue (450 nm) spectral range for 1296 different meteorological conditions with different solar elevation angles θ and per cent cloud cover ρ. From the measured d-patterns of a given sky we determined the proportion P of the sky for which d > d*. We obtained that P is the largest at low solar elevations θ ≈ 0° and under totally or nearly clear skies with cloud coverage ρ = 0%, when the sun's position is already easily determined. If the sun is below the horizon (-5° ≤ θ regions are bright, clear and polarized enough for perception of Haidinger's brushes.

  1. Etiology and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of community-acquired bacterial ocular infections in a tertiary eye care hospital in south India

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    Bharathi M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To identify the etiology, incidence and prevalence of ocular bacterial infections, and to assess the in vitro susceptibility of these ocular bacterial isolates to commonly used antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of consecutive samples submitted for microbiological evaluation from patients who were clinically diagnosed with ocular infections and were treated at a tertiary eye care referral center in South India between January 2002 and December 2007. Results: A total of 4417 ocular samples was submitted for microbiological evaluation, of which 2599 (58.8% had bacterial growth, 456 (10.3% had fungal growth, 15 (0.34% had acanthamoebic growth, 14 (0.32% had mixed microbial growth and the remaining 1333 (30.2% had negative growth. The rate of culture-positivity was found to be 88% (P < 0.001 in eyelids′ infection, 70% in conjunctival, 69% in lacrimal apparatus, 67.4% in corneal, 51.6% in intraocular tissues, 42.9% in orbital and 39.2% in scleral infections. The most common bacterial species isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (26.69% followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.14%. Sta. aureus was more prevalent more in eyelid infections (51.22%; P = 0.001 coagulase-negative staphylococci in endophthalmitis (53.1%; P = 0.001, Str. pneumoniae in lacrimal apparatus and corneal infections (64.19%; P = 0.001, Corynebacterium species in blepharitis and conjunctivitis (71%; P = 0.001, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in keratitis and dacryocystitis (66.5%; P = 0.001, Haemophilus species in dacryocystitis and conjunctivitis (66.7%; P = 0.001, Moraxella lacunata in blepharitis (54.17%; P = 0.001 and Moraxella catarrhalis in dacryocystitis (63.83%; P = 0.001. The largest number of gram-positive isolates was susceptible to moxifloxacin (98.7% and vancomycin (97.9%, and gram-negative isolates to amikacin (93.5% and gatifloxacin (92.7%. Conclusions: Gram-positive cocci were the most frequent bacteria isolated from ocular infections and were

  2. Distribution of albumin in the normal monkey eye as revealed by Evans blue fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-03-01

    Since intravenously injected Evans blue binds irreversibly to serum albumin, its distribution reflects albumin exchange between the intravascular and extravascular tissue compartments. In histologic specimens examined by fluorescence, microscopy, extravasated Evans blue--albumin complex was identified within the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork of normal monkey eyes. In eyes fixed by intra-arterial perfusion of fixative, no dye was identified in the choroid, retina, or optic nerve. With immersion fixation, however, some extravasation was seen in the choroid and adjacent optic nerve. In some specimens, the optic nerve was stained not only with material apparently leaking from the choroid but also from a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in the major disc vasculature during the interval before fixative penetrates into the tissue. Perfusion fixation must be used to avoid this artifact, and freezing techniques would be even better.

  3. Eating for Your Eyes

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    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  4. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the eye nausea or vomiting after an eye injury Think Prevention! Kids who play sports should wear protective goggles or unbreakable glasses as needed. Keep chemicals and other potentially dangerous objects out of the reach of children. Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, ... (Conjunctivitis) Eyes Corneal Abrasions Styes Activity: Eyes ...

  5. Pigment dispersion glaucoma induced by the chafing effect of intraocular lens haptics in Asian eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying; Sun, Yan-Xiu; Qi, Hong; Zhou, Ji-Chao; Hao, Yan-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    To study the possible mechanism and treatment for pigment dispersion glaucoma (PDG) caused by single-piece acrylic (SPA) intraocular lens (IOL) ciliary sulcus fixation in Asian eyes. Patients referred for PDG caused by SPA IOL ciliary sulcus fixation to our hospital from April 2005 to June 2011 were included. The patients' general information, IOL type, interval between initial surgery and PDG occurrence, examination findings, antiglaucoma medicine regimen and surgical interventions were recorded. In total, six eyes from five Chinese patients were included in this study. The intraocular pressure (IOP) increased 19-30 days after cataract surgery and was not satisfactorily controlled with antiglaucoma medication. Dense pigmentation was deposited on the IOLs and on the anterior chamber angle. IOL haptic chafing was noted on the rear iris surface. IOL repositioning in the capsular bag was performed in three eyes and was combined with trabeculectomy in two eyes with progressive glaucoma. An IOL exchange with three-piece IOL ciliary sulcus fixation was performed in the other three eyes. Scanning electron microscopy of the explanted IOLs demonstrated a rough edge on the IOL haptics. SPA IOLs were not suitable for ciliary sulcus fixation. The chafing effect of the IOL haptics on the posterior iris pigment epithelium could induce PDG in Asian eyes. IOLs should be positioned in the capsular bag or a three-piece IOL should be used instead.

  6. Does consolidation of visuospatial sequence knowledge depend on eye movements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomans, Daphné; Vandenbossche, Jochen; Homblé, Koen; Van den Bussche, Eva; Soetens, Eric; Deroost, Natacha

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we assessed whether visuospatial sequence knowledge is retained over 24 hours and whether this retention is dependent on the occurrence of eye movements. Participants performed two sessions of a serial reaction time (SRT) task in which they had to manually react to the identity of a target letter pair presented in one of four locations around a fixation cross. When the letter pair 'XO' was presented, a left response had to be given, when the letter pair 'OX' was presented, a right response was required. In the Eye Movements (EM) condition, eye movements were necessary to perform the task since the fixation cross and the target were separated by at least 9° visual angle. In the No Eye Movements (NEM) condition, on the other hand, eye movements were minimized by keeping the distance from the fixation cross to the target below 1° visual angle and by limiting the stimulus presentation to 100 ms. Since the target identity changed randomly in both conditions, no manual response sequence was present in the task. However, target location was structured according to a deterministic sequence in both the EM and NEM condition. Learning of the target location sequence was determined at the end of the first session and 24 hours after initial learning. Results indicated that the sequence learning effect in the SRT task diminished, yet remained significant, over the 24 hour interval in both conditions. Importantly, the difference in eye movements had no impact on the transfer of sequence knowledge. These results suggest that the retention of visuospatial sequence knowledge occurs alike, irrespective of whether this knowledge is supported by eye movements or not.

  7. Does consolidation of visuospatial sequence knowledge depend on eye movements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphné Coomans

    Full Text Available In the current study, we assessed whether visuospatial sequence knowledge is retained over 24 hours and whether this retention is dependent on the occurrence of eye movements. Participants performed two sessions of a serial reaction time (SRT task in which they had to manually react to the identity of a target letter pair presented in one of four locations around a fixation cross. When the letter pair 'XO' was presented, a left response had to be given, when the letter pair 'OX' was presented, a right response was required. In the Eye Movements (EM condition, eye movements were necessary to perform the task since the fixation cross and the target were separated by at least 9° visual angle. In the No Eye Movements (NEM condition, on the other hand, eye movements were minimized by keeping the distance from the fixation cross to the target below 1° visual angle and by limiting the stimulus presentation to 100 ms. Since the target identity changed randomly in both conditions, no manual response sequence was present in the task. However, target location was structured according to a deterministic sequence in both the EM and NEM condition. Learning of the target location sequence was determined at the end of the first session and 24 hours after initial learning. Results indicated that the sequence learning effect in the SRT task diminished, yet remained significant, over the 24 hour interval in both conditions. Importantly, the difference in eye movements had no impact on the transfer of sequence knowledge. These results suggest that the retention of visuospatial sequence knowledge occurs alike, irrespective of whether this knowledge is supported by eye movements or not.

  8. Culture shapes eye movements for visually homogeneous objects

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    David J Kelly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Culture affects the way people move their eyes to extract information in their visual world. Adults from Eastern societies (e.g., China display a disposition to process information holistically, whereas individuals from Western societies (e.g., Britain process information analytically. In terms of face processing, adults from Western cultures typically fixate the eyes and mouth, while adults from Eastern cultures fixate centrally on the nose region, yet face recognition accuracy is comparable across populations. A potential explanation for the observed differences relates to social norms concerning eye gaze avoidance/engagement when interacting with conspecifics. Furthermore, it has been argued that faces represent a ‘special’ stimulus category and are processed holistically, with the whole face processed as a single unit. The extent to which the holistic eye movement strategy deployed by East Asian observers is related to holistic processing for faces is undetermined. To investigate these hypotheses, we recorded eye movements of adults from Western and Eastern cultural backgrounds while learning and recognizing visually homogeneous objects: human faces, sheep faces and greebles. Both group of observers recognized faces better than any other visual category, as predicted by the specificity of faces. However, East Asian participants deployed central fixations across all the visual categories. This cultural perceptual strategy was not specific to faces, discarding any parallel between the eye movements of Easterners with the holistic processing specific to faces. Cultural diversity in the eye movements used to extract information from visual homogenous objects is rooted in more general and fundamental mechanisms.

  9. Yarbus, Eye Movements, and Vision

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    Benjamin W Tatler

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of Yarbus's research on eye movements was enormous following the translation of his book Eye Movements and Vision into English in 1967. In stark contrast, the published material in English concerning his life is scant. We provide a brief biography of Yarbus and assess his impact on contemporary approaches to research on eye movements. While early interest in his work focused on his study of stabilised retinal images, more recently this has been replaced with interest in his work on the cognitive influences on scanning patterns. We extended his experiment on the effect of instructions on viewing a picture using a portrait of Yarbus rather than a painting. The results obtained broadly supported those found by Yarbus.

  10. Nitrogen fixation by marine cyanobacteria.

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    Zehr, Jonathan P

    2011-04-01

    Discrepancies between estimates of oceanic N(2) fixation and nitrogen (N) losses through denitrification have focused research on identifying N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria and quantifying cyanobacterial N(2) fixation. Previously unrecognized cultivated and uncultivated unicellular cyanobacteria have been discovered that are widely distributed, and some have very unusual properties. Uncultivated unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria (UCYN-A) lack major metabolic pathways including the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxygen-evolving photosystem II. Genomes of the oceanic N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are highly conserved at the DNA level, and genetic diversity is maintained by genome rearrangements. The major cyanobacterial groups have different physiological and ecological constraints that result in highly variable geographic distributions, with implications for the marine N-cycle budget.

  11. Implant fixation by bone ingrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienapfel, H; Sprey, C; Wilke, A; Griss, P

    1999-04-01

    The term osseointegration referred originally to an intimate contact of bone tissue with the surface of a titanium implant; the term bone ingrowth refers to bone formation within an irregular (beads, wire mesh, casting voids, cut grooves) surface of an implant. The section dealing with the historical background describes the development of macroporous, microporous, and textured surfaces with an emphasis on the evolution of porous and textured metal surfaces. The principal requirements for osseointegration and bone ingrowth are systematically reviewed as follows: i) the physiology of osseointegration and bone ingrowth, including biomaterial biocompatibility with respect to cellular and matrix response at the interface; ii) the implant surface geometry characteristics; iii) implant micromotion and fixation modes; and iv) the implant-bone interface distances. Based on current methods of bone ingrowth assessment, this article comparatively reviews and discusses the results of experimental studies with the objective of determining local and systemic factors that enhance bone ingrowth fixation.

  12. Eye movements predict recollective experience.

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    Tali Sharot

    Full Text Available Previously encountered stimuli can bring to mind a vivid memory of the episodic context in which the stimulus was first experienced ("remembered" stimuli, or can simply seem familiar ("known" stimuli. Past studies suggest that more attentional resources are required to encode stimuli that are subsequently remembered than known. However, it is unclear if the attentional resources are distributed differently during encoding and recognition of remembered and known stimuli. Here, we record eye movements while participants encode photos, and later while indicating whether the photos are remembered, known or new. Eye fixations were more clustered during both encoding and recognition of remembered photos relative to known photos. Thus, recognition of photos that bring to mind a vivid memory for the episodic context in which they were experienced is associated with less distributed overt attention during encoding and recognition. The results suggest that remembering is related to encoding of a few distinct details of a photo rather than the photo as a whole. In turn, during recognition remembering may be trigged by enhanced memory for the salient details of the photos.

  13. Eye Movements Affect Postural Control in Young and Older Females.

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    Thomas, Neil M; Bampouras, Theodoros M; Donovan, Tim; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits, and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results showed that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions.

  14. Eye-Hand Coordination in Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder Using a Gap-Overlap Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Alessandro; Forti, Sara; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated eye-hand coordination in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in comparison with age-matched normally developing peers. The eye-hand correlation was measured by putting fixation latencies in relation with pointing and key pressing responses in visual detection tasks where a gap-overlap paradigm was used and compared to…

  15. Face in profile view reduces perceived facial expression intensity: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Shaw, Heather

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies measuring the facial expressions of emotion have focused primarily on the perception of frontal face images. As we frequently encounter expressive faces from different viewing angles, having a mechanism which allows invariant expression perception would be advantageous to our social interactions. Although a couple of studies have indicated comparable expression categorization accuracy across viewpoints, it is unknown how perceived expression intensity and associated gaze behaviour change across viewing angles. Differences could arise because diagnostic cues from local facial features for decoding expressions could vary with viewpoints. Here we manipulated orientation of faces (frontal, mid-profile, and profile view) displaying six common facial expressions of emotion, and measured participants' expression categorization accuracy, perceived expression intensity and associated gaze patterns. In comparison with frontal faces, profile faces slightly reduced identification rates for disgust and sad expressions, but significantly decreased perceived intensity for all tested expressions. Although quantitatively viewpoint had expression-specific influence on the proportion of fixations directed at local facial features, the qualitative gaze distribution within facial features (e.g., the eyes tended to attract the highest proportion of fixations, followed by the nose and then the mouth region) was independent of viewpoint and expression type. Our results suggest that the viewpoint-invariant facial expression processing is categorical perception, which could be linked to a viewpoint-invariant holistic gaze strategy for extracting expressive facial cues.

  16. Spontaneous eye movements and trait empathy predict vicarious learning of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleberg, Johan L; Selbing, Ida; Lundqvist, Daniel; Hofvander, Björn; Olsson, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Learning to predict dangerous outcomes is important to survival. In humans, this kind of learning is often transmitted through the observation of others' emotional responses. We analyzed eye movements during an observational/vicarious fear learning procedure, in which healthy participants (N=33) watched another individual ('learning model') receiving aversive treatment (shocks) paired with a predictive conditioned stimulus (CS+), but not a control stimulus (CS-). Participants' gaze pattern towards the model differentiated as a function of whether the CS was predictive or not of a shock to the model. Consistent with our hypothesis that the face of a conspecific in distress can act as an unconditioned stimulus (US), we found that the total fixation time at a learning model's face increased when the CS+ was shown. Furthermore, we found that the total fixation time at the CS+ during learning predicted participants' conditioned responses (CRs) at a later test in the absence of the model. We also demonstrated that trait empathy was associated with stronger CRs, and that autistic traits were positively related to autonomic reactions to watching the model receiving the aversive treatment. Our results have implications for both healthy and dysfunctional socio-emotional learning.

  17. A nonparametric method for detecting fixations and saccades using cluster analysis: removing the need for arbitrary thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Seth D; Buffalo, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-30

    Eye tracking is an important component of many human and non-human primate behavioral experiments. As behavioral paradigms have become more complex, including unconstrained viewing of natural images, eye movements measured in these paradigms have become more variable and complex as well. Accordingly, the common practice of using acceleration, dispersion, or velocity thresholds to segment viewing behavior into periods of fixations and saccades may be insufficient. Here we propose a novel algorithm, called Cluster Fix, which uses k-means cluster analysis to take advantage of the qualitative differences between fixations and saccades. The algorithm finds natural divisions in 4 state space parameters-distance, velocity, acceleration, and angular velocity-to separate scan paths into periods of fixations and saccades. The number and size of clusters adjusts to the variability of individual scan paths. Cluster Fix can detect small saccades that were often indistinguishable from noisy fixations. Local analysis of fixations helped determine the transition times between fixations and saccades. Because Cluster Fix detects natural divisions in the data, predefined thresholds are not needed. A major advantage of Cluster Fix is the ability to precisely identify the beginning and end of saccades, which is essential for studying neural activity that is modulated by or time-locked to saccades. Our data suggest that Cluster Fix is more sensitive than threshold-based algorithms but comes at the cost of an increase in computational time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Eye tracking to evaluate evidence recognition in crime scene investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watalingam, Renuka Devi; Richetelli, Nicole; Pelz, Jeff B; Speir, Jacqueline A

    2017-08-23

    Crime scene analysts are the core of criminal investigations; decisions made at the scene greatly affect the speed of analysis and the quality of conclusions, thereby directly impacting the successful resolution of a case. If an examiner fails to recognize the pertinence of an item on scene, the analyst's theory regarding the crime will be limited. Conversely, unselective evidence collection will most likely include irrelevant material, thus increasing a forensic laboratory's backlog and potentially sending the investigation into an unproductive and costly direction. Therefore, it is critical that analysts recognize and properly evaluate forensic evidence that can assess the relative support of differing hypotheses related to event reconstruction. With this in mind, the aim of this study was to determine if quantitative eye tracking data and qualitative reconstruction accuracy could be used to distinguish investigator expertise. In order to assess this, 32 participants were successfully recruited and categorized as experts or trained novices based on their practical experiences and educational backgrounds. Each volunteer then processed a mock crime scene while wearing a mobile eye tracker, wherein visual fixations, durations, search patterns, and reconstruction accuracy were evaluated. The eye tracking data (dwell time and task percentage on areas of interest or AOIs) were compared using Earth Mover's Distance (EMD) and the Needleman-Wunsch (N-W) algorithm, revealing significant group differences for both search duration (EMD), as well as search sequence (N-W). More specifically, experts exhibited greater dissimilarity in search duration, but greater similarity in search sequences than their novice counterparts. In addition to the quantitative visual assessment of examiner variability, each participant's reconstruction skill was assessed using a 22-point binary scoring system, in which significant group differences were detected as a function of total

  19. Celestial polarization patterns sufficient for Viking navigation with the naked eye: detectability of Haidinger's brushes on the sky versus meteorological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Gábor; Takács, Péter; Kretzer, Balázs; Szilasi, Szilvia; Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Barta, András

    2017-02-01

    If a human looks at the clear blue sky from which light with high enough degree of polarization d originates, an 8-shaped bowtie-like figure, the yellow Haidinger's brush can be perceived, the long axis of which points towards the sun. A band of high d arcs across the sky at 90° from the sun. A person can pick two points on that band, observe the yellow brushes and triangulate the position of the sun based on the orientation of the two observed brushes. This method has been suggested to have been used on the open sea by Viking navigators to determine the position of the invisible sun occluded by cloud or fog. Furthermore, Haidinger's brushes can also be used to locate the sun when it is below the horizon or occluded by objects on the horizon. To determine the position of the sun using the celestial polarization pattern, the d of the portion of the sky used must be greater than the viewer's degree of polarization threshold d* for perception of Haidinger's brushes. We studied under which sky conditions the prerequisite d > d* is satisfied. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we measured the d-pattern of skylight in the blue (450 nm) spectral range for 1296 different meteorological conditions with different solar elevation angles θ and per cent cloud cover ρ. From the measured d-patterns of a given sky we determined the proportion P of the sky for which d > d*. We obtained that P is the largest at low solar elevations θ ≈ 0° and under totally or nearly clear skies with cloud coverage ρ = 0%, when the sun's position is already easily determined. If the sun is below the horizon (-5° ≤ θ see text] under clear sky conditions. Consequently, the sky-polarimetric Viking navigation based on Haidinger's brushes is most useful after sunset and prior to sunrise, when the sun is not visible and large sky regions are bright, clear and polarized enough for perception of Haidinger's brushes.

  20. Celestial polarization patterns sufficient for Viking navigation with the naked eye: detectability of Haidinger's brushes on the sky versus meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Péter; Kretzer, Balázs; Szilasi, Szilvia; Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Barta, András

    2017-01-01

    If a human looks at the clear blue sky from which light with high enough degree of polarization d originates, an 8-shaped bowtie-like figure, the yellow Haidinger's brush can be perceived, the long axis of which points towards the sun. A band of high d arcs across the sky at 90° from the sun. A person can pick two points on that band, observe the yellow brushes and triangulate the position of the sun based on the orientation of the two observed brushes. This method has been suggested to have been used on the open sea by Viking navigators to determine the position of the invisible sun occluded by cloud or fog. Furthermore, Haidinger's brushes can also be used to locate the sun when it is below the horizon or occluded by objects on the horizon. To determine the position of the sun using the celestial polarization pattern, the d of the portion of the sky used must be greater than the viewer's degree of polarization threshold d* for perception of Haidinger's brushes. We studied under which sky conditions the prerequisite d > d* is satisfied. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we measured the d-pattern of skylight in the blue (450 nm) spectral range for 1296 different meteorological conditions with different solar elevation angles θ and per cent cloud cover ρ. From the measured d-patterns of a given sky we determined the proportion P of the sky for which d > d*. We obtained that P is the largest at low solar elevations θ ≈ 0° and under totally or nearly clear skies with cloud coverage ρ = 0%, when the sun's position is already easily determined. If the sun is below the horizon (−5° ≤ θ < 0°) during twilight, P = 76.17 ± 4.18% for dmin∗=23% under clear sky conditions. Consequently, the sky-polarimetric Viking navigation based on Haidinger's brushes is most useful after sunset and prior to sunrise, when the sun is not visible and large sky regions are bright, clear and polarized enough for perception of Haidinger

  1. EALab (Eye Activity Lab): a MATLAB Toolbox for Variable Extraction, Multivariate Analysis and Classification of Eye-Movement Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Perez, Javier; Solnais, Celine; Sriskandarajah, Kumuthan

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the reliability of the eye-tracking methodology as well as the increasing availability of affordable non-intrusive technology have opened the door to new research opportunities in a variety of areas and applications. This has raised increasing interest within disciplines such as medicine, business and education for analysing human perceptual and psychological processes based on eye-tracking data. However, most of the currently available software requires programming skills and focuses on the analysis of a limited set of eye-movement measures (e.g., saccades and fixations), thus excluding other measures of interest to the classification of a determined state or condition. This paper describes 'EALab', a MATLAB toolbox aimed at easing the extraction, multivariate analysis and classification stages of eye-activity data collected from commercial and independent eye trackers. The processing implemented in this toolbox enables to evaluate variables extracted from a wide range of measures including saccades, fixations, blinks, pupil diameter and glissades. Using EALab does not require any programming and the analysis can be performed through a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) consisting of three processing modules: 1) eye-activity measure extraction interface, 2) variable selection and analysis interface, and 3) classification interface.

  2. Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with cow-hitch knot in posterior chamber intraocular lens decentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ertuğrul; Koçak, Nurullah; Yücel, Özlem Eşki; Gül, Adem; Öztürk, Hilal Eser; Sayın, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: To describe a simplified ab-interno cow-hitch suture fixation technique for repositioning decentered posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL). Materials and Methods: Two cases are presented with the surgical correction of decentered and subluxated IOL. Ab-interno scleral suture fixation technique with hitch-cow knot in the eye was performed with a ciliary sulcus guide instrument and 1 year follow-up was completed. Results: Both of the patients had well centered lenses postoperatively. Corrected distant and near visual acuities of the patients were improved. There was no significant postoperative complication. In the follow-up period of 1 year, no evidence of suture erosion was found. Conclusions: Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with hitch-cow knot in the eye was effective in repositioning decentered or subluxated PC IOLs with excellent postoperative centered lenses and visual outcomes. PMID:27050346

  3. Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with cow-hitch knot in posterior chamber intraocular lens decentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Can

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: To describe a simplified ab-interno cow-hitch suture fixation technique for repositioning decentered posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL. Materials and Methods: Two cases are presented with the surgical correction of decentered and subluxated IOL. Ab-interno scleral suture fixation technique with hitch-cow knot in the eye was performed with a ciliary sulcus guide instrument and 1 year follow-up was completed. Results: Both of the patients had well centered lenses postoperatively. Corrected distant and near visual acuities of the patients were improved. There was no significant postoperative complication. In the follow-up period of 1 year, no evidence of suture erosion was found. Conclusions: Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with hitch-cow knot in the eye was effective in repositioning decentered or subluxated PC IOLs with excellent postoperative centered lenses and visual outcomes.

  4. Visual scan patterns and decision-making skills of expert assistant referees in offside situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catteeuw, Peter; Helsen, Werner; Gilis, Bart; Van Roie, Evelien; Wagemans, Johan

    2009-12-01

    The offside decision-making process of international and national assistant referees (ARs) was evaluated using video simulations. A Tobii T120 Eye Tracker was used to record the eye movements. Two hypotheses for explaining incorrect decisions were investigated, namely, the flash-lag effect and the shift of gaze. Performance differences between skill levels were also examined. First, results showed a bias toward flag errors for national ARs as expected by the flash-lag effect. Second, ARs fixated the offside line before, during, and after the precise moment the pass was given, implying there was no shift of gaze from the passer to the receiving attacker. Third, no differences were found in scan patterns between international and national ARs. In conclusion, international ARs seem to have found a strategy to better deal with the perceptual illusion resulting from the flash-lag effect. Based on their experience, they have learned to correct for this illusion, and, consequently, show fewer flag errors.

  5. Fixation of external drainage device with injectable shape-memory alloy clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jeffrey L; Erlanger, Michael

    2013-09-01

    To describe a novel surgical technique and novel surgical instrumentation for fixating an extraocular drainage device used for glaucoma-filtering surgery. The technique was performed in a laboratory setting using ex-vivo porcine eyes. We describe the surgical technique of using injectable, 25-gauge shape-memory clip system to fixate an Ahmed drainage device. The use of an injectable, shape-memory alloy clip provides the advantages of rapid, easy deployment and decreased risk of late suture failure. Importantly, the injectable, shape-memory clips can be used in surgical situations where suturing is difficult and time intensive, such as those encountered during glaucoma drainage device placement. The use of an injectable, shape-memory alloy clip is a promising new surgical tool and technique for fixating an extraocular drainage device used for glaucoma surgery.

  6. The effects of fixation and restricted visual field on vection-induced motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Anderson, Richard B.; Leibowitz, Herschel W.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 60 percent of healthy human subjects experience motion sickness when exposed to a rotating optokinetic drum. Here, the effects of certain visual factors on susceptibility to motion sickness were determined. Vection data (illusory self-motion), horizontal eye movement recordings, subjective motion sickness report, and a measure of gastric myoelectric activity were obtained from 45 subjects, who were randomly divided into the following three groups: a control group that observed the entire visual field with no fixation, a group that fixated on a central target, and a third group that had a visual field restricted to 15 deg. The experimental session was divided into three 12-min periods: baseline, drum rotation, and recovery. The results showed that fixation greatly reduced nystagmus and slightly reduced vection. The restricted visual field slightly reduced nystagmus and greatly reduced vection. Both of these manipulations significantly reduced symptoms of motion sickness and abnormal gastric myoelectric activity.

  7. Paroxysmal eye-head movements in Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S; Pons, Roser; Engelstad, Kristin; Kane, Steven A; Goldberg, Michael E; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2017-04-25

    To describe a characteristic paroxysmal eye-head movement disorder that occurs in infants with Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 101 patients with Glut1 DS to obtain clinical data about episodic abnormal eye movements and analyzed video recordings of 18 eye movement episodes from 10 patients. A documented history of paroxysmal abnormal eye movements was found in 32/101 patients (32%), and a detailed description was available in 18 patients, presented here. Episodes started before age 6 months in 15/18 patients (83%), and preceded the onset of seizures in 10/16 patients (63%) who experienced both types of episodes. Eye movement episodes resolved, with or without treatment, by 6 years of age in 7/8 patients with documented long-term course. Episodes were brief (usually <5 minutes). Video analysis revealed that the eye movements were rapid, multidirectional, and often accompanied by a head movement in the same direction. Eye movements were separated by clear intervals of fixation, usually ranging from 200 to 800 ms. The movements were consistent with eye-head gaze saccades. These movements can be distinguished from opsoclonus by the presence of a clear intermovement fixation interval and the association of a same-direction head movement. Paroxysmal eye-head movements, for which we suggest the term aberrant gaze saccades, are an early symptom of Glut1 DS in infancy. Recognition of the episodes will facilitate prompt diagnosis of this treatable neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Combined transscleral fixation of an artificial iris prosthesis with an intraocular lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzeyır Gunenc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Post-traumatic aniridia combined with aphakia may be seen after globe injury. Aside from esthetic aspects, partial or total loss of the iris tissue may also be related to various degrees of glare and photophobia. Such patients suffer from severe visual impairment secondary to aphakia. Herein we describe a novel surgical technique for the management of an aphakic eye with traumatic aniridia for a patient who underwent transscleral fixation of a custom-tailored artificial iris prosthesis combined with a rigid intraocular lens (IOL. Tight suturing of the IOL haptic eyelets on the silicone iris prosthesis and fixation of such a complex to the scleral wall may provide excellent cosmetic and functional outcomes in aphakic eyes with aniridia.

  9. The Added Value of Eye-tracking in Diagnosing Dyscalculia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske eVan Viersen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared eye movements and performance of a nine-year-old girl with Developmental Dyscalculia (DD on a series of number line tasks to those of a group of typically developing (TD children (n = 10, in order to answer the question whether eye-tracking data from number line estimation tasks can be a useful tool to discriminate between TD children and children with a number processing deficit. Quantitative results indicated that the child with dyscalculia performed worse on all symbolic number line tasks compared to the control group, indicated by a low linear fit (R2 and a low accuracy measured by mean percent absolute error. In contrast to the control group, her magnitude representations seemed to be better represented by a logarithmic than a linear fit. Furthermore, qualitative analyses on the data of the child with dyscalculia revealed more unidentifiable fixation patterns in the processing of multi-digit numbers and more dysfunctional estimation strategy use in one third of the estimation trials as opposed to approximately 10% in the control group. In line with her dyscalculia diagnosis, these results confirm the difficulties with spatially representing and manipulating numerosities on a number line, resulting in inflexible and inadequate estimation or processing strategies. It can be concluded from this case study that eye-tracking data can be used to discern different number processing and estimation strategies in TD children and children with a number processing deficit. Hence, eye-tracking data in combination with number line estimation tasks might be a valuable and promising addition to current diagnostic measures.

  10. The added value of eye-tracking in diagnosing dyscalculia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Viersen, Sietske; Slot, Esther M; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Van't Noordende, Jaccoline E; Leseman, Paul P M

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared eye movements and performance of a 9-year-old girl with Developmental Dyscalculia (DD) on a series of number line tasks to those of a group of typically developing (TD) children (n = 10), in order to answer the question whether eye-tracking data from number line estimation tasks can be a useful tool to discriminate between TD children and children with a number processing deficit. Quantitative results indicated that the child with dyscalculia performed worse on all symbolic number line tasks compared to the control group, indicated by a low linear fit (R (2)) and a low accuracy measured by mean percent absolute error. In contrast to the control group, her magnitude representations seemed to be better represented by a logarithmic than a linear fit. Furthermore, qualitative analyses on the data of the child with dyscalculia revealed more unidentifiable fixation patterns in the processing of multi-digit numbers and more dysfunctional estimation strategy use in one third of the estimation trials as opposed to ~10% in the control group. In line with her dyscalculia diagnosis, these results confirm the difficulties with spatially representing and manipulating numerosities on a number line, resulting in inflexible and inadequate estimation or processing strategies. It can be concluded from this case study that eye-tracking data can be used to discern different number processing and estimation strategies in TD children and children with a number processing deficit. Hence, eye-tracking data in combination with number line estimation tasks might be a valuable and promising addition to current diagnostic measures.

  11. The Effects of Body Action and Attentive Anticipation on Oculomotor Fixation Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyosun Choi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Tiny eye movements, such as micro-saccades, ocular tremor, and drifts, occur involuntarily during fixation. We found evidence that involvement of body action and anticipation of visual stimuli modulates them. While eye movements were monitored, subjects performed the working memory task with a touch-screen display in two different conditions. In the passive condition, each number was shown for 400-ms and spaced in time by 500-ms automatically. In the active condition, touching action was required to trigger the appearance of each number. The delay between the touch and stimulus onset was constant within a block as 200, 500, or 800-ms. Subjects were prompted to type in the number sequence after five numbers were shown. As a measure of fixation instability, deviation of eye position was analyzed by comparing eye positions with those during the reference interval (0∼50ms time period after the number onset. We observed two results: first, the deviation was smaller in pre-reference time than in post-reference time. Second, the deviation was smaller in the active condition. These results show that micro eye movements are influenced by attentive anticipation of upcoming events, which becomes more pronounced with bodily interactions. These findings suggest a cross-modal interaction among visual, motor, and oculomotor systems.

  12. Endoscopic-Assisted Scleral Fixated IOL in the Management of Secondary Aphakia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hossam Eldin; Haroun, Hazem Effat; El Deeb, Mohamed Wagieh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the short-term postoperative outcomes in endoscopic-assisted sclera fixation intraocular lens (IOL) for the management of secondary aphakia in children. Methods. This is a prospective study, whereas 40 aphakic eyes with absence of a good capsular support were implanted by endoscopy-assisted sclera fixation technique. Results. No major intraoperative complications were recorded. All cases were followed up for 6 months. Only transient ocular hypertension occurred in 10 (25%) eyes. Lens decentration and/or tilting were clinically detected in 2 eyes (5%). Ultrasonic biomicroscopic (UBM) examination revealed lens tilting in 2 (5%) of the operated eyes, despite the proper haptics positioning in the ciliary sulcus. Postoperative vitreous hemorrhage was reported in 5 eyes (12.5%) in the early postoperative period and retinal detachment in one eye. A postoperative refractive astigmatism ranging from 0.75 D to 3.75 D (mean 1.7 D ± 0.79) was recorded, as compared to mean preoperative values of 2.00 D, with no statistically significant differences being recorded (p ≥ 0.05). An improvement of BCVA, 1-2 lines on Snellen chart at the end of the follow-up period, was detected in 23 eyes (57.5%) with a mean of 0.6 ± 0.08 SD, as compared to a preoperative mean values of 0.5 ± 0.07 SD (p ≥ 0.05). Conclusion. Using an endoscope for transscleral suturing of intraocular lenses in aphakic pediatric eyes might be considered as being an effective technique that can reduce surgical complications, especially postoperative lens decentration. PMID:27595016

  13. Endoscopic-Assisted Scleral Fixated IOL in the Management of Secondary Aphakia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba A. El Gendy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the short-term postoperative outcomes in endoscopic-assisted sclera fixation intraocular lens (IOL for the management of secondary aphakia in children. Methods. This is a prospective study, whereas 40 aphakic eyes with absence of a good capsular support were implanted by endoscopy-assisted sclera fixation technique. Results. No major intraoperative complications were recorded. All cases were followed up for 6 months. Only transient ocular hypertension occurred in 10 (25% eyes. Lens decentration and/or tilting were clinically detected in 2 eyes (5%. Ultrasonic biomicroscopic (UBM examination revealed lens tilting in 2 (5% of the operated eyes, despite the proper haptics positioning in the ciliary sulcus. Postoperative vitreous hemorrhage was reported in 5 eyes (12.5% in the early postoperative period and retinal detachment in one eye. A postoperative refractive astigmatism ranging from 0.75 D to 3.75 D (mean 1.7 D ± 0.79 was recorded, as compared to mean preoperative values of 2.00 D, with no statistically significant differences being recorded (p≥0.05. An improvement of BCVA, 1-2 lines on Snellen chart at the end of the follow-up period, was detected in 23 eyes (57.5% with a mean of 0.6±0.08 SD, as compared to a preoperative mean values of 0.5±0.07 SD (p≥0.05. Conclusion. Using an endoscope for transscleral suturing of intraocular lenses in aphakic pediatric eyes might be considered as being an effective technique that can reduce surgical complications, especially postoperative lens decentration.

  14. [Iris suture fixation of posterior-chamber elastic intraocular lens in ligament apparatus laxity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashtaev, N P; Bat'kov, E N; Zotov, V V

    2010-01-01

    An original MIOL-23 multifocal elastic intraocular lens (IOL) was used to operate 5 eyes with acquired lens dislocation and traumatic cataract. By making self-sealing tunnel incision, ILO was implanted into the capsular sac and sutured to the iris. MIOL-23 implantation caused an increase in mean visual acuity. The IOL took up a correct position. Elastic IOL implantation with iris suture fixation is an efficient and safe mode of additional ILO support.

  15. Intramedullary foot fixation for midfoot Charcot neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Bradley M; Siddiqui, Noman A; Nair, Ajitha K; LaPorta, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Midfoot Charcot collapse commonly occurs through the tarsometatarsal and/or midtarsal joints, which creates the characteristic "rocker bottom" deformity. Intramedullary metatarsal fixation spanning the tarsus into the talus and/or calcaneus is a recently developed method for addressing unstable midfoot Charcot deformity. The intramedullary foot fixation technique has various advantages when addressing midfoot Charcot deformity in the neuropathic patient. These advantages include anatomical realignment, minimally invasive fixation technique, formal multiple joint fusion, adjacent joint fixation beyond the level of Charcot collapse, rigid interosseus fixation, and preservation of foot length. The goals of the intramedullary foot fixation procedure are to create a stable, plantigrade, and ulcer-free foot, which allows the patient to ambulate with custom-molded orthotics and shoes.

  16. The diagnostic significance of the multifocal pattern visual evoked potential in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S L; Klistorner, A

    1999-04-01

    The concept of objective perimetry is an exciting one because it strives to assess glaucoma damage without relying on psychophysical testing. The recent introduction of multifocal stimulus recording has enhanced our ability to examine the human visual field using electrophysiology. A multifocal pattern visual evoked potential can now be recorded, testing up to 60 sites within the central 25 degrees. The test requires only that the subject fixate on a target, while a cortically scaled dartboard pattern stimulus undergoes pseudorandom alternation within each of the test segments. In its present configuration the test requires at least 8 minutes recording time per eye. Modified bipolar electrode positions are required to ensure that adequate signals are detected from all parts of the visual field. In glaucoma patients, pattern visual evoked potential amplitudes have been shown to reflect visual field loss with reduction of signal amplitude in the affected areas. This technique represents the first major step toward objective detection of visual field defects in glaucoma.

  17. Recognition of facial emotions and identity in patients with mesial temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsy: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ibañez, Asier; Urrestarazu, Elena; Viteri, Cesar

    2014-11-01

    To describe visual scanning pattern for facial identity recognition (FIR) and emotion recognition (FER) in patients with idiopathic generalized (IGE) and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Secondary endpoint was to correlate the results with cognitive function. Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) and Ekman&Friesen series were performed for FIR and FER respectively in 23 controls, 20 IGE and 19 MTLE patients. Eye movements were recorded by a Hi-Speed eye-tracker system. Neuropsychological tools explored cognitive function. Correct FIR rate was 78% in controls, 70.7% in IGE and 67.4% (p=0.009) in MTLE patients. FER hits reached 82.7% in controls, 74.3% in IGE (p=0.006) and 73.4% in MTLE (p=0.002) groups. IGE patients failed in disgust (p=0.005) and MTLE ones in fear (p=0.009) and disgust (p=0.03). FER correlated with neuropsychological scores, particularly verbal fluency (r=0.542, p<0.001). Eye-tracking revealed that controls scanned faces more diffusely than IGE and MTLE patients for FIR, who tended to top facial areas. A longer scanning of the top facial area was found in the three groups for FER. Gap between top and bottom facial region fixation time decreased in MTLE patients, with more but shorter fixations in bottom facial region. However, none of these findings were statistically significant. FIR was impaired in MTLE patients, and FER in both IGE and MTLE, particularly for fear and disgust. Although not statistically significant, those with impaired FER tended to perform more diffuse eye-tracking over the faces and have cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of fixation disparity curve parameters obtained with the Wesson and Saladin fixation disparity cards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ngan, Janice; Goss, David A; Despirito, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This study compared fixation curve parameters with two commercially available fixation disparity cards, one that has been available for several years, the Wesson card, and a new one, the Saladin card...

  19. Most severe consequences of eye contusion injuries: Surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosavljević Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One third of all eye injuries are contusion injuries. The most common causes of contusion eye injuries are squash ball, fist fights, sports, and work with blunt objects. Objective. The objective of our study was to analyze the surgical treatment methods and materials for managing the most severe consequences of eye contusion injuries. Method. A large number of complications of contusion eye injuries were treated at Department for Vitreoretinal Surgery of the Eye Clinic, Military Medical Academy, Belgrade. This paper analyzed two periods, from 1991-1999, and 2000-2004. During these periods, 461 patients with contusion eye injuries were surgically treated. Pars plana vitrectomy and phacoemulsification with PCL implantation were the most commonly performed operations. Results. During the analyzed period, a total of 334 pars plana vitrectomies, 253 combined operations (PHACO+ VPP and 214 operations with PCL implantation (PHACO+VPP+PCL were performed. Scleral fixation was carried out in 14 patients. After pars plana vitrectomy, some form of extended tamponade of vitreal space, in relation to degree of injury and complications, was performed in 194 cases. CONCLUSION Eye traumatism is still one of the leading causes of vision loss (from the earliest ages in our region. Preventive measures that could lead to decrease of eye injuries should be fully supported, not only through expert meetings and publications, but via media as well.

  20. Learning to Detect Objects from Eye-Tracking Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P Papadopoulous

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the bottlenecks in computer vision, especially in object detection, is the need for a large amount of training data. Typically, this is acquired by manually annotating images by hand. In this study, we explore the possibility of using eye-trackers to provide training data for supervised machine learning. We have created a new large scale eye-tracking dataset, collecting fixation data for 6270 images from the Pascal VOC 2012 database. This represents 10 of the 20 classes included in the Pascal database. Each image was viewed by 5 observers, and a total of over 178k fixations have been collected. While previous attempts at using fixation data in computer vision were based on a free-viewing paradigm, we used a visual search task in order to increase the proportion of fixations on the target object. Furthermore, we divided the dataset into five pairs of semantically similar classes (cat/dog, bicycle/motorbike, horse/cow, boat/aeroplane and sofa/diningtable, with the observer having to decide which class each image belonged to. This kept the observer's task simple, while decreasing the chance of them using the scene gist to identify the target parafoveally. In order to alleviate the central bias in scene viewing, the images were presented to the observers with a random offset. The goal of our project is to use the eye-tracking information in order to detect and localise the attended objects. Our model so far, based on features representing the location of the fixations and an appearance model of the attended regions, can successfully predict the location of the target objects in over half of images.

  1. Exploring eye movements of experienced and novice readers of medical texts concerning the cardiovascular system in making a diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilppu, Henna; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Södervik, Ilona; Österholm-Matikainen, Erika

    2017-01-01

    This study used the eye-tracking method to explore how the level of expertise influences reading, and solving, two written patient cases on cardiac failure and pulmonary embolus. Eye-tracking is a fairly commonly used method in medical education research, but it has been primarily applied to studies analyzing the processing of visualizations, such as medical images or patient video cases. Third-year medical students (n = 39) and residents (n = 13) read two patient case texts in an eye-tracking laboratory. The analysis focused on the diagnosis made, the total visit duration per text slide, and eye-movement indicators regarding task-relevant and task-redundant areas of the patient case text. The results showed that almost all participants (48/52) made the correct diagnosis of the first patient case, whereas all the residents, but only 17 students, correctly diagnosed the second case. The residents were efficient patient-case-solvers: they reached the correct diagnoses, and processed the cases faster and with a lower number of fixations than did the students. Further, the students and residents demonstrated different reading patterns with regard to which slides they proportionally paid most attention. The observed differences could be utilized in medical education to model expert reasoning and to teach the manner in which a good medical text is constructed. Eye-tracking methodology appears to have a great deal of potential in evaluating performance and growing diagnostic expertise in reading medical texts. However, further research using medical texts as stimuli is required. Anat Sci Educ 10: 23-33. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. A MATLAB-based eye tracking control system using non-invasive helmet head restraint in the macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luna, Paolo; Mohamed Mustafar, Mohamed Faiz Bin; Rainer, Gregor

    2014-09-30

    Tracking eye position is vital for behavioral and neurophysiological investigations in systems and cognitive neuroscience. Infrared camera systems which are now available can be used for eye tracking without the need to surgically implant magnetic search coils. These systems are generally employed using rigid head fixation in monkeys, which maintains the eye in a constant position and facilitates eye tracking. We investigate the use of non-rigid head fixation using a helmet that constrains only general head orientation and allows some freedom of movement. We present a MATLAB software solution to gather and process eye position data, present visual stimuli, interact with various devices, provide experimenter feedback and store data for offline analysis. Our software solution achieves excellent timing performance due to the use of data streaming, instead of the traditionally employed data storage mode for processing analog eye position data. We present behavioral data from two monkeys, demonstrating that adequate performance levels can be achieved on a simple fixation paradigm and show how performance depends on parameters such as fixation window size. Our findings suggest that non-rigid head restraint can be employed for behavioral training and testing on a variety of gaze-dependent visual paradigms, reducing the need for rigid head restraint systems for some applications. While developed for macaque monkey, our system of course can work equally well for applications in human eye tracking where head constraint is undesirable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Multi-View Algorithm for Face, Eyes and Eye State Detection in Human Image- Study Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latesh Kumari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For fatigue detection such as in the application of driver‟s fatigue monitoring system, the eye state analysis is one of the important and deciding steps to determine the fatigue of driver‟s eyes. In this study, algorithms for face detection, eye detection and eye state analysis have been studied and presented as well as an efficient algorithm for detection of face, eyes have been proposed. Firstly the efficient algorithm for face detection method has been presented which find the face area in the human images. Then, novel algorithms for detection of eye region and eye state are introduced. In this paper we propose a multi-view based eye state detection to determine the state of the eye. With the help of skin color model, the algorithm detects the face regions in an YCbCr color model. By applying the skin segmentation which normally separates the skin and non-skin pixels of the images, it detects the face regions of the image under various lighting and noise conditions. Then from these face regions, the eye regions are extracted within those extracted face regions. Our proposed algorithms are fast and robust as there is not pattern match.

  4. Harvesting clues from genome wide transcriptome analysis for exploring thalidomide mediated anomalies in eye development of chick embryo: Nitric oxide rectifies the thalidomide mediated anomalies by swinging back the system to normal transcriptome pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavitra; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Kathirvel, Priyadarshan; Veeriah, Vimal; Dutta, Priya; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha; Gupta, Ravi; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-02-01

    Thalidomide, the notorious teratogen is known to cause various developmental abnormalities, among which a range of eye deformations are very common. From the clinical point of view, it is necessary to pinpoint the mechanisms of teratogens that tune the gene expression. However, to our knowledge, the molecular basis of eye deformities under thalidomide treatmenthas not been reported so far. Present study focuses on the possible mechanism by which thalidomide affects eye development and the role of Nitric Oxide in recovering thalidomide-mediated anomalies of eye development using chick embryo and zebrafish models with transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis showed that 403 genes were up-regulated and 223 genes were down-regulated significantly in thalidomide pre-treated embryos. 8% of the significantly modulated genes have been implicated in eye development including Pax6, OTX2, Dkk1 and Shh. A wide range of biological process and molecular function was affected by thalidomide exposure. Biological Processes including structural constituent of eye lens and Molecular functions such as visual perception and retinal metabolic process formed strong annotation clustersindicating the adverse effects of thalidomide on eye development and function. Here, we have discussed the whole embryo transcriptome with the expression of PAX6, SOX2, and CRYAAgenes from developing eyes. Our experimental data showing structural and functional aspects includingeye size, lens transparency and optic nerve activity and bioinformatics analyses of transcriptome suggest that NO could partially protect thalidomide treated embryos from its devastating effects on eye development and function.

  5. Eye movement prediction by oculomotor plant Kalman filter with brainstem control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oleg V.KOMOGORTSEV; Javed I.KHAN

    2009-01-01

    Our work addresses one of the core issues related to Human Computer Interaction (HCI) systems that use eye gaze as an input.This issue is the sensor,transmission and other delays that exist in any eye tracker-based system,reducing its performance.A delay effect can be compensated by an accurate prediction of the eye movement trajectories.This paper introduces a mathematical model of the human eye that uses anatomical properties of the Human Visual System to predict eye movement trajectories.The eye mathematical model is transformed into a Kalman filter form to provide continuous eye position signal prediction during all eye movement types.The model presented in this paper uses brainstem control properties employed during transitions between fast (saccade) and slow (fixations,pursuit) eye movements.Results presented in this paper indicate that the proposed eye model in a Kalman filter form improves the accuracy of eye move-ment prediction and is capable of a real-time performance.In addition to the HCI systems with the direct eye gaze input,the proposed eye model can be immediately applied for a bit-rate/computational reduction in real-time gaze-contingent systems.

  6. [Systematic deviations of saccadic eye movements in Wallenberg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, K U

    1979-01-01

    A patient suffering from lateral medullary infarction (Wallenberg's syndrome) is presented, exhibiting a striking bias of all saccadic eye movements toward the side of the lesion. Oculographic tracings demonstrate this oculomotor disorder. Other disturbances of ocular motility which resemble this one superficially are discussed. Interruption of fixation leads to a gliding movement veeringly to the side of the infarction. Since all saccades generated under different circumstances are affected, it is contemplated where the pathological signal is intruded into the prenuclear level, to adulterate all saccades causing lateropulsion of saccadic eye movements.

  7. Percepção de expressões faciais em pessoas com esquizofrenia: movimentos oculares, sintomatologia e nível intelectual The perception of facial expressions in people with schizophrenia: eye movements, symptomatology and intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Lukasova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A análise dos padrões dos movimentos oculares em esquizofrênicos mostra que estes apresentam alterações próprias da doença. O objetivo foi avaliar e relacionar as propriedades dos movimentos oculares com o estado clínico e nível intelectual durante observação de faces. Foram avaliados 10 sujeitos com diagnóstico de esquizofrenia e 10 controle, pareados em função de sexo, idade e escolaridade. Foi utilizada a Escala das Síndromes Positiva e Negativa (ESPN, o Teste de Matrizes Progressivas Raven e o Penn Emotion Acuity Test. A busca visual foi registrada com programa EyeGaze®. Resultados mostram que ambos os grupos fixaram mais as faces com conteúdo emocional, sendo o número total de fixações menor entre os pacientes com esquizofrenia. A duração da fixação teve correlação inversa com a pontuação no Raven, PANSS e número de fixação. Parâmetros dos movimentos oculares se correlacionaram com a condição clínica e nível intelectual dos pacientes com esquizofrenia.Analyses of the eye movement patterns of schizophrenics show some specific characteristics underlying the illness. The objective of present study was to evaluate and correlate basic properties of the eye movements with the clinical state and intelligence during the visual scan of faces. 10 outpatient subjects with schizophrenia and 10 controls matched in gender, age and school years were evaluated. The assessment tools were the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PNSS, the Raven's Progressive Matrices Test and the Penn Emotion Acuity Test. The visual scan was registered with the EyeGaze® program. Both groups showed more fixations for stimuli with emotional expression, with significantly smaller overall number of fixations for the schizophrenic subjects group. Duration of fixations was inversely correlated with score in the Raven Test, PANSS and number of fixations. The properties of the eye movements showed correlation with the clinical condition and

  8. Characteristics of Spontaneous Square-Wave Jerks in the Healthy Macaque Monkey during Visual Fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M Costela

    Full Text Available Saccadic intrusions (SIs, predominantly horizontal saccades that interrupt accurate fixation, include square-wave jerks (SWJs; the most common type of SI, which consist of an initial saccade away from the fixation target followed, after a short delay, by a return saccade that brings the eye back onto target. SWJs are present in most human subjects, but are prominent by their increased frequency and size in certain parkinsonian disorders and in recessive, hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias. SWJs have been also documented in monkeys with tectal and cerebellar etiologies, but no studies to date have investigated the occurrence of SWJs in healthy nonhuman primates. Here we set out to determine the characteristics of SWJs in healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta during attempted fixation of a small visual target. Our results indicate that SWJs are common in healthy nonhuman primates. We moreover found primate SWJs to share many characteristics with human SWJs, including the relationship between the size of a saccade and its likelihood to be part of a SWJ. One main discrepancy between monkey and human SWJs was that monkey SWJs tended to be more vertical than horizontal, whereas human SWJs have a strong horizontal preference. Yet, our combined data indicate that primate and human SWJs play a similar role in fixation correction, suggesting that they share a comparable coupling mechanism at the oculomotor generation level. These findings constrain the potential brain areas and mechanisms underlying the generation of fixational saccades in human and nonhuman primates.

  9. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a ... the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... is also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears. How do tears work? ... you blink, a film of tears spreads over the eye. This keeps the eye’s surface smooth and ...

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... tissue covering the white of your eye and inside your eyelids. Normally, our eyes constantly make tears ... Multimedia Public & Patients: Contact Us About the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical ...

  13. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye ... What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ...

  14. TUBERCULOSIS AND THE EYE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Mycobacteria; Tuberculosis; Eye ... of tuberculous eye disease or ocular tuberculosis has also been raised. Ocular ... patients with ocular complaints, compiled in an area ..... tuberculomas are usually solitary and may measure up.

  15. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... you see. Check out the diagrams below to learn about each part of your eye and what ... the optic nerve to the brain. Watch now! Learn how the different parts of your eye work ...

  16. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid ... Your eyes are made up of many different parts that work together to help you see. Check out the ...

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear- ... Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology ...

  18. Preventing eye injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daksha Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge in developing a strategy to prevent eye injuries is that there are so many different causes and situations that can lead to eye injuries, each requiring a different approach.

  19. Common Eye Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.cdc.gov/emailupdates/">What's this? Submit Button Common Eye Disorders Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Other common eye disorders include amblyopia and strabismus. For a ...

  20. In your eyes only: deficits in executive functioning after frontal TMS reflect in eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthi, Mathias; Henke, Katharina; Gutbrod, Klemens; Nyffeler, Thomas; Chaves, Silvia; Müri, René M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the roles of the right and left dorsolateral prefrontal (rDLPFC, lDLPFC) and the medial frontal cortex (MFC) in executive functioning using a theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) approach. Healthy subjects solved two visual search tasks: a number search task with low cognitive demands, and a number and letter search task with high cognitive demands. To observe how subjects solved the tasks, we assessed their behavior with and without TMS using eye movements when subjects were confronted with specific executive demands. To observe executive functions, we were particularly interested in TMS-induced changes in visual exploration strategies found to be associated with good or bad performance in a control condition without TMS stimulation. TMS left processing time unchanged in both tasks. Inhibition of the rDLPFC resulted in a decrease in anticipatory fixations in the number search task, i.e., a decrease in a good strategy in this low demand task. This was paired with a decrease in stimulus fixations. Together, these results point to a role of the rDLPFC in planning and response selection. Inhibition of the lDLPFC and the MFC resulted in an increase in anticipatory fixations in the number and letter search task, i.e., an increase in the application of a good strategy in this task. We interpret these results as a compensatory strategy to account for TMS-induced deficits in attentional switching when faced with high switching demands. After inhibition of the lDLPFC, an increase in regressive fixations was found in the number and letter search task. In the context of high working memory demands, this strategy appears to support TMS-induced working memory deficits. Combining an experimental TMS approach with the recording of eye movements proved sensitive to discrete decrements of executive functions and allows pinpointing the functional organization of the frontal lobes.

  1. Reduced sensitivity to contrast signals from the eye region in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Katie; Towler, John; Eimer, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Contrast-related signals from the eye region are known to be important for the processing of facial identity. Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have severe face recognition problems, which may be linked to deficits in the perceptual processing of identity-related information from the eyes. We tested this hypothesis by measuring N170 components in DP participants and age-matched controls in response to face images where the contrast polarity of the eyes and of other face parts was independently manipulated. In different trials, participants fixated either the eye region or the lower part of a face. In the Control group, contrast-reversal of the eyes resulted in enhanced and delayed N170 components, irrespective of the contrast of other face parts and of gaze location. In the DP group, these effects of eye contrast on N170 amplitudes were strongly and significantly reduced, demonstrating that perceptual face processing in DP is less well tuned to contrast information from the eye region. Inverting the contrast of other parts of the face affected N170 amplitudes only when fixation was outside the eye region. This effect did not differ between the two groups, indicating that DPs are not generally insensitive to the contrast polarity of face images. These results provide new evidence that a selective deficit in detecting and analysing identity-related information provided by contrast signals from the eye region may contribute to the face recognition impairment in DP.

  2. The all seeing eye?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    The All Seeing Eye? Did you know that you are probably a believer in the All Seeing Eye? The odds are that I’m right—why? Well, the bulk of mainstream vision literature blindly relies on the All Seeing Eye. It is written all over papers, albeit between the lines. Understandably so, for scientists re

  3. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  4. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... when I sleep? Feb 10, 2016 Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Find an Ophthalmologist ...

  5. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  6. The all seeing eye?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070864543

    2014-01-01

    The All Seeing Eye? Did you know that you are probably a believer in the All Seeing Eye? The odds are that I’m right—why? Well, the bulk of mainstream vision literature blindly relies on the All Seeing Eye. It is written all over papers, albeit between the lines. Understandably so, for scientists

  7. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Margaret I; Kamilar, Jason M; Kirk, E Christopher

    2012-12-22

    Most vertebrate groups exhibit eye shapes that vary predictably with activity pattern. Nocturnal vertebrates typically have large corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual sensitivity. Conversely, diurnal vertebrates generally demonstrate smaller corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual acuity. By contrast, several studies have concluded that many mammals exhibit typical nocturnal eye shapes, regardless of activity pattern. However, a recent study has argued that new statistical methods allow eye shape to accurately predict activity patterns of mammals, including cathemeral species (animals that are equally likely to be awake and active at any time of day or night). Here, we conduct a detailed analysis of eye shape and activity pattern in mammals, using a broad comparative sample of 266 species. We find that the eye shapes of cathemeral mammals completely overlap with nocturnal and diurnal species. Additionally, most diurnal and cathemeral mammals have eye shapes that are most similar to those of nocturnal birds and lizards. The only mammalian clade that diverges from this pattern is anthropoids, which have convergently evolved eye shapes similar to those of diurnal birds and lizards. Our results provide additional evidence for a nocturnal 'bottleneck' in the early evolution of crown mammals.

  8. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Margaret I.; Kamilar, Jason M.; Kirk, E. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Most vertebrate groups exhibit eye shapes that vary predictably with activity pattern. Nocturnal vertebrates typically have large corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual sensitivity. Conversely, diurnal vertebrates generally demonstrate smaller corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual acuity. By contrast, several studies have concluded that many mammals exhibit typical nocturnal eye shapes, regardless of activity pattern. However, a recent study has argued that new statistical methods allow eye shape to accurately predict activity patterns of mammals, including cathemeral species (animals that are equally likely to be awake and active at any time of day or night). Here, we conduct a detailed analysis of eye shape and activity pattern in mammals, using a broad comparative sample of 266 species. We find that the eye shapes of cathemeral mammals completely overlap with nocturnal and diurnal species. Additionally, most diurnal and cathemeral mammals have eye shapes that are most similar to those of nocturnal birds and lizards. The only mammalian clade that diverges from this pattern is anthropoids, which have convergently evolved eye shapes similar to those of diurnal birds and lizards. Our results provide additional evidence for a nocturnal ‘bottleneck’ in the early evolution of crown mammals. PMID:23097513

  9. Medicare Benefits and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe to eNews Close Donate Medicare Benefits & Your Eyes Eye Health is Important! As you age, your risk ... that you need. Ask about eye exams! Routine Eye Exams Medicare does not generally cover the costs ...

  10. Prevent Eye Injuries from Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Assistance Information Vision Screening and Eye Exams Zika Virus and Vision Eye Problems Eye Problems Amblyopia ( ... Eye Health Report Reports and External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision ...

  11. Outcome of rail fixator system in reconstructing bone gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Lakhani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: All patients well tolerated rail fixator with good functional results and gap reconstruction. Easy application of rail fixator and comfortable distraction procedure suggest rail fixator a good alternative for gap reconstruction of limbs.

  12. Scan patterns when viewing natural scenes: emotion, complexity, and repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Margaret M; Houbova, Petra; Miccoli, Laura; Costa, Vincent D; Lang, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    Eye movements were monitored during picture viewing, and effects of hedonic content, perceptual composition, and repetition on scanning assessed. In Experiment 1, emotional and neutral pictures that were figure-ground compositions or more complex scenes were presented for a 6-s free viewing period. Viewing emotional pictures or complex scenes prompted more fixations and broader scanning of the visual array, compared to neutral pictures or simple figure-ground compositions. Effects of emotion and composition were independent, supporting the hypothesis that these oculomotor indices reflect enhanced information seeking. Experiment 2 tested an orienting hypothesis by repeatedly presenting the same pictures. Although repetition altered specific scan patterns, emotional, compared to neutral, picture viewing continued to prompt oculomotor differences, suggesting that motivationally relevant cues enhance information seeking in appetitive and defensive contexts. Copyright © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  13. Sustained fixation induced changes in phoria and convergence peak velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun H Kim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study sought to investigate the influence of phoria adaptation on convergence peak velocity from responses located at different initial vergence positions. METHODS: Symmetrical 4° convergence step responses and near dissociated phoria (measured at 40 cm from the subject's midline were recorded from six subjects with normal binocular vision using an infrared limbus tracking system with a haploscope. Two different sustained fixations (1° and 16° convergent rotation along the subject's midline were used to study whether phoria had an influence on the peak velocity of convergence responses located at two initial vergence positions (1° or 'far' steps and 12° or 'near' steps. RESULTS: Phoria was significantly adapted after a sustained fixation task at near (16° and far (1° (p<0.002. A repeated measures ANOVA showed that convergence far steps were significantly faster than the near steps (p<0.03. When comparing convergence steps with the same initial vergence position, steps measured after near phoria adaptation were faster than responses after far adaptation (p<0.02. A regression analysis demonstrated that the change in phoria and the change in convergence peak velocity were significantly correlated for the far convergence steps (r = 0.97, p = 0.001. A weaker correlation was observed for the near convergence steps (r = 0.59, p = 0.20. CONCLUSION: As a result of sustained fixation, phoria was adapted and the peak velocity of the near and far convergence steps was modified. This study has clinical considerations since prisms, which evoke phoria adaptation, can be prescribed to help alleviate visual discomfort. Future investigations should include a systematic study of how prisms may influence convergence and divergence eye movements for those prescribed with prisms within their spectacles.

  14. Dynamic Programming for Re-Mapping Noisy Fixations in Translation Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Eyetrackers which allow for free head movements are in many cases imprecise to the extent that reading patterns become heavily distorted. The poor usability and interpretability of these gaze patterns is corroborated by a "naïve" fixation-to-symbol mapping, which often wrongly maps the possibly d...... successive fixations and the symbol locations, so as to smooth the gazing path according to the background gazing model. A qualitative and quantitative evaluation shows that the algorithm increases the accuracy of the re-mapped symbol sequence....

  15. Eye Tracking Meets the Process of Process Modeling: a Visual Analytic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burattin, Andrea; Kaiser, M.; Neurauter, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Research on the process of process modeling (PPM) studies how process models are created. It typically uses the logs of the interactions with the modeling tool to assess the modeler’s behavior. In this paper we suggest to introduce an additional stream of data (i.e., eye tracking) to improve...... diagram, heat maps, fixations distributions) both static and dynamic (i.e., movies with the evolution of the model and eye tracking data on top)....

  16. Stability of unicortical locked fixation versus bicortical non-locked fixation for forearm fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy J.Pater; Steve I Grindel; Gregory J.Schmeling; Mei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Locking plate fixation is being widely applied for fixation of forearm fractures and has many potential advantages, such as fixed angle fixation and improved construct stability, especially in osteoporotic bone. Biomechanical data comparing locking devices to commonly used Low Contact Dynamic Compression (LCDCP) plates for the fixation of forearm fractures has been lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the fixation stability of a 3.5-mm unicortical locked plate with bicortical non-locked LCDCP plates. Six matched pairs of fresh frozen cadaveric forearms were randomly assigned to unicortical locked and bicortical unlocked groups. Non-destructive four-point bending and torsional test was performed on the ulna and radius separately, using a servohydraulic testing system to obtain construct stiffness of the intact specimens and specimens after osteotomy and plating. The specimens were then loaded to failure to test the fixation strength. The locked unicortical fixation showed significantly higher bending stiffness than the unlocked bicortical fixation, but with significantly lower stiffness and strength in torsion. Fixation strength was comparable between the two groups under bending, but significantly greater in the bicortical non-locked group under torsion. Findings from this study suggest that postoperative rehabilitation protocols may need modification to limit torsional loading in the early stage when using locked unicortical fixation. The study also points out the potential advantage of a hybrid fixation that combines locked unicortical and unlocked bicortical screws.

  17. Comparison of fixation disparity curve parameters obtained with the Wesson and Saladin fixation disparity cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Janice; Goss, David A; Despirito, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This study compared fixation curve parameters with two commercially available fixation disparity cards, one that has been available for several years, the Wesson card, and a new one, the Saladin card. Fixation disparity curves were measured on 50 subjects with the Wesson fixation disparity card and the Saladin fixation disparity card. The x intercepts were on average more in the base-in direction with the Wesson card than with the Saladin card. The y intercepts were shifted in the exo direction with the Wesson card compared with the Saladin card. The slope with the Wesson card was steeper than the slope obtained with the Saladin card. The distribution of curve types was also different with the two different instruments. Fixation disparity curves measured with these two instruments are different, and separate norms should be used for each fixation disparity measurement method.

  18. Effect of Additive on Sulfur-fixation Process of Sulfur-fixation Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jun-lin; QIU Jian-rong; ZHAO Gai-ju; LOU Jin-ping; HAN Chun-hua

    2003-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of desulfurization product is directly related to its high-temperatureresistant ability. Effects of the additive on the sulfur-fixation efficiency of the Ba-sulfur-fixation agent and also on the crystallization behavior of the sulfur-fixation product were studied when CaCO3 and BaCO3 were used as the desulfurization agent and MgO and SrCO3 used as the assistant sulfur-fixation agent. The result shows that increase of sulfur-fixation capability for the additive is not owe to their directly react to form sulfate or interact with CaCO3 and BaCO3 to form composite mineral heat-resistant in high temperature, but owe to their activation to sulfur-fixation reaction of the sulfur-fixation agent.

  19. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  20. Magnetoactive elastomer as an element of a magnetic retina fixator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L. A.; Nadzharyan, T. A.; Alekhina, Yu A.; Stepanov, G. V.; Kazimirova, E. G.; Perov, N. S.; Kramarenko, E. Yu

    2017-09-01

    We explore the possibility of creating an effective retinal fixator on the basis of magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) and systems of permanent magnets. MAEs consist of silicone elastomer matrix with embedded magnetic iron microparticles. We study theoretically and experimentally magnetic forces acting between MAE samples and permanent magnets in various configurations. The theoretical model is based around classical magnetostatics and Maxwell equations with different parameters accounting for peculiarities of the material and the setup. Approximation of the experimentally measured magnetization curves for MAE samples was used to find input parameters for the theoretical model. To test the model, we conducted a series of experimental measurements of magnetic forces accompanied by model predictions for the system of one cylindrical magnet and a cuboid MAE sample. Calculated dependences of the average pressure arising from magnetic interactions on the distance between the closest faces of MAE samples and a permanent magnet are in a good agreement with the experimental data. The proof on concept for smaller magnetic systems required for eye surgery includes data for 10 magnets configuration and a thin MAE band. This research demonstrates high prospects of using MAE as an element of a magnetic fixator for treatment of complicated retinal detachments.

  1. EYE GAZE TRACKING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of performing eye gaze tracking of at least one eye of a user, by determining the position of the center of the eye, said method comprising the steps of: detecting the position of at least three reflections on said eye, transforming said positions to spanning...... a normalized coordinate system spanning a frame of reference, wherein said transformation is performed based on a bilinear transformation or a non linear transformation e.g. a möbius transformation or a homographic transformation, detecting the position of said center of the eye relative to the position...... of said reflections and transforming this position to said normalized coordinate system, tracking the eye gaze by tracking the movement of said eye in said normalized coordinate system. Thereby calibration of a camera, such as knowledge of the exact position and zoom level of the camera, is avoided...

  2. External fixation combined with limited internal fixation in the treatment of pilon tibia fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Intraarticular fractures of the tibial plafond (pilon fractures belong to the group of most severe fractures. They are usually caused by high-energy trauma and frequently associated with a marked soft-tissue damage. Surgical treatment has replaced the traditional nonoperative treatment. The aim of this study was to present the results of the treatment of distal tibial intraarticular fracture by the use of internal fixation, as well as the combination of minimal internal fixation and external fixation. Methods. The study included 47 patients with pilon tibia fractures who went through at the Clinic for Orthopedics and Traumatology, School of Medicine, Niš (1995-2004. Within the analyzed group there were 33 (70.2% males and 14 (29.8% females. The patients mean age was 45.8 years. In the first group, which consisted of 22 patients, open reduction and internal fixation of both the tibia and the fibula was performed in the two separate incisions. The second group consisted of 25 patients managed with external fixation by external fixator "Mitković" with limited internal fixation. Besides external fixation, a minimal internal fixation was performed by the use of Kirschner wires and screws. The patients were followed-up inside a 24-months-period. Results. The obtained was a substantially high number of complications after open reduction and internal fixation in the group of patients. There was no difference in a long-term clinical outcome. Postoperative osteitis, as the most severe complication in the management of closed pilon tibia fractures, was not registered in the second group. Conclusion. Considering the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that external fixation by the "Mitković" external fixator with the minimal internal fixation is a satisfactory method for the treatment of fractures of the tibial plafond causing less complications than internal fixation. .

  3. A dataset of stereoscopic images and ground-truth disparity mimicking human fixations in peripersonal space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Andrea; Gibaldi, Agostino; Chessa, Manuela; Fato, Marco; Solari, Fabio; Sabatini, Silvio P.

    2017-03-01

    Binocular stereopsis is the ability of a visual system, belonging to a live being or a machine, to interpret the different visual information deriving from two eyes/cameras for depth perception. From this perspective, the ground-truth information about three-dimensional visual space, which is hardly available, is an ideal tool both for evaluating human performance and for benchmarking machine vision algorithms. In the present work, we implemented a rendering methodology in which the camera pose mimics realistic eye pose for a fixating observer, thus including convergent eye geometry and cyclotorsion. The virtual environment we developed relies on highly accurate 3D virtual models, and its full controllability allows us to obtain the stereoscopic pairs together with the ground-truth depth and camera pose information. We thus created a stereoscopic dataset: GENUA PESTO—GENoa hUman Active fixation database: PEripersonal space STereoscopic images and grOund truth disparity. The dataset aims to provide a unified framework useful for a number of problems relevant to human and computer vision, from scene exploration and eye movement studies to 3D scene reconstruction.

  4. A dataset of stereoscopic images and ground-truth disparity mimicking human fixations in peripersonal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Andrea; Gibaldi, Agostino; Chessa, Manuela; Fato, Marco; Solari, Fabio; Sabatini, Silvio P

    2017-03-28

    Binocular stereopsis is the ability of a visual system, belonging to a live being or a machine, to interpret the different visual information deriving from two eyes/cameras for depth perception. From this perspective, the ground-truth information about three-dimensional visual space, which is hardly available, is an ideal tool both for evaluating human performance and for benchmarking machine vision algorithms. In the present work, we implemented a rendering methodology in which the camera pose mimics realistic eye pose for a fixating observer, thus including convergent eye geometry and cyclotorsion. The virtual environment we developed relies on highly accurate 3D virtual models, and its full controllability allows us to obtain the stereoscopic pairs together with the ground-truth depth and camera pose information. We thus created a stereoscopic dataset: GENUA PESTO-GENoa hUman Active fixation database: PEripersonal space STereoscopic images and grOund truth disparity. The dataset aims to provide a unified framework useful for a number of problems relevant to human and computer vision, from scene exploration and eye movement studies to 3D scene reconstruction.

  5. Sutureless intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with lamellar dissection of scleral tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaji, Takahiro; Sato, Tomoki; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the results of sutureless scleral fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) by using our developed simple technique. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 48 eyes of 47 patients who underwent sutureless intrascleral IOL fixation by using our modified technique. A 25-gauge microvitreoretinal knife was used to perform sclerotomies and create limbus-parallel scleral tunnels with lamellar dissection in which the haptics were fixed. Results The IOLs were fixed and centered well. The mean follow-up period was 26.7 months. Postoperative complications included smooth vitreous hemorrhage in four eyes (8.3%), cystoid macular edema in two eyes (4.2%), and iris capture of the IOL in two eyes (4.2%). No other complications, such as breakage of the IOL, spontaneous IOL dislocation, or retinal detachment, were detected during the follow-up period. Conclusion The lamellar dissection of the limbus-parallel scleral tunnel can simplify the forceps-assisted introduction of the haptics into the scleral tunnel, and this technique seemed to be safe. PMID:26869757

  6. The Impact of Language Opacity and Proficiency on Reading Strategies in Bilinguals: An Eye Movement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León Rodríguez, Diego; Buetler, Karin A.; Eggenberger, Noëmi; Laganaro, Marina; Nyffeler, Thomas; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Müri, René M.

    2016-01-01

    Reading strategies vary across languages according to orthographic depth – the complexity of the grapheme in relation to phoneme conversion rules – notably at the level of eye movement patterns. We recently demonstrated that a group of early bilinguals, who learned both languages equally under the age of seven, presented a first fixation location (FFL) closer to the beginning of words when reading in German as compared with French. Since German is known to be orthographically more transparent than French, this suggested that different strategies were being engaged depending on the orthographic depth of the used language. Opaque languages induce a global reading strategy, and transparent languages force a local/serial strategy. Thus, pseudo-words were processed using a local strategy in both languages, suggesting that the link between word forms and their lexical representation may also play a role in selecting a specific strategy. In order to test whether corresponding effects appear in late bilinguals with low proficiency in their second language (L2), we present a new study in which we recorded eye movements while two groups of late German–French and French–German bilinguals read aloud isolated French and German words and pseudo-words. Since, a transparent reading strategy is local and serial, with a high number of fixations per stimuli, and the level of the bilingual participants’ L2 is low, the impact of language opacity should be observed in L1. We therefore predicted a global reading strategy if the bilinguals’ L1 was French (FFL close to the middle of the stimuli with fewer fixations per stimuli) and a local and serial reading strategy if it was German. Thus, the L2 of each group, as well as pseudo-words, should also require a local and serial reading strategy. Our results confirmed these hypotheses, suggesting that global word processing is only achieved by bilinguals with an opaque L1 when reading in an opaque language; the low level in the L2

  7. An eye for the I: Preferential attention to the eyes of ingroup members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kerry; Williams, Amanda; Sidhu, David; Choma, Becky L; Rodriguez-Bailón, Rosa; Cañadas, Elena; Chung, Derek; Hugenberg, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    Human faces, and more specifically the eyes, play a crucial role in social and nonverbal communication because they signal valuable information about others. It is therefore surprising that few studies have investigated the impact of intergroup contexts and motivations on attention to the eyes of ingroup and outgroup members. Four experiments investigated differences in eye gaze to racial and novel ingroups using eye tracker technology. Whereas Studies 1 and 3 demonstrated that White participants attended more to the eyes of White compared to Black targets, Study 2 showed a similar pattern of attention to the eyes of novel ingroup and outgroup faces. Studies 3 and 4 also provided new evidence that eye gaze is flexible and can be meaningfully influenced by current motivations. Specifically, instructions to individuate specific social categories increased attention to the eyes of target group members. Furthermore, the latter experiments demonstrated that preferential attention to the eyes of ingroup members predicted important intergroup biases such as recognition of ingroup over outgroup faces (i.e., the own-race bias; Study 3) and willingness to interact with outgroup members (Study 4). The implication of these findings for general theorizing on face perception, individuation processes, and intergroup relations are discussed.

  8. Fixation probabilities of evolutionary coordination games on two coupled populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liye; Ying, Limin; Zhou, Jie; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Evolutionary forces resulted from competitions between different populations are common, which change the evolutionary behavior of a single population. In an isolated population of coordination games of two strategies (e.g., s1 and s2), the previous studies focused on determining the fixation probability that the system is occupied by only one strategy (s1) and their expectation times, given an initial mixture of two strategies. In this work, we propose a model of two interdependent populations, disclosing the effects of the interaction strength on fixation probabilities. In the well-mixing limit, a detailed linear stability analysis is performed, which allows us to find and to classify the different equilibria, yielding a clear picture of the bifurcation patterns in phase space. We demonstrate that the interactions between populations crucially alter the dynamic behavior. More specifically, if the coupling strength is larger than some threshold value, the critical initial density of one strategy (s1) that corresponds to fixation is significantly delayed. Instead, the two populations evolve to the opposite state of all (s2) strategy, which are in favor of the red queen hypothesis. We delineate the extinction time of strategy (s1) explicitly, which is an exponential form. These results are validated by systematic numerical simulations.

  9. Dinitrogen fixation in aphotic oxygenated marine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal eRahav

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We measured N2 fixation rates from oceanic zones that have traditionally been ignored as sources of biological N2 fixation; the aphotic, fully oxygenated, nitrate (NO3--rich, waters of the oligotrophic Levantine Basin (LB and the Gulf of Aqaba (GA. N2 fixation rates measured from pelagic aphotic waters to depths up to 720 m, during the mixed and stratified periods, ranged from 0.01 nmol N L-1 d-1 to 0.38 nmol N L-1 d-1. N2 fixation rates correlated significantly with bacterial productivity and heterotrophic diazotrophs were identified from aphotic as well as photic depths. Dissolved free amino acid amendments to whole water from the GA enhanced bacterial productivity by 2to 3.5 and N2 fixation rates by ~ 2 fold in samples collected from aphotic depths while in amendments to water from photic depths bacterial productivity increased 2 to 6 fold while N2 fixation rates increased by a factor of 2 to 4 illustrating that both BP an heterotrophic N2 fixation are carbon limited. Experimental manipulations of aphotic waters from the LB demonstrated a significant positive correlation between transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP concentration and N2 fixation rates. This suggests that sinking organic material and high carbon (C: nitrogen (N micro-environments (such as TEP-based aggregates or marine snow could support high heterotrophic N2 fixation rates in oxygenated surface waters and in the aphotic zones. Indeed, our calculations show that aphotic N2 fixation accounted for 37 to 75 % of the total daily integrated N2 fixation rates at both locations in the Mediterranean and Red Seas with rates equal or greater to those measured from the photic layers. Moreover, our results indicate that that while N2 fixation may be limited in the surface waters, aphotic, pelagic N2 fixation may contribute significantly to new N inputs in other oligotrophic basins, yet it is currently not included in regional or global N budgets.

  10. Saccadic eye movements in a high-speed bimanual stacking task: changes of attentional control during learning and automatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Rebecca M; Carbone, Elena; Koesling, Hendrik; Schneider, Werner X

    2011-06-10

    Principles of saccadic eye movement control in the real world have been derived by the study of self-paced well-known tasks such as sandwich or tea making. Little is known whether these principles generalize to high-speed sensorimotor tasks and how they are affected by learning and automatization. In the present study, right-handers practiced the speed-stacking task in 14 consecutive daily training sessions, while their eye movements were recorded. Speed stacking is a high-speed sensorimotor task that requires grasping, moving, rotating, and placing of objects. The following main results emerged. Throughout practice, the eyes led the hands, displayed by a positive eye-hand time span. Moreover, visual information was gathered for the subsequent manual sub-action, displayed by a positive eye-hand unit span. With automatization, the eye-hand time span became shorter, yet it increased when corrected by the decreasing trial duration. In addition, fixations were mainly allocated to the goal positions of the right hand or objects in the right hand. The number of fixations decreased while the fixation rate remained constant. Importantly, all participants fixated on the same task-relevant locations in a similar scan path across training days, revealing a long-term memory-based mode of attention control after automatization of a high-speed sensorimotor task.

  11. A systematic investigation of the invariance of resting-state network patterns: is resting-state fMRI ready for pre-surgical planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollndorfer, K; Fischmeister, F Ph S; Kasprian, G; Prayer, D; Schöpf, V

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of resting-state networks (RSNs) have been used to investigate a wide range of diseases, such as dementia or epilepsy. This raises the question whether this method could also serve as a pre-surgical planning tool. Generating reliable functional connectivity patterns is of crucial importance, particularly for pre-surgical planning, as these patterns may directly affect the outcome. This study investigated the reproducibility of four commonly used resting-state conditions: fixation of a black crosshair on a white screen; fixation of the center of a black screen; eyes-closed and fixation of the words "Entspann dich!" (Engl., "relax"). Ten healthy, right-handed male subjects (mean age, 25 years; SD 2) participated in the experiment. The spatial overlap for different RSNs across the four conditions was calculated. The spatial overlap across all four conditions was calculated for each seed region on a single subject and at the group level. Activation maps at the single-subject and group levels were highly stable, especially for the reading network (RNW). The lowest consistency measures were found for the visual network (VIN). At the single-subject level spatial overlap values ranged from 0.31 (VIN) to 0.45 (RNW). These findings suggest that RSN measurements are a reliable tool to assess language-related networks in clinical settings. Generally, resting-state conditions showed comparable activation patterns, therefore no specific conditions appears to be preferable.

  12. Real-time eye motion compensation for OCT imaging with tracking SLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienola, Kari V.; Braaf, Boy; Sheehy, Christy K.; Yang, Qiang; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Arathorn, David W.; de Boer, Johannes F.; Roorda, Austin

    2012-01-01

    Fixational eye movements remain a major cause of artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images despite the increases in acquisition speeds. One approach to eliminate the eye motion is to stabilize the ophthalmic imaging system in real-time. This paper describes and quantifies the performance of a tracking OCT system, which combines a phase-stabilized optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system and an eye tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO). We show that active eye tracking minimizes artifacts caused by eye drift and micro saccades. The remaining tracking lock failures caused by blinks and large saccades generate a trigger signal which signals the OCT system to rescan corrupted B-scans. Residual motion artifacts in the OCT B-scans are reduced to 0.32 minutes of arc (~1.6 µm) in an in vivo human eye enabling acquisition of high quality images from the optic nerve head and lamina cribrosa pore structure. PMID:23162731

  13. The analysis of frequency domain characteristics of emotional images in eye-tracking experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Boqiang; Ma, Huimin; Wang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Although recently eye-tracking method has been introduced into behavioral experiments based on dot-probe paradigm, some characteristics in eye-tracking data do not draw as much attention as traditional characteristics like reaction time. It is also necessary to associate eye-tracking data to characteristics of images shown in experiments. In this research, new variables, such as fixation length, times of fixation and times of eye movement, in eye-tracking data were extracted from a behavioral experiment based on dot probe paradigm. They were analyzed and compared to traditional reaction time. After the analysis of positive and negative scenery images, parameters such as hue frequency spectrum PAR (Peak to Average Ratio) were extracted and showed difference between negative and positive images. These parameters of emotional images could discriminate scenery images according to their emotions in an SVM classifier well. Besides, it was found that images' hue frequency spectrum PAR is obviously relevant to eye-tracking statistics. When the dot was on the negative side, negative images' hue frequency spectrum PAR and horizontal eye-jumps confirmed to hyperbolic distribution, while that of positive images was linear with horizontal eye-jumps. The result could help to explain the mechanism of human's attention and boost the study in computer vision.

  14. New evidence for strategic differences between static and dynamic search tasks: An individual observer analysis of eye movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eDickinson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments are reported that further explore the processes underlying dynamic search. In Experiment 1, observers’ oculomotor behavior was monitored while they searched for a randomly oriented T among oriented L distractors under static and dynamic viewing conditions. Despite similar search slopes, eye movements were less frequent and more spatially constrained under dynamic viewing relative to static, with misses also increasing more with target eccentricity in the dynamic condition. These patterns suggest that dynamic search involves a form of sit-and-wait strategy in which search is restricted to a small group of items surrounding fixation. To evaluate this interpretation, we developed a computational model of a sit-and-wait process hypothesized to underlie dynamic search. In Experiment 2 we tested this model by varying fixation position in the display and found that display positions optimized for a sit-and-wait strategy resulted in higher d' values relative to a less optimal location. We conclude that different strategies, and therefore underlying processes, are used to search static and dynamic displays.

  15. Taxonomic identity determines N2 fixation by canopy trees across lowland tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzburger, Nina; Hedin, Lars O

    2016-01-01

    Legumes capable of fixing atmospheric N2 are abundant and diverse in many tropical forests, but the factors determining ecological patterns in fixation are unresolved. A long-standing idea is that fixation depends on soil nutrients (N, P or Mo), but recent evidence shows that fixation may also differ among N2-fixing species. We sampled canopy-height trees across five species and one species group of N2-fixers along a landscape P gradient, and manipulated P and Mo to seedlings in a shadehouse. Our results identify taxonomy as the major determinant of fixation, with P (and possibly Mo) only influencing fixation following tree-fall disturbances. While 44% of trees did not fix N2, other trees fixed at high rates, with two species functioning as superfixers across the landscape. Our results raise the possibility that fixation is determined by biodiversity, evolutionary history and species-specific traits (tree growth rate, canopy stature and response to disturbance) in the tropical biome.

  16. Nitrogen Fixation Aligns with nifH Abundance and Expression in Two Coral Trophic Functional Groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pogoreutz, Claudia

    2017-06-28

    Microbial nitrogen fixation (diazotrophy) is a functional trait widely associated with tropical reef-building (scleractinian) corals. While the integral role of nitrogen fixation in coral nutrient dynamics is recognized, its ecological significance across different coral functional groups remains yet to be evaluated. Here we set out to compare molecular and physiological patterns of diazotrophy (i.e., nifH gene abundance and expression as well as nitrogen fixation rates) in two coral families with contrasting trophic strategies: highly heterotrophic, free-living members of the family Fungiidae (Pleuractis granulosa, Ctenactis echinata), and mostly autotrophic coral holobionts with low heterotrophic capacity (Pocilloporidae: Pocillopora verrucosa, Stylophora pistillata). The Fungiidae exhibited low diazotroph abundance (based on nifH gene copy numbers) and activity (based on nifH gene expression and the absence of detectable nitrogen fixation rates). In contrast, the mostly autotrophic Pocilloporidae exhibited nifH gene copy numbers and gene expression two orders of magnitude higher than in the Fungiidae, which coincided with detectable nitrogen fixation activity. Based on these data, we suggest that nitrogen fixation compensates for the low heterotrophic nitrogen uptake in autotrophic corals. Consequently, the ecological importance of diazotrophy in coral holobionts may be determined by the trophic functional group of the host.

  17. Critical importance of appropriate fixation conditions for faithful imaging of receptor microclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess A. Stanly

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Receptor clustering is known to trigger signalling events that contribute to critical changes in cellular functions. Faithful imaging of such clusters by means of fluorescence microscopy relies on the application of adequate cell fixation methods prior to immunolabelling in order to avoid artefactual redistribution by the antibodies themselves. Previous work has highlighted the inadequacy of fixation with paraformaldehyde (PFA alone for efficient immobilisation of membrane-associated molecules, and the advantages of fixation with PFA in combination with glutaraldehyde (GA. Using fluorescence microscopy, we here highlight how inadequate fixation can lead to the formation of artefactual clustering of receptors in lymphatic endothelial cells, focussing on the transmembrane hyaluronan receptors LYVE-1 and CD44, and the homotypic adhesion molecule CD31, each of which displays their native diffuse surface distribution pattern only when visualised with the right fixation techniques, i.e. PFA/GA in combination. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP confirms that the artefactual receptor clusters are indeed introduced by residual mobility. In contrast, we observed full immobilisation of membrane proteins in cells that were fixed and then subsequently permeabilised, irrespective of whether the fixative was PFA or PFA/GA in combination. Our study underlines the importance of choosing appropriate sample preparation protocols for preserving authentic receptor organisation in advanced fluorescence microscopy.

  18. Biomechanical Analysis of Latarjet Screw Fixation: Comparison of Screw Types and Fixation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jason J; Hamamoto, Jason T; Leroux, Timothy S; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Jain, Akshay; Khair, Mahmoud M; Mellano, Christen R; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Nicholson, Gregory P; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-09-01

    To compare the initial fixation stability, failure strength, and mode of failure of 5 different screw types and fixation methods commonly used for the classic Latarjet procedure. Thirty-five fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulder specimens were allocated into 5 groups. A 25% anteroinferior glenoid defect was created, and a classic Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure was performed. All grafts were fixed with 2 screws, differing by screw type and/or fixation method. The groups included partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with unicortical fixation, fully threaded solid 3.5-mm cortical screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, and partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm captured screws with bicortical fixation. All screws were stainless steel. Outcomes included cyclic creep and secant stiffness during cyclic loading, as well as load and work to failure during the failure test. Intergroup comparisons were made by a 1-way analysis of variance. There were no significant differences among different screw types or fixation methods in cyclic creep or secant stiffness after cyclic loading or in load to failure or work to failure during the failure test. Post-failure radiographs showed evidence of screw bending in only 1 specimen that underwent the Latarjet procedure with partially threaded solid cancellous screws with bicortical fixation. The mode of failure for all specimens analyzed was screw cutout. In this biomechanical study, screw type and fixation method did not significantly influence biomechanical performance in a classic Latarjet procedure. When performing this procedure, surgeons may continue to select the screw type and method of fixation (unicortical or bicortical) based on preference; however, further studies are required to determine the optimal method of treatment. Surgeons may choose the screw type and

  19. Human secretory phospholipase A(2), group IB in normal eyes and in eye diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, Jan U; Bazan, Nicolas G; Heegaard, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    study was to identify human GIB (hGIB) in the normal human eye and investigate the pattern of expression in patients with eye diseases involving hGIB-rich cells. METHODS: Human GIB mRNA was identified in the human retina by means of in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Antibodies against...... hGIB were obtained and immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and pathological eyes. Donor eyes from patients with descemetization of the cornea, Fuchs' corneal endothelial dystrophy, age-related macular degeneration, malignant choroidal melanoma......, retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma were evaluated. RESULTS: Expression of hGIB was found in various cells of the eye. The most abundant expression was found in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, the inner photoreceptor segments, ganglion cells and the corneal endothelium. We explored diseases involving...

  20. Origins of superior dynamic visual acuity in baseball players: superior eye movements or superior image processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Uchida

    Full Text Available Dynamic visual acuity (DVA is defined as the ability to discriminate the fine parts of a moving object. DVA is generally better in athletes than in non-athletes, and the better DVA of athletes has been attributed to a better ability to track moving objects. In the present study, we hypothesized that the better DVA of athletes is partly derived from better perception of moving images on the retina through some kind of perceptual learning. To test this hypothesis, we quantitatively measured DVA in baseball players and non-athletes using moving Landolt rings in two conditions. In the first experiment, the participants were allowed to move their eyes (free-eye-movement conditions, whereas in the second they were required to fixate on a fixation target (fixation conditions. The athletes displayed significantly better DVA than the non-athletes in the free-eye-movement conditions. However, there was no significant difference between the groups in the fixation conditions. These results suggest that the better DVA of athletes is primarily due to an improved ability to track moving targets with their eyes, rather than to improved perception of moving images on the retina.