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Sample records for extremity low-field mri

  1. Dedicated low-field MRI in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquet, P; Breton, E; Goetz, C; Constantinesco, A; Marin, C

    2009-01-01

    The rationale of this work is to point out the relevance of in vivo MR images of mice obtained using a dedicated low-field system. For this purpose a small 0.1 T water-cooled electro-magnet and solenoidal radio frequency (RF) transmit-receive coils were used. All MR images were acquired in three-dimensional (3D) mode. An isolation cell was designed allowing easy placement of the RF coils and simple delivery of gaseous anesthesia as well as warming of the animal. Images with and without contrast agent were obtained in total acquisition times on the order of half an hour to four hours on normal mice as well as on animals bearing tumors. Typical in plane pixel dimensions range from 200 x 200 to 500 x 500 μm 2 with slice thicknesses ranging between 0.65 and 1.50 mm. This work shows that, besides light installation and low cost, dedicated low-field MR systems are suitable for small rodents imaging, opening this technique even to small research units.

  2. Dedicated low-field MRI in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, P.; Breton, E.; Goetz, C.; Marin, C.; Constantinesco, A.

    2009-09-01

    The rationale of this work is to point out the relevance of in vivo MR images of mice obtained using a dedicated low-field system. For this purpose a small 0.1 T water-cooled electro-magnet and solenoidal radio frequency (RF) transmit-receive coils were used. All MR images were acquired in three-dimensional (3D) mode. An isolation cell was designed allowing easy placement of the RF coils and simple delivery of gaseous anesthesia as well as warming of the animal. Images with and without contrast agent were obtained in total acquisition times on the order of half an hour to four hours on normal mice as well as on animals bearing tumors. Typical in plane pixel dimensions range from 200 × 200 to 500 × 500 µm2 with slice thicknesses ranging between 0.65 and 1.50 mm. This work shows that, besides light installation and low cost, dedicated low-field MR systems are suitable for small rodents imaging, opening this technique even to small research units.

  3. Application of low field intensity joint MRI in ankle injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenyu; Wang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the diagnostic value of the low field intensity joint magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in traumatic ankles. Methods: Through a retrospective examination and collection of 50 cases with complete information and checked by arthroscope or/and operated from Jan 2007 to Jun 2010, the diagnostic value ligament of the ankle joint, bone contusion,occult fracture, talus cartilage, and tendon could be evaluated. Cases of fracture for which could be diagnosed by X rays and CT were not included in this research. Results: The special low field intensity joint MRI had a high diagnostic sensitivity of 88.9% to ligamentum talofibulare anterius, but was only 50% sensitive to ligamentum calcaneofibulare. Its sensitivity to injury of ligamentum deltoideum and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was up to 100%. Tendon injury, bone contusion and occult fracture could be exactly diagnosed. Its total sensitivity on talus cartilage traumatism was 70.6%. Its diagnosis sensitivity to talus cartilage traumatism at the 3rd-5th period by Mintz was 90%, with a lower one of 42.9% at the 1st-2nd period. Talus cartilage traumatism could be exactly predicted by osseous tissue dropsy below cartilage. Conclusion: The special low field intensity joint MRI is highly applicable to the diagnosis on ankle joint traumatism and facilitates clinical treatment. (authors)

  4. Spinal meningeal cyst: analysis with low-field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongzhou; Chen Yejia; Chen Ronghua; Chen Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of spinal meningeal cyst in low-field MRI and to discuss its classification, subtype, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. Methods: Forty-two patients (20 male, 22 female) were examined with sagittal T 1 -and T 2 -, axial T 2 -weighted MR imaging. Twelve patients were also examined with contrast-enhanced MRI. Results: The cysts were classified using Nakors' classification as type Ia extradural meningeal cysts (4 patients), type Ib sacral meningeal cysts (32), type II extradural meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers (4), and type III spinal intradural meningeal cysts (2). All 42 spinal meningeal cysts had well-defined boundaries with low T 1 and high T 2 signal intensities similar to cerebral spinal fluid. In type Ia, the lesions were often on the dorsum of mid-lower thoracic spinal cord compressing the spinal cord and displacing the extradural fat. In type Ib, the lesions were in the sacral canal with fat plane between the cyst and dural sac. In type II, the lesions contained nerve roots and were lateral to the dural sac. In type III, the lesions were often on the dorsum of spinal cord compressing and displacing the spinal cord anteriorly. Conclusion: Low-field MRI can clearly display the spinal meningeal cyst. Types Ia and Ib spinal meningeal cysts had typical features and can be easily diagnosed. Types II and III should be differentiated from cystic schwannomas and enterogenous cysts, respectively. (authors)

  5. Ultra-low field MRI food inspection system prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, Satoshi, E-mail: s133413@edu.tut.ac.jp; Toyota, Hirotomo; Hatta, Junichi; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Saburo, E-mail: tanakas@ens.tut.ac.jp

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We have developed a ULF-MRI system using HTS-SQUID for food inspection. • We developed a compact magnetically shielded box to attenuate environmental noise. • The 2D-MR image was reconstructed from the grid processing data using 2D-FFT method. • The 2D-MR images of a disk-shaped and a multiple cell water sample were obtained. • The results showed the possibility of applying the ULF-MRI system to food inspection. - Abstract: We develop an ultra-low field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using a high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (HTS-SQUID) for food inspection. A two-dimensional (2D)-MR image is reconstructed from the grid processing raw data using the 2D fast Fourier transform method. In a previous study, we combined an LC resonator with the ULF-MRI system to improve the detection area of the HTS-SQUID. The sensitivity was improved, but since the experiments were performed in a semi-open magnetically shielded room (MSR), external noise was a problem. In this study, we develop a compact magnetically shielded box (CMSB), which has a small open window for transfer of a pre-polarized sample. Experiments were performed in the CMSB and 2D-MR images were compared with images taken in the semi-open MSR. A clear image of a disk-shaped water sample is obtained, with an outer dimension closer to that of the real sample than in the image taken in the semi-open MSR. Furthermore, the 2D-MR image of a multiple cell water sample is clearly reconstructed. These results show the applicability of the ULF-MRI system in food inspection.

  6. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  7. Low-field MRI of the ankle joint-first experience in the pediatric age group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herber, S.; Kreitner, K.F.; Kalden, P.; Loew, R.; Thelen, M.; Berger, S.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic confidence of MRI with an open low field System (Magnetom open trademark , Siemens, Germany) in children with predominantly traumatic disorders. Material and methods: Conventional X-rays and MRI examinations have been evaluated in 55 children. MRI was performed at an open 0.2 T MR-unit. The study protocol comprised coronal STIR-sequence, an angulated T 2 weighted TSE-sequence and T 1 weighted SE-sequence. Results: MRI showed ligamental ruptur in 33/50 (60%) cases. Injuries of the ATFL were most frequent (27/33); osseous ligamental tears occurred in approx. 50% of all cases. Fractures of the distal tibia and fibula were diagnosed in 28/55 children. 15/28 cases showed an involvement of the epiphysis. We found occult fractures in 11/28 children. Fractures, diagnosed by conventional X-rays, were excluded in 6 cases. Therapy changed in 35/55 patients on the basis of MRI-findings. Conclusion: Low-field MRI of the ankle joint in children and adolescents is able to show numerous pathological conditions. We recommend low-field MRI of the ankle in children with persistent or unclear pain of the ankle joint and inconspicuous conventional X-ray. (orig.) [de

  8. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, A., E-mail: ajabrilf@unal.edu.co; Agulles-Pedrós, L., E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co [Medical Physics Group, Physics department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the {sup 99m}Tc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  9. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the "9"9"mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  10. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  11. Development of contaminant detection system based on ultra-low field SQUID-NMR/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunaki, S; Yamamoto, M; Hatta, J; Hatsukade, Y; Tanaka, S

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI system using an HTS-rf-SQUID and evaluated performance of the system as a contaminant detection system for foods and drinks. In this work, we measured 1D MRIs from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as aluminum and glass balls using the system. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. We measured 2D MRIs from food samples with and without a hole. In the 2D MRIs, the hole position in the sample was well visualized. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect and localize contaminants in foods and drinks.

  12. Diagnostic value of low-field MRI for acute poisoning brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Lianrong; He Qinyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of low-field MIR in diagnosis of acute CO poisoning brain injury. Methods: The brain MIR and clinical data of 110 patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury confirmed by clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Long T1 and T2 signal intensity was showed on MRI in cerebral hemispheres and globus pallidus symmetrically. There were three basic types of MIR manifestations, white matter of brain type, globus pallidus type and brain mixed type. Conclusions: MRI could be used for confirming the degree and range of acute CO poisoning brain injury. It has important clinical value in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury. (authors)

  13. One dimensional spatial resolution optimization on a hybrid low field MRI-gamma detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agulles-Pedrós, L., E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co; Abril, A., E-mail: ajabrilf@unal.edu.co [Medical Physics Group, Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Hybrid systems like Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) and MRI/gamma camera, offer advantages combining the resolution and contrast capability of MRI with the better contrast and functional information of nuclear medicine techniques. However, the radiation detectors are expensive and need an electronic set-up, which can interfere with the MRI acquisition process or viceversa. In order to improve these drawbacks, in this work it is presented the design of a low field NMR system made up of permanent magnets compatible with a gamma radiation detector based on gel dosimetry. The design is performed using the software FEMM for estimation of the magnetic field, and GEANT4 for the physical process involved in radiation detection and effect of magnetic field. The homogeneity in magnetic field is achieved with an array of NbFeB magnets in a linear configuration with a separation between the magnets, minimizing the effect of Compton back scattering compared with a no-spacing linear configuration. The final magnetic field in the homogeneous zone is ca. 100 mT. In this hybrid proposal, although the gel detector do not have spatial resolution per se, it is possible to obtain a dose profile (1D image) as a function of the position by using a collimator array. As a result, the gamma detector system described allows a complete integrated radiation detector within the low field NMR (lfNMR) system. Finally we present the better configuration for the hybrid system considering the collimator parameters such as height, thickness and distance.

  14. Passive shimming of the fringe field of a superconducting magnet for ultra-low field hyperpolarized noble gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Robles, Juan; Cross, Albert R; Santyr, Giles E

    2005-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs) provide exciting possibilities for MR imaging at ultra-low magnetic field strengths (superconductive magnets used in clinical MR imaging can provide a stable magnetic field for this purpose. In addition to offering the benefit of HNG MR imaging alongside conventional high field proton MRI, this approach offers the other useful advantage of providing different field strengths at different distances from the magnet. However, the extremely strong field gradients associated with the fringe field present a major challenge for imaging since impractically high active shim currents would be required to achieve the necessary homogeneity. In this work, a simple passive shimming method based on the placement of a small number of ferromagnetic pieces is proposed to reduce the fringe field inhomogeneities to a level that can be corrected using standard active shims. The method explicitly takes into account the strong variations of the field over the volume of the ferromagnetic pieces used to shim. The method is used to obtain spectra in the fringe field of a high-field (1.89 T) superconducting magnet from hyperpolarized 129Xe gas samples at two different ultra-low field strengths (8.5 and 17 mT). The linewidths of spectra measured from imaging phantoms (30 Hz) indicate a homogeneity sufficient for MRI of the rat lung.

  15. Methodological developments of low field MRI: Elasto-graphy, MRI-ultrasound interaction and dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madelin, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with two aspects of low field (0.2 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): the research of new contrasts due to the interaction between Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and acoustics (elasto-graphy, spin-phonon interaction) and enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). Magnetic Resonance Elasto-graphy (MRE) allows to assess some viscoelastic properties of tissues by visualization of the propagation of low frequency acoustic strain waves. A review on MRE is given, as well as a study on local measurement of the acoustic absorption coefficient. The next part is dedicated to MRI-ultrasound interaction. First, the ultrasonic transducer was calibrated for power and acoustic field using the comparison of two methods: the radiation force method (balance method) and laser interferometry. Then, we tried to modify the T1 contrast of tissues by spin-phonon interaction due to the application of ultrasound at the resonance frequency at 0.2 T, which is about 8.25 MHz. No modification of T1 contrast has been obtained, but the acoustic streaming phenomenon has been observed in liquids. MRI visualization of this streaming could make possible to calibrate transducers as well as to assess some mechanical properties of viscous fluids. The goal of the last part was to set up DNP experiments at 0.2 T in order to enhance the NMR signal. This double resonance method is based on the polarization transfer of unpaired electrons of free radicals to the surrounding protons of water. This transfer occurs by cross relaxation during the saturation of an electronic transition using Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Two EPR cavities operating at 5.43 GHz have been tested on oxo-TEMPO free radicals (nitroxide). An enhancement of the NMR signal by a factor 30 was obtained during these preliminary experiments. (author)

  16. Free induction decay MR signal measurements toward ultra-low field MRI with an optically pumped atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takenori; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF-MRI) has attracted attention because of its low running costs and minimum patient exposure. An optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM) is a magnetic sensor with high sensitivity in the low frequency range, which does not require a cryogenic cooling system. In an effort to develop a ULF-MRI, we attempted to measure the free induction decay MR signals with an OPAM. We successfully detected the MR signals by combining an OPAM and a flux transformer, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed system.

  17. Low-Cost, High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    low- cost and high-throughput was a key element proposed for this project, which we believe will be of significant benefit to the patients suffering...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0272 TITLE: Low- Cost , High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI...STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s

  18. Low Cost, High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    greater gas polarizations and production amounts/ throughputs- benefiting in particular from the advent of com- pact, high-power, relatively low- cost ...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0271 TITLE: Low- Cost , High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the

  19. Comparative magnetic resonance imaging of renal space-occupying lesions with a high and a low field MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehl, H.B.; Lorch, H.; Amblank, O.B.M.; Engerhoff, B.; Weiss, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study of the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of two MRI systems in the detection of renal tumors was investigated. Materials and Methods: 34 patients with the clinical suspicion of a space-occupying renal lesion were examined by MRI with a low field (0.2 Tesla magnet) and a high field (1.5 Tesla magnet) for comparison. An 'informed' and a 'blind' observer evaluated all of the MR images. In addition, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were evaluated as second quality parameters. Results: In 29 cases the results could be compared with a confirmed release diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy was comparable with both systems (Sensitivity for both observer on LF apparatus: 83%, HF apparatus: 81%) although the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly poorer at low field. Conclusions: The low field system in comparable to the high field MRI for detection and differentiation of renal space-occupying lesions. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiographs and low field MRI (0.2T) as predictors of efficacy in a weight loss trial in obese women with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, Henrik; Boesen, Mikael; Christensen, Robin

    2011-01-01

    To study the predictive value of baseline radiographs and low-field (0.2T) MRI scans for the symptomatic outcome of clinically significant weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis.......To study the predictive value of baseline radiographs and low-field (0.2T) MRI scans for the symptomatic outcome of clinically significant weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis....

  1. MRI of intracerebral haematoma at low field (0.15T) using T2 dependent partial saturation sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.; Pennock, J.M.; Porteous, R.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Gadian, D.G.; Young, I.R.

    1988-01-01

    Results of MRI at 0.15T in twelve successive patients with intracerebral haematoma are reviewed. Using T 2 weighted spin echo (SE) and partial saturation (PS without a refocussing 180 0 pulse) sequences, low intensity areas were seen in eleven of the twelve cases. These included central regions (three cases), a peripheral rim (seven cases) and more diffuse patterns involving the brainstem and cerebral hemispheres (two cases). One case initially displayed a peripheral rim and later a central low intensity region. Central low intensity regions were seen in acute, subacute, and chronic cases. Follow up in five cases displayed an increase in signal within the haematoma in three cases and a decrease in signal intensity in two cases. Low signal intensity areas can be seen within and around intracerebral haematomas imaged with T 2 weighted sequences at low field strength. (orig.)

  2. Orthopedic and interventional applications at low field MRI with horizontally open configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, S.K.; Parkkola, R.K.; Karhu, J.; Komu, M.E.S.; Kormano, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The recently introduced horizontally open configuration imagers allow imaging of knee, hip or shoulder during whole range of motion, which is not possible in conventional MR imagers. Special joint motion devices can be used to provide accurate and reproducible studies. In cervical spine, functional MR imaging may be useful in evaluating alarligament stability in patients with late sequelae of a whiplash injury, and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are clinically suspected of having a cervical myelopathy or superior migration of the odontoid process. In shoulder, full range of motion abduction study may be helpful in assessing the supraspinatus tendon impingement. To evaluate patellofemoral malalignment, quadriceps loading is recommended since associated contracting muscles and related soft tissue structures can be evaluated. The position of the femoral head relative to the acetabulum during different positions can be assessed. Open-configuration scanners provide an access to patients during scanning procedure, and therefore permit interventional procedures to be monitored with MRI. Such interventions include aspiration cytology/biopsy and different drainage procedures. (orig.) [de

  3. Software Defined Radio (SDR and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS for NMR/MRI Instruments at Low-Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktham Asfour

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR systems at low-field (0.1 T is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer. The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…. The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to “enjoy” from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed.

  4. Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for NMR/MRI Instruments at Low-Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Aktham; Raoof, Kosai; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF) electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems at low-field (0.1 T) is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer). The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…). The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to “enjoy” from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay) signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed. PMID:24287540

  5. Orthopedic and interventional applications at low field MRI with horizontally open configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, S.K.; Parkkola, R.K.; Karhu, J.; Komu, M.E.S.; Kormano, M.J. [Diagnostic Radiology, Turku Univ. Hospital (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The recently introduced horizontally open configuration imagers allow imaging of knee, hip or shoulder during whole range of motion, which is not possible in conventional MR imagers. Special joint motion devices can be used to provide accurate and reproducible studies. In cervical spine, functional MR imaging may be useful in evaluating alarligament stability in patients with late sequelae of a whiplash injury, and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are clinically suspected of having a cervical myelopathy or superior migration of the odontoid process. In shoulder, full range of motion abduction study may be helpful in assessing the supraspinatus tendon impingement. To evaluate patellofemoral malalignment, quadriceps loading is recommended since associated contracting muscles and related soft tissue structures can be evaluated. The position of the femoral head relative to the acetabulum during different positions can be assessed. Open-configuration scanners provide an access to patients during scanning procedure, and therefore permit interventional procedures to be monitored with MRI. Such interventions include aspiration cytology/biopsy and different drainage procedures. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die kuerzlich eingefuehrten bildgebenden Systeme mit horizontal offener Konfiguration ermoeglichen die Darstellung von Knie, Huefte oder Schulter ueber den gesamten Bewegungsbereich, war bisher mit konventionellen MR-Systemen nicht moeglich. Fuer genauere und reproduzierbare Untersuchungen koennen spezielle Gelenkbewegungsgeraete verwendet werden. Bei der Halswirbelsaeule kann die funktionelle NMR-Darstellung im Hinblick auf die Beurteilung der Stabilitaet der Ligamenta alaria bei Patienten mit Spaetfolgen eines Schleudertraumas und bei Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis von Nutzen sein, wenn klinisch eine zervikale Myelopathie oder superiore migration des Dens axis vermutet wird. Bei der Schulter kann eine Abduktionsstudie des vollen Bewegungsbereichs bei der Beurteilung

  6. Comparative evaluation of chest radiography, low-field MRI, the Shwachman-Kulczycki score and pulmonary function tests in patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjorin, Angela; Vogl, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Helga; Posselt, Hans-Georg; Smaczny, Christina; Ackermann, Hanns; Deimling, Michael; Abolmaali, Nasreddin

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parenchymal lung damage in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) can be equivalently quantified by the Chrispin-Norman (CN) scores determined with low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional chest radiography (CXR). Both scores were correlated with pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the Shwachman-Kulczycki method (SKM). To evaluate the comparability of MRI and CXR for different states of the disease, all scores were applied to patients divided into three age groups. Seventy-three CF patients (mean SKM score: 62 ± 8) with a median age (range) of 14 years (7-32) were included. The mean CN scores determined with both imaging methods were comparable (CXR: 12.1 ± 4.7; MRI: 12.0 ± 4.5) and showed high correlation (P < 0.05, R = 0.97). Only weak correlations were found between imaging, PFT, and SKM. Both imaging modalities revealed significantly more severe disease expression with age, while PFT and SKM failed to detect early signs of disease. We conclude that imaging of the lung in CF patients is capable of detecting subtle and early parenchymal destruction before lung function or clinical scoring is affected. Furthermore, low-field MRI revealed high consistency with chest radiography and may be used for a thorough follow-up while avoiding radiation exposure. (orig.)

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: dedicated low-field (0.25-T) versus high-field (3.0-T) MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Griffith, James F.; Wang, D.F.; Yeung, David K.W. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, L. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Division of Neurology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Li, Edmund K.; Tam, L.S. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the assessment of wrist synovitis severity, synovial volume and synovial perfusion parameters on a dedicated low-field (0.25-T) to that of a high-field (3-T) whole-body MR system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-one patients (mean age 50.0 ± 9.8 years) with active RA were recruited prospectively. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examination of the most severely affected wrist was performed at both 0.25 T and 3 T. Three MRI-derived parameters, synovitis severity (RAMRIS grade), synovial volume (ml{sup 3}) and synovial perfusion indices (maximum enhancement and enhancement slope), were compared. Comparing 0.25- and 3-T MRI, there was excellent agreement for semiquantitative assessment (r: 0.80, p < 0.00001) of synovitis (RAMRIS) as well as quantitative assessment (r: 0.94, p < 0.00001) of synovial volume. Good agreement for synovial Emax (r: 0.6, p = 0.002) and fair agreement (r: 0.5, p = 0.02) for synovial Eslope was found. Imaging of the RA wrist at 0.25 T yields excellent correlation with 3 T with regard to the synovitis activity score (RAMRIS) and synovial volume measurement. Fair to good correlation between low- (0.25-T) and high-field (3-T) MR systems was found for perfusion parameters, being better for Emax than for Eslope. (orig.)

  8. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph.; Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  9. MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy in low-field (0.23-T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Ojala, Risto O.; Klemola, Rauli; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Vaara, Teuvo J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy. Sixty-seven nerve root infiltrations under MRI guidance were done for 61 patients suffering from lumbosacral radicular pain. Informed consent was acquired from all patients. A 0.23-T open-MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Philips Medical Systems, MR Technologies, Finland) was used. A surface coil was used in all cases. Nerve root infiltration was performed with MRI-compatible 20-G needle (Chiba type MReye, Cook, Bloomington, Ind.; or Manan type, MD Tech, Florida). The evaluation of clinical outcome was achieved with 6 months of clinical follow-up and questionnaire. The effect of nerve root infiltration to the radicular pain was graded: 1=good to excellent, i.e., no pain or not disturbing pain allowing normal physical activity at 3 months from the procedure; 2=temporary, i.e., temporary relief of pain; 3=no relief of pain; and 4=worsening of pain. As an adjunct to MRI-guided positioning of the needle the correct needle localization by the nerve root was confirmed with saline injection to nerve root channel and single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging. The MRI guidance allowed adequate needle positioning in all but 1 case (98.5%). This failure was caused by degeneration-induced changes in anatomy. Of patients, 51.5% had good to excellent effect with regard to radicular pain from the procedure, 22.7% had temporary relief, 21.2% had no effect, and in 4.5% the pain worsened. Our results show that MRI guidance is accurate and safe in performing nerve root infiltration at lumbosacral area. The results of radicular pain relief from nerve root infiltration are comparable to CT or fluoroscopy studies on the subject. (orig.)

  10. Comparative study on occurrence characteristics of matrix water in static and gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentations using low-field NMR and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qin; Chen, Hong-zhang

    2015-12-01

    The water in a solid substrate is generally divided into three forms: hygroscopic, capillary, and free. However, there are few methods available for detecting the contents of different states of water in substrates. In this paper, low-field NMR and MRI were used to analyze the water occurrence characteristics of steam-exploded corn straw in solid-state fermentation (SSF). A significant linear relationship was found between the total NMR peak areas and the total water contents with a correlation coefficient of 0.993. It was further proved to be successful in comparing the contents and distributions of different states of water in static SSF and gas double-dynamic SSF (GDD-SSF). The results showed that among the three states of water, capillary water was the main form of water present and lost in substrates during fermentation. Total water and capillary water contents did not significantly differ as a result of different sample treatments, but hygroscopic water and free water contents in static SSF were respectively 0.38 and 2.98 times that in GDD-SSF with a packing height of 3 cm after fermentation. A relatively uniform water distribution and deep-depth region for microbial growth were found in GDD-SSF, suggesting that GDD-SSF was more suitable for industrialization. This technology has great potential for achieving efficient on-line water supply through water loss detection in SSF.

  11. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by two different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A.; Vestergaard, A.; Dohn, U.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the ability of two different dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. Methods: CR and two MRI examinations (using 0.2 T Esaote Artoscan and 0...

  12. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of 2 different dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. METHODS: CR and 2 MRI-examinations (on 0.2T Esaote...

  13. MRI findings of neurilemmoma of the extremities: Pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Joo Wan; Kim, Ho Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Kyungpook Natioanl University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Neurilemmomas of the extremities are nerve sheath tumors involving peripheral nerves of the extremities. We analyzed MR images of 16 surgically proved tumors in 12 patients and compared the MR images with gross pathologic specimens in two tumors (2/16). Spin echo T1-weighted images were obtained in all the patients but T2-weighted images were obtained in six patients with a gradient echo technique. Gadolinium dimeglumine enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained in 11 patients (15/16). Signal on T1-weighted images was iso or slightly higher than that of the adjacent muscles. Signal on T2-weighted images ranged from homogeneous high to heterogeneous. After Gadolinium injection, all the 15 tumors showed enhancement. Small sized tumors were enhanced homogeneously but there was a tendency to be enhanced heterogeneously to the central portion with peripheral rim enhancement as the size of the tumors increased. Pathologically, the enhanced portion was correlated the with solid portion of the tumors. Also encapsulation of the mass (12/16), suspended nerve strings (9/16) and bony erosion(1/16) were detected. MR characteristics of neurilemmoma include heterogeneity on enhanced T1 and T2 weighted images, encapsulation, and suspended nerve strings. Signal heterogeneity on enhanced T1 and T2 weighted images may be attributed to the variable cellularity, cystic changes, vascularity and focal hemorrhage of the tumors.

  14. MRI findings of neurilemmoma of the extremities: Pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Joo Wan; Kim, Ho Chul; Suh, Kyung Jin; Song, Chi Sung

    1993-01-01

    Neurilemmomas of the extremities are nerve sheath tumors involving peripheral nerves of the extremities. We analyzed MR images of 16 surgically proved tumors in 12 patients and compared the MR images with gross pathologic specimens in two tumors (2/16). Spin echo T1-weighted images were obtained in all the patients but T2-weighted images were obtained in six patients with a gradient echo technique. Gadolinium dimeglumine enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained in 11 patients (15/16). Signal on T1-weighted images was iso or slightly higher than that of the adjacent muscles. Signal on T2-weighted images ranged from homogeneous high to heterogeneous. After Gadolinium injection, all the 15 tumors showed enhancement. Small sized tumors were enhanced homogeneously but there was a tendency to be enhanced heterogeneously to the central portion with peripheral rim enhancement as the size of the tumors increased. Pathologically, the enhanced portion was correlated the with solid portion of the tumors. Also encapsulation of the mass (12/16), suspended nerve strings (9/16) and bony erosion(1/16) were detected. MR characteristics of neurilemmoma include heterogeneity on enhanced T1 and T2 weighted images, encapsulation, and suspended nerve strings. Signal heterogeneity on enhanced T1 and T2 weighted images may be attributed to the variable cellularity, cystic changes, vascularity and focal hemorrhage of the tumors

  15. MRI-guided trephine biopsy and fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of bone lesions in low-field (0.23 T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Klemola, Rauli; Ojala, Risto; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Soini, Ylermi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI-guided bone biopsy with optical instrument tracking and evaluate advantage of combined fine-needle aspiration (FNA) with trephine biopsy. Twenty trephine bone biopsies and 13 FNAs were performed under MRI and CT guidance in 14 patients. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The evaluation of diagnostic accuracy was achieved by comparing the histopathological and cytological diagnosis with current or final diagnosis made during 6-month clinical follow-up. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, Cleveland, Ohio) was used. A surface coil was used. For trephine biopsy MRI-compatible bone biopsy set (Daum medical, Schwerin, Germany) was used. The FNA was performed with MRI compatible 20-G needle (Cook, Bloomington, Ind.). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided trephine biopsy was 95%. The FNA sample diagnosis concurred with the histological in 54%. Our results show that MRI guidance in bone biopsies is accurate and safe. It is comparable to CT-guided or open biopsy. The role of combined FNA with bone biopsies remains controversial. (orig.)

  16. Early Conventional MRI for Prediction of Neurodevelopmental Impairment in Extremely-Low-Birth-Weight Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Laurel A; Bonfante-Mejia, Eliana; Hintz, Susan R; Dvorchik, Igor; Parikh, Nehal A

    2016-01-01

    Extremely-low-birth-weight (ELBW; ≤1,000 g) infants are at high risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. Conventional brain MRI at term-equivalent age is increasingly used for prediction of outcomes. However, optimal prediction models remain to be determined, especially for cognitive outcomes. The aim was to evaluate the accuracy of a data-driven MRI scoring system to predict neurodevelopmental impairments. 122 ELBW infants had a brain MRI performed at term-equivalent age. Conventional MRI findings were scored with a standardized algorithm and tested using a multivariable regression model to predict neurodevelopmental impairment, defined as one or more of the following at 18-24 months' corrected age: cerebral palsy, bilateral blindness, bilateral deafness requiring amplification, and/or cognitive/language delay. Results were compared with a commonly cited scoring system. In multivariable analyses, only moderate-to-severe gyral maturational delay was a significant predictor of overall neurodevelopmental impairment (OR: 12.6, 95% CI: 2.6, 62.0; p neurodevelopmental impairment/death. Diffuse cystic abnormality was a significant predictor of cerebral palsy (OR: 33.6, 95% CI: 4.9, 229.7; p neurodevelopmental impairment. In our cohort, conventional MRI at term-equivalent age exhibited high specificity in predicting neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, sensitivity was suboptimal, suggesting additional clinical factors and biomarkers are needed to enable accurate prognostication. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Neoadjuvant radiation in primary extremity liposarcoma: correlation of MRI features with histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortman, Jeremy R. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shinagare, Atul B.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Tirumani, Harika [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Hornick, Jason L. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate MRI features of response of primary extremity liposarcoma (LPS) to neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) with histopathologic correlation. In this IRB-approved study including 125 patients with extremity LPS treated with neoadjuvant RT from 2000 to 2013, MRI of the primary tumour in 18 patients (5 pleomorphic LPS, 13 myxoid LPS) before and after RT were reviewed by two radiologists by consensus. Histopathology of the surgical specimens was reviewed by a pathologist with expertise in sarcomas. In the pleomorphic LPS cohort, 3/5 tumours increased in size; 3/5 decreased in enhancing component; and 3/5 increased in peritumoral oedema, intratumoral haemorrhage, and necrosis. In the myxoid LPS cohort, 12/13 tumours decreased in size, 8/13 decreased in enhancing component, and 5/13 increased in internal fat following RT. Histopathology showed ≥50 % residual tumour in 1/5 pleomorphic LPS and 2/13 myxoid LPS. Hyalinization/necrosis of ≥75 % was noted in 4/5 pleomorphic LPS and 11/13 myxoid LPS. Cytodifferentiation was noted in 1/5 pleomorphic and 9/13 myxoid LPS. While pleomorphic LPS showed an increase in size, peritumoral oedema, intratumoral haemorrhage, and necrosis on MRI following neoadjuvant RT, myxoid LPS showed a decrease in size and enhancement with an increase in internal fat. (orig.)

  18. CT and MRI Findings of Soft Tissue Adult Fibrosarcoma in Extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hexiang Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize and evaluate CT and MRI features of extremity soft tissue adult fibrosarcoma. Methods. CT and MRI images from 10 adult patients with pathologically proven fibrosarcomas were retrospectively analyzed with regard to tumor location, size, number, shape, margins, attenuation, signal intensity, and enhancement patterns on MR images. Additionally, the relationships between lesions, deep fascia, and change in adjacent bones were also assessed. Results. Nineteen tumor lesions in 10 patients were selected for this study. Eighteen lesions were lobulated and one was oval in shape. Most cases were located under the deep fascia, including seven cases that had a nodular lump adjacent to the deep fascia and one case that had broken lesion through the deep fascia. On CT, the adult fibrosarcomas mostly showed iso-attenuated soft tissue masses (n=6. On MRI, all the cases (n=9 displayed low signal on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI and heterogeneous low and high intensity signals on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI, with band-like areas of low signal on both T1WI and T2WI. On contrast-enhanced MRI images, three cases showed heterogeneous peripheral enhancement and one case demonstrated a spoke-wheel-like enhancement. Eight cases showed muscle edema signals in the peritumoral muscle and one case involved adjacent bone. Conclusion. CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in diagnosing adult fibrosarcoma. Combined application of CT and MR is recommended for patients with suspected adult fibrosarcoma.

  19. MRI induced second-degree burn in a patient with extremely large uterine leiomyomas: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Min; Kang, Bo Kyeong; Song, Soon Young; Koh, Byung Hee; Choi, Joong Sub; Lee, Won Moo

    2015-01-01

    Burns and thermal injuries related with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are rare. Previous literature indicates that medical devices with cable, cosmetics or tattoo are known as risk factors for burns and thermal injuries. However, there is no report of MRI-related burns in Korea. Herein, we reported a case of deep second degree burn after MRI in a 38-year-old female patient with multiple uterine leiomyomas including some that were large and degenerated. The large uterine leiomyoma-induced protruded anterior abdominal wall in direct contact with the body coil during MRI was suspected as the cause of injury, by retrospective analysis. Therefore, awareness of MRI related thermal injury is necessary to prevent this hazard, together with extreme care during MRI

  20. MRI induced second-degree burn in a patient with extremely large uterine leiomyomas: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Kang, Bo Kyeong; Song, Soon Young; Koh, Byung Hee; Choi, Joong Sub; Lee, Won Moo [Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Burns and thermal injuries related with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are rare. Previous literature indicates that medical devices with cable, cosmetics or tattoo are known as risk factors for burns and thermal injuries. However, there is no report of MRI-related burns in Korea. Herein, we reported a case of deep second degree burn after MRI in a 38-year-old female patient with multiple uterine leiomyomas including some that were large and degenerated. The large uterine leiomyoma-induced protruded anterior abdominal wall in direct contact with the body coil during MRI was suspected as the cause of injury, by retrospective analysis. Therefore, awareness of MRI related thermal injury is necessary to prevent this hazard, together with extreme care during MRI.

  1. Local changes in bone marrow at MRI after treatment of extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sinchun; Lefkowitz, Robert; Landa, Jonathan; Akin, Oguz; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Cassie, Conrad; Panicek, David M.; Healey, John H.; Alektiar, Kaled M.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and appearance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal changes that occur in local bone marrow after radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Seventy patients with primary STS at the level of a long bone who also had undergone pretreatment MRI and at least one post-treatment MRI of the tumor bed were identified. MRIs of each patient were retrospectively reviewed for new changes in marrow signal in the region of the tumor bed and for the morphology, relative signal intensities, heterogeneity, and progression or regression of changes over time. Focal signal changes in marrow were observed in 26/70 patients (37%) at a median of 9.5 months after RT and/or chemotherapy and diffuse changes in seven (10%) at a median of 8 months. Patients who received neither RT nor chemotherapy did not develop marrow changes. Mean RT doses in patients with changes and those without were 5,867 and 6,076 cGy, respectively. In most patients with focal changes, changes were seen in all sequences and were linear-curvilinear, patchy, or mixed at the level of the tumor bed. Predominant signal intensity of changes was between muscle and fat at T1WI and between muscle and fluid at fat-saturated T2WI or short tau inversion recovery. Most focal changes enhanced heterogeneously and increased or fluctuated in size over time. Changes in MRI appearance of long bone marrow frequently are evident after combined RT and chemotherapy for STS and most commonly increase or fluctuate in size over time. These changes have various non-mass-like configurations and often show signal intensities similar to those of red marrow and thus should not be mistaken for metastases. The marrow changes might represent an early stage of gelatinous transformation of marrow. (orig.)

  2. MRI, MDCT features, and clinical outcome of extremity leiomyosarcomas: experience in 47 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Robert W.; Shinagare, Atul B.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Kurra, Vikram; Hornick, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    To describe MRI, MDCT features, and clinical outcome of extremity leiomyosarcomas (LMS). In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, we included 47 patients (23 women, 24 men; mean age: 55.3 years, range: 17-85 years) with pathologically confirmed extremity LMS seen at our adult tertiary cancer center between 2000 and 2012. MRI/MDCT of primary tumors in 23 patients and follow-up in all patients were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus. Clinical data were extracted from electronic medical records. Primary tumors were distributed in bones (6 out of 47), deep soft tissues (24 out of 47), and superficial soft tissues (17 out of 47). On imaging (bone = 4, deep soft tissue = 11, superficial soft tissue = 8), compared with skeletal muscle, they were T1 iso-hypointense and T2 hyperintense. Bone LMS were metaphyseal tumors with cortical destruction (3 out of 4). Deep soft-tissue LMS were large with hemorrhage (7 out of 11) and necrosis (10 out of 11). Superficial soft-tissue LMS were relatively smaller, homogeneously enhancing (6 out of 8) tumors. Distant metastases developed in 32 out of 47 patients (bone LMS [6 out of 6], deep soft-tissue LMS [18 out of 24], superficial soft-tissue LMS [8 out of 17]), commonly to lung (29 out of 47) and bone (14 out of 47). At the time of writing, 22 out of 36 patients (bone LMS [4 out of 6], deep soft-tissue LMS [15 out of 24], superficial soft-tissue LMS [4 out of 17]) have died. There was no statistically significant correlation between metastatic disease and tumor size or grade. Extremity LMS arise in bones and in the deep and superficial soft tissues, frequently metastasize to the lungs, and have a poor prognosis. Superficial LMS tend to have a better prognosis than bone or deep soft-tissue LMS. (orig.)

  3. MRI, MDCT features, and clinical outcome of extremity leiomyosarcomas: experience in 47 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Robert W.; Shinagare, Atul B. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Kurra, Vikram [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Hornick, Jason L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    To describe MRI, MDCT features, and clinical outcome of extremity leiomyosarcomas (LMS). In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, we included 47 patients (23 women, 24 men; mean age: 55.3 years, range: 17-85 years) with pathologically confirmed extremity LMS seen at our adult tertiary cancer center between 2000 and 2012. MRI/MDCT of primary tumors in 23 patients and follow-up in all patients were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus. Clinical data were extracted from electronic medical records. Primary tumors were distributed in bones (6 out of 47), deep soft tissues (24 out of 47), and superficial soft tissues (17 out of 47). On imaging (bone = 4, deep soft tissue = 11, superficial soft tissue = 8), compared with skeletal muscle, they were T1 iso-hypointense and T2 hyperintense. Bone LMS were metaphyseal tumors with cortical destruction (3 out of 4). Deep soft-tissue LMS were large with hemorrhage (7 out of 11) and necrosis (10 out of 11). Superficial soft-tissue LMS were relatively smaller, homogeneously enhancing (6 out of 8) tumors. Distant metastases developed in 32 out of 47 patients (bone LMS [6 out of 6], deep soft-tissue LMS [18 out of 24], superficial soft-tissue LMS [8 out of 17]), commonly to lung (29 out of 47) and bone (14 out of 47). At the time of writing, 22 out of 36 patients (bone LMS [4 out of 6], deep soft-tissue LMS [15 out of 24], superficial soft-tissue LMS [4 out of 17]) have died. There was no statistically significant correlation between metastatic disease and tumor size or grade. Extremity LMS arise in bones and in the deep and superficial soft tissues, frequently metastasize to the lungs, and have a poor prognosis. Superficial LMS tend to have a better prognosis than bone or deep soft-tissue LMS. (orig.)

  4. Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Canine Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Adamiak* and M. Jaskólska and A. Pomianowski1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented study was to evaluate selected surface spine coil, and low-field magnetic resonance (MR selected sequences in diagnosing hydrocephalus in dogs. This paper discusses 19 dogs (14 canine patients with hydrocephalus and 5 healthy dogs, of five breeds, subjected to low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of hydrocephalus. Area of the lateral ventricles and brain were examined in dogs with hydrocephalus using low-field MRI (at 0.25 Tesla. The MRI of FSE REL, SE, FLAIR, STIR, 3D HYCE, T3DT1, GE STIR 3D and 3D SHARC sequences with an indication of the most effective sequences are described. Additionally, coils for MR were compared, and models for infusion anesthesia were described. As a result of performed study all estimated sequences were diagnostically useful. However, spinal coil No. 2 (ESAOTE was the most optimal for examining and positioning the cranium.

  5. Very low field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging at very low field (from 1 mT to 10 mT). A new kind of sensor called 'mixed sensor' has been used to achieve a good detectivity at low frequencies. Combining a superconducting loop and a giant magnetoresistance, those detectors have a competitive equivalent field noise compared to existing devices (Tuned coils, SQUIDs and Atomic Magnetometers). They have been combined with flux transformers to increase the coupling between the sample and the sensor. A complete study has been performed to adapt it to mixed sensors and then maximize the gain. This set has been incorporated in an existing small MRI device to test its robustness in real conditions. In parallel, several MRI sequences (GE, SE, FLASH, EPI,...) have been integrated and adapted to very low field requirements. They have been used to perform in-vivo three dimensional imaging and relaxometry studies on well known products to test their reliability. Finally, a larger setup adapted for full-head imaging has been designed and built to perform images on a larger working volume. (author) [fr

  6. fMRI of Simultaneous Interpretation Reveals the Neural Basis of Extreme Language Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Moser-Mercer, Barbara; Michel, Christoph M; Golestani, Narly

    2015-12-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural basis of extreme multilingual language control in a group of 50 multilingual participants. Comparing brain responses arising during simultaneous interpretation (SI) with those arising during simultaneous repetition revealed activation of regions known to be involved in speech perception and production, alongside a network incorporating the caudate nucleus that is known to be implicated in domain-general cognitive control. The similarity between the networks underlying bilingual language control and general executive control supports the notion that the frequently reported bilingual advantage on executive tasks stems from the day-to-day demands of language control in the multilingual brain. We examined neural correlates of the management of simultaneity by correlating brain activity during interpretation with the duration of simultaneous speaking and hearing. This analysis showed significant modulation of the putamen by the duration of simultaneity. Our findings suggest that, during SI, the caudate nucleus is implicated in the overarching selection and control of the lexico-semantic system, while the putamen is implicated in ongoing control of language output. These findings provide the first clear dissociation of specific dorsal striatum structures in polyglot language control, roles that are consistent with previously described involvement of these regions in nonlinguistic executive control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The diagnosis of a fully flexed neck position MRI diagnosis in juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huaijun; Li Caiying; He Dan; Chi Chen; Cui Caixia; Huang Boyuan; Wang Guoshi; Zhu Qingfeng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of the diagnosis of MRI during neck flexion in juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity. Methods: Five young male patients (mean age 21 years old) with clinical and electrophysiological alterations were performed MR examination with routine neck position and a fully flexed neck position. Eight age-match young men were examined as control subjects. SE T 1 WI, T 2 WI, Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences were scanned. Results: A distinctive finding in the disorder was forward displacement of the cervical dural sac, compressive flattening of the lower cervical cord during neck flexion and flow void in the posterior epidural space. The forward displacement was significantly greater in patients than in age-matched control subjects. Conclusion: Flexed neck position MRI is helpful to find radiological abnormalities of the lower cervical dural sac and spinal cord, which were combined with clinical disorder to diagnose juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity. (authors)

  8. Clinical Implications of Diffuse Excessive High Signal Intensity (DEHSI on Neonatal MRI in School Age Children Born Extremely Preterm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Broström

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain carried out during the neonatal period shows that 55-80% of extremely preterm infants display white matter diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI. Our aim was to study differences in developmental outcome at the age of 6.5 years in children born extremely preterm with and without DEHSI.This was a prospective cohort study of 83 children who were born in Stockholm, Sweden, between 2004 and 2007, born at gestational age of < 27 weeks + 0 days and who underwent an MRI scan of their brain at term equivalent age. The outcome measures at 6.5 years included testing 66 children with the modified Touwen neurology examination, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition, Beery Visual-motor Integration test-Sixth Edition, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Group-wise comparisons were done between children with and without DEHSI using Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test, Chi square test and regression analysis.DEHSI was detected in 39 (59% of the 66 children who were assessed at 6.5 years. The presence of DEHSI was not associated with mild neurological dysfunction, scores on M-ABC assessment, cognition, visual-motor integration, or behavior at 6.5 years.The presence of qualitatively defined DEHSI on neonatal MRI did not prove to be a useful predictor of long-term impairment in children born extremely preterm.

  9. MRI and clinical features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in the pelvis and extremities: can LCH really look like anything?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samet, Jonathan; Weinstein, Joanna; Fayad, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    To assess clinical and MRI features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the pelvis and extremities. The MRI and clinical features of 21 pathologically proven cases of LCH involving the pelvis and extremities were studied. Multiple characteristics of the lesions were evaluated (location, size, T1/ T2/post-contrast features, perilesional bone and soft tissue signal, endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, soft tissue mass, pathologic fracture). Pre-biopsy radiologic diagnoses were collected from the original clinical reports. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature, and white blood cell count (WBC) were collected at the time of diagnosis when available. The locations of the LCH lesions included five humerus, four femur, five ilium, one tibia, one clavicle, and three scapula. Lesional size ranged from 1.8 to 7.1 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm. All lesions demonstrated perilesional bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction, endosteal scalloping, and post-contrast enhancement. An associated soft tissue mass was present in 15/21 (71.4 %). Clinically, the WBC, ESR, and CRP were elevated in 2/14 (14 %), 8/12 (67 %), and 4/10 (40 %) of cases, respectively. Fever was documented in 1/15 (7 %) patients and pain was reported in 15/15 (100 %). The clinical and radiologic features of LCH in the pelvis and extremities overlap with infection and malignancy, but LCH must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as it routinely presents with aggressive MRI features, including endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, perilesional edema, and a soft tissue mass. Furthermore, an unknown skeletal lesion at presentation without aggressive MRI features is unlikely to represent LCH. (orig.)

  10. MRI and clinical features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in the pelvis and extremities: can LCH really look like anything?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samet, Jonathan [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Weinstein, Joanna [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-05-15

    To assess clinical and MRI features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the pelvis and extremities. The MRI and clinical features of 21 pathologically proven cases of LCH involving the pelvis and extremities were studied. Multiple characteristics of the lesions were evaluated (location, size, T1/ T2/post-contrast features, perilesional bone and soft tissue signal, endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, soft tissue mass, pathologic fracture). Pre-biopsy radiologic diagnoses were collected from the original clinical reports. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature, and white blood cell count (WBC) were collected at the time of diagnosis when available. The locations of the LCH lesions included five humerus, four femur, five ilium, one tibia, one clavicle, and three scapula. Lesional size ranged from 1.8 to 7.1 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm. All lesions demonstrated perilesional bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction, endosteal scalloping, and post-contrast enhancement. An associated soft tissue mass was present in 15/21 (71.4 %). Clinically, the WBC, ESR, and CRP were elevated in 2/14 (14 %), 8/12 (67 %), and 4/10 (40 %) of cases, respectively. Fever was documented in 1/15 (7 %) patients and pain was reported in 15/15 (100 %). The clinical and radiologic features of LCH in the pelvis and extremities overlap with infection and malignancy, but LCH must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as it routinely presents with aggressive MRI features, including endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, perilesional edema, and a soft tissue mass. Furthermore, an unknown skeletal lesion at presentation without aggressive MRI features is unlikely to represent LCH. (orig.)

  11. MRI findings associated with microscopic residual tumor following unplanned excision of soft tissue sarcomas in the extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lee; Chelala, Lydia; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Kerr, Darcy A. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Yang, Xuan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Miami, FL (United States)

    2018-02-15

    MRI is often used to determine the presence of residual disease following unplanned excisions (UPE) of soft tissue sarcomas (STS). We sought to identify MRI features associated with histologic evidence of residual disease after TBE. This was an IRB-approved retrospective review of 27 patients with R1-type UPE of STS over a 32-month period, with subsequent MRI and TBE. MRI studies were retrospectively evaluated to determine depth of tissue involvement, presence of nodular enhancement, and maximum length of soft tissue edema normalized to extremity size. MRI findings were correlated with histology from unplanned excision and TBE. Among the 21 subjects, there were 13 males and 8 females, mean age 58. Eighteen of 21 STS were grade 2 or 3. Deep compartments were involved in 5/21 cases. Original margins were positive in 17/21 UPE, with inadequate margin assessment in the remaining 4 cases. Residual tumor was present at TBE in 11/21 cases; it was found in 4/6 cases with nodular enhancement and 7/15 cases without nodular enhancement (sensitivity = 0.36; specificity = 0.80; PPV = 0.67; NPV = 0.53). Increased extent of soft tissue edema increased the likelihood of residual tumor at TBE (OR = 35.0; 95% CI = 1.6 to 752.7; p = 0.023). Nodular enhancement is neither sensitive nor specific in predicting residual microscopic tumor in TBE following UPE. Extensive soft tissue edema on MRI after UPE increases the likelihood of finding a residual microscopic tumor, justifying ample margins at TBE and consideration of adjuvant therapy. (orig.)

  12. An MRI-based technique for assessment of lower extremity deformities - reproducibility, accuracy, and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Graichen, Heiko; Vogl, Thomas J.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that length, torsion, and axis of a leg phantom can be measured accurately and reproducibly by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and that this can be applied to patients with leg deformities. Two phantoms and 30 patients (genu varum, n=15; genu valgum, n=15) were investigated using an optimized MRI technique. Reference measurements were performed with a micrometer screw and a goniometer. Patient leg length and axis were compared with long radiographs in bipedal stance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and accuracy were calculated using the mean absolute difference (MAD) and the 95% confidence interval. In patients, comparisons were done using a paired Student's t-test. MAD, intraobserver MAD, and interobserver MAD were 0.03, 0.03, 0.04 mm (length); 0.98, 1.2, 0.98 (torsion); and 0.18, 0.23, 0.22 (axis), respectively. In patients, leg length was underestimated by MRI (-2.4 ± 0.7%; 1.9±0.7 cm; P 0.05), while it was significantly underestimated in valgus knees (-3.6 ± 2.8 ; P<0.05). The phantom study revealed that leg length, torsion, and axis can be measured accurately and reproducibly by MRI. Although underestimation of leg length and HKA in valgus knees occurred, this optimized MRI technique can be applied to patients with leg deformities. (orig.)

  13. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma;Controle par IRM bas champ in vivo de l'efficacite d'une therapie genique par gene suicide dans un modele murin de glioblastome orthotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph. [Service de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, hopital de Hautepierre, CHRU de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Institut de mecanique des fluides et des solides, CNRS, universite de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R. [Transgene SA, parc d' innovation, 67 - Illkirch Graffenstaden (France)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  14. Cortical reorganization associated lower extremity motor recovery as evidenced by functional MRI and diffusion tensor tractography in a stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; You, Sung H; Kwon, Yong-Hyun; Hallett, Mark; Lee, Mi Young; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2005-01-01

    Recovery mechanisms supporting upper extremity motor recovery following stroke are well established, but cortical mechanism associated with lower extremity motor recovery is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess cortical reorganization associated with lower extremity motor recovery in a hemiparetic patient. Six control subjects and a 17 year-old woman with left intracerebral hemorrhage due to an arterio-venous malformation rupture were evaluated. The motor function of the paretic (left) hip and knee had recovered slowly to the extent of her being able to overcome gravity for 10 months after the onset of stroke. However, her paretic upper extremity showed no significant motor recovery. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI at 1.5 Tesla was used to determine the acutual location of cortical activation in the predefined regions of interest. Concurrently, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in combination with a novel 3D-fiber reconstruction algorithm was utilized to investigate the pattern of the corticospinal pathway connectivity between the areas of the motor stream. All subjects' body parts were secured in the scanner and performed a sequential knee flexion-extension with a predetermined angle of 0-60 degrees at 0.5 Hz. Controls showed anticipated activation in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex (SM1) and the descending corticospinal fibers stemming from motor cortex. In contrast to control normal subjects, the stroke patient showed fMRI activation only in the unaffected (right) primary SM1 during either paretic or nonparetic knee movements. DTT fiber tracing data showed that the corticospinal tract fibers were found only in the unaffected hemisphere but not in the affected hemisphere. Our results indicate that an ipsilateral motor pathway from the unaffected (right) motor cortex to the paretic (right) leg was present in this patient. This study raises the potential that the contralesional (ipsilateral) SM1 is involved in cortical

  15. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  16. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  17. Language changes coincide with motor and fMRI changes following upper extremity motor therapy for hemiparesis: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnish, Stacy; Meinzer, Marcus; Trinastic, Jonathan; Fitzgerald, David; Page, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    To formally assess changes in language, affected UE movement, and motor functional activation changes via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following participation in motor therapy without any accompanying language intervention. Pre-post case series. Five subjects with stroke exhibiting chronic, stable UE hemiparesis. The upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer (FM), the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), administered during performance of an affected UE motor task. All subjects were administered six weeks of repetitive task specific training (RTP), performed for approximately 2.5 hours per day, split into two sessions. For the first four weeks of the intervention period, RTP was administered every weekday, whereas, for the subsequent two weeks, RTP was administered 3 days/week. Epidural cortical stimulation was co-administered with the RTP via an electrode array and implanted pulse generator. For all sessions, one subject worked with a single therapist. Four weeks before and four weeks after the intervention period, all subjects were administered the FM, WAB, and fMRI. Three of the subjects exhibited clinically significant language changes on the WAB. These individuals exhibited the largest motor changes as measured by the FM. Functional MRI revealed distinct motor activation patterns in these subjects, characterized by more strongly right lateralized focal BOLD activity or a shift in activation toward the right hemisphere. Language changes appear to co-occur with motor changes after UE RTP. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of these findings may lead to more efficient and synergistic rehabilitative therapy delivery.

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced, extremity-dedicated MRI identifies synovitis changes in the follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with rituximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco A; Parodi, Massimiliano; Zampogna, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    according to the 1987 ACR criteria were treated with a single course of RTX (2 infusions of 1000 mg, 15 days apart). MRI of the dominant hand was performed with a 0.2T extremity-dedicated machine using pre and post contrast T1 weighted SE, turbo 3D, and STIR sequences at baseline, and after 4 and 24 weeks....... MRI was analysed using the OMERACT-RAMRIS score and the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) technique for wrist synovitis, which calculates the enhancement ratio as both rate of early enhancement (REE) and relative enhancement (RE). The corresponding ME and IRE parameters were calculated also through...

  19. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  20. Low field magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Reliability of qualitative evaluation of disc and muscle parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Joan Solgaard; Kjaer, Per; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the intra- and interobserver reliability in grading disc and muscle parameters using low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: MRI scans of 100 subjects representative of the general population were evaluated blindly by two radiologists. Criteria......: Convincing reliability was found in the evaluation of disc- and muscle-related MRI variables....

  1. MRI Findings of Causalgia of the Lower Extremity Following Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ryan Ormond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Causalgia is continuing pain, allodynia, or hyperalgesia after nerve injury with edema, changes in skin blood flow, or abnormal sudomotor activity. Here we report a case of lower extremity causalgia following elective transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary tumor in a young man. Clinical Presentation. A 33-year-old man with acromegaly underwent elective sublabial transsphenoidal resection of his pituitary tumor. During the three-hour surgery, the lower limbs were kept in a supine, neutral position with a pillow under the knees. The right thigh was slightly internally rotated with a tape to expose fascia lata, which was harvested to repair the sella. Postoperatively, he developed causalgia in a distal sciatic and common peroneal nerve distribution. Pain was refractory to several interventions. Finally, phenoxybenzamine improved his pain significantly. Conclusions. Malpositioning in the operating room resulted in causalgia in this young man. Phenoxybenzamine improved, and ultimately resolved, his symptoms. Improvement in his pain symptoms correlated with resolution of imaging changes in the distal sciatic and peroneal nerves on the side of injury.

  2. Application of DCE-MRI in evaluating lower extremity capillary endothelial function in patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by peripheral vascular disease after PTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hao; Zhao Jinli; Chen Xiaohua; Wu Xianhua; Li Yuehua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify endothelial function of lower extremity capillary in patients with peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes mellitus by using DCE-MRI, and to explore the feasibility of DCE-MRI in predicting vascular restenosis in lower extremity after PTA. Methods: During the period form May 2009 to Jan. 2012, a total of 51 patients (study group) with diabetic lower extremity vascular diseases (77 diseased legs in total) were admitted to the hospital and were treated with PTA. Another 20 volunteers were used as control group. K-trans values were measured in soleus muscle using DCE-MRI. Based on the results after 6 months follow-up, the patients were classified into restenosis group and non-restenosis group. The K -trans values and others clinical data were compared between the two groups. Results: Although clinical symptoms and signs were improved in both groups after the treatment, K-trans value of restenosis group showed no obvious changes after PTA, while K-trans value of non-restenosis group was improved significantly. Before PTA, the difference in K -trans value between the two groups was not statistically significant, while K-trans values of the two groups were significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: K-trans value can reflect the endothelial function in diabetes mellitus patients with peripheral vascular disease, and it can also predict the occurrence of restenosis, providing a useful evidence for clinical. therapy. (authors)

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in a low-field intraoperative scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulder, Michael; Azmi, Hooman; Biswal, Bharat

    2003-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used for preoperative planning and intraoperative surgical navigation. However, most experience to date has been with preoperative images acquired on high-field echoplanar MRI units. We explored the feasibility of acquiring fMRI of the motor cortex with a dedicated low-field intraoperative MRI (iMRI). Five healthy volunteers were scanned with the 0.12-tesla PoleStar N-10 iMRI (Odin Medical Technologies, Israel). A finger-tapping motor paradigm was performed with sequential scans, acquired alternately at rest and during activity. In addition, scans were obtained during breath holding alternating with normal breathing. The same paradigms were repeated using a 3-tesla MRI (Siemens Corp., Allandale, N.J., USA). Statistical analysis was performed offline using cross-correlation and cluster techniques. Data were resampled using the 'jackknife' process. The location, number of activated voxels and degrees of statistical significance between the two scanners were compared. With both the 0.12- and 3-tesla imagers, motor cortex activation was seen in all subjects to a significance of p < 0.02 or greater. No clustered pixels were seen outside the sensorimotor cortex. The resampled correlation coefficients were normally distributed, with a mean of 0.56 for both the 0.12- and 3-tesla scanners (standard deviations 0.11 and 0.08, respectively). The breath holding paradigm confirmed that the expected diffuse activation was seen on 0.12- and 3-tesla scans. Accurate fMRI with a low-field iMRI is feasible. Such data could be acquired immediately before or even during surgery. This would increase the utility of iMRI and allow for updated intraoperative functional imaging, free of the limitations of brain shift. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Validity of soft-tissue thickness of calf measured using MRI for assessing unilateral lower extremity lymphoedema secondary to cervical and endometrial cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Yulai; Chen, Tian-Wu; Yao, Yuan; Zhao, Zizhou; Li, Yang; Xu, Jianrong; Jiang, Zhaohua; Hu, Jiani

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether soft-tissue thickness of the calf measured using MRI could be valid for assessing unilateral lower extremity lymphoedema (LEL) secondary to cervical and endometrial cancer treatments. Materials and methods: Seventy women with unilateral LEL and 25 without LEL after cervical or endometrial cancer treatments underwent MRI examinations of their calves. Total thickness of soft-tissue (TT), muscle thickness (MT), and subcutaneous tissue thickness (STT) of the calf, and the difference between the affected and contralateral unaffected calf regarding TT (DTT), MT (DMT), and STT (DSTT) were obtained using fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging in the middle of the calves. The volume of the calf and difference in volume (DV) between calves were obtained by the method of water displacement. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the validity of MRI measurements by volume measurements in staging LEL. Results: There was a close correlation between volume and TT for the affected (r = 0.927) or unaffected calves (r = 0.896). STT of the affected calf, and DTT or DSTT of the calves were closely correlated with volume of the affected calf or DV of the calves (all p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed significant differences in TT, STT, volume of the affected calf, DTT, DSTT, and DV between stages except in volume of the affected calf or in DV between stage 0 and 1. For staging LEL, DSTT showed the best discrimination ability among all the parameters. Conclusions: Soft-tissue thickness of the calf measured at MRI could be valid for quantitatively staging unilateral LEL, and DSTT of the calves could be the best classifying factor. - Highlights: • The soft tissue thickness of calves on MRI could quantitatively assess secondary LEL. • Calf soft tissue thickness indicated concurrent or construct validity of calf volume. • The difference of subcutaneous tissue thickness of calves could be used to stage LEL

  5. Prospective evaluation of MR overlay on real-time fluoroscopy for percutaneous extremity biopsies of bone lesions visible on MRI but not on CT in children in the interventional radiology suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Vatsky, Seth; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Setser, Randolph M. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often provides better visualization of bone marrow abnormalities than computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy, but bone biopsies are usually performed using conventional CT or, more recently, C-arm CT guidance. Biopsies of bone lesions solely visible on MRI are often challenging to localize and require the operator to review the MRI on a separate console to correlate with MRI anatomical landmarks during the biopsy. The MR overlay technique facilitates such biopsies in the angiographic suite by allowing the pre-procedural 3-D MRI to be overlaid on intraprocedural 2-D fluoroscopy. This study describes our initial experience with the MR overlay technique in the angiography suite during pediatric percutaneous extremity bone biopsies of lesions visible on MRI but not on CT or fluoroscopy and demonstrates its utility in relevant clinical cases. (orig.)

  6. Prospective evaluation of MR overlay on real-time fluoroscopy for percutaneous extremity biopsies of bone lesions visible on MRI but not on CT in children in the interventional radiology suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Vatsky, Seth; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie; Setser, Randolph M.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often provides better visualization of bone marrow abnormalities than computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy, but bone biopsies are usually performed using conventional CT or, more recently, C-arm CT guidance. Biopsies of bone lesions solely visible on MRI are often challenging to localize and require the operator to review the MRI on a separate console to correlate with MRI anatomical landmarks during the biopsy. The MR overlay technique facilitates such biopsies in the angiographic suite by allowing the pre-procedural 3-D MRI to be overlaid on intraprocedural 2-D fluoroscopy. This study describes our initial experience with the MR overlay technique in the angiography suite during pediatric percutaneous extremity bone biopsies of lesions visible on MRI but not on CT or fluoroscopy and demonstrates its utility in relevant clinical cases. (orig.)

  7. Repeatability of chemical-shift-encoded water-fat MRI and diffusion-tensor imaging in lower extremity muscles in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponrartana, Skorn; Andrade, Kristine E; Wren, Tishya A L; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Hu, Houchun H; Bluml, Stefan; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of water-fat MRI and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) as quantitative biomarkers of pediatric lower extremity skeletal muscle. MRI at 3 T of a randomly selected thigh and lower leg of seven healthy children was studied using water-fat separation and DTI techniques. Muscle-fat fraction, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were calculated. Test-retest and interrater repeatability were assessed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman analysis. Bland-Altman plots show that the mean difference between test-retest and interrater measurements of muscle-fat fraction, ADC, and FA was near 0. The correlation coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients were all between 0.88 and 0.99 (p DTI measurements in lower extremity skeletal muscles are objective repeatable biomarkers in children. This knowledge should aid in the understanding of the number of participants needed in clinical trials when using these determinations as an outcome measure to noninvasively monitor neuromuscular disease.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Feist, Eugen [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Minden, Kirsten [Helios Clinics, 2nd Children' s Hospital Berlin-Buch, Rheumatology Unit, Berlin (Germany); German Rheumatology Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Schink, Tania [Department of Medical Biometry, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kgh@charite.de

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 {+-} 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.; Feist, Eugen; Minden, Kirsten; Schink, Tania; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 ± 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients

  10. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  11. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  12. The effects of pre-salting methods on salt and water distribution of heavily salted cod, as analyzed by 1H and 23Na MRI, 23Na NMR, low-field NMR and physicochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðjónsdóttir, María; Traoré, Amidou; Jónsson, Ásbjörn

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different pre-salting methods (brine injection with salt with/without polyphosphates, brining and pickling) on the water and salt distribution in dry salted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fillets was studied with proton and sodium NMR and MRI methods, supported by physicochemical analy...

  13. Usefulness of intraoperative ultra low-field magnetic resonance imaging in glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; Hermann, Elvis; Franz, Kea; Gasser, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of a mobile, intraoperative 0.15-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner in glioma surgery. We analyzed our prospectively collected database of patients with glial tumors who underwent tumor resection with the use of an intraoperative ultra low-field MRI scanner (PoleStar N-20; Odin Medical Technologies, Yokneam, Israel/Medtronic, Louisville, CO). Sixty-three patients with World Health Organization Grade II to IV tumors were included in the study. All patients were subjected to postoperative 1.5-T imaging to confirm the extent of resection. Intraoperative image quality was sufficient for navigation and resection control in both high- and low-grade tumors. Primarily enhancing tumors were best detected on T1-weighted imaging, whereas fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences proved best for nonenhancing tumors. Intraoperative resection control led to further tumor resection in 12 (28.6%) of 42 patients with contrast-enhancing tumors and in 10 (47.6%) of 21 patients with noncontrast-enhancing tumors. In contrast-enhancing tumors, further resection led to an increased rate of complete tumor resection (71.2 versus 52.4%), and the surgical goal of gross total removal or subtotal resection was achieved in all cases (100.0%). In patients with noncontrast-enhancing tumors, the surgical goal was achieved in 19 (90.5%) of 21 cases, as intraoperative MRI findings were inconsistent with postoperative high-field imaging in 2 cases. The use of the PoleStar N-20 intraoperative ultra low-field MRI scanner helps to evaluate the extent of resection in glioma surgery. Further tumor resection after intraoperative scanning leads to an increased rate of complete tumor resection, especially in patients with contrast-enhancing tumors. However, in noncontrast- enhancing tumors, the intraoperative visualization of a complete resection seems less specific, when compared with postoperative 1.5-T MRI.

  14. A radiomics model from joint FDG-PET and MRI texture features for the prediction of lung metastases in soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallières, M; El Naqa, I; Freeman, C R; Skamene, S R

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at developing a joint FDG-PET and MRI texture-based model for the early evaluation of lung metastasis risk in soft-tissue sarcomas (STSs). We investigate if the creation of new composite textures from the combination of FDG-PET and MR imaging information could better identify aggressive tumours. Towards this goal, a cohort of 51 patients with histologically proven STSs of the extremities was retrospectively evaluated. All patients had pre-treatment FDG-PET and MRI scans comprised of T1-weighted and T2-weighted fat-suppression sequences (T2FS). Nine non-texture features (SUV metrics and shape features) and forty-one texture features were extracted from the tumour region of separate (FDG-PET, T1 and T2FS) and fused (FDG-PET/T1 and FDG-PET/T2FS) scans. Volume fusion of the FDG-PET and MRI scans was implemented using the wavelet transform. The influence of six different extraction parameters on the predictive value of textures was investigated. The incorporation of features into multivariable models was performed using logistic regression. The multivariable modeling strategy involved imbalance-adjusted bootstrap resampling in the following four steps leading to final prediction model construction: (1) feature set reduction; (2) feature selection; (3) prediction performance estimation; and (4) computation of model coefficients. Univariate analysis showed that the isotropic voxel size at which texture features were extracted had the most impact on predictive value. In multivariable analysis, texture features extracted from fused scans significantly outperformed those from separate scans in terms of lung metastases prediction estimates. The best performance was obtained using a combination of four texture features extracted from FDG-PET/T1 and FDG-PET/T2FS scans. This model reached an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.984 ± 0.002, a sensitivity of 0.955 ± 0.006, and a specificity of 0.926 ± 0.004 in bootstrapping

  15. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Structural MRI Images Using a Regularized Extreme Learning Machine and PCA Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Lama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive, neurodegenerative brain disorder that attacks neurotransmitters, brain cells, and nerves, affecting brain functions, memory, and behaviors and then finally causing dementia on elderly people. Despite its significance, there is currently no cure for it. However, there are medicines available on prescription that can help delay the progress of the condition. Thus, early diagnosis of AD is essential for patient care and relevant researches. Major challenges in proper diagnosis of AD using existing classification schemes are the availability of a smaller number of training samples and the larger number of possible feature representations. In this paper, we present and compare AD diagnosis approaches using structural magnetic resonance (sMR images to discriminate AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and healthy control (HC subjects using a support vector machine (SVM, an import vector machine (IVM, and a regularized extreme learning machine (RELM. The greedy score-based feature selection technique is employed to select important feature vectors. In addition, a kernel-based discriminative approach is adopted to deal with complex data distributions. We compare the performance of these classifiers for volumetric sMR image data from Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI datasets. Experiments on the ADNI datasets showed that RELM with the feature selection approach can significantly improve classification accuracy of AD from MCI and HC subjects.

  16. Low field MR imaging of sellar and parasellar lesions: Experience in a developing country hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbole, G.I.; Adeyinka, O.A.; Okolo, C.A.; Ogun, A.O.; Atalabi, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an advancement which followed computed tomography (CT) is expensive and inaccessible in most developing countries. However it is the procedure of choice in evaluating sellar and parasellar lesions. Its major advantages are its superior soft tissue contrast differentiation, its capacity for multiplanar imaging and nonexistence of ionising radiation. Its use is relatively new in Nigeria, a developing economy in Africa. Since its introduction in 2005, it has been utilised extensively for neuroimaging at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan; a large hospital in south-western Nigeria. Objective: To review the role and pattern of low field MR Imaging in sellar and parasellar lesions presenting to a tertiary care centre in Nigeria. Methods: All 62 patients with clinically suspected sellar and parasellar masses, referred to the Department of Radiology, UCH Ibadan for MRI between December 2006 and January 2010 were retrospectively analysed. The examinations were performed using an open 0.2 T permanent magnet MR unit. T1W, T2W, T2/FLAIR, TOF and T1W post gadolinium DTPA sequences of the sellar region were obtained. Results: Of the 62 patients, there were 27 males and 35 females. The modal age group was 40–49 years with a mean age of 39.94 years (±16.65 years). Twenty-four cases (38.7%) had histological diagnosis, of which 20 (83.3%) were consistent with initial MRI diagnosis. Pituitary adenomas were the commonest (58.06%) lesions of the sellar and parasellar regions. Others include parasellar meningiomas, cranipharyngiomas, and giant aneurysms. Headache and visual impairment were the major presenting features and showed no significant correlation with tumour size. Conclusion: The use of low field MRI in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected sellar or parasellar lesions in developing countries of low economic resource is commendable as it provides beneficial outcomes in management.

  17. Low-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging in the canine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve Ratsch, B.

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 0,23 T) of the canine brain was performed. Each scan plane was compared with corresponding anatomic sections. The best imaging planes to visualize various anatomic structures were determined. Low-field-strength MRI allowed the good definition of all relevant anatomic structures of the brain of 55 dogs with the exception of most cranial nerves. White matter could be best differentiated using proton-weighted images. On T1-weighted images the contrast of white matter was markedly limited in the living dogs in contrast to the examined canine specimens. The relative size of the lateral ventricle was defined as the ratio of the size of the lateral ventricle and the size of the half brain. The relative size of the lateral ventricle of Yorkshire Terrier dogs (5,35 %) was significantly (p 0,05) in the relative size of the lateral ventricles of healthy Yorkshire Terrier dogs (5,35 %) and Yorkshire Terrier dogs with neurological symptoms (7,06 %). Asymmetric lateral ventricles were very common in the examined dogs independently from body size, skull shape and neurological status. Occasionally the septum telencephali was not developed completely. 11 of 12 intracranial neoplasm could be delineated using low-field-strength MRI. Anatomic site, number of intracerebral lesions, limitation, shape and growth pattern, secondary brain lesions and development of peritumoral edema were described for each intracranial neoplasm as well as its signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and contrast enhancement pattern. MRI did not allow an accurate diagnosis of tumor type, nevertheless skull shape (brachycephalic/dolichocephalic), anatomic site and number of intracerebral lesions facilitated a presumable diagnosis of the tumor type. (author)

  18. Retrospective 5-year analysis of MR-guided biopsies in a low-field MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangos, Stephan; Mueller, C.; Mayer, F.; Naguib, N.N.; Nour-Eldin, N.E.A.; Herzog, C.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Thalhammer, A.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J.; Eichler, K.; Hansmann, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and clinical value of MR-guided biopsies in an open 0.2 T low-field system. Materials and methods: A total of 322 patients with suspicious lesions of different body regions were biopsied in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted Flash sequences (TR/TE = 100/9; 70 ). The lesions were repeatedly biopsied using the coaxial technique with a 15-gauge (diameter 2 mm) puncture needle. Complications and biopsy findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In all cases the biopsy procedures were successfully performed with MR guidance. In 298 patients diagnosis was able to be confirmed on the basis of the probes. The clinical follow-up showed that in 24 patients the lesions were missed by MR-guided biopsy. From this a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 87% and an accuracy of 93% were calculated. In two patients major complications were observed (morbidity rate 0.6%). Conclusion: MR-guided biopsy can be performed safely and precisely in a low-field MR system and are a supplement to US or CT-guided biopsies. (orig.)

  19. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  20. Comparison of onboard low-field magnetic resonance imaging versus onboard computed tomography for anatomy visualization in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J; Spencer, Christopher R; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Onboard magnetic resonance imaging (OB-MRI) for daily localization and adaptive radiotherapy has been under development by several groups. However, no clinical studies have evaluated whether OB-MRI improves visualization of the target and organs at risk (OARs) compared to standard onboard computed tomography (OB-CT). This study compared visualization of patient anatomy on images acquired on the MRI-(60)Co ViewRay system to those acquired with OB-CT. Fourteen patients enrolled on a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and undergoing image-guided radiotherapy for cancer in the thorax (n = 2), pelvis (n = 6), abdomen (n = 3) or head and neck (n = 3) were imaged with OB-MRI and OB-CT. For each of the 14 patients, the OB-MRI and OB-CT datasets were displayed side-by-side and independently reviewed by three radiation oncologists. Each physician was asked to evaluate which dataset offered better visualization of the target and OARs. A quantitative contouring study was performed on two abdominal patients to assess if OB-MRI could offer improved inter-observer segmentation agreement for adaptive planning. In total 221 OARs and 10 targets were compared for visualization on OB-MRI and OB-CT by each of the three physicians. The majority of physicians (two or more) evaluated visualization on MRI as better for 71% of structures, worse for 10% of structures, and equivalent for 14% of structures. 5% of structures were not visible on either. Physicians agreed unanimously for 74% and in majority for > 99% of structures. Targets were better visualized on MRI in 4/10 cases, and never on OB-CT. Low-field MR provides better anatomic visualization of many radiotherapy targets and most OARs as compared to OB-CT. Further studies with OB-MRI should be pursued.

  1. Detection of early osteoarthritis in the centrodistal joints of Icelandic horses: Evaluation of radiography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, C J; Björnsdóttir, S; Ekman, S; Boyde, A; Hansson, K

    2016-01-01

    Validated noninvasive detection methods for early osteoarthritis (OA) are required for OA prevention and early intervention treatment strategies. To evaluate radiography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of early stage OA osteochondral lesions in equine centrodistal joints using microscopy as the reference standard. Prospective imaging of live horses and imaging and microscopy of cadaver tarsal joints. Centrodistal (distal intertarsal) joints of 38 Icelandic research horses aged 27-29 months were radiographed. Horses were subjected to euthanasia approximately 2 months later and cadaver joints examined with low-field MRI. Osteochondral joint specimens were classified as negative or positive for OA using light microscopy histology or scanning electron microscopy. Radiographs and MRIs were evaluated for osteochondral lesions and results compared with microscopy. Forty-two joints were classified OA positive with microscopy. Associations were detected between microscopic OA and the radiography lesion categories; mineralisation front defect (Pradiography and low-field MRI pooled lesion categories, but radiography was often superior when individual lesion categories were compared. Early stage centrodistal joint OA changes may be detected with radiography and low-field MRI. Detection of mineralisation front defects in radiographs may be a useful screening method for detection of early OA in centrodistal joints of young Icelandic horses. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos, NM; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos, NM; Mosher, John C [Los Alamos, NM; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos, NM; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  3. Does Low-Field Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Improve the Results of Endoscopic Pituitary Surgery? Experience of the Implementation of a New Device in a Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Sergio; Reyes, Luis; Roldán, Pedro; Torales, Jorge; Halperin, Irene; Hanzu, Felicia; Langdon, Cristobal; Alobid, Isam; Enseñat, Joaquim

    2017-06-01

    To assess the contribution of low-field intraoperative magnetic resonance (iMRI) to endoscopic pituitary surgery. We analyzed a prospective series of patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery for pituitary macroadenomas assisted with a low-field iMRI (PoleStarN30, 0.15 T [Medtronic]). Clinical, radiologic, and surgical variables were analyzed and compared with our fully endoscopic historic cohort operated on without iMRI assistance. A bibliographic review of pituitary surgery assisted with iMRI was conducted. Thirty patients (57% female; mean age, 55 years) were prospectively analyzed. The most frequent tumor subtype was nonfunctioning macroadenoma (50%). The average Knosp grade was 2.3 and mean tumor size was 18 mm. Surgical and positioning time were 102 and 47 minutes, respectively. Hospital stay and complication rates were similar to our historical cohort for pituitary surgery. Mean follow-up was 10 months. Complete resection (CR) was achieved in 83% of patients. Seven patients (23%) benefited from iMRI assistance and achieved a CR in their surgeries. All patients except 1 experienced hormonal activity remission. iMRI sensitivity and specificity was 0.8 and 1, respectively. Although not statistically significant, CR rates were globally 11.5% superior in iMRI series compared with our historical cohort. This difference was independent of cavernous sinus invasiveness grade (CR rate increased 12.5% for Knosp grade 0-2 and 8.1% for Knosp grade 3-4). Low-field iMRI is a useful and safe assistance even in advanced surgical techniques such as endoscopy. Its contribution is limited by the intrinsic features of the tumor. Further randomized studies are required to confirm the cost-effectiveness of iMRI in pituitary surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultra-Low Field SQUID-NMR using LN2 Cooled Cu Polarizing Field coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demachi, K.; Kawagoe, S.; Ariyoshi, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2017-07-01

    We are developing an Ultra-Low Field (ULF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using a High-Temperature Superconductor superconducting quantum interference device (HTS rf-SQUID) for food inspection. The advantages of the ULF-NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) / MRI as compared with a conventional high field MRI are that they are compact and of low cost. In this study, we developed a ULF SQUID-NMR system using a polarizing coil to measure fat of which relaxation time T1 is shorter. The handmade polarizing coil was cooled by liquid nitrogen to reduce the resistance and accordingly increase the allowable current. The measured decay time of the polarizing field was 40 ms. The measurement system consisted of the liquid nitrogen cooled polarizing coil, a SQUID, a Cu wound flux transformer, a measurement field coil for the field of 47 μT, and an AC pulse coil for a 90°pulse field. The NMR measurements were performed in a magnetically shielded room to reduce the environmental magnetic field. The size of the sample was ϕ35 mm × L80 mm. After applying a polarizing field and a 90°pulse, an NMR signal was detected by the SQUID through the flux transformer. As a result, the NMR spectra of fat samples were obtained at 2.0 kHz corresponding to the measurement field Bm of 47 μT. The T1 relaxation time of the mineral oil measured in Bm was 45 ms. These results suggested that the ULF-NMR/MRI system has potential for food inspection.

  5. Nondestructive prediction and visualization of plumpness in live Eriocheir sinensis using low-field 1 H magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongcai; Mei, Jun; Chen, Shunsheng; Wu, Xugan

    2018-02-06

    The plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) depends on the grading scale and its commercial value. In this work, a low-field T 1 -weighted 1 H magnetic resonance imaging (LF- 1 H MRI) technique was developed to nondestructively analyze the plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live E. sinensis. Both male and female E. sinensis were characterized by two-dimensional (2D) LF- 1 H MRI. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3D) LF- 1 H MRI model that quantitatively integrated the total volume of lipid tissues in live E. sinensis was used. The results showed 2D LF- 1 H MRI could accurately discriminate the plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live E. sinensis. The results of the 3D LF- 1 H MRI model displayed that the lipid volume of E. sinensis could be used to quantify lipid accumulation in lipid tissues. LF- 1 H MRI technology was successfully developed to accurately discriminate the development of E. sinensis hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in a nondestructive manner, indicating its application potential in grading commercial live crabs or advising crab farmers on breeding and fattening processes. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. New Methods of Low-Field MRI for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    at the MGH/A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Cara - van is an expert in targeted molecular imaging and his group has labeled the protein...Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States, 2Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science...Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA 2Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of

  7. Improving Magnet Designs With High and Low Field Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A general scheme for increasing the difference in magnetic flux density between a high and a low magnetic field region by removing unnecessary magnet material is presented. This is important in, e.g., magnetic refrigeration where magnet arrays have to deliver high field regions in close proximity...... to low field regions. Also, a general way to replace magnet material with a high permeability soft magnetic material where appropriate is discussed. As an example, these schemes are applied to a two dimensional concentric Halbach cylinder design resulting in a reduction of the amount of magnet material...

  8. Low-field susceptibilities of rare earth spin glass alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkissian, B.V.B.

    1977-01-01

    Static susceptibility in various applied fields and AC susceptibility data on Sc 13% Gd and Sc 4.5% Tb spin glass alloys are reported. The data show that the sharp peak at the freezing temperature, Tsub(g), normally observed in the low-field susceptibility of spin glasses containing 3d magnetic impurities is observed here in the case of Gd, which is an S state solute, but not for Tb. On the contrary, for the Sc-Tb alloy a rather rounded maximum is observed which becomes slightly sharper with increasing applied magnetic fields. (author)

  9. MR-guided breast biopsy and hook wire marking using a low-field (0.23 T) scanner with optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Reinikainen, Heli; Blanco Sequeiros, Andreas M.; Ojala, Risto; Paeaekkoe, Eija; Tervonen, Osmo; Vaara, Teuvo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of MR-guided percutaneous breast biopsy (LCNB) and breast hook wire marking in a low-field (0.23 T) MRI system with optical instrument tracking. MR-guided core biopsy and/or hook wire marking was performed on 13 lesions observable at MR imaging only. Seven breast LCNBs and 10 hook wire markings were performed under MR guidance on 11 patients. The diagnosis was confirmed by excision biopsy or mastectomy in 12 lesions and with histopathological and cytological diagnosis and 12-month clinical follow-up in one lesion. All lesions seen in the high-field scanner were also successfully identified and targeted in the low-field scanner. The following procedures were typically technically successful. There were difficulties due to unsatisfactory functioning of some core biopsy guns. Detailed description of low-field MR guidance and optical tracking in breast biopsies is provided. The procedure seems accurate and safe and provides means to obtain a histological diagnosis of a breast lesion only seen with MRI. The low-field biopsy system is comparable to the high-field MRI system. MR-compatible biopsy guns need to be improved. (orig.)

  10. Relaxation rates of low-field gas-phase ^129Xe storage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limes, Mark; Saam, Brian

    2010-10-01

    A study of longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates T1 of ^129Xe and Xe-N2 mixtures in a magnetic field of 3.8 mT is presented. In this regime, intrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the intramolecular spin-rotation interaction due to persistent xenon dimers, a mechanism that can be quelled by introducing large amounts of N2 into the storage cell. Extrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the wall-relaxation rate, which is the primary quantity of interest for the various low-field storage cells and coatings that we have tested. Previous group work has shown that extremely long gas-phase relaxation times T1 can be obtained, but only at large magnetic fields and low xenon densities. The current work is motivated by the practical benefits of retaining hyperpolarized ^129Xe for extended periods of time in a small magnetic field.

  11. Low-field magnetotransport in graphene cavity devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. Q.; Kang, N.; Li, J. Y.; Lin, Li; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H. Q.

    2018-05-01

    Confinement and edge structures are known to play significant roles in the electronic and transport properties of two-dimensional materials. Here, we report on low-temperature magnetotransport measurements of lithographically patterned graphene cavity nanodevices. It is found that the evolution of the low-field magnetoconductance characteristics with varying carrier density exhibits different behaviors in graphene cavity and bulk graphene devices. In the graphene cavity devices, we observed that intravalley scattering becomes dominant as the Fermi level gets close to the Dirac point. We associate this enhanced intravalley scattering to the effect of charge inhomogeneities and edge disorder in the confined graphene nanostructures. We also observed that the dephasing rate of carriers in the cavity devices follows a parabolic temperature dependence, indicating that the direct Coulomb interaction scattering mechanism governs the dephasing at low temperatures. Our results demonstrate the importance of confinement in carrier transport in graphene nanostructure devices.

  12. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Michael W; Giorni, Andrea; Vegh, Viktor; Pellicer-Guridi, Ruben; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  13. Evaluation of the SLAP lesion using a low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of the low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance (MR) system in the detection of the superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. One hundred fifty patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder over a 7-month period. Forty-six patients underwent arthroscopic surgery, and the surgical results were correlated with the findings of the MR imaging. Arthroscopic procedures were performed within a mean of 8 days after MR imaging. MR imaging of the shoulder was conducted as follows: shoulder coil; T1-weighted spin echo, coronal-oblique images; T2-weighted gradient echo, coronal-oblique and axial images; and T2-weighted spin echo, coronal oblique and sagittal-oblique images. Prospectively, one radiologist interpreted the MR images. The results of surgery were as follow: SLAP II in 26 shoulders, SLAP III in 1 shoulder, SLAP IV in 1 shoulder, normal labrum in 6 shoulder. For SLAP lesions with a higher grade than type 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the low-field MRI were 85.7%, 55.5%. 75%, 71%, and 74%, respectively. There was relatively good agreement for the comparison of the MR results obtained using a low-field MR system with the surgical findings for identifying SLAP lesions

  14. In situ viscosity of oil sands using low field NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, J.; Moon, D.; Kantzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    In heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs, oil viscosity is a vital piece of information that will have great bearing on the chosen EOR scheme and the recovery expected. Prediction of in situ viscosity with a logging tool would he very beneficial in reservoir characterization and exploitation design. Low field NMR is a technology that has shown great potential as a tool for characterizing hydrocarbon properties in heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs. An oil viscosity correlation has previously been developed that is capable of providing order of magnitude viscosity estimates for a wide range of oils taken from various fields in Alberta. This paper presents tuning procedures to improve the NMR predictions for different viscosity ranges, and extends the NMR viscosity model to in situ heavy oil in unconsolidated sands. The results of this work show that the NMR oil peak can be de-convoluted from the in situ signals of the oil and water, and the bulk viscosity correlation that was developed for bulk oils can he applied to predict the in situ oil viscosity. These results can be translated to an NMR logging tool algorithm, allowing for in situ measurements of oil viscosity at the proper reservoir conditions. (author)

  15. Evaluation of PHB nanocomposite by low field NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mariana Bruno Rocha e; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) based on nanocomposites containing different amounts of a commercial organically modified clay (viscogel B8) were prepared employing solution intercalation method. The relationship among the processing conditions; molecular structure and intermolecular interaction, between both nanocomposite components, were investigated using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as a part of characterization methodology, which has been used by Tavares et al. It involves the proton spin-lattice relaxation time, T1 H, by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, employing low field NMR. X-ray diffraction was also employed because it is a conventional technique, generally used to obtain the first information on nanocomposite formation. Changes in PHB crystallinity were observed after the organophilic nanoclay had been incorporated in the polymer matrix. These changes, in the microstructure, were detected by the variation of proton nuclear relaxation time values and by X-ray, which showed an increase in the clay interlamellar space due to the intercalation of the polymer in the clay between lamellae. (author)

  16. Analysis of knee movement with low-field MR equipment. A normal volunteer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo; Aoki, Ikuo; Yamada, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to make a normal standard by analyzing knee movement in detail. An open low-field unit was used for 23 healthy knee joints. With three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) gradient echo sequence, 50 sagittal slices of 4.5 mm in thickness were obtained at four flexion angles: 0, 30, 60, and 90 degrees (lateral position). Although the tension ratio of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL, PCL) increased during knee flexion, the change in the tension ratio was significantly different between the ACL and PCL. The femur-ACL angle and femur-PCL angle were parallel with the knee flexion angle, but the tibia-ACL angle and tibia-PCL angle changed complexly. The lateral and medial condyles rolled and slid during knee flexion, and the medial side moved more than the lateral side, consistent with rotation of the lower thigh. The difference in backward movement distance on the tibia between the two condyles was significantly larger in females than in males. This might explain the dominance of knee osteoarthritis in women. Although the lateral position is not completely physiological, we could show initial cinematic data of up to 90 degrees of knee flexion using open-type MRI, which is impossible with high- and middle-field machines. (author)

  17. MR arthrography in chondromalacia patellae diagnosis on a low-field open magnet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Mustafa; Ipeksoy, Umit; Dogan, Ali; Arslan, Halil; Etlik, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy conventional MRI and MR arthrography (MRA) in the diagnosis of chondromalacia patella (CP) on a low-field open magnet system (LFOMS), correlated with arthroscopy. Forty-two patients (50 knees) with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with LFOMS, including T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. All were also examined T1-weighted MRI after intraarticular injection of dilue gadopentetate dimeglumine. Two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation, evaluated each imaging technique independently. Thirty-six of the 50 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of CP were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 16 facets were normal. Four (30%) of 13 grade 1 lesions were detected with T1. Four lesions (30%) with T2 and three lesions (23%) with proton-weighted images were detected. Seven (53%) of 13 grade 1 lesions were detected with MRA. Grade 2 abnormalities were diagnosed in two (33%) of six facets with proton density-weighted pulse sequences, two (33%) of six facets with T1-weighted pulse sequences, in three (50%) of six facets with T2-weighted pulse sequences, in five (83%) of six facets with MRA sequences. Grade 3 abnormalities were diagnosed in three (71%) of seven facets with proton density- and T1-weighted images, five (71%) of seven facets with T2-weighted pulse sequences, six (85%) of seven facets with MRA sequences. Grade 4 CP was detected with equal sensitivity with T1-, proton density- and T2-weighted pulse sequences, all showing seven (87%) of the eight lesions. MRA again showed these findings in all eight patients. All imaging techniques were insensitive to grade 1 lesions and highly sensitive to grade 4 lesion, so that no

  18. Local anesthetic sympathectomy restores fMRI cortical maps in CRPS I after upper extremity stellate blockade: a prospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stude, Philipp; Enax-Krumova, Elena K; Lenz, Melanie; Lissek, Silke; Nicolas, Volkmar; Peters, Soeren; Westermann, Amy; Tegenthoff, Martin; Maier, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I) show a cortical reorganization with contralateral shrinkage of cortical maps in S1. The relevance of pain and disuse for the development and the maintenance of this shrinkage is unclear. Aim of the study was to assess whether short-term pain relief induces changes in the cortical representation of the affected hand in patients with CRPS type I. Case series analysis of prospectively collected data. We enrolled a case series of 5 consecutive patients with CRPS type I (disease duration 3 - 36 months) of the non-dominant upper-limb and previously diagnosed sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) by reduction of the pain intensity of more than > 30% after prior diagnostic sympathetic block. We performed fMRI for analysis of the cortical representation of the affected hand immediately before as well as one hour after isolated sympathetic block of the stellate ganglion on the affected side. Wilcoxon-Test, paired t-test, P CRPS, and that these are rapidly reversible.

  19. Low field-low cost: Can low-field magnetic resonance systems replace high-field magnetic resonance systems in the diagnostic assessment of multiple sclerosis patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reith, W.; Sartor, K.

    2001-01-01

    As low-field MR imaging is becoming a widely used imaging technique, we aimed at a prospective assessment of differences in imaging quality between low- and high-field MR imaging in multiple sclerosis patients possibly interfering with diagnostic or therapeutic decision making. Twenty patients with clinically proven multiple sclerosis were examined with optimized imaging protocols in a 1.5- and a 0.23-T MR scanner within 48 h. Images were assessed independently by two neuroradiologists. No statistically significant interrater discrepancies were observed. A significantly lower number of white matter lesions could be identified in low-field MR imaging both on T1- and on T2-weighted images (T2: high field 700, low field 481; T1: high field 253, low field 177). A total of 114 enhancing lesions were discerned in the high-field MR imaging as opposed to 45 enhancing lesions in low-field MR imaging. Blood-brain barrier disruption was identified in 11 of 20 patients in the high-field MR imaging, but only in 4 of 20 patients in low-field MR imaging. Since a significantly lower lesion load is identified in low-field MR imaging than in high-field MR imaging, and blood-brain barrier disruption is frequently missed, caution must be exercised in interpreting a normal low-field MR imaging scan in a patient with clinical signs of multiple sclerosis and in interpreting a scan without enhancing lesions in a patient with known multiple sclerosis and clinical signs of exacerbation. (orig.)

  20. Diagnosis of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. A comparison between low-field magnetic resonance imaging, 3-phase bone scintigraphy and conventional X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, S.; Dresel, S.; Weiss, M.; Hahn, K.; Treitl, M.; Krolak, C.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Schattenkirchner, M.

    2002-01-01

    Besides conventional X-rays, in the diagnostic work up of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 3-phase bone scintigraphy (3P-Sz) is as well established as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the newly developed low field MRI with the proven methods X-rays and 3P-Sz. Methods: 65 patients (47f, 18m; 20-86 yrs) were studied on a one day protocol with 3P-Sz (550 MBq Tc-99m DPD), MRI and X-rays of the hands. Images were visually analysed by two blinded nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists and classified as a) RA-typical, b) inflammatory, non-RA-typical and c) non inflammatory changes. All methods were compared to 3P-Sz as golden standard. Results: In comparison to 3P-Sz, low field MRI presents with almost equal sensitivity and specificity in rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes. Conventional X-rays revealed in arthritis-typical changes as well as in inflammatory changes a significantly lower sensitivity and also a lower negative predictive value while specificity equals the one of MRI. Quantitative analysis of 3P-Sz using ROI-technique unveiled significantly higher values in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with no inflammatory changes. Conclusion: MRI represents an equally sensitive method in the initial diagnosis of rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes in the region of the hands as compared to the 3P-Sz. Besides the basic diagnosis with conventional X-rays, 3P-Sz is still the recommended method of choice to evaluate the whole body when RA is suspected. Additionally, quantitative analysis of the 3P-Sz using the ROI technique in the region of the hands reveals statistically significant results and should therefore be taken into account in the assessment of inflammatory changes. (orig.) [de

  1. The Holocene Geomagnetic Field: Spikes, Low Field Anomalies, and Asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of the Holocene magnetic field is constrained by individual paleomagnetic records of variable quality and resolution, composite regional secular variation curves, and low resolution global time-varying geomagnetic field models. Although spatial and temporal data coverages have greatly improved in recent years, typical views of millennial-scale secular variation and the underlying physical processes continue to be heavily influenced by more detailed field structure and short term variability inferred from the historical record and modern observations. Recent models of gyre driven decay of the geomagnetic dipole on centennial time scales, and studies of the evolution of the South Atlantic Anomaly provide one prominent example. Since 1840 dipole decay has largely been driven by meridional flux advection, with generally smaller fairly steady contributions from magnetic diffusion. The decay is dominantly associated with geomagnetic activity in the Southern Hemisphere. In contrast to the present decay, dipole strength generally grew between 1500 and 1000 BC, sustaining high but fluctuating values around 90-100 ZAm2 until after 1500 AD. Thus high dipole moments appear to have been present shortly after 1000 AD at the time of the Levantine spikes, which represent extreme variations in regional geomagnetic field strength. It has been speculated that the growth in dipole moment originated from a strong flux patch near the equatorial region at the core-mantle boundary that migrated north and west to augment the dipole strength, suggesting the presence of a large-scale anticyclonic gyre in the northern hemisphere, not totally unlike the southern hemisphere flow that dominates present day dipole decay. The later brief episodes of high field strength in the Levant may have contributed to prolonged values of high dipole strength until the onset of dipole decay in the late second millennium AD. This could support the concept of a large-scale stable flow

  2. MRI findings in cranial eumycetoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Munawwar; Sureka, Jyoti; Chacko, Geeta; Eapen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cranial eumycetoma (CE) due to direct inoculation of Madurella grisea into the scalp is extremely rare. We describe a case of CE caused by direct inoculation of M. grisea with the characteristic MRI findings of the “dot-in-circle” sign and a conglomeration of multiple, extremely hypointense “dots.”

  3. Rare case of acute dengue encephalitis with correlated MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Hegde, Pavan; Devdas, Jaidev M.; Khan, Habeeb Ullah; Bukelo, Mario Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Dengue encephalitis is extremely rare, with most patients showing no significant abnormality on neuroimaging (CT/MRI). We report one of the very few documented cases of dengue encephalitis, with abnormal signal intensities on all major sequences on brain MRI.

  4. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  5. Low-field magnetic resonance imaging or combined ultrasonography and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody improve correct classification of individuals as established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens K; Lorenzen, Tove; Ejbjerg, Bo

    2014-01-01

    (RA). METHODS: In 53 individuals from a population-based, cross-sectional study, historic fulfilment of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1987 criteria ("classification") or RA diagnosed by a rheumatologist ("diagnosis") were used as standard references. The sensitivity, specificity and Area....../specificity) was 78% (62%/94%) (classification) and 85% (69%/100%) (diagnosis), while for the total synovitis score of MCP joints plus wrist (cut-off ≥10) it was 78% (62%/94%) (both classification and diagnosis). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the ACR 1987 criteria, low-field MRI alone or adapted criteria incorporating...

  6. MRI in gout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, G.; Ullrich, R.; Trattnig, S.; Dominkus, M.; Morscher, M.; Aringer, M.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    The appearance of gouty tophus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is characteristic. On T1- and T2-weighted SE images, the signal intensity of tophaceous lesions is similar to that of muscles. According to the histology, T2-weighted SE images demonstrate extremely hyperintense signals, which reflect the high protein content in the amorpheous center of the tophus. The microscopic urate crystals deposited there have no MRI signal and are of no further diagnostic impact. Vascularized granulation tissue surrounding the tophus center enhance after intervenous application of contrast agents (Gadolinium). The inflammed tophus is associated with local edema, causing high signal intensity. MRI is superior to plain radiography for early detection of intraosseous tophi. Involvement of anatomical structures such as ligaments and tendons can be evaluated sufficiently. For peripheral joints, axial slice orientation is most helpful. (orig.) [de

  7. Mandelbrot's Extremism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beirlant, J.; Schoutens, W.; Segers, J.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the sixties Mandelbrot already showed that extreme price swings are more likely than some of us think or incorporate in our models.A modern toolbox for analyzing such rare events can be found in the field of extreme value theory.At the core of extreme value theory lies the modelling of maxima

  8. Low field Monte-Carlo calculations in heterojunctions and quantum wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, van P.J.; Rooij, de R.; Wolter, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    We present results of low-field Monte-Carlo calculations and compare them with experimental results. The negative absolute mobility of minority electrons in p-type quantum wells, as found in recent experiments, is described quite well.

  9. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered. (orig.)

  10. Field quality issues in iron-dominated dipoles at low fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.C.

    1996-10-01

    In order to help assess the usable dynamic range of iron-dominated dipoles, field shape data at low field on several Fermi-lab accelerator dipole designs are presented. Emphasis is placed on the systematic and random values of the low field sextupole since it is the first ''allowed'' field error. The Main Injector dipoles provide four times smaller sextupole and more than 20 times less sextupole hysteresis than earlier designs for the Main Ring

  11. 2-D Reflectometer Modeling for Optimizing the ITER Low-field Side Reflectometer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.J.; Budny, R.V.; Kessel, C.; Johnson, D.

    2005-01-01

    The response of a low-field side reflectometer system for ITER is simulated with a 2?D reflectometer code using a realistic plasma equilibrium. It is found that the reflected beam will often miss its launch point by as much as 40 cm and that a vertical array of receiving antennas is essential in order to observe a reflection on the low-field side of ITER

  12. Observation of large low-field magnetoresistance in spinel cobaltite: A new half-metal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2015-12-10

    Low-field magnetoresistance is an effective and energy-saving way to use half-metallic materials in magnetic reading heads and magnetic random access memory. Common spin-polarized materials with low field magnetoresistance effect are perovskite-type manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum oxides. In this study, we report a new type of spinel cobaltite materials, self-assembled nanocrystalline NiCo2O4, which shows large low field magnetoresistance as large as –19.1% at 0.5 T and –50% at 9 T (2 K). The large low field magnetoresistance is attributed to the fast magnetization rotation of the core nanocrystals. The surface spin-glass is responsible for the observed weak saturation of magnetoresistance under high fields. Our calculation demonstrates that the half-metallicity of NiCo2O4 comes from the hopping eg electrons within the tetrahedral Co-atoms and the octahedral Ni-atoms. The discovery of large low-field magnetoresistance in simple spinel oxide NiCo2O4, a non-perovskite oxide, leads to an extended family of low-field magnetoresistance materials. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Observation of large low-field magnetoresistance in spinel cobaltite: A new half-metal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng; Xia, Chuan; Zheng, Dongxing; Wang, Ping; Jin, Chao; Bai, Haili

    2015-01-01

    Low-field magnetoresistance is an effective and energy-saving way to use half-metallic materials in magnetic reading heads and magnetic random access memory. Common spin-polarized materials with low field magnetoresistance effect are perovskite-type manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum oxides. In this study, we report a new type of spinel cobaltite materials, self-assembled nanocrystalline NiCo2O4, which shows large low field magnetoresistance as large as –19.1% at 0.5 T and –50% at 9 T (2 K). The large low field magnetoresistance is attributed to the fast magnetization rotation of the core nanocrystals. The surface spin-glass is responsible for the observed weak saturation of magnetoresistance under high fields. Our calculation demonstrates that the half-metallicity of NiCo2O4 comes from the hopping eg electrons within the tetrahedral Co-atoms and the octahedral Ni-atoms. The discovery of large low-field magnetoresistance in simple spinel oxide NiCo2O4, a non-perovskite oxide, leads to an extended family of low-field magnetoresistance materials. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Postoperative computed tomography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis treated by dorsal laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Martin; Ley, Charles J; Hansson, Kerstin; Sjöström, Lennart

    2017-03-20

    To describe postoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) treated by dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy. Prospective clinical case study of dogs diagnosed with and treated for DLSS. Surgical and clinical findings were described. Computed tomography and low field MRI findings pre- and postoperatively were described and graded. Clinical, CT and MRI examinations were performed four to 18 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 dogs were clinically improved and two dogs had unchanged clinical status postoperatively despite imaging signs of neural compression. Vacuum phenomenon, spondylosis, sclerosis of the seventh lumbar (L7) and first sacral (S1) vertebrae endplates and lumbosacral intervertebral joint osteoarthritis became more frequent in postoperative CT images. Postoperative MRI showed mild disc extrusions in five cases, and in all cases contrast enhancing non-discal tissue was present. All cases showed contrast enhancement of the L7 spinal nerves both pre- and postoperatively and seven had contrast enhancement of the lumbosacral intervertebral joints and paraspinal tissue postoperatively. Articular process fractures or fissures were noted in four dogs. The study indicates that imaging signs of neural compression are common after DLSS surgery, even in dogs that have clinical improvement. Contrast enhancement of spinal nerves and soft tissues around the region of disc herniation is common both pre- and postoperatively and thus are unreliable criteria for identifying complications of the DLSS surgery.

  15. The low-field MRI and CT of chronic subdural hematomas; An analysis of 52 cases with 78 hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawanishi, Masahiro; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoji; Hirota, Naoki; Takase, Takashi (Suisei-kai Kajikawa Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at a field strength of 0.2 T in 52 patients with 78 surgery-proven chronic subdural hematomas. Signal intensities of the lesions, which were obtained on T1- (n=74), T2- (n=73), and proton density-weighted (n=64) spin-echo sequences, were compared with concurrently available CT densities. Of 74 hematomas, 60, 10, and 4 had hyperintensities, isointensities, and hypointensities, respectively, on T1-weighted images. Of 22 hematomas having high density on CT, 17 were hyperintense and 5 were isointense on T1-weighted images. Similarly, 25 isodensity hematomas on CT consisted of 23 hyperintensities and two isointensities; and 27 low density hematomas consisted of 20 hyperintensities, 3 isointensities, and 4 hypointensities. Both T2- and proton density-weighted images revealed hyperintensity in all hematomas. Two spin-echo images, T{sub 1} and proton density, were useful in differentiating chronic subdural hematoma from edema. (N.K.).

  16. Comparative evaluation of the ventricles in the Yorkshire Terrier and the German Shepherd dog using low-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Ratsch, B; Kneissl, S; Gabler, C

    2001-01-01

    MR images provide for the exact assessment of the brain, including ventricular size. Still inter- and intrabreed comparison of ventricle size is difficult due to the varying anatomies in dogs. To compare the ventricle area of different sized breeds, 25 dogs (13 Yorkshire Terriers and 12 German Shepard dogs) were reviewed, retrospectively. Hemisphere and ventricle of each side were outlined manually three times. All measurements were averaged and their percentage (ventricle area by hemisphere area) was defined as the relative ventricle area. This value in Yorkshire Terriers (5.3) was significantly higher compared to German Shepard dogs (1.7). However, on the basis of the neurologically symptomatic sample (7 Yorkshire Terriers) in this study, threshold values of normal and abnormal relative ventricle areas could not be detected.

  17. Low Cost, High-Throughput 3D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low Field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    ht s, a. u. ) time (s) -30...routine use, to a contractor of the Agency having need for the information in order to perform a contract. Recipients of information shall be required...LIN EA R: A N G UL A R: Q .A M FG A PP V ’D C HK ’D D RA W N W EI G HT : 1 33 79 .6 4 KG B SI G W A 0 .0 47 5T M A G N ET A N D G RA

  18. Low-Cost, High-Throughput 3D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    ht s, a. u. ) time (s) -30-20-100102030 15N shift (ppm; arb. ref.) O O O n NH N O Ir+ [PF6]- N N H H TiO2 OH N N H...system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to a contractor of the Agency having need for the information in order to perform a contract...A R: Q .A M FG A PP V ’D C HK ’D D RA W N W EI G HT : 1 33 79 .6 4 KG B SI G W A 0 .0 47 5T M A G N ET A N D G RA D IE N T C O IL

  19. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks which are magnetically nonlinear even in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrouda, František; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, Josef

    2018-06-01

    Theory of the low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) assumes a linear relationship between magnetization and magnetizing field, resulting in field-independent susceptibility. This is valid for diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals by definition and also for pure magnetite, while in titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite and hematite the susceptibility may be clearly field-dependent even in low fields used in common AMS meter. Consequently, the use of the linear AMS theory is fully legitimate in the former minerals, but in principle incorrect in the latter ones. Automated measurement of susceptibility in 320 directions in variable low-fields ranging from 5 to 700 A m-1 was applied to more than 100 specimens of various pyrrhotite-bearing and titanomagnetite-bearing rocks. Data analysis showed that the anisotropic susceptibility remains well represented by an ellipsoid in the entire low-field span even though the ellipsoid increases its volume and eccentricity. The principal directions do not change their orientations with low-field in most specimens. Expressions for susceptibility as a function of field were found in the form of diagonal tensor whose elements are polynomials of low order. In a large proportion of samples, the susceptibility expressions can be further simplified to have one common skeleton polynomial.

  20. Low-field mobility and carrier transport mechanism transition in nanoscale MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongwei; Wang Runsheng; Huang Ru; Zhang Xing

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends the flux scattering method to study the carrier transport property in nanoscale MOSFETs with special emphasis on the low-field mobility and the transport mechanism transition. A unified analytical expression for the low-field mobility is proposed, which covers the entire regime from drift-diffusion transport to quasi-ballistic transport in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D MOSFETs. Two key parameters, namely the long-channel low-field mobility (μ 0 ) and the low-field mean free path (λ 0 ), are obtained from the experimental data, and the transport mechanism transition in MOSFETs is further discussed both experimentally and theoretically. Our work shows that λ 0 is available to characterize the inherent transition of the carrier transport mechanism rather than the low-field mobility. The mobility reduces in the MOSFET with the shrinking of the channel length; however, λ 0 is nearly a constant, and λ 0 can be used as the 'entry criterion' to determine whether the device begins to operate under quasi-ballistic transport to some extent. (semiconductor devices)

  1. Extreme cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The universe is all about extremes. Space has a temperature 270°C below freezing. Stars die in catastrophic supernova explosions a billion times brighter than the Sun. A black hole can generate 10 million trillion volts of electricity. And hypergiants are stars 2 billion kilometres across, larger than the orbit of Jupiter. Extreme Cosmos provides a stunning new view of the way the Universe works, seen through the lens of extremes: the fastest, hottest, heaviest, brightest, oldest, densest and even the loudest. This is an astronomy book that not only offers amazing facts and figures but also re

  2. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  3. Low-field susceptibilities of rare-earth spin glass alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkissian, B.V.B.

    1978-01-01

    The low-field AC susceptibilities of the dilute rare-earth spin glass alloys Sc-Gd, Sc-Tb, Pr-Tb and Pr-Gd are reported and compared with low-field DC susceptibilities of the same samples. The similarities between their behaviour and that of Au-Fe spin glass alloys is also considered. When single-ion anisotropy is important, this can cause a dramatic broadening of the sharp peak. Broadening in the AC peak has also observed as the frequency of the deriving field is increased. These data can be qualitatively discussed in terms of a recent magnetic-cluster model for spin glasses. (author)

  4. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  5. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  6. Low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder joint: technique, indications, and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.-F.; Thelen, M.; Loew, R.; Runkel, M.; Zoellner, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the age of cost containment and urgent reductions in health care expenditures, new options have to be explored to satisfy both diagnostic requirements and economic limitations. The introduction of low-field MR systems for assessment of joint disorders seemed to be an option for lower costs. The purpose of this article is to summarize available experiences with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with respect to image quality and diagnostic accuracy in detecting labral and rotator cuff lesions. Up to now, there has been only a limited number of studies available dealing with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint. They reveal that, despite a minor image quality in comparison with high-field imaging, low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder allows for sufficient evaluation of intra- and extra-articular structures in the detection of major abnormalities such as glenohumeral instability or rotator cuff disease. Furthermore, open-configured MR scanners enable kinematic studies: Besides the analysis of normal motion, pathological findings in patients with instabilities and impingement syndrome can be delineated. They further offer the possibility for performing MR imaging-guided arthrography of the shoulder. This was first described using an open C-arm scanner with a vertically oriented magnetic field so that MR arthrography may be performed in one setting. (orig.)

  7. Usefulness of low-field FlAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowska, D.; Sasiadek, M.; Zimny, A.

    2004-01-01

    Plain MR study is often insufficient for visualization of all important details of intracranial tumors, hence there are attempts to use supplementary MR techniques. One of them is FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) sequence which previously was available only in high-field MR units, but recently has been introduced also in less expensive low-field units. FLAIR is already widely used in the diagnostics of ischemic and demyelinating lesions, while there are few papers concerning its application in intracranial tumors, none of them regarding low-field MR units.The aim of our study was detailed evaluation of low-field FLAIR in the diagnostics of intracranial tumors. The material consisted of 76 patients with intracranial tumors, who were examined with low-field open MR unit (0.23 Tesla). In all patients, standard T2-weighted and T1-weighted (before and after contrast enhancement) sequences, as well as FLAIR sequence, were performed. The following symptoms were compared in the aforementioned sequences: tumor-edema, edema-brain and tumor-brain borders, visualization of tumour structure, vessels in the tumor area and precise tumor localization. A superiority of FLAIR in assessment of all symptoms has been confirmed, at least in part of the patient group. It concerned particularly the evaluation of brain-edema and edema-brain borders which were better visible with FLAIR than with all other sequences in 29 and 30 patients, respectively. In the assessment of the remaining symptoms (tumor-brain border, tumor structure, visualization of vessels, tumor localization) FLAIR was superior to other sequences in smaller number of patients (13,11,11 and 12, respectively). Totally, in 48 out of 76 patients (63.2%) FLAIR allowed better assessment of at least one of the analyzed symptoms. Low-field MR FLAIR enriches diagnostic information in majority of patients with intracranial tumors, therefore it should be included routinely in the diagnostic algorithm in this group of

  8. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9 the g...

  9. Extracranial vascular malformation: value of antenatal and postnatal MRI in management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, C.J.; Pilling, D.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Liverpool Children' s Hospital NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Walkinshaw, S.A. [Dept. of Fetal Medicine, Liverpool Women' s Hospital (United Kingdom); May, P.L. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Royal Liverpool Children' s Hospital NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2001-10-01

    We report a case where fetal MRI using a low-field-strength magnet (0.5 T) accurately confirmed a large extracranial vascular malformation, which was suspected on antenatal US. Fetal MRI enabled better counselling of the parents and allowed suitable plans to be made regarding method of delivery and early management of the neonate. To our knowledge this is the first case of an extracranial vascular malformation imaged using fetal MRI. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  11. Guar gum/borax hydrogel: Rheological, low field NMR and release characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grassi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum (GG and Guar gum/borax (GGb hydrogels are studied by means of rheology, Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF NMR and model drug release tests. These three approaches are used to estimate the mesh size (ζ of the polymeric network. A comparison with similar Scleroglucan systems is carried out. In the case of GGb, the rheological and Low Field NMR estimations of ζ lead to comparable results, while the drug release approach seems to underestimate ζ. Such discrepancy is attributed to the viscous effect of some polymeric chains that, although bound to the network to one end, can freely fluctuate among meshes. The viscous drag exerted by these chains slows down drug diffusion through the polymeric network. A proof for this hypothesis is given by the case of Scleroglucan gel, where the viscous contribution is not so significant and a good agreement between the rheological and release test approaches was found.

  12. Low-field multi-step magnetization of GaV4S8 single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H; Kajinami, Y; Tabata, Y [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ikeno, R; Motoyama, G; Kohara, T, E-mail: h.nakamura@ht8.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    The magnetization process of single crystalline GaV4S8 including tetrahedral magnetic clusters was measured in the magnetically ordered state below T{sub C} {approx_equal} 13 K. Just below TC, steps were observed at very low fields of the order of 100 Oe, suggesting the competition of several intra- and inter-cluster interactions in a low energy range.

  13. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  14. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  15. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  16. Non-radiological contrast agents (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemain, B.; Lautrou, J.; Meyer, D.; Doucet, D.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past few years, extensive research has been carried out in an attempt to develop contrast agents that could help improve both the performance (acquisition times) and the diagnostic efficacy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques. On the basis of physicochemical and pharmacological criteria discussed in this presentation, a few efficacious, well-tolerated compounds could be developed. Two of them, the gadolinium complexes Gd-DOTA and Gd-DTPA, are currently being tried in man. This first generation of contrast agents, which are aspecific markers of the intravascular space, has been shown to have good diagnostic potential in conventional MRI procedures. The diagnostic contribution of these contrast agents will probably be a most essential factor in new MRI techniques using low field strengh or fast imaging sequences [fr

  17. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author)

  18. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author).

  19. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry

    2013-03-05

    Method comprising obtaining an NMR measurement from a sample wherein an ultra-low field NMR system probes the sample and produces the NMR measurement and wherein a sampling temperature, prepolarizing field, and measurement field are known; detecting the NMR measurement by means of inductive coils; analyzing the NMR measurement to obtain at least one measurement feature wherein the measurement feature comprises T1, T2, T1.rho., or the frequency dependence thereof; and, searching for the at least one measurement feature within a database comprising NMR reference data for at least one material to determine if the sample comprises a material of interest.

  20. Low field NMR study of the latex derived from Brosimum parinarioides - Moraceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguez, Eduardo; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2009-01-01

    Brosimum parinarioides is a tree found in the Amazonia forest and its latex (Leite de Amapa) is often used like food and by the popular medicine in the treatment of tuberculosis and asthma. Being swallowed in nature, its necessary determinate the stability degree of this latex in the storage conditions in which is used in Amazonia. The analyses of T 2 data showed that the limit of stability is not longer than six month in the storage conditions used by the population of Amazonia. The Low field NMR proved to be an efficient method for this kind of study. (author)

  1. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  2. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  3. Large low-field magnetoresistance of Fe3O4 nanocrystal at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, Shu; Liu, Rui; Li, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yong; Chen, Ziyu

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles with an average size of 6.5 nm and good monodispersion were synthesized and investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Corresponding low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) was tested by physical property measurement system. A quite high LFMR has been observed at room temperature. For examples, at a field of 3000 Oe, the LFMR is −3.5%, and when the field increases to 6000 Oe, the LFMR is up to −5.1%. The electron spin polarization was estimated at 25%. This result is superior to the previous reports showing the LFMR of no more than 2% at room temperature. The conduction mechanism is proposed to be the tunneling of conduction electrons between adjacent grains considering that the monodisperse nanocrystals may supply more grain boundaries increasing the tunneling probability, and consequently enhancing the overall magnetoresistance. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with small size were synthesized. • A quite high LFMR has been observed at room temperature. • The more grain boundaries increase the tunneling probability and enlarge the MR. • The fast response of the sample increase the MR at a low field.

  4. Evaluation of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) with low field MR fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoko; Ishigaki, Takeo; Okada, Tamotsu.

    1995-01-01

    Eight cases of clinically diagnosed sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and two normal volunteers were studied with low field MR fluoroscopy in order to monitor the waking and sleeping status of the upper airway. MR fluoroscopy revealed that only the sleeping patients showed occlusions of the upper airway. This technique provided us with useful information about the level, frequency and duration of occlusion in each case. Four of the eight patients demonstrated simple retropalatal occlusion, whereas the other four demonstrated mixed retropalatal and retropalato-retroglossal occlusion. Thus long-time monitoring, which is only possible with MR fluoroscopy, is needed to appreciate the complex nature of the disease. In addition, the comfortable surroundings and low noise level provided by the low field enabled physiological study to be performed without any tranquilizers in most of the patients, which is again only possible with MR fluoroscopy. MR fluoroscopy may become a tool of great clinical value, providing much important information for disease evaluation and treatment selection. (author)

  5. Assessing the wettability of unconsolidated porous media using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, Florence Pabalan

    2002-01-01

    Methods such as the molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) test and water drop penetration test (WDPT) are commonly used to measure soil wettability because these tests are quick and easy to perform. However, they are not without limitations. This thesis proposes using a low-field NMR relaxometer as an alternative method of assessing soil wettability. This instrument is able to discriminate surface bound fluid from bulk fluid Fluid bound to the surface relaxes quickly and produces signal amplitude peaks at low transverse relaxation time (T 2 ) values. Bulk fluid , on the other hand, relaxes much more slowly and signal amplitude peaks consequently appear at higher T 2 values. An extensive experimental program was designed to test the above hypothesis. Hundreds of NMR measurements were performed on clays, humic acids, fulvic acids, clean sands, sands coated with organic matter, wettable soils and water-repellent soils exposed to distilled water and kerosene. The results confirm the hypothesis and show clearly that NMR does detect preferentially water-wet and water-repellent samples. The differences in the solid-fluid interactions between water and unconsolidated porous media with varying wetting preferences also allow for the use of low-field NMR to detect wettability alteration and to monitor fluid uptake in unconsolidated porous media. The advantages of using this tool include obtaining reproducible results quickly, using only small amounts of sample for analysis, and calculating the mass of water without performing a mass balance calculation. (author)

  6. Low-field NMR logging sensor for measuring hydraulic parameters of model soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucre, Oscar; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Minière, Adrien; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    SummaryKnowing the exact hydraulic parameters of soils is very important for improving water management in agriculture and for the refinement of climate models. Up to now, however, the investigation of such parameters has required applying two techniques simultaneously which is time-consuming and invasive. Thus, the objective of this current study is to present only one technique, i.e., a new non-invasive method to measure hydraulic parameters of model soils by using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hereby, two model clay or sandy soils were respectively filled in a 2 m-long acetate column having an integrated PVC tube. After the soils were completely saturated with water, a low-field NMR sensor was moved up and down in the PVC tube to quantitatively measure along the whole column the initial water content of each soil sample. Thereafter, both columns were allowed to drain. Meanwhile, the NMR sensor was set at a certain depth to measure the water content of that soil slice. Once the hydraulic equilibrium was reached in each of the two columns, a final moisture profile was taken along the whole column. Three curves were subsequently generated accordingly: (1) the initial moisture profile, (2) the evolution curve of the moisture depletion at that particular depth, and (3) the final moisture profile. All three curves were then inverse analyzed using a MATLAB code over numerical data produced with the van Genuchten-Mualem model. Hereby, a set of values ( α, n, θr and θs) was found for the hydraulic parameters for the soils under research. Additionally, the complete decaying NMR signal could be analyzed through Inverse Laplace Transformation and averaged on the 1/ T2 space. Through measurement of the decay in pure water, the effect on the relaxation caused by the sample could be estimated from the obtained spectra. The migration of the sample-related average with decreasing saturation speaks for a enhancement of the surface relaxation as the soil dries, in

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  9. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  13. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  14. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    vectorially to the encoding field. This is explicitly corrected for when calculating the encoding matrix. Other external fields and magnet field drift (~-1/ 2G ...simulated reconstruction with the same parameters as Fig. 3c. Fig. 3f and 3g show the experimental and simulated single coil image from the phantom...acquisition times (1), including a mobile MRI system developed for outdoor imaging of small tree branches (2), but these scanners lack a bore size suitable for

  15. Ultra-low field NMR for detection and characterization of 235 UF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated the first ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), both depleted and 70% enriched, which is used in the uranium enrichment process. A sensitive non-invasive detection system would have an important role in non-proliferation surveillance. A two-frequency technique was employed to remove the transients induced by rapidly switching off the 50 mT pre-polarization field. A mean transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} of 24 ms was estimated for the un-enriched UF{sub 6} sample measured at a mean temperature of 80 C. Nuclear magnetic resonance at ULF has several advantages including the ability to measure through metal, such as pipes, and simple magnetic field generation hardware. We present here recent data and discuss the potential for non-proliferation monitoring of enrichment and flow velocity.

  16. Low-Field Mobility and Galvanomagnetic Properties of Holes in Germanium with Phonon Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawætz, Peter

    1968-01-01

    acoustic scattering, no overall consistency is found between available galvanomagnetic data and deformation potentials derived directly from experiments on strained Ge. The discrepancies may be ascribed to ionized-impurity scattering, but at higher temperatures where optical phonon scattering is operative......A theoretical calculation of the low-field galvanomagnetic properties of holes in Ge has been carried out incorporating all relevant details of the band structure. The scattering is limited to acoustic and optical phonons and is described by the deformation potentials a, b, d, and d0. For pure......, the deviations are still appreciable. We are led to conclude that the deformation-potential theory of phonon scattering needs reconsideration, and a nontrivial correction is pointed out....

  17. Ultra low field MR imaging of cervical spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M.; Bjoernebrink, J.; Ekelund, L.; Toolanen, G. (Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and Orthopedic Surgery)

    1992-03-01

    In a study of 30 patients with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis the diagnostic usefulness of ultra low field MR equipment was analyzed in assessing lesions of the craniocervical junction. It was found that at 0.04 T all the examinations were diagnostic and that in combination with plain radiography the diagnostic information obtained was valuable in further planning of the treatment strategies. The neurologic findings were related to the degree and severity of atlantoaxial luxation, either horizontal or vertical, and to the periodontoid pannus formation. The correlation between the degree of cord compression shown with MR imaging and the clinical symptoms, especially long tract symptoms, was poor. The only correlating factor was the duration of the disease. (orig.).

  18. A study of the suitability of ferrite for use in low-field insertion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1995-02-01

    Most insertion devices built to date use rare-earth permanent-magnet materials, which have a high remanent field and are more expensive than many other permanent-magnet materials. Low-field insertion devices could use less-expensive, lower performance magnetic materials if they had suitable magnetic characteristics. These materials must be resistant to demagnetization during construction and operation of the insertion device, have uniform magnetization, possess low minor-axis magnetic moments, and have small minor field components on the surfaces. This paper describes an investigation to determine if ferrite possesses magnetic qualities suitable for insertion device applications. The type of ferrite investigated, MMPA Ceramic 8 from Stackpole Inc., was found to be acceptable for insertion device applications.

  19. Thales: an instrument to measure the low field magnetophoretic mobility of microscopic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, S L; St Pierre, T G

    2005-01-01

    An instrument, Thales, was designed and constructed to measure the induce motion of magnetic microspheres in a low magnetic field strength environment. Results show that Thales can be used to precisely measure the speed of microspheres (± 0.08 μm.s -1 ). We evaluated the motion of magnetic microspheres induced by an inhomogeneous magnetic field, and developed models for the microsphere magnetophoretic mobility, a parameter determining the speed attained by the microsphere in a given static low strength magnetic field environment. The data suggested that the magnetic material was located at the surfaces of the microspheres rather than being distributed evenly through the microspheres. With suitable calibration microspheres, Thales will be capable of directly measuring the low field magnetophoretic mobility of microscopic objects

  20. Detection of Virgin Olive Oil Adulteration Using Low Field Unilateral NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of adulteration in edible oils is a concern in the food industry, especially for the higher priced virgin olive oils. This article presents a low field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR method for the detection of the adulteration of virgin olive oil that can be performed through sealed bottles providing a non-destructive screening technique. Adulterations of an extra virgin olive oil with different percentages of sunflower oil and red palm oil were measured with a commercial unilateral instrument, the profile NMR-Mouse. The NMR signal was processed using a 2-dimensional Inverse Laplace transformation to analyze the transverse relaxation and self-diffusion behaviors of different oils. The obtained results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting adulterations of olive oil with percentages of at least 10% of sunflower and red palm oils.

  1. Low-field vortex pinning model for undoped sintered MgB2 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agassi, Y D

    2011-01-01

    Sintered MgB 2 powders constitute a porous ensemble of irregularly shaped agglomerates of tightly packed grains. The low-field critical current density in such powders was experimentally observed to scale with the inverse of the average agglomerate size. Motivated by this observation we consider a flux pinning model which accounts for the MgB 2 powder porosity by focusing on a single finite-size agglomerate size. According to the model the observed critical current density dependence on the agglomerate size reflects the outward pull exerted on a vortex that is pinned in proximity to the agglomerate edges. The calculated critical current density replicates the observed scaling within agglomerate-size bounds. Implications of the model are discussed.

  2. Precise measurements and shimming of magnetic field gradients in the low field regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmendinger, Fabian; Schmidt, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Grasdijk, Olivier; Jungmann, Klaus; Willmann, Lorenz [University of Groningen (Netherlands); Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Repetto, Maricel; Sobolev, Yuri; Zimmer, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhaeuser, Andreas [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: MIXed-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    For many experiments at the precision frontier of fundamental physics, the accurate measurement and knowledge of magnetic field gradients in particular in the low field regime (<μT) is a necessity: On the one hand, in the search for an Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of free neutrons or atoms, field gradients contribute to geometric-phase-induced false EDM signals for particles in traps. On the other hand, clock comparison experiments like the {sup 3}He/{sup 129}Xe spin clock experiment suffer from gradients, since the coherent T{sub 2}*-time of free spin precession, and thus the measurement sensitivity, scales ∝ ∇ vector B{sup -2}. Here we report on a new and very effective method, to shim and to measure tiny magnetic field gradients in the range of pT/cm by using effective T{sub 2}*-measurement sequences in varying the currents of trim coils of known geometry.

  3. Study of relaxation times of nanocomposites of starch/montmorillonite employing low field NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Luciana M.; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its various applications and features, especially in therapies for controlled release of pharmaceuticals, polymers are among the most widely used excipients in pharmaceutical technology. One of the most promising nanocomposites is formed from organic polymer and inorganic clay minerals. Nanocomposites of starch/montmorillonite were prepared employing solution intercalation and characterized by proton spin-lattice relaxation time, through NMR relaxometry. The characterization of nanocomposites was done by X-ray diffraction and by nuclear magnetic resonance. The results showed that nanostructured films were obtained by intercalation from solution. Furthermore, the use of low field NMR, T1H, provided more precise information about the movement of materials, being complementary to the results obtained by X-ray diffraction. (author)

  4. Effects of CO2 injection and Kerogen Maturation on Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, M.; Livo, K.

    2017-12-01

    Low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is commonly used in petrophysical analysis of petroleum reservoir rocks. NMR experiments record the relaxation and polarization of in-situ hydrogen protons present in gaseous phases such as free-gas intervals and solution gas fluids, bulk fluid phases such as oil and aquifer intervals, and immovable fractions of kerogen and bitumen. Analysis of NMR relaxation spectra is performed to record how fluid composition, maturity, and viscosity change NMR experimental results. We present T1-T2 maps as thermal maturity of a water-saturated, sub-mature Woodford shale is increased at temperatures from 125 to 400 degrees Celsius. Experiments with applied fluid pressure in paraffinic mineral oil and DI water with varying fluid pH have been performed to mimic reservoir conditions in analysis of the relaxation of bulk fluid phases. We have recorded NMR spectra, T1-T2 maps, and fluid diffusion coefficients using a low-field (2 MHz) MagritekTM NMR. CO2 was injected at a pressure of 900 psi in an in house developed NMR pressure vessel made of torlon plastic. Observable 2D NMR shifts in immature kerogen formations as thermal maturity is increased show generation of lighter oils with increased maturity. CO2 injection leads to a decrease in bulk fluid relaxation time that is attributed to viscosity modification with gas presence. pH variation with increased CO2 presence were shown to not effect NMR spectra. From this, fluid properties have been shown to greatly affect NMR readings and must be taken into account for more accurate NMR reservoir characterization.

  5. MR equipment acquisition strategies: low-field or high-field scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti-Bonmati, L.; Kormano, M.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) field strength is one of the key aspects to consider when purchasing MR equipment. Other aspects include the gradient system, coil design, computer and pulse sequence availability, purchase cost, local reimbursement policies, and current opinion within the medical community. Our objective here is to evaluate the decision-influencing aspects of the MR market, with a focus on some specific areas such as high resolution studies, examination times, special techniques, instrumentation, open design magnets, costs and reimbursement policies, academic and industrial interests, contrast media, clinical efficacy, and finally, clinicians' preferences. Certainly the advantage of high-field is a higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved resolution. With a high-field unit, higher spatial resolution images and higher temporal resolution images can be obtained. Typical imaging times needed to produce clinically diagnostic images are about 3 times longer at 0.1 T than at 1.0 or 1.5 T. High-field-related advanced techniques, such as functional imaging, spectroscopy and microscopy, may become clinically useful in the near future. As long as there is an unlimited demand for MR examinations, it appears financially profitable to run a high-field system, despite the associated higher costs. However, if demand for MR becomes saturated, low-field systems will cause less financial strain on the reimbursement organisation and service provider. Recent emphasis on cost containment, the development of interventional techniques, the increased use of MR for patients in intensive care and operating suites, the deployment of magnets in office suites, and the development of new magnet configurations, all favour the supplementary use of low-field systems. Hence, MR units of all field strengths have a role in radiology. (orig.)

  6. Homogeneity characterization of ethylene-co-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) and hydrophobic silica nanocomposite by low field NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stael, Giovanni Chaves; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2005-01-01

    This project proposes the characterization of a polymeric matrix composite material using nanometric scale hydrophobic silica as charge element, with the ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), by using the spin-lattice relaxation time measurement applying the low field NMR

  7. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Bjoernebrink, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pettersson, K. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Hildingsson, C. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients` subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  8. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerlund, M.; Bjoernebrink, J.; Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients' subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  9. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  10. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta [University of Pisa, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa (Italy); D' aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide [Radiology Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-10-24

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  11. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta; D'aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide

    2015-01-01

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  12. Compact Intraoperative MRI: Stereotactic Accuracy and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Daniel; Lin, Dishen; Salas, Sussan; Kohn, Nina; Schulder, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging must supply data that can be used for accurate stereotactic navigation. This information should be at least as accurate as that acquired from diagnostic imagers. The aim of this study was to compare the stereotactic accuracy of an updated compact intraoperative MRI (iMRI) device based on a 0.15-T magnet to standard surgical navigation on a 1.5-T diagnostic scan MRI and to navigation with an earlier model of the same system. The accuracy of each system was assessed using a water-filled phantom model of the brain. Data collected with the new system were compared to those obtained in a previous study assessing the older system. The accuracy of the new iMRI was measured against standard surgical navigation on a 1.5-T MRI using T1-weighted (W) images. The mean error with the iMRI using T1W images was lower than that based on images from the 1.5-T scan (1.24 vs. 2.43 mm). T2W images from the newer iMRI yielded a lower navigation error than those acquired with the prior model (1.28 vs. 3.15 mm). Improvements in magnet design can yield progressive increases in accuracy, validating the concept of compact, low-field iMRI. Avoiding the need for registration between image and surgical space increases navigation accuracy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  14. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  15. Characterization of polyurethane/organophilic montmorillonite nanocomposites by low field NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcos Anacleto da; Tavares, Maria I.B.; Nascimento, Suelen A.M.; Rodrigues, Elton J. da R

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethanes are important and versatile materials, mainly due to some of their properties, such as high resistance to abrasion and tearing, excellent absorption of mechanical shocks and good flexibility and elasticity. However, they have some drawbacks as well, such as low thermal stability and barrier properties. To overcome these disadvantages, various studies have been conducted involving organophilic polyurethane/montmorillonite nanocomposites. The investigation of the structure of polyurethane/clay nanocomposites has mainly been done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this work, PU/clay nanocomposite films obtained by solution intercalation were studied. The nanocomposites were characterized by XRD and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR). The LF-NMR measurements, with determination of the spin-lattice relaxation time of the hydrogen nucleus, supplied important information about the molecular dynamics of these nanocomposites. The X-ray diffraction measurements validated the results found by NMR. The thermal stability of the material was also determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under an inert atmosphere. A slight improvement in this stability was observed in the nanocomposite in comparison with polyurethane (author)

  16. Magnetization, Low Field Instability and Quench of RHQT Nb(3)Al Strands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; Wake, M.; Kikuchi, A.; Velev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Since 2005, we made and tested three RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, one with Nb matrix and two with Ta matrix, which are fully stabilized with Cu electroplating. We observed anomalously large magnetization curves extending beyond 1 to 1.5 Tesla with the F1 Nb matrix strand at 4.2 K, when we measured its magnetization with a balanced coil magnetometer. This problem was eliminated with the Ta matrix strands operating at 4.2 K. But with these strands a similar but smaller anomalous magnetization was observed at 1.9 K. We studied these phenomena with FEM. With the F1 Nb matrix strand, it is explained that at low external field, inter-filamentary coupling currents in the outer layers of sub-elements create a shielding effect. It reduces the inside field, keeps the inside Nb matrix superconductive, and stands against a higher outside field beyond the Hc of Nb. At an even higher external field, the superconductivity of the whole Nb matrix collapses and releases a large amount of energy, which may cause a big quench. Depending on the size of the energy in the strand or the cable, a magnet could quench, causing the low field instability. Some attempt to analyze the anomaly with FEM is presented.

  17. High-pressure low-field 1H NMR relaxometry in nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, Carsten; Schlayer, Stefan; Stallmach, Frank

    2014-03-01

    A low-field NMR sensor with NdFeB permanent magnets (B0=118 mT) and a pressure cell made of PEEK (4 cm outer diameter) were designed for (1)H relaxation time studies of adsorbed molecules at pressures of up to 300 bar. The system was used to investigate methane uptake of microporous metal-organic frameworks and nanoporous activated carbon. T2 relaxation time distribution of pure methane and of methane under co-adsorption of carbon dioxide show that the host-guest interaction lead to a relaxation time contrasts, which may be used to distinguish between the gas phase and the different adsorbed phases of methane. Adsorption isotherms, exchange of methane between adsorbent particles and the surrounding gas phase, successive displacement of methane from adsorption sites by co-adsorption of carbon dioxide and CO2/CH4 adsorption separation factors were determined from the observed NMR relaxation time distributions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Low field critical currents and ac losses of thin film niobium--tin superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study of the low field critical current and ac loss properties of niobium-tin thin films and layered composites fabricated by electron-beam coevaporation are presented. Particular emphasis is placed upon determining the suitability of this material for use as a conductor in a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter I contains a summary of this work and its major results together with an introduction to the scientific and engineering concepts associated with a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter II is a discussion of the physics of current transport and the associated loss mechanisms in a type-II superconductor. Chapter III gives the details of the electron-beam coevaporation technique developed to fabricate the samples for this study. Also discussed in this chapter are the effects of the evaporation conditions on the growth morphology of the niobium-tin films. Chapter IV presents the details of the experimental techniques developed to measure the ac loss and critical current in these samples as a function of temperature. Chapter V shows the dependence of the critical current of these films and composites on temperature, magnetic field, and on the number of artificially introduced pinning centers in the layered composites. Experimental results are also presented concerning the stability of these conductors against flux jumps. Chapter VI is a discussion of the ac losses in these samples. Detailed comparisons are made between the measured loss and the predictions of the critical state model

  19. Using low-field NMR to infer the physical properties of glassy oligosaccharide/water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhardt, Kasia; Bui, Quang D; Normand, Valéry

    2007-03-01

    Low-field NMR (LF-NMR) is usually used as an analytical technique, for instance, to determine water and oil contents. For this application, no attempt is made to understand the physical origin of the data. Here we build a physical model to explain the five fit parameters of the conventional free induction decay (FID) for glassy oligosaccharide/water mixtures. The amplitudes of the signals from low-mobility and high-mobility protons correspond to the density of oligosaccharide protons and water protons, respectively. The relaxation time of the high-mobility protons is described using a statistical model for the probability that oligosaccharide hydroxyl groups form multiple hydrogen bonds. The variation of energy of the hydrogen bond is calculated from the average bond distance and the average angle contribution. Applying the model to experimental data shows that hydrogen atoms screen the water oxygen atoms when two water molecules solvate a single hydroxyl group. Furthermore, the relaxation time of the oligosaccharide protons is independent of its molecular weight and the water content. Finally, inversion of the FID using the inverse Laplace transform gives the continuous spectrum of relaxation times, which is a fingerprint of the oligosaccharide.

  20. Low-field STIR imaging of avascular necrosis, marrow edema, and infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, B.A.; Schwartz, A.N.; Olson, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    Based on 12 months experience with low-field (0.15-T) short-T1 inversion recovery (STIR) imaging, the authors replaced T2-weighted spin echo (T2SE) images with STIR for avascular necrosis (AVN). With STIR (repetition time 1,600 echo time 36, inversion time 100, 2 Avg, 256 x 128), fat is black and edema or joint fluid is bright white; 14 contiguous images take less than 7 minutes and have much greater contrast than T1 or T2 SE images. MR examinations of 36 patients with suspected AVN, marrow edema, or infarction were reviewed. AVN was equally well diagnosed with T1 SE and STIR in 16 of 16 patients. However, small effusions and the extent of marrow edema or infarction were better delineated on STIR. Joints with effusions were almost always symptomatic. Asymptomatic AVN was detected and confirmed by pressure measurements. AVN or asymptomatic marrow infarction was detected in four of six renal transplant patients. Serial STIR imaging may allow clinical monitoring of AVN. STIR improves detection of effusion, permits shorter imaging time, and can replace T2SE for AVN

  1. Pulsed magnetic field generation suited for low-field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunkar, Neelam Prabhu; Selvaraj, Jayaprakash; Theh, Wei-Shen; Weber, Robert; Mina, Mani

    2018-05-01

    Pulsed magnetic fields can be used to provide instantaneous localized magnetic field variations. In presence of static fields, pulsed field variations are often used to apply torques and in-effect to measure behavior of magnetic moments in different states. In this work, the design and experimental performance of a pulsed magnetic field generator suited for low static field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications is presented. One of the challenges of low bias field NMR measurements is low signal to noise ratio due to the comparable nature of the bias field and the pulsed field. Therefore, a circuit is designed to apply pulsed currents through an inductive load, leading to generation of pulsed magnetic fields which can temporarily overpower the effect of the bias field on magnetic moments. The designed circuit will be tuned to operate at the precession frequency of 1H (protons) placed in a bias field produced by permanent magnets. The designed circuit parameters may be tuned to operate under different bias conditions. Therefore, low field NMR measurements can be performed for different bias fields. Circuit simulations were used to determine design parameters, corresponding experimental measurements will be presented in this work.

  2. Estimation of diffusion coefficients in bitumen solvent mixtures as derived from low field NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.; Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    Use of solvents for the extraction of heavy oil and bitumen appears to be an increasingly feasible technology. Both vapour extraction and direct solvent injection are considered for conventional exploration and production schemes, while solvent dilution of bitumen is a standard technique in oil sands mining. Mass transfer between solvent and bitumen is a poorly understood process. In some cases, it is totally ignored compared to viscous force effects. In other cases, phenomenological estimations of diffusion and dispersion coefficients are used. Low field NMR has been used successfully in determining both solvent content and viscosity reduction in heavy oil and bitumen mixtures with various solvents. As a solvent comes into contact with a heavy oil or bitumen sample, the mobility of hydrogen bearing molecules of both solvent and oil changes. These changes are detectable through changes in the NMR relaxation characteristics of both solvent and oil. Relaxation changes can then be correlated to mass flux and concentration changes. Based on Fick's Second Law, a diffusion coefficient, which is independent of concentration, was calculated against three oils and six solvents. (author)

  3. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Results Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Conclusions Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution. PMID:23590829

  4. Partial volume effect in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Munehiro; Yoshiya, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Eiji

    1989-01-01

    According to the direction and the thickness of the imaging slice in tomography, the border between the tissues becomes unclear (partial volume effect). In the present MRI experiment, we examined border area between fat and water components using phantom in order to investigate the partial volume effect in MRI. In spin echo sequences, the intensity of the border area showed a linear relationship with composition of fat and water. Whereas, in inversion recovery and field echo sequences, we found the parameters to produce an extremely low intensity area at the border region between fat and water. This low intensity area was explained by cancellation of NMR signals from fat and water due to the difference in the direction of magnetic vectors. Clinically, partial volume effect can cause of mis-evaluation of walls, small nodules, tumor capsules and the tumor invasion in the use of inversion recovery and field echo sequences. (author)

  5. Evaluation of muscle MRI in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuri; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    Various objective measurements can be used to diagnose amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). T2-weighted brain MRI images revealed high signal areas at the posterior limb of the internal capsules in ALS patients. Recently, muscle MRI proved useful to evaluate abnormalities of the muscle in myositis patients. Therefore, in the present study, we examined muscle MRI of leg muscles in ALS patients, and correlated MRI with functional measurements, such as muscle strength, and compound muscle action potential amplitude of the tibialis anterior (TA) after stimulation of the peroneal nerve. The subjects consisted of 10 ALS patients (7 males and 3 females), ranging in age from 49 to 87. Neurologic symptoms at the onset of ALS consisted of bulbar dysfunction in one patient, upper extremity involvement in three patients, and lower extremity involvement in six patients. Muscle MRI of the legs was performed in 9 (ALS patients. A peripheral nerve conduction study was performed on the peroneal nerve, with the recording electrode over the TA. The T2-weighted muscle MRI images revealed high signal aeras in the muscle in six ALS patients, whose muscle weakness existed predominantly in the lower extremities. Extracellular fluid accumulation has been proposed to be responsible for the signal increase of denervated muscles on T2-weighted muscle MRI images. We assume that muscle MRI is useful to demonstrate the distribution of muscle involvement in ALS patients and to assess the disease's stage. (author)

  6. MR-guided transgluteal biopsies with an open low-field system in patients with clinically suspected prostate cancer: technique and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangos, Stephan [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eichler, Katrin; Engelmann, Kerstin; Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Dettmer, Sebastian; Herzog, Christopher; Pegios, Wasilios; Wetter, A.; Lehnert, Thomas; Mack, Martin G.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of MR-guided biopsies with a transgluteal approach in patients with uncertain or suspicious prostate lesions. Twenty-five patients with uncertain or suspicious focal prostate lesions detected by high-field MR imaging of the prostate gland using endorectal coil imaging were biopsied with a transgluteal approach in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted FLASH sequences. The prostate gland was biopsied repeatedly with a coaxial technique through a 15-gauge pencil tip with a 16-gauge biopsy handy (median 3.8 samples per patient). Complications and biopsy findings were documented retrospectively. Using T1-weighted sequences biopsy procedures were performed successfully with MR guidance in all cases without any side effects or complications. The median intervention time was 11.3 min. Pathological findings revealed ten cases of hyperplasia or atrophy, three cases of prostatitis, ten cases of carcinoma and two cases of normal tissue. The clinical follow-up showed that in two patients prostate cancer was missed at MR-guided biopsy. Transgluteal MR-guided biopsy of the prostate gland is a safe and promising approach for histological clarification of uncertain or suspicious lesions. (orig.)

  7. A novel non-destructive manner for quantitative determination of plumpness of live Eriocheir sinensis using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lingling; Zhang, Hongcai; Chen, Shunsheng

    2018-03-01

    The present study investigated the quantitative and non-destructive determination of Eriocheir sinensis' plumpness during four mature stages using low field-nuclear magnetic resonance (LF- 1 H NMR). Normalized lipid volume of live E. sinensis was calculated from Sept to Dec using 3D LF- 1 H nuclear magnetic imaging (MRI) and the validity of proposed technique was compared and verified with traditional Soxhlet extraction and live dissection method, respectively. The results showed the plumpness of female E. sinensis was higher than that of male ones from Sept to Dec and the highest plumpness of male and female E. sinensis reached 99,436.44 and 109,207.15mm 3 in Oct. The normalized lipid volume of live male and female E. sinensis had a positive correlation with lipid content. This proposed method with short assay time, favorable selectivity, and accuracy demonstrated its application potential in grading regulation and quality evaluation of live E. sinensis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Lumbar Modic Changes - A Comparison Between Findings at Low-and High-field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Tom; Sorensen, Joan S; Henriksson, Gustaf A C

    2012-01-01

    Study Design. A cross-sectional observational study.Objective. To investigate if there is a difference in findings of lumbar Modic changes in low-field (0.3 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as compared to high field (1.5 Tesla).Summary of Background Data. It is a challenge to give patients...

  9. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of organic content in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Kirkland, Catherine; Vogt, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry is a non-invasive technique commonly used to assess hydrogen-bearing fluids in petroleum reservoir rocks. Longitudinal T1 and transverse T2 relaxation time measurements made using LF-NMR on conventional reservoir systems provides information on rock porosity, pore size distributions, and fluid types and saturations in some cases. Recent improvements in LF-SNMR instrument electronics have made it possible to apply these methods to assess highly viscous and even solid organic phases within reservoir rocks. T1 and T2 relaxation responses behave very differently in solids and liquids, therefore the relationship between these two modes of relaxation can be used to differentiate organic phases in rock samples or to characterize extracted organic materials. Using T1-T2 correlation data, organic components present in shales, such as kerogen and bitumen, can be examined in laboratory relaxometry measurements. In addition, implementation of a solid-echo pulse sequence to refocus some types of T2 relaxation during correlation measurements allows for improved resolution of solid phase photons. LF-NMR measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time correlations were carried out on raw oil shale samples from resources around the world. These shales vary widely in mineralogy, total organic carbon (TOC) content and kerogen type. NMR results were correlcated with Leco TOC and geochemical data obtained from Rock-Eval. There is excellent correlation between NMR data and programmed pyrolysis parameters, particularly TOC and S2, and predictive capability is also good. To better understand the NMR response, the 2D NMR spectra were compared to similar NMR measurements made using high-field (HF) NMR equipment.

  10. Static and dynamic evaluation of pelvic floor disorders with an open low-field tilting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiaschetti, V.; Pastorelli, D.; Squillaci, E.; Funel, V.; Rascioni, M.; Meschini, A.; Salimbeni, C.; Sileri, P.; Franceschilli, L.; Simonetti, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance defaecography (MRD) in pelvic floor disorders using an open tilting magnet with a 0.25 T static field and to compare the results obtained from the same patient both in supine and orthostatic positions. Materials and methods: From May 2010 to November 2011, 49 symptomatic female subjects (mean age 43.5 years) were enrolled. All the patients underwent MRD in the supine and orthostatic positions using three-dimensional (3D) hybrid contrast-enhanced (HYCE) sequences and dynamic gradient echo (GE) T1-weighted sequences. All the patients underwent conventional defaecography (CD) to correlate both results. Two radiologists evaluated the examinations; inter and intra-observer concordance was measured. The results obtained in the two positions were compared between them and with CD. Results: The comparison between CD and MRD found statistically significant differences in the evaluation of anterior and posterior rectocoele during defaecation in both positions and of rectal prolapse under the pubo-coccygeal line (PCL) during evacuation, only in the supine position (versus MRD orthostatic: rectal prolapse p < 0.0001; anterior rectocoele p < 0.001; posterior rectocoele p = 0.008; versus CD: rectal prolapse p < 0.0001; anterior rectocoele p < 0.001; posterior rectocoele p = 0.01). The value of intra-observer intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) ranged from good to excellent; the interobserver ICC from moderate to excellent. Conclusion: MRD is feasible with an open low-field tilting magnet, and it is more accurate in the orthostatic position than in the supine position to evaluate pelvic floor disorders

  11. Redesigning existing transcranial magnetic stimulation coils to reduce energy: application to low field magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Boshuo; Shen, Michael R.; Deng, Zhi-De; Smith, J. Evan; Tharayil, Joseph J.; Gurrey, Clement J.; Gomez, Luis J.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. To present a systematic framework and exemplar for the development of a compact and energy-efficient coil that replicates the electric field (E-field) distribution induced by an existing transcranial magnetic stimulation coil. Approach. The E-field generated by a conventional low field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) coil was measured for a spherical head model and simulated in both spherical and realistic head models. Then, using a spherical head model and spatial harmonic decomposition, a spherical-shaped cap coil was synthesized such that its windings conformed to a spherical surface and replicated the E-field on the cortical surface while requiring less energy. A prototype coil was built and electrically characterized. The effect of constraining the windings to the upper half of the head was also explored via an alternative coil design. Main results. The LFMS E-field distribution resembled that of a large double-cone coil, with a peak field strength around 350 mV m‑1 in the cortex. The E-field distributions of the cap coil designs were validated against the original coil, with mean errors of 1%–3%. The cap coil required as little as 2% of the original coil energy and was significantly smaller in size. Significance. The redesigned LFMS coil is substantially smaller and more energy-efficient than the original, improving cost, power consumption, and portability. These improvements could facilitate deployment of LFMS in the clinic and potentially at home. This coil redesign approach can also be applied to other magnetic stimulation paradigms. Finally, the anatomically-accurate E-field simulation of LFMS can be used to interpret clinical LFMS data.

  12. Extremely Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Extremely Preterm Birth Home For Patients Search FAQs Extremely Preterm Birth ... Spanish FAQ173, June 2016 PDF Format Extremely Preterm Birth Pregnancy When is a baby considered “preterm” or “ ...

  13. Effectiveness of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing brachial plexus tumours in dogs – short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiak Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences that contribute to a quick and reliable diagnosis of brachial plexus tumours in dogs. The tumours were successfully diagnosed in 6 dogs by the MRI with the use of SE, FSE, STIR, Turbo 3 D, 3D HYCE, and GE sequences and the gadolinium contrast agent

  14. Impacts of pellets injected from the low-field side on plasma in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisitsorasak, A.; Onjun, T.

    2011-01-01

    Impacts of pellets injected from the low-field side (LFS) on plasma in ITER are investigated using the 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the pellet ablation is described using the neutral gas shielding (NGS) model. The pellet ablation model is coupled with the plasma core transport model, which is a combination of the MMM95 anomalous transport model and NCLASS neoclassical transport model. The boundary conditions are assumed to be at the top of the pedestal, in which the pedestal parameters are predicted using a pedestal model based on the theoretical-based pedestal width scaling (either magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling, or flow shear stabilization width scaling, or normalized poloidal pressure width scaling) and the infinite-n ballooning mode pressure gradient limit. These pedestal models depend sensitively on the density at the top of the pedestal, which can be strongly influenced by the injection of pellets. The combination of the MMM95 and NCLASS models, together with the pedestal and NGS models, is used to simulate the time evolution of the plasma current, ion and electron temperatures, and density profiles for ITER standard type-I ELMy H-mode discharges during the injection of LFS pellets. It is found that the injection of pellets results in a complicated plasma scenario, especially in the outer region of the plasma and the plasma conditions at the boundary in which the pellet has an impact on increasing the plasma edge density, but reducing the plasma edge temperature. The LFS pellet has a stronger impact on the edge as compared to the center. For fusion performance, the pellet can result in either enhancement or degradation, depending sensitively on the pellet parameters; such as the pellet size, pellet velocity, and pellet frequency. For example, when a series of deuterium pellets with a size of 0.5 cm, velocity of 1 km/s, and frequency of 2 Hz are injected into the ITER plasma from the LFS, the

  15. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D - T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D - T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and hydraulic

  16. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  17. Acute peripheral joint injury: cost and effectiveness of low-field-strength MR imaging--results of randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikken, J.J.; Oei, E.H.; Ginai, A.Z.; Krestin, G.P.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hunink, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess prospectively if a short imaging examination performed with low-field-strength dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in addition to radiography is effective and cost saving compared with the current diagnostic imaging strategy (radiography alone) in patients with recent acute

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  19. Low-field one-dimensional and direction-dependent relaxation imaging of bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Mollova, Ayret; Stapf, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    The structure of articular cartilage is separated into three layers of differently oriented collagen fibers, which is accompanied by a gradient of increasing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and decreasing water concentration from the top layer towards the bone interface. The combined effect of these structural variations results in a change of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times as a function of the distance from the cartilage surface. In this paper, this dependence is investigated at a magnetic field strength of 0.27 T with a one-dimensional depth resolution of 50 μm on bovine hip and stifle joint articular cartilage. By employing this method, advantage is taken of the increasing contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate found at lower magnetic field strengths. Furthermore, evidence for an orientational dependence of relaxation times with respect to an axis normal to the surface plane is given, an observation that has recently been reported using high-field MRI and that was explained by preferential orientations of collagen bundles in each of the three cartilage zones. In order to quantify the extent of a further contrast mechanism and to estimate spatially dependent glycosaminoglycan concentrations, the data are supplemented by proton relaxation times that were acquired in bovine articular cartilage that was soaked in a 0.8 mM aqueous Gd ++ solution.

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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  6. MRI of the Chest

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  7. MRI of the Chest

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  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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  13. MRI of the Chest

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  14. MRI of the Chest

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    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  1. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  2. Low-Field Bi-Skyrmion Formation in a Noncentrosymmetric Chimney Ladder Ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, R.; Yu, X. Z.; White, J. S.; Shibata, K.; Kaneko, Y.; Tatara, G.; Rønnow, H. M.; Tokura, Y.; Seki, S.

    2018-01-01

    The real-space spin texture and the relevant magnetic parameters were investigated for an easy-axis noncentrosymmetric ferromagnet Cr11 Ge19 with Nowotny chimney ladder structure. Using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, we report the formation of bi-Skyrmions, i.e., pairs of spin vortices with opposite magnetic helicities. The quantitative evaluation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) proves that the magnetic dipolar interaction plays a more important role than the DMI on the observed bi-Skyrmion formation. Notably, the critical magnetic field value required for the formation of bi-Skyrmions turned out to be extremely small in this system, which is ascribed to strong easy-axis anisotropy associated with the characteristic helix crystal structure. The family of Nowotny chimney ladder compounds may offer a unique material platform where two distinctive Skyrmion formation mechanisms favoring different topological spin textures can become simultaneously active.

  3. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  4. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  5. MRI of articular cartilaginous lesions. MRI findings in osteoarthritis of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Takezawa, Yuuichi; Suguro, Tohru; Igata, Atsuomi; Kudo, Yukihiko; Motegi, Mitsuo.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging for imaging of the knee joint, especially for detecting articular cartilaginous lesions associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 141 patients with osteoarthritis were examined (23 males, 118 females). Their age range was 40-93 (mean age 66.2). Using radiotherapy examinations, patients were classified according to Hokkaido University Classification Criteria; 22, 49, 46, 16, and 8 patients were classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Articular cartilage defects were examined using MRI, and the number of such defects increased as the X-ray stage progressed. The appearance of a low signal intensity area in the bone marrow was examined using MRI, and the number of patients observed to have such areas increased as the x-ray stages progressed. JOA OA scores were significantly low for patients with meniscal tears. Patients were classified and results reviewed using MRI examinations. Classification by MRI of articular cartilage lesions correlated with the JOA OA scores. Low signal intensity areas in the bone marrow were frequently observed in advanced osteoarthritis cases, and there was correlation between FTA and MRI classifications of these areas. MRI is extremely valuable in detecting articular cartilage lesions in the knee joint, showing those lesions which cannot be detected by conventional radiography examinations. Thus, MRI is judged to be a clinically useful method for diagnosis of osteoarthritis. (author)

  6. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C.L. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Sahdev, A.; Rockall, A.G. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom); Singh, N. [Department of Pathology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom); Sohaib, S.A. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Reznek, R.H. [Cancer Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm{sup 3}) and mucinous (6358.2 cm{sup 3}) subtypes (p = 0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  7. Low field magnetic resonance experiments in superfluid 3He--A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gully, W.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse nuclear magnetic resonance signals have been made on the A phase of liquid 3 He. They were performed on a sample of 3 He self-cooled by the Pomeranchuk effect to the critical temperature of the superfluid at 2.7 m 0 K. The longitudinal resonance is a magnetic mode of the liquid excited by radio frequency magnetic fields applied in the direction of the static magnetic field. Frequency profiles of this resonance were indirectly obtained by contour techniques from signals recorded by sweeping the temperature. Its frequency is found to be related to the frequency shift of the transverse resonance in agreement with theoretical predictions for the ABM pairing state. Its linewidth also agrees with theoretical predictions based upon dissipative phenomena peculiar to the superfluid phase. An analysis of the linewidth of the longitudinal resonance yields a value for the quasiparticle collision time. Transverse NMR lines were also studied. In low magnetic fields (20 Oersted) these lines were found to become extremely broad. This is shown to be a manifestation of the same collisional processes that broaden the longitudinal resonance lines. Also, the effects of various textures on the resonance lines are discussed, including the results of an attempt to create a single domain of 3 He with crossed electric and magnetic fields

  8. Enhancement of Giant Magneto-Impedance in Series Co-Rich Microwires for Low-Field Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S. D.; Eggers, T.; Thiabgoh, O.; Xing, D. W.; Fang, W. B.; Sun, J. F.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2018-02-01

    Two soft ferromagnetic Co68.25Fe4.25Si12.25B15.25 microwires with the same diameter of 50 ± 1 μm but different fabrication processes were placed in series and in parallel circuit configurations to investigate their giant magneto-impedance (GMI) responses in a frequency range of 1-100 MHz for low-field sensing applications. We show that, while the low-field GMI response is significantly reduced in the parallel configuration, it is greatly enhanced in the series connection. These results suggest that a highly sensitive GMI sensor can be designed by arranging multi-wires in a saw-shaped fashion to optimize the sensing area, and soldered together in series connection to maintain the excellent magnetic field sensitivity.

  9. Preparation of polyurethane/montmorillonite nanocomposites by solution: characterization using low-field NMR and study of thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcos Anacleto da; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes (PU) are important and versatile class of polymer materials, especially because of their desirable properties, such as high abrasion resistance, tear strength, excellent shock absorption, flexibility and elasticity. However, there also exist some disadvantages, for example, low thermal stability and barrier properties. To overcome the disadvantages, research on novel polyurethane/clay nanocomposites has been carried out. The investigation of the structure of polyurethane/clay nanocomposites has been mostly done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this work, PU/clay films were prepared by solution, and the obtained nanocomposites were characterized by XRD and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Low field NMR measurements were able to provide important information on molecular dynamics of the polymeric nanocomposites PU/OMMT. In addition, they also confirmed the results obtained by XRD. The thermal stability was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). (author)

  10. Low field magnetoresistance in a 2D topological insulator based on wide HgTe quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshanetsky, E B; Kvon, Z D; Gusev, G M; Mikhailov, N N; Dvoretsky, S A

    2016-09-01

    Low field magnetoresistance is experimentally studied in a two-dimensional topological insulator (TI) in both diffusive and quasiballistic samples fabricated on top of a wide (14 nm) HgTe quantum well. In all cases a pronounced quasi-linear positive magnetoresistance is observed similar to that found previously in diffusive samples based on a narrow (8 nm) HgTe well. The experimental results are compared with the main existing theoretical models based on different types of disorder: sample edge roughness, nonmagnetic disorder in an otherwise coherent TI and metallic puddles due to locally trapped charges that act like local gate on the sample. The quasiballistic samples with resistance close to the expected quantized values also show a positive low-field magnetoresistance but with a pronounced admixture of mesoscopic effects.

  11. Low-field anomalous magnetic phase in the kagome-lattice shandite Co3Sn2S2

    OpenAIRE

    Kassem, Mohamed A.; Tabata, Yoshikazu; Waki, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The magnetization process of single crystals of the metallic kagom\\'e ferromagnet Co3Sn2S2 was carefully measured via magnetization and AC susceptibility. Field-dependent anomalous transitions in the magnetization indicate a low-field unconventionally ordered phase stabilized just below TC. The magnetic phase diagrams in applied fields along different crystallographic directions were determined. The magnetic relaxation process studied in frequencies covering five orders of magnitude from 0.01...

  12. Superconducting transition and low-field magnetoresistance of a niobium single crystal at 4.2 deg. K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriot, G.

    1967-01-01

    We report the study of the electrical resistance of a niobium single crystal, at 4.2 deg. K, from the beginning of the superconductive transition to 80 kilo oersteds. Critical fieldsH c2 and H c3 have been determined. Influences on superconductive transition of current density, field-current angle, crystal orientation and magnetoresistance have been studied. Variation laws of low-field transverse and longitudinal magneto-resistances have been determined. (author) [fr

  13. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; DiMaio, Simon P.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challengin...

  14. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The exploratory development of A self-made oral Gd-DTPA solution for low field MRCP in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Mao; Zhou Min; Gu Zhicheng; Wu Jizhi; Guo Wanliang; Ni Yongbiao; Fang Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of ingestion self-made Gd-DTPA solutin for low field magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) (0.35T) in children. Methods: Phantom experiments were performed to select the optimal concentration of Gd-DTPA to be used as an oral negative contrast agent in low field MRCP. Twenty children suspected of celiac disease were performed with MRCP before and after ingestion Gd-DTPA solution. Signal intensity measurements of gastroduodenal lumens, pancreatobiliary ducts, and image quality scores were obtained systematically before and after contrast ingestion. Results: The selected Gd-DTPA concentration was 1.992 mmol/L. Ingestion of 80 ml solution eliminated or suppressed efficiently the gastroduodenal signal intensity, improving the MRCP image quality scores (P<0.01) significantly in children. Conclusion: 1.992 mmol/L self-made Gd-DTPA solutin can suppress or eliminate water signals from gastrointestinal tract and improve the quality of low field MRCP image in children. (authors)

  16. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  17. MRI in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulert, Christoph; Shenton, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  18. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  19. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  20. Extreme value distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ahsanullah, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the book is to give a through account of the basic theory of extreme value distributions. The book cover a wide range of materials available to date. The central ideas and results of extreme value distributions are presented. The book rwill be useful o applied statisticians as well statisticians interrested to work in the area of extreme value distributions.vmonograph presents the central ideas and results of extreme value distributions.The monograph gives self-contained of theory and applications of extreme value distributions.

  1. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  2. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  3. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal coupling in low fields between the nuclear and electronic spins in Tm2+ doped CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbina, Cristian.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in a CaF 2 crystal doped with divalent thulium ions there is in low fields, a thermal coupling between the electron magnetic moments of Tm 2+ and the nuclear moments of 19 F. When these ones have been lowered down to temperature through dynamical high-field polarization and adiabatic demagnetization in succession the resulting polarisation of the formed ones can overstep their original polarization in high field. A trial is given to explain this Zeeman electronic energy cooling through nuclear Zeeman energy with invoking a thermal coupling between both systems through the spin-spin electronic interaction but no theoretical model is developed in view of a quantitative explanation of the dynamics of such a process. The magnetic resonance spectrum of Tm 2 + in low field is also investigated: an important shift and narrowing of the electron resonance line in low field are obtained when 19 F nuclei are very cold. This special spectral characters are explained as due to magnetic interactions between electronic impurities and the neighbouring 19 F nuclei and a theoretical model is developed (based on the local Weiss field approximation) which explains rather well the changes in the spectral shift as a function of the 19 F nucleus temperature. A second theoretical model has also been developed in view of a quantitative explanation of both the narrowing and shift of the spectrum, but its prediction disagree with the experimental results. It is shown that in low fieldsx it is possible to get rid of paramagnetic impurities after they have been reused as reducing agents for 19 F nucleus entropy populating at about 80%, a non magnetic metastable state with these impurities [fr

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  9. Characteristics of Xanthosoma sagittifolium roots during cooking, using physicochemical analysis, uniaxial compression, multispectral imaging and low field NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boakye, Abena Achiaa; Gudjónsdóttir, María; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    and white varieties of cocoyam roots were thus analysed by low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry, multispectral imaging, uniaxial compression testing, and relevant physicochemical analysis in the current study. Both varieties had similar dry matter content, as well as physical and mechanical...... of that spectral region for rapid analysis of dry matter and water content of the roots. The small, but significant differences in the structural and gelatinization characteristics of the two varieties indicated that they may not be equally suited for further processing, e.g. to flours or starches. Processors thus...

  10. The effects of amylose and starch phosphate on starch gel retrogradation studied by low-field 1H NMR relaxometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Blennow, A.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    Low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (23 MHz) was used to study the effects of the degree of phosphorylation, the amylose content and the amylopectin chain length distribution on gel retrogradation for a set of 26 starches, six of which were of crystal polymorph type A, 18 of type B and two of type......) relaxation curves from the two measurements (day 1 and day 7) could be used as a simple, illustrative way of describing the retrogradation. Three different behaviours were identified: One group of samples (mostly potato starches) slowly changed from a soft to a more rigid gel from day 1 to 7. A second group...

  11. Low field anisotropic properties of a single crystals of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammann, J.; Ocio, M.; Vincent, E.; Bertinotti, A.; Luzet, D.

    1987-09-01

    Low field (0.4G≤H≤3G) magnetization measurements have been performed on small single crystals of superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7.δ using a SQUID magnetometer. They revealed anisotropic properties in the temperature dependences of the shielding and the Meissner effects. A sharp unique transition at 95 K is observed with the field parallel to c. In the perpendicular direction a second transition line seems to be crossed at T* = 84 K. This temperature T* remains constant in the range of fields investigated

  12. Low-field anomalous magnetic phase in the kagome-lattice shandite C o3S n2S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Mohamed A.; Tabata, Yoshikazu; Waki, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    The magnetization process of single crystals of the metallic kagome ferromagnet C o3S n2S2 was carefully measured via magnetization and ac susceptibility. Field-dependent anomalous transitions observed in low fields indicate the presence of an unconventional magnetic phase just below the Curie temperature, TC. The magnetic phase diagrams in low magnetic fields along different crystallographic directions were determined for the first time. The magnetic relaxation measurements at various frequencies covering five orders of magnitude from 0.01 to 1000 Hz indicate markedly slow spin dynamics only in the anomalous phase with characteristic relaxation times longer than 10 s.

  13. Antisite disorder-induced low-field magnetoresistance in some frustrated Sr2FeMoO6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Tianyi; Ju Sheng; Li Zhenya

    2006-01-01

    Considering the existence of antiferromagnetic patches induced by the antisite disorder in ferrimagnetic Sr 2 FeMoO 6 , we have developed a resistor network model to account for the effects of the antisite disorder on the magnetoresistance in this material. It is proposed that the magnetic disorder resulting from the existence of frustration around the antiferromagnetic patches will be suppressed under the applied magnetic field and low-field magnetoresistance will be observed. For samples with low levels of antisite defects, the magnetoresistive behaviour may be strongly affected by the different degrees of magnetic inhomogeneity. Our calculated results are in agreement with experimental observations

  14. Automatic analysis of trabecular bone structure from knee MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Joselene; Granlund, Rabia; Lillholm, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of quantifying osteoarthritis (OA) by analysis of the trabecular bone structure in low-field knee MRI. Generic texture features were extracted from the images and subsequently selected by sequential floating forward selection (SFFS), following a fully automatic......, uncommitted machine-learning based framework. Six different classifiers were evaluated in cross-validation schemes and the results showed that the presence of OA can be quantified by a bone structure marker. The performance of the developed marker reached a generalization area-under-the-ROC (AUC) of 0...

  15. PET/MRI for Preoperative Planning in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft Jakobsen, Annika; Jensen, Karl Erik; L�fgren, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Clinical positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition protocols may improve the evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) prior to surgical planning. We examined two patients with lower extremity STS using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MRI scanner and the glucose...

  16. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI sca...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  2. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  8. Dedicated extremity MR imaging of the foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hottya, G.A.; Peterfy, C.G.; Uffmann, M.; Haeckl, F.O.; LeHir, P.; Redei, J.; Gindele, A.U.; Dion, E.; Genant, H.K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide illustrative examples of diseases of the foot and ankle when imaged with a low-field MR imaging system. A retrospective review of 268 foot and ankle examinations, performed in our institution within the past 3 years with a 0.2-T (Artoscan Esaote, Genoa, Italy) dedicated extremity MR system was done. Additionally, illustrative comparison with conventional radiography and high-field MR imaging is presented in patients in whom these examinations were also performed. Although motion artifact limited the value of a few studies, in the majority of examinations low-field MR imaging provided diagnostic image quality for the full spectrum of disorders affecting the foot and ankle and seemed to be a feasible alternative to high-field MR imaging in establishing an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  10. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  11. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  12. How extreme is extreme hourly precipitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Pappas, Christoforos

    2016-04-01

    The importance of accurate representation of precipitation at fine time scales (e.g., hourly), directly associated with flash flood events, is crucial in hydrological design and prediction. The upper part of a probability distribution, known as the distribution tail, determines the behavior of extreme events. In general, and loosely speaking, tails can be categorized in two families: the subexponential and the hyperexponential family, with the first generating more intense and more frequent extremes compared to the latter. In past studies, the focus has been mainly on daily precipitation, with the Gamma distribution being the most popular model. Here, we investigate the behaviour of tails of hourly precipitation by comparing the upper part of empirical distributions of thousands of records with three general types of tails corresponding to the Pareto, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Specifically, we use thousands of hourly rainfall records from all over the USA. The analysis indicates that heavier-tailed distributions describe better the observed hourly rainfall extremes in comparison to lighter tails. Traditional representations of the marginal distribution of hourly rainfall may significantly deviate from observed behaviours of extremes, with direct implications on hydroclimatic variables modelling and engineering design.

  13. Optimization with Extremal Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Percus, Allon G.

    2001-01-01

    We explore a new general-purpose heuristic for finding high-quality solutions to hard discrete optimization problems. The method, called extremal optimization, is inspired by self-organized criticality, a concept introduced to describe emergent complexity in physical systems. Extremal optimization successively updates extremely undesirable variables of a single suboptimal solution, assigning them new, random values. Large fluctuations ensue, efficiently exploring many local optima. We use extremal optimization to elucidate the phase transition in the 3-coloring problem, and we provide independent confirmation of previously reported extrapolations for the ground-state energy of ±J spin glasses in d=3 and 4

  14. Large low-field magnetoresistance of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystal at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Shu, E-mail: mishu@buaa.edu.cn; Liu, Rui, E-mail: liurui1987@buaa.edu.cn; Li, Yuanyuan, E-mail: buaaliyuan@163.com; Xie, Yong, E-mail: xiey@buaa.edu.cn; Chen, Ziyu, E-mail: chenzy@buaa.edu.cn

    2017-04-15

    Superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with an average size of 6.5 nm and good monodispersion were synthesized and investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Corresponding low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) was tested by physical property measurement system. A quite high LFMR has been observed at room temperature. For examples, at a field of 3000 Oe, the LFMR is −3.5%, and when the field increases to 6000 Oe, the LFMR is up to −5.1%. The electron spin polarization was estimated at 25%. This result is superior to the previous reports showing the LFMR of no more than 2% at room temperature. The conduction mechanism is proposed to be the tunneling of conduction electrons between adjacent grains considering that the monodisperse nanocrystals may supply more grain boundaries increasing the tunneling probability, and consequently enhancing the overall magnetoresistance. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with small size were synthesized. • A quite high LFMR has been observed at room temperature. • The more grain boundaries increase the tunneling probability and enlarge the MR. • The fast response of the sample increase the MR at a low field.

  15. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  16. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: kminaif@uol.com.br; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis. Unit of Abdomen; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology. Sector of Videlaparoscopy; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  17. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eutsler, Eric P. [Nemours Children' s Health System/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Horton, Daniel B. [Nemours Children' s Health System/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Wilmington, DE (United States); Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Epelman, Monica [Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Finkel, Terri [Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Orlando, FL (United States); Averill, Lauren W. [Nemours Children' s Health System/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol. (orig.)

  18. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eutsler, Eric P.; Horton, Daniel B.; Epelman, Monica; Finkel, Terri; Averill, Lauren W.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol. (orig.)

  19. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutsler, Eric P; Horton, Daniel B; Epelman, Monica; Finkel, Terri; Averill, Lauren W

    2017-04-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol.

  20. Ultrasound and MRI features of pyomyositis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trusen, Andreas; Beissert, Matthias; Schultz, Georg; Darge, Kassa [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Radiodiagnostics, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany); Chittka, Bernd [University Children' s Hospital, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Pyomyositis (PM) is an infectious disease of the skeletal muscle with a wide range of symptoms such as pain, fever or swelling, and is predominantly found in the tropics. In recent years PM has increasingly been diagnosed in Europe and in the U.S. Our objective is to describe the ultrasound and MRI features of PM in children. A retrospective analysis of 12 children with PM (2 girls and 10 boys; age range 1-13 years) admitted to our hospital between 1998 and 2002 was carried out. All children had a US exam and 8 children underwent MRI. Children with osteomyelitis and accompanying myositis were excluded from this study. In all patients who had MRI (n=8) the infected muscles were found to have the following features: hyperintensity on the T2-weighted images, diffuse borders and contrast enhancement. In the pelvis (n=4), only one PM could be detected with US, in the other 3 cases only US of the hip joint was performed based on the clinical symptoms. In the extremities (n=8) US always revealed an altered echogenicity of the affected muscles as well as fluid collection in 5 cases. Both US and MRI reveal characteristic changes of the PM. Ultrasound should be the first imaging modality in the extremities. In the pelvis MRI is the imaging modality of choice. The MRI is needed to differentiate pyomyositis from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  1. Classifying Returns as Extreme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I consider extreme returns for the stock and bond markets of 14 EU countries using two classification schemes: One, the univariate classification scheme from the previous literature that classifies extreme returns for each market separately, and two, a novel multivariate classification scheme tha...

  2. Indications for body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, M. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@az.vub.ac.be; Boulet, C. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: cedric.boulet@az.vub.ac.be; Op de Beeck, B. [Department of Radiology, UZA and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: bart.op.de.beeck@uza.be; Mey, J. de [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@az.vub.ac.be

    2008-02-15

    The lack of ionizing radiation use in MRI makes the high spatial resolution technique very appealing. Also, the easy access to multiplanar imaging and the fact that gadolinium-DTPA is well tolerated and not nephrotoxic makes MRI a robust alternative in the healthy as well as the renal compromised patient. Furthermore, MRI adds advanced possibility for tissue characterization and pathology detection and dynamic imaging can be performed. Specific contrast agents specific to the hepatobiliary or the reticuloendothelial system can help with additional information in problem cases. The role of MRI for different organs is discussed and a review of the literature is given. We concluded that MRI is considered a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of hepatic iron concentration, to correct misdiagnosis (pseudolesions) from US and CT in focal steatosis and to help with focal lesion detection and characterization, in the healthy and especially in the cirrhotic liver, where MRI is superior to CT. Moreover, MRCP is excellent for identifying the presence and the level of biliary obstruction in malignant invasion and is considered in the literature as a non-invasive screening tool for common bile duct stones, appropriately selecting candidates for preoperative ERCP and sparing others the need for an endoscopic procedure with its associated complications. MRI is the first choice modality for adrenal evaluation in contemporary medical imaging. It is a useful examination in renal as well as splenic pathology and best assesses loco-regional staging, i.e. arterial involvement in pancreatic cancer.

  3. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  4. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  5. Measurement and Quantification of Heterogeneity, Flow, and Mass Transfer in Porous Media Using NMR Low-Field Techiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciok, E.; Olaru, A. M.; Haber, A.; van Landeghem, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Sucre, O. E.; Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.; RWTH Aachen Mobile Low-Field NMR

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is renowned for its unique potential to both reveal and correlate spectroscopic, relaxometric, spatial and dynamic properties in a large variety of organic and inorganic systems. NMR has no restrictions regarding sample opacity and is an entirely non-invasive method, which makes it the ideal tool for the investigation of porous media. However, for years NMR research of soils was limited by the use of high-field NMR devices, which necessitated elaborate NMR experiments and were not applicable to bulky samples or on-site field measurements. The evolution of low-field NMR devices during the past 20 years has brought forth portable, small-scale NMR systems with open and closed magnet arrangements specialized to specific NMR applications. In combination with recent advances in 2D-NMR Laplace methodology [1], low-field NMR has opened up the possibility to study real-life microporous systems ranging from granular media to natural soils and oil well boreholes. Thus, information becomes available, which before has not been accessible with high-field NMR. In this work, we present our recent progress in mobile low-field NMR probe design for field measurements of natural soils: a slim-line logging tool, which can be rammed into the soil of interest on-site. The performance of the device is demonstrated in measurements of moisture profiles of model soils [2] and field measurements of relaxometric properties and moisture profiles of natural soils [3]. Moreover, an improved concept of the slim-line logging tool is shown, with a higher excitation volume and a better signal-to-noise due to an improved coil design. Furthermore, we present our recent results in 2D exchange relaxometry and simulation. These include relaxation-relaxation experiments on natural soils with varying degree of moisture saturation, where we could draw a connection between the relaxometric properties of the soil to its pore size-related diffusivity and to its clay content

  6. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  9. Evaluation of low back pain with low field open magnetic resonance imaging scanner in rural hospital of Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanandham Shrinuvasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain (LBP is the most common symptom which is associated with limitation of normal activities and work-related disability. Imaging techniques are often essential in making the correct diagnosis for prompt management. Plain Radiography though remain a first imaging modality, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI due to its inherent softtissue contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation remains invaluable modality in the evaluation of LBP. Aim: To find the common causes of LBP in different age groups and the role of MRI in detecting the spectrum of various pathological findings. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study done in the Department of Radiodiagnosis during a period of 2 years from July 2013 to July 2015. The study population includes all the cases referred to our department with complaints of LBP. Patients with ferromagnetic metallic implants and uncooperative cases were excluded. HITACHI 0.4 Tesla open MRI machine was used for imaging. Results and Conclusion: This study involved a total of 235 cases. There were 121 males and 114 females. The age of the patient ranged from 21 to 68 years with an average of 41.3 years. Back pain was commonly observed in the third to fifth decade. The common causes for back pain are disc herniations (disc bulge - 35.3%, disc protrusion - 39.6%, disc extrusion - 7.2% accounting to 82.1%, followed by normal study (10.2%, vertebral collapse (traumatic - 2.1%, osteoporotic - 1.7%, infections (2.1%, and neoplasm (1.7%. MRI provides valuable information regarding the underlying causes of LBP, especially in disc and marrow pathology.

  10. Electron cyclotron current drive at ω approx. = ωc with X-mode launched from the low field side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuterer, F.; Kubo, S.

    2000-02-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance layer in a tokamak, ω=ω c (r), is not accessible by the extraordinary wave from the low field side, because it is shielded by a cutoff layer. However, a X-mode launched with a nonzero toroidal angle propagates at the cutoff parallel to the magnetic field and has a circular polarization. Therefore it can already at the cutoff layer interact efficiency with electrons via the Doppler shifted resonance. The driven current can be substantially higher than that driven by the second harmonic X-mode. The applicability of this current drive scheme is limited to rather low values of ω p 2 /ω c 2 , but may be of interest for high magnetic field devices. (author)

  11. Characterization of moisture in acetylated and propionylated radiata pine using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LFNMR) relaxometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Greeley; Thybring, Emil Engelund; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht

    2018-01-01

    . A possible explanation is the counteracting effects of decreased hydrophilicity and reduced moisture content (MC) of these water populations at higher levels of acetylation. The evaluation of propionylation on WCW T2 data was complicated by peak splitting in the relaxation spectrum. Constant T2 values......Moisture in radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) earlywood (EW), which was acetylated or propionylated to various degrees, was measured by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LFNMR) relaxometry. Spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were determined for fully saturated samples at 22 and -18°C. T2 values...... for EW lumen water increased with increasing acetylation weight percentage gain (WPG), perhaps caused by the less hydrophilic acetylated wood (AcW) surface. Cell wall water (WCW) and the water in pits and small voids also showed increasing T2 values as a function of WPG but with a weaker tendency...

  12. Natural history of symptomatic lumbar disk herniation controlled by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Hiromichi; Yamaura, Isakichi; Kurosa, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Hirotoshi; Nakai, Osamu.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in clinical symptoms and sequential findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 66 patients managed with conservative treatment for lumbar disc herniation. In all but 12 patients, there was a good correlation between leg pain and MRI findings, although findings of MRI tended to slightly follow symptom improvement. A notable reduction of herniated mass was seen in a high frequency in sequentrated herniation from an extremely degenerated lumbar disk. The greater the degree of sequentration, the greater the reduction of herniated mass. A shorter duration of leg pain was significantly associated with greater reduction of the herniated mass; leg pain disappeared within 2 months when the herniated mass disappeared on MRI. Because herniated mass disappeared within a short period of time, the involvement of immune reaction was suggested, as well as the possibility of sequentration, degeneration, and phagocytosis. (N.K.)

  13. MRI in the diagnosis of diphallia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafoori, Mahyar; Varedi, Peyman [Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital, Radiology Department, Tehran (Iran); Hosseini, Seyed J. [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran (Iran)

    2007-12-15

    Diphallia or duplication of the penis is an extremely rare but well-documented anomaly. According to the presence of one or two corpora cavernosa in each of the penises, diphallia is classified into two major groups of bifid phallus or true diphallia, respectively. We report a 5-year-old boy with duplication of the penis. Significant separation of the penises and their morphology made them appear as true complete phalluses, but MRI established the definitive diagnosis of bifid phallus by demonstrating the presence of one corpus cavernosum in each penis. MRI is a valuable method for achieving the accurate diagnosis of these anomalies and associated malformations. It also provides the appropriate knowledge regarding anatomical detail and assists the surgeon in decision making and preoperative planning for the optimal surgical approach. (orig.)

  14. Pocket atlas of MRI body anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; May, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a guide to the anatomy of extracranial organs as seen in magnetic resonance images. This collection of 96 magnetic resonance images, accompanied by explanatory line drawings, covers all the major organs of the body- shoulder and humerus; elbow and forearm; hand and wrist; chest; abdomen; pelvis; thigh; knee; calf; and ankle. The images are displayed in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, enabling radiologists to quickly review coronal and sagittal anatomy as it applies to routine MRI practice. Special emphasis is placed on the extremities, where spatial resolution, coronal and sagittal planes, and soft tissue contrast provide important anatomic detail. Each MRI image is carefully labeled - using numbers with legends at the top of the page - to highlight key anatomic features. Where applicable, special parameters and positioning are noted below the images. Accompanying each image is a line drawing demonstrating the level and plane of the image.

  15. Infantile hypopituitarism: etiological variability evidenced by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, M.H.; Zegher, F. de; Vanderschueren-Lodeweyckx, M.; Marchal, G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to document potentially present morphostructural abnormalities of the hypothalamopituitary region in seven infants (age 0-21 months) who presented very early in life with clinical and biochemical evidence of hypopituitarism. Four infants had associated congenital cerebro-facial malformations. The following anatomical abnormalities were identified in variable combinations: ectopic neurohypophysis, absence of the pituitary stalk, extreme elongation of the pituitary stalk, aplasia of the anterior pituitary lobe and no identification of the hypothalamopituitary complex. MRI proved to be very sensitive in the identification of structural malformations of the hypothalamopituitary region in infants with or without cerebro-facial malformations. Although the magnetic resonance image does not appear to be a good predictor of endocrine dysfunction, it provides us more insight into the precise aetiology of this disorder and may be therefore of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic importance. (orig.)

  16. MRI in the diagnosis of diphallia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoori, Mahyar; Varedi, Peyman; Hosseini, Seyed J.

    2007-01-01

    Diphallia or duplication of the penis is an extremely rare but well-documented anomaly. According to the presence of one or two corpora cavernosa in each of the penises, diphallia is classified into two major groups of bifid phallus or true diphallia, respectively. We report a 5-year-old boy with duplication of the penis. Significant separation of the penises and their morphology made them appear as true complete phalluses, but MRI established the definitive diagnosis of bifid phallus by demonstrating the presence of one corpus cavernosum in each penis. MRI is a valuable method for achieving the accurate diagnosis of these anomalies and associated malformations. It also provides the appropriate knowledge regarding anatomical detail and assists the surgeon in decision making and preoperative planning for the optimal surgical approach. (orig.)

  17. Diagnosis of posttraumatic syringomyelia with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Sakamoto, Yuji; Kojima, Ryutaro; Matsuno, Taiji

    1988-01-01

    Five cases with development of syringomyelia, following long stable period of paraplegia after spinal trauma, have been studied with a resistive MRI unit. In all five cases there was spinal cord damage at the lower dorsal or dorsolumbar vertebral levels. Symptoms and signs of syringomyelia developed after long steady period with increased paresthesia, muscle weakness and pain of the shoulders and upper extremities. MRI revealed syringomyelia involving the dorsal and cervical cord up to the C1 or C2 level. The syringomyelia cavity was hypointense on T1 weighted images, but T2 weighted images showed isointensity in 2 of 4 cases showing no flow void. At the site of the cord injury there was diffuse increased signal intensity within the cord, probably indicating myelomalacia or gliosis. Pathogenesis of post-traumatic syringomyelia was discussed from the standpoint of diagnosis and treatment. (author)

  18. Diagnosis of posttraumatic syringomyelia with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Sakamoto, Yuji; Kojima, Ryutaro; Matsuno, Taiji

    1988-11-01

    Five cases with development of syringomyelia, following long stable period of paraplegia after spinal trauma, have been studied with a resistive MRI unit. In all five cases there was spinal cord damage at the lower dorsal or dorsolumbar vertebral levels. Symptoms and signs of syringomyelia developed after long steady period with increased paresthesia, muscle weakness and pain of the shoulders and upper extremities. MRI revealed syringomyelia involving the dorsal and cervical cord up to the C1 or C2 level. The syringomyelia cavity was hypointense on T1 weighted images, but T2 weighted images showed isointensity in 2 of 4 cases showing no flow void. At the site of the cord injury there was diffuse increased signal intensity within the cord, probably indicating myelomalacia or gliosis. Pathogenesis of post-traumatic syringomyelia was discussed from the standpoint of diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Extremal surface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) ... center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI ... pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging modalities (typically CT) or which are particularly well-suited to MR imaging. determine tumor size, extent, ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ... thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ... A physician or nurse specializing in sedation or anesthesia for children should be available during the exam ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... usually completed within one hour but may occasionally take longer. top of page What will I experience ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of ...

  16. MRI features of chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Liu Xia; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MR imaging features of chondroblastoma. Methods: MRI examinations of 20 patients with histological proven chondmblastoma were reviewed retrospectively. The MRI findings of chondroblastoma including the signal intensity, the shape, the growth patterns, and the surrounding bone marrow edema and the adjacent soft tissue edema, the periosteal reaction, the adjacent joint effusion were analyzed. Results: All 20 cases demonstrated heterogeneous MR signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI images and showed lobular margins. Sixteen cases demonstrated expansive growth patterns. Surrounding bone marrow edema was found in 18 cases and adjacent soft tissue edema in 14 cases. Periosteal reaction was identified in 6 cases. In 7 cases the tumor extended to adjacent soft tissue. Adjacent joint effusion was visible on MRI in 6 cases. Conclusion: Heterogeneous signal intensity, lobular margins and expansive growth pattern, adjacent bone marrow and soft tissue edema were the common features of chondroblastoma on MRI. (authors)

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior obstruction of blood flow). determine blood flow dynamics in the vessels and heart chambers. display lymph ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  3. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in evaluating women at high risk for breast cancer. MRI can successfully image the dense breast tissue common in younger women, and it can successfully image breast implants. Both of these are difficult to image using ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ... the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. ... top of page Who interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist, a physician ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ...

  8. Arm MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  9. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  10. Leg MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  11. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary ... is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed on outpatients or inpatients. You will be positioned on the ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... injection. If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exam, a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam ... soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x- ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. ... outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help you pass the time. In some cases, intravenous injection of contrast material ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete ...

  8. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  10. Studying neuroanatomy using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Jason P; van der Kouwe, André J W; Raznahan, Armin; Paus, Tomáš; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Miller, Karla L; Smith, Stephen M; Fischl, Bruce; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N

    2017-02-23

    The study of neuroanatomy using imaging enables key insights into how our brains function, are shaped by genes and environment, and change with development, aging and disease. Developments in MRI acquisition, image processing and data modeling have been key to these advances. However, MRI provides an indirect measurement of the biological signals we aim to investigate. Thus, artifacts and key questions of correct interpretation can confound the readouts provided by anatomical MRI. In this review we provide an overview of the methods for measuring macro- and mesoscopic structure and for inferring microstructural properties; we also describe key artifacts and confounds that can lead to incorrect conclusions. Ultimately, we believe that, although methods need to improve and caution is required in interpretation, structural MRI continues to have great promise in furthering our understanding of how the brain works.

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... there is any question of their presence, an x-ray may be taken to detect and identify ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  15. Towards MRI microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids.

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with ... exam and bring it to your exam in case the radiologist or technologist has any questions. Some ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast for an MRI. If you ... can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ...

  4. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2011-01-01

    of this score will require more PsA imaging datasets. As well, due to improved image resolution since the development of the original rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), the Task Force has worked on semiquantitative assessment of joint space narrowing, and developed a reliable method......The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation...

  5. Third degree skin burns caused by a MRI conditional electrocardiographic monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brix L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual cases of third degree skin burns are reported using MRI approved electrocardiographic leads. This is very uncommon as it is most often the electrodes which are the source of heat related issues. Both patients were sedated due to pain related issues of their lower spine. The burns were caused by a combination of using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner and the inability to cry out during scanning. We would like to bring forward a message that even when using MRI conditional equipment, clinical staff must be extremely careful in order to secure safe image acquisition using MRI.

  6. MRI in osteochondrosis dissecans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, K.; Heuck, A.; Rodammer, G.; Raff, W.; Haller, W.

    1987-08-01

    The osseous manifestations of osteochondrosis dissecans are well demonstrated by conventional and computerised tomography. Beyond that, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is effective in evaluating the vitality and loosening of an osseous dissecate. Subchondral cavities and cartilaginous defects are detected with high acccuracy. Further, MRI seems to be a useful method in childhood to differentiate a variant irregularity of the osseous articular surface from definite osteochondrosis dissecans.

  7. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The MRI Assessment Program involves installation and operation of five MRI units in Australian public hospitals and the evaluation at each unit of the cost and efficacy of the technology over a period of two years. This first report in a series presents preliminary usage and cost data for the year to 30 June 1987 as well as describing the background and the data set. 6 figs., tabs

  8. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  9. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  10. Statistics of Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Davison, Anthony C.; Huser, Raphaë l

    2015-01-01

    Statistics of extremes concerns inference for rare events. Often the events have never yet been observed, and their probabilities must therefore be estimated by extrapolation of tail models fitted to available data. Because data concerning the event

  11. Analysis of extreme events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khuluse, S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ) determination of the distribution of the damage and (iii) preparation of products that enable prediction of future risk events. The methodology provided by extreme value theory can also be a powerful tool in risk analysis...

  12. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute lower extremity ischaemia. Acute lower limb ischaemia is a surgical emergency. ... is ~1.5 cases per 10 000 persons per year. Acute ischaemia ... Table 2. Clinical features discriminating embolic from thrombotic ALEXI. Clinical features.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Chiral Dendrimer-Triamine-Coordinated Gd-MRI Contrast Agents Evaluated by in Vivo MRI and Estimated by in Vitro QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Miyake

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed novel chiral dendrimer-triamine-coordinated Gd-MRI contrast agents (Gd-MRI CAs, which showed longitudinal relaxivity (r1 values about four times higher than that of clinically used Gd-DTPA (Magnevist®, Bayer. In our continuing study of pharmacokinetic differences derived from both the chirality and generation of Gd-MRI CAs, we found that the ability of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs to circulate within the body can be directly evaluated by in vitro MRI (7 T. In this study, the association constants (Ka of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs to bovine serum albumin (BSA, measured and calculated with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in vitro, were found to be an extremely easy means for evaluating the body-circulation ability of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs. The Ka values of S-isomeric dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs were generally greater than those of R-isomeric dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs, which is consistent with the results of our previous MRI study in vivo.

  14. Upper extremity peripheral neuropathies: role and impact of MR imaging on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Burg, Doris; Studer, Ansgar; Weishaupt, Dominik

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of MR imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of peripheral nerve lesions of the upper extremities and to assess its impact on the patient management. Fifty-one patients with clinical evidence of radial, median, and/or ulnar nerve lesions and unclear or ambiguous clinical findings had MRI of the upper extremity at 1.5 T. MR images and clinical data were reviewed by two blinded radiologists and a group of three clinical experts, respectively, with regard to radial, median, and/or ulnar nerve, as well as muscle abnormalities. MRI and clinical findings were correlated using Spearman's (p) rank correlation test. The impact of MRI on patient management was assessed by the group of experts and ranked as ''major,'' ''moderate,'' or ''no'' impact. The correlation of MRI and clinical findings was moderate for the assessment of the median/radial nerve and muscles (p=0.51/0.51/0.63, respectively) and weak for the ulnar nerve (p=0.40). The impact of MRI on patient management was assessed as ''major'' in 24/51 (47%), ''moderate'' in 19/51 (37%), and ''no'' in 8/51 (16%) patients. MRI in patients with upper extremity peripheral neuropathies and unclear or ambiguous clinical findings substantially influences the patient management. (orig.)

  15. Investigation on water status and distribution in broccoli and the effects of drying on water status using NMR and MRI methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Fangfang; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-01-01

    Many quality attributes of food products are influenced by the water status and the microstructure. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are applied to non-destructively monitor the water status and structure of food. The aim of this study is to

  16. Fetal MRI: obstetrical and neurological perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gressens, Pierre [INSERM E 9935 and Service de Neurologie Pediatrique, Hopital Robert Debre, 48 Blvd Serurier, 75019, Paris (France); Luton, Dominique [Maternity Department, Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France)

    2004-09-01

    Despite major advances in the understanding and in the genetics of several diseases of the developing brain, early prediction of the neurological prognosis of brain abnormality discovered in utero or of white matter damage discovered in a preterm neonate remains particularly difficult. Advances in prenatal diagnosis and the increased rate of survival of extremely preterm infants who are at higher risk of developing white matter damage underline the critical and urgent need for reliable predictive techniques. New imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy or functional MRI applied to the fetus represent promising tools in this perspective. (orig.)

  17. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme

  18. Cine MRI of dissecting aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Hajime

    1991-01-01

    Cine MRI was performed in 25 cases of aortic dissection and comparative study among cine MRI, spin-echo static MRI, contrast-enhanced CT and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was made. Cine MRI accurately detected aortic dissection. It was most accurate among various diagnostic methods in demonstration of entry site of dissection. Take-off of renal artery and its relation to true and false channels was also accurately demonstrated by cine MRI. The above results suggest that cine MRI can be an important diagnostic modality with almost equal diagnostic quality to those of conventional angiography. However, further technical improvement to shorten the imaging time seems necessary to replace angiography. (author)

  19. Imaging of upper extremity stress fractures in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark W

    2006-07-01

    Although it is much less common than injuries in the lower extremities, an upper extremity stress injury can have a significant impact on an athlete. If an accurate and timely diagnosis is to be made, the clinician must have a high index of suspicion of a stress fracture in any athlete who is involved in a throwing, weightlifting, or upper extremity weight-bearing sport and presents with chronic pain in the upper extremity. Imaging should play an integral role in the work-up of these patients; if initial radiographs are unrevealing, further cross-sectional imaging should be strongly considered. Although a three-phase bone scan is highly sensitive in this regard, MRI has become the study of choice at most centers.

  20. Extreme meteorological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinger de Schwarzkopf, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Different meteorological variables which may reach significant extreme values, such as the windspeed and, in particular, its occurrence through tornadoes and hurricanes that necesarily incide and wich must be taken into account at the time of nuclear power plants' installation, are analyzed. For this kind of study, it is necessary to determine the basic phenomenum of design. Two criteria are applied to define the basic values of design for extreme meteorological variables. The first one determines the expected extreme value: it is obtained from analyzing the recurence of the phenomenum in a convened period of time, wich may be generally of 50 years. The second one determines the extreme value of low probability, taking into account the nuclear power plant's operating life -f.ex. 25 years- and considering, during said lapse, the occurrence probabilities of extreme meteorological phenomena. The values may be determined either by the deterministic method, which is based on the acknowledgement of the fundamental physical characteristics of the phenomena or by the probabilistic method, that aims to the analysis of historical statistical data. Brief comments are made on the subject in relation to the Argentine Republic area. (R.J.S.) [es

  1. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care.......The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants...... critically assessed the current state of PET/MRI, both clinically and as a research tool, and attempted to chart future directions. The meeting addressed the use of PET/MRI and workflows in oncology, neurosciences, infection, inflammation and chronic pain syndromes, as well as deeper discussions about how...

  2. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  3. The technique of MRT aided abdominal drainage using an open low field magnet. Feasibility and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehl, H.B.; Frahm, C.; Schimmelpenning, H.; Weiss, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    To test the practicality of MRT-aided drainage using an open low field magnet and to report on the early clinical results. So far seven patients have been treated (four subphrenic abscesses, two psoas abscesses and one pancreatic pseudocyst). The planning of the approach and catheter insertion were carried out under MRT control (Magnetom Open, 0.2 T). Subsequent treatment was controlled by CT and fluoroscopy. Initial puncture was carried out with a non-magnetic 18 gauge Chiba needle. The drainage catheter was introduced by Seldinger's technique in six cases and with a trocar in one patient. In all seven patients drainage could be started successfully. The design of the magnet and coils permitted adequate accessibility of the patient. There were no problems in visualising the puncture needle. Controlling the position of the catheter by MRT was, however, difficult. The first two steps in abscess drainage (planning the approach and inserting the catheter) can be carried out under MRT control. For further catheter control and observing the course of the disease we presently prefer CT or fluoroscopy. (orig.) [de

  4. Study of the method of water-injected meat identifying based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianmei; Lin, Qing; Yang, Fang; Zheng, Zheng; Ai, Zhujun

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study to apply low-field nuclear magnetic resonance technique was to study regular variation of the transverse relaxation spectral parameters of water-injected meat with the proportion of water injection. Based on this, the method of one-way ANOVA and discriminant analysis was used to analyse the differences between these parameters in the capacity of distinguishing water-injected proportion, and established a model for identifying water-injected meat. The results show that, except for T 21b, T 22e and T 23b, the other parameters of the T 2 relaxation spectrum changed regularly with the change of water-injected proportion. The ability of different parameters to distinguish water-injected proportion was different. Based on S, P 22 and T 23m as the prediction variable, the Fisher model and the Bayes model were established by discriminant analysis method, qualitative and quantitative classification of water-injected meat can be realized. The rate of correct discrimination of distinguished validation and cross validation were 88%, the model was stable.

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  6. Acclimatization to extreme heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, M. E.; Ganguly, A. R.; Bhatia, U.

    2017-12-01

    Heat extremes throughout the globe, as well as in the United States, are expected to increase. These heat extremes have been shown to impact human health, resulting in some of the highest levels of lives lost as compared with similar natural disasters. But in order to inform decision makers and best understand future mortality and morbidity, adaptation and mitigation must be considered. Defined as the ability for individuals or society to change behavior and/or adapt physiologically, acclimatization encompasses the gradual adaptation that occurs over time. Therefore, this research aims to account for acclimatization to extreme heat by using a hybrid methodology that incorporates future air conditioning use and installation patterns with future temperature-related time series data. While previous studies have not accounted for energy usage patterns and market saturation scenarios, we integrate such factors to compare the impact of air conditioning as a tool for acclimatization, with a particular emphasis on mortality within vulnerable communities.

  7. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  8. Statistics of Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Davison, Anthony C.

    2015-04-10

    Statistics of extremes concerns inference for rare events. Often the events have never yet been observed, and their probabilities must therefore be estimated by extrapolation of tail models fitted to available data. Because data concerning the event of interest may be very limited, efficient methods of inference play an important role. This article reviews this domain, emphasizing current research topics. We first sketch the classical theory of extremes for maxima and threshold exceedances of stationary series. We then review multivariate theory, distinguishing asymptotic independence and dependence models, followed by a description of models for spatial and spatiotemporal extreme events. Finally, we discuss inference and describe two applications. Animations illustrate some of the main ideas. © 2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  9. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  10. MRI for myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutberlet, M.; Luecke, C.; Krieghoff, C.; Hildebrand, L.; Steiner, J.; Adam, J.; Grotthoff, M.; Lehmkuhl, L.; Lurz, P.; Eitel, I.; Thiele, H.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has become the primary tool for the non-invasive assessment in patients with suspected myocarditis, especially after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the differential diagnosis. Various MRI parameters are available which have different accuracies. Volumetric and functional ventricular assessment and the occurrence of pericardial effusion alone demonstrate only a poor sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the T2-ratio (edema assessment), the early or global relative myocardial enhancement (gRE) and the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), which represents irreversibly injured myocardium, are more specific parameters. All MRI parameters demonstrate the best accuracy in infarct-like acute myocarditis, whereas in chronic myocarditis sensitivity and specificity are less accurate. Therefore, a multisequential (at least two out of three parameters are positive) approach is recommended. The assessment of the value of newer, more quantitative MRI sequences, such as T1 and T2-mapping is still under investigation. (orig.) [de

  11. MRI of oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, N.A., E-mail: ahmad77chinar@gmail.co [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India); Robbani, I.; Kosar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India)

    2011-02-15

    Oriental cholangiohepatitis (OCH) also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized by intrahepatic duct calculi, strictures, and recurrent infections. In turn cholangitis can result in multiple hepatic abscesses, further biliary strictures, and in severe cases, progressive hepatic parenchymal destruction, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and conventional T1-weighted (T1 W) and T2-weighted (T2 W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have been described in patients with OCH. MRCP findings include duct dilation, strictures, and calculi. MRCP can help to localize the diseased ducts and determine the severity of involvement. T1 and T2 W sequences reveal the parenchymal changes of atrophy, abscess formation, and portal hypertension in addition to calculi. Post-treatment changes are also well depicted using MRI. Comprehensive, non-invasive assessment is achieved by using conventional MRI and MRCP in OCH providing a roadmap for endoscopic or surgical management.

  12. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extremal graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The ever-expanding field of extremal graph theory encompasses a diverse array of problem-solving methods, including applications to economics, computer science, and optimization theory. This volume, based on a series of lectures delivered to graduate students at the University of Cambridge, presents a concise yet comprehensive treatment of extremal graph theory.Unlike most graph theory treatises, this text features complete proofs for almost all of its results. Further insights into theory are provided by the numerous exercises of varying degrees of difficulty that accompany each chapter. A

  14. Preterm brain injury on term-equivalent age MRI in relation to perinatal factors and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Margaretha J; Kersbergen, Karina J; van Kooij, Britt J M; Benders, Manon J N L; van Haastert, Ingrid C; Koopman-Esseboom, C; Neil, Jeffrey J; de Vries, Linda S; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Inder, Terrie E; Groenendaal, Floris

    OBJECTIVES: First, to apply a recently extended scoring system for preterm brain injury at term-equivalent age (TEA-)MRI in a regional extremely preterm cohort; second, to identify independent perinatal factors associated with this score; and third, to assess the prognostic value of this TEA-MRI

  15. Multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings of adult mesoblastic nephroma: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqin Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoblastic nephroma (MN presenting in an adult is extremely rare. The computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of this tumor in adulthood have not been widely reported. We present two additional cases of adult MN and describe the multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute ''wiiitis'' of the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nett, Michael P.; Sperling, John W.; Collins, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first reported case of acute ''wiiitis'', documented clinically and by imaging, of the upper extremity, caused by prolonged participation in a physically interactive virtual video-game. Unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated marked T2-weighted signal abnormality within several muscles of the shoulder and upper arm, without evidence of macroscopic partial- or full-thickness tearing of the muscle or of intramuscular hematoma. (orig.)

  17. MRI characterization of the glenohumeral joint in Apert syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Tami [University of Illinois-Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Wyers, Mary [Children' s Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Children' s Plaza, Box 9, Chicago, IL (United States); King, Erik [Children' s Memorial Hospital, Orthopaedic Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The features of craniosynostosis, facial dysmorphism, and distal extremity syndactyly in Apert syndrome are well known. However, there have been limited descriptions of the associated glenohumeral joint findings. We report the radiographic and MRI abnormalities of the glenohumeral joints in a 10-month-old girl with Apert syndrome. The MRI findings in the girl support the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of Apert syndrome is caused by defective cartilage segmentation with premature and abnormal ossification of a cartilage bar within a joint space. The resultant shoulder joint deformity is related to glenoid hypoplasia and growth arrest of the medial aspect of the humeral head. (orig.)

  18. Lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve: typical and atypical MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Bernadette Zhi Ying; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Wenger, Doris E.; Dyck, P. James B.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Spinner, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Lipomatosis of nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of nerve, usually affecting the median nerve. The MRI appearance is characteristic. We describe two cases of lipomatosis of nerve involving the sciatic nerve, an extremely unusual location for this lesion, in patients with sciatic neuropathy. These cases share the typical features previously described in the literature for other nerves, but also contain atypical features not previously highlighted, relating to the variability in distribution and extent of the fatty deposition. Recognition of the MRI appearance of this entity is important in order to avoid unnecessary attempts at surgical resection of this lesion. (orig.)

  19. Contrast agents for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemain, B.

    1994-01-01

    Contrast agents MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) have been developed to improve the diagnostic information obtained by this technic. They mainly interact on T1 and T2 parameters and increase consequently normal to abnormal tissues contrast. The paramagnetic agents which mainly act on longitudinal relaxation rate (T1) are gadolinium complexes for which stability is the main parameter to avoid any release of free gadolinium. The superparamagnetic agents that decrease signal intensity by an effect on transversal relaxation rate (T2) are developed for liver, digestive and lymph node imaging. Many area of research are now opened for optimal use of present and future contrast agents in MRI. (author). 28 refs., 4 tabs

  20. MRI of vaginal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C.; Balogun, M.; Ganesan, R.; Olliff, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the assessment of suspected vaginal pathology. This pictorial review demonstrates the MRI features and some of the histopathological findings of a variety of vaginal conditions. These may be congenital (total vaginal agenesis, partial vaginal agenesis, longitudinal vaginal septum, transverse vaginal septum), benign (Bartholin's cyst, diffuse vaginal inflammation, invasive endometriosis, ureterovaginal fistula, post-surgical appearances with the formation of a neovagina and adhesions) or malignant, usually due to extension or recurrence from another pelvic malignancy. In this paper, examples of the above are described and illustrated together with examples of the much rarer primary vaginal malignancies

  1. MRI of vaginal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, C. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: carolina.lopez@bwhct.nhs.uk; Balogun, M. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Ganesan, R. [Department of Histopathology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Olliff, J.F. [University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the assessment of suspected vaginal pathology. This pictorial review demonstrates the MRI features and some of the histopathological findings of a variety of vaginal conditions. These may be congenital (total vaginal agenesis, partial vaginal agenesis, longitudinal vaginal septum, transverse vaginal septum), benign (Bartholin's cyst, diffuse vaginal inflammation, invasive endometriosis, ureterovaginal fistula, post-surgical appearances with the formation of a neovagina and adhesions) or malignant, usually due to extension or recurrence from another pelvic malignancy. In this paper, examples of the above are described and illustrated together with examples of the much rarer primary vaginal malignancies.

  2. Respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK): Initial clinical experience on an MRI-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Du, Dongsu; Gao, Yu; Rashid, Shams; Cao, Minsong; Shaverdian, Narek; Hegde, John V; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy; Raldow, Ann; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2018-06-01

    To optimize and evaluate the respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK-4D-MRI) method in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRgRT) system. The study included seven patients with abdominal tumors treated on the MRgRT system. ROCK-4D-MRI and 2D-CINE, was performed immediately after one of the treatment fractions. Motion quantification based on 4D-MRI was compared with those based on 2D-CINE. The image quality of 4D-MRI was evaluated against 4D-CT. The gross tumor volumes (GTV) were defined based on individual respiratory phases of both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and compared for their variability over the respiratory cycle. The motion measurements based on 4D-MRI matched well with 2D-CINE, with differences of 1.04 ± 0.52 mm in the superior-inferior and 0.54 ± 0.21 mm in the anterior-posterior directions. The image quality scores of 4D-MRI were significantly higher than 4D-CT, with better tumor contrast (3.29 ± 0.76 vs. 1.86 ± 0.90) and less motion artifacts (3.57 ± 0.53 vs. 2.29 ± 0.95). The GTVs were more consistent in 4D-MRI than in 4D-CT, with significantly smaller GTV variability (9.31 ± 4.58% vs. 34.27 ± 23.33%). Our study demonstrated the clinical feasibility of using the ROCK-4D-MRI to acquire high quality, respiratory motion-resolved 4D-MRI in a low-field MRgRT system. The 4D-MRI image could provide accurate dynamic information for radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ... may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... than 30 minutes from the onset of symptoms. Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast for an MRI. If you ... of time after placement (usually six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. ... information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules ...

  4. The trunk and extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raval, B.; Yeakley, J.W.; Harris, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Together these volumes form an atlas for multiplanar anatomy of the entire body - using modern state-of-the-art computed tomography supplemented with MRI to provide the thorough knowledge of normal anatomy that's fundamental to recognizing pathological alteration. Each volume can stand alone, and each presents the material using radiologic images presented side by side with labeled drawings. There's information of the sella, temporal bone, wrist, and foot. Different window settings are used to emphasize bone and soft tissue detail. Each of the CT or MR images in the atlas have been specifically selected by the authors to illustrate particular radiologic anatomy

  5. MRI diagnosis of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into central spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Cheng Jingliang; Wang Juan; Li Huali; Ren Cuiping; Zhang Yan; Gao Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the appearances of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal, as well as the MRI diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: Eleven cases of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal were reviewed. Six cases underwent whole spine MRI scan, 2 cases with thoracic and lumbar spine MRI, as well as 3 cases only with lumbar spine MRI. Results: Free fat droplets within spinal cord central canal demonstrated high signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight declined signal intensity on T 2 WI, and extremely low signal on fat suppression sequence. Of the 11 cases, 2 cases broke into neighboring central spinal canal of the dermoid, 3 cases scattered within thoracic spinal cord central canal, 4 cases discontinuously distributed in the whole spinal cord central canal, 2 cases showed continuous distribution. Conclusion: Intraspinal dermoid ruptured in the central spinal canal had specific appearance on MRI, when a dermoid tumor is suspected, MRI of the entire spine were recommended to detect possible leakage of' fat within central spinal canal. (authors)

  6. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems...... consistent data throughout the course of a study, and consistent stability across time and sites is needed to allow data from different time periods or acquisition sites to be optimally integrated....

  7. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  8. Stellar extreme ultraviolet astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, W.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The design, calibration, and launch of a rocket-borne imaging telescope for extreme ultraviolet astronomy are described. The telescope, which employed diamond-turned grazing incidence optics and a ranicon detector, was launched November 19, 1976, from the White Sands Missile Range. The telescope performed well and returned data on several potential stellar sources of extreme ultraviolet radiation. Upper limits ten to twenty times more sensitive than previously available were obtained for the extreme ultraviolet flux from the white dwarf Sirius B. These limits fall a factor of seven below the flux predicted for the star and demonstrate that the temperature of Sirius B is not 32,000 K as previously measured, but is below 30,000 K. The new upper limits also rule out the photosphere of the white dwarf as the source of the recently reported soft x-rays from Sirius. Two other white dwarf stars, Feige 24 and G191-B2B, were observed. Upper limits on the flux at 300 A were interpreted as lower limits on the interstellar hydrogen column densities to these stars. The lower limits indicate interstellar hydrogen densitites of greater than .02 cm -3 . Four nearby stars (Sirius, Procyon, Capella, and Mirzam) were observed in a search for intense low temperature coronae or extended chromospheres. No extreme ultraviolet radiation from these stars was detected, and upper limits to their coronal emisson measures are derived

  9. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003461.htm Extremity x-ray To use the sharing features on this page, ... in the body Risks There is low-level radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the ...

  10. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  11. Statistics of Local Extremes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Bierbooms, W.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2003-01-01

    . A theoretical expression for the probability density function associated with local extremes of a stochasticprocess is presented. The expression is basically based on the lower four statistical moments and a bandwidth parameter. The theoretical expression is subsequently verified by comparison with simulated...

  12. Less Confusion in Diffusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tax, CMW

    2016-01-01

    With its unique ability to investigate tissue architecture and microstructure in vivo, diffusion MRI (dMRI) has gained tremendous interest and the society has been continuously triggered to develop novel dMRI image analysis approaches. With the overwhelming amount of strategies currently available

  13. MRI in subacute combined degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, S.; Naritomi, H.; Sawada, T.

    1994-01-01

    Neuropathological studies show the main lesions to be in the posterior and lateral columns. Recent progress in MRI has made it possible to clarify the lesions of many neutrological diseases. However, there has only been one report of the lesions of SCD shown definitely on MRI. We report a typical case of the disease, with lesions shown clearly on MRI. (orig./MG)

  14. Evaluation of low-frequency operational limit of proposed ITER low-field-side reflectometer waveguide run including miter bends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guiding [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Plasma Science and Technology Inst. (PSTI); Peebles, W. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Plasma Science and Technology Inst. (PSTI); Doyle, E. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Plasma Science and Technology Inst. (PSTI); Crocker, N. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Plasma Science and Technology Inst. (PSTI); Wannberg, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Plasma Science and Technology Inst. (PSTI); Lau, Cornwall H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hanson, Gregory R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Doane, John L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The present design concept for the ITER low-field-side reflectometer transmission line (TL) consists of an ~40 m long, 6.35 cm diameter helically corrugated waveguide (WG) together with ten 90° miter bends. This paper presents an evaluation of the TL performance at low frequencies (33-50 GHz) where the predicted HE11 mode ohmic and mode conversion losses start to increase significantly. Quasi-optical techniques were used to form a near Gaussian beam to efficiently couple radiation in this frequency range into the WG. We observed that the output beams from the guide remained linearly polarized with cross-polarization power levels of ~1.5%-3%. The polarization rotation due to the helical corrugations was in the range ~1°-3°. The radiated beam power profiles typically show excellent Gaussian propagation characteristics at distances >20 cm from the final exit aperture. The round trip propagation loss was found to be ~2.5 dB at 50 GHz and ~6.5 dB at 35 GHz, showing an inverse increase with frequency. This was consistent with updated calculations of miter bend and ohmic losses. At low frequencies (33-50 GHz), the mode purity remained very good at the exit of the waveguide, and the losses are perfectly acceptable for operation in ITER. Finally, the primary challenge may come from the future addition of a Gaussian telescope and other filter components within the corrugated guide, which will likely introduce additional perturbations to the beam profile and an increase in mode-conversion loss.

  15. Dynamical cancellation of pulse-induced transients in a metallic shielded room for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Dong, Hui; Clarke, John

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-induced transients such as eddy currents can cause problems in measurement techniques where a signal is acquired after an applied preparatory pulse. In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, performed in magnetic fields typically of the order of 100 μT, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced in part by prepolarizing the proton spins with a pulse of much larger magnetic field and in part by detecting the signal with a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). The pulse turn-off, however, can induce large eddy currents in the shielded room, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic-field transient that both seriously distorts the spin dynamics and exceeds the range of the SQUID readout. It is essential to reduce this transient substantially before image acquisition. We introduce dynamical cancellation (DynaCan), a technique in which a precisely designed current waveform is applied to a separate coil during the later part and turn off of the polarizing pulse. This waveform, which bears no resemblance to the polarizing pulse, is designed to drive the eddy currents to zero at the precise moment that the polarizing field becomes zero. We present the theory used to optimize the waveform using a detailed computational model with corrections from measured magnetic-field transients. SQUID-based measurements with DynaCan demonstrate a cancellation of 99%. Dynamical cancellation has the great advantage that, for a given system, the cancellation accuracy can be optimized in software. This technique can be applied to both metal and high-permeability alloy shielded rooms, and even to transients other than eddy currents

  16. Aspects of 'low field' magnetotransport in epitaxial thin films of the ferromagnetic metallic oxide SrRuO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, O.; Saldarriaga, W.; Baca, E.

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the conductive ferromagnetic oxide SrRuO 3 were grown on an (001) SrTiO 3 (STO) substrate by using DC sputtering technique. The magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of the films were measured by applying the magnetic field both perpendicular (out-of-plane) and parallel (in-plane) to the film plane and ever maintaining the direction of the applied field perpendicular to that of the transport current. The films grown on an (001) STO substrate showed identical magnetization properties in two orthogonal crystallographic directions of the substrate, [100] S and [001] S (in-plane and out-of-plane geometry), which suggests the presence of a multi domain structure within the plane of the film. For such samples, no anisotropic field (hard axis) along de [001]s direction, i.e., perpendicular to the film-plane could be detected. Nevertheless, a distinguishable temperature dependent out-of-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) along with strong temperature dependent low field hysteretic MR(H) behavior was detected for the studied films. A negative MR ratio MR(T)=[ρ(μ 0 H=9T; T)-ρ( μ 0 H=0T; T)]/ρ( μ 0 H=0T; T) on the order of a few percent, with maximums of ∼6% and ∼4% (right at the Curie temperature, T C ∼160K) was calculated for an in-plane and out-of plane measuring geometry, respectively. In addition there is an equally strong MR effect at low temperatures, which might be related to the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy together with a magnetization rotation. Both the MR(T) behavior and the achieved values (except for T 3 films grown on 2 o miscut (001) STO substrates with the current parallel to the field and parallel to the [1-bar11] direction, which was identified as the easier axis for magnetization

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prepare your child for the sedation or anesthesia. Alternatively, certain pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need for sedation or anesthesia. They prepare the children for MRI by showing ...

  18. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of MRI ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or anesthesia. Alternatively, certain pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a metal ... in patients with iodine contrast allergy. It is far less common for a patient ...

  4. Acute epiglottitis: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozanne, A.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Ducreux, D.; Lasjaunias, P.; Meyer, B.

    2004-01-01

    We report the MRI findings in an adult with epiglottitis. There was thickening of the epiglottis and left aryepiglottic fold. Management of this life-threatening condition requires imaging only when the diagnosis is uncertain or when an abscess or other complication is suspected. (orig.)

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious ...

  6. Hippocampal malrotation: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez, Paulina; Martinez, Adriana; Romero, Carlos; Lopez, Miriam; Zaffaroni, Alejandra; Lopez, Adriana

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the common features of hippocampus malrotation in patients with epilepsy by volumetric and high-resolution MRI. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 5 patients (2 females and 3 males) ages ranged between 6-41 years (average: 25 years), all of them with epilepsy diagnosis. MRI was performed with a 1.5 T (GE Signa). The epilepsy protocol include sagittal T1, axial T1 and T2, coronal FLAIR, coronal T2 (high-resolution) and volumetric 3D SPGR IR 1.5 mm thick sequences. Results: The common features found in all patients were: a) Incomplete inversion and round configuration of the hippocampus; b) Unilateral affectation; c) Variable affectation of the hippocampus; d) Normal signal intensity; e) Modification of the inner structure of the hippocampus; f) Abnormal angularity of the collateral sulcus; g) Abnormal position and size of the fornix; h) Normal size of the temporal lobe; and i) Enlargement of the temporal horn with particular configuration. Conclusion: Hippocampus malrotation is a malformation that should be included in the differential diagnosis of the epilepsy patients. MRI provides accurate information for the diagnosis. (author)

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also ... will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician for a prescription for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine-containing contrast ... more information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media . ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  13. Fetal MRI; Fetales MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany); Turowski, B. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Neuroradiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany); Schaper, J. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Kinderradiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Ultrasonography is the method of choice for prenatal malformation screening, but it does not always provide sufficient information for correct diagnosis or adequate abnormality evaluation. Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to complete sonographic findings. It was initially used for evaluation of cerebral abnormalities but is increasingly being applied to other fetal areas. In vivo investigation of fetal brain maturation has been enhanced by MRI. An adequate analysis of fetal chest and abdomen can be achieved with fast T2-, T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The advantages include the great field of view and the excellent soft tissue contrast. This allows correct diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and evaluation of the consequences on pulmonary growth. Other pulmonary malformations, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration and brochogenic cysts, can also be easily identified. Renal position can be quickly determined using DWI sequences and renal agenesia can be easily diagnosed with only one sequence. Prenatal MRI is virtually as effective as postnatal examination, dispenses with transport of a potentially very ill newborn, and provides logistic advantages. Therefore, prenatal MRI is useful for adequate postnatal treatment of newborns with malformations. (orig.)

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. Women should always inform their physician or technologist if ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. ... should be available during the exam for your child's safety. You will be given special instructions for ...

  16. MRI in suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, M.M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op de optimalisatie van beeldvormende diagnostiek bij patiënten met een klinische verdenking op appendicitis, waarbij het gebruik van ‘magnetic resonance imaging’ (MRI) wordt verkend. Het proefschrift omvat de resultaten van de OPTIMAP-studie (OPTimisation of IMaging

  17. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. Methods A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Results Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. Conclusions The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization. PMID:29351339

  18. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization.

  19. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium

  20. Extremes in nature

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, Gianfausto; Kottegoda, Nathabandu T

    2007-01-01

    This book is about the theoretical and practical aspects of the statistics of Extreme Events in Nature. Most importantly, this is the first text in which Copulas are introduced and used in Geophysics. Several topics are fully original, and show how standard models and calculations can be improved by exploiting the opportunities offered by Copulas. In addition, new quantities useful for design and risk assessment are introduced.

  1. MRI diagnosis of diabetic muscle infarction: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, N.J.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Kathol, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction (DMI) is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus occurring in patients with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes. In previous reports, the diagnosis of this condition was based on the pathologic studies, although MRI examinations were performed in a few patients as part of the diagnostic work-up. In this report, we describe two additional cases of DMI where the diagnosis was based on the MRI findings in conjunction with the clinical picture and laboratory studies. The patients usually present with thigh or calf pain and swelling, are afebrile, and have normal white blood cell count. MRI examination typically shows diffuse swelling and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the affected muscles, with no focal fluid collections. In the proper clinical setting, these findings are diagnostic of DMI and patients should be spared unnecessary invasive diagnostic examinations such as lower extremity venograms and biopsies. (orig.). With 4 figs

  2. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Bhaskar N

    1997-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma accounting for almost 55%. These tumors arise from unsegmented mesoderm or primitive mesenchyma, which have the capacity to differentiate into muscle. Less than 5% occur in the first year of life. Extremity rhabdomyosarcoma are mainly seen in the adolescent years. The most common histologic subtype is the alveolar variant. Other characteristics of extremity rhabdomyosarcoma include a predilection for lymph node metastasis, a high local failure, and a relatively low survival rate. They often present as slow painless masses; however, lesions in the hand and foot often present as painful masses and imaging studies may show invasion of the bone. Initial diagnostic approaches include needle biopsy or incisional biopsy for larger lesions. Excisional biopsy is indicated preferably for lesions less than 2.5 cm. following this in most instances therapy is initiated with multi agent chemotherapy depending upon response, the next modality may be either surgery with intent to cure or radiation therapy. Amputation of an extremity for local control is not considered in most instances. Prognostic factors that have been determined over the years to be of significance by multi variant analysis have included age, tumor size, invasiveness, presence of either nodal or distant metastasis, and complete excision whenever feasible, with supplemental radiation therapy for local control

  3. Is Low-field NMR a Complementary Tool to GC-MS in Quality Control of Essential Oils? A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, Andre; Wu, Yu; Tian, Runtao; Beek, van Teris A.

    2018-01-01

    High-field NMR is an expensive and important quality control technique. In recent years, cheaper and simpler low-field NMR has become available as a new quality control technique. In this study, 60 MHz 1 H-NMR was compared with GC-MS and refractometry for the detection of adulteration of essential

  4. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National Universty Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  5. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot perform...

  6. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  7. MRI of a Subcutaneous Myolipoma in the Ankle: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Sang Eun; Lee, Jung Uee; Choi, Eun Seok [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Myolipoma is a rare benign tumor, composed of irregularly admixed adipose tissue and smooth muscle fibers. Few literature studies have described the radiologic appearance of myolipoma, especially in the soft tissue. No MRI findings in subcutaneous myolipoma of an extremity have been reported. Here, we report on the case of a 34-year-old woman with myolipoma in the subcutaneous tissue of the ankle and describe MRI features of the lesion.

  8. Modified Gadonanotubes as a Promising Novel MRI Contrasting Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Rouzbeh Jahanbakhsh; Fatemeh Atyabi; Saeed Shanehsazzadeh; Zahra Sobhani; Mohsen Adeli; Rassoul Dinarvand

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging drug and imaging carrier systems which show significant versatility. One of the extraordinary characteristics of CNTs as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrasting agent is the extremely large proton relaxivities when loaded with gadolinium ion (Gdn 3+) clusters. Methods In this study equated Gdn 3+ clusters were loaded in the sidewall defects of oxidized multiwalled (MW) CNTs. The amount of loaded gadolinium ion into ...

  9. MRI of cardiovascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastler, Bruno [Centre Hospitalier Univ. Jean Minjoz, Besancon (France); Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (FR). Lab. I4S (Health, Innovation, Intervention, Imaging, Engineering); Centre Hospitalier Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    MRI is a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality that is perfectly suited for the diagnosis and follow-up of both pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. It provides a large field of view and has the unique ability to depict complex cardiac and vascular anatomy and to measure cardiac function and flow within one examination. MRI is the ideal complement to echocardiography whenever the information provided by the latter is limited. This book has been conceived as a self-teaching manual that will assist qualified radiologists, cardiologists, and pediatricians, as well as those in training. It is richly illustrated with numerous images and drawings that cover all usual and most unusual anomalies. The principal author, Professor Bruno Kastler, is head of radiology at Besancon University Hospital, France and is board certified in both radiology and cardiology. (orig.)

  10. MRI of cardiovascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastler, Bruno; Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon; Centre Hospitalier Sherbrooke Univ., PQ

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality that is perfectly suited for the diagnosis and follow-up of both pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. It provides a large field of view and has the unique ability to depict complex cardiac and vascular anatomy and to measure cardiac function and flow within one examination. MRI is the ideal complement to echocardiography whenever the information provided by the latter is limited. This book has been conceived as a self-teaching manual that will assist qualified radiologists, cardiologists, and pediatricians, as well as those in training. It is richly illustrated with numerous images and drawings that cover all usual and most unusual anomalies. The principal author, Professor Bruno Kastler, is head of radiology at Besancon University Hospital, France and is board certified in both radiology and cardiology. (orig.)

  11. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  12. Boomerang sign on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Karen G; Hoesch, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    Altered mental status and more subtle cognitive and personality changes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are pervasive problems in patients who survive initial injury. MRI is not necessarily part of the diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Case report with relevant image and review of the literature. Injury to the corpus callosum is commonly described in traumatic brain injury; however, extensive lesions in the splenium are not well described. This image shows an important pattern of brain injury and demonstrates a common clinical syndrome seen in patients with corpus callosum pathology. Injury to the splenium of the corpus callosum due to trauma may be extensive and can cause significant neurologic deficits. MRI is important in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with cognitive changes after TBI.

  13. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  14. MRI: Imaging of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, W. W. M; Lee, J. S. W.; Ho, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The study is to determine the optimal MRI bowel preparation regime for visualization of the stomach anatomy, Eight healthy volunteers were asked to take water, 75% barium and blueberry juice. The image quality and tolerance of different stomach distension regime were evaluated. Blueberry juice gave the best distension, but the signal intensity was not very homogeneous. Taking into account the image quality, tolerability and adverse effects, it is concluded that water is the most desirable oral contrast for MR stomach imaging

  15. MRI anatomy of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarley, R W; Wible, C G; Frumin, M; Hirayasu, Y; Levitt, J J; Fischer, I A; Shenton, M E

    1999-05-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data have provided much evidence in support of our current view that schizophrenia is a brain disorder with altered brain structure, and consequently involving more than a simple disturbance in neurotransmission. This review surveys 118 peer-reviewed studies with control group from 1987 to May 1998. Most studies (81%) do not find abnormalities of whole brain/intracranial contents, while lateral ventricle enlargement is reported in 77%, and third ventricle enlargement in 67%. The temporal lobe was the brain parenchymal region with the most consistently documented abnormalities. Volume decreases were found in 62% of 37 studies of whole temporal lobe, and in 81% of 16 studies of the superior temporal gyrus (and in 100% with gray matter separately evaluated). Fully 77% of the 30 studies of the medial temporal lobe reported volume reduction in one or more of its constituent structures (hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus). Despite evidence for frontal lobe functional abnormalities, structural MRI investigations less consistently found abnormalities, with 55% describing volume reduction. It may be that frontal lobe volume changes are small, and near the threshold for MRI detection. The parietal and occipital lobes were much less studied; about half of the studies showed positive findings. Most studies of cortical gray matter (86%) found volume reductions were not diffuse, but more pronounced in certain areas. About two thirds of the studies of subcortical structures of thalamus, corpus callosum and basal ganglia (which tend to increase volume with typical neuroleptics), show positive findings, as do almost all (91%) studies of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP). Most data were consistent with a developmental model, but growing evidence was compatible also with progressive, neurodegenerative features, suggesting a "two-hit" model of schizophrenia, for which a cellular hypothesis is discussed. The relationship of clinical

  16. MRI anatomy of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    McCarley, Robert William; Wible, Cynthia Gayle; Frumin, Melissa; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Levitt, James Jonathan; Fischer, Iris A.; Shenton, Martha Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data have provided much evidence in support of our current view that schizophrenia is a brain disorder with altered brain structure, and consequently involving more than a simple disturbance in neurotransmission. This review surveys 118 peer–reviewed studies with control group from 1987 to May 1998. Most studies (81%) do not find abnormalities of whole brain/intracranial contents, while lateral ventricle enlargement is reported in 77%, and third ven...

  17. MRI in insulinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liessi, Guido; Pasquali, Claudio; Alfano D'Andrea, Alfonso; Pedrazzoli, Sergio; Scandellari, Cesare

    1992-01-01

    After establishing the diagnosis of an insulinoma, most surgeons prefer preoperative localization. Selective arteriography is usually considered the gold standard for this purpose. Recently, computed tomography (CT) and preoperative US have contended the role to angiography. MRI has been used in few cases of endocrine pancreatic tumors, and its role in this particular field has to be defined. Between November 1988-September 1990 7 adult patients who had undergone surgery were evaluated. Eight tumors were resected in 6 patients who were cured; in an 18-year-old woman surgical treatment was unsuccessful. Arterio-graphy, CT, preoperative US, MRI and intraoperative US detected 2, 6, 6, 5 and 6 tumors respectively. Two insulinomas (0.2 and 0.7 cm) were found at histologic examination in resected specimen. The ability of intra-operative US and careful surgical exploration to resolve more than 90 percent of cases makes the preoperative use of arteriography and CT questionable value. If further experience confirms these findings, US and MRI may suffice. (author). 13 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  18. MRI of symptomatic shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Segata, Tateki; Kunitake, Katsuhiko; Morisawa, Keizo; Harada, Masataka; Hirano, Mako

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cuff tear and acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) osteoarthrosis by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation in symptomatic shoulders. MRI was performed on 124 shoulders in 115 patients whose age ranged from 16 to 83 years (average: 58.0 years). There were 74 men (79 shoulders) and 41 women (45 shoulders). The patients were divided into three groups according to age; A group (10 shoulders: 16-29 years), B group (43 shoulders: 30-59 years), and C group (71 shoulders: 60-83 years). Rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis were graded on scales 0 to 3 (normal, increased signal intensity, incomplete, complete), and 1 to 4 (none, mild, moderate, severe), respectively. There was a significant difference in the severity of the cuff tears and the ACJ osteoarthrosis with respect to age. Twenty percent of the shoulders were graded incomplete or complete cuff tears in group A, 88% in group B, and 93% in group C. No shoulders were graded moderate or severe ACJ changes in group A, 63% in group B, and 93% in group C. There was a definite correlation between the cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. MRI of the symptomatic shoulders indicated well correlation between the rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. (author)

  19. MR manifestation of lower extremity rhabdomyolysis caused by crush injury in earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhengyan; Zou Ling; Song Bin; Liu Chang; Sun Jiayu; Zhang Weiwei; Zhang Cuiping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Rhabdomyolysis (RM) is a common disorder resulting from a large variety of causes. Acute injury is one of the main reasons. The purpose is to describe the MRI manifestations of rhabdomyolysis caused by 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan province and to discuss their importance in diagnosis and treatment of rhabdomyolysison in clinic practice. Methods: Three patients with rhabdomyolysis caused by earthquake were studied via 1.5 T MRI. In all the patients, T 1 and T 2 weighted sequences with and without fat suppression, and short time inversion recovery (STIR) of both lower extremities were obtained in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. All patients were given contrast material during imaging, and MRA (magnetic resonance angiography) of both lower extremity vessels were performed. The MRI characteristics of damaged extremities in 3 cases were studied. Results: MRI showed swelling of the affected muscles and subcutaneous fat tissue on both T 1 and T 2 weighted images. The margins of involved muscles were blurred. On T 1 weighted images, swollen muscles showed equal or slightly decreased intensity with small patterns of increased intensity in some local areas. On T 2 weighted and STIR sequences, the affected muscles showed inhomogeneous increased signal intensity with clearer margin. Slight fluid collection in spatium intermusculare was observed. Contrast-enhanced scanning showed nonhomologous intensification of damaged muscles, the enhancement inside the muscles was decreased when compared with normal muscles. The locations of all these abnormal intensity were correlated with the injury history and clinic physical examinations. MRA showed no lower extremity vessels were affected. Conclusion: MRI has very high sensitivity in detecting the injury of muscles. It's very useful in evaluating the extent and severity of muscles affected in rhabdomyolysis caused by trauma. Also it's very valuable to evaluate the condition of blood vessels in involved extremity

  20. Extreme Programming Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chromatic

    2003-01-01

    Extreme Programming (XP) is a radical new approach to software development that has been accepted quickly because its core practices--the need for constant testing, programming in pairs, inviting customer input, and the communal ownership of code--resonate with developers everywhere. Although many developers feel that XP is rooted in commonsense, its vastly different approach can bring challenges, frustrations, and constant demands on your patience. Unless you've got unlimited time (and who does these days?), you can't always stop to thumb through hundreds of pages to find the piece of info