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Sample records for extremely harsh environment

  1. Precision in harsh environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    French, Paddy; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Roozeboom, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Microsystems are increasingly being applied in harsh and/or inaccessible environments, but many markets expect the same level of functionality for long periods of time. Harsh environments cover areas that can be subjected to high temperature, (bio)-chemical and mechanical disturbances, electromagnet

  2. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Mihailov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of their small size, passive nature, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and capability to directly measure physical parameters such as temperature and strain, fiber Bragg grating sensors have developed beyond a laboratory curiosity and are becoming a mainstream sensing technology. Recently, high temperature stable gratings based on regeneration techniques and femtosecond infrared laser processing have shown promise for use in extreme environments such as high temperature, pressure or ionizing radiation. Such gratings are ideally suited for energy production applications where there is a requirement for advanced energy system instrumentation and controls that are operable in harsh environments. This paper will present a review of some of the more recent developments.

  3. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  4. HEAT Sensor: Harsh Environment Adaptable Thermionic Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limb, Scott J. [Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This document is the final report for the “HARSH ENVIRONMENT ADAPTABLE THERMIONIC SENSOR” project under NETL’s Crosscutting contract DE-FE0013062. This report addresses sensors that can be made with thermionic thin films along with the required high temperature hermetic packaging process. These sensors can be placed in harsh high temperature environments and potentially be wireless and self-powered.

  5. Optical sensors for harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Maity, S.; Bekal, A.; Vartak, S.; Sridharan, A. K.; Mitra, C.

    2015-05-01

    The development of a harsh environment ammonia slip sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. A hybrid optical sensor design, through combination of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and alignment control, is proposed as an approach towards reliable in-situ measurements in misalignment prone harsh environments. 1531.59 nm, 1553.4 nm and 1555.56 nm are suggested as possible absorption lines for trace ammonia measurement (system are presented in detail. Effect of misalignment related measurement degradation is investigated and significant improvement in measurement fidelity is demonstrated through the use of the hybrid optical sensor design.

  6. Lidar Architecture for Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Philip

    2016-06-01

    An overview is provided of the obscurantpenetrating OPAL lidar sensor developed for harsh environments, including poor visibility conditions. The underlying technology, hardware and software architecture of the sensor are presented along with some examples of its software modules' applications. The paper also discusses the performance of the OPAL in the presence of various types of obscurants.

  7. Lidar Architecture for Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Church Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is provided of the obscurantpenetrating OPAL lidar sensor developed for harsh environments, including poor visibility conditions. The underlying technology, hardware and software architecture of the sensor are presented along with some examples of its software modules’ applications. The paper also discusses the performance of the OPAL in the presence of various types of obscurants.

  8. Cognition in harsh and unpredictable environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankenhuis, W.E.; Panchanathan, K.; Nettle, D.

    2016-01-01

    In environments that are harsh and unpredictable, people are typically more vigilant, act more impulsively, and discount the future more. In this paper, we argue that these behaviors reflect a present-orientation produced by biological adaptations, despite potential harm to health and wellbeing. We

  9. Asset tracking in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neal, E.S. [Infosight Corp., Chillicothe, OH (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Current economic times require tight control of all assets / inventory and processes a company manages. These items if managed correctly and timely can mean the difference between success and failure of a company. Cost savings in hard economic times are essential to allow a company to utilize its assets to the fullest potential by eliminating duplication and waste. Accurate process management leads to greater customer satisfaction and loyalty. Many industries and processes have believed it to be impossible to track their products or assets using bar-codes due to the unique conditions of their environment; whether it is high temperature, rough handling or chemicals. That has now changed. Companies specializing in identification methods have stepped up to the challenge and have overcome many obstacles of the past. It's no longer a paper or plastic bar-code world. The presentation will be broken down into four parts: 1) The differences between Asset and ID tracking; 2) Why does a company need to bar-code?; 3) The objections many companies use for not bar-coding; and, 4) What's new in bar-coding? Case study handouts and a reference list of various companies including software, labeling and attachment techniques will be available at the end of the presentation. (author)

  10. Sensors Increase Productivity in Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    California's San Juan Capistrano-based Endevco Corporation licensed three patents covering high-temperature, harsh-environment silicon carbide (Si-C) pressure sensors from Glenn Research Center. The company is exploring their use in government markets, as well as in commercial markets, including commercial jet testing, deep well drilling applications where pressure and temperature increase with drilling depth, and in automobile combustion chambers.

  11. Supply vessel operations in a harsh environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strong, R. [Seabase Ltd., St. John' s, NF (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Supply vessel contracts provide a range of services for multi-purpose supply vessels (MPSV) and anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels. The features of both types of vessels were presented along with the key challenges to meet operational expectations, particularly in harsh environments. The successes and accomplishments for Seabase/Maersk in Atlantic Canada were reviewed. The work role of Seabase Ltd. is to ensure safety in offshore cargo operations, anchor handling, rig move operations, iceberg management, sub-sea support operations, and environmental response operations such as oil boom deployment. Seabase Ltd. also monitors other environmental factors such as icing, visibility, wind speed, sea height, and weather conditions. Seabase/Maersk currently provides contracts to 8 supply vessels that are actively working in east coast Canada. In 2003 there were no lost time accidents. figs.

  12. Porous polyoxadiazole membranes for harsh environment

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2013-10-01

    A series of polyoxadiazoles with exceptionally high stability at temperatures as high as 370°C and in oxidative medium has been synthesized by polycondensation and manufactured into porous membranes by phase inversion. The membranes were characterized by thermal analysis (TGA), chemical stability was measured by immersion test, oxidative stability by Fenton\\'s test, pore diameter by porosimetry and the morphology by FESEM. The polymers are soluble only in sulfuric acid and are stable in organic solvents like NMP, THF and isopropanol. The membranes selectivity was confirmed by separation of polystyrene standards with different molecular weights. Most membranes were characterized as having a cut-off of 60,000. g/mol. Being stable under harsh environments, the membranes have incomparable characteristics with perspectives of application in chemical and pharmaceutical industry, catalytic reactors, in combination with oxidative processes and other applications so far envisioned only for ceramic membranes. © 2013.

  13. Miniature in vivo robots for remote and harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, M E; Platt, S R; Berg, K; Dumpert, J; Oleynikov, D; Farritor, S M

    2008-01-01

    Long-term human space exploration will require contingencies for emergency medical procedures including some capability to perform surgery. The ability to perform minimally invasive surgery (MIS) would be an important capability. The use of small incisions reduces surgical risk, but also eliminates the ability of the surgeon to view and touch the surgical environment directly. Robotic surgery, or telerobotic surgery, may provide emergency surgical care in remote or harsh environments such as space flight, or extremely forward environments such as battlefields. However, because current surgical robots are large and require extensive support personnel, their implementation has remained limited in forward environments, and they would be difficult, or impossible, to use in space flight or on battlefields. This paper presents experimental analysis of miniature fixed-base and mobile in vivo robots to support MIS surgery in remote and harsh environments. The objective is to develop wireless imaging and task-assisting robots that can be placed inside the abdominal cavity during surgery. Such robots will provide surgical task assistance and enable an on-site or remote surgeon to view the surgical environment from multiple angles. This approach is applicable to long-duration space flight, battlefield situations, and for traditional medical centers and other remote surgical locations.

  14. Laser Interferometry for Harsh Environment MEMS Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieva, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    Silicon-based MEMS technology has enabled the fabrication of a broad range of sensor and actuator systems that are having a great impact in areas that benefit from miniaturization and increased functionality. The main advantage of Si-based MEMS technologies is their possibility of integration with microelectronics thus allowing the economical production of smart microsystems. In the automotive industry for example, there is a need for inexpensive smart MEMS sensors for engine control applications. For instance, smart MEMS sensors capable of operating ``in cylinder'', where temperatures are around 400 C, could continuously monitor the combustion quality of the cylinders of automotive engines thus leading to reduced emissions and improved fuel economy. However, when the environment temperature is too high (>180 C), conventional Si-based microelectronics suffer from severe performance degradation, thus making smart Si-based MEMS impractical. Hence, further development, in terms of new MEMS materials and/or new technologies, is needed especially where high temperature capability is crucial to realizing improved electronic control. Remote sensing through optical signal detection has major advantages for safe signal transmission in harsh environments. It is highly resistant to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI) and at the same time, it eliminates the necessity of on-board electronics, which has been one of the main obstacles in the development of smart MEMS sensors for high temperature applications. An economical way to deal with higher temperatures and other aggressive environmental conditions is to build MEMS sensors out of robust materials (e.g. Silicon nitride, SiC) and integrate them with optical signal detection techniques to form MOEMS. In this paper, we review recent trends for the use of laser interferometry for MEMS sensors in the context of using them for high temperature applications. Technological challenges faced in

  15. Solar Weather Ice Monitoring Station (SWIMS). A low cost, extreme/harsh environment, solar powered, autonomous sensor data gathering and transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, S.; Field, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic ocean's continuing decrease of summer-time ice is related to rapidly diminishing multi-year ice due to the effects of climate change. Ice911 Research aims to develop environmentally respectful materials that when deployed will increase the albedo, enhancing the formation and/preservation of multi-year ice. Small scale deployments using various materials have been done in Canada, California's Sierra Nevada Mountains and a pond in Minnesota to test the albedo performance and environmental characteristics of these materials. SWIMS is a sophisticated autonomous sensor system being developed to measure the albedo, weather, water temperature and other environmental parameters. The system (SWIMS) employs low cost, high accuracy/precision sensors, high resolution cameras, and an extreme environment command and data handling computer system using satellite and terrestrial wireless communication. The entire system is solar powered with redundant battery backup on a floating buoy platform engineered for low temperature (-40C) and high wind conditions. The system also incorporates tilt sensors, sonar based ice thickness sensors and a weather station. To keep the costs low, each SWIMS unit measures incoming and reflected radiation from the four quadrants around the buoy. This allows data from four sets of sensors, cameras, weather station, water temperature probe to be collected and transmitted by a single on-board solar powered computer. This presentation covers the technical, logistical and cost challenges in designing, developing and deploying these stations in remote, extreme environments. Image captured by camera #3 of setting sun on the SWIMS station One of the images captured by SWIMS Camera #4

  16. Plasmonics Based Harsh Environment Compatible Chemical Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Carpenter

    2012-01-15

    Au-YSZ, Au-TiO{sub 2} and Au-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite films have been investigated as a potential sensing element for high-temperature plasmonic sensing of H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} in an oxygen containing environment. The Au-YSZ and Au-TiO{sub 2} films were deposited using PVD methods, while the CeO{sub 2} thin film was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and Au was implanted into the as-grown film at an elevated temperature followed by high temperature annealing to form well-defined Au nanoclusters. Each of the films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). For the gas sensing experiments, separate exposures to varying concentrations of H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} were performed at a temperature of 500°C in oxygen backgrounds of 5.0, 10, and ~21% O{sub 2}. Changes in the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak were monitored during gas exposures and are believed to be the result of oxidation-reduction processes that fill or create oxygen vacancies in the respective metal oxides. This process affects the LSPR peak position either by charge exchange with the Au nanoparticles or by changes in the dielectric constant surrounding the particles. Hyperspectral multivariate analysis was used to gauge the inherent selectivity of the film between the separate analytes. From principal component analysis (PCA), unique and identifiable responses were seen for each of the analytes. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was also used on the Au-CeO{sub 2} results and showed separation between analytes as well as trends in gas concentration. Results indicate that each of the films are is selective towards O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} in separate exposures. However, when the films were analyzed in a sensor array based experiment, ie simultaneous exposures to the target gases, PCA analysis of the combined response showed an even greater selective character towards the target gases. Combined

  17. Harsh Environment Gas Sensor Array for Venus Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and the Ohio State University propose to develop a harsh environment tolerant gas sensor array for atmospheric analysis in future Venus missions....

  18. Harsh Environment Gas Sensor Array for Venus Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and the Ohio State University propose to develop a harsh environment tolerant gas sensor array for atmospheric analysis in future Venus missions....

  19. New Wireless Sensors for Diagnostics Under Harsh Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is an acute need for robust sensors and sensor systems capable of operation in harsh environments. In particular, high temperature passive wireless surface...

  20. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensor for Harsh Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless Sensor Technologies has for several years been developing a passive Wireless Temperature Sensor (WTS) for gas turbine engine and other harsh environment...

  1. Encoder designed to work in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2007-05-15

    Dynapar has developed the Acuro AX71 absolute encoder for use on offshore or land-based oil rig operations. It provides feedback on the operation of automated systems such as draw works, racking systems, rotary tables and top drives. By ensuring that automated systems function properly, this encoder responds to a need by the oil and gas industry to keep workers safe and improve efficiency, particularly for operations in rugged situations. The encoder provides feedback from motor systems to controllers, giving information about position and speed of downhole drill bits. This newly developed encoder is better than commonly used incremental encoders which are not precise in strong electrical noise environments. Rather, the absolute encoder uses a different method of reporting to the controller. A digital signal is transmitted constantly as the device operates. It is less susceptible to noise issues. It is highly accurate, tolerant of noise and is not affected by power outages. However, the absolute encoder is generally more delicate in drilling applications with high ambient temperatures and shock levels. Dynapar addressed this issue by developing compact stainless steel housing that is useful for corrosion resistance in marine applications. The AX71 absolute encoder can withstand up to 100 G of mechanical shock and ambient temperatures of up to 60 degrees C. The encoder is ATEX certified without barriers, and offers the high resolution feedback of 4,000 counts of multiturn rotation and 16,000 counts of position. 1 fig.

  2. Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph; Reuter, Walter Graham; Weinberg, David Michael

    1999-09-01

    Electric potential measurement (EPM) technology offers an attractive alternative to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for monitoring crack growth in harsh environments. Where conventional NDE methods typically require localized human interaction, the EPM technique developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) can be operated remotely and automatically. Once a crack-like defect is discovered via conventional means, EPM can be applied to monitor local crack size changes. This is of particular interest in situations where an identified structural defect is not immediately rejectable from a fitness-for-service viewpoint, but due to operational and environmental conditions may grow to an unsafe size with continuing operation. If the location is in a harsh environment where periodic monitoring by normal means is either too costly or not possible, a very expensive repair may be immediately mandated. However, the proposed EPM methodology may offer a unique monitoring capability that would allow for continuing service. INEEL has developed this methodology, supporting equipment, and calibration information to apply EPM in a field environment for just this purpose. Laboratory and pilot scale tests on full-size engineering structures (pressure vessels and piping) have been successfully performed. The technique applicable is many severe environments because the sensitive equipment (electronics, operators) can be situated in a remote location, with only current and voltage probe electrical leads entering into the harsh environment. Experimental results showing the utility of the methodology are presented, and unique application concepts that have been examined by multiple experiments are discussed.

  3. A Fully Transparent Resistive Memory for Harsh Environments

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Po-Kang

    2015-10-12

    A fully transparent resistive memory (TRRAM) based on Hafnium oxide (HfO2) with excellent transparency, resistive switching capability, and environmental stability is demonstrated. The retention time measured at 85 °C is over 3 × 104 sec, and no significant degradation is observed in 130 cycling test. Compared with ZnO TRRAM, HfO2 TRRAM shows reliable performance under harsh conditions, such as high oxygen partial pressure, high moisture (relative humidity = 90% at 85 °C), corrosive agent exposure, and proton irradiation. Moreover, HfO2 TRRAM fabricated in cross-bar array structures manifests the feasibility of future high density memory applications. These findings not only pave the way for future TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of HfO2 TRRAM for harsh environments.

  4. Surface acoustic wave sensing of VOCs in harsh chemical environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-06-01

    The measurement of VOC concentrations in harsh chemical and physical environments is a formidable task. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been designed for this purpose and its construction and testing are described in this paper. Included is a detailed description of the design elements specific to operation in 300{degree}C steam and HCl environments including temperature control, gas handling, and signal processing component descriptions. In addition, laboratory temperature stability was studied and a minimum detection limit was defined for operation in industrial environments. Finally, a description of field tests performed on steam reforming equipment at Synthetica Technologies Inc. of Richmond, CA is given including a report on destruction efficiency of CCl{sub 4} in the Synthetica moving bed evaporator. Design improvements based on the field tests are proposed.

  5. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alfadhel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  6. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-05-07

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  7. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  8. Wireless Sensor Applications in Extreme Aeronautical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require rigorous ground and flight testing. Many of the testing environments can be extremely harsh. These environments include cryogenic temperatures and high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). Temperature, pressure, vibration, ionizing radiation, and chemical exposure may all be part of the harsh environment found in testing. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new wireless sensors that address anticipated structural health monitoring (SHM) and testing needs for aeronautical vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless sensors for ground testing and high altitude aircraft operations are presented. Some of the challenges and issues of the technology are also presented.

  9. Diagnostics hardening for harsh environment in Laser Megajoule (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgade, J L; Marmoret, R; Darbon, S; Rosch, R; Troussel, P; Villette, B; Glebov, V; Shmayda, W T; Gomme, J C; Le Tonqueze, Y; Aubard, F; Baggio, J; Bazzoli, S; Bonneau, F; Boutin, J Y; Caillaud, T; Chollet, C; Combis, P; Disdier, L; Gazave, J; Girard, S; Gontier, D; Jaanimagi, P; Jacquet, H P; Jadaud, J P; Landoas, O; Legendre, J; Leray, J L; Maroni, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Miquel, J L; Marshall, F J; Masclet-Gobin, I; Pien, G; Raimbourg, J; Reverdin, C; Richard, A; Rubin de Cervens, D; Sangster, C T; Seaux, J P; Soullie, G; Stoeckl, C; Thfoin, I; Videau, L; Zuber, C

    2008-10-01

    The diagnostic designs for the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) will require components to operate in environments far more severe than those encountered in present facilities. This harsh environment will be induced by fluxes of neutrons, gamma rays, energetic ions, electromagnetic radiations, and, in some cases, debris and shrapnel, at levels several orders of magnitude higher than those experienced today on existing facilities. The lessons learned about the vulnerabilities of present diagnostic parts fielded mainly on OMEGA for many years, have been very useful guide for the design of future LMJ diagnostics. The present and future LMJ diagnostic designs including this vulnerability approach and their main mitigation techniques will be presented together with the main characteristics of the LMJ facility that provide for diagnostic protection.

  10. Diagnostics hardening for harsh environment in Laser Megajoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgade, J.L.; Marmoret, R.; Darbon, S.; Rosch, R.; Troussel, P.; Villette, B.; Aubard, F.; Baggio, J.; Bazzoli, S.; Bonneau, F.; Boutin, J.Y.; Caillaud, T.; Chollet, C.; Combis, P.; Disdier, L.; Gazave, J.; Girard, S.; Gontier, D.; Jacquet, H.P.; Jadaud, J.P.; Landoas, O.; Legendre, J.; Leray, J.L.; Maroni, R.; Miquel, J.L.; Masclet-Gobin, I.; Raimbourg, J.; Reverdin, C.; Richard, A.; Rubin de Cervens, D.; Soullie, G.; Thfoin, I.; Videau, L.; Zuber, C. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Glebov, V.; Shmayda, W.T.; Jaanimagi, P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Marshall, F.J.; Pien, G.; Sangster, C.T.; Stoeckl, C. [Rochester Univ., Laser Energetics Lab., Rochester, NY (United States); Gomme, J.C.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Seaux, J.P. [CESTA - CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France)

    2008-07-01

    The diagnostic designs for the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) will require components to operate in environments far more severe than those encountered in present facilities. This harsh environment will be induced by fluxes of neutrons, gamma rays, energetic ions, electromagnetic radiations, and, in some cases, debris and shrapnel, at levels several orders of magnitude higher than those experienced today on existing facilities. The lessons learned about the vulnerabilities of present diagnostic parts fielded mainly on OMEGA for many years, have been very useful guide for the design of future LMJ diagnostics. The present and future LMJ diagnostic designs including this vulnerability approach and their main mitigation techniques will be presented together with the main characteristics of the LMJ facility that provide for diagnostic protection. (authors)

  11. Ironless Inductive Position Sensor for Harsh Magnetic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro

    Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) are widely used for high-precision and high-accuracy linear position sensing in harsh environments, such as the LHC collimators at CERN. These sensors guarantee theoretically infinite resolution and long lifetimes thanks to contactless sensing. Furthermore, they offer very good robustness and ruggedness, as well as micrometer uncertainty over a range of centimeters when proper conditioning techniques are used (such as the three-parameter Sine-Fit algorithm). They can also be suitable for radioactive environments. Nevertheless, an external DC/slowly-varying magnetic field can seriously affect the LVDT reading, leading to position drifts of hundreds of micrometers, often unacceptable in high-accuracy applications. The effect is due to the presence of non-linear ferromagnetic materials in the sensor’s structure. A detailed Finite Element model of an LVDT is first proposed in order to study and characterize the phenomenon. The model itself becomes a powerful de...

  12. A harsh environment wireless pressure sensing solution utilizing high temperature electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-02-27

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines.

  13. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines.

  14. Engineering food crops to grow in harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arredondo, Damar; González-Morales, Sandra Isabel; Bello-Bello, Elohim; Alejo-Jacuinde, Gerardo; Herrera, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sustainable agriculture and producing enough food for the increasing global population will require effective strategies to cope with harsh environments such as water and nutrient stress, high temperatures and compacted soils with high impedance that drastically reduce crop yield. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, cellular and epigenetic mechanisms that orchestrate plant responses to abiotic stress will serve as the platform to engineer improved crop plants with better designed root system architecture and optimized metabolism to enhance water and nutrients uptake and use efficiency and/or soil penetration. In this review we discuss such advances and how the generated knowledge could be used to integrate effective strategies to engineer crops by gene transfer or genome editing technologies.

  15. Design and Testing of Electronic Devices for Harsh Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nico, Costantino

    This thesis reports an overview and the main results of the research activity carried out within the PhD programme in Information Engineering of the University of Pisa (2010-2012). The research activity has been focused on different fields, including Automotive and High Energy Physics experiments, according to a common denominator: the development of electroni c devices and systems operating in harsh environments. There are many applications that forc e the adoption of design methodologies and strategies focused on this type of envir onments: military, biom edical, automotive, industrial and space. The development of solutions fulfilling specific operational requirements, therefore represents an interesting field of research. The first research activity has been framed within the ATHENIS project, funded by the CORDIS Commission of the European Community, and aiming at the development of a System-on-Chip, a r egulator for alternators employed on vehicles, presenting both configurability an d t...

  16. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-04-13

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  17. High temperature, harsh environment sensors for advanced power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, P. R.; Credle, S.; Buric, M.; Lewis, R.; Seachman, S.

    2015-05-01

    One mission of the Crosscutting Technology Research program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is to develop a suite of sensors and controls technologies that will ultimately increase efficiencies of existing fossil-fuel fired power plants and enable a new generation of more efficient and lower emission power generation technologies. The program seeks to accomplish this mission through soliciting, managing, and monitoring a broad range of projects both internal and external to the laboratory which span sensor material and device development, energy harvesting and wireless telemetry methodologies, and advanced controls algorithms and approaches. A particular emphasis is placed upon harsh environment sensing for compatibility with high temperature, erosive, corrosive, and highly reducing or oxidizing environments associated with large-scale centralized power generation. An overview of the full sensors and controls portfolio is presented and a selected set of current and recent research successes and on-going projects are highlighted. A more detailed emphasis will be placed on an overview of the current research thrusts and successes of the in-house sensor material and device research efforts that have been established to support the program.

  18. Radio-frequency plasma transducer for use in harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Andrew; Andarawis, Emad

    2007-10-01

    We describe a compact transducer used to generate and modulate low-intensity radio-frequency atmospheric pressure plasma (RF-APP) for high temperature gap measurement and generation of air-coupled ultrasound. The new transducer consists of a quarter-wave transmission line where the ground return path is a coaxial solenoid winding. The RF-APP is initiated at the open end of the transmission line and stabilized by passive negative feedback between the electrical impedance of the plasma and the energy stored in the solenoid. The electrical impedance of the plasma was measured at the lower-voltage source end of the transducer, eliminating the need to measure kilovolt-level voltages near the discharge. We describe the use of a 7 MHz RF-APP prototype as a harsh-environment clearance sensor to demonstrate the suitability of plasma discharges for a common nondestructive inspection application. Clearance measurements of 0-5 mm were performed on a rotating calibration target with a measurement precision of 0.1 mm and a 20 kHz sampling rate.

  19. Harsh-Environment Packaging for Downhole Gas and Oil Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubhra Bansal; Junghyun Cho; Kevin Durocher; Chris Kapusta; Aaron Knobloch; David Shaddock; Harry Schoeller; Hua Xia

    2007-08-31

    This research into new packaging materials and methods for elevated temperatures and harsh environment electronics focused on gaining a basic understanding of current state-of-the-art in electronics packaging used in industry today, formulating the thermal-mechanical models of the material interactions and developing test structures to confirm these models. Discussions were initiated with the major General Electric (GE) businesses that currently sell into markets requiring high temperature electronics and packaging. They related the major modes of failure they encounter routinely and the hurdles needed to be overcome in order to improve the temperature specifications of these products. We consulted with our GE business partners about the reliability specifications and investigated specifications and guidelines that from IPC and the SAE body that is currently developing guidelines for electronics package reliability. Following this, a risk analysis was conducted for the program to identify the critical risks which need to be mitigated in order to demonstrate a flex-based packaging approach under these conditions. This process identified metal/polyimide adhesion, via reliability for flex substrates and high temperature interconnect as important technical areas for reliability improvement.

  20. A New Vertical JFET Power Device for Harsh Radiation Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Fernández-Martínez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasing demand for power electronic devices able to be operative in harsh radiation environments is now taking place. Specifically, in High Energy Physics experiments the required power devices are expected to withstand very high radiation levels which are normally too hard for most of the available commercial solutions. In this context, a new vertical junction field effect transistor (JFET has been designed and fabricated at the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica (IMB-CNM, CSIC. The new silicon V-JFET devices draw upon a deep-trenched technology to achieve volume conduction and low switch-off voltage, together with a moderately high voltage capability. The first batches of V-JFET prototypes have been already fabricated at the IMB-CNM clean room, and several aspects of their design, fabrication and the outcome of their characterization are summarized and discussed in this paper. Radiation hardness of the fabricated transistors have been tested both with gamma and neutron irradiations, and the results are also included in the contribution.

  1. Offshore produced water management: A review of current practice and challenges in harsh/Arctic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jisi; Chen, Bing; Thanyamanta, Worakanok; Hawboldt, Kelly; Zhang, Baiyu; Liu, Bo

    2016-03-15

    Increasing offshore oil and gas exploration and development in harsh/Arctic environments require more effective offshore produced water management, as these environments are much more sensitive to changes in water quality than more temperate climates. However, the number and scope of studies of offshore produced water management in harsh/Arctic environments are limited. This paper reviews the current state of offshore produced water management, impacts, and policies, as well as the vulnerability, implications and operational challenges in harsh/Arctic environments. The findings show that the primary contaminant(s) of concern are contained in both the dissolved oil and the dispersed oil. The application of emerging technologies that can tackle this issue is significantly limited by the challenges of offshore operations in harsh/Arctic environments. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient and suitable management systems since more stringent policies are being implemented due to the increased vulnerability of harsh/Arctic environments.

  2. Extreme environments and exobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, E I

    1993-01-01

    Ecological research on extreme environments can be applied to exobiological problems such as the question of life on Mars. If life forms (fossil or extant) are found on Mars, their study will help to solve fundamental questions about the nature of life on Earth. Extreme environments that are beyond the range of adaptability of their inhabitants are defined as "absolute extreme". Such environments can serve as terrestrial models for the last stages of life in the history of Mars, when the surface cooled down and atmosphere and water disappeared. The cryptoendolithic microbial community in porous rocks of the Ross Desert in Antarctica and the microbial mats at the bottom of frozen Antarctic lakes are such examples. The microbial communities of Siberian permafrost show that, in frozen but stable communities, long-term survival is possible. In the context of terraforming Mars, selected microorganisms isolated from absolute extreme environments are considered for use in creation of a biological carbon cycle.

  3. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Michael [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Oh, Sang-Hyun [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  4. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The

  5. Study of harsh environment operation of flexible ferroelectric memory integrated with PZT and silicon fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2015-08-05

    Flexible memory can enable industrial, automobile, space, and smart grid centered harsh/extreme environment focused electronics application(s) for enhanced operation, safety, and monitoring where bent or complex shaped infrastructures are common and state-of-the-art rigid electronics cannot be deployed. Therefore, we report on the physical-mechanical-electrical characteristics of a flexible ferroelectric memory based on lead zirconium titanate as a key memory material and flexible version of bulk mono-crystalline silicon (100). The experimented devices show a bending radius down to 1.25 cm corresponding to 0.16% nominal strain (high pressure of ∼260 MPa), and full functionality up to 225 °C high temperature in ambient gas composition (21% oxygen and 55% relative humidity). The devices showed unaltered data retention and fatigue properties under harsh conditions, still the reduced memory window (20% difference between switching and non-switching currents at 225 °C) requires sensitive sense circuitry for proper functionality and is the limiting factor preventing operation at higher temperatures.

  6. Study of harsh environment operation of flexible ferroelectric memory integrated with PZT and silicon fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, M. T.; Hussain, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    Flexible memory can enable industrial, automobile, space, and smart grid centered harsh/extreme environment focused electronics application(s) for enhanced operation, safety, and monitoring where bent or complex shaped infrastructures are common and state-of-the-art rigid electronics cannot be deployed. Therefore, we report on the physical-mechanical-electrical characteristics of a flexible ferroelectric memory based on lead zirconium titanate as a key memory material and flexible version of bulk mono-crystalline silicon (100). The experimented devices show a bending radius down to 1.25 cm corresponding to 0.16% nominal strain (high pressure of ˜260 MPa), and full functionality up to 225 °C high temperature in ambient gas composition (21% oxygen and 55% relative humidity). The devices showed unaltered data retention and fatigue properties under harsh conditions, still the reduced memory window (20% difference between switching and non-switching currents at 225 °C) requires sensitive sense circuitry for proper functionality and is the limiting factor preventing operation at higher temperatures.

  7. Robust, Thin Optical Films for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The environment of space presents scientists and engineers with the challenges of a harsh, unforgiving laboratory in which to conduct their scientific research. Solar astronomy and X-ray astronomy are two of the more challenging areas into which NASA scientists delve, as the optics for this high-tech work must be extremely sensitive and accurate, yet also be able to withstand the battering dished out by radiation, extreme temperature swings, and flying debris. Recent NASA work on this rugged equipment has led to the development of a strong, thin film for both space and laboratory use.

  8. Harsh Environments, Life History Strategies, and Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study of Oregon Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Hampson, Sarah E.; Andrews, Judy A.; Barckley, Maureen; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the effects of harsh environments in childhood on adjustment in early emerging adulthood, through parenting style and the development of fast Life History Strategies (LHS; risky beliefs and behaviors) in adolescence. Participants were from the Oregon Youth Substance Use Project (N = 988; 85.7% White). Five cohorts of children in Grades 1–5 at recruitment were assessed through one-year post high school. Greater environmental harshness (neighborhood quality and family poverty) in Gra...

  9. Technologies and Materials for Recovering Waste Heat in Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thekdi, Arvind [E3M, Inc. North Potomac, MD (United States); Rogers, Benjamin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kafka, Orion L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wenning, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A large amount (7,204 TBtu/year) of energy is used for process heating by the manufacturing sector in the United States (US). This energy is in the form of fuels mostly natural gas with some coal or other fuels and steam generated using fuels such as natural gas, coal, by-product fuels, and some others. Combustion of these fuels results in the release of heat, which is used for process heating, and in the generation of combustion products that are discharged from the heating system. All major US industries use heating equipment such as furnaces, ovens, heaters, kilns, and dryers. The hot exhaust gases from this equipment, after providing the necessary process heat, are discharged into the atmosphere through stacks. This report deals with identification of industries and industrial heating processes in which the exhaust gases are at high temperature (>1200 F), contain all of the types of reactive constituents described, and can be considered as harsh or contaminated. It also identifies specific issues related to WHR for each of these processes or waste heat streams.

  10. Mobile Sensor Networks for Inspection Tasks in Harsh Industrial Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Jacob; Wang, Xinyu; Ferwerda, Franke; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled the fast development of mobile sensor networks operating in various unknown and sometimes hazardous environments. In this paper, we introduce one integrative approach to design, analyze and test distributed control algorithms to coordinate a network

  11. Harsh Environment Wireless MEMS Sensors for Energy & Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Wireless MEMS Acknowledgements • BSAC • Berkeley Microfab Lab • Prof. Roya Maboudian (UCB) • Prof. Mehran Mehregany (CASE) • Prof. Arun Majumdar (UCB/LBNL...environment TAPS (Temperature, Acceleration, Pressure, and Strain) sensors on a single chip • Silicon carbide (SiC) as a platform material...Deposition Temperature (℃ ) 1,3-Disilabutane* 98% Liquid $ 22 $ 990 750-850 Methylsilane** 99.9%+ Gas $ 17 $ 798 750-850 Methyltrichloro- silane ** 99

  12. Mobile sensor networks for inspection tasks in harsh industrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Jacob; Wang, Xinyu; Ferwerda, Franke; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled the fast development of mobile sensor networks operating in various unknown and sometimes hazardous environments. In this paper, we introduce one integrative approach to design, analyze and test distributed control algorithms to coordinate a network of autonomous mobile sensors by utilizing both simulation tools and a robotic testbed. The research has been carried out in the context of the mobile sensing project, PicoSmart, in the northern provinces of the Netherlands for the inspection of natural gas pipelines.

  13. UCom: Ultra-wideband Communications in Harsh Propagation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekoogar, F

    2007-03-14

    LLNL has developed an ultra-wideband (UWB) system that provides unique, through-the-wall wireless communications in heavy metallic and heavy concrete indoor channels. LLNL's UWB system is the only available wireless communications system that performs successfully and reliably in facilities where conventional narrowband communications usually fail due to destructive reflections from multiple surfaces. These environments include: cargo ships and reinforced, heavy concrete buildings. LLNL's revolutionary system has applications for the military, as well as commercial indoor communications in multistory buildings, and cluttered industrial structures.

  14. Galileo: The Added Value for Integrity in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Borio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A global navigation satellite system (GNSS-based navigation is a challenging task in a signal-degraded environments where GNSS signals are distorted by multipath and attenuated by fading effects: the navigation solution may be inaccurate or unavailable. A possible approach to improve accuracy and availability is the joint use of measurements from different GNSSs and quality check algorithms; this approach is investigated here using live GPS and Galileo signals. A modified receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM algorithm, including geometry and separability checks, is proposed to detect and exclude erroneous measurements: the multi-constellation approach provides redundant measurements, and RAIM exploits them to exclude distorted observations. The synergy between combined GPS/Galileo navigation and RAIM is analyzed using live data; the performance is compared to the accuracy and availability of a GPS-only solution. The tests performed demonstrate that the methods developed are effective techniques for GNSS-based navigation in signal-degraded environments. The joint use of the multi-constellation approach and of modified RAIM algorithms improves the performance of the navigation system in terms of both accuracy and availability.

  15. Galileo: The Added Value for Integrity in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borio, Daniele; Gioia, Ciro

    2016-01-16

    A global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-based navigation is a challenging task in a signal-degraded environments where GNSS signals are distorted by multipath and attenuated by fading effects: the navigation solution may be inaccurate or unavailable. A possible approach to improve accuracy and availability is the joint use of measurements from different GNSSs and quality check algorithms; this approach is investigated here using live GPS and Galileo signals. A modified receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) algorithm, including geometry and separability checks, is proposed to detect and exclude erroneous measurements: the multi-constellation approach provides redundant measurements, and RAIM exploits them to exclude distorted observations. The synergy between combined GPS/Galileo navigation and RAIM is analyzed using live data; the performance is compared to the accuracy and availability of a GPS-only solution. The tests performed demonstrate that the methods developed are effective techniques for GNSS-based navigation in signal-degraded environments. The joint use of the multi-constellation approach and of modified RAIM algorithms improves the performance of the navigation system in terms of both accuracy and availability.

  16. Bromeliad selection by two salamander species in a harsh environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ruano-Fajardo

    Full Text Available Bromeliad phytotelmata are frequently used by several Neotropical amphibian taxa, possibly due to their high humidity, microclimatic stability, and role as a refuge from predators. Indeed, the ability of phytotelmata to buffer against adverse environmental conditions may be instrumental in allowing some amphibian species to survive during periods of environmental change or to colonize sub-optimal habitats. Association between bromeliad traits and salamanders has not been studied at a fine scale, despite the intimate association of many salamander species with bromeliads. Here, we identify microhabitat characteristics of epiphytic bromeliads used by two species of the Bolitoglossa morio group (B. morio and B. pacaya in forest disturbed by volcanic activity in Guatemala. Specifically, we measured multiple variables for bromeliads (height and position in tree, phytotelma water temperature and pH, canopy cover, phytotelma size, leaf size, and tree diameter at breast height, as well as salamander size. We employed a DNA barcoding approach to identify salamanders. We found that B. morio and B. pacaya occurred in microsympatry in bromeliads and that phytotelmata size and temperature of bromeliad microhabitat were the most important factors associated with the presence of salamanders. Moreover, phytotelmata with higher pH contained larger salamanders, suggesting that larger salamanders or aggregated individuals might modify pH. These results show that bromeliad selection is nonrandom with respect to microhabitat characteristics, and provide insight into the relationship between salamanders and this unique arboreal environment.

  17. A high resolution pneumatic stepping actuator for harsh reactor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippetts, Thomas B.; Evans, Paul S.; Riffle, George K.

    1993-01-01

    A reactivity control actuator for a high-power density nuclear propulsion reactor must be installed in close proximity to the reactor core. The energy input from radiation to the actuator structure could exceed hundreds of W/cc unless low-cross section, low-absorptivity materials are chosen. Also, for post-test handling and subsequent storage, materials should not be used that are activated into long half-life isotopes. Pneumatic actuators can be constructed from various reactor-compatible materials, but conventional pneumatic piston actuators generally lack the stiffness required for high resolution reactivity control unless electrical position sensors and compensated electronic control systems are used. To overcome these limitations, a pneumatic actuator is under development that positions an output shaft in response to a series of pneumatic pulses, comprising a pneumatic analog of an electrical stepping motor. The pneumatic pulses are generated remotely, beyond the strong radiation environment, and transmitted to the actuator through tubing. The mechanically simple actuator uses a nutating gear harmonic drive to convert motion of small pistons directly to high-resolution angular motion of the output shaft. The digital nature of this actuator is suitable for various reactor control algorithms but is especially compatible with the three bean salad algorithm discussed by Ball et al. (1991).

  18. Bromeliad Selection by Two Salamander Species in a Harsh Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Fajardo, Gustavo; Rovito, Sean M.; Ladle, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Bromeliad phytotelmata are frequently used by several Neotropical amphibian taxa, possibly due to their high humidity, microclimatic stability, and role as a refuge from predators. Indeed, the ability of phytotelmata to buffer against adverse environmental conditions may be instrumental in allowing some amphibian species to survive during periods of environmental change or to colonize sub-optimal habitats. Association between bromeliad traits and salamanders has not been studied at a fine scale, despite the intimate association of many salamander species with bromeliads. Here, we identify microhabitat characteristics of epiphytic bromeliads used by two species of the Bolitoglossa morio group (B. morio and B. pacaya) in forest disturbed by volcanic activity in Guatemala. Specifically, we measured multiple variables for bromeliads (height and position in tree, phytotelma water temperature and pH, canopy cover, phytotelma size, leaf size, and tree diameter at breast height), as well as salamander size. We employed a DNA barcoding approach to identify salamanders. We found that B. morio and B. pacaya occurred in microsympatry in bromeliads and that phytotelmata size and temperature of bromeliad microhabitat were the most important factors associated with the presence of salamanders. Moreover, phytotelmata with higher pH contained larger salamanders, suggesting that larger salamanders or aggregated individuals might modify pH. These results show that bromeliad selection is nonrandom with respect to microhabitat characteristics, and provide insight into the relationship between salamanders and this unique arboreal environment. PMID:24892414

  19. Harsh Environments, Life History Strategies, and Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study of Oregon Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Sarah E; Andrews, Judy A; Barckley, Maureen; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the effects of harsh environments in childhood on adjustment in early emerging adulthood, through parenting style and the development of fast Life History Strategies (LHS; risky beliefs and behaviors) in adolescence. Participants were from the Oregon Youth Substance Use Project (N = 988; 85.7% White). Five cohorts of children in Grades 1-5 at recruitment were assessed through one-year post high school. Greater environmental harshness (neighborhood quality and family poverty) in Grades 1-6 predicted less parental investment at Grade 8. This parenting style was related to the development of fast LHS (favorable beliefs about substance users and willingness to use substances at Grade 9, and engagement in substance use and risky sexual behavior assessed across Grades 10-12). The indirect path from harsh environment through parenting and LHS to (less) psychological adjustment (indicated by lower life satisfaction, self-rated health, trait sociability, and higher depression) was significant (indirect effect -.024, p = .011, 95% CI = -.043, -.006.). This chain of development was comparable to that found by Gibbons et al. (2012) for an African-American sample that, unlike the present study, included perceived racial discrimination in the assessment of harsh environment.

  20. Sensor and Communication Network Technology for Harsh Environments in the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Yu Rak; Jung, Gwang Il; Jung, Jong Eun; Park, Hee Yoon; Hong, Seok Bong; Koo, In Soo

    2008-02-15

    One of the challenges in harsh environments qualification and verification for emerging new I and C system of the nuclear power plant is to define the operational environment of these new emerging I and C sensor and communication network such that they are tested to the limits of a mission without requiring expensive over design. To aid this, this report defines, discusses and recommends environmental guideline and verification requirements for using state-of-the-art RPS sensors, fiber optic communication system, wireless communication and wireless smart sensors in nuclear harsh environments. This report focuses on advances in sensors (e.g., temperature, pressure, neutron and thermal power sensors) and their potential impact. Discussed are: radiation, thermal, electromagnetic, and electrical environment specifications. Presented are the typical performance data (survivability guidelines and experimental data), evaluation procedure and standard test method of communication devices, state-of-the-art RPS sensors, and communication systems.

  1. The design of the multipurpose Lusi drone. When technology can access harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano; Iarocci, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme and inaccessible environments are a new frontier that unmanned and remotely operated vehicles can today safely access and monitor. The Lusi mud eruption (NE Java Island, Indonesia) represents one of these harsh environments that are totally unreachable with traditional techniques. Here boiling mud is constantly spewed tens of meters in height and tall gas clouds surround the 100 meters wide active crater. The crater is surrounded by a 600 meters circular zone of hot mud that prevents any approach to investigate and sample the eruption site. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we assembled and designed a multipurpose drone to survey the eruption site. The Lusi drone is equipped with numerous airborne devices suitable for use on board of other multicopters. During the missions three cameras can complete 1) video survey, 2) high resolution photogrammetry of desired and preselected polygons, and 3) thermal photogrammetry surveys with infra-red camera to locate hot fluids seepage areas or faulted zones. Crater sampling and monitoring operations can be pre-planned with a flight software, and the pilot is required only for take-off and landing. An automatic winch allows the deployment of gas, mud and water samplers and contact thermometers to be operated with no risk for the aircraft. During the winch operations (that can be performed automatically) the aircraft hovers at a safety height until the tasks are completed while being controlled by the winch embedded processor. The drone is also equipped with a GPS connected CO2 and CH4 sensors. Gridded surveys using these devices allowed obtaining 2D maps of the concentration and distribution of various gasses over the area covered by the flight path.

  2. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W;

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses human capacity for movement in the context of extreme loading and with it the combined effects of metabolic, biomechanical and gravitational stress on the human body. This topic encompasses extreme duration, as occurs in ultra-endurance competitions (e.g. adventure racing...... and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may...

  3. Robust Multilayered Encapsulation for High-Performance Triboelectric Nanogenerator in Harsh Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiang; Jin, Yiming; Liu, Zhuo; Ouyang, Han; Li, Hu; Shi, Bojing; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Hao; Li, Zhou; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-10-03

    Harvesting biomechanical energy especially in vivo is of special significance for sustainable powering of wearable/implantable electronics. The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is one of the most promising solutions considering its high efficiency, low cost, light weight, and easy fabrication, but its performance will be greatly affected if there is moisture or liquid leaked into the device when applied in vivo. Here, we demonstrate a multiple encapsulation process of the TENG to maintain its output performance in various harsh environments. Through systematic studies, the encapsulated TENG showed great reliability in humid or even harsh environment over 30 days with a stability index of more than 95%. Given its outstanding reliability, the TENG has the potential to be applied in variety of circumstances to function as a sustainable power source for self-powered biomedical electronics and environmental sensing systems.

  4. Applications of Optical Fiber Assemblies in Harsh Environments, the Journey Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie N.; LaRocca, Frank; Thomas, William Joe; Switzer, Robert; Chuska, Richard; Macmurphy, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Over the past ten years, NASA has studied the effects of harsh environments on optical fiber assemblies for communication systems, lidar systems, and science missions. The culmination of this has resulted in recent technologies that are unique and tailored to meeting difficult requirements under challenging performance constraints. This presentation will focus on the past mission applications of optical fiber assemblies including; qualification information, lessons learned and new technological advances that will enable the road ahead.

  5. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W

    2016-01-01

    and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may...

  6. Fiber-optic photo-acoustic spectroscopy sensor for harsh environment gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juntao; Deng, Kung-Li; Guida, Renato; Lee, Boon

    2007-09-01

    Photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) has been successfully applied to detect various gases and chemicals due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. However, the performance of the conventional acoustic sensors prohibits the application of PAS for harsh environment gas species real-time monitoring. By replacing conventional acoustic sensors, such as microphone and piezo-transducers, with a high-temperature Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) vibration sensor, we developed a fiber-optic PAS sensing system that can be used in high-temperature and high-pressure harsh environments for gas species identification and concentration measurement. A resonant acoustic chamber is designed, and FBG vibration sensor is embedded in the molybdenum membrane. An OPO laser is used for spectrum scanning. Preliminary test on water vapor has been conducted, and the result is analyzed. This sensing technology can be adapted into harsh environments, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, and provide on-line real-time monitoring of gases species, such as CO, H IIO, and O II. Presently, our FBG-based vibration sensor can withstand the high temperature up to 800°C.

  7. Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hai [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Tsai, Hai-Lung [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Dong, Junhang [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This is the final report for the program “Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments”, funded by NETL, and performed by Missouri University of Science and Technology, Clemson University and University of Cincinnati from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2014. Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is a central element to the mission of The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensor technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems. The main objective of this research program is to conduct fundamental and applied research that will lead to successful development and demonstration of robust, multiplexed, microstructured silica and single-crystal sapphire fiber sensors to be deployed into the hot zones of advanced power and fuel systems for simultaneous measurements of high temperature and gas pressure. The specific objectives of this research program include: 1) Design, fabrication and demonstration of multiplexed, robust silica and sapphire fiber temperature and dynamic gas pressure sensors that can survive and maintain fully operational in high-temperature harsh environments. 2) Development and demonstration of a novel method to demodulate the multiplexed interferograms for simultaneous measurements of temperature and gas pressure in harsh environments. 3) Development and demonstration of novel sapphire fiber cladding and low numerical aperture (NA) excitation techniques to assure high signal integrity and sensor robustness.

  8. Metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, D A; Ramond, J-B; Makhalanyane, T P; De Maayer, P

    2015-06-01

    Whether they are exposed to extremes of heat or cold, or buried deep beneath the Earth's surface, microorganisms have an uncanny ability to survive under these conditions. This ability to survive has fascinated scientists for nearly a century, but the recent development of metagenomics and 'omics' tools has allowed us to make huge leaps in understanding the remarkable complexity and versatility of extremophile communities. Here, in the context of the recently developed metagenomic tools, we discuss recent research on the community composition, adaptive strategies and biological functions of extremophiles.

  9. Thermal stability and energy harvesting characteristics of Au nanorods: harsh environment chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karker, Nicholas; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the levels of polluting gases such as CO and NOx from high temperature (500°C and higher) combustion environments requires materials with high thermal stability and resilience that can withstand harsh oxidizing and reducing environments. Au nanorods (AuNRs) have shown potential in plasmonic gas sensing due to their catalytic activity, high oxidation stability, and absorbance sensitivity to changes in the surrounding environment. By using electron beam lithography, AuNR geometries can be patterned with tight control of the rod dimensions and spacings, allowing tunability of their optical properties. Methods such as NR encapsulation within an yttria-stabilized zirconia overcoat layer with subsequent annealing procedures will be shown to improve temperature stability within a simulated harsh environment. Since light sources and spectrometers are typically required to obtain optical measurements, integration is a major barrier for harsh environment sensing. Plasmonic sensing results will be presented where thermal energy is harvested by the AuNRs, which replaces the need for an external incident light source. Results from gas sensing experiments that utilize thermal energy harvesting are in good agreement with experiments which use an external incident light source. Principal component analysis results demonstrate that by selecting the most "active" wavelengths in a plasmonic band, the wavelength space can be reduced from hundreds of monitored wavelengths to just four, without loss of information about selectivity of the AuNRs. By combining thermal stability, the thermal energy harvesting capability, and the selectivity in gas detection (achieved through multivariate analysis), integration of plasmonic sensors into combustion environments can be greatly simplified.

  10. Ecophysiology of gelatinous Nostoc colonies: unprecedented slow growth and survival in resource-poor and harsh environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterial genus Nostoc includes several species forming centimetre-large gelatinous colonies in nutrient-poor freshwaters and harsh semi-terrestrial environments with extended drought or freezing...

  11. Life in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn; Bray, James A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Each recent report of liquid water existing elsewhere in the solar system has reverberated through the international press and excited the imagination of humankind. Why? Because in the last few decades we have come to realize that where there is liquid water on Earth, virtually no matter what the physical conditions, there is life. What we previously thought of as insurmountable physical and chemical barriers to life, we now see as yet another niche harboring 'extremophiles'. This realization, coupled with new data on the survival of microbes in the space environment and modeling of the potential for transfer of life between celestial bodies, suggests that life could be more common than previously thought. Here we critically examine what it means to be an extremophile, the implications of this for evolution, biotechnology, and especially the search for life in the cosmos.

  12. Implementation of a Readout Circuit on SOI Technology for the Signal Conditioning of a Neutron Detector in Harsh Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Krit, S.; Coulie-Castellani, K.; Rahajandraibe, W. [Aix-Marseille, IM2NP UMR CNRS 7334, Marseille (France); Micolau, G. [Avignon University, IM2NP UMR CNRS 7334, Marseille (France); Lyoussi, A. [CEA Cadarache, CEA/DEN/DER/SPEx, Laboratoire Dosimetrie Capteurs Instrumentation, Cadarache (France)

    2015-07-01

    A transistor level implementation of the analog block of a readout system on SOI process is presented here. This system is dedicated to the signal conditioning of a neutron detector in harsh environment. The different parts of the readout circuits are defined. The harsh environment constraints (crossing particle effect, high temperatures) are also detailed and modeled in the circuit in order to test and evaluate the characteristics of the designed block when working under these conditions. (authors)

  13. DE-FE0013062 Final report PARC NETL DOE Heat sensor heat sensor harsh environment adaptable thermionic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limb, Scott J. [Palo Alto Research Center Inc., CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This document is the final report for the “HARSH ENVIRONMENT ADAPTABLE THERMIONIC SENSOR” project under NETL’s Crosscutting contract DE-FE0013062. This report addresses sensors that can be made with thermionic thin films along with the required high temperature hermetic packaging process. These sensors can be placed in harsh high temperature environments and potentially be wireless and self-powered.

  14. FBG system for temperature monitoring under electromagnetic immersed and harsh oil and gas reservoir environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villnow, Michael; Bosselmann, Thomas; Willsch, Michael; Kaiser, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    A common way to explore oil out of tar sand is to use a technique called Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage SAGD. This method can be enhanced by using an inductive heater (EM-SAGD). To monitor the heat dissipation of the inductor a measurement system for this harsh electromagnetic environment is needed. In this paper different optical temperature measurement systems are compared to find the most suitable system for this kind of application. A field test with great results was performed, where the performance of the inductor and the FBG measurement system were demonstrated.

  15. A life history approach to delineating how harsh environments and hawk temperament traits differentially shape children's problem-solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suor, Jennifer H; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Davies, Patrick T; Cicchetti, Dante

    2017-08-01

    Harsh environments are known to predict deficits in children's cognitive abilities. Life history theory approaches challenge this interpretation, proposing stressed children's cognition becomes specialized to solve problems in fitness-enhancing ways. The goal of this study was to examine associations between early environmental harshness and children's problem-solving outcomes across tasks varying in ecological relevance. In addition, we utilize an evolutionary model of temperament toward further specifying whether hawk temperament traits moderate these associations. Two hundred and one mother-child dyads participated in a prospective multimethod study when children were 2 and 4 years old. At age 2, environmental harshness was assessed via maternal report of earned income and observations of maternal disengagement during a parent-child interaction task. Children's hawk temperament traits were assessed from a series of unfamiliar episodes. At age 4, children's reward-oriented and visual problem-solving were measured. Path analyses revealed early environmental harshness and children's hawk temperament traits predicted worse visual problem-solving. Results showed a significant two-way interaction between children's hawk temperament traits and environmental harshness on reward-oriented problem-solving. Simple slope analyses revealed the effect of environmental harshness on reward-oriented problem-solving was specific to children with higher levels of hawk traits. Results suggest early experiences of environmental harshness and child hawk temperament traits shape children's trajectories of problem-solving in an environment-fitting manner. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  16. Automation Rover for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan; Hilgemann, Evan; Johnson, Michael; Parness, Aaron; Hall, Jeffrey; Kawata, Jessie; Stack, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Almost 2,300 years ago the ancient Greeks built the Antikythera automaton. This purely mechanical computer accurately predicted past and future astronomical events long before electronics existed1. Automata have been credibly used for hundreds of years as computers, art pieces, and clocks. However, in the past several decades automata have become less popular as the capabilities of electronics increased, leaving them an unexplored solution for robotic spacecraft. The Automaton Rover for Extreme Environments (AREE) proposes an exciting paradigm shift from electronics to a fully mechanical system, enabling longitudinal exploration of the most extreme environments within the solar system.

  17. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Li; Li, Xin; Jin, Tian; Yue, Song; Xue, Rui

    2016-01-23

    As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL) is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS) aid, PLLs' tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N₀), vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods.

  18. Durability of the tunable adhesive superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces for harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yao; Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng; Huo, Jinglan; Yang, Qing; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    Tunable adhesive superhydrophobic materials have attracted increasing research interest due to their applications in microdroplet manipulation, biological detection and microfluidic system. However, most of the artificial materials easily lose superhydrophobicity in harsh environments. The durability of superhydrophobic materials is very important to extend their lifetime in practical applications. In this paper, bioinspired durable superhydrophobicity with tunable adhesion on polytetrafluoroethylene surfaces is realized via a one-step femtosecond laser irradiation. On the laser-induced superhydrophobic surfaces, the sliding angle can be tuned from 1° to 90° (water droplet is pinned on the surface at any titled angles). The tunable water adhesion results from different contact states which change from the lotus state to the transition state and then to the composite state with increasing average distance of irradiation points. Water droplet quick localization and no-loss droplet transportation were achieved through designing surface adhesion. In addition, the resultant surfaces are so stable that they can maintain superhydrophobicity even after storing in harsh environments, without dramatical superhydrophobicity decay for a long time.

  19. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS aid, PLLs’ tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N0, vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods.

  20. Sample Handling in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellar, Louisa; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environments, such as that on Venus, preclude the use of existing equipment for functions that involve interaction with the environment. The operating limitations of current high temperature electronics are well below the actual temperature and pressure found on Venus (460 deg C and 92 atm), so proposed lander configurations typically include a pressure vessel where the science instruments are kept at Earth-like temperature and pressure (25 deg C and 1 atm). The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a method for sample transfer from an external drill to internal science instruments for a lander on Venus. The initial concepts were string and pneumatically driven systems; and the latter system was selected for its ability to deliver samples at very high speed. The pneumatic system was conceived to be driven by the pressure difference between the Venusian atmosphere and the inside of the lander. The pneumatic transfer of a small capsule was demonstrated, and velocity data was collected from the lab experiment. The sample transfer system was modeled using CAD software and prototyped using 3D printing. General structural and thermal analyses were performed to approximate the proposed system's mass and effects on the temperature and pressure inside of the lander. Additionally, a sampler breadboard for use on Titan was tested and functionality problems were resolved.

  1. Sample Handling in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellar, Louisa; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environments, such as that on Venus, preclude the use of existing equipment for functions that involve interaction with the environment. The operating limitations of current high temperature electronics are well below the actual temperature and pressure found on Venus (460 deg C and 92 atm), so proposed lander configurations typically include a pressure vessel where the science instruments are kept at Earth-like temperature and pressure (25 deg C and 1 atm). The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a method for sample transfer from an external drill to internal science instruments for a lander on Venus. The initial concepts were string and pneumatically driven systems; and the latter system was selected for its ability to deliver samples at very high speed. The pneumatic system was conceived to be driven by the pressure difference between the Venusian atmosphere and the inside of the lander. The pneumatic transfer of a small capsule was demonstrated, and velocity data was collected from the lab experiment. The sample transfer system was modeled using CAD software and prototyped using 3D printing. General structural and thermal analyses were performed to approximate the proposed system's mass and effects on the temperature and pressure inside of the lander. Additionally, a sampler breadboard for use on Titan was tested and functionality problems were resolved.

  2. Rugged optical mirrors for Fourier-Transform Spectrometers operated in harsh environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Feist

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC operate a number of Fourier-Transform Spectrometers (FTSs that measure trace gases in the atmosphere by observing solar spectra. To guide the sunlight into the FTS, a solar tracker has to be placed outside. This device needs high-quality optical mirrors with good reflectivity in the near and mid infrared. More and more FTS stations are operated in remote locations with harsh environments. Optical mirrors are usually made for laboratory conditions and might not last very long there. At the MPI-BGC's TCCON site on Ascension Island, several mirrors from different optical manufacturers were destroyed within weeks. To continue operation, the MPI-BGC had to develop rugged mirrors that could sustain the harsh conditions for months or even years. While commercially available mirrors are typically made from a substrate coverered with a thin reflective coating, these rugged mirrors were made from stainless steel with no additional coating. Except for their lower reflectivity (which can easily be compensated for, their optical properties are comparable to existing mirrors. However, their rugged design makes them mostly immune to corrosion and scratching. Unlike most coated mirrors, they can also be cleaned easily.

  3. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest.

  4. A Wireless Passive Pressure Microsensor Fabricated in HTCC MEMS Technology for Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingliang Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A wireless passive high-temperature pressure sensor without evacuation channel fabricated in high-temperature co-fired ceramics (HTCC technology is proposed. The properties of the HTCC material ensure the sensor can be applied in harsh environments. The sensor without evacuation channel can be completely gastight. The wireless data is obtained with a reader antenna by mutual inductance coupling. Experimental systems are designed to obtain the frequency-pressure characteristic, frequency-temperature characteristic and coupling distance. Experimental results show that the sensor can be coupled with an antenna at 600 °C and max distance of 2.8 cm at room temperature. The senor sensitivity is about 860 Hz/bar and hysteresis error and repeatability error are quite low.

  5. A Harsh Environment-Oriented Wireless Passive Temperature Sensor Realized by LTCC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulin Tan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To meet measurement needs in harsh environments, such as high temperature and rotating applications, a wireless passive Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics (LTCC temperature sensor based on ferroelectric dielectric material is presented in this paper. As a LC circuit which consists of electrically connected temperature sensitive capacitor and invariable planar spiral inductor, the sensor has its resonant frequency shift with the variation in temperature. Within near-filed coupling distance, the variation in resonant frequency of the sensor can be detected contactlessly by extracting the impedance parameters of an external antenna. Ferroelectric ceramic, which has temperature sensitive permittivity, is used as the dielectric. The fabrication process of the sensor, which differs from conventional LTCC technology, is described in detail. The sensor is tested three times from room temperature to 700 °C, and considerable repeatability and sensitivity are shown, thus the feasibility of high performance wireless passive temperature sensor realized by LTCC technology is demonstrated.

  6. A harsh environment-oriented wireless passive temperature sensor realized by LTCC technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiulin; Luo, Tao; Xiong, Jijun; Kang, Hao; Ji, Xiaxia; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Mingliang; Wang, Xiaolong; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wendong

    2014-03-03

    To meet measurement needs in harsh environments, such as high temperature and rotating applications, a wireless passive Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics (LTCC) temperature sensor based on ferroelectric dielectric material is presented in this paper. As a LC circuit which consists of electrically connected temperature sensitive capacitor and invariable planar spiral inductor, the sensor has its resonant frequency shift with the variation in temperature. Within near-filed coupling distance, the variation in resonant frequency of the sensor can be detected contactlessly by extracting the impedance parameters of an external antenna. Ferroelectric ceramic, which has temperature sensitive permittivity, is used as the dielectric. The fabrication process of the sensor, which differs from conventional LTCC technology, is described in detail. The sensor is tested three times from room temperature to 700 °C, and considerable repeatability and sensitivity are shown, thus the feasibility of high performance wireless passive temperature sensor realized by LTCC technology is demonstrated.

  7. A wireless passive pressure microsensor fabricated in HTCC MEMS technology for harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiulin; Kang, Hao; Xiong, Jijun; Qin, Li; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Chen; Ding, Liqiong; Zhang, Xiansheng; Yang, Mingliang

    2013-08-02

    A wireless passive high-temperature pressure sensor without evacuation channel fabricated in high-temperature co-fired ceramics (HTCC) technology is proposed. The properties of the HTCC material ensure the sensor can be applied in harsh environments. The sensor without evacuation channel can be completely gastight. The wireless data is obtained with a reader antenna by mutual inductance coupling. Experimental systems are designed to obtain the frequency-pressure characteristic, frequency-temperature characteristic and coupling distance. Experimental results show that the sensor can be coupled with an antenna at 600 °C and max distance of 2.8 cm at room temperature. The senor sensitivity is about 860 Hz/bar and hysteresis error and repeatability error are quite low.

  8. On the Integration of a Readout System Dedicated for Neutron Discrimination in Harsh Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krit S. Ben

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New insights related to the integration of a readout system dedicated for the detection and discrimination of neutrons are presented here. This study takes place in the framework of the I_SMART European project. This system will have to work later in a harsh environment in terms of temperature and radiations, what makes not only the development of specifications for operation and reliability of the components necessary but also the investigation of margins for the interplay of the system. Implementation of the analog conditioning chain at transistor level (AMS (Analog/Mixed Signal 0.35μm CMOS technology is investigated here where electrical performances have been validated at SPICE-level simulations using “Spectre” simulator (SPICE-based under Cadence DFII.

  9. Ultra-thin nanocrystalline diamond membranes as pressure sensors for harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, S. D., E-mail: stoffel.d.janssens@gmail.com; Haenen, K., E-mail: ken.haenen@uhasselt.be [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Drijkoningen, S. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-02-17

    Glass and diamond are suitable materials for harsh environments. Here, a procedure for fabricating ultra-thin nanocrystalline diamond membranes on glass, acting as an electrically insulating substrate, is presented. In order to investigate the pressure sensing properties of such membranes, a circular, highly conductive boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond membrane with a resistivity of 38 mΩ cm, a thickness of 150 nm, and a diameter of 555 μm is fabricated in the middle of a Hall bar structure. During the application of a positive differential pressure under the membrane (0–0.7 bar), four point piezoresistive effect measurements are performed. From these measurements, it can be concluded that the resistance response of the membrane, as a function of differential pressure, is highly linear and sensitive.

  10. Neural-Network-Based Smart Sensor Framework Operating in a Harsh Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Narendra S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an artificial neural-network- (NN- based smart interface framework for sensors operating in harsh environments. The NN-based sensor can automatically compensate for the nonlinear response characteristics and its nonlinear dependency on the environmental parameters, with high accuracy. To show the potential of the proposed NN-based framework, we provide results of a smart capacitive pressure sensor (CPS operating in a wide temperature range of 0 to . Through simulated experiments, we have shown that the NN-based CPS model is capable of providing pressure readout with a maximum full-scale (FS error of only over this temperature range. A novel scheme for estimating the ambient temperature from the sensor characteristics itself is proposed. For this purpose, a second NN is utilized to estimate the ambient temperature accurately from the knowledge of the offset capacitance of the CPS. A microcontroller-unit- (MCU- based implementation scheme is also provided.

  11. Emerging GaN-based HEMTs for mechanical sensing within harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köck, Helmut; Chapin, Caitlin A.; Ostermaier, Clemens; Häberlen, Oliver; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2014-06-01

    Gallium nitride based high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been investigated extensively as an alternative to Si-based power transistors by academia and industry over the last decade. It is well known that GaN-based HEMTs outperform Si-based technologies in terms of power density, area specific on-state resistance and switching speed. Recently, wide band-gap material systems have stirred interest regarding their use in various sensing fields ranging from chemical, mechanical, biological to optical applications due to their superior material properties. For harsh environments, wide bandgap sensor systems are deemed to be superior when compared to conventional Si-based systems. A new monolithic sensor platform based on the GaN HEMT electronic structure will enable engineers to design highly efficient propulsion systems widely applicable to the automotive, aeronautics and astronautics industrial sectors. In this paper, the advancements of GaN-based HEMTs for mechanical sensing applications are discussed. Of particular interest are multilayered heterogeneous structures where spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization between the interface results in the formation of a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Experimental results presented focus on the signal transduction under strained operating conditions in harsh environments. It is shown that a conventional AlGaN/GaN HEMT has a strong dependence of drain current under strained conditions, thus representing a promising future sensor platform. Ultimately, this work explores the sensor performance of conventional GaN HEMTs and leverages existing technological advances available in power electronics device research. The results presented have the potential to boost GaN-based sensor development through the integration of HEMT device and sensor design research.

  12. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Duong Ngo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a “one-sensor-one-packaging_technology” concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a “floating-concept”, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO. A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process. A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not “floating” but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA.

  13. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ha-Duong; Mukhopadhyay, Biswaijit; Ehrmann, Oswin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-08-18

    In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a "one-sensor-one-packaging_technology" concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a "floating-concept", capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load) with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO). A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane) transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process). A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not "floating" but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA.

  14. Communication path for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Betts, Bradley J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and systems for using one or more radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs), or other suitable signal transmitters and/or receivers, to provide a sensor information communication path, to provide location and/or spatial orientation information for an emergency service worker (ESW), to provide an ESW escape route, to indicate a direction from an ESW to an ES appliance, to provide updated information on a region or structure that presents an extreme environment (fire, hazardous fluid leak, underwater, nuclear, etc.) in which an ESW works, and to provide accumulated thermal load or thermal breakdown information on one or more locations in the region.

  15. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, C. C.; Heyes, A. L.; Feist, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  16. Wireless Passive Temperature Sensor Realized on Multilayer HTCC Tapes for Harsh Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulin Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless passive temperature sensor is designed on the basis of a resonant circuit, fabricated on multilayer high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC tapes, and measured with an antenna in the wireless coupling way. Alumina ceramic used as the substrate of the sensor is fabricated by lamination and sintering techniques, and the passive resonant circuit composed of a planar spiral inductor and a parallel plate capacitor is printed and formed on the substrate by screen-printing and postfiring processes. Since the permittivity of the ceramic becomes higher as temperature rises, the resonant frequency of the sensor decreases due to the increasing capacitance of the circuit. Measurements on the input impedance versus the resonant frequency of the sensor are achieved based on the principle, and discussions are made according to the exacted relative permittivity of the ceramic and quality factor (Q of the sensor within the temperature range from 19°C (room temperature to 900°C. The results show that the sensor demonstrates good high-temperature characteristics and wide temperature range. The average sensitivity of the sensor with good repeatability and reliability is up to 5.22 KHz/°C. It can be applied to detect high temperature in harsh environment.

  17. Conformal Thin Film Packaging for SiC Sensor Circuits in Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Karnick, David A.; Ponchak, George E.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation sputtered silicon carbide annealed at 300 C for one hour is used as a conformal thin film package. A RF magnetron sputterer was used to deposit 500 nm silicon carbide films on gold metal structures on alumina wafers. To determine the reliability and resistance to immersion in harsh environments, samples were submerged in gold etchant for 24 hours, in BOE for 24 hours, and in an O2 plasma etch for one hour. The adhesion strength of the thin film was measured by a pull test before and after the chemical immersion, which indicated that the film has an adhesion strength better than 10(exp 8) N/m2; this is similar to the adhesion of the gold layer to the alumina wafer. MIM capacitors are used to determine the dielectric constant, which is dependent on the SiC anneal temperature. Finally, to demonstrate that the SiC, conformal, thin film may be used to package RF circuits and sensors, an LC resonator circuit was fabricated and tested with and without the conformal SiC thin film packaging. The results indicate that the SiC coating adds no appreciable degradation to the circuits RF performance. Index Terms Sputter, silicon carbide, MIM capacitors, LC resonators, gold etchants, BOE, O2 plasma

  18. Ceramic-polymer capacitive sensors for tactile/force awareness in harsh environment robotic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weadon, Timothy L.; Evans, Thomas H.; Sabolsky, Edward M.

    2013-12-01

    The need for force feedback and spatial awareness of contact in harsh environment applications, such as space servicing, has been unsatisfied due to the inability of current sensor technology to resist environmental effects. In this work, capacitive sensors based on a thick film 0:3 connectivity ceramic:polymer composite structure were evaluated for potential use in future operations within robotic end effectors, withstanding temperatures ranging from -80 ° C to 120 ° C and forces up to 350 kPa. A thick film design is utilized to allow for ease of embedding, allowing sensors to be implemented into exciting robotic hardware with minimal intrusion, and protecting sensors from electron bombardment, radiation, and point concentrations from metal-on-metal contact. Taguchi design of experiments allows composition variables including sensor thickness, ceramic composition, ceramic particle size, ceramic volume loading, polymer character, modifier character, and the polymer:modifier ratio to be evaluated simultaneously. Dynamic thermal and mechanical loading techniques were implemented to characterize the composite sensors with in situ electrical acquisition. Individual composition variables were linked to the sensor magnitude, sensitivity, drift, and hysteresis, showing that the sensor response is optimized with a thickness of single microns, 10 vol% loading of nano-particle ceramics, and high molecular weight polymers with a low content of simple architecture modifiers lacking glass or melting temperatures in the working range.

  19. A Computationally Efficient and Adaptive Approach for Online Embedded Machinery Diagnosis in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Condition-based monitoring (CBM has advanced to the stage where industry is now demanding machinery that possesses self-diagnosis ability. This need has spurred the CBM research to be applicable in more expanded areas over the past decades. There are two critical issues in implementing CBM in harsh environments using embedded systems: computational efficiency and adaptability. In this paper, a computationally efficient and adaptive approach including simple principal component analysis (SPCA for feature dimensionality reduction and K-means clustering for classification is proposed for online embedded machinery diagnosis. Compared with the standard principal component analysis (PCA and kernel principal component analysis (KPCA, SPCA is adaptive in nature and has lower algorithm complexity when dealing with a large amount of data. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is firstly validated using a standard rolling element bearing test dataset on a personal computer. It is then deployed on an embedded real-time controller and used to monitor a rotating shaft. It was found that the proposed approach scaled well, whereas the standard PCA-based approach broke down when data quantity increased to a certain level. Furthermore, the proposed approach achieved 90% accuracy when diagnosing an induced fault compared to 59% accuracy obtained using the standard PCA-based approach.

  20. Silicon Carbide Micro/Nano Systems for Demanding and Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran

    2008-03-01

    Micro/nano systems enable the development of smart products and systems by augmenting the computational ability of microelectronics with the perception and control capabilities of sensors and actuators. Micro/nano systems are also known as micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), and have been commercialized in a wide range of applications including crash sensing, blood pressure measurement, optical projection, and fluid flow control to name a few. Silicon, in single- and polycrystalline forms, has been the platform semiconductor material underpinning the fabrication of the mechanical and electronic elements of micro/nano systems. However, the materials properties of silicon impose limitations on its use in harsh environment and demanding applications--for example, those involving operation in the presence of high temperatures, corrosive media, high shock loads, erosive flows, and/or high radiation, or involving performance requirements for the mechanical elements that are beyond silicon's capabilities. Silicon carbide (SiC) is an alternative platform semiconductor material that enables such applications because of its wider bandgap and higher melting/sublimation temperature, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, hardness, chemical inertness, and thermal conductivity. This talk will highlight our most recent SiC material, process, and device advances to enable sensing and actuation in applications such as propulsion instrumentation/control, power generation, resource exploration, nuclear reactor instrumentation, deep space exploration, and communications.

  1. Selection of Shear Horizontal Wave Transducers for Robotic Nondestructive Inspection in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Harsh environments and confined spaces require that nondestructive inspections be conducted with robotic systems. Ultrasonic guided waves are well suited for robotic systems because they can provide efficient volumetric coverage when inspecting for various types of damage, including cracks and corrosion. Shear horizontal guided waves are especially well suited for robotic inspection because they are sensitive to cracks oriented perpendicular or parallel to the wave propagation direction and can be generated with electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs and magnetostrictive transducers (MSTs. Both types of transducers are investigated for crack detection in a stainless steel plate. The MSTs require the robot to apply a compressive normal force that creates frictional force coupling. However, the coupling is observed to be very dependent upon surface roughness and surface debris. The EMATs are coupled through the Lorentz force and are thus noncontact, although they depend on the lift off between transducer and substrate. After comparing advantages and disadvantages of each transducer for robotic inspection the EMATs are selected for application to canisters that store used nuclear fuel.

  2. Spacer engineered Trigate SOI TFET: An investigation towards harsh temperature environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallikarjunarao; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pradhan, K. P.; Artola, L.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel N-channel Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET) i.e., Trigate Silicon-ON-Insulator (SOI) N-TFET with high-k spacer is proposed for better Sub-threshold swing (SS) and OFF-state current (IOFF) by keeping in mind the sensitivity towards temperature. The proposed model can achieve a Sub-threshold swing less than 35 mV/decade at various temperatures, which is desirable for designing low power CTFET for digital circuit applications. In N-TFET source doping has a significant effect on the ON-state current (ION) level; therefore more electrons will tunnel from source to channel region. High-k Spacer i.e., HfO2 is used to enhance the device performance and also it avoids overlapping of transistors in an integrated circuits (IC's). We have designed a reliable device by performing the temperature analysis on Transfer characteristics, Drain characteristics and also on various performance metrics like ON-state current (ION), OFF-state current (IOFF), ION/IOFF, Trans-conductance (gm), Trans-conductance Generation Factor (TGF), Sub-threshold Swing (SS) to observe the applications towards harsh temperature environment.

  3. Study on ammonia slip detection in the harsh combustion environments using diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Li, Hong-bin; He, Yin; Gao, Yan-wei; Wang, Li-ming; Liu, Wen-qing

    2016-10-01

    The emissions of NOX from Cement plant or Coal-fired power plant have serious pollution to the environment. In recent years, Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is an effective means of reducing the emissions of NOX by injecting ammonia into the combustion flue gas, which ideally reacts with the NOX to produce harmless components (H2O and N2). The efficiency of SCR is determined by monitoring the ammonia slip of the flue exhaust outlet, excess ammonia injection can cause ammonia slip, which not only destroy the plant, but also increase the operating costs. In addition, ammonia is also pollution gases as NOX. The flue gas at the measurement point is high temperature, vibrate and high particle density processes in Cement plant primarily, such harsh conditions coupled with the highly reactive nature of ammonia, so it is difficult to reliable extractive low level analysis. The paper describes an in-situ Tunable Diode Laser analyzer for measuring ammonia slip in the combustion flue gas after SCR in Cement Plant or Coal-fired power plant. A correlation filtering algorithm is developed to select high-quality spectral absorption signal, which improve the accuracy of concentration inversion of analyzer. The paper also includes field test data on an actual Cement plant all day, and we compare the ammonia slip and NOX emissions of flue gas during actual production process, the results indicate that the measured values of the ammonia slip and NOX emissions present a good correlation and comply with the principle of SCR.

  4. QCD matter in extreme environments

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We review various theoretical approaches to the states of QCD matter out of quarks and gluons in extreme environments such as the high-temperature states at zero and finite baryon density and the dimensionally reduced state under an intense magnetic field. The topics at high temperature include the Polyakov loop and the 't Hooft loop in the perturbative regime, the Polyakov loop behaviour and the phase transition in some of non-perturbative methods; the strong-coupling expansion, the large-Nc limit and the holographic QCD models. These analyses are extended to hot and dense matter with a finite baryon chemical potential. We point out that the difficulty in the finite-density problem has similarity to that under a strong magnetic field. We make a brief summary of results related to the topological contents probed by the magnetic field and the Chiral Magnetic Effect. We also address the close connection to the (1+1) dimensional system.

  5. Ultrasonic techniques for measuring physical properties of fluids in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantea, Cristian

    Ultrasonic-based measurement techniques, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain, include a wide range of experimental methods for investigating physical properties of materials. This discussion is specifically focused on ultrasonic methods and instrumentation development for the determination of liquid properties at conditions typically found in subsurface environments (in the U.S., more than 80% of total energy needs are provided by subsurface energy sources). Such sensors require materials that can withstand harsh conditions of high pressure, high temperature and corrosiveness. These include the piezoelectric material, electrically conductive adhesives, sensor housings/enclosures, and the signal carrying cables, to name a few. A complete sensor package was developed for operation at high temperatures and pressures characteristic to geothermal/oil-industry reservoirs. This package is designed to provide real-time, simultaneous measurements of multiple physical parameters, such as temperature, pressure, salinity and sound speed. The basic principle for this sensor's operation is an ultrasonic frequency domain technique, combined with transducer resonance tracking. This multipurpose acoustic sensor can be used at depths of several thousand meters, temperatures up to 250 °C, and in a very corrosive environment. In the context of high precision measurement of sound speed, the determination of acoustic nonlinearity of liquids will also be discussed, using two different approaches: (i) the thermodynamic method, in which precise and accurate frequency domain sound speed measurements are performed at high pressure and high temperature, and (ii) a modified finite amplitude method, requiring time domain measurements of the second harmonic at room temperature. Efforts toward the development of an acoustic source of collimated low-frequency (10-150 kHz) beam, with applications in imaging, will also be presented.

  6. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW, (United Kingdom); Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul [Metrosol Limited, Plum Park Estate, Watling Street, Paulerspury, Northamptonshire, NN12 6LQ, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  7. Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

    2006-05-30

    This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance

  8. Surface modification of NiTi by plasma based ion implantation for application in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.M., E-mail: rogerio@plasma.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, B.B.; Carreri, F.C.; Goncalves, J.A.N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, M.M.N.F. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva, M.M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Pichon, L. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, University of Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Camargo, E.N.; Otubo, J. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New nitrogen PBII set up was used to treat samples of NiTi in moderate temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A very rich nitrogen atomic concentration was achieved on the top surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen diffused at least for 11 {mu}m depth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved tribological and corrosion properties were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A concentration dependent diffusion coefficient was calculated. - Abstract: The substitution of conventional components for NiTi in distinct devices such as actuators, valves, connectors, stents, orthodontic arc-wires, e.g., usually demands some kind of treatment to be performed on the surface of the alloy. A typical case is of biomaterials made of NiTi, in which the main drawback is the Ni out-diffusion, an issue that has been satisfactorily addressed by plasma based ion implantation (PBII). Even though PBII can tailor selective surface properties of diverse materials, usually, only thin modified layers are attained. When NiTi alloys are to be used in the harsh space environment, as is the case of devices designed to remotely release the solar panels and antenna arrays of satellites, e.g., superior mechanical and tribological properties are demanded. For this case the thickness of the modified layer must be larger than the one commonly achieved by conventional PBII. In this paper, new nitrogen PBII set up was used to treat samples of NiTi in moderate temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C, with negative voltage pulses of 7 kV/250 Hz/20 {mu}s, in a process lasting 1 h. A rich nitrogen atomic concentration of 85 at.% was achieved on the near surface and nitrogen diffused at least for 11 {mu}m depth. Tribological properties as well as corrosion resistance were evaluated.

  9. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Lefèvre

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4 and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  10. Astrobiology: Life in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. It seeks to answer two important scientific questions: how did we get here and are we alone in the universe? Scientists begin by studying life on Earth and its limits. The discovery of extremophiles on Earth capable of surviving extremes encourages the…

  11. Astrobiology: Life in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. It seeks to answer two important scientific questions: how did we get here and are we alone in the universe? Scientists begin by studying life on Earth and its limits. The discovery of extremophiles on Earth capable of surviving extremes encourages the…

  12. A Radiation Hard Multi-Channel Digitizer ASIC for Operation in the Harsh Jovian Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shahid; Aslam, S.; Akturk, A.; Quilligan, G.

    2011-01-01

    ultimately impact the surface of Europa after the mission is completed. The current JEO mission concept includes a range of instruments on the payload, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiters atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. The payload includes a low mass (3.7 Kg) and low power (< 5 W) Thermal Instrument (TI) concept for measuring possible warm thermal anomalies on Europa s cold surface caused by recent (< 10,000 years) eruptive activity. Regions of anomalously high heat flow will be identified by thermal mapping using a nadir pointing, push-broom filter radiometer that provides far-IR imagery in two broad band spectral wavelength regions, 8-20 m and 20-100 m, for surface temperature measurements with better than a 2 K accuracy and a spatial resolution of 250 m/pixel obtained from a 100 Km orbit. The temperature accuracy permits a search for elevated temperatures when combined with albedo information. The spatial resolution is sufficient to resolve Europa's larger cracks and ridge axial valleys. In order to accomplish the thermal mapping, the TI uses sensitive thermopile arrays that are readout by a custom designed low-noise Multi-Channel Digitizer (MCD) ASIC that resides very close to the thermopile linear array outputs. Both the thermopile array and the MCD ASIC will need to show full functionality within the harsh Jovian radiation environment, operating at cryogenic temperatures, typically 150 K to 170 K. In the following, a radiation mitigation strategy together with a low risk Radiation-Hardened-By-Design (RHBD) methodology using commercial foundry processes is given for the design and manufacture of a MCD ASIC that will meet this challenge.

  13. Ecophysiology of gelatinous Nostoc colonies: unprecedented slow growth and survival in resource-poor and harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2014-07-01

    The cyanobacterial genus Nostoc includes several species forming centimetre-large gelatinous colonies in nutrient-poor freshwaters and harsh semi-terrestrial environments with extended drought or freezing. These Nostoc species have filaments with normal photosynthetic cells and N2-fixing heterocysts embedded in an extensive gelatinous matrix of polysaccharides and many other organic substances providing biological and environmental protection. Large colony size imposes constraints on the use of external resources and the gelatinous matrix represents extra costs and reduced growth rates. The objective of this review is to evaluate the mechanisms behind the low rates of growth and mortality, protection against environmental hazards and the persistence and longevity of gelatinous Nostoc colonies, and their ability to economize with highly limiting resources. Simple models predict the decline in uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and a decline in the growth rate of spherical freshwater colonies of N. pruniforme and N. zetterstedtii and sheet-like colonies of N. commune in response to a thicker diffusion boundary layer, lower external DIC concentration and higher organic carbon mass per surface area (CMA) of the colony. Measured growth rates of N. commune and N. pruniforme at high DIC availability comply with general empirical predictions of maximum growth rate (i.e. doubling time 10-14 d) as functions of CMA for marine macroalgae and as functions of tissue thickness for aquatic and terrestrial plants, while extremely low growth rates of N. zetterstedtii (i.e. doubling time 2-3 years) are 10-fold lower than model predictions, either because of very low ambient DIC and/or an extremely costly colony matrix. DIC uptake is limited by diffusion at low concentrations for all species, although they exhibit efficient HCO3(-) uptake, accumulation of respiratory DIC within the colonies and very low CO2 compensation points. Long light paths and light attenuation by

  14. Ecophysiology of gelatinous Nostoc colonies: unprecedented slow growth and survival in resource-poor and harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    Background The cyanobacterial genus Nostoc includes several species forming centimetre-large gelatinous colonies in nutrient-poor freshwaters and harsh semi-terrestrial environments with extended drought or freezing. These Nostoc species have filaments with normal photosynthetic cells and N2-fixing heterocysts embedded in an extensive gelatinous matrix of polysaccharides and many other organic substances providing biological and environmental protection. Large colony size imposes constraints on the use of external resources and the gelatinous matrix represents extra costs and reduced growth rates. Scope The objective of this review is to evaluate the mechanisms behind the low rates of growth and mortality, protection against environmental hazards and the persistence and longevity of gelatinous Nostoc colonies, and their ability to economize with highly limiting resources. Conclusions Simple models predict the decline in uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and a decline in the growth rate of spherical freshwater colonies of N. pruniforme and N. zetterstedtii and sheet-like colonies of N. commune in response to a thicker diffusion boundary layer, lower external DIC concentration and higher organic carbon mass per surface area (CMA) of the colony. Measured growth rates of N. commune and N. pruniforme at high DIC availability comply with general empirical predictions of maximum growth rate (i.e. doubling time 10–14 d) as functions of CMA for marine macroalgae and as functions of tissue thickness for aquatic and terrestrial plants, while extremely low growth rates of N. zetterstedtii (i.e. doubling time 2–3 years) are 10-fold lower than model predictions, either because of very low ambient DIC and/or an extremely costly colony matrix. DIC uptake is limited by diffusion at low concentrations for all species, although they exhibit efficient HCO3– uptake, accumulation of respiratory DIC within the colonies and very low CO2 compensation points. Long light paths

  15. Vibration Protection of Sensitive Components of Infrared Equipment in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Veprik

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the principles of optimal vibration protection of the internal sensitive components of infrared equipment from harsh environmental vibration. The authors have developed an approach to the design of external vibration isolators with properties to minimise the vibration-induced line-of-sight jitter which is caused by the relative deflection of the infrared sensor and the optic system, subject to strict constraints on the allowable sway space of the entire electro-optic package. In this approach, the package itself is used as the first-level vibration isolation stage relative to the internal highly responsive components.

  16. Inventorying the molecular potential of Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains surviving harsh space-related environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnendonckx, Kristel; van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Bossus, Albert; Ott, C. Mark; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Leys, Natalie

    isolates survived exposure to 2µM AgNO3 for up to 5 weeks. All strains were able to grow on kanamycin (50µg/ml) and chloramphenicol (30 µg/ml and up to 150 µg/ml for the Cupriavidus strains). C. metallidurans IV (0502478) was not able to grow on ampicillin (100µg/ml). All Ralstonia and two Cupriavidus isolates were able to grow on carbenicilllin (100µg/ml). None of the isolates were able to grow on tetracycline (20µg/ml). These antibiotic concentrations are typically used for selection of the relevant resistance markers in a wide range of gram-negative bacteria. In addition, all isolates carried at least one large plasmid. The differences in the plasmid profile might be related to the differences in heavy metal and antibiotic resistance of the isolates. In general, these Ralstonia and Cupriavidus strains seemed to be well adapted to persist in these harsh and oligotrophic spacecraft-related environments. Moreover, these bacteria clearly possessed large plasmids, which are known to carry specific traits, such as metal and antibiotics resistance systems. It is therefore hypothesised that thanks to these plasmids the strains were specifically adapted to their rapid changing environment. These first results justify a more detailed study of the genetic content and the survival and proliferation strategies of these strains to improve the prevention of bacterial contamination, monitoring and disinfection tools for future manned space exploration. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA-PRODEX) and the Belgian Science Policy (Belspo) through the MISSEX and COMICS projects.

  17. Compact and robust open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope for applications in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Behzad M.; Yahalom, Ram; Faridian, Ferey; Black, Richard J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Ooi, Teng; Corder, Aaron

    2010-09-01

    Next generation navigation systems demand performance enhancements to support new applications with longer range capabilities, provide robust operation in severe thermal and vibration environments while simultaneously reducing weight, size and power dissipation. Compact, inexpensive, advanced guidance components are essential for such applications. In particular, Inertial Reference Units (IRUs) that can provide high-resolution stabilization and accurate inertial pointing knowledge are needed. For space applications, an added requirement is radiation hardening up to 300 krad over 5 to 15 years. Manufacturing specifications for the radiation-induced losses are not readily available and empirical test data is required for all components in order to optimize the system performance. Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes (IFOGs) have proven to be a leading technology for tactical and navigational systems. The sensors have no moving parts. This ensures high reliability and a long life compared to the mechanical gyroscopes and dithered ring laser gyroscopes. However, the available architectures limit the potential size and cost of the IFOG. The work reported here describes an innovative approach for the design, fabrication, and testing of the IFOG and enables the production of a small, robust and low cost gyro with excellent noise and bandwidth characteristics with high radiation tolerance. The development is aimed at achieving a sensor volume architecture, where the light source, electronics and receiver are integrated in an external package, while the sensor head is integrated in a robust and environmentally rigid package. The sensor package design is compatible with the most severe environmental requirements foreseen for the target applications. This paper presents the current state-of-the-art performance of the prototype gyros and the potential for further reduction of size with improved performance. The gyro sample and data rates are extremely high and can be close

  18. Simulating the evolution of the human family: cooperative breeding increases in harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Paul E; Newson, Lesley; Schank, Jeffrey C; Richerson, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Verbal and mathematical models that consider the costs and benefits of behavioral strategies have been useful in explaining animal behavior and are often used as the basis of evolutionary explanations of human behavior. In most cases, however, these models do not account for the effects that group structure and cultural traditions within a human population have on the costs and benefits of its members' decisions. Nor do they consider the likelihood that cultural as well as genetic traits will be subject to natural selection. In this paper, we present an agent-based model that incorporates some key aspects of human social structure and life history. We investigate the evolution of a population under conditions of different environmental harshness and in which selection can occur at the level of the group as well as the level of the individual. We focus on the evolution of a socially learned characteristic related to individuals' willingness to contribute to raising the offspring of others within their family group. We find that environmental harshness increases the frequency of individuals who make such contributions. However, under the conditions we stipulate, we also find that environmental variability can allow groups to survive with lower frequencies of helpers. The model presented here is inevitably a simplified representation of a human population, but it provides a basis for future modeling work toward evolutionary explanations of human behavior that consider the influence of both genetic and cultural transmission of behavior.

  19. Simulating the evolution of the human family: cooperative breeding increases in harsh environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Smaldino

    Full Text Available Verbal and mathematical models that consider the costs and benefits of behavioral strategies have been useful in explaining animal behavior and are often used as the basis of evolutionary explanations of human behavior. In most cases, however, these models do not account for the effects that group structure and cultural traditions within a human population have on the costs and benefits of its members' decisions. Nor do they consider the likelihood that cultural as well as genetic traits will be subject to natural selection. In this paper, we present an agent-based model that incorporates some key aspects of human social structure and life history. We investigate the evolution of a population under conditions of different environmental harshness and in which selection can occur at the level of the group as well as the level of the individual. We focus on the evolution of a socially learned characteristic related to individuals' willingness to contribute to raising the offspring of others within their family group. We find that environmental harshness increases the frequency of individuals who make such contributions. However, under the conditions we stipulate, we also find that environmental variability can allow groups to survive with lower frequencies of helpers. The model presented here is inevitably a simplified representation of a human population, but it provides a basis for future modeling work toward evolutionary explanations of human behavior that consider the influence of both genetic and cultural transmission of behavior.

  20. Extreme Programming in a Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the applicability of Extreme Programming in a scientific research context. The cultural environment at a government research center differs from the customer-centric business view. The chief theoretical difficulty lies in defining the customer to developer relationship. Specifically, can Extreme Programming be utilized when the developer and customer are the same person? Eight of Extreme Programming's 12 practices are perceived to be incompatible with the existing research culture. Further, six of the nine 'environments that I know don't do well with XP' apply. A pilot project explores the use of Extreme Programming in scientific research. The applicability issues are addressed and it is concluded that Extreme Programming can function successfully in situations for which it appears to be ill-suited. A strong discipline for mentally separating the customer and developer roles is found to be key for applying Extreme Programming in a field that lacks a clear distinction between the customer and the developer.

  1. SOI MESFETs for Extreme Environment Electronics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing a new extreme environment electronics (EEE) technology based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs)....

  2. Technology of planetary extreme environment simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.; Hall, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four test chamber systems were devleoped to simulate the extreme atmospheric environs of Venus and Jupiter, in order to assure satisfactory performance of scientific entry probes and their experiments.

  3. WildSense: Monitoring Interactions among Wild Deer in Harsh Outdoor Environments Using a Delay-Tolerant WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junho Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologists and ecologists often monitor the spread of disease among deer in the wild by using tracking systems that record their movement patterns, locations, and interaction behavior. The existing commercial systems for monitoring wild deer utilize collars with GPS sensors, deployed on captured and rereleased deer. The GPS sensors record location data every few hours, enabling researchers to approximate the interaction behavior of tracked deer with their GPS locations. However, the coarse granularity of periodically recorded GPS location data provides only limited precision for determining deer interaction behavior. We have designed a novel system to monitor wild deer interaction behavior more precisely in harsh wilderness environments. Our system combines the functionalities of both GPS and RF-radio sensors with low-cost and minimal-resource motes. We designed and built our system to be able to operate robustly for a period of up to several months for continual tracking and monitoring of the locations and interaction behaviors of wild deer in harsh environments. We successfully deployed six deer collars on six wild deer that were captured and rereleased in the Soapstone Prairie Natural Area of northern Colorado over a one-month period. In this paper, we describe how we designed and built this system and evaluate its successful operation in a wilderness area.

  4. Flexible Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 Films for a Hybrid Piezoelectric-Pyroelectric Nanogenerator under Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young Joon; Kim, Dong Yeong; Won, Sung Sik; Ahn, Chang Won; Kim, Ill Won; Kingon, Angus I; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jung, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    In spite of extremely high piezoelectric and pyroelectric coefficients, there are few reports on flexible ferroelectric perovskite film based nanogenerators (NGs). Here, we report the successful growth of a flexible Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) film and its application to hybrid piezoelectric-pyroelectric NG. A highly flexible Ni-Cr metal foil substrate with a conductive LaNiO3 bottom electrode enables the growth of flexible PZT film having high piezoelectric (140 pC/N) and pyroelectric (50 nC/cm(2)K) coefficients at room temperature. The flexible PZT-based NG effectively scavenges mechanical vibration and thermal fluctuation from sources ranging from the human body to the surroundings such as wind. Furthermore, it stably generates electric current even at elevated temperatures of 100 °C, relative humidity of 70%, and pH of 13 by virtue of its high Curie temperature and strong resistance for water and base. As proof of power generation under harsh environments, we demonstrate the generation of extremely high current at the exhaust pipe of a car, where hot CO and CO2 gases are rapidly expelled to air. This work expands the application of flexible PZT film-based NG for the scavenging mechanical vibration and thermal fluctuation energies even at extreme conditions.

  5. Psychological factors in exceptional, extreme and torturous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, John

    2016-01-01

    Our cognitive system has adapted to support goal-directed behaviour within a normal environment. An abnormal environment is one to which we are not optimally adapted but can accommodate through the development of coping strategies. These abnormal environments can be 'exceptional', e.g., polar base, space station, submarine, prison, intensive care unit, isolation ward etc.; 'extreme', marked by more intense environmental stimuli and a real or perceived lack of control over the situation, e.g., surviving at sea in a life-raft, harsh prison camp etc.; or 'tortuous', when specific environmental stimuli are used deliberately against a person in an attempt to undermine his will or resistance. The main factors in an abnormal environment are: psychological (isolation, sensory deprivation, sensory overload, sleep deprivation, temporal disorientation); psychophysiological (thermal, stress positions), and psychosocial (cultural humiliation, sexual degradation). Each single factor may not be considered tortuous, however, if deliberately structured into a systemic cluster may constitute torture under legal definition. The individual experience of extremis can be pathogenic or salutogenic and attempts are being made to capitalise on these positive experiences whilst ameliorating the more negative aspects of living in an abnormal environment.

  6. Psychophysiological Studies in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, William B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the results from two studies that employed the methodology of multiple converging indicators (physiological measures, subjective self-reports and performance metrics) to examine individual differences in the ability of humans to adapt and function in high stress environments. The first study was a joint collaboration between researchers at the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and NASA Ames Research Center. Twenty-four men and women active duty soldiers volunteered as participants. Field tests were conducted in the Command and Control Vehicle (C2V), an enclosed armored vehicle, designed to support both stationary and on-the-move operations. This vehicle contains four computer workstations where crew members are expected to perform command decisions in the field under combat conditions. The study objectives were: 1) to determine the incidence of motion sickness in the C2V relative to interior seat orientation/position, and parked, moving and short-haul test conditions; and 2) to determine the impact of the above conditions on cognitive performance, mood, and physiology. Data collected during field tests included heart rate, respiration rate, skin temperature, and skin conductance, self-reports of mood and symptoms, and cognitive performance metrics that included seven subtests in the DELTA performance test battery. Results showed that during 4-hour operational tests over varied terrain motion sickness symptoms increased; performance degraded by at least 5 percent; and physiological response profiles of individuals were categorized based on good and poor cognitive performance. No differences were observed relative to seating orientation or position.

  7. Nano-Fabrication Methods for Micro-Miniature Optical Thermometers Suited to High Temperatures and Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePew, K. A.; Ma, C.; Schiffbauer, J. D.; Wang, J.; Dong, B.; Lally, E.; Wang, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Photonics Technology (CPT) at Virginia Tech is engaged in cutting edge research of fiber optic sensing technologies. One current research area is the design of fiber optic temperature sensors for harsh environments. Fiber optic temperature sensing offers significant advantages over electronic sensing in terms of size and insensitivity to harsh environmental conditions and electromagnetic interference. In the field, fiber optic thermometers have been used in recent snow cover studies as well as fluvial temperature profiling projects. The extended capabilities of CPT optical sensors open further possibilities for application in additional geologic realms requiring high temperature sensing in corrosive environments. Significant strides have been made in developing single-crystal sapphire based fiber optic sensing elements for high temperature environments which are otherwise difficult to instrument. Utilization of strain insensitive designs and optical sapphire materials allow for thermometers capable of operation above 1500°C with reduced sensitivity to chemical corrosion and mechanical interference. Current efforts in fabrication techniques are reducing the footprint of temperature sensors below the millimeter scale while maintaining high resolution and operating range. The FEI Helios 600 NanoLab workstation at the Virginia Tech Institute for Critical Technologies and Applied Science has been employed, providing the capabilities necessary to reduce the footprint of sensing elements to the dimensions of standard optical communication fiber using a Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB). The capability of semi-distributed multi-point sensing can also be accomplished at this scale using similar FIB milling techniques. The fiber optic thermometer designs resulting from these methods are compact, lightweight, and able to provide remote sensing without need for electrical power at the measurement point. These traits make them an ideal sensing platform for laboratory

  8. Silicon-glass-based single piezoresistive pressure sensors for harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Haisheng; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Yuxi; Chen, Xuyuan

    2013-07-01

    Silicon-glass (Si-glass)-based single piezoresistive pressure sensors were designed and fabricated by standard MEMS technology. The single piezoresistive sensing element was designed to be on the lower surface of the silicon diaphragm and be vacuum-sealed in a Si-glass cavity, which form a self-packaging protection structure helpful to the applications of sensors in harsh media. The pressure sensors were fabricated using a Si-glass anodic bonding technique, and the embedded Al feedthrough lines at the Si-glass interface are used to realize the electrical connections between the piezo-sensing element and the electrode-pads, and two larger-size electrode-pads are fabricated for realizing the soldered electrical connection between the sensor and the external circuit. The performance of the pressure sensors was characterized by a pressure test system at different temperature conditions. The temperature compensation was performed by the difference between the output voltage at zero-pressure and the output at operation pressure. The measurement results show that the sensitivity is 24 mV V-1 MPa-1, the coefficient of sensitivity is 0.14% FS °C-1, and both the zero-point offset and the temperature coefficient of offset are equal to zero, which are able to meet the commercial application requirements. However, a nonlinearity of 5.2% FS caused by the balloon effect would considerably worsen the accuracy of the pressure sensor. It is suggested to reduce the balloon effect by using a bossed-diaphragm structure in the pressure sensor.

  9. From Modeling to Fabrication of Double Side Microstructured Silicon Windows for Infrared Gas Sensing in Harsh Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, René; Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Kafka, Jan Robert

    2014-01-01

    Commercial infrared windows used for gas sensing in the mid-IR range usually possess an anti-reflective coating. Those coatings can normally not withstand harsh environments, particularly not high temperatures. With a simple “3-step” fabrication process, high temperature resistant silicon windows...... was achieved. The modeling of the anti-reflective microstructures, their fabrication process and final transmittance analysis of the windows is discussed....... (∅1") were manufactured. The windows show high temperature resistant sub-wavelength anti-reflective surface microstructures on both side faces. Thus, a peak transmittance of 100% for a defined main wavelength (5 μm) and more than 90 % average transmittance for the wavelength range of 5-7 μm...

  10. Geomicrobiological processes in extreme environments: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailiang Dong; Bingsong Yu

    2007-01-01

    @@ The last decade has seen an extraordinary growth of Geomicrobiology. Microorganisms have been studied in numerous extreme environments on Earth, ranging from crystalline rocks from the deep subsurface, ancient sedimentary rocks and hypersaline lakes, to dry deserts and deep-ocean hydrothermal vent systems. In light of this recent progress, we review several currently active research frontiers: deep continental subsurface microbiology, microbial ecology in saline lakes, microbial formation of dolomite, geomicrobiology in dry deserts,fossil DNA and its use in recovery of paleoenvironmental conditions, and geomicrobiology of oceans.Throughout this article we emphasize geomicrobiological processes in these extreme environments.

  11. Rad-Tolerant, Thermally Stable, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Network for Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, Matt; Hull, Tony; Leary, Michael; Leftwich, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Future NASA destinations will be challenging to get to, have extreme environmental conditions, and may present difficulty in retrieving a spacecraft or its data. Space Photonics is developing a radiation-tolerant (rad-tolerant), high-speed, multi-channel fiber-optic transceiver, associated reconfigurable intelligent node communications architecture, and supporting hardware for intravehicular and ground-based optical networking applications. Data rates approaching 3.2 Gbps per channel will be achieved.

  12. Self-Recovery Experiments in Extreme Environments Using a Field Programmable Transistor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Arslan, Tughrul; Duong, Vu; Zebulum, Ricardo; Ferguson, Ian; Guo, Xin

    2004-01-01

    Temperature and radiation tolerant electronics, as well as long life survivability are key capabilities required for future NASA missions. Current approaches to electronics for extreme environments focus on component level robustness and hardening. However, current technology can only ensure very limited lifetime in extreme environments. This paper describes novel experiments that allow adaptive in-situ circuit redesign/reconfiguration during operation in extreme temperature and radiation environments. This technology would complement material/device advancements and increase the mission capability to survive harsh environments. The approach is demonstrated on a mixed-signal programmable chip (FPTA-2), which recovers functionality for temperatures until 28 C and with total radiation dose up to 250kRad.

  13. Characterization of Polarizing Splitter Optics in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Ryand; Olson, Matthew; Morelli, Gregg

    2013-01-04

    Development of laser systems capable of surviving extreme conditions experienced in military applications requires mounts and components that are able to survive these conditions. The characterization of mounted and/or bonded optical assemblies in harsh environments is critical for the development of laser and optical systems for functionality in these extreme conditions. Customized mounts, bonding assemblies and packaging strategies are utilized to develop and field reliable and robust optical subassemblies. Thin film polarizers operating at 45o and polarizing beam splitter cubes were chosen for initial testing based on past experiences, advancements in optical coating and construction technologies and material properties. Shock, vibration, shear strength, tensile strength and temperature testing are performed on mounted polarizing beam splitter cubes and thin film polarizers from two manufacturers. Previous testing showed that polarizing beam splitter cubes constructed using epoxy would become damaged in the laser resonator. The cubes being tested in this report are constructed using epoxy- free direct optical contact bonding. Thin film polarizers operating at 45o are chosen opposed to Brewster’s angle thin film polarizers to reduce the size and simplify design and construction since an optical wedge is not required. The components and mounts are each environmentally tested beyond the manufacturers’ specifications for shock, vibration, and temperature. Component functionality is monitored during and after the environmental testing. Experimental results from the testing will be discussed as will the impact on future laser resonator designs.

  14. Propulsion IVHM Extreme Environment Instrumentation Power IVHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, June

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents propulsion and instrumentation power for integrated vehicle health management technologies. The topics include: 1) Propulsion IVHM Capabilities Research; 2) Projects: X-33 Post-Test Diagnostic System; 3) X-34 NITEX; 4) Advanced Health Monitoring Systems; 5) Active Vibration Monitoring System; 6) Smart Self Healing Propulsion Systems; 7) Extreme Environment Sensors; and 8) Systems Engineering and Integration.

  15. Autonomous Navigation of a Surveillance Robot in Harsh Outdoor Road Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjin Shin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the autonomous navigation problem of a mobile robot in outdoor road environments. The target application is surveillance in petroleum storage bases. Although there have been remarkable technological achievements recently in the area of outdoor navigation, robotic systems are still expensive due to a large number of high cost sensors. This paper proposes the reliable extraction algorithm of traversable regions using a single onboard Laser Range Finder (LRF in outdoor road environments. The traversable regions are derived from the classifications of the road surfaces, curbs, and obstacles. The proposed scheme was experimentally tested in success. Since there are many potential applications that require autonomous service robots to move in semistructured road environments, the proposed scheme can be widely used as a low-cost practical solution.

  16. Biology-environment interaction and evocative biology-environment correlation: contributions of harsh discipline and parental psychopathology to problem adolescent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins-Caspers, Kristin M; Cadoret, Remi J; Knutson, John F; Langbehn, Douglas

    2003-05-01

    Using an adoption paradigm, the Bioecological Model of development proposed by Bronfenbrenner and Ceci in 1994 was tested by concurrently modeling for biology-environment interaction and evocative biology-environment correlation. A sample of 150 adult adoptees (ages, 18-45 years) provided retrospective reports of harsh adoptive parent discipline, which served as the environmental independent variables. Birth parent psychopathology served as the biological predictor. The dependent variables were retrospective adoptee and adoptive parent reports on adolescent aggressive and conduct-disordered behaviors. Finally, adoptees were classified as experiencing contextual environmental risk using the presence of two or more adverse factors in the adoptive home (e.g., adoptive parent psychopathology) as the cutoff. The contextual environment was found to moderate the biological process of evocative biology-environment correlation, providing empirical support for the Bronfenbrenner and Ceci (1994) Bioecological Model.

  17. Embedded I&C for Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This project uses embedded instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies to demonstrate potential performance gains of nuclear power plant components in extreme environments. Extreme environments include high temperature, radiation, high pressure, high vibration, and high EMI conditions. For extreme environments, performance gains arise from moment-to-moment sensing of local variables and immediate application of local feedback control. Planning for embedding I&C during early system design phases contrasts with the traditional, serial design approach that incorporates minimal I&C after mechanical and electrical design is complete. The demonstration application involves the development and control of a novel, proof-of-concept motor/pump design. The motor and pump combination operate within the fluid environment, eliminating the need for rotating seals. Actively controlled magnetic bearings also replace failure-prone mechanical contact bearings that typically suspend rotating components. Such as design has the potential to significantly enhance the reliability and life of the pumping system and would not be possible without embedded I&C.

  18. A monitor for the laboratory evaluation of control integrity in digital control systems operating in harsh electromagnetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Celeste M.; Fischl, Robert; Kam, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a strategy for dynamically monitoring digital controllers in the laboratory for susceptibility to electromagnetic disturbances that compromise control integrity. The integrity of digital control systems operating in harsh electromagnetic environments can be compromised by upsets caused by induced transient electrical signals. Digital system upset is a functional error mode that involves no component damage, can occur simultaneously in all channels of a redundant control computer, and is software dependent. The motivation for this work is the need to develop tools and techniques that can be used in the laboratory to validate and/or certify critical aircraft controllers operating in electromagnetically adverse environments that result from lightning, high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF), and nuclear electromagnetic pulses (NEMP). The detection strategy presented in this paper provides dynamic monitoring of a given control computer for degraded functional integrity resulting from redundancy management errors, control calculation errors, and control correctness/effectiveness errors. In particular, this paper discusses the use of Kalman filtering, data fusion, and statistical decision theory in monitoring a given digital controller for control calculation errors.

  19. Calibration-free wavelength-modulation spectroscopy for measurements of gas temperature and concentration in harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, Gregory B; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2009-10-10

    We present a practical implementation of calibration-free wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for measurements of gas temperature and concentration in harsh environments. The method is applicable to measurements using lasers with synchronous wavelength and intensity modulation (such as injection current-tuned diode lasers). The key factors that enable measurements without the on-site calibration normally associated with WMS are (1) normalization of the WMS-2f signal by the first harmonic (1f) signal to account for laser intensity, and (2) the inclusion of laser-specific tuning characteristics in the spectral-absorption model that is used to compare with measured 1f-normalized, WMS-2f signals to infer gas properties. The uncertainties associated with the calibration-free WMS method are discussed, with particular emphasis on the influence of pressure and optical depth on the WMS signals. Many of these uncertainties are also applicable to calibrated WMS measurements. An example experimental setup that combines six tunable diode laser sources between 1.3 and 2.0 mum into one probe beam for measurements of temperature, H(2)O, and CO(2) is shown. A hybrid combination of wavelength and frequency demultiplexing is used to distinguish among the laser signals, and the optimal set of laser-modulation waveforms is presented. The system is demonstrated in the harsh environment of a ground-test scramjet combustor. A comparison of direct absorption and 1f-normalized, WMS-2f shows a factor of 4 increase in signal-to-noise ratio with the WMS technique for measurements of CO(2) in the supersonic flow. Multidimensional computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) calculations are compared with measurements of temperature and H(2)O using a simple method that accounts for the influence of line-of-sight (LOS) nonuniformity on the absorption measurements. The comparisons show the ability of the LOS calibration-free technique to gain useful information about

  20. Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) Independent Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smiles, Michael D.; George, Mark A.; Ton, Mimi C.; Le, Son K.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief of the Space Science Project Office at Glenn Research Center (GRC) requested support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to satisfy a request from the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Associate Administrator and the Planetary Science Division Chief to obtain an independent review of the Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) and the operational controls in place for mitigating any hazard associated with its operation. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  1. Endurance cycling results in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, S. M.; Nguyen, D. N.; Scheick, L. Z.

    2003-01-01

    A new test bed for life testing flash memories in extreme environments is introducted. the test bed is based on a state-of-the-art development board. Since space applications often desire state-of-the-art devices, such a basis seems appropriate. Comparison of this tester to other such systems, including those with data presented here in the past is made. Limitations of different testers for varying applications are discussed. Recently developed data, using this test bed is also presented.

  2. Wearable sensors for skin heating and electric field strength in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jay; Klem, Ethan; Cunningham, Garry; Dummer, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    Two novel sensor technologies have been developed for the measurement of skin surface temperature and RF field strength in an RF environment. Such a sensor system would be particularly useful in the test and evaluation of directed energy systems. The sensors operate without being affected by the presence of RF fields and with minimal perturbation of the fields, therefore having a minimal effect on a test. The sensors are designed to be wearable and interface with a portable, battery powered electronics pack by optical fibers. The temperature sensor is based on the variation in fluorescence intensity of a sensor layer with temperature. The RF field sensors operate using a passive circuit that converts the RF field into an optical signal that is measured remotely. Both sensors have been demonstrated in high power microwave lab tests. RF sensor operability has been demonstrated for fields in the range of 0.4 - 8.9 W/cm2, while the temperature sensor has been demonstrated over the 30 - 60°C temperature range.

  3. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  4. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  5. Investigation of Bucket Wheel Excavator Lattice Structure Internal Stress in Harsh Environment through a Remote Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risteiu, M.; Dobra, R.; Andras, I.; Roventa, M.; Lorincz, A.

    2017-06-01

    The paper shows the results of a lab model for strain gauges based measuring system for multiple measuring heads of the mechanical stress in lattice structures of the bucket wheel excavator for open pit mines-harsh environment. The system is designed around a microcontroller system. Because of specific working conditions, the measuring system sends data to a processing system (a PC with Matlab software), we have implemented a secure communication solution based on ISM standard, by using NRF24L01 module. The transceiver contains a fully integrated frequency synthesizer based on crystal oscillator, and a Enhanced ShockBurst™ protocol engine. The proposed solution has a current consumption around 9.0 mA at an output power of -6dBm and 12.3mA in RX mode. Built-in Power Down and Standby modes makes power saving easily realizable for our solution battery powered. The stress from structures is taken by specific strain gauges adapted to low frequency vibrations. We are using a precision 24-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) designed for weigh scales and industrial control applications to interface directly with a bridge sensor-instrumentation device, with low drift voltage, low noise, common mode rejection signal, frequency and temperature stability. As backup implementation for measurements a high speed storage implementation is used.

  6. A novel fibre Bragg grating sensor packaging design for ultra-high temperature sensing in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Amir; Liang, Richard; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a novel packaging of conventional Corning SMF-28™ single-mode fibre Bragg grating sensors for ultra-high temperature sensing. The package is in a cylindrical shape made of yttria-stabilized zirconia tubes. The fibre optic sensor is epoxied to one end inside the tube to be protected from high external temperatures and also harsh environments. Highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite tube with an exceptional anisotropic thermal conductivity with higher conductivity in transverse than radial direction is positioned around the fibre to protect it from high temperatures. Air cooling system is also provided from the other end to dissipate the transferred heat from inside the tube. The shift in the Bragg wavelength is influenced by the thermal expansion of the package and internal temperature variations, which translates into thermal expansion of the fibre. The modelling and experimental results revealed that the Bragg wavelength shift increases to 1.4 pm °C-1 at higher temperatures with linear behaviour at temperatures above 600 °C. The finite element modelling and the experimental results are also in good proximity indicating the similar trend for the shift in the Bragg wavelength.

  7. Radiation Hardened Electronics for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches.

  8. Reconfiguration of Analog Electronics for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Zebulum, Ricardo; Keymeulen, Didier; Guo, Xin

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues in favor of adaptive reconfiguration as a technique to expand the operational envelope of analog electronics for extreme environments (EE). On a reconfigurable device, although component parameters change in EE, as long as devices still operate, albeit degraded, a new circuit design, suitable for new parameter values, may be mapped into the reconfigurable structure to recover the initial circuit function. Laboratory demonstrations of this technique were performed by JPL in several independent experiments in which bulk CMOS reconfgurable devices were exposed to, and degraded by, high temperatures (approx.300 C) or radiation (300kRad TID), and then recovered by adaptive reconfiguration using evolutionary search algorithms.

  9. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXIES: THE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, M. E. [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria–Universidad de La Laguna, CIE Canarias: Tri-Continental Atlantic Campus, Canary Islands (Spain); Almeida, J. Sánchez; Muñoz-Tuñón, C. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nuza, S. E.; Kitaura, F.; Heß, S., E-mail: mfilho@astro.up.pt [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed bibliographical observational data and theoretical predictions, in order to probe the environment in which extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies (XMPs) reside. We have assessed the H i component and its relation to the optical galaxy, the cosmic web type (voids, sheets, filaments and knots), the overdensity parameter and analyzed the nearest galaxy neighbors. The aim is to understand the role of interactions and cosmological accretion flows in the XMP observational properties, particularly the triggering and feeding of the star formation. We find that XMPs behave similarly to Blue Compact Dwarfs; they preferably populate low-density environments in the local universe: ∼60% occupy underdense regions, and ∼75% reside in voids and sheets. This is more extreme than the distribution of irregular galaxies, and in contrast to those regions preferred by elliptical galaxies (knots and filaments). We further find results consistent with previous observations; while the environment does determine the fraction of a certain galaxy type, it does not determine the overall observational properties. With the exception of five documented cases (four sources with companions and one recent merger), XMPs do not generally show signatures of major mergers and interactions; we find only one XMP with a companion galaxy within a distance of 100 kpc, and the H i gas in XMPs is typically well-behaved, demonstrating asymmetries mostly in the outskirts. We conclude that metal-poor accretion flows may be driving the XMP evolution. Such cosmological accretion could explain all the major XMP observational properties: isolation, lack of interaction/merger signatures, asymmetric optical morphology, large amounts of unsettled, metal-poor H i gas, metallicity inhomogeneities, and large specific star formation.

  10. Extreme Environments Technologies for Probes to Venus and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Cutts, James A.; Belz, Andrea P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the technologies that are used to mitigate extreme environments for probes at Venus and Jupiter. The contents include: 1) Extreme environments at Venus and Jupiter; 2) In-situ missions to Venus and Jupiter (past/present/future); and 3) Approaches to mitigate conditions of extreme environments for probes with systems architectures and technologies.

  11. Magnetic Reconnection in Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a basic plasma process of dramatic rearrangement of magnetic topology, often leading to a violent release of magnetic energy. It is important in magnetic fusion and in space and solar physics --- areas that have so far provided the context for most of reconnection research. Importantly, these environments consist just of electrons and ions and the dissipated energy always stays with the plasma. In contrast, in this paper I introduce a new direction of research, motivated by several important problems in high-energy astrophysics --- reconnection in high energy density (HED) radiative plasmas, where radiation pressure and radiative cooling become dominant factors in the pressure and energy balance. I identify the key processes distinguishing HED reconnection: special-relativistic effects; radiative effects (radiative cooling, radiation pressure, and Compton resistivity); and, at the most extreme end, QED effects, including pair creation. I then discuss the main astrophysical application...

  12. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  13. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  14. Coaxial Cables for Martian Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Harvey, Wayne L.; Valas, Sam; Tsai, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Work was conducted to validate the use of the rover external flexible coaxial cabling for space under the extreme environments to be encountered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The antennas must survive all ground operations plus the nominal 670-Martian-day mission that includes summer and winter seasons of the Mars environment. Successful development of processes established coaxial cable hardware fatigue limits, which were well beyond the expected in-flight exposures. In keeping with traditional qualification philosophy, this was accomplished by subjecting flight-representative coaxial cables to temperature cycling of the same depth as expected in-flight, but for three times the expected number of in-flight thermal cycles. Insertion loss and return loss tests were performed on the coaxial cables during the thermal chamber breaks. A vector network analyzer was calibrated and operated over the operational frequency range 7.145 to 8.450 GHz. Even though some of the exposed cables function only at UHF frequencies (approximately 400 MHz), the testing was more sensitive, and extending the test range down to 400 MHz would have cost frequency resolution. The Gore flexible coaxial cables, which were the subject of these tests, proved to be robust and displayed no sign of degradation due to the 3X exposure to the punishing Mars surface operations cycles.

  15. Advanced Flip Chips in Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2010-01-01

    material and the silicon die or chip, and also the underfill materials. Advanced packaging interconnects technology such as flip-chip interconnect test boards have been subjected to various extreme temperature ranges that cover military specifications and extreme Mars and asteroid environments. The eventual goal of each process step and the entire process is to produce components with 100 percent interconnect and satisfy the reliability requirements. Underfill materials, in general, may possibly meet demanding end use requirements such as low warpage, low stress, fine pitch, high reliability, and high adhesion.

  16. Qualification of UHF Antenna for Extreme Martian Thermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Amaro, Luis R.; Brown, Paula R.; Usiskin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this development was to validate the use of the external Rover Ultra High Frequency (RUHF) antenna for space under extreme thermal environments to be encountered during the surface operations of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The antenna must survive all ground operations plus the nominal 670 Martian sol mission that includes summer and winter seasons of the Mars thermal environment.The qualification effort was to verify that the RUHF antenna design and its bonding and packaging processes are adequate to survive the harsh environmental conditions. The RUHF is a quadrifilar helix antenna mounted on the MSL Curiosity rover deck. The main components of the RUHF antenna are the helix structure, feed cables, and hybrid coupler, and the high-power termination load. In the case of MSL rover externally mounted hardware, not only are the expected thermal cycle depths severe, but there are temperature offsets between the Mars summer and winter seasons. The total number of temperature cycles needed to be split into two regimes of summer cycles and winter cycles. The qualification test was designed to demonstrate a survival life of three times more than all expected ground testing, plus a nominal 670 Martian sol missions. Baseline RF tests and a visual inspection were performed prior to the start of the qualification test. Functional RF tests were performed intermittently during chamber breaks over the course of the qualification test. For the RF return loss measurements, the antenna was tested in a controlled environment outside the thermal chamber with a vector network analyzer that was calibrated over the antenna s operational frequency range. A total of 2,010 thermal cycles were performed. Visual inspection showed a dulling of the solder material. This change will not affect the performance of the antenna. No other changes were observed. RF tests were performed on the RUHF helix antenna, hybrid, and load after the 2,010 qualification cycles test

  17. Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

    In addition to the several extreme environments on Earth, Space can be considered as just another exceptional environment with a unique mixture of stress factors comprising UV radiation, vacuum, desiccation, temperature, ionizing radiation and microgravity. Life that processes in these environments can depend on the life forms and their state of living. The question is whether there are different strategies for individual microorganisms compared to communities of the same organisms to cope with the different factors of their surroundings. Comparative studies of the survi-val of these communities called biofilms and planktonic cell samples of Deinococcus geothermalis stand at the focal point of the presented investigations. A biofilm is a structured community of microorganisms that live encapsulated in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances on a surface. Microorganisms living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties to cooperate than individually living microorganisms of the same species. An advantage of the biofilm is increased resistance to various chemical and physical effects, while the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of the cells protect the interior of the microbial consortium. The space experiment BOSS (Biofilm organisms surfing Space) as part the ESA experimental unit EXPOSE R-2 with a planned launch date in July 2014 will be subsequently mounted on the Russian Svesda module outside the ISS. An international team of scientists coordinated by Dr. P. Rettberg will investigate the hypothesis whether microorganisms organized as biofilm outmatch the same microorganisms exposed individually in the long-term survival of the harsh environmental conditions as they occur in space and on Mars. Another protective function in the samples could be dust par-ticles for instance Mars regolith simulant contained inside the biofilms or mixed with the planktonic cells, as additional shelter especially against the extraterrestrial UV

  18. Colors of extreme exo-Earth environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Siddharth; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The search for extrasolar planets has already detected rocky planets and several planetary candidates with minimum masses that are consistent with rocky planets in the habitable zone of their host stars. A low-resolution spectrum in the form of a color-color diagram of an exoplanet is likely to be one of the first post-detection quantities to be measured for the case of direct detection. In this paper, we explore potentially detectable surface features on rocky exoplanets and their connection to, and importance as, a habitat for extremophiles, as known on Earth. Extremophiles provide us with the minimum known envelope of environmental limits for life on our planet. The color of a planet reveals information on its properties, especially for surface features of rocky planets with clear atmospheres. We use filter photometry in the visible as a first step in the characterization of rocky exoplanets to prioritize targets for follow-up spectroscopy. Many surface environments on Earth have characteristic albedos and occupy a different color space in the visible waveband (0.4-0.9 μm) that can be distinguished remotely. These detectable surface features can be linked to the extreme niches that support extremophiles on Earth and provide a link between geomicrobiology and observational astronomy. This paper explores how filter photometry can serve as a first step in characterizing Earth-like exoplanets for an aerobic as well as an anaerobic atmosphere, thereby prioritizing targets to search for atmospheric biosignatures.

  19. Compact genome of the Antarctic midge is likely an adaptation to an extreme environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joanna L.; Peyton, Justin T.; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Teets, Nicholas M.; Yee, Muh-Ching; Johnston, J. Spencer; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Lee, Richard E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The midge, Belgica antarctica, is the only insect endemic to Antarctica, and thus it offers a powerful model for probing responses to extreme temperatures, freeze tolerance, dehydration, osmotic stress, ultraviolet radiation and other forms of environmental stress. Here we present the first genome assembly of an extremophile, the first dipteran in the family Chironomidae, and the first Antarctic eukaryote to be sequenced. At 99 megabases, B. antarctica has the smallest insect genome sequenced thus far. Although it has a similar number of genes as other Diptera, the midge genome has very low repeat density and a reduction in intron length. Environmental extremes appear to constrain genome architecture, not gene content. The few transposable elements present are mainly ancient, inactive retroelements. An abundance of genes associated with development, regulation of metabolism and responses to external stimuli may reflect adaptations for surviving in this harsh environment. PMID:25118180

  20. Compact genome of the Antarctic midge is likely an adaptation to an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joanna L; Peyton, Justin T; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Teets, Nicholas M; Yee, Muh-Ching; Johnston, J Spencer; Bustamante, Carlos D; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2014-08-12

    The midge, Belgica antarctica, is the only insect endemic to Antarctica, and thus it offers a powerful model for probing responses to extreme temperatures, freeze tolerance, dehydration, osmotic stress, ultraviolet radiation and other forms of environmental stress. Here we present the first genome assembly of an extremophile, the first dipteran in the family Chironomidae, and the first Antarctic eukaryote to be sequenced. At 99 megabases, B. antarctica has the smallest insect genome sequenced thus far. Although it has a similar number of genes as other Diptera, the midge genome has very low repeat density and a reduction in intron length. Environmental extremes appear to constrain genome architecture, not gene content. The few transposable elements present are mainly ancient, inactive retroelements. An abundance of genes associated with development, regulation of metabolism and responses to external stimuli may reflect adaptations for surviving in this harsh environment.

  1. TransFormers for Ensuring Long-Term Operations in Lunar Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, J. G.; Stoica, A.; Alkalai, L.; Wilcox, B.; Quadrelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    "Surviving Extreme Space Environments" (EE) is one of NASA's Space Technology Grand Challenges. Power generation and thermal control are the key survival ingredients that allow a robotic explorer to cope with the EE using resources available to it, for example, by harvesting the local solar energy or by utilizing an onboard radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). TransFormers (TFs) are a new technology concept designed to transform a localized area within a harsh extreme environment into a survivable micro-environment by projecting energy to the precise location where robots or humans operate. For example, TFs placed at a location on the rim of Shackleton Crater, which is illuminated by solar radiation for most of the year, would be able to reflect solar energy onto robots operating in the dark cold crater. TFs utilize a shape transformation mechanism to un-fold from a compact volume to a large reflective surface, and to control how much-and where-the energy is projected, and by adjusting for the changing position of the sun. TFs would enable in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) activities within locations of high interest that would normally be unreachable because of their extreme environment

  2. Extreme Environment High Temperature Communication Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a communications system capable of operation at extreme temperatures and pressures in hostile and corrosive...

  3. Magnetic Logic Circuits for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program aims to demonstrate a new genre of all-magnetic logic circuits which are radiation-tolerant and capable of reliable operation in extreme environmental...

  4. Successful field application in continuous DTS monitoring under harsh environment of SAGD wells using improved optical fiber technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaura, J.; Sierra, J. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada). WellDynamics

    2008-10-15

    Most protective materials of conventional optical fibers used in well monitoring applications are not designed for the extreme temperatures associated with steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations. Optical fiber performance is highly affected by hydrogen ingression; thermal resistance of materials; and mechanical resistance of the fiber. Optical fibers exposed to hydrogen experience increased absorption or light loss due to various chemical species in the glass fiber. This paper described the performance of a newly developed distributed temperature sensing (DTS) high temperature (HT) system for use in a hydrogen-rich SAGD environment. The OptoLog uses a new single-mode fiber that is hydrogen resilient under severe temperature. Hydrogen molecular reactions with impurities from the manufacturing process are minimized by a pure core glass fiber. The new temperature calculation algorithm used by the system was also described in this paper along with a comparative evaluation of the system performance with that of a conventional multi-mode DTS system. It was concluded that this newly developed system is a feasible solution for lowering Opex and minimizing interventions. It also reduces personnel exposure to hazardous well conditions because of the enhanced longevity of the OptoLog DTS-HT fiber. The data provided by the new system enables users to quickly identify anomalies; implement corrective actions immediately; and allow for better steam utilization. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Extreme Environments: The Ghetto and the South Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Chester M.

    Extreme environments, such as polar regions or space crafts, provide an analogue for speculations concerning the needs of, educational provisions for, and environmental impacts on ghetto youth in kindergarten through the third grade. This discussion first centers on the common qualities of an extreme environment (whether exotic or mundane): forced…

  6. Modeling and preliminary characterization of passive, wireless temperature sensors for harsh environment applications based on periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfin Manriquez, Diego I.

    Wireless temperature sensing has attained significant attention in recent years due to the increasing need to develop reliable and affordable sensing solutions for energy conversion systems and other harsh environment applications. The development of next generation sensors for energy production processing parameters, such as temperature and pressure, can result in better performance of the system. Particularly, continuous temperature monitoring in energy conversion systems can result in enhancements such as better system integrity, less pollution and higher thermal efficiencies. However, the conditions experienced in these system components hinder the performance of current solutions due to the presence of semi-conductor materials and welded joints. Additionally, the use of wired systems can result in complex wiring networks, increasing the cost of installation, maintenance and sensor replacement. Therefore, next generation sensing solutions must be developed to overcome current challenges in systems where adverse conditions are present. This research project proposes two novel passive, wireless temperature sensor designs based on concepts of guided mode resonance filters (GMRF) and metamaterials. For the GMRF, a tri-layer structure using a metallic encasing and a circular aperture grating layer was developed to have a resonance frequency of 10 GHz. While for the metamaterial-based sensor a continuation of previous work was presented by utilizing a dielectric substrate and an array of commercially available metallic washers divided in two layers. For both designs, High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) from ANSYSRTM was employed to assess the feasibility of the sensor as well as to optimize the geometry and guide the fabrication process. A systematic approach consisting of evaluating the unit cell, then assessing the number of periods needed, and finally characterizing the response of the final sensor was followed for each case. After the modeling process was

  7. Bone Microstructure of the Stereospondyl Lydekkerina Huxleyi Reveals Adaptive Strategies to the Harsh Post Permian-Extinction Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canoville, Aurore; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2015-07-01

    The small-bodied stereospondyl Lydekkerina huxleyi, dominated the amphibian fauna of the South African Lower Triassic. Even though the anatomy of this amphibian has been well described, its growth strategies and lifestyle habits have remained controversial. Previous studies attributed the relative uniformity in skull sizes to a predominance of subadult and adult specimens recovered in the fossil record. Anatomical and taphonomic data suggested that the relatively small body-size of this genus, as compared to its Permo-Triassic relatives, could be linked to a shortened, rapid developmental period as an adaptation to maintain successful breeding populations under harsh environmental conditions. Moreover, Lydekkerina's habitat has been hypothesized to be either aquatic or mainly terrestrial. The current study, utilizes bone microstructure to reassess previous hypotheses pertaining to the biology and ecology of Lydekkerina. Various skeletal elements of different-sized specimens are analyzed to understand its growth dynamics, intraskeletal variability, and lifestyle adaptations. Bone histology revealed that our sample comprises individuals at different ontogenetic stages i.e., juveniles to mature individuals. Our results show that these amphibians, despite exhibiting plasticity in growth, experienced an overall faster growth during early ontogeny (thereby attaining sexual maturity sooner), as compared to most other temnospondyls. The microanatomy of the long bones with their thick bone walls and distinctive medullary cavity suggests that Lydekkerina may have been amphibious with a tendency to be more terrestrial. Our study concludes that Lydekkerina employed a peculiar growth strategy and lifestyle adaptations, which enabled it to endure the harsh, dry conditions of the Early Triassic.

  8. Drought-tolerance of wheat improved by rhizosphere bacteria from harsh environments: enhanced biomass production and reduced emissions of stress volatiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salme Timmusk

    Full Text Available Water is the key resource limiting world agricultural production. Although an impressive number of research reports have been published on plant drought tolerance enhancement via genetic modifications during the last few years, progress has been slower than expected. We suggest a feasible alternative strategy by application of rhizospheric bacteria coevolved with plant roots in harsh environments over millions of years, and harboring adaptive traits improving plant fitness under biotic and abiotic stresses. We show the effect of bacterial priming on wheat drought stress tolerance enhancement, resulting in up to 78% greater plant biomass and five-fold higher survivorship under severe drought. We monitored emissions of seven stress-related volatiles from bacterially-primed drought-stressed wheat seedlings, and demonstrated that three of these volatiles are likely promising candidates for a rapid non-invasive technique to assess crop drought stress and its mitigation in early phases of stress development. We conclude that gauging stress by elicited volatiles provides an effectual platform for rapid screening of potent bacterial strains and that priming with isolates of rhizospheric bacteria from harsh environments is a promising, novel way to improve plant water use efficiency. These new advancements importantly contribute towards solving food security issues in changing climates.

  9. The complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, a master survivalist in harsh and anthropogenic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Janssen

    Full Text Available Many bacteria in the environment have adapted to the presence of toxic heavy metals. Over the last 30 years, this heavy metal tolerance was the subject of extensive research. The bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, originally isolated by us in 1976 from a metal processing factory, is considered a major model organism in this field because it withstands milli-molar range concentrations of over 20 different heavy metal ions. This tolerance is mostly achieved by rapid ion efflux but also by metal-complexation and -reduction. We present here the full genome sequence of strain CH34 and the manual annotation of all its genes. The genome of C. metallidurans CH34 is composed of two large circular chromosomes CHR1 and CHR2 of, respectively, 3,928,089 bp and 2,580,084 bp, and two megaplasmids pMOL28 and pMOL30 of, respectively, 171,459 bp and 233,720 bp in size. At least 25 loci for heavy-metal resistance (HMR are distributed over the four replicons. Approximately 67% of the 6,717 coding sequences (CDSs present in the CH34 genome could be assigned a putative function, and 9.1% (611 genes appear to be unique to this strain. One out of five proteins is associated with either transport or transcription while the relay of environmental stimuli is governed by more than 600 signal transduction systems. The CH34 genome is most similar to the genomes of other Cupriavidus strains by correspondence between the respective CHR1 replicons but also displays similarity to the genomes of more distantly related species as a result of gene transfer and through the presence of large genomic islands. The presence of at least 57 IS elements and 19 transposons and the ability to take in and express foreign genes indicates a very dynamic and complex genome shaped by evolutionary forces. The genome data show that C. metallidurans CH34 is particularly well equipped to live in extreme conditions and anthropogenic environments that are rich in metals.

  10. Plasma Physics of Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Certain classes of astrophysical objects, namely magnetars and central engines of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are characterized by extreme physical conditions not encountered elsewhere in the Universe. In particular, they possess magnetic fields that exceed the critical quantum field of 44 teragauss. Figuring out how these complex ultra-magnetized systems work requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). However, an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying physics to such an extent that many relevant plasma-physical problems call for building QED-based relativistic quantum plasma physics. In this review, after describing the extreme astrophysical systems of interest and identifying the key relevant plasma-physical problems, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We discuss how a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and outline the basic theoretical framework f...

  11. Plant volatiles in extreme terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Steinke, Michael; McGenity, Terry; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding on plant and algal volatile organic compound (VOC) production and emission in extreme environments, where temperature, water availability, salinity or other environmental factors pose stress on vegetation. Here, the extreme environments include terrestrial systems, such as arctic tundra, deserts, CO₂ springs and wetlands, and marine systems such as sea ice, tidal rock pools and hypersaline environments, with mangroves and salt marshes at the land-sea interface. The emission potentials at fixed temperature and light level or actual emission rates for phototrophs in extreme environments are frequently higher than for organisms from less stressful environments. For example, plants from the arctic tundra appear to have higher emission potentials for isoprenoids than temperate species, and hypersaline marine habitats contribute to global dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emissions in significant amounts. DMS emissions are more widespread than previously considered, for example, in salt marshes and some desert plants. The reason for widespread VOC, especially isoprenoid, emissions from different extreme environments deserves further attention, as these compounds may have important roles in stress resistance and adaptation to extremes. Climate warming is likely to significantly increase VOC emissions from extreme environments both by direct effects on VOC production and volatility, and indirectly by altering the composition of the vegetation.

  12. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Ellerby, D.; Stackpoole, M..; Peterson, K.; Gage, P.; Beerman, A.; Blosser, M.; Chinnapongse, R.; Dillman, R.; Feldman, J.; Gasch, M.; Munk, M.; Prabhu, D.; Poteet, C.

    2013-01-01

    Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Technology (HEEET) project is based on the 3-D Woven TPS, an emerging innovative and game changing technology funded by SMD and STMD to fill the ablative TPS gap that exists currently for reaching the depths of Saturn and Venus. Woven TPS technology will address the challenges currently faced by the Venus, Saturn, and higher speed sample return mission Science community due to lack of availability of the only TPS, namely Carbon Phenolic and enable the Science community to move forward with proposals in this decade with Woven TPS. This presentation describes the approach in maturing the technology in the next three years enabling NF-4 mission proposers to address the challenges of Venus, Saturn or higher speed sample return missions.

  13. Extreme Environment Ceramic-to-Metal Seal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will demonstrate the feasibility of large ceramic to metal joints/seals that can tolerate extreme environments. The immediate...

  14. Diving In Extreme Environments:: The Scientific Diving Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The scope of extreme-environment diving defined within this work encompasses diving modes outside of the generally accepted no-decompression, open-circuit, compressed-air diving limits on selfcontained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) in temperate or warmer waters. Extreme-environment diving is scientifically and politically interesting. The scientific diving operational safety and medical framework is the cornerstone from which diving takes place in the scientific community. From this ...

  15. Engineering food crops to grow in harsh environments [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5f1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damar López-Arredondo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Achieving sustainable agriculture and producing enough food for the increasing global population will require effective strategies to cope with harsh environments such as water and nutrient stress, high temperatures and compacted soils with high impedance that drastically reduce crop yield. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, cellular and epigenetic mechanisms that orchestrate plant responses to abiotic stress will serve as the platform to engineer improved crop plants with better designed root system architecture and optimized metabolism to enhance water and nutrients uptake and use efficiency and/or soil penetration. In this review we discuss such advances and how the generated knowledge could be used to integrate effective strategies to engineer crops by gene transfer or genome editing technologies.

  16. Hetero-Interfaces for Extreme Electronic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    describing the intrinsic behavior. In the original intrinsic hypothesis, it was described as the electrostatic field reaching the band gap energy...ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENTS Quasi-two-dimensional electron gas (Q-2D-EG) forms at the interface between two perovskite band insulators; LaAlO3 (LAO) and...SrO)0 or ( TiO2 )0 – intersecting with negatively charged (AlO2)1- or positively charged (LaO)1+ layers, respectively. (this latter "LaO" layer

  17. The epidemiology of extreme hiking injuries in volcanic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W; Heggie, Tracey M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize the epidemiological literature for extreme hikers in volcanic environments and describe the incidence, nature and severity of injuries, the factors contributing to the injuries, and strategies for preventing injuries. Due to the relative newness of extreme hiking in volcanic environments, there are only a small handful of studies addressing the topic. Moreover, these studies are primarily focused on extreme hikers in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. These studies found that the majority of extreme hikers in volcanic environments are inexperienced and unfamiliar with the potential hazards present in volcanic environments. The studies found that upper respiratory irritation resulting from exposure to volcanic gases and dehydration and scrapes, abrasions, lacerations, and thermal burns to the extremities were common injuries. The severity of the injuries ranged from simple on-site treat-and-release incidents to more severe incidents and even death. This review reveals a need for well-designed epidemiologic research from volcanic destinations outside of Hawaii that identify the nature and severity of injuries along with the factors contributing to injury incidents. There is also a demonstrated need for studies identifying preventive measures that reduce both the occurrence and severity of extreme hiking incidents in volcanic environments.

  18. Colors of extreme exoEarth environments

    CERN Document Server

    Hegde, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    Context. The search for extrasolar planets has already detected rocky planets and several planetary candidates with minimum masses that are consistent with rocky planets in the Habitable Zone of their host stars. A low-resolution spectrum in the form of a color-color diagram of an exoplanet is likely to be one of the first post-detection quantities to be measured for the case of direct detection. Aims. In this paper, we explore potentially detectable surface features on rocky exoplanets and their connection to and importance as a habitat for extremophiles, as known on Earth. Extremophiles provide us with the minimum known envelope of environmental limits for life on our planet. Methods. The color of a planet reveals information on its properties, especially for surface features of rocky planets with clear atmospheres. We use filter photometry in the visible as a first step in the characterization of rocky exoplanets to prioritize targets for follow up spectroscopy. Results. Many surface environments on Earth ...

  19. Autonomous Mission Design in Extreme Orbit Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovik, David Allen

    An algorithm for autonomous online mission design at asteroids, comets, and small moons is developed to meet the novel challenges of their complex non-Keplerian orbit environments, which render traditional methods inapplicable. The core concept of abstract reachability analysis, in which a set of impulsive maneuvering options is mapped onto a space of high-level mission outcomes, is applied to enable goal-oriented decision-making with robustness to uncertainty. These nuanced analyses are efficiently computed by utilizing a heuristic-based adaptive sampling scheme that either maximizes an objective function for autonomous planning or resolves details of interest for preliminary analysis and general study. Illustrative examples reveal the chaotic nature of small body systems through the structure of various families of reachable orbits, such as those that facilitate close-range observation of targeted surface locations or achieve soft impact upon them. In order to fulfill extensive sets of observation tasks, the single-maneuver design method is implemented in a receding-horizon framework such that a complete mission is constructed on-the-fly one piece at a time. Long-term performance and convergence are assured by augmenting the objective function with a prospect heuristic, which approximates the likelihood that a reachable end-state will benefit the subsequent planning horizon. When state and model uncertainty produce larger trajectory deviations than were anticipated, the next control horizon is advanced to allow for corrective action -- a low-frequency form of feedback control. Through Monte Carlo analysis, the planning algorithm is ultimately demonstrated to produce mission profiles that vary drastically in their physical paths but nonetheless consistently complete all goals, suggesting a high degree of flexibility. It is further shown that the objective function can be tuned to preferentially minimize fuel cost or mission duration, as well as to optimize

  20. Genomics and Metagenomics of Extreme Acidophiles in Biomining Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 160 draft or complete genomes of extreme acidophiles (pH models of the ecophysiology of biomining environments and provide insight into the gene and genome evolution of extreme acidophiles. Additionally, since most of these acidophiles are also chemoautolithotrophs that use minerals as energy sources or electron sinks, their genomes can be plundered for clues about the evolution of cellular metabolism and bioenergetic pathways during the Archaean abiotic/biotic transition on early Earth. Acknowledgements: Fondecyt 1130683.

  1. [Hormonal changes in response to extreme environment factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubassov, R V

    2014-01-01

    In this paper presented current state about hormonal changes in sympathetic-adrenal, hypophysis-adrenal, hypophysis-gonads and thyroid levels from extreme environment factors. It's shown that hypophysis gonads and thyroid endocrine links along with sympathetic adrenal, hypophysis adrenal axes are very important relevance in response to extreme environment factors and organism adaptation. In this time a hormonal secretion changes corresponds as interrelated reactions cascade in mechanisms of homeostasis maintenance. A studying of this mechanisms and revealing of its role in stress pathogenesis is fundamental biomedical investigation task. A problem solving allow to perfect prophylactic and treatment methods against stress diseases.

  2. The Lusi drone: a mutidisciplinary tool to access extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Giovanni; Mazzini, Adriano; Alessandro, Iarocci; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Benedetti, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Active eruptions are notoriously inaccessible for monitoring and sampling. The "Lusi drone" is a hexacopter developed and assembled in order to complete multidisciplinary studies in such inaccessible environments. The Lusi drone is equipped with three gimbaled cameras that can complete video, photogrammetry, and thermal surveys during the missions. Two different prototypes of remote controlled gas containers can vacuum multiple samples when required. A remote controlled winch is able to deploy 1) a logger to monitor high temperature (up to 250° C) variations of erupted fluids (water-gas) and 2) a specifically designed sampler to collect solid and fluid specimens at preselected coordinates. A GPS-connected software allows to pre-plan the full mission of the drone and to constantly communicate and monitor its position. The device is solid, stable even with significant wind, affordable, and easy to transport. The Lusi drone has been successfully used at the active Lusi eruption site in Indonesia and proved to be an excellent tool to study harsh environments, where operations with more conventional methods are too expensive, dangerous or simply impossible.

  3. Design of a MGy radiation tolerant resolver-to-digital convertor IC for remotely operated maintenance in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, Paul, E-mail: paul.leroux@kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Dept. of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), AdvISe, Kleinhoefstraat 4, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Van Koeckhoven, Wesley; Verbeeck, Jens [KU Leuven, Dept. of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), AdvISe, Kleinhoefstraat 4, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Van Uffelen, Marco; Esqué, Salvador; Ranz, Roberto; Damiani, Carlo [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Hamilton, David [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    During future ITER maintenance operations, sensors and their embarked electronics will be exposed to a hostile and radioactive environment. This paper presents the design of a MGy radiation tolerant 16 bit resolver-to-digital converter (RDC) in 130 nm CMOS technology. The RDC features a Type II digital tracking loop, able to track resolvers with speeds up to 300 rps, and excitation frequencies up to 4 kHz. The RDC uses two integrated ΔΣ-analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) to digitize the resolver outputs. The 16 bit, 10 kHz ADCs utilize a correlated double sampling technique to remove radiation induced offset and 1/f-noise. The front-end features a static angular resolution of 16 bits (4.2 arcsec{sub rms}) and a resolution of 10 bits (6 arcmin{sub rms}) at a rotor speed of 100 rps. The circuit has a simulated radiation tolerance exceeding 1 MGy. It has the ability to operate under temperatures up to 125 °C, and to allow multiplexing with signals from other conventional sensors for compact, robust read-out architectures.

  4. Mitochondrial Plasticity With Exercise Training and Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity and biochemical coupling efficiency may be differentially regulated...... with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial up-regulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level. SUMMARY: Muscle mitochondrial are responsive to training and environment, yet thresholds for volume vs. regulatory changes and their physiological...

  5. Comparative community genomics in the Dead Sea: an increasingly extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodaker, Idan; Sharon, Itai; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Feingersch, Roi; Shmoish, Michael; Andreishcheva, Ekaterina; Sogin, Mitchell L; Rosenberg, Mira; Maguire, Michael E; Belkin, Shimshon; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2010-03-01

    Owing to the extreme salinity ( approximately 10 times saltier than the oceans), near toxic magnesium levels (approximately 2.0 M Mg(2+)), the dominance of divalent cations, acidic pH (6.0) and high-absorbed radiation flux rates, the Dead Sea represents a unique and harsh ecosystem. Measures of microbial presence (microscopy, pigments and lipids) indicate that during rare bloom events after exceptionally rainy seasons, the microbial communities can reach high densities. However, most of the time, when the Dead Sea level is declining and halite is precipitating from the water column, it is difficult to reliably measure the presence of microorganisms and their activities. Although a number of halophilic Archaea have been previously isolated from the Dead Sea, polar lipid analyses of biomass collected during Dead Sea blooms suggested that these isolates were not the major components of the microbial community of these blooms. In this study, in an effort to characterize the perennial microbial community of the Dead Sea and compare it with bloom assemblages, we performed metagenomic analyses of concentrated biomass from hundreds of liters of brine and of microbial material from the last massive Dead Sea bloom. The difference between the two conditions was reflected in community composition and diversity, in which the bloom was different and less diverse from the residual brine population. The distributional patterns of microbial genes suggested Dead Sea community trends in mono- and divalent cation metabolisms as well as in transposable elements. This may indicate possible mechanisms and pathways enabling these microbes to survive in such a harsh environment.

  6. Improving diversity in cultures of bacteria from an extreme environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Greenland represent one of the few permanently cold and alkaline environments on Earth, and the interior of the columns is home to a bacterial community adapted to these extreme conditions. The community is characterized by low cell numbers imbedded...

  7. JD3 - Neutron Stars: Timing in Extreme Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloni, Tomaso M.; Méndez, Mariano; Zhang, Chengmin

    2009-01-01

    The space-time around Neutron Stars is indeed an extreme environment. Whether they are in accreting binary systems, isolated or in non-accreting binaries (perhaps with another Neutron Star), Neutron Stars provide a window onto physical processes not accessible by other means. In particular, the stud

  8. JD3 - Neutron Stars: Timing in Extreme Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloni, Tomaso M.; Méndez, Mariano; Zhang, Chengmin

    2010-01-01

    The space-time around Neutron Stars is indeed an extreme environment. Whether they are in accreting binary systems, isolated or in non-accreting binaries (perhaps with another Neutron Star), Neutron Stars provide a window onto physical processes not accessible by other means. In particular, the stud

  9. Flexible Electronics-Based Transformers for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Stoica, Adrian; Ingham, Michel; Thakur, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of the use of modular multifunctional systems, called Flexible Transformers, to facilitate the exploration of extreme and previously inaccessible environments. A novel dynamics and control model of a modular algorithm for assembly, folding, and unfolding of these innovative structural systems is also described, together with the control model and the simulation results.

  10. Mitochondrial plasticity with exercise training and extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Sahlin, Kent

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity, and biochemical coupling efficiency may be regulated differentially with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial upregulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level.

  11. Imaging polarimetry of circumstellar environments with the Extreme Polarimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325801843; Canovas, H.; Jeffers, S.V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052658; Min, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/277318416; Keller, C.U.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824550

    2010-01-01

    Three successful observation campaigns have been conducted with the Extreme Polarimeter, an imaging polarimeter for the study of circumstellar environments in scattered light at visible wavelengths. A contrast ratio between the central star and the circumstellar source of 10-5 can be achieved with p

  12. Optical fiber and integrated optics accelerometers for real-time vibration monitoring in harsh environments: in-lab and in-field characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel; Mottier, Patrick L.; Cobo, Adolfo; Ollier, Eric; Morante Rabago, Miguel A.; Chabrol, C.; Madruga Saavedra, Francisco J.; Philippe, P.

    1998-06-01

    The reliability of rotating machines such as electrical generator is critical to the overall reliability and operation of electrical power plants. The very high cost of these machines, makes it necessary to improve the lifetime of a wide set of currently installed hydrogenerators around the world and avoid costly maintenance. Vibration monitoring is essential in maintenance and protection programs. However, due to the harsh environment and the very low frequency spectrum of the vibrations, the above mentioned machines cannot be appropriately monitored by piezoelectric sensors. Several combination of optical fiber with silicon microstructures or in integrated optics, but because of technical or economic reasons, up to now, these sensors are not fully suited for the above-mentioned applications. In this paper both optical fiber and integrated optics accelerometers developed in order to satisfy specifications required for these applications are presented. Their developments were a part of a European project dedicated to real time defect detection and predict forthcoming failures of a generator group in an electric power plant in Spain. In-laboratory and in-field test are reported.

  13. Correlating microbial diversity patterns with geochemistry in an extreme and heterogeneous environment of mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Chen, Lin-Xing; Kuang, Jia-Liang; Li, Sheng-Jin; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Huang, Li-Nan

    2014-06-01

    Recent molecular surveys have advanced our understanding of the forces shaping the large-scale ecological distribution of microbes in Earth's extreme habitats, such as hot springs and acid mine drainage. However, few investigations have attempted dense spatial analyses of specific sites to resolve the local diversity of these extraordinary organisms and how communities are shaped by the harsh environmental conditions found there. We have applied a 16S rRNA gene-targeted 454 pyrosequencing approach to explore the phylogenetic differentiation among 90 microbial communities from a massive copper tailing impoundment generating acidic drainage and coupled these variations in community composition with geochemical parameters to reveal ecological interactions in this extreme environment. Our data showed that the overall microbial diversity estimates and relative abundances of most of the dominant lineages were significantly correlated with pH, with the simplest assemblages occurring under extremely acidic conditions and more diverse assemblages associated with neutral pHs. The consistent shifts in community composition along the pH gradient indicated that different taxa were involved in the different acidification stages of the mine tailings. Moreover, the effect of pH in shaping phylogenetic structure within specific lineages was also clearly evident, although the phylogenetic differentiations within the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes were attributed to variations in ferric and ferrous iron concentrations. Application of the microbial assemblage prediction model further supported pH as the major factor driving community structure and demonstrated that several of the major lineages are readily predictable. Together, these results suggest that pH is primarily responsible for structuring whole communities in the extreme and heterogeneous mine tailings, although the diverse microbial taxa may respond differently to various environmental conditions.

  14. Correlating Microbial Diversity Patterns with Geochemistry in an Extreme and Heterogeneous Environment of Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Chen, Lin-Xing; Kuang, Jia-Liang; Li, Sheng-Jin; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Recent molecular surveys have advanced our understanding of the forces shaping the large-scale ecological distribution of microbes in Earth's extreme habitats, such as hot springs and acid mine drainage. However, few investigations have attempted dense spatial analyses of specific sites to resolve the local diversity of these extraordinary organisms and how communities are shaped by the harsh environmental conditions found there. We have applied a 16S rRNA gene-targeted 454 pyrosequencing approach to explore the phylogenetic differentiation among 90 microbial communities from a massive copper tailing impoundment generating acidic drainage and coupled these variations in community composition with geochemical parameters to reveal ecological interactions in this extreme environment. Our data showed that the overall microbial diversity estimates and relative abundances of most of the dominant lineages were significantly correlated with pH, with the simplest assemblages occurring under extremely acidic conditions and more diverse assemblages associated with neutral pHs. The consistent shifts in community composition along the pH gradient indicated that different taxa were involved in the different acidification stages of the mine tailings. Moreover, the effect of pH in shaping phylogenetic structure within specific lineages was also clearly evident, although the phylogenetic differentiations within the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes were attributed to variations in ferric and ferrous iron concentrations. Application of the microbial assemblage prediction model further supported pH as the major factor driving community structure and demonstrated that several of the major lineages are readily predictable. Together, these results suggest that pH is primarily responsible for structuring whole communities in the extreme and heterogeneous mine tailings, although the diverse microbial taxa may respond differently to various environmental conditions

  15. Harsh photovoltaics using InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well schemes

    KAUST Repository

    Lien, Derhsien

    2015-01-01

    Harvesting solar energy at extremely harsh environments is of practical interest for building a self-powered harsh electronic system. However, working at high temperature and radiative environments adversely affects the performance of conventional solar cells. To improve the performance, GaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are introduced into the solar cells. The implementation of MQWs enables improved efficiency (+0.52%/K) and fill factor (+0.35%/K) with elevated temperature and shows excellent reliability under high-temperature operation. In addition, the GaN-based solar cell exhibits superior radiation robustness (lifetime >30 years under solar storm proton irradiation) due to their strong atomic bonding and direct-bandgap characteristics. This solar cell employing MQW nanostructures provides valuable routes for future developments in self-powered harsh electronics.

  16. Terrestrial Applications of Extreme Environment Stirling Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger. W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been developing power systems capable of long-term operation in extreme environments such as the surface of Venus. This technology can use any external heat source to efficiently provide electrical power and cooling; and it is designed to be extremely efficient and reliable for extended space missions. Terrestrial applications include: use in electric hybrid vehicles; distributed home co-generation/cooling; and quiet recreational vehicle power generation. This technology can reduce environmental emissions, petroleum consumption, and noise while eliminating maintenance and environmental damage from automotive fluids such as oil lubricants and air conditioning coolant. This report will provide an overview of this new technology and its applications.

  17. Wearable oximetry for harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-23

    a wearable monitor is required. Related to this, commercial oximetry sensors (e.g., from Masimo, BSX Insight, Cercacor) are now being marketed for...Schmid, C. Fulco, S. Muza, “Predictive models of acute mountain sickness after rapid ascent to various altitudes,” Med & Sci in Sports & Exercise, 792

  18. Wearable Oximetry for Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    to this, commercial oximetry sensors (e.g., from Masimo, BSX Insight, Cercacor) are now being marketed for enhancing performance of elite athletes...considerable re-packaging and integration. The green wavelength is well known to provide a strong modulation for measuring HR [8], as evidenced by nearly...every consumer PPG-based HR monitor using green LEDs. However, for oximetry, red and IR wavelengths are the standard choices, in order to

  19. Applying positive psychology in the study of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedfeld, P

    2001-12-01

    Positive psychology orientation for the selection of personnel for isolated, confined environments and extreme and unusual environments is presented. It is suggested that personnel for isolated environments be selected for their ability to live and work in such an environment. The traditional negative psychology orientation focuses on characteristics such as demanding work, long stretches of empty time, unusual circadian rhythms, problems with group and interpersonal relationships, narrowed cognitive focus, cross-cultural differences, flattened leadership hierarchy, excessive interpersonal intimacy, and interaction with off site management. A positive psychology orientation focuses on the natural grandeur of the environment, mystery, efficiency, coziness, comfort, novelty and familiarity, improvisation, free time, time out from daily hassles, and social group characteristics such as camaraderie, intimacy, inderdependence, superordinate goals, and belonging to an elite group.

  20. Distributed Motor Controller (DMC) for Operation in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Colin M.; Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Some, Rafi; Sirota, Allen; Kopf, Ted; Stern, Ryan; Hunter, Don

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extreme environment capable Distributed Motor Controller (DMC) module suitable for operation with a distributed architecture of future spacecraft systems. This motor controller is designed to be a bus-based electronics module capable of operating a single Brushless DC motor in extreme space environments: temperature (-120 C to +85 C required, -180 C to +100 C stretch goal); radiation (>;20K required, >;100KRad stretch goal); >;360 cycles of operation. Achieving this objective will result in a scalable modular configuration for motor control with enhanced reliability that will greatly lower cost during the design, fabrication and ATLO phases of future missions. Within the heart of the DMC lies a pair of cold-capable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that enable its miniaturization and operation in extreme environments. The ASICs are fabricated in the IBM 0.5 micron Silicon Germanium (SiGe) BiCMOS process and are comprised of Analog circuitry to provide telemetry information, sensor interface, and health and status of DMC. The FPGA contains logic to provide motor control, status monitoring and spacecraft interface. The testing and characterization of these ASICs have yielded excellent functionality in cold temperatures (-135 C). The DMC module has demonstrated successful operation of a motor at temperature.

  1. Extreme Environment Technologies for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Cutts, James A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Over the next decades, NASA's planned solar system exploration missions are targeting planets, moons and small bodies, where spacecraft would be expected to encounter diverse extreme environmental (EE) conditions throughout their mission phases. These EE conditions are often coupled. For instance, near the surface of Venus and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets, probes would experience high temperatures and pressures. In the Jovian system low temperatures are coupled with high radiation. Other environments include thermal cycling, and corrosion. Mission operations could also introduce extreme conditions, due to atmospheric entry heat flux and deceleration. Some of these EE conditions are not unique to space missions; they can be encountered by terrestrial assets from the fields of defense,oil and gas, aerospace, and automotive industries. In this paper we outline the findings of NASA's Extreme Environments Study Team, including discussions on state of the art and emerging capabilities related to environmental protection, tolerance and operations in EEs. We will also highlight cross cutting EE mitigation technologies, for example, between high g-load tolerant impactors for Europa and instrumented projectiles on Earth; high temperature electronics sensors on Jupiter deep probes and sensors inside jet engines; and pressure vessel technologies for Venus probes and sea bottom monitors. We will argue that synergistic development programs between these fields could be highly beneficial and cost effective for the various agencies and industries. Some of these environments, however, are specific to space and thus the related technology developments should be spear headed by NASA with collaboration from industry and academia.

  2. Exascale Co-design for Modeling Materials in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germann, Timothy C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Computational materials science has provided great insight into the response of materials under extreme conditions that are difficult to probe experimentally. For example, shock-induced plasticity and phase transformation processes in single-crystal and nanocrystalline metals have been widely studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, and many of these predictions are beginning to be tested at advanced 4th generation light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). I will describe our simulation predictions and their recent verification at LCLS, outstanding challenges in modeling the response of materials to extreme mechanical and radiation environments, and our efforts to tackle these as part of the multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx). ExMatEx has initiated an early and deep collaboration between domain (computational materials) scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and hardware architects, in order to establish the relationships between algorithms, software stacks, and architectures needed to enable exascale-ready materials science application codes within the next decade. We anticipate that we will be able to exploit hierarchical, heterogeneous architectures to achieve more realistic large-scale simulations with adaptive physics refinement, and are using tractable application scale-bridging proxy application testbeds to assess new approaches and requirements. Such current scale-bridging strategies accumulate (or recompute) a distributed response database from fine-scale calculations, in a top-down rather than bottom-up multiscale approach.

  3. Fabrication of Diamond Based Sensors for Use in Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi K. Samudrala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and magnetic sensors can be lithographically fabricated on top of diamond substrates and encapsulated in a protective layer of chemical vapor deposited single crystalline diamond. This process when carried out on single crystal diamond anvils employed in high pressure research is termed as designer diamond anvil fabrication. These designer diamond anvils allow researchers to study electrical and magnetic properties of materials under extreme conditions without any possibility of damaging the sensing elements. We describe a novel method for the fabrication of designer diamond anvils with the use of maskless lithography and chemical vapor deposition in this paper. This method can be utilized to produce diamond based sensors which can function in extreme environments of high pressures, high and low temperatures, corrosive and high radiation conditions. We demonstrate applicability of these diamonds under extreme environments by performing electrical resistance measurements during superconducting transition in rare earth doped iron-based compounds under high pressures to 12 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K.

  4. Technology perspectives in the future exploration of extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J.; Balint, T.; Kolawa, El.; Peterson, C.

    2007-08-01

    Solar System exploration is driven by high priority science goals and objectives at diverse destinations, as described in the NRC Decadal Survey and in NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Roadmap. Proposed missions to these targets encounter extreme environments, including high or low temperatures, high pressure, corrosion, high heat flux, radiation and thermal cycling. These conditions are often coupled, such as low temperature and high radiation at Europa; and high temperature and high pressure near the surface of Venus. Mitigation of these environmental conditions frequently reaches beyond technologies developed for terrestrial applications, for example, by the automotive and oil industries. Therefore, space agencies require dedicated technology developments to enable these future missions. Within NASA, proposed missions are divided into three categories. Competed small (Discovery class) and medium (New Frontiers class) missions are cost capped, thus limiting significant technology developments. Therefore, large (Flagship class) missions are required not only to tackle key science questions which can't be addressed by smaller missions, but also to develop mission enabling technologies that can feed forward to smaller missions as well. In a newly completed extreme environment technology assessment at NASA, we evaluated technologies from the current State of Practice (SoP) to advanced concepts for proposed missions over the next decades. Highlights of this report are discussed here, including systems architectures, such as hybrid systems; protection systems; high temperature electronics; power generation and storage; mobility technologies; sample acquisition and mechanisms; and the need to test these technologies in relevant environments. It is expected that the findings - documented in detail in NASA's Extreme Environments Technologies report - would help identifying future technology investment areas, and in turn enable or enhance planned SSE missions

  5. Directional Dependence for Dark Matter Annihilation in Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadie, O. Grahm; Tinsley, Todd

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the directional dependence that extreme magnetic fields have on the annihilation of dark matter into electron-positron pairs. We take the neutralino of the Minimally Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as our dark matter candidate and assume magnetic field strengths on the order of the critical field (Bc 1013 G). This is characteristic of extreme astrophysical environments in which dark matter may accumulate. We will present the results for the annihilation cross section at varying incoming particle direction. In addition, we will present how these results differ with neutralino mass and energy, as well as with the magnetic field strength. Our goal is to demonstrate the ways that the direction of the magnetic field affects the states of the final electron and positron. This work is supported by NASA/Arkansas Space Grant Consortium and the Hendrix Odyssey Program.

  6. Life on the Edge-the Biology of Organisms Inhabiting Extreme Environments: An Introduction to the Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Annie R; Buckley, Bradley A; Eppley, Sarah M; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Stedman, Kenneth M; Wagner, Josiah T

    2016-10-01

    Life persists, even under extremely harsh conditions. While the existence of extremophiles is well known, the mechanisms by which these organisms evolve, perform basic metabolic functions, reproduce, and survive under extreme physical stress are often entirely unknown. Recent technological advances in terms of both sampling and studying extremophiles have yielded new insight into their evolution, physiology and behavior, from microbes and viruses to plants to eukaryotes. The goal of the "Life on the Edge-the Biology of Organisms Inhabiting Extreme Environments" symposium was to unite researchers from taxonomically and methodologically diverse backgrounds to highlight new advances in extremophile biology. Common themes and new insight that emerged from the symposium included the important role of symbiotic associations, the continued challenges associated with sampling and studying extremophiles and the important role these organisms play in terms of studying climate change. As we continue to explore our planet, especially in difficult to reach areas from the poles to the deep sea, we expect to continue to discover new and extreme circumstances under which life can persist.

  7. Remotely Powered Reconfigurable Receiver for Extreme Environment Sensing Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2012-01-01

    Wireless sensors connected in a local network offer revolutionary exploration capabilities, but the current solutions do not work in extreme environments of low temperatures (200K) and low to moderate radiation levels (<50 krad). These sensors (temperature, radiation, infrared, etc.) would need to operate outside the spacecraft/ lander and be totally independent of power from the spacecraft/lander. Flash memory field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are being used as the main signal processing and protocol generation platform in a new receiver. Flash-based FPGAs have been shown to have at least 100 reduced standby power and 10 reduction operating power when compared to normal SRAM-based FPGA technology.

  8. Human and team performance in extreme environments: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuster, J.

    1998-01-01

    Analogous experience is often instructive when attempting to understand human behavior in extreme environments. The current paper refers to the experiences of polar explorers and remote duty personnel to help identify the factors that influence individual and team performance when small groups are isolated and confined for long durations. The principal factors discussed include organizational structure, intracrew communications, interpersonal relations, leadership style, personnel selection, and training. Behavioral implications also are addressed for the design of procedures and equipment to facilitate sustained individual and group performance under conditions of isolation and confinement. To be consistent with the theme of the symposium, this paper emphasizes the crew requirements for an international expedition to Mars.

  9. Whole lot of parts: stress in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, G Daniel

    2005-06-01

    Stress has been a central interest for researchers of human behavior in extreme and unusual environments and also for those who are responsible for planning and carrying out expeditions involving such environments. This paper compares the actuarial and case study methods for predicting reactions to stress. Actuarial studies are useful, but do not tap enough variables to allow us to predict how a specific individual will cope with the rigors of an individual mission. Case histories provide a wealth of detail, but few investigators understand the challenges of properly applying this method. This study reviews some of the strengths and weaknesses of the actuarial and case history methods, and presents a four celled taxonomy of stress based on method (actuarial and case history) and effects (distress and eustress). For both research and operational purposes, the person, the setting, and time should not be considered independently; rather, it is an amalgam of these variables that provides the proper basis of analysis.

  10. Microbes Thriving in Extreme Environments: How Do They Do It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prameela Jha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge about habitat of microorganisms appears diminutive when we witness amazing flexibility in choice of survival under various conditions. Extremophiles refers to the organisms living and carrying out vital life processes at extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration among others and this is why they have attracted attention of researchers worldwide. There is a continuous quest to unreveal the probable mechanism or structural and functional adaptations that make extremophiles survive under other holistic conditions. There occur modifications primarily in cell membrane, DNA, RNA, protein and enzymes in order to render fit microbial cell to its external environment. Thus, extremophiles are robust source of high temperature and alkali stable enzymes. Various enzymes as lipase and protease have found several applications in food and cosmetic industry while Taq polymerase from bacteria Thermus aquaticus has revolutionized entire scene of molecular biology. Present review focuses on extremophiles, their structural and molecular adaptations to overcome unfavorable conditions of environment.

  11. Extreme environments in the forests of Ushuaia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antoni, Hector; Rothschild, Lynn; Schultz, Cynthia; Burgess, Seth; Skiles, J. W.

    2007-11-01

    A survey over two mountain slopes (Glaciar Martial and Cerro Guanaco) in the vicinity of Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) showed normal results for the region in terms of chlorophyll concentration in the leaves of the dominant tree species Nothofagus antarctica, N. pumilio and N. betuloides, and soil variables such as temperature, moisture, pH, and concentration of nitrogen, sodium and potassium. Solar radiation, on the other hand, showed high values of ultraviolet over the 200-400 nm range, suggesting that the environment is extreme in terms of incoming solar radiation. The forest canopy absorbs and/or reflects a significant amount of that radiation. In separate analyses we showed that these tree species contain UV-absorbing pigments (cyanidin, delphidin, and flavonol glycosides). We submit that the rippled and glossy surface of leaves serves as a reflection/backscattering mechanism that protects their inner structure and function. The presence of krummholz (= twisted, dwarf trees) in the upper end of the forest shows the effects of an extreme environment.

  12. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, R; Schinner, F

    2001-09-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure, Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds, has been shown to occur in various extreme habitats. The biodegradation of many components of petroleum hydrocarbons has been reported in a variety of terrestrial and marine cold ecosystems. Cold-adapted hydrocarbon degraders are also useful for wastewater treatment. The use of thermophiles for biodegradation of hydrocarbons with low water solubility is of interest, as solubility and thus bioavailability, are enhanced at elevated temperatures. Thermophiles, predominantly bacilli, possess a substantial potential for the degradation of environmental pollutants, including all major classes. Indigenous thermophilic hydrocarbon degraders are of special significance for the bioremediation of oil-polluted desert soil. Some studies have investigated composting as a bioremediation process. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of high salt concentrations is of interest for the bioremediation of oil-polluted salt marshes and industrial wastewaters, contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons or with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Our knowledge of the biodegradation potential of acidophilic, alkaliphilic, or barophilic microorganisms is limited.

  13. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margesin, R.; Schinner, F. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie

    2001-07-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure. Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds, has been shown to occur in various extreme habitats. The biodegradation of many components of petroleum hydrocarbons has been reported in a variety of terrestrial and marine cold ecosystems. Cold-adapted hydrocarbon degraders are also useful for wastewater treatment. The use of thermophiles for biodegradation of hydrocarbons with low water solubility is of interest, as solubility and thus bioavailability, are enhanced at elevated temperatures. Thermophiles, predominantly bacilli, possess a substantial potential for the degradation of environmental pollutants, including all major classes. Indigenous thermophilic hydrocarbon degraders are of special significance for the bioremediation of oil-polluted desert soil. Some studies have investigated composting as a bioremediation process. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of high salt concentrations is of interest for the bioremediation of oil-polluted salt marshes and industrial wastewaters, contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons or with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Our knowledge of the biodegradation potential of acidophilic, alkaliphilic, or barophilic microorganisms is limited. (orig.)

  14. Re-Configurable Electronics Characterization under Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Lacayo, Veronica; Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Keymeulen, Didier; Zebulum, Ricardo; Neff, Joe; Burke, Gary; Daud, Taher

    2005-01-01

    The need for reconfigurable electronics is driven by requirements to survive longer missions and harsher environments. It is possible to compensate for degradations in Extreme Environments (EE). EE has effect on electronics: circuits are designed to exploit device characteristics and when a certain temperature or radiation range is exceeded the circuit function gradually degrades. It is possible to employ Hardening by reconfiguration (HBR) to mitigate drifts, degradation, or damage on electronic devices in EE by using reconfigurable devices and an adaptive self-reconfiguration of circuit topology. In this manner degraded components can be salvaged, and completely damaged components can be bypassed. The challenge of conventional design is replaced with that of designing a recover process that automatically performs the (re) design in place of the designer. The objective of testing a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) under the extreme temperatures was to determine the lowest temperature at which the DAP can operate. The objective of testing a Xilinx VirtexII Pro FPGA board was to initially find our whether the evaluation board and the FPGA would survive and continue at temperature ranges from -180 C, and 120 C. The Virtex II functioned correctly at the temperatures tested. The next test was done on the GM-C filter building block using the same temperature range as the Virtex II. The current lower and upper limits were shown to be reduced as the temperature gets lower. The device function can be recovered by increasing the Vb from .08V to .85V. The negative and positive saturation voltages increases as the temperature gets higher. The function of the device can be recovered by decreasing the Vb from .8V to around .75V. The next test was performed to test the recovery of the GmC low pass filter through Vb in a filter circuit. The test indicate that bias voltage control adjustment is an efficient mechanism for circuit recovery at extreme temperatures.

  15. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Don; Gage, Peter; Kazemba, Cole; Mahzari, Milad; Nishioka, Owen; Peterson, Keith; Stackpoole, Mairead; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Young, Zion; Poteet, Carl; Splinter, Scott; Fowler, Mike; Kellerman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The Heat shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project is a NASA STMD and SMD co-funded effort. The goal is to develop and mission infuse a new ablative Thermal Protection System that can withstand extreme entry. It is targeted to support NASAs high priority missions, as defined in the latest decadal survey, to destinations such as Venus and Saturn in-situ robotic science missions. Entry into these planetary atmospheres results in extreme heating. The entry peak heat-flux and associated pressure are estimated to be between one and two orders of magnitude higher than those experienced by Mars Science Laboratory or Lunar return missions. In the recent New Frontiers community announcement NASA has indicated that it is considering providing an increase to the PI managed mission cost (PIMMC) for investigations utilizing the Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) and in addition, NASA is considering limiting the risk assessment to only their accommodation on the spacecraft and the mission environment. The HEEET ablative TPS utilizes 3D weaving technology to manufacture a dual layer material architecture. The 3-D weaving allows for flat panels to be woven. The dual layer consists of a top layer designed to withstand the extreme external environment while the inner or insulating layer by design, is designed to achieve low thermal conductivity, and it keeps the heat from conducting towards the structure underneath. Both arc jet testing combined with material properties have been used to develop thermal response models that allows for comparison of performance with heritage carbon phenolic. A 50 mass efficiency is achieved by the dual layer construct compared to carbon phenolic for a broad range of missions both to Saturn and Venus. The 3-D woven flat preforms are molded to achieve the shape as they are compliant and then resin infusion with curing forms a rigid panels. These panels are then bonded on to the aeroshell structure. Gaps

  16. In-Situ Micromechanical Testing in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinacci, Amanda Sofia

    In order to design engineering applications that can withstand extreme environments, we must first understand the underlying deformation mechanisms that can hinder material performance. It is not enough to characterize the mechanical properties alone, we must also characterize the microstructural changes as well so that we can understand the origin of material degradation. This dissertation focuses on two different extreme environments. The first environment is the cryogenic environment, where we focus on the deformation behavior of solder below the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The second environment is the irradiated environment, where we focus on the effects that ion beam irradiation has on both the mechanical properties and microstructure of 304 stainless steel. Both classes of materials and testing environments utilize novel in situ micromechanical testing techniques inside a scanning electron microscope which enhances our ability to link the observed deformation behavior with its associated mechanical response. Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the DBTT is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at -142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity while at -142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (100) orientation and a non-symmetric (45¯1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations. This approach was also extended to a more complex solder alloy that is commonly used in industry, Sn96. In the case of the solder alloy more complex geometries

  17. Electro-Mechanical Systems for Extreme Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Tyler, Tony R.; Abel, Phillip B.; Levanas, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Exploration beyond low earth orbit presents challenges for hardware that must operate in extreme environments. The current state of the art is to isolate and provide heating for sensitive hardware in order to survive. However, this protection results in penalties of weight and power for the spacecraft. This is particularly true for electro-mechanical based technology such as electronics, actuators and sensors. Especially when considering distributed electronics, many electro-mechanical systems need to be located in appendage type locations, making it much harder to protect from the extreme environments. The purpose of this paper to describe the advances made in the area of developing electro-mechanical technology to survive these environments with minimal protection. The Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), the Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Aeroflex, Inc. over the last few years have worked to develop and test electro-mechanical hardware that will meet the stringent environmental demands of the moon, and which can also be leveraged for other challenging space exploration missions. Prototype actuators and electronics have been built and tested. Brushless DC actuators designed by Aeroflex, Inc have been tested with interface temperatures as low as 14 degrees Kelvin. Testing of the Aeroflex design has shown that a brushless DC motor with a single stage planetary gearbox can operate in low temperature environments for at least 120 million cycles (measured at motor) if long life is considered as part of the design. A motor control distributed electronics concept developed by JPL was built and operated at temperatures as low as -160 C, with many components still operational down to -245 C. Testing identified the components not capable of meeting the low temperature goal of -230 C. This distributed controller is universal in design with the ability to control different types of motors and read many different types of sensors. The controller

  18. Qualification of Fiber Optic Cables for Martian Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Lindensmith, Christian A.; Roberts, William T.; Rainen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Means have been developed for enabling fiber optic cables of the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometer instrument to survive ground operations plus the nominal 670 Martian conditions that include Martian summer and winter seasons. The purpose of this development was to validate the use of the rover external fiber optic cabling of ChemCam for space applications under the extreme thermal environments to be encountered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Flight-representative fiber optic cables were subjected to extreme temperature thermal cycling of the same diurnal depth (or delta T) as expected in flight, but for three times the expected number of in-flight thermal cycles. The survivability of fiber optic cables was tested for 600 cumulative thermal cycles from -130 to +15 C to cover the winter season, and another 1,410 cumulative cycles from -105 to +40 C to cover the summer season. This test satisfies the required 3 times the design margin that is a total of 2,010 thermal cycles (670 x 3). This development test included functional optical transmission tests during the course of the test. Transmission of the fiber optic cables was performed prior to and after 1,288 thermal cycles and 2,010 thermal cycles. No significant changes in transmission were observed on either of the two representative fiber cables subject through the 3X MSL mission life that is 2,010 thermal cycles.

  19. Integrating Simulation and Data for Materials in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    We are using large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the response of nanocrystalline metals such as tantalum to uniaxial (e.g., shock) compression. With modern petascale-class platforms, we are able to model sample sizes with edge lengths over one micrometer, which match the length and time scales experimentally accessible at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS) and SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). I will describe our simulation predictions and their recent verification at LCLS, as well as outstanding challenges in modeling the response of materials to extreme mechanical and radiation environments, and our efforts to tackle these as part of the multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx). ExMatEx has initiated an early and deep collaboration between domain (computational materials) scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and hardware architects, in order to establish the relationships between algorithms, software stacks, and architectures needed to enable exascale-ready materials science application codes within the next decade. We anticipate that we will be able to exploit hierarchical, heterogeneous architectures to achieve more realistic large-scale simulations with adaptive physics refinement, and are using tractable application scale-bridging proxy application testbeds to assess new approaches and requirements. The current scale-bridging strategies accumulate (or recompute) a distributed response database from fine-scale calculations, in a top-down rather than bottom-up multiscale approach. I will demonstrate this approach and our initial assessments, using the newly emerging capabilities at new 4th generation synchrotron light sources as an experimental driver.

  20. Improving diversity in cultures of bacteria from an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2013-08-01

    The ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Greenland represent one of the few permanently cold and alkaline environments on Earth, and the interior of the columns is home to a bacterial community adapted to these extreme conditions. The community is characterized by low cell numbers imbedded in a calcium carbonate matrix, making extraction of bacterial cells and DNA a challenge and limiting molecular and genomic studies of this environment. To utilize this genetic resource, cultivation at high pH and low temperature was studied as a method for obtaining biomass and DNA from the fraction of this community that would not otherwise be amenable to genetic analyses. The diversity and community dynamics in mixed cultures of bacteria from ikaite columns was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA. Both medium composition and incubation time influenced the diversity of the culture and many hitherto uncharacterized genera could be brought into culture by extended incubation time. Extended incubation time also gave rise to a more diverse community with a significant number of rare species not detected in the initial community.

  1. Bounding Extreme Spacecraft Charging in the Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.

    2008-01-01

    Robotic and manned spacecraft from the Apollo era demonstrated that the lunar surface in daylight will charge to positive potentials of a few tens of volts because the photoelectron current dominates the charging process. In contrast, potentials of the lunar surface in darkness which were predicted to be on the order of a hundred volts negative in the Apollo era have been shown more recently to reach values of a few hundred volts negative with extremes on the order of a few kilovolts. The recent measurements of night time lunar surface potentials are based on electron beams in the Lunar Prospector Electron Reflectometer data sets interpreted as evidence for secondary electrons generated on the lunar surface accelerated through a plasma sheath from a negatively charged lunar surface. The spacecraft potential was not evaluated in these observations and therefore represents a lower limit to the magnitude of the lunar negative surface potential. This paper will describe a method for obtaining bounds on the magnitude of lunar surface potentials from spacecraft measurements in low lunar orbit based on estimates of the spacecraft potential. We first use Nascap-2k surface charging analyses to evaluate potentials of spacecraft in low lunar orbit and then include the potential drops between the ambient space environment and the spacecraft to the potential drop between the lunar surface and the ambient space environment to estimate the lunar surface potential from the satellite measurements.

  2. High temperature pressure sensor for harsh environment%用于恶劣环境的耐高温压力传感器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵立波; 赵玉龙

    2009-01-01

    In order to solve the pressure measurement problem in harsh environments, such as high temperature above 200 ℃, a special piezoresistive pressure sensor with the ranges of 0~120 kPa is developed based on the Micro Electro-mechanical System(MEMS) and Separation by Implantation of Oxygen(SIMOX) technology. The piezoresistive pressure sensor chip consists of a silicon substrate, a thin silicon dioxide layer, an optimized boron ion implantation layer photolitho graphically patterned on a Wheatstone bridge configuration, a stress matching layer with silicon nitride, a Ti-Pt-Au beam lead layer for bonding gold wires, and a cavity fabricated by the wet etching. A special buried silicon dioxide layer with a thickness of 367 nm is fabricated by the SIMOX technology with the oxygen ion dose of 1.4×1018/cm2 and an implantation energy of 200 keV. The buried SiO2 layer is used to isolate the upper measuring circuit layer from the silicon substrate to avoid the leak-current influence, so the fabricated sensor chip can be used in a high temperature above 200 ℃. In order to improve the stability in the wide temperature range, the temperature compensation methods are studied and carried out, so the Temperature Coefficient of Sensitivity(TCS) and Temperature Coefficient of Offset(TCO) of the compensated sensor are easily obtained to be less than 1×10-4/℃·FS. The calibration results show that the developed high temperature pressure sensor has good performances under 200 ℃ for alinearity error of 0.12%FS, a repeatability error of 0.1%FS, a hysteresis error of 0.12%FS, and the sensor's accuracy of 0.197%FS. Which shows it is able to meet the requirements of modern industry, such as oilcans, wind tunnels, mobiles,petrochemical industry,etc..%为了解决如高温200℃等恶劣环境下的压力测量问题,基于微机电系统(MEMS)和高能氧离子注入(SIMOX)技术,研制了一种量程为0~120 kPa的压阻式压力传感器.该传感器芯片由硅基底、薄层

  3. Biodegradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Extremely Acidic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Raymond D.; Savage, Dwayne C.; Sayler, Gary S.; Stacey, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in soil samples recovered along gradients of both contaminant levels and pH values existing downstream of a long-term coal pile storage basin. pH values for areas greatly impacted by runoff from the storage basin were 2.0. Even at such a reduced pH, the indigenous microbial community was metabolically active, showing the ability to oxidize more than 40% of the parent hydrocarbons, naphthalene and toluene, to carbon dioxide and water. Treatment of the soil samples with cycloheximide inhibited mineralization of the aromatic substrates. DNA hybridization analysis indicated that whole-community nucleic acids recovered from these samples did not hybridize with genes, such as nahA, nahG, nahH, todC1C2, and tomA, that encode common enzymes from neutrophilic bacteria. Since these data suggested that the degradation of aromatic compounds may involve a microbial consortium instead of individual acidophilic bacteria, experiments using microorganisms isolated from these samples were initiated. While no defined mixed cultures were able to evolve 14CO2 from labeled substrates in these mineralization experiments, an undefined mixed culture including a fungus, a yeast, and several bacteria successfully metabolized approximately 27% of supplied naphthalene after 1 week. This study shows that biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons can occur in environments with extremely low pH values. PMID:9797263

  4. IR DirectFET Extreme Environments Evaluation Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Martin; Mottiwala, Amin

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, International Rectifier (IR) introduced a new version of its DirectFET metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) packaging. The new version (referred to as 'Version 2') enhances device moisture resistance, makes surface mount (SMT) assembly of these devices to printed wiring boards (PWBs) more repeatable, and subsequent assembly inspection simpler. In the present study, the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in collaboration with Stellar Microelectronics (Stellar), continued an evaluation of the DirectFET that they started together in 2006. The present study focused on comparing the two versions of the DirectFET and examining the suitability of the DirectFET devices for space applications. This study evaluated both versions of two DirectFET packaged devices that had both been shown in the 2006 study to have the best electrical and thermal properties: the IRF6635 and IRF6644. The present study evaluated (1) the relative electrical and thermal performance of both versions of each device, (2) the performance through high reliability testing, and (3) the performance of these devices in combination with a range of alternate solder alloys in the extreme thermal environments of deep space....

  5. Annual fish: developmental adaptations for an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berois, Nibia; Arezo, María J; Papa, Nicolás G; Clivio, Graciela A

    2012-01-01

    Annual fish are freshwater teleosts found in South America and Africa that are exposed to an extremely variable environment. They develop and reproduce in seasonal ponds that dry during the summer eliminating the entire adult population. Remarkably, desiccation-resistant embryos survive in these dry ponds that hatch during the next rainy season when the ponds are recreated. Among vertebrates, they represent one of the most remarkable extremophiles. They share several features with other fish models; however, they exhibit unique traits related to their peculiar life cycle. Epiboly is temporally and spatially uncoupled from organogenesis, and the embryos can undergo reversible developmental arrests (diapauses). These attributes make them a useful model to study diverse topics in developmental biology using a comparative and evolutionary approach. In this article, different aspects related to annual fish biology, taxonomy and phylogenetic considerations, reproductive strategy, and developmental characteristics with special focus on arrests, are summarized. The current challenge is to document and determine the factors that generate such high diversity and unique adaptations of annual fish. To understand this complexity, interdisciplinary approaches are being employed taking into consideration evolutionary biology, ethology, reproductive strategies, regulation of developmental mechanisms, and senescence.

  6. Reconfiguration of Analog Electronics for Extreme Environments: Problem or Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Zebulum, Ricardo; Keymeulen, Didier; Guo, Xin

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues in favor of adaptive reconfiguration as a technique to expand the operational envelope of analog electronics for extreme environments (EE). In addition to hardening-by-process and hardening-by-design, "hardening-by-reconfiguration", when applicable, could be used to mitigate drifts, degradation, or damage on electronic devices (chips) in EE, by using re-configurable devices and an adaptive self-reconfiguration of their circuit topology. Conventional circuit design exploits device characteristics within a certain temperature/radiation range; when that is exceeded, the circuit function degrades. On a reconfigurable device, although component parameters change in EE, as long as devices still operate, albeit degraded, a new circuit design, suitable for new parameter values, may be mapped into the reconfigurable structure to recover the initial circuit function. Partly degraded resources are still used, while completely damaged resources are bypassed. Designs suitable for various environmental conditions can be determined prior to operation or can be determined in-situ, by adaptive reconfiguration algorithms running on built-in digital controllers. Laboratory demonstrations of this technique were performed by JPL in several independent experiments in which bulk CMOS reconfigurable devices were exposed to, and degraded by, low temperatures (approx. 196 C), high temperatures (approx.300 C) or radiation (300kRad TID), and then recovered by adaptive reconfiguration using evolutionary search algorithms. Taking this technology from Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 to TRL 5 is the target of a current NASA project.

  7. Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2010-09-01

    This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

  8. Phospholipid and Respiratory Quinone Analyses From Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Extreme environments on Earth have been chosen as surrogate sites to test methods and strategies for the deployment of space craft in the search for extraterrestrial life. Surrogate sites for many of the NASA astrobiology institutes include the South African gold mines, Canadian subpermafrost, Atacama Desert, and acid rock drainage. Soils, sediments, rock cores, fracture waters, biofilms, and service and drill waters represent the types of samples collected from these sites. These samples were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry for phospholipid fatty acid methyl esters and by high performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for respiratory quinones. Phospholipid analyses provided estimates of biomass, community composition, and compositional changes related to nutritional limitations or exposure to toxic conditions. Similar to phospholipid analyses, respiratory quinone analyses afforded identification of certain types of microorganisms in the community based on respiration and offered clues to in situ redox conditions. Depending on the number of samples analyzed, selected multivariate statistical methods were applied to relate membrane lipid results with site biogeochemical parameters. Successful detection of life signatures and refinement of methodologies at surrogate sites on Earth will be critical for the recognition of extraterrestrial life. At this time, membrane lipid analyses provide useful information not easily obtained by other molecular techniques.

  9. Assessment of SOI AND Gate, Type CHT-7408, for Operation in Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla Rivera

    2009-01-01

    Electronic parts based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are finding widespread applications due to their ability to operate in harsh environments and the benefits they offer as compared to their silicon counterparts. Due to their construction, they are tailored for high temperature operation and show good tolerance to radiation events. In addition, their inherent design lessens the formation of parasitic junctions, thereby reducing leakage currents, decreasing power consumption, and enhancing speed. These devices are typically rated in temperature capability from -55 C to about +225 C, and their characteristics over this temperature range are documented in data sheets. Since electronics in some of NASA space exploration missions are required to operate under extreme temperature conditions, both cold and hot, their characteristic behavior within the full temperature spectrum must be determined to establish suitability for use in space applications. The effects of extreme temperature exposure on the performance of a new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) SOI AND gate device were evaluated in this work. The high temperature, quad 2-inputs AND gate device, which was recently introduced by CISSOID, is fabricated using a CMOS SOI process. Some of the specifications of the CHT-7408 chip are listed in a table. By supplying a constant DC voltage to one gate input and a 10 kHz square wave into the other associated gate input, the chip was evaluated in terms of output response, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (tf), and propagation delays (using a 50% level between input and output during low to high (tPLH) and high to low (tPHL) transitions). The supply current of the gate circuit was also obtained. These parameters were recorded at various test temperatures between -195 C and +250 C using a Sun Systems environmental chamber programmed at a temperature rate of change of 10 C/min. In addition, the effects of thermal cycling on this chip were determined by exposing

  10. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliar, Mikhail [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested

  11. Harsh Parenting in Relation to Child Emotion Regulation and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lei; Schwartz, David; Dodge, Kenneth A.; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a model of harsh parenting that has an indirect effect, as well as a direct effect, on child aggression in the school environment through the mediating process of child emotion regulation. Tested on a sample of 325 Chinese children and their parents, the model showed adequate goodness of fit. Also investigated were interaction effects between parents’ and children’s gender. Mothers’ harsh parenting affected child emotion regulation more strongly than fathers’, whereas harsh parenting emanating from fathers had a stronger effect on child aggression. Fathers’ harsh parenting also affected sons more than daughters, whereas there was no gender differential effect with mothers’ harsh parenting. These results are discussed with an emphasis on negative emotionality as a potentially common cause of family perturbations, including parenting and child adjustment problems. PMID:14640808

  12. NEEMO - NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operations: On to a NEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. S.; Baskin, P. J.; Todd, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    During NEEMO missions, a crew of six Aquanauts lives aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory the world's only undersea laboratory located 5.6 km off shore from Key Largo, Florida. The Aquarius habitat is anchored 62 feet deep on Conch Reef which is a research only zone for coral reef monitoring in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The crew lives in saturation for a week to ten days and conducts a variety of undersea EVAs (Extra Vehicular Activities) to test a suite of long-duration spaceflight Engineering, Biomedical, and Geoscience objectives. The crew also tests concepts for future lunar exploration using advanced navigation and communication equipment in support of the Constellation Program planetary exploration analog studies. The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate and Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) at NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas support this effort to produce a high-fidelity test-bed for studies of human planetary exploration in extreme environments as well as to develop and test the synergy between human and robotic curation protocols including sample collection, documentation, and sample handling. The geoscience objectives for NEEMO missions reflect the requirements for Lunar Surface Science outlined by the LEAG (Lunar Exploration Analysis Group) and CAPTEM (Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials) white paper [1]. The BHP objectives are to investigate best meas-ures and tools for assessing decrements in cogni-tive function due to fatigue, test the feasibility study examined how teams perform and interact across two levels, use NEEMO as a testbed for the development, deployment, and evaluation of a scheduling and planning tool. A suite of Space Life Sciences studies are accomplished as well, ranging from behavioral health and performance to immunology, nutrition, and EVA suit design results of which will

  13. Reconsidering punitive and harsh discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Wanda K; Anderson, Jeffrey A

    2002-12-01

    Corporal punishment and other harsh interventions continue to be widespread despite the fact that the leading theories or models of behavioral management do not support their effectiveness. There is overwhelming evidence that harsh interventions are damaging to children, both emotionally and physically. The effects of such trauma may be compounded when a child has preexisting learning difficulties. When schools respond to these challenges using harsh methods, children can be further traumatized. The authors review principles of childhood neurodevelopment, describe a model to understand children in context, and discuss how exposure to certain noxious sensory experiences can affect children's responses to threat or perceived threat. They also describe implications for school nurses.

  14. Significance of Environmental Variables on Flight Electronics and Design Concerns for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeli, K.; Kingstedt, O. T.

    2017-05-01

    It is critical to investigate the performance of electronic systems and their components under the environments experienced during proposed missions to improve spacecraft and robotic vehicle functionality and performance in extreme environments.

  15. A Fault-Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment (FOX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hensbergen, Eric; Speight, William; Xenidis, Jimi

    2013-03-15

    IBM Research’s contribution to the Fault Oblivious Extreme-scale Execution Environment (FOX) revolved around three core research deliverables: • collaboration with Boston University around the Kittyhawk cloud infrastructure which both enabled a development and deployment platform for the project team and provided a fault-injection testbed to evaluate prototypes • operating systems research focused on exploring role-based operating system technologies through collaboration with Sandia National Labs on the NIX research operating system and collaboration with the broader IBM Research community around a hybrid operating system model which became known as FusedOS • IBM Research also participated in an advisory capacity with the Boston University SESA project, the core of which was derived from the K42 operating system research project funded in part by DARPA’s HPCS program. Both of these contributions were built on a foundation of previous operating systems research funding by the Department of Energy’s FastOS Program. Through the course of the X-stack funding we were able to develop prototypes, deploy them on production clusters at scale, and make them available to other researchers. As newer hardware, in the form of BlueGene/Q, came online, we were able to port the prototypes to the new hardware and release the source code for the resulting prototypes as open source to the community. In addition to the open source coded for the Kittyhawk and NIX prototypes, we were able to bring the BlueGene/Q Linux patches up to a more recent kernel and contribute them for inclusion by the broader Linux community. The lasting impact of the IBM Research work on FOX can be seen in its effect on the shift of IBM’s approach to HPC operating systems from Linux and Compute Node Kernels to role-based approaches as prototyped by the NIX and FusedOS work. This impact can be seen beyond IBM in follow-on ideas being incorporated into the proposals for the Exasacale Operating

  16. Mechanical Development of a Very Non-Standard Patch Array Antenna for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard; Chamberlain, Neil; Jakoboski, Julie; Petkov, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical development of patch antenna arrays for the Juno mission. The patch arrays are part of a six-frequency microwave radiometer instrument that will be used to measure thermal emissions from Jupiter. The very harsh environmental conditions in Jupiter orbit, as well as a demanding launch environment, resulted in a design that departs radically from conventional printed circuit patch antennas. The paper discusses the development and qualification of the Juno patch array antennas, with emphasis on the materials approach that was devised to mitigate the effects of electron charging in Jupiter orbit.

  17. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović, M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: {it Escherichia coli (E. coli K12}, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0D C ({it Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum} and {it Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii} and 110D C ({it Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri}. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the {it chaperones} known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved {it chaperons} found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique {it chaperone TF55}. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The followinghyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used forthese studies: {it Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii, M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus} and threespecies of {it Pyrococcus}. Common genes were annotated and groupedaccording to their roles in cellular processes where such informationwas available and proteins not previously implicated in theheat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additionalexperimental data are needed in order to learn more about theseproteins. To address non-gene based components of thermaladaptation

  18. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: Escherichia coli (E. coli K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0ºC (Metarhizium frigidum (M. frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii (M. burtonii and 110ºC (Methanopyrus kandleri (M. kandleri. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii, M. kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A. fulgidus and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were

  19. Resistive Memory for Harsh Electronics: Immunity to Surface Effect and High Corrosion Resistance via Surface Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng-Han; Yang, Po-Kang; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Chen-Fang; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Chueh, Yu-Lun; He-Hau, Jr.

    2014-03-01

    The tolerance/resistance of the electronic devices to extremely harsh environments is of supreme interest. Surface effects and chemical corrosion adversely affect stability and operation uniformity of metal oxide resistive memories. To achieve the surrounding-independent behavior, the surface modification is introduced into the ZnO memristors via incorporating fluorine to replace the oxygen sites. F-Zn bonds is formed to prevent oxygen chemisorption and ZnO dissolution upon corrosive atmospheric exposure, which effectively improves switching characteristics against harmful surroundings. In addition, the fluorine doping stabilizes the cycling endurance and narrows the distribution of switching parameters. The outcomes provide valuable insights for future nonvolatile memory developments in harsh electronics.

  20. Mechanisms of interfacial reactivity in near surface and extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Balaska, Eric [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weare, John [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Fulton, John [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bogatko, Stuart [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Balasubramanian, Mahalingam [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cauet, Emilie [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kerisit, Sebastien [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schenter, Gregory [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weare, Jonathan [U of Chicago

    2017-01-09

    +, Co2+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Cr3+. Calculations on these systems are demanding because of their open electronic shells, and high ionic charge. Principal Investigator: Professor John Weare (University of California, San Diego) The prediction of the interactions of geochemical fluids with minerals, nanoparticles, and colloids under extreme near surface conditions of temperature (T) and pressure (P) is a grand challenge research need in geosciences (U.S. DOE 2007, Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating the 21st Energy Systems.). To evaluate the impact of these processes on energy production and management strategies it is necessary to have a high level of understanding of the interaction between complex natural fluids and mineral formations. This program emphasizes 1st principle parameter free simulations of complex chemical processes in solutions, in the mineral phase, and in the interfaces between these phases The development of new computational tools (with emphasis on oxide materials and reaction dynamics) tailored to treat wide range of conditions and time scales experienced in such geochemical applications is has been developed. Because of the sensitivity of the interaction in these systems to electronic structure and local bonding environments, and of the need to describe bond breaking/formation, our simulations are based on interactions calculated at the electronic structure level (ab-initio molecular dynamics, AIMD). The progress in the computational aspects of program may be summarized in terms of the following themes (objectives); Development of efficient parameter free dynamical simulation technology based on 1st principles force and energy calculations especially adapted for geochemical applications (e.g., mineral, interfaces and aqueous solutions) (continuing program); Calculation of the dynamics of water structure of in the surface-water interface of transition metal oxides and oxihydroxides; and

  1. A novel approach to tribological measurements at harsh conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltevreden, Esther R.; van der Heide, Emile

    2011-10-01

    When dealing with high-tech equipment, accurate positioning is of the utmost importance to ensure durability and a productive lifetime. Unexpected high friction or wear of positioning mechanisms can lead to unnecessary down-time or products that are not up to specification. To ensure a sufficient lifetime, it is necessary to know beforehand how the sliding and rolling contacts will behave over time. This demand becomes more stringent when the machine operates at extreme conditions, e.g. vacuum or extremely low temperatures. Traditional greases and mineral oil based lubricants do not perform adequately in such extreme environments, as they either contaminate the vacuum or do not provide sufficient film thickness. TNO recently developed a unique measuring application, the TNO cryotribometer, in order to measure friction and wear of position mechanisms at harsh conditions. Preliminary results show that the contact pressure and the sliding velocity influenced the friction level greatly. This set-up is currently used to find and analyze different material combinations, which demonstrate a constant friction level under cryogenic vacuum conditions.

  2. Harsh Parenting in Relation to Child Emotion Regulation and Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Lei; Schwartz, David; Dodge, Kenneth A.; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    This study presents a model of harsh parenting that has an indirect effect, as well as a direct effect, on child aggression in the school environment through the mediating process of child emotion regulation. Tested on a sample of 325 Chinese children and their parents, the model showed adequate goodness of fit. Also investigated were interaction effects between parents’ and children’s gender. Mothers’ harsh parenting affected child emotion regulation more strongly than fathers’, whereas hars...

  3. Harsh Parenting in Relation to Child Emotion Regulation and Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Lei; Schwartz, David; Dodge, Kenneth A.; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    This study presents a model of harsh parenting that has an indirect effect, as well as a direct effect, on child aggression in the school environment through the mediating process of child emotion regulation. Tested on a sample of 325 Chinese children and their parents, the model showed adequate goodness of fit. Also investigated were interaction effects between parents’ and children’s gender. Mothers’ harsh parenting affected child emotion regulation more strongly than fathers’, whereas hars...

  4. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

    CERN Document Server

    Filipovic, M D; Ognjanovic, M

    2008-01-01

    This is initial study of a gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the life in extreme Earth environments. We present a results on ID of the clusters of COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile: E.coli.K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme T. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0C (M.frigidum and M.burtonii) and 110C (M.kandleri). Not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. Highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim is to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The follo...

  5. New insights into microbial adaptation to extreme saline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vauclare P.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme halophiles are microorganisms adapted to low water activity living at the upper salt concentration that life can tolerate. We review here recent data that specify the main factors, which determine their peculiar salt-dependent biochemistry. The data suggested that evolution proceeds by stage to modify the molecular dynamics properties of the entire proteome. Extreme halophiles therefore represent tractable models to understand how fast and to what extent microorganisms adapt to environmental changes. Halophiles are also robust organisms, capable to resist multiple stressors. Preliminary studies indicated that they have developed a cellular response specifically aimed to survive when the salt condition fluctuates. Because of these properties halophilic organisms deserve special attention in the search for traces of life on other planets.

  6. VALIDATION OF HANFORD PERSONNEL AND EXTREMITY DOSIMETERS IN PLUTONIUM ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Fix, John J.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2000-02-10

    A study was performed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant to assess the performance of Hanford personnel neutron dosimetry. The study was assessed whole body dosimetry and extremity dosimetry performance. For both parts of the study, the TEPC was used as the principle instrument for characterizing workplace neutron fields. In the whole body study, 12.7-cm-diameter TEPCs were used in ten different locations in the facility. TLD and TED personnel dosimeters were exposed on a water-filled phantom to enable a comparison of TEPC and dosimeter response. In the extremity study, 1.27-cm-diameter TEPCs were exposed inside the fingers of a gloveboxe glove. Extremity dosimeters were wrapped around the TEPCs. The glove was then exposed to six different cans of plutonium, simulating the exposure that a worker's fingers would receive in a glovebox. The comparison of TEPC-measured neutron dose equivalent to TLD-measured gamma dose equivalent provided neutron-to-gamma ratios that can be used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent received by a worker's finger based on the gamma readings of an extremity dosimeter. The study also utilized a Snoopy and detectors based on bubble technology for assessing neutron exposures, providing a comparison of the effectiveness of these instruments for workplace monitoring. The study concludes that the TLD component of the HCND performs adequately overall, with a positive bias of 30%, but exhibits excessive variability in individual results due to instabilities in the algorithm. The TED response was less variable but only 20% of the TEPC reference dose on average because of the low neutron energies involved. The neutron response of the HSD was more variable than the TLD component of the HCND and biased high by a factor of 8 overall due to its calibration to unmoderated 252Cf. The study recommends further work to correct instabilities in the HCND algorithm and to explore the potential shown by the bubble-based dosimeters.

  7. The genome and transcriptome of Trichormus sp. NMC-1: insights into adaptation to extreme environments on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qin; Huang, Yanyan; Qi, Ji; Qu, Mingzhi; Jiang, Chen; Lin, Pengcheng; Li, Renhui; Song, Lirong; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Crabbe, M. James C.; Chen, Fan; Zhang, Ticao; Zhong, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) has the highest biodiversity for an extreme environment worldwide, and provides an ideal natural laboratory to study adaptive evolution. In this study, we generated a draft genome sequence of cyanobacteria Trichormus sp. NMC-1 in the QTP and performed whole transcriptome sequencing under low temperature to investigate the genetic mechanism by which T. sp. NMC-1 adapted to the specific environment. Its genome sequence was 5.9 Mb with a G+C content of 39.2% and encompassed a total of 5362 CDS. A phylogenomic tree indicated that this strain belongs to the Trichormus and Anabaena cluster. Genome comparison between T. sp. NMC-1 and six relatives showed that functionally unknown genes occupied a much higher proportion (28.12%) of the T. sp. NMC-1 genome. In addition, functions of specific, significant positively selected, expanded orthogroups, and differentially expressed genes involved in signal transduction, cell wall/membrane biogenesis, secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and energy production and conversion were analyzed to elucidate specific adaptation traits. Further analyses showed that the CheY-like genes, extracellular polysaccharide and mycosporine-like amino acids might play major roles in adaptation to harsh environments. Our findings indicate that sophisticated genetic mechanisms are involved in cyanobacterial adaptation to the extreme environment of the QTP. PMID:27381465

  8. Fungi living in diverse extreme habitats of the marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Raghukumar, C.; Manohar, C.S.

    . Fungi are capable of withstanding high salinity conditions, such as those in intertidal mangrove environments and salt pans. Cold water, psychrotolerant fungi have been identified from polar waters. Numerous studies have shown that fungi grow actively...

  9. Rapid self-organized criticality: Fractal evolution in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Julianne D.; Warden, Andrew C.; Sadedin, Suzanne; Li, Wentian

    2004-09-01

    We introduce the phenomenon of rapid self-organized criticality (RSOC) and show that, like some models of self-organized criticality (SOC), RSOC generates scale-invariant event distributions and 1/f noise. Unlike SOC, however, RSOC persists despite more than an order of magnitude variation in driving rate and displays extremely thick and dynamic branching geometry. Starting with an initial set of parameter values, we perform two numerical experiments in which nonequilibrium RSOC systems are tuned towards their critical points. The approach to the critical state is tracked using average branching rates, which must equal 1 if systems are genuinely critical.

  10. A new extreme environment for aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs: biological soil crusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csotonyi, Julius T; Swiderski, Jolantha; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil crusts improve the health of arid or semiarid soils by enhancing water content, nutrient relations and mechanical stability, facilitated largely by phototrophic microorganisms. Until recently, only oxygenic phototrophs were known from soil crusts. A recent study has demonstrated the presence of aerobic representatives of Earth's second major photosynthetic clade, the evolutionarily basal anoxygenic phototrophs. Three Canadian soil crust communities yielded pink and orange aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic strains possessing the light-harvesting pigment bacteriochlorophyll a. At relative abundances of 0.1-5.9% of the cultivable bacterial community, they were comparable in density to aerobic phototrophs in other documented habitats. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the isolates to be related to Methylobacterium, Belnapia, Muricoccus and Sphingomonas. This result adds a new type of harsh habitat, dry soil environments, to the environments known to support aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs.

  11. A neuroscience approach to optimizing brain resources for human performance in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Martin P; Potterat, Eric G; Taylor, Marcus K; Van Orden, Karl F; Bauman, James; Momen, Nausheen; Padilla, Genieleah A; Swain, Judith L

    2009-07-01

    Extreme environments requiring optimal cognitive and behavioral performance occur in a wide variety of situations ranging from complex combat operations to elite athletic competitions. Although a large literature characterizes psychological and other aspects of individual differences in performances in extreme environments, virtually nothing is known about the underlying neural basis for these differences. This review summarizes the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral consequences of exposure to extreme environments, discusses predictors of performance, and builds a case for the use of neuroscience approaches to quantify and understand optimal cognitive and behavioral performance. Extreme environments are defined as an external context that exposes individuals to demanding psychological and/or physical conditions, and which may have profound effects on cognitive and behavioral performance. Examples of these types of environments include combat situations, Olympic-level competition, and expeditions in extreme cold, at high altitudes, or in space. Optimal performance is defined as the degree to which individuals achieve a desired outcome when completing goal-oriented tasks. It is hypothesized that individual variability with respect to optimal performance in extreme environments depends on a well "contextualized" internal body state that is associated with an appropriate potential to act. This hypothesis can be translated into an experimental approach that may be useful for quantifying the degree to which individuals are particularly suited to performing optimally in demanding environments.

  12. Star formation in extreme environments : The effects of cosmic rays and mechanical heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Loenen, A. F.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    Context. The molecular interstellar medium in extreme environments, such as Arp 220, but also NGC 253 appears to have extremely high cosmic ray (CR) rates (10(3)-10(4) x Milky Way) and substantial mechanical heating from supernova driven turbulence. Aims. We explore the consequences of high CR rates

  13. Thermal Protection System Materials (TPSM): Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environ­ment Technology (HEEET) project seeks to mature a game changing Woven Ther­mal Protection System (TPS) technology to...

  14. Motor Controller for Extreme Environments Based on SiGe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a motor-control subsystem capable of operation in extreme environments, including those to be encountered on the Moon and Mars....

  15. Evolution of Fish in Extreme Environments : Insights from the Magadi tilapia (Alcolapia grahami)

    OpenAIRE

    Kavembe, Geraldine Dorcas

    2015-01-01

    Extreme environments such as soda lakes are largely unexplored habitats where a surprising number of often endemic species thrive regardless of multiple co-occurring abiotic stresses, depleted food resources and restricted dispersal abilities. Their distinct geochemistry, ecological boundaries, simplified biota and high levels of endemism strikingly resemble the features found on islands that have long been used for evolutionary studies. Extreme environments thus represent prime natural labor...

  16. Eukaryotic Organisms in Extreme Acidic Environments, the Río Tinto Case

    OpenAIRE

    Angeles Aguilera

    2013-01-01

    A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of...

  17. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body...

  18. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  19. Thermal Testing of Woven TPS Materials in Extreme Entry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G.; Stackpoole, M.

    2014-01-01

    NASAs future robotic missions to Venus and outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of current mid density ablators (PICA or Avcoat). Therefore mission planners assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heatshield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust TPS however its high density and thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, high heat fluxes, high pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program in NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System to meet the needs of NASAs most challenging entry missions. The high entry conditions pose certification challenges in existing ground based test facilities. Recent updates to NASAs IHF and AEDCs H3 high temperature arcjet test facilities enable higher heatflux (2000 Wcm2) and high pressure (5 atm) testing of TPS. Some recent thermal tests of woven TPS will be discussed in this paper. These upgrades have provided a way to test higher entry conditions of potential outer planet and Venus missions and provided a baseline against carbon phenolic material. The results of these tests have given preliminary insight to sample configuration and physical recession profile characteristics.

  20. A Fault-oblivious Extreme-scale Execution Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today's machines. Systems software for exascale machines must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. We propose a new approach to the data and work distribution model provided by system software based on the unifying formalism of an abstract file system. The proposed hierarchical data model provides simple, familiar visibility and access to data structures through the file system hierarchy, while providing fault tolerance through selective redundancy. The hierarchical task model features work queues whose form and organization are represented as file system objects. Data and work are both first class entities. By exposing the relationships between data and work to the runtime system, information is available to optimize execution time and provide fault tolerance. The data distribution scheme provides replication (where desirable and possible) for fault tolerance and efficiency, and it is hierarchical to make it possible to take advantage of locality. The user, tools, and applications, including legacy applications, can interface with the data, work queues, and one another through the abstract file model. This runtime environment will provide multiple interfaces to support traditional Message Passing Interface applications, languages developed under DARPA's High Productivity Computing Systems program, as well as other, experimental programming models. We will validate our runtime system with pilot codes on existing platforms and will use simulation to validate for exascale-class platforms. In this final report, we summarize research

  1. Studies on Actinomycetal Resources under Extreme Environments in the West of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.

    2005-12-01

    s: Actinomycetes play a quite important role in natural ecological system and they are also profile producers of antibiotics, antitumor agents, enzymes, enzyme inhibitors and immunomodifiers. which have been widely applied in industry, agriculture, forestry and pharmaceutical industry. In the past, the research work on actinomycetes was mainly concentrated on that of common habitats. Actinomycetes resources under extreme environments (including extreme high and low temperature, extreme high or low pH, high salt concentration etc.) have received comparatively little attention from microbiologists. Actinomycetes are regarded as one kind of sideline microorganisms and those under extreme environments are better materials for biological evolution and phylogenetic development in research. There are much more unknown species and much more worth researching for actinomycetes under extreme environments. There are many extreme environmental resources in the west of China. For example, wide range snow-mountains, basified soil and lakes, widely distributed acid and alkaline hot-springs in Yunnan provinces; more than 73.3 million hektares basified soil and salt lakes in Xinjiang Province and many unusual environments in Qinghai Province and other western Provinces. They were mostly precious natural resources and were destroyed, relatively fewer can provided us with unique conditions for study on actinomycetal resources under extreme environments. In recent years, our main work was focusing on study of extremophilic actinomycetal resources in the west of China by using conventional cultivation-methods and culture-independent methods (PCR-clone and DGGE/TGGE, etc), Results showed that large amount of unknown microbial resources (including actinomycetal resources) existed in natural extreme environments. Additionally, lots of new taxa were isolated and characterized using a polyphasic approach. Further, we got some new compounds with different bioactivities from these

  2. Capability Study of Ti, Cr, W, Ta and Pt as Seed Layers for Electrodeposited Platinum Films on γ-Al2O3 for High Temperature and Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Seifert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature surface acoustic wave sensors based on radio frequency identification technology require adequate antennas of high efficiency and thermal stability for the signal transmission. Platinum is well known and frequently used as a material of choice for high temperature and harsh environment applications because of the high melting point and its chemical stability. Therefore, one way to realize high temperature stable antennas is the combination of a Pt metallization on an Al 2 O 3 substrate. As a cost-effective technique, the Pt film is deposited via electrochemical deposition. For this growth procedure, a pre-deposited metallization on the Al 2 O 3 layer is required. This paper analyzes the influence of various seed layers (Ta, Ti, W, Cr, Pt on the morphology, stability and electrical properties of the electrochemically-grown Pt thick film after heat treatments up to 1000 ∘ C in air. We find an oxidation of all adhesion layers except for Pt, for which the best electrical properties were measured. Although significant areas of the films delaminate from the substrate, individual anchor structures retain a stable connection between the Pt layer and the rough Al 2 O 3 substrate.

  3. The Extreme Chemical Environments Associated with Dying Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, Lucy

    Mass loss from dying stars is the main avenue by which material enters the interstellar medium, and eventually forms solar systems and planets. When stars consume all the hydrogen burning in their core, they start to burn helium, first in their centers, and then in a surrounding shell. During these phases, the so-called ``giant branches,'' large instabilities are created, and stars begin to shed their outer atmospheres, producing so-called circumstellar envelopes. Molecules form readily in these envelopes, in part by LTE chemistry at the base of the stellar photosphere, and also by radical reactions in the outer regions. Eventually most stars shed almost all their mass, creating ``planetary nebulae,'' which consist of a hot, ultraviolet-emitting white dwarf surrounded by the remnant stellar material. The environs in such nebulae are not conducive to chemical synthesis; yet molecular gas exits. The ejecta from these nebulae then flows into the interstellar medium, becoming the starting material for diffuse clouds, which subsequently collapse into dense clouds and then stars. This molecular ``life cycle'' is repeated many times in the course of the evolution of our Galaxy. We have been investigating the interstellar molecular life cycle, in particular the chemical environments of circumstellar shells and planetary nebulae, through both observational and laboratory studies. Using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO), we have conducted broad-band spectral-line surveys to characterize the contrasting chemical and physical properties of carbon (IRC +10216) vs. oxygen-rich envelopes (VY CMa and NML Cyg). The carbon-rich types are clearly more complex in terms of numbers of chemical compounds, but the O-rich variety appear to have more energetic, shocked material. We have also been conducting surveys of polyatomic molecules towards planetary nebulae. Species such as HCN, HCO+, HNC, CCH, and H2CO appear to be common constituents of these objects, and their

  4. Risk analysis for autonomous underwater vehicle operations in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Mario Paulo; Griffiths, Gwyn; Challenor, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are used increasingly to explore hazardous marine environments. Risk assessment for such complex systems is based on subjective judgment and expert knowledge as much as on hard statistics. Here, we describe the use of a risk management process tailored to AUV operations, the implementation of which requires the elicitation of expert judgment. We conducted a formal judgment elicitation process where eight world experts in AUV design and operation were asked to assign a probability of AUV loss given the emergence of each fault or incident from the vehicle's life history of 63 faults and incidents. After discussing methods of aggregation and analysis, we show how the aggregated risk estimates obtained from the expert judgments were used to create a risk model. To estimate AUV survival with mission distance, we adopted a statistical survival function based on the nonparametric Kaplan-Meier estimator. We present theoretical formulations for the estimator, its variance, and confidence limits. We also present a numerical example where the approach is applied to estimate the probability that the Autosub3 AUV would survive a set of missions under Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica in January-March 2009.

  5. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue.

  6. Small RNA transcriptomes of mangroves evolve adaptively in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Lin, Xingqin; Xie, Munan; Wang, Yushuai; Shen, Xu; Liufu, Zhongqi; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key players in plant stress responses. Here, we present the sRNA transcriptomes of mangroves Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel. Comparative computational analyses and target predictions revealed that mangroves exhibit distinct sRNA regulatory networks that differ from those of glycophytes. A total of 32 known and three novel miRNA families were identified. Conserved and mangrove-specific miRNA targets were predicted; the latter were widely involved in stress responses. The known miRNAs showed differential expression between the mangroves and glycophytes, reminiscent of the adaptive stress-responsive changes in Arabidopsis. B. gymnorrhiza possessed highly abundant but less conserved TAS3 trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) in addition to tasiR-ARFs, with expanded potential targets. Our results indicate that the evolutionary alteration of sRNA expression levels and the rewiring of sRNA-regulatory networks are important mechanisms underlying stress adaptation. We also identified sRNAs that are involved in salt and/or drought tolerance and nutrient homeostasis as possible contributors to mangrove success in stressful environments.

  7. Nonlinear optical field sensors in extreme electromagnetic and acoustic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Sensors based on electro-optic (EO) and magneto-optic (MO) crystals measure external electric and magnetic fields through changes in birefringence which the fields induce on the nonlinear crystals. Due to their small size and all-dielectric structure, EO and MO sensors are ideal in environments involving very large electromagnetic powers. Conventional antennas and metallic probes not only present safety hazards, due to their metallic structure and the presence of large currents, but they can also perturb the very fields they intend to measure. In the case of railguns, the large electromagnetic signals are also accompanied by tremendous acoustic noise, which presents a noise background that the sensors must overcome. In this presentation, we describe extensive data obtained from fiber optic EO and MO sensors used in the railgun of the Naval Research Laboratory. Along with the field measurements obtained, we will describe the interactions between the acoustic noise and the nonlinear crystals (most notably, photoelastic effects), the noise equivalent fields they produce, and methods they could be suppressed through the optical and geometrical configurations of the sensor so that the signal to noise ratio can be maximized.

  8. Transparent Memory For Harsh Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, C. H.

    2017-03-14

    As a new class of non-volatile memory, resistive random access memory (RRAM) offers not only superior electronic characteristics, but also advanced functionalities, such as transparency and radiation hardness. However, the environmental tolerance of RRAM is material-dependent, and therefore the materials used must be chosen carefully in order to avoid instabilities and performance degradation caused by the detrimental effects arising from environmental gases and ionizing radiation. In this work, we demonstrate that AlN-based RRAM displays excellent performance and environmental stability, with no significant degradation to the resistance ratio over a 100-cycle endurance test. Moreover, transparent RRAM (TRRAM) based on AlN also performs reliably under four different harsh environmental conditions and 2 MeV proton irradiation fluences, ranging from 1011 to 1015 cm-2. These findings not only provide a guideline for TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of AlN TRRAM for future transparent harsh electronics.

  9. A Fault Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKie, Jim

    2014-11-20

    The FOX project, funded under the ASCR X-stack I program, developed systems software and runtime libraries for a new approach to the data and work distribution for massively parallel, fault oblivious application execution. Our work was motivated by the premise that exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today’s machines. To deliver the capability of exascale hardware, the systems software must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. Our OS research has prototyped new methods to provide efficient resource sharing, synchronization, and protection in a many-core compute node. We have experimented with alternative task/dataflow programming models and shown scalability in some cases to hundreds of thousands of cores. Much of our software is in active development through open source projects. Concepts from FOX are being pursued in next generation exascale operating systems. Our OS work focused on adaptive, application tailored OS services optimized for multi → many core processors. We developed a new operating system NIX that supports role-based allocation of cores to processes which was released to open source. We contributed to the IBM FusedOS project, which promoted the concept of latency-optimized and throughput-optimized cores. We built a task queue library based on distributed, fault tolerant key-value store and identified scaling issues. A second fault tolerant task parallel library was developed, based on the Linda tuple space model, that used low level interconnect primitives for optimized communication. We designed fault tolerance mechanisms for task parallel computations

  10. Power Converters Secure Electronics in Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In order to harden power converters for the rigors of space, NASA awarded multiple SBIR contracts to Blacksburg, Virginia-based VPT Inc. The resulting hybrid DC-DC converters have proven valuable in aerospace applications, and as a result the company has generated millions in revenue from the product line and created four high-tech jobs to handle production.

  11. CSP Assembly Reliability: Commercial and Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, R.; Kim, N.; Selk, K.; Bjorndahl, B.; Bonner, J.; Barr, S.

    1999-01-01

    The JPL-led CSP Consortium of enterprises representing government agencies and private companies has jointed together to pool in-kind resources for developing the quality and reliability of chip scale packages (CSPs) for a variety of projects.

  12. Adaptation of barley to harsh Mediterranean environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, van E.

    1993-01-01

    Research ObjectivesBarley is in Syria the dominant crop in areas receiving less than 300 mm annual precipitation. Grain yield is often below 1 ton ha -1, and is reduced by low temperatures in winter and terminal drought stress in spring. Variation i

  13. Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Edema agudo del pulmon [Acute mountain sickness: Acute edema of the lungs]. An Fac Med (Lima). 1955;38:244. 9. Hurtado A. Pathological aspects of life...recommendations for career dose lim- its, based on lifetime excess risk of cancer mortality, take into account age at first exposure and gender. The ca- reer

  14. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology: Results from Acreage and Integrated Seams Arcjet Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2016-01-01

    This invited talk will give a brief overview of the integrated heat-shield system design that requires seams and the extreme environment conditions that HEEET should be demonstrated to be capable of thermal performance without fail. We have tested HEEET across many different facilities and at conditions that are extreme. The presentation will highlight the performance of both the acreage as well as integrated seam at these conditions. The Invite talks are 10 min and hence this presentation will be short.

  15. Eukaryotic Organisms in Extreme Acidic Environments, the Río Tinto Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles Aguilera, Angeles

    2013-07-01

    A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of extremely acidic environments has become increasingly important since environmental acidity is often caused by microbial activity. Highly acidic environments are relatively scarce worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic activity or mining operations. For most acidic environments, low pH facilitates metal solubility, and therefore acidic waters tend to have high concentrations of heavy metals. However, highly acidic environments are usually inhabited by acidophilic and acidotolerant eukaryotic microorganisms such as algae, amoebas, ciliates, heliozoan and rotifers, not to mention filamentous fungi and yeasts. Here, we review the general trends concerning the diversity and ecophysiology of eukaryotic acidophilic microorganims, as well as summarize our latest results on this topic in one of the largest extreme acidic rivers, Río Tinto (SW, Spain).

  16. Eukaryotic Organisms in Extreme Acidic Environments, the Río Tinto Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeles Aguilera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of extremely acidic environments has become increasingly important since environmental acidity is often caused by microbial activity. Highly acidic environments are relatively scarce worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic activity or mining operations. For most acidic environments, low pH facilitates metal solubility, and therefore acidic waters tend to have high concentrations of heavy metals. However, highly acidic environments are usually inhabited by acidophilic and acidotolerant eukaryotic microorganisms such as algae, amoebas, ciliates, heliozoan and rotifers, not to mention filamentous fungi and yeasts. Here, we review the general trends concerning the diversity and ecophysiology of eukaryotic acidophilic microorganims, as well as summarize our latest results on this topic in one of the largest extreme acidic rivers, Río Tinto (SW, Spain.

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Native Sheep Provides Insights into Rapid Adaptations to Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji; Li, Wen-Rong; Lv, Feng-Hua; He, San-Gang; Tian, Shi-Lin; Peng, Wei-Feng; Sun, Ya-Wei; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Tu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Min; Xie, Xing-Long; Wang, Yu-Tao; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Yong-Gang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Guang-Jian; Lu, Hong-Feng; Kantanen, Juha; Han, Jian-Lin; Li, Meng-Hua; Liu, Ming-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Global climate change has a significant effect on extreme environments and a profound influence on species survival. However, little is known of the genome-wide pattern of livestock adaptations to extreme environments over a short time frame following domestication. Sheep (Ovis aries) have become well adapted to a diverse range of agroecological zones, including certain extreme environments (e.g., plateaus and deserts), during their post-domestication (approximately 8-9 kya) migration and differentiation. Here, we generated whole-genome sequences from 77 native sheep, with an average effective sequencing depth of ∼5× for 75 samples and ∼42× for 2 samples. Comparative genomic analyses among sheep in contrasting environments, that is, plateau (>4,000 m above sea level) versus lowland (1500 m) versus low-altitude region (600 mm), and arid zone (400 mm), detected a novel set of candidate genes as well as pathways and GO categories that are putatively associated with hypoxia responses at high altitudes and water reabsorption in arid environments. In addition, candidate genes and GO terms functionally related to energy metabolism and body size variations were identified. This study offers novel insights into rapid genomic adaptations to extreme environments in sheep and other animals, and provides a valuable resource for future research on livestock breeding in response to climate change.

  18. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Xu

    Full Text Available Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05. The design joint return period (RP of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  19. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Ma, Chao; Lian, Jijian; Bin, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05). The design joint return period (RP) of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  20. Extreme Space Weather Events and Charging Hazard Assessments in Lunar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The sunlit lunar surface charges to positive potentials with mean values of a few tens of volts where photoelectron currents dominate the charging process. In contrast, surfaces in darkness may charge to negative potentials on the order of a few hundred volts when the charging process is dominated by hot electron populations in the absence of solar photons. Recently, observations of electron beams measured by instruments on spacecraft in low lunar orbit have been interpreted as evidence for extreme lunar surface potentials exceeding a few kilovolts suggesting that lunar orbital and surface plasma environments may contain charging risks similar to geostationary orbit during extreme space weather conditions. Space system design for successful operation in a wide range of lunar environments will therefore require evaluation of charging hazards during extreme space weather conditions. We present results from a study of space weather environments conducted to obtained credible extreme charging environments for use in charging hazard assessments for lunar missions including extreme conditions encountered when the Moon is in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the Earth's magnetotail.

  1. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  2. Extreme Environments Development of Decision Processes and Training Programs for Medical Policy Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to survey existing health and safety policies as well as processes and practices for various extreme environments; to identify strengths and shortcomings of these processes; and to recommend parameters for inclusion in a generic approach to policy formulation, applicable to the broadest categories of extreme environments. It was anticipated that two additional workshops would follow. The November 7, 2003 workshop would be devoted to the evaluation of different model(s) and a concluding expert evaluation of the usefulness of the model using a policy formulation example. The final workshop was planned for March 2004.

  3. Sample environment for in situ synchrotron corrosion studies of materials in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Motta, Arthur T.; Weidner, Randy; Anderson, Thomas; Ecker, Lynne E.

    2016-10-01

    A new in situ sample environment has been designed and developed to study the interfacial interactions of nuclear cladding alloys with high temperature steam. The sample environment is particularly optimized for synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies for in situ structural analysis. The sample environment is highly corrosion resistant and can be readily adapted for steam environments. The in situ sample environment design complies with G2 ASTM standards for studying corrosion in zirconium and its alloys and offers remote temperature and pressure monitoring during the in situ data collection. The use of the in situ sample environment is exemplified by monitoring the oxidation of metallic zirconium during exposure to steam at 350 °C. The in situ sample environment provides a powerful tool for fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms by elucidating the substoichiometric oxide phases formed during the early stages of corrosion, which can provide a better understanding of the oxidation process.

  4. Examining personal values in extreme environment contexts: Revisiting the question of generalizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N.; Sandal, G. M.; Leon, G. R.; Kjærgaard, A.

    2017-08-01

    Land-based extreme environments (e.g. polar expeditions, Antarctic research stations, confinement chambers) have often been used as analog settings for spaceflight. These settings share similarities with the conditions experienced during space missions, including confinement, isolation and limited possibilities for evacuation. To determine the utility of analog settings for understanding human spaceflight, researchers have examined the extent to which the individual characteristics (e.g., personality) of people operating in extreme environments can be generalized across contexts (Sandal, 2000) [1]. Building on previous work, and utilising new and pre-existing data, the present study examined the extent to which personal value motives could be generalized across extreme environments. Four populations were assessed; mountaineers (N =59), military personnel (N = 25), Antarctic over-winterers (N = 21) and Mars simulation participants (N = 12). All participants completed the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ; Schwartz; 2) capturing information on 10 personal values. Rank scores suggest that all groups identified Self-direction, Stimulation, Universalism and Benevolence as important values and acknowledged Power and Tradition as being low priorities. Results from difference testing suggest the extreme environment groups were most comparable on Self-direction, Stimulation, Benevolence, Tradition and Security. There were significant between-group differences on five of the ten values. Overall, findings pinpointed specific values that may be important for functioning in challenging environments. However, the differences that emerged on certain values highlight the importance of considering the specific population when comparing results across extreme settings. We recommend that further research examine the impact of personal value motives on indicators of adjustment, group working, and performance. Information from such studies could then be used to aid selection and

  5. Occurrence, activity and contribution of anammox in some freshwater extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guibing; Xia, Chao; Shanyun, Wang; Zhou, Leiliu; Liu, Lu; Zhao, Siyan

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) widely occurs in marine ecosystems, and it plays an important role in the global nitrogen cycle. But in freshwater ecosystems its occurrence, distribution and contribution, especially in extreme environments, are still not well known. In this study, anammox process was investigated in some extreme environments of freshwater ecosystems, such as those with high (above 75°C) and low (below -35°C) temperature, high (pH > 8) and low (pH  300 mg kg(-1) ). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening results showed that anammox bacteria were widespread in the examined sediments from freshwater extreme environments. Quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 6.94 × 10(4) to 8.05 × 10(6) hydrazine synthase (hzsB) gene copies g(-1) dry soil. (15) N-labelled incubation experiments indicated the occurrence of anammox in all examined sediments and the potential anammox rates ranged from 0.02 to 6.24 nmol N g(-1)  h(-1) , with a contribution of 3.45-58.74% of the total N2 production. In summary, these results demonstrate the occurrence of anammox in these extreme environments, inferring that anammox may harbour a wide ecological niche in the freshwater ecosystems.

  6. Constructing and screening a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline extreme environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Natural cold or alkaline environments are common on Earth. A rare combination of these two extremes is found in the permanently cold (less than 6 °C) and alkaline (pH above 10) ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Southern Greenland. Bioprospecting efforts have established the ikaite columns...

  7. Rhizobacterial Community Structures Associated with Native Plants Grown in Chilean Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Milko A; Maruyama, Fumito; Ogram, Andrew V; Navarrete, Oscar U; Lagos, Lorena M; Inostroza, Nitza G; Acuña, Jacquelinne J; Rilling, Joaquín I; de La Luz Mora, María

    2016-10-01

    Chile is topographically and climatically diverse, with a wide array of diverse undisturbed ecosystems that include native plants that are highly adapted to local conditions. However, our understanding of the diversity, activity, and role of rhizobacteria associated with natural vegetation in undisturbed Chilean extreme ecosystems is very poor. In the present study, the combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing approaches was used to describe the rhizobacterial community structures of native plants grown in three representative Chilean extreme environments: Atacama Desert (ATA), Andes Mountains (AND), and Antarctic (ANT). Both molecular approaches revealed the presence of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria as the dominant phyla in the rhizospheres of native plants. Lower numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed in rhizosphere soils from ATA compared with AND and ANT. Both approaches also showed differences in rhizobacterial community structures between extreme environments and between plant species. The differences among plant species grown in the same environment were attributed to the higher relative abundance of classes Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. However, further studies are needed to determine which environmental factors regulate the structures of rhizobacterial communities, and how (or if) specific bacterial groups may contribute to the growth and survival of native plants in each Chilean extreme environments.

  8. Potential contributions of extremophiles to hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiasheng; WANG Yongbiao; LI Qing

    2007-01-01

    To understand the potential mechanism of marine extremophiles participating in the formation and the evolution of hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments,some typical kinds of extremophiles and their distributions in marine hydrothermal and cold vents are discussed and evaluated respectively.The potential relationship between extremophile activities and hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments are then discussed in details.It could be now preliminary concluded that archaea and bacteria are the two main kinds of extremophiles in marine extreme environments.The dominating microbe communities in hydrothermal vents are heterotrophic zymogens,sulfate reducers and methanogens,while the ANME-2 group(Methanosarcinales) surrounded by sulfate-reducing bacteria and ANME-1 group dominate in cold vents.Marine extremophiles would be able to use CH,and H2S to synthesize energy for metabolism and to support food chains for other unique macrobiota nearby,which together present a high abundance but a low diversity with distinct characteristics of horizontal and vertical distributions.Marine extremophiles might play an important role either directly or indirectly in the processes of hydrocarbon formation and subsequent alteration,and could indicate the evolution of hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments.Our research thus has a great significance both in theoretical approach of potential hydrocarbon resources formed by marine extremophile activities and in practical exploration of the potential hydrocarbonsource sedimentary layers formed in the Earth history or the potential strata in southern China.

  9. Photosynthesis in extreme environments: responses to different light regimes in the Antarctic alga Koliella antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Nicoletta; Sciuto, Katia; Meneghesso, Andrea; Moro, Isabella; Rascio, Nicoletta; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic algae play a fundamental role in polar ecosystem thanks to their ability to grow in an extreme environment characterized by low temperatures and variable illumination. Here, for prolonged periods, irradiation is extremely low and algae must be able to harvest light as efficiently as possible. On the other side, at low temperatures even dim irradiances can saturate photosynthesis and drive to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Colonization of this extreme environment necessarily required the optimization of photosynthesis regulation mechanisms by algal organisms. In order to investigate these adaptations we analyzed the time course of physiological and morphological responses to different irradiances in Koliella antarctica, a green microalga isolated from Ross Sea (Antarctica). Koliella antarctica not only modulates cell morphology and composition of its photosynthetic apparatus on a long-term acclimation, but also shows the ability of a very fast response to light fluctuations. Koliella antarctica controls the activity of two xanthophyll cycles. The first, involving lutein epoxide and lutein, may be important for the growth under very low irradiances. The second, involving conversion of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin, is relevant to induce a fast and particularly strong non-photochemical quenching, when the alga is exposed to higher light intensities. Globally K. antarctica thus shows the ability to activate a palette of responses of the photosynthetic apparatus optimized for survival in its natural extreme environment.

  10. Extreme Science (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajo-Franklin, Caroline; Klein, Spencer; Minor, Andrew; Torok, Tamas

    2012-02-27

    On Feb. 27, 2012 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, four Berkeley Lab scientists presented talks related to extreme science - and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel.

  11. Tardigrades living in extreme environments have naturally selected prerequisites useful to space conquer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Roberto; Tiziana, Altiero; Cesari, Michele; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Bertolani, Roberto; Galletta, Giuseppe; Dalessandro, Maurizio; Rebecchi, Lorena

    Extreme habitats are highly selective and can host only living organisms possessing specific adaptations to stressors. Among extreme habitats, space environment has particular charac-teristics of radiations, vacuum, microgravity and temperature, which induce rapid changes in living systems. Consequently, the response of multicellular complex organisms, able to colo-nize extreme environments, to space stresses can give very useful information on the ability to withstand a single stress or stress combinations. This knowledge on changes in living systems in space, with their similarity to the ageing processes, offers the opportunity to improve human life both on Earth and in space. Even though experimentation in space has often been carried out using unicellular organisms, multicellular organisms are very relevant in order to develop the appropriate countermeasures to avoid the risks imposed by environmental space in humans. The little attention received by multicellular organisms is probably due, other than to difficul-ties in the manipulation of biological materials in space, to the presence of only few organisms with the potential to tolerate environmental space stresses. Among them, tardigrades are small invertebrates representing an attractive animal model to study adaptive strategies for surviving extreme environments, including space environment. Tardigrades are little known microscopic aquatic animals (250-800 m in body length) distributed in different environments (from the deep sea to high mountains and deserts all over the world), and frequently inhabiting very unstable and unpredictable habitats (e.g. interstices of mosses, lichens, leaf litter, freshwater ponds, cryoconite holes). Their ability to live in the extreme environments is related to a wide variety of their life histories and adaptive strategies. A widespread and crucial strategy is cryptobiosis, a form of quiescence. It includes strategies such as anhydrobiosis and cryobiosis, characterized by

  12. Rapid adaptation of microalgae to bodies of water with extreme pollution from uranium mining: an explanation of how mesophilic organisms can rapidly colonise extremely toxic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Balboa, C; Baselga-Cervera, B; García-Sanchez, A; Igual, J M; Lopez-Rodas, V; Costas, E

    2013-11-15

    Extreme environments may support communities of microalgae living at the limits of their tolerance. It is usually assumed that these extreme environments are inhabited by extremophile species. However, global anthropogenic environmental changes are generating new extreme environments, such as mining-effluent pools of residual waters from uranium mining with high U levels, acidity and radioactivity in Salamanca (Spain). Certain microalgal species have rapidly adapted to these extreme waters (uranium mining in this area began in 1960). Experiments have demonstrated that physiological acclimatisation would be unable to achieve adaptation. In contrast, rapid genetic adaptation was observed in waters ostensibly lethal to microalgae by means of rare spontaneous mutations that occurred prior to the exposure to effluent waters from uranium mining. However, adaptation to the most extreme conditions was only possible after recombination through sexual mating because adaptation requires more than one mutation. Microalgae living in extreme environments could be the descendants of pre-selective mutants that confer significant adaptive value to extreme contamination. These "lucky mutants" could allow for the evolutionary rescue of populations faced with rapid environmental change.

  13. Rapid adaptation of microalgae to bodies of water with extreme pollution from uranium mining: An explanation of how mesophilic organisms can rapidly colonise extremely toxic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Balboa, C.; Baselga-Cervera, B. [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García-Sanchez, A.; Igual, J.M. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Salamanca (IRNASA-CSIC), PO Box 257, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Lopez-Rodas, V. [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Costas, E., E-mail: ecostas@vet.ucm.es [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Some microalgae species survive to extreme environments in ponds of residual waters from uranium mining. •Adaptation of microalgae to U arose very fast. •Spontaneous mutations that confer large adaptive value were able to produce the adaptation to residual waters of U mining. •Adaptation to more extreme waters of U mining is only possible after the recombination subsequent to sexual mating. •Resistant microalgae bio-adsorbs uranium to the cell wall and internalises uranium inside the cytoplasm. -- Abstract: Extreme environments may support communities of microalgae living at the limits of their tolerance. It is usually assumed that these extreme environments are inhabited by extremophile species. However, global anthropogenic environmental changes are generating new extreme environments, such as mining-effluent pools of residual waters from uranium mining with high U levels, acidity and radioactivity in Salamanca (Spain). Certain microalgal species have rapidly adapted to these extreme waters (uranium mining in this area began in 1960). Experiments have demonstrated that physiological acclimatisation would be unable to achieve adaptation. In contrast, rapid genetic adaptation was observed in waters ostensibly lethal to microalgae by means of rare spontaneous mutations that occurred prior to the exposure to effluent waters from uranium mining. However, adaptation to the most extreme conditions was only possible after recombination through sexual mating because adaptation requires more than one mutation. Microalgae living in extreme environments could be the descendants of pre-selective mutants that confer significant adaptive value to extreme contamination. These “lucky mutants” could allow for the evolutionary rescue of populations faced with rapid environmental change.

  14. Extreme Environment Simulation - Current and New Capabilities to Simulate Venus and Other Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, Tibor; Vento, Dan; Lalli, Nick; Palinski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Science, technology, and planetary mission communities have a growing interest in components and systems that are capable of working in extreme (high) temperature and pressure conditions. Terrestrial applications range from scientific research, aerospace, defense, automotive systems, energy storage and power distribution, deep mining and others. As the target environments get increasingly extreme, capabilities to develop and test the sensors and systems designed to operate in such environments will be required. An application of particular importance to the planetary science community is the ability for a robotic lander to survive on the Venus surface where pressures are nearly 100 times that of Earth and temperatures approach 500C. The scientific importance and relevance of Venus missions are stated in the current Planetary Decadal Survey. Further, several missions to Venus were proposed in the most recent Discovery call. Despite this interest, the ability to accurately simulate Venus conditions at a scale that can test and validate instruments and spacecraft systems and accurately simulate the Venus atmosphere has been lacking. This paper discusses and compares the capabilities that are known to exist within and outside the United States to simulate the extreme environmental conditions found in terrestrial or planetary surfaces including the Venus atmosphere and surface. The paper then focuses on discussing the recent additional capability found in the NASA Glenn Extreme Environment Rig (GEER). The GEER, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is designed to simulate not only the temperature and pressure extremes described, but can also accurately reproduce the atmospheric compositions of bodies in the solar system including those with acidic and hazardous elements. GEER capabilities and characteristics are described along with operational considerations relevant to potential users. The paper presents initial operating results and concludes

  15. Development and Testing of Mechanism Technology for Space Exploration in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Tony R.; Levanas, Greg; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Glenn Research Center (GRC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Aeroflex, Inc. have partnered to develop and test actuator hardware that will survive the stringent environment of the moon, and which can also be leveraged for other challenging space exploration missions. Prototype actuators have been built and tested in a unique low temperature test bed with motor interface temperatures as low as 14 degrees Kelvin. Several years of work have resulted in specialized electro-mechanical hardware to survive extreme space exploration environments, a test program that verifies and finds limitations of the designs at extreme temperatures, and a growing knowledge base that can be leveraged by future space exploration missions.

  16. Extreme Environment Capable, Modular and Scalable Power Processing Unit for Solar Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gregory A.; Iannello, Christopher J.; Chen, Yuan; Hunter, Don J.; Del Castillo, Linda; Bradley, Arthur T.; Stell, Christopher; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is to present a concept of a modular and scalable High Temperature Boost (HTB) Power Processing Unit (PPU) capable of operating at temperatures beyond the standard military temperature range. The various extreme environments technologies are also described as the fundamental technology path to this concept. The proposed HTB PPU is intended for power processing in the area of space solar electric propulsion, where the reduction of in-space mass and volume are desired, and sometimes even critical, to achieve the goals of future space flight missions. The concept of the HTB PPU can also be applied to other extreme environment applications, such as geothermal and petroleum deep-well drilling, where higher temperature operation is required.

  17. Exploring knowledge about microbes living in the extreme environments – the resources review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula K. Czyżewska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Extremophiles are organisms that tolerate or require to live the extreme ranges of variation ofthe environmental factors such as temperature, pH, salinity, concentrations of heavy metals, highhydrostatic pressure, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet, availability of water, light, oxygen, and nutritionallylimited environments, etc. Exposure to such diverse factors caused, in the light of evolutionary changes,the appearence of many biochemical adaptations. In most cases, extremophiles are unicellular organismsbelonging to the Archaea domain, but there are also representatives of other domains (Bacteria,Eucaryota and multicellular organisms. The diversity of the Internet resources and printed materials(scientific publications reflect areas of this interest. Special characteristics of extremophiles are ofinterest to researchers in various fields of biological sciences (astrobiology, ecology, biotechnology,biospeleology. The purpose of this article is to review the most representative resources aboutmicroorganisms living in extreme environments and indicate the directions of the future research.

  18. EVOLUTION OF THE CIRCADIAN CLOCK IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENT: LESSONS FROM CAVEFISH.

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallari, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has been strongly influenced by the daily cycles of temperature and light imposed by the rotation of the Earth. Fascinating demonstrations of this are seen in extreme environments such as caves where some animals have remained completely isolated from the day-night cycle for millions of years. Most of these species show convergent evolution, sharing a range of striking physical properties such as eye loss. One fundamental issue is whether “hypogean” species retain a functional circa...

  19. GNC of the SphereX Robot for Extreme Environment Exploration on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Kalita, Himangshu; Nallapu, Ravi teja; Warren, Andrew; Thangavelautham, Jekan

    2017-01-01

    Wheeled ground robots are limited from exploring extreme environments such as caves, lava tubes and skylights. Small robots that can utilize unconventional mobility through hopping, flying or rolling can overcome these limitations. Mul-tiple robots operating as a team offer significant benefits over a single large ro-bot, as they are not prone to single-point failure, enable distributed command and control and enable execution of tasks in parallel. These robots can complement large rovers and...

  20. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Development and Maturation Status for NF Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, D.; Blosser, M.; Boghozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J.; Chinnapongse, R.; Fowler, M.; Gage, P.; Gasch, M.; Gonzales, G.; Hamm, K.; Kazemba, C.; Ma, J.; Mahzari, M.; Milos, F.; Nishioka, O.; Peterson, K.; Poteet, C.; Prabhu, D.; Splinter, S.; Stackpoole, M.; Venkatapathy, E.; Young, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the requirements, design, development and testing of the 3D Woven TPS being developed under NASA's Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) project. Under this current program, NASA is working to develop a Thermal Protection System (TPS) capable of surviving entry into Saturn. A primary goal of the project is to build and test an Engineering Test Unit (ETU) to establish a Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of 6 for this technology by 2017.

  1. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) - Enabling Missions Beyond Heritage Carbon Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, D.; Beerman, A.; Blosser, M.; Boghozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J.; Chinnapongse, R.; Fowler, M.; Gage, P.; Gasch, M.; Gonzales, G.; Hamm, K.; Ma, J.; Milos, F.; Nishioka, O.; Poteet, C.; Splinter, S.; Stackpoole, M.; Venkatapathy, E.; Young, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the requirements, design, development and testing of the 3D Woven TPS being developed under NASA's Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) project. Under this current program, NASA is working to develop a Thermal Protection System (TPS) capable of surviving entry into Venus or Saturn. A primary goal of the project is to build and test an Engineering Test Unit (ETU) to establish a Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of 6 for this technology by 2017.

  2. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Enabling Missions Beyond Heritage Carbon Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, D.; Beerman, A.; Blosser, M.; Boghozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J.; Chinnapongse, R.; Fowler, M.; Gage, P.; Gasch, M.; Gonzaes, G.; Hamm, K.; Kazemba, C.; Ma, J.; Mahzari, M.; Milos, F.; Nishioka, O.; Peterson, K.; Poteet, C.; Prabhu, D.; Splinter, S.; Stackpoole, M.; Venkatapathy, E.; Young, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the requirements, design, development and testing of the 3D Woven TPS being developed under NASAs Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) project. Under this current program, NASA is working to develop a Thermal Protection System (TPS) capable of surviving entry into Venus or Saturn. A primary goal of the project is to build and test an Engineering Test Unit (ETU) to establish a Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of 6 for this technology by 2017.

  3. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) for Missions to Saturn and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, D.; Blosser, M.; Chinnapongse, R.; Fowler, M.; Gasch, M.; Hamm, K.; Kazemba, C.; Ma, J.; Milos, F.; Nishioka, O.; Poteet, C.; Splinter, S.; Stackpoole, M.; Venkatapathy, E.; Young, Z.; Gasch, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the requirements, design, development and testing of the 3D Woven TPS being developed under NASAs Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) project. Under this current program, NASA is working to develop a Thermal Protection System (TPS) capable of surviving entry into Saturn. A primary goal of the project is to build and test an Engineering Test Unit (ETU) to establish a Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of 6 for this technology by 2017.

  4. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  5. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  6. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-12-02

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  7. Alteration of a human intestinal microbiota under extreme life environment in the Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Touyama, Mutsumi; Yamada, Shin; Yamazaki, Takashi; Benno, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota (HIM) settles from birth and continues to change phenotype by some factors (e.g. host's diet) throughout life. However, the effect of extreme life environment on human HIM composition is not well known. To understand HIM fluctuation under extreme life environment in humans, fecal samples were collected from six Japanese men on a long Antarctic expedition. They explored Antarctica for 3 months and collected their fecal samples at once-monthly intervals. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, the composition of HIM in six subjects was investigated. Three subjects presented restoration of HIM after the expedition compared versus before and during the expedition. Two thirds samples collected during the expedition belonged to the same cluster in dendrogram. However, all through the expedition, T-RFLP patterns showed interindividual variability. Especially, Bifidobacterium spp. showed a tendency to decrease during and restore after the expedition. A reduction of Bifidobacterium spp. was observed in five subjects the first 1 month of the expedition. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which is thought to proliferate during emotional stress, significantly decreased in one subject, indicating that other factors in addition to emotional stress may affect the composition of HIM in this study. These findings could be helpful to understand the effect of extreme life environment on HIM.

  8. Magnetic characterization of the nickel layer protecting the copper wires in harsh applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Daniel; Duchesne Stephane; Iosif Vadim

    2017-01-01

    High Temperature (HT°) motor coils open new perspectives for extending the applications of electrical motors or generators to very harsh environments or for designing very high power density machines working with high...

  9. Copahue Geothermal System: A Volcanic Environment with Rich Extreme Prokaryotic Biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sofía Urbieta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Copahue geothermal system is a natural extreme environment located at the northern end of the Cordillera de los Andes in Neuquén province in Argentina. The geochemistry and consequently the biodiversity of the area are dominated by the activity of the Copahue volcano. The main characteristic of Copahue is the extreme acidity of its aquatic environments; ponds and hot springs of moderate and high temperature as well as Río Agrio. In spite of being an apparently hostile location, the prokaryotic biodiversity detected by molecular ecology techniques as well as cultivation shows a rich and diverse environment dominated by acidophilic, sulphur oxidising bacteria or archaea, depending on the conditions of the particular niche studied. In microbial biofilms, found in the borders of the ponds where thermal activity is less intense, the species found are completely different, with a high presence of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic species. Our results, collected during more than 10 years of work in Copahue, have enabled us to outline geomicrobiological models for the different environments found in the ponds and Río Agrio. Besides, Copahue seems to be the habitat of novel, not yet characterised autochthonous species, especially in the domain Archaea.

  10. Copahue Geothermal System: A Volcanic Environment with Rich Extreme Prokaryotic Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbieta, María Sofía; Porati, Graciana Willis; Segretín, Ana Belén; González-Toril, Elena; Giaveno, María Alejandra; Donati, Edgardo Rubén

    2015-07-08

    The Copahue geothermal system is a natural extreme environment located at the northern end of the Cordillera de los Andes in Neuquén province in Argentina. The geochemistry and consequently the biodiversity of the area are dominated by the activity of the Copahue volcano. The main characteristic of Copahue is the extreme acidity of its aquatic environments; ponds and hot springs of moderate and high temperature as well as Río Agrio. In spite of being an apparently hostile location, the prokaryotic biodiversity detected by molecular ecology techniques as well as cultivation shows a rich and diverse environment dominated by acidophilic, sulphur oxidising bacteria or archaea, depending on the conditions of the particular niche studied. In microbial biofilms, found in the borders of the ponds where thermal activity is less intense, the species found are completely different, with a high presence of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic species. Our results, collected during more than 10 years of work in Copahue, have enabled us to outline geomicrobiological models for the different environments found in the ponds and Río Agrio. Besides, Copahue seems to be the habitat of novel, not yet characterised autochthonous species, especially in the domain Archaea.

  11. Consideration of Task Performance for Robots Engaged in Extremely Dangerous Environment in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seung Mo; Han, Kee Soo; Yi, Sung Deok; Kim, Seoung Rae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    After Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident, it is started to pay more attention to operation and accident of nuclear power plants (NPPs). For domestic nuclear industry, it was recommended to establish corresponding strategies against accidents due to extremely dangerous natural disasters. Each nuclear power plant is also preparing to establish strategies to secure nuclear safety functions by estimating the counterplans for extreme accidents. Robots are particularly being used to access the areas where those are dangerous for human beings to access or to restore the accident. Robot technologies in NPPs are emerging cutting-edge technologies that are just a start except the developed countries like USA, Japan, etc. But they are carefully considered because they have the advantages of performing tasks in extremely dangerous environment in NPPs instead of human beings. In this study, the applicability of robots will be considered in extremely dangerous environment in NPPs. Accurate judgment of the inside situation of the plant and quick actions in the extreme condition like earthquake accompanied by loss of all AC powers should be considered as major function in terms of prevention of accident spread. According to the reported stress test results of domestic NPPs, the difficult things for operators to carry out in extreme conditions can be predictable, therefore the active use of robots as accident mitigation strategies will be helpful to reduce the unnecessary spending for facility improvement. Current trend of domestic and foreign robot technology development focuses on the information search of the inside of the plant and development of preventive maintenance of NPPs. As seen actually in Fukushima Daiichi, main roles of robots place emphasis on measuring the inside radiation level accessing to the area where operator cannot access and delivering information which can support operator's decision-making and actions. Therefore, it is considered that development of

  12. Nanomaterials in Extreme Environments: Fundamentals and Applications Rostislav A. Andrievski and Arsen V. Khatchoyan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ram

    2016-10-01

    Nanomaterials in Extreme Environments Rostislav A. Andrievski and Arsen V. Khatchoyan Springer, 2016 106 pages, $99.00 (e-book $69.99) ISBN 978–3-319–25331–2 This slim volume is an extensive review of our current understanding of the response of nanostructured materials to extreme operating conditions, such as high temperature, flux of high energy neutrons, high pressure, mechanical stress, and oxidizing environments. The emphasis is on metallic materials, especially Cu alloys. Graphene-based materials, fullerenes, polymeric materials, nano-glasses and glass-ceramics are not covered by this review. The book has six chapters including an introduction and a brief conclusion. The introduction documents the growth of scientific interest in nanostructured materials and stresses the need to study the behavior of nanomaterials under extreme conditions. This chapter also presents Herbert Gleiter’s classification of nanomaterials into twelve groups based on the shapes of the nanoscale features and chemical composition of the components of the nanostructure. The second chapter deals with the high temperature environment and the thermodynamics and kinetics of grain growth. The authors identify the lack of reliable thermodynamic data as a key limitation in this field. The discussion brings out the interplay of structural relaxation, redistribution of excess free volume, diffusion, and recrystallization in multicomponent nanostructures at elevated temperature. Chapter 3 focuses on the effects of ion and neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of nanomaterials. The authors do a good job of highlighting recent studies on the radiation tolerance of nanocrystalline oxides and rapid grain growth under irradiation. The material addresses both fission and fusion reactor applications. Chapter 4 reviews the effects of severe plastic deformation and cyclic loading on nanostructure formation and phase transformation. This chapter also explores the challenge of

  13. Enabling Structured Exploration of Workflow Performance Variability in Extreme-Scale Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Stephan, Eric G.; Raju, Bibi; Altintas, Ilkay; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram

    2015-11-15

    Workflows are taking an Workflows are taking an increasingly important role in orchestrating complex scientific processes in extreme scale and highly heterogeneous environments. However, to date we cannot reliably predict, understand, and optimize workflow performance. Sources of performance variability and in particular the interdependencies of workflow design, execution environment and system architecture are not well understood. While there is a rich portfolio of tools for performance analysis, modeling and prediction for single applications in homogenous computing environments, these are not applicable to workflows, due to the number and heterogeneity of the involved workflow and system components and their strong interdependencies. In this paper, we investigate workflow performance goals and identify factors that could have a relevant impact. Based on our analysis, we propose a new workflow performance provenance ontology, the Open Provenance Model-based WorkFlow Performance Provenance, or OPM-WFPP, that will enable the empirical study of workflow performance characteristics and variability including complex source attribution.

  14. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  15. Evaporation from Bare Soil in Extremely Arid Environment in Southern Israel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXUEFENG; XUFUAN; 等

    1996-01-01

    Microlysimeters of different sizes(5cm 10cm and 15cm in length) were used extensively in the present study of the measurements of soil evaporation in situ in an extremely arid area in southern Israel,All of the data obtained from the microlysimeters were used to evaluate two conventional evaporation models developed by Black et al.and Ritchie,respectively.Our results indicated that the models could overestimate total cumulative evaporation by about 30% in the extremely arid environment.Reducing the power factor of the conventional model by a factor of 0.1 produced good agreement between the measured and simulated cumulative evaporation.Microlysimeter method proved to be a simple and accurate approach for the evaluation of soil evaporation.

  16. Reliability of High I/O High Density CCGA Interconnect Electronic Packages under Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non-destructive inspection tools were used to assess the reliability of high density CCGA packages for deep space extreme temperature missions. Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages such as high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performances, compatibility with standard surface-mount packaging assembly processes, and so on. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logic and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, payload electronics, and flight avionics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief than leaded packages or more strain relief over lead-less chip carrier packages, the reliability of CCGA packages is very important for short-term and long-term deep space missions. We have employed high density CCGA 1152 and 1272 daisy chained electronic packages in this preliminary reliability study. Each package is divided into several daisy-chained sections. The physical dimensions of CCGA1152 package is 35 mm x 35 mm with a 34 x 34 array of columns with a 1 mm pitch. The dimension of the CCGA1272 package is 37.5 mm x 37.5 mm with a 36 x 36 array with a 1 mm pitch. The columns are made up of 80% Pb/20%Sn material. CCGA interconnect electronic package printed wiring polyimide boards have been assembled and inspected using non-destructive x-ray imaging techniques. The assembled CCGA boards were subjected to extreme temperature thermal atmospheric cycling to assess their reliability for future deep space missions. The resistance of daisy-chained interconnect sections were monitored continuously during thermal cycling. This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non

  17. Reliability of High I/O High Density CCGA Interconnect Electronic Packages under Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non-destructive inspection tools were used to assess the reliability of high density CCGA packages for deep space extreme temperature missions. Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages such as high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performances, compatibility with standard surface-mount packaging assembly processes, and so on. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logic and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, payload electronics, and flight avionics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief than leaded packages or more strain relief over lead-less chip carrier packages, the reliability of CCGA packages is very important for short-term and long-term deep space missions. We have employed high density CCGA 1152 and 1272 daisy chained electronic packages in this preliminary reliability study. Each package is divided into several daisy-chained sections. The physical dimensions of CCGA1152 package is 35 mm x 35 mm with a 34 x 34 array of columns with a 1 mm pitch. The dimension of the CCGA1272 package is 37.5 mm x 37.5 mm with a 36 x 36 array with a 1 mm pitch. The columns are made up of 80% Pb/20%Sn material. CCGA interconnect electronic package printed wiring polyimide boards have been assembled and inspected using non-destructive x-ray imaging techniques. The assembled CCGA boards were subjected to extreme temperature thermal atmospheric cycling to assess their reliability for future deep space missions. The resistance of daisy-chained interconnect sections were monitored continuously during thermal cycling. This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non

  18. Can we colonize the solar system? Human biology and survival in the extreme space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launius, Roger D

    2010-09-01

    Throughout the history of the space age the dominant vision for the future has been great spaceships plying the solar system, and perhaps beyond, moving living beings from one planet to another. Spacesuited astronauts would carry out exploration, colonization, and settlement as part of a relentlessly forward looking movement of humanity beyond Earth. As time has progressed this image has not changed appreciably even as the full magnitude of the challenges it represents have become more and more apparent. This essay explores the issues associated with the human movement beyond Earth and raises questions about whether humanity will ever be able to survive in the extreme environment of space and the other bodies of the solar system. This paper deals with important historical episodes as well as wider conceptual issues about life in space. Two models of expansion beyond Earth are discussed: (1) the movement of microbes and other types of life on Earth that can survive the space environment and (2) the modification of humans into cyborgs for greater capability to survive in the extreme environments encountered beyond this planet.

  19. Evaluation of pediatric lower extremity fractures managed with external fixation: outcomes in a deployed environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Josef K; McKenzie, Colin S; Devine, John G

    2012-01-01

    External fixation of pediatric lower extremity fractures is usually reserved for severe, open fractures in polytraumatized patients, but it is often the only available treatment option for deployed military surgeons. We analyzed the outcomes and complications of 17 consecutive pediatric long bone fractures treated with external fixation at a Forward Surgical Team facility in an austere environment during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan during a 12-month period. Treatment consisted of uniplanar external fixation for 12 femoral shaft fractures (11 closed), 4 tibial shaft fractures (all open), and 1 subtrochanteric fracture (closed) in 14 males and 3 females with an average age of 7.4 years. All 17 fractures went on to union with no incidences of refracture. Complications included 1 broken pin and 3 pin site infections treated with wound care and oral antibiotics. In a deployed environment, external fixation is the treatment method of choice for lower extremity fractures by virtue of patient, environment, equipment, and mission factors. This case series validates the usage of a simple, uniplanar external fixator for a variety of open and closed pediatric long bone fractures as evidenced by the successful union rate and low number of complications.

  20. Ion Pair in Extreme Aqueous Environments, Molecular-Based and Electric Conductance Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Palmer, Donald [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We determine by molecular-based simulation the density profiles of the Na+!Cl! ion-pair association constant in steam environments along three supercritical isotherms to interrogate the behavior of ion speciation in dilute aqueous solutions at extreme conditions. Moreover, we describe a new ultra-sensitive flow-through electric conductance apparatus designed to bridge the gap between the currently lowest steam-density conditions at which we are experimentally able to attain electric conductance measurements and the theoretically-reachable zero-density limit. Finally, we highlight important modeling challenges encountered near the zero-density limit and discuss ways to overcome them.

  1. Bipolar integrated circuits in SiC for extreme environment operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterling, Carl-Mikael; Hallén, Anders; Hedayati, Raheleh; Kargarrazi, Saleh; Lanni, Luigia; Malm, B. Gunnar; Mardani, Shabnam; Norström, Hans; Rusu, Ana; Saveda Suvanam, Sethu; Tian, Ye; Östling, Mikael

    2017-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) integrated circuits have been suggested for extreme environment operation. The challenge of a new technology is to develop process flow, circuit models and circuit designs for a wide temperature range. A bipolar technology was chosen to avoid the gate dielectric weakness and low mobility drawback of SiC MOSFETs. Higher operation temperatures and better radiation hardness have been demonstrated for bipolar integrated circuits. Both digital and analog circuits have been demonstrated in the range from room temperature to 500 °C. Future steps are to demonstrate some mixed signal circuits of greater complexity. There are remaining challenges in contacting, metallization, packaging and reliability.

  2. Greenhouses in extreme environments: The Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse design and operation overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Richard; Berinstain, Alain; Braham, Stephen; Graham, Thomas; Bamsey, Matthew; Boyd, Keegan; Silver, Matthew; Lussier-Desbiens, Alexis; Lee, Pascal; Boucher, Marc; Cowing, Keith; Dixon, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Since its deployment on Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic, in 2002, the Haughton Mars Project's Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse (ACMG) has supported extreme environment related scientific and operation research that is relevant to Mars analogue studies - each at a specific level of fidelity and complexity. The Greenhouse serves as an initial experimental test-bed supporting field research, from which lessons may be learned to support the design and implementation of future field facilities, and enabling higher fidelity demonstrations. This paper provides an overall description of the ACMG, describes the different subsystems, explains its operational modes, details some results over the three years of operation and discusses future development plans.

  3. Tolerance of anhydrobiotic eggs of the Tardigrade Ramazzottius varieornatus to extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Daiki D; Yamaguchi, Ayami; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Daisuke; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Yukuhiro, Fumiko; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Kunieda, Takekazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nakahara, Yuichi; Wada, Seiichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Katagiri, Chihiro; Higashi, Seigo; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Rothschild, Lynn J; Okuda, Takashi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Tardigrades are tiny (less than 1 mm in length) invertebrate animals that have the potential to survive travel to other planets because of their tolerance to extreme environmental conditions by means of a dry ametabolic state called anhydrobiosis. While the tolerance of adult tardigrades to extreme environments has been reported, there are few reports on the tolerance of their eggs. We examined the ability of hydrated and anhydrobiotic eggs of the tardigrade Ramazzottius varieornatus to hatch after exposure to ionizing irradiation (helium ions), extremely low and high temperatures, and high vacuum. We previously reported that there was a similar pattern of tolerance against ionizing radiation between hydrated and anhydrobiotic adults. In contrast, anhydrobiotic eggs (50% lethal dose; 1690 Gy) were substantially more radioresistant than hydrated ones (50% lethal dose; 509 Gy). Anhydrobiotic eggs also have a broader temperature resistance compared with hydrated ones. Over 70% of the anhydrobiotic eggs treated at either -196°C or +50°C hatched successfully, but all the hydrated eggs failed to hatch. After exposure to high-vacuum conditions (5.3×10(-4) Pa to 6.2×10(-5) Pa), the hatchability of the anhydrobiotic eggs was comparable to that of untreated control eggs.

  4. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  5. A study of meteorological variables in some extreme environments via cross correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Kuri, L.; McKay, C. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    Some of us have been studying soils in the Atacama Desert, Chile and in Pico de Orizaba, Mexico. The Atacama, is an extreme, arid, temperate desert that extends across 1000 km with monthly mean air temperatures between 16 to 14°C and is remarkably uniform throughout the year (±3°C). Pico de Orizaba (19° N) is a mountain that possesses a glacier and has tropical alpine environments. Both of such environments are of interest as models for Mars. Meteorological data for the Yungay area of the Atacama Desert, as well as meteorological data of the Northern and Southern faces of Pico de Orizaba have been collected. Both sets of data were analyzed using the cross correlation technique of multivariate time series. In this report we describe some of the patterns found for these statistics.

  6. Biota and Biomolecules in Extreme Environments on Earth: Implications for Life Detection on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost W. Aerts

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the characterization of extant or extinct life. Due to their indispensability for life on Earth, these biomarkers are also prime targets in the search for life on Mars. Biomarkers degrade over time; in situ environmental conditions influence the preservation of those molecules. Nonetheless, upon shielding (e.g., by mineral surfaces, particular biomarkers can persist for billions of years, making them of vital importance in answering questions about the origins and limits of life on early Earth and Mars. The search for organic material and biosignatures on Mars is particularly challenging due to the hostile environment and its effect on organic compounds near the surface. In support of life detection on Mars, it is crucial to investigate analogue environments on Earth that resemble best past and present Mars conditions. Terrestrial extreme environments offer a rich source of information allowing us to determine how extreme conditions affect life and molecules associated with it. Extremophilic organisms have adapted to the most stunning conditions on Earth in environments with often unique geological and chemical features. One challenge in detecting biomarkers is to optimize extraction, since organic molecules can be low in abundance and can strongly adsorb to mineral surfaces. Methods and analytical tools in the field of life science are continuously improving. Amplification methods are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of genomic material but most other organic molecules are not prone to amplification methods. Therefore, a great deal depends on the extraction efficiency. The questions “what to look for”, “where to look”, and “how to

  7. Biota and biomolecules in extreme environments on Earth: implications for life detection on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Joost W; Röling, Wilfred F M; Elsaesser, Andreas; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2014-10-13

    The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids) occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the characterization of extant or extinct life. Due to their indispensability for life on Earth, these biomarkers are also prime targets in the search for life on Mars. Biomarkers degrade over time; in situ environmental conditions influence the preservation of those molecules. Nonetheless, upon shielding (e.g., by mineral surfaces), particular biomarkers can persist for billions of years, making them of vital importance in answering questions about the origins and limits of life on early Earth and Mars. The search for organic material and biosignatures on Mars is particularly challenging due to the hostile environment and its effect on organic compounds near the surface. In support of life detection on Mars, it is crucial to investigate analogue environments on Earth that resemble best past and present Mars conditions. Terrestrial extreme environments offer a rich source of information allowing us to determine how extreme conditions affect life and molecules associated with it. Extremophilic organisms have adapted to the most stunning conditions on Earth in environments with often unique geological and chemical features. One challenge in detecting biomarkers is to optimize extraction, since organic molecules can be low in abundance and can strongly adsorb to mineral surfaces. Methods and analytical tools in the field of life science are continuously improving. Amplification methods are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of genomic material but most other organic molecules are not prone to amplification methods. Therefore, a great deal depends on the extraction efficiency. The questions "what to look for", "where to look", and "how to look for it" require more of

  8. Predictors of Behavior and Performance in Extreme Environments: The Antarctic Space Analogue Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Gunderson, E K. Eric; Holland, A. W.; Miller, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    To determine which, if any, characteristics should be incorporated into a select-in approach to screening personnel for long-duration spaceflight, we examined the influence of crewmember social/ demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station physical environments on performance measures in 657 American men who spent an austral winter in Antarctica between 1963 and 1974. During screening, subjects completed a Personal History Questionnaire which obtained information on social and demographic characteristics, the Deep Freeze Opinion Survey which assessed 5 different personality traits, and the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior (FIRO-B) Scale which measured 6 dimensions of interpersonal needs. Station environment included measures of crew size and severity of physical environment. Performance was assessed on the basis of combined peer-supervisor evaluations of overall performance, peer nominations of fellow crewmembers who made ideal winter-over candidates, and self-reported depressive symptoms. Social/demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station environments collectively accounted for 9-17% of the variance in performance measures. The following characteristics were significant independent predictors of more than one performance measure: military service, low levels of neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness, and a low desire for affection from others. These results represent an important first step in the development of select-in criteria for personnel on long-duration missions in space and other extreme environments. These criteria must take into consideration the characteristics of the environment and the limitations they place on meeting needs for interpersonal relations and task performance, as well as the characteristics of the individuals and groups who live and work in these environments.

  9. Predictors of Behavior and Performance in Extreme Environments: The Antarctic Space Analogue Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Gunderson, E K. Eric; Holland, A. W.; Miller, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    To determine which, if any, characteristics should be incorporated into a select-in approach to screening personnel for long-duration spaceflight, we examined the influence of crewmember social/ demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station physical environments on performance measures in 657 American men who spent an austral winter in Antarctica between 1963 and 1974. During screening, subjects completed a Personal History Questionnaire which obtained information on social and demographic characteristics, the Deep Freeze Opinion Survey which assessed 5 different personality traits, and the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior (FIRO-B) Scale which measured 6 dimensions of interpersonal needs. Station environment included measures of crew size and severity of physical environment. Performance was assessed on the basis of combined peer-supervisor evaluations of overall performance, peer nominations of fellow crewmembers who made ideal winter-over candidates, and self-reported depressive symptoms. Social/demographic characteristics, personality traits, interpersonal needs, and characteristics of station environments collectively accounted for 9-17% of the variance in performance measures. The following characteristics were significant independent predictors of more than one performance measure: military service, low levels of neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness, and a low desire for affection from others. These results represent an important first step in the development of select-in criteria for personnel on long-duration missions in space and other extreme environments. These criteria must take into consideration the characteristics of the environment and the limitations they place on meeting needs for interpersonal relations and task performance, as well as the characteristics of the individuals and groups who live and work in these environments.

  10. Applying systems biology methods to the study of human physiology in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsay M; Thiele, Ines

    2013-03-22

    Systems biology is defined in this review as 'an iterative process of computational model building and experimental model revision with the aim of understanding or simulating complex biological systems'. We propose that, in practice, systems biology rests on three pillars: computation, the omics disciplines and repeated experimental perturbation of the system of interest. The number of ethical and physiologically relevant perturbations that can be used in experiments on healthy humans is extremely limited and principally comprises exercise, nutrition, infusions (e.g. Intralipid), some drugs and altered environment. Thus, we argue that systems biology and environmental physiology are natural symbionts for those interested in a system-level understanding of human biology. However, despite excellent progress in high-altitude genetics and several proteomics studies, systems biology research into human adaptation to extreme environments is in its infancy. A brief description and overview of systems biology in its current guise is given, followed by a mini review of computational methods used for modelling biological systems. Special attention is given to high-altitude research, metabolic network reconstruction and constraint-based modelling.

  11. Refuge from predation, the benefit of living in an extreme acidic environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonie, Gaëtan; Dierick, Manuel; Houthoofd, Wouter; Willems, Maxime; Jacobs, Patric; Bert, Wim

    2010-12-01

    Organisms living in extreme habitats require costly adaptations to cope with these conditions. Among the suggested potential benefits that trade off these costs is refuge from predation. To study these interactions in extreme environments, samples were taken in the cave Cueva de Villa Luz, Tabasco, Mexico, where more than 32 subterranean springs, some H(2)S rich, rise from the floor. Hydrogen sulfide gas plus oxygen is absorbed by freshwater, and oxidation forms concentrated sulfuric acid. Snottites, whitish hollow mucous tubes, hang from the ceiling of the cave. Fluid drops from these snottites were recorded as having pH values of 0-3. We report the discovery of a new species of nematode that thrives in the highly acidic environment of the snottite. Micro CT scan of snottites reveals a complex interaction between the acidic snottite, nematodes, and abundant nematode-eating mites. The nematode adaptation to low pH probably protects them against mite predation, for which nematodes are most likely the most important source of carbon in this sulfur-driven ecosystem.

  12. Investigation of Loop Heat Pipe Survival and Restart After Extreme Cold Environment Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric; Ku, Jentung; Licari, Anthony; Sanzi, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA plans human exploration near the South Pole of the Moon, and other locations where the environment is extremely cold. This paper reports on the heat transfer performance of a loop heat pipe (LHP) exposed to extreme cold under the simulated reduced gravitational environment of the Moon. A common method of spacecraft thermal control is to use a LHP with ammonia working fluid. Typically, a small amount of heat is provided either by electrical heaters or by environmental design, such that the LHP condenser temperature never drops below the freezing point of ammonia. The concern is that a liquid-filled, frozen condenser would not restart, or that a thawing condenser would damage the tubing due to the expansion of ammonia upon thawing. This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation of a novel approach to avoid these problems. The LHP compensation chamber (CC) is conditioned such that all the ammonia liquid is removed from the condenser and the LHP is nonoperating. The condenser temperature is then reduced to below that of the ammonia freezing point. The LHP is then successfully restarted.

  13. A walk on the tundra: Host-parasite interactions in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Susan J; Hoberg, Eric P; Molnár, Péter K; Dobson, Andy; Verocai, Guilherme G

    2014-08-01

    Climate change is occurring very rapidly in the Arctic, and the processes that have taken millions of years to evolve in this very extreme environment are now changing on timescales as short as decades. These changes are dramatic, subtle and non-linear. In this article, we discuss the evolving insights into host-parasite interactions for wild ungulate species, specifically, muskoxen and caribou, in the North American Arctic. These interactions occur in an environment that is characterized by extremes in temperature, high seasonality, and low host species abundance and diversity. We believe that lessons learned in this system can guide wildlife management and conservation throughout the Arctic, and can also be generalized to more broadly understand host-parasite interactions elsewhere. We specifically examine the impacts of climate change on host-parasite interactions and focus on: (I) the direct temperature effects on parasites; (II) the importance of considering the intricacies of host and parasite ecology for anticipating climate change impacts; and (III) the effect of shifting ecological barriers and corridors. Insights gained from studying the history and ecology of host-parasite systems in the Arctic will be central to understanding the role that climate change is playing in these more complex systems.

  14. Tracing molecular gas mass in extreme extragalactic environments: an observational study

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Ming; Xilouris, Emmanuel M; Kuno, Nario; Lisenfeld, Ute

    2009-01-01

    We present a new observational study of the CO(1-0) line emission as an H2 gas mass tracer under extreme conditions in extragalactic environments. Our approach is to study the full neutral interstellar medium (H2, HI and dust) of two galaxies whose bulk interstellar medium (ISM) resides in environments that mark (and bracket) the excitation extremes of the ISM conditions found in infrared luminous galaxies, the starburst NGC3310 and the quiescent spiral NGC157. Our study maintains a robust statistical notion of the so-called X factor (i.e. a large ensemble of clouds is involved) while exploring its dependency on the very different average ISM conditions prevailing within these two systems. These are constrained by fully-sampled CO(3-2) and CO(1-0) observations, at a matched beam resolution of Half Power Beam Width 15'', obtained with the JCMT the Nobeyama 45-m telescope, combined with sensitive 850 and 450 micron dust emission and HI interferometric images which allow a complete view of all the neutral ISM co...

  15. PRELIMINARY BIOGEOCHEMICAL DATA ON MICROBIAL CARBONATOGENESIS IN ANCIENT EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS (KESS-KESS MOUNDS, MOROCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANO GUIDO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Devonian Kess-Kess mounds, cropping out in the Hamar Laghdad Ridge (SE Morocco, provide a useful case-study for understanding the relationships between the microbial metabolic activities and micrite precipitation in an extreme environment. Very fine dark and white wrinkled laminae record microbial activity and the geochemistry of the organic matter allows the  characterization of the source organisms. The biogeochemical characterization of extracted organic matter was performed through the functional group analyses by FT-IR Spectroscopy. FT-IR parameters indicate a marine origin and low thermal evolution for the organic material. The organic matter is characterized by the presence of stretching ?C=C vibrations attributable to alkene and/or unsaturated carboxylic acids. Preliminary analysis with GC-MS provides evidence for an autochthonous (extreme environment may have implications in astrobiological research considering the recent discovery of carbonate deposits on Mars. 

  16. ENERGETIC EXTREMES IN REEF FISH OCCUPYING HARSH HABITATS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2009-01-01

    document how relatively small changes in fin morphology has afforded some coral reef fish taxa with exceptional locomotor performance and energetic efficiency, and how this key attribute may have played a key role in the evolution and ecology of several diverse Indo-Pacific reef fish families. Using......-finned counterparts. We discuss how such differences in locomotor efficiency are pivotal to the habitat-use of these fishes, and how eco-energetic models may be used to provide new insights into spatial variations in fish demography and ecology among coral reef habitat zones....

  17. A Motor Drive Electronics Assembly for Mars Curiosity Rover: An Example of Assembly Qualification for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth; Chen, Yuan; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Weber, Carissa Tudryn; Hunter, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the technology development and infusion of a motor drive electronics assembly for Mars Curiosity Rover under space extreme environments. The technology evaluation and qualification as well as space qualification of the assembly are detailed and summarized. Because of the uncertainty of the technologies operating under the extreme space environments and that a high level reliability was required for this assembly application, both component and assembly board level qualifications were performed.

  18. Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Ellerby, Don; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Heat shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project is a NASA STMD and SMD co-funded effort. The goal is to develop and mission infuse a new ablative Thermal Protection System that can withstand extreme entry. It is targeted to support NASA's high priority missions, as defined in the latest decadal survey, to destinations such as Venus and Saturn in-situ robotic science missions. Entry into these planetary atmospheres results in extreme heating. The entry peak heat-flux and associated pressure are estimated to be between one and two orders of magnitude higher than those experienced by Mars Science Laboratory or Lunar return missions. In the recent New Frontiers community announcement NASA has indicated that it is considering providing an increase to the PI managed mission cost (PIMMC) for investigations utilizing the Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) and in addition, NASA is considering limiting the risk assessment to only their accommodation on the spacecraft and the mission environment. The HEEET ablative TPS utilizes 3D weaving technology to manufacture a dual layer material architecture. The 3-D weaving allows for flat panels to be woven. The dual layer consists of a top layer designed to withstand the extreme external environment while the inner or insulating layer by design, is designed to achieve low thermal conductivity, and it keeps the heat from conducting towards the structure underneath. Both arc jet testing combined with material properties have been used to develop thermal response models that allows for comparison of performance with heritage carbon phenolic. A 50% mass efficiency is achieved by the dual layer construct compared to carbon phenolic for a broad range of missions both to Saturn and Venus. The 3-D woven flat preforms are molded to achieve the shape as they are compliant and then resin infusion with curing forms a rigid panels. These panels are then bonded on to the aeroshell structure. Gaps

  19. Solid Lubricants and Coatings for Extreme Environments: State-of-the-Art Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2007-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to survey anticipated requirements for solid lubricants in lunar and Martian environments, as well as the effects of these environments on lubricants and their performance and durability. The success of habitats and vehicles on the Moon and Mars, and ultimately, of the human exploration of and permanent human presence on the Moon and Mars, are critically dependent on the correct and reliable operation of many moving mechanical assemblies and tribological components. The coefficient of friction and lifetime of any lubricant generally vary with the environment, and lubricants have very different characteristics under different conditions. It is essential, therefore, to select the right lubrication technique and lubricant for each mechanical and tribological application. Several environmental factors are hazardous to performance integrity on the Moon and Mars. Potential threats common to both the Moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings (thermal cycling), solar flux, cosmic radiation, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars has the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Solid lubricants and coatings are needed for lunar and Martian applications, where liquid lubricants are ineffective and undesirable, and these lubricants must perform well in the extreme environments of the Moon, Mars, and space, as well as on Earth, where they will be assembled and tested. No solid lubricants and coatings and their systems currently exist or have been validated that meet these requirements, so new solid lubricants must be designed and validated for these applications.

  20. Looking for Life in Extreme Environments on Earth and Beyond: Professional Development Workshop for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droppo, R.; Pratt, L.; Suchecki, P. C.

    2010-08-01

    The Looking for Life in Extreme Environments workshop held at Indiana University Bloomington in July of 2009 was the first in a series of workshops for high-school teachers that are currently in development. The workshops' modules are based on the research of faculty members in the Departments of Geological Sciences, Biology, and Astronomy, the School of Education, and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University Bloomington; the modules use lessons from Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life. Earth Analogues for Possible Life on Mars: Lessons and Activities, curricular materials that were produced and edited by Lisa Pratt and Ruth Droppo and published by NASA in 2008. Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life is a workbook, a DVD (with closed-captioning), and a CD with the lessons in digital text format for adaptation to classroom needs and printing. Each lesson includes the National Education Standards that apply to the materials. The workbook's lessons are written with three considerations: Life Domains, Cellular Metabolism, and Extreme Environments and Microbes. Students are challenged to build, draw, measure, discuss, and participate in laboratory processes and experiments that help them understand and describe microbes and their environments. In the Capstone, the students write a grant proposal based on the three lessons' analogues. The DVD is collection of videotaped interviews with scientists in laboratories at Michigan State, Princeton, and Indiana University, who are working on water and gas samples they collected from deep gold mines in South Africa and the Canadian Arctic. The interview materials and some animated graphics are compiled into four video pieces that support and compliment the accompanying workbook lessons and activities, and offer students insight into the excitement of scientific discovery.

  1. Individual Traits, Personal Values, and Conflict Resolution in an Isolated, Confined, Extreme Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneliussen, Jesper G; Leon, Gloria R; Kjærgaard, Anders; Fink, Birgit A; Venables, Noah C

    2017-06-01

    The study of personality traits, personal values, and the emergence of conflicts within groups performing in an isolated, confined, and extreme environment (ICE) may provide insights helpful for the composition and support of space crews for long duration missions. Studied pre/post and over the 2-yr period of the investigation were 10 Danish military personnel deployed to stations in Greenland on a 26-mo staggered rotation. Subjects completed the NEO PI-R, Triarchic Psychopathy Measure, and Portrait Values Questionnaire, and participated in structured interviews. During deployment, questionnaires were completed biweekly and a cognitive function test once a month. Personality findings indicated a generally well-adjusted group, above average in positive personality traits [Conscientiousness T-score = 59.4 (11.41); Agreeableness T-score = 54.4 (9.36)] and boldness. Personal values of benevolence and self-direction were highly rated. The decision when to "pick sides" and intervene during disagreements between group members was viewed as an important component of conflict resolution. There were no changes in positive/negative affect or cognitive function over the annual light/dark cycle. The personal values of group members appear highly compatible for living in a small group ICE environment for an extended period. Disagreements between group members impact the functioning of the entire group, particularly in regard to decisions whether to support one of the individuals or let the argument run its course. Extended training in strategies for conflict resolution are needed in planning for future long duration missions to avoid fault lines forming within the group.Corneliussen JG, Leon GR, Kjærgaard A, Fink BA, Venables NC. Individual traits, personal values, and conflict resolution in an isolated, confined, extreme environment. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):535-543.

  2. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  3. Extreme Red Sea: Life in the deep-sea anoxic brine lakes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tectonic splitting of the Arabian and African plates originated the Red Sea together with one of the most unique, remote, and extreme environments on Earth: deep-sea anoxic brine lakes. They combine multiple extremes namely increased salinity (7-fold), temperature (up to 70°C), concentration of heavy metals (1,000- to 10,000-fold), and hydrostatic pressure [1]. Despite such harsh conditions, they harbor an unexpectedly high biodiversity and are teeming with life. Increased i...

  4. Extreme Temperature Gearhead Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the need for actuators, particularly, gear heads, that can operate in the harsh Venusian environment for extended periods of time, on the order of...

  5. Extreme Temperature Gearhead Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the need for actuators that can operate in the harsh Venusian environment for extended periods of time, Honeybee Robotics conducted extensive research...

  6. High yield simultaneous hydrogen and ethanol production under extreme-thermophilic (70 C) mixed culture environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chenxi [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); O-Thong, Sompong [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Thaksin University, Patthalung 93110 (Thailand); Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongtao [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-07-15

    The effect of pH and medium composition on extreme-thermophilic (70 C) dark fermentative simultaneous hydrogen and ethanol production (process performance and microbial ecology) was investigated. Hydrogen and ethanol yields were optimized with respect to glucose, peptone, FeSO{sub 4}, NaHCO{sub 3}, yeast extract, trace mineral salts, vitamins, and phosphate buffer concentrations as well as initial pH as independent variables. A combination of low levels of both glucose ({<=}2 g/L) and vitamin solutions ({<=}1 mL/L) and high levels of initial pH ({>=}7), mineral salts solution ({>=}5 mL/L) and FeSO{sub 4} ({>=}100 mg/L) stimulated the hydrogen production, while high level of glucose ({>=}5 g/L) and low levels of both initial pH ({<=}5.5) and mineral salts solution ({<=}1 mL/L) enhanced the ethanol production. High yield of simultaneous hydrogen and ethanol production (1.58 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose combined with an ethanol yield of 0.90 mol ethanol/mol glucose) was achieved under extreme-thermophilic mixed culture environment. Results obtained showed that the shift of the metabolic pathways favouring either hydrogen or ethanol production was affected by the change in cultivation conditions (pH and medium composition). The mixed culture in this study demonstrated flexible ability for simultaneous hydrogen and ethanol production, depending on pH and nutrients formulation. The microorganisms involved could be regarded as simultaneous hydrogen/ethanol producers, as hydrogen and ethanol fermentation under all conditions was carried out by a group of extreme-thermophilic bacterial species related to Thermoanaerobacter, Thermoanaerobacterium and Caldanaerobacter. (author)

  7. Experimental selection for Drosophila survival in extremely low O(2 environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular hypoxia, if severe enough, results usually in injury or cell death. Our research in this area has focused on the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic tissue injury to explore strategies to prevent injury or enhance tolerance. The current experiments were designed to determine the genetic basis for adaptation to long term low O(2 environments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With long term experimental selection over many generations, we obtained a Drosophila melanogaster strain that can live perpetually in extremely low, normally lethal, O(2 condition (as low as 4% O(2. This strain shows a dramatic phenotypic divergence from controls, including a decreased recovery time from anoxic stupor, a higher rate of O(2 consumption in hypoxic conditions, and a decreased body size and mass due to decreased cell number and size. Expression arrays showed that about 4% of the Drosophila genome altered in expression and about half of the alteration was down-regulation. The contribution of some altered transcripts to hypoxia tolerance was examined by testing the survival of available corresponding P-element insertions (and their excisions under extremely low O(2 conditions. We found that down-regulation of several candidate genes including Best1, broad, CG7102, dunce, lin19-like and sec6 conferred severe hypoxia tolerance in Drosophila. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified a number of genes that play an important role in the survival of a selected Drosophila strain in extremely low O(2 conditions, selected by decreasing O(2 availability over many generations. Because of conservation of pathways, we believe that such genes are critical in hypoxia adaptation in physiological or pathological conditions not only in Drosophila but also in mammals.

  8. Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor Thermal Design for Low Heater Power and Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The heater power available for the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS MAG sensor is less than half of the heritage value for other missions. Nominally the MAG sensors are in the spacecraft's umbra. In the worst hot case, approximately 200 spacecraft communication downlinks, up to 10 hours each, are required at 0.7 AU. These downlinks require the spacecraft to slew 45 deg. about the Y-axis, exposing the MAG sensors and boom to sunlight. This paper presents the thermal design to meet the MAG sensor thermal requirements in the extreme thermal environment and with low heater power. A thermal balance test on the MAG sensor engineering model has verified the thermal design and correlated the thermal model for flight temperature predictions.

  9. Structures and Materials Technologies for Extreme Environments Applied to Reusable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Clay, Christopher; Rezin, Marc

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the evolution of structures and materials technology approaches to survive the challenging extreme environments encountered by earth-to-orbit space transportation systems, with emphasis on more recent developments in the USA. The evolution of technology requirements and experience in the various approaches to meeting these requirements has significantly influenced the technology approaches. While previous goals were primarily performance driven, more recently dramatic improvements in costs/operations and in safety have been paramount goals. Technologies that focus on the cost/operations and safety goals in the area of hot structures and thermal protection systems for reusable launch vehicles are presented. Assessments of the potential ability of the various technologies to satisfy the technology requirements, and their current technology readiness status are also presented.

  10. Plant adaptation to extreme environments: the example of Cistus salviifolius of an active geothermal alteration field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Giacomo; Bottega, Stefania; Forino, Laura M C; Ciccarelli, Daniela; Spanò, Carmelina

    2014-02-01

    Cistus salviifolius is able to colonise one of the most extreme active geothermal alteration fields in terms of both soil acidity and hot temperatures. The analyses of morpho-functional and physiological characters, investigated in leaves of plants growing around fumaroles (G leaves) and in leaves developed by the same plants after transfer into growth chamber under controlled conditions (C leaves) evidenced the main adaptive traits developed by this pioneer plant in a stressful environment. These traits involved leaf shape and thickness, mesophyll compactness, stomatal and trichome densities, chloroplast size. Changes of functional and physiological traits concerned dry matter content, peroxide and lipid peroxidation, leaf area, relative water and pigment contents. A higher reducing power and antioxidant enzymatic activity were typical of G leaves. Though the high levels of stress parameters, G leaves showed stress-induced specific morphogenic and physiological responses putatively involved in their surviving in active geothermal habitats.

  11. Mitigating Extreme Environments for In-Situ Jupiter and Venus Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Cutts, James A.

    2006-01-01

    In response to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), NASA's Solar System Exploration (SSE) Roadmap identified the in situ exploration of Venus and Jupiter as high priority science objectives. For Jupiter, deep entry probes are recommended, which would descend to approx.250 km - measured from the 1 bar pressure depth. At this level the pressure would correspond to approx.100 bar and the temperature would reach approx.500(deg)C. Similarly, at the surface of Venus the temperature and pressure conditions are approx.460(deg)C and approx.90 bar. Lifetime of the Jupiter probes during descent can be measured in hours, while in{situ operations at and near the surface of Venus are envisioned over weeks or months. In this paper we discuss technologies, which share commonalities in mitigating these extreme conditions over proposed mission lifetimes, specially focusing on pressure and temperature environments.

  12. Targeted isolation of proteins from natural microbial communities living in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms from extreme environments are often very difficult to cultivate, precluding detailed study by biochemical and physiological techniques. Recent advances in genomic sequencing and proteomic measurements of samples obtained from natural communities have allowed new access to these uncultivated extremophiles and identified abundant proteins that can be isolated directly from natural samples. Here we report the isolation of two abundant heme proteins from low-diversity biofilm microbial communities that thrive in very acidic (pH ~ 1), metal-rich water in a subsurface mine. Purification and detailed characterization of these proteins has afforded new insight into the possible mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation by Leptospirillum Group II, the dominant population in most of these biofilms, and demonstrated that the abundance and posttranslational modifications of one of these proteins is dependent on the lifecycle of the biofilm.

  13. A SiGe BiCMOS Instrumentation Channel for Extreme Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandradevi Ulaganathan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An instrumentation channel is designed, implemented, and tested in a 0.5-μm SiGe BiCMOS process. The circuit features a reconfigurable Wheatstone bridge network that interfaces an assortment of external sensors to signal processing circuits. Also, analog sampling is implemented in the channel using a flying capacitor configuration. The analog samples are digitized by a low-power multichannel A/D converter. Measurement results show that the instrumentation channel supports input signals up to 200 Hz and operates across a wide temperature range of -180°C to 125°C. This work demonstrates the use of a commercially available first generation SiGe BiCMOS process in designing circuits suitable for extreme environment applications.

  14. Biodiversity and geochemistry of an extremely acidic, low-temperature subterranean environment sustained by chemolithotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Sakurako; Bryan, Christopher G; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2011-08-01

    The geochemical dynamics and composition of microbial communities within a low-temperature (≈ 8.5°C), long-abandoned (> 90 years) underground pyrite mine (Cae Coch, located in north Wales) were investigated. Surface water percolating through fractures in the residual pyrite ore body that forms the roof of the mine becomes extremely acidic and iron-enriched due to microbially accelerated oxidative dissolution of the sulfide mineral. Water droplets on the mine roof were found to host a very limited diversity of exclusively autotrophic microorganisms, dominated by the recently described psychrotolerant iron/sulfur-oxidizing acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and smaller numbers of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. In contrast, flowing water within the mine chamber was colonized with vast macroscopic microbial growths, in the form of acid streamers and microbial stalactites, where the dominant microorganisms were Betaproteobacteria (autotrophic iron oxidizers such as 'Ferrovum myxofaciens' and a bacterium related to Gallionella ferruginea). An isolated pool within the mine showed some similarity (although greater biodiversity) to the roof droplets, and was the only site where archaea were relatively abundant. Bacteria not previously associated with extremely acidic, metal-rich environments (a Sphingomonas sp. and Ralstonia pickettii) were found within the abandoned mine. Data supported the hypothesis that the Cae Coch ecosystem is underpinned by acidophilic, mostly autotrophic, bacteria that use ferrous iron present in the pyrite ore body as their source of energy, with a limited role for sulfur-based autotrophy. Results of this study highlight the importance of novel bacterial species (At. ferrivorans and acidophilic iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria) in mediating mineral oxidation and redox transformations of iron in acidic, low-temperature environments. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Donald; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Stackpoole, Margaret; Chinnapongse, Ronald; Munk, Michelle; Dillman, Robert; Feldman, Jay; Prabhu, Dinesh; Beerman, Adam

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-shield for extreme entry environment.

  16. Fabrication of Silica Nanospheres Coated Membranes: towards the Effective Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsion in Extremely Acidic and Concentrated Salty Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Yuning Chen; Na Liu; Yingze Cao; Xin Lin; Liangxin Xu; Weifeng Zhang; Yen Wei; Lin Feng

    2016-01-01

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic surface is fabricated by simply coating silica nanospheres onto a glass fiber membrane through a sol-gel process. Such membrane has a complex framework with micro and nano structures covering and presents a high efficiency (more than 98%) of oil-in-water emulsion separation under harsh environments including strong acidic and concentrated salty conditions. This membrane also possesses outstanding stability since no obvious decline in efficienc...

  17. Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The chemical stability of high temperature materials must be known for use in the extreme environments of combustion applications. The characterization techniques available at NASA Glenn Research Center vary from fundamental thermodynamic property determination to material durability testing in actual engine environments. In this paper some of the unique techniques and facilities available at NASA Glenn will be reviewed. Multiple cell Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry is used to determine thermodynamic data by sampling gas species formed by reaction or equilibration in a Knudsen cell held in a vacuum. The transpiration technique can also be used to determine thermodynamic data of volatile species but at atmospheric pressures. Thermodynamic data in the Si-O-H(g) system were determined with this technique. Free Jet Sampling Mass Spectrometry can be used to study gas-solid interactions at a pressure of one atmosphere. Volatile Si(OH)4(g) was identified by this mass spectrometry technique. A High Pressure Burner Rig is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrocarbon-fueled combustion environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) volatility rates were measured in the burner rig as a function of total pressure, gas velocity and temperature. Finally, the Research Combustion Lab Rocket Test Cell is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine environments to assess material durability. SiC recession due to rocket engine exposures was measured as a function of oxidant/fuel ratio, temperature, and total pressure. The emphasis of the discussion for all techniques will be placed on experimental factors that must be controlled for accurate acquisition of results and reliable prediction of high temperature material chemical stability.

  18. Microorganisms in extreme environments with a view to astrobiology in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckbach, Joseph; Chela-Flores, Julian

    2015-09-01

    We review the various manifestations of the evolution of life in extreme environments. We review those aspects of extremophiles that are most relevant for astrobiology. We are aware that geothermal energy triggering sources of heat in oceanic environments are not unique to our planet, a fact that was exposed by the Voyager mission images of volcanic activity on Io, the Jovian moon. Such activity exceeded by far what was known form terrestrial geology. The science of astrobiology has considered the possible presence of several moon oceans in the vicinity of both giant gas and icy planets. These watery environments include, not only Europa (strongly suggested by data from the Galileo mission), but the Voyager flybys exposed, not only the unusual geothermal activity on Io, but also the possible presence of subsurface oceans and some geothermal activity on the Neptune's moon Triton. More recently, calculations of Hussmann and coworkers with available data do not exclude that even Uranus moons may be candidates for bearing subsurface oceans. These possibilities invite a challenge that we gladly welcome, of preliminary discussions of habitability of extremophiles in so far novel environments for the science of astrobiology. Nevertheless, such exploration is currently believed to be feasible with the new generations of missions suggested for the time window of 2030 - 2040, or even earlier. We are envisaging, not only the current exploration of the moons of Saturn, but in the coming years we expect to go beyond to Uranus and Neptune to include dwarf planets and trans-neptunian worlds. Consequently, it is necessary to begin questioning whether the Europa-like conditions for the evolution of microorganisms are repeatable elsewhere. At present three new missions are in the process of being formulated, including the selection of payloads that will be necessary for the exploration of the various so far unexplored moons.

  19. NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations: Science Operations Development for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission 16 in 2012 was to evaluate and compare the performance of a defined series of representative near-Earth asteroid (NEA) extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks under different conditions and combinations of work systems, constraints, and assumptions considered for future human NEA exploration missions. NEEMO 16 followed NASA's 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS), the primary focus of which was understanding the implications of communication latency, crew size, and work system combinations with respect to scientific data quality, data management, crew workload, and crew/mission control interactions. The 1-g environment precluded meaningful evaluation of NEA EVA translation, worksite stabilization, sampling, or instrument deployment techniques. Thus, NEEMO missions were designed to provide an opportunity to perform a preliminary evaluation of these important factors for each of the conditions being considered. NEEMO 15 also took place in 2011 and provided a first look at many of the factors, but the mission was cut short due to a hurricane threat before all objectives were completed. ARES Directorate (KX) personnel consulted with JSC engineers to ensure that high-fidelity planetary science protocols were incorporated into NEEMO mission architectures. ARES has been collaborating with NEEMO mission planners since NEEMO 9 in 2006, successively building upon previous developments to refine science operations concepts within engineering constraints; it is expected to continue the collaboration as NASA's human exploration mission plans evolve.

  20. Adrenocortical stress responses influence an invasive vertebrate's fitness in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Tim S; Letnic, Mike; Webb, Jonathan K; Dempster, Tim

    2013-10-07

    Continued range expansion into physiologically challenging environments requires invasive species to maintain adaptive phenotypic performance. The adrenocortical stress response, governed in part by glucocorticoid hormones, influences physiological and behavioural responses of vertebrates to environmental stressors. However, any adaptive role of this response in invasive populations that are expanding into extreme environments is currently unclear. We experimentally manipulated the adrenocortical stress response of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) to investigate its effect on phenotypic performance and fitness at the species' range front in the Tanami Desert, Australia. Here, toads are vulnerable to overheating and dehydration during the annual hot-dry season and display elevated plasma corticosterone levels indicative of severe environmental stress. By comparing unmanipulated control toads with toads whose adrenocortical stress response was manipulated to increase acute physiological stress responsiveness, we found that control toads had significantly reduced daily evaporative water loss and higher survival relative to the experimental animals. The adrenocortical stress response hence appears essential in facilitating complex phenotypic performance and setting fitness trajectories of individuals from invasive species during range expansion.

  1. A Multi-Wavelength View of the Environments of Extreme Clustered Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buizer, James M.

    2017-01-01

    It is believed that the vast majority of, if not all, stars form within OB clusters. Most theories of star formation assume a star forms in isolation and ignore the fact that the cluster environment and, especially, the presence of extremely energetic and high mass young stellar objects nearby, may have a profound impact on the formation process of a typical cluster member. Giant HII (GHII) regions are Galactic analogs to starburst regions seen in external galaxies, hosting the most active areas of clustered star formation. As such, GHII regions represent a population of objects that can reveal a wealth of information on the environment of the earliest stages of clustered star formation and how it is affected by feedback from the most massive cluster members. This study employs new mid-infrared imaging data obtained from the airborne observatory, SOFIA, as well as archival imaging data from the near-infrared to cm radio wavelengths to create a rich multi-wavelength dataset of a dozen galactic GHII regions. These data allow quantification of the detailed physical conditions within GHII regions individually and as a population on both global and small scales.

  2. Extreme operative temperatures are better descriptors of the thermal environment than mean temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Agustín; Trefaut Rodrigues, Miguel; Navas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In ecological studies of thermal biology the thermal environment is most frequently described using the mean or other measures of central tendency in environmental temperatures. However, this procedure may hide biologically relevant thermal variation for ectotherms, potentially misleading interpretations. Extremes of operative temperatures (EOT) can help with this problem by bracketing the thermal environment of focal animals. Within this paper, we quantify how mean operative temperatures relate to the range of simultaneously available operative temperatures (a measure of error). We also show how EOT: 1) detect more thermal differences among microsites than measures of central tendency, like the mean OT, 2) allow inferring on microsite use by ectothermic animals, and 3) clarify the relationships between field operative temperatures and temperatures measured at weather stations (WS). To do that, we explored operative temperatures measured at four sites of the Brazilian Caatingas and their correspondent nearest weather stations. We found that the daily mean OT can hide temperature ranges of 41 °C simultaneously available at our study sites. In addition, EOT detected more thermal differences among microsites than central quantiles. We also show how EOT allow inferring about microsite use of ectothermic animals in a given site. Finally, the daily maximum temperature and the daily temperature range measured at WSs predicted well the minimum available field OT at localities many kilometers away. Based on our results, we recommend the use of EOT, instead of mean OT, in thermal ecology studies.

  3. A milestone toward understanding PDR properties in the extreme environment of LMC-30Dor

    CERN Document Server

    Chevance, M; Lebouteiller, V; Godard, B; Cormier, D; Galliano, F; Hony, S; Indebetouw, R; Bourlot, J Le; Lee, M Y; Petit, F Le; Pellegrini, E; Roueff, E; Wu, R

    2016-01-01

    More complete knowledge of galaxy evolution requires understanding the process of star formation and interaction between the interstellar radiation field and the interstellar medium in galactic environments traversing a wide range of physical parameter space. Here we focus on the impact of massive star formation on the surrounding low metallicity ISM in 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A low metal abundance, as is the case of some galaxies of the early universe, results in less ultra-violet shielding for the formation of the molecular gas necessary for star formation to proceed. The half-solar metallicity gas in this region is strongly irradiated by the super star cluster R136, making it an ideal laboratory to study the structure of the ISM in an extreme environment. Our spatially resolved study investigates the gas heating and cooling mechanisms, particularly in the photo-dissociation regions where the chemistry and thermal balance are regulated by far-ultraviolet photons (6 eV< h\

  4. Extremely environment-hard and low work function transfer-mold field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Masayuki, E-mail: m-nakamoto@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan); Moon, Jonghyun [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Extremely environment-hard and low work function field-emitter arrays (FEAs) were fabricated by a transfer-mold emitter fabrication method to produce highly reliable vacuum nanoelectronic devices able to operate stably at low voltage in highly oxidizing atmospheres. Amorphous carbon (a-C) having a work function of 3.6 eV and sp{sup 3} fraction of 85.6% prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used as the emitter material. The field-emission characteristics of the obtained transfer-mold FEAs strongly depended on their work function and morphology. The environment-hard characteristics of the transfer-mold a-C FEAs were compared with those of the transfer-mold titanium nitride FEAs and nickel FEAs. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to confirm the stable chemical states of the FEAs after oxygen radical treatment. The small amount of material oxidized (6.3%) at the surface of the a-C FEAs compared with 11.8% for the TiN-FEAs and 39.0% for Ni FEAs after oxygen radical treatment explained their almost constant work function in oxidizing atmospheres. The emission fluctuation rates of transfer-mold a-C FEAs without resistive layers under in situ radical treatment were as low as ±5.0%, compared with 5–100% for conventional FEAs with resistive layers not under highly oxidizing atmospheres. Therefore, the present environment-hard and low work function transfer-mold a-C FEAs are expected to be useful for reliable vacuum nanoelectronic devices.

  5. Optimization of Damper Top Mount Characteristics to Improve Vehicle Ride Comfort and Harshness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina M. S. Kaldas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optimization technique for optimizing the damper top mount characteristics to improve vehicle ride comfort and harshness is developed. The proposed optimization technique employs a new combined objective function based on ride comfort, harshness, and impact harshness evaluation. A detailed and accurate damper top mount mathematical model is implemented inside a validated quarter vehicle model to provide a realistic simulation environment for the optimization study. The ride comfort and harshness of the quarter vehicle are evaluated by analyzing the body acceleration in different frequency ranges. In addition, the top mount deformation is considered as a penalty factor for the system performance. The influence of the ride comfort and harshness weighting parameters of the proposed objective function on the optimal damper top mount characteristics is studied. The dynamic stiffness of the damper top mount is used to describe the optimum damper top mount characteristics for different optimization case studies. The proposed optimization routine is able to find the optimum characteristics of the damper top mount which improve the ride comfort and the harshness performances together.

  6. An Overview of Materials Structures for Extreme Environments Efforts for 2015 SBIR Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for Agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR 2015 Phase I and II projects that specifically address areas in Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments, one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. Each article describes an innovation, defines its technical objective, and highlights NASA applications as well as commercial and industrial applications. Ten technologies are featured: metamaterials-inspired aerospace structures, metallic joining to advanced ceramic composites, multifunctional polyolefin matrix composite structures, integrated reacting fluid dynamics and predictive materials degradation models for propulsion system conditions, lightweight inflatable structural airlock (LISA), copolymer materials for fused deposition modeling 3-D printing of nonstandard plastics, Type II strained layer superlattice materials development for space-based focal plane array applications, hydrogenous polymer-regolith composites for radiation-shielding materials, a ceramic matrix composite environmental barrier coating durability model, and advanced composite truss printing for large solar array structures. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, program managers, and other personnel to learn about innovations in this technology area as well as possibilities for collaboration with innovative small businesses that could benefit NASA programs and projects.

  7. Moving in extreme environments: open water swimming in cold and warm water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Michael; Bradford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Open water swimming (OWS), either 'wild' such as river swimming or competitive, is a fast growing pastime as well as a part of events such as triathlons. Little evidence is available on which to base high and low water temperature limits. Also, due to factors such as acclimatisation, which disassociates thermal sensation and comfort from thermal state, individuals cannot be left to monitor their own physical condition during swims. Deaths have occurred during OWS; these have been due to not only thermal responses but also cardiac problems. This paper, which is part of a series on 'Moving in Extreme Environments', briefly reviews current understanding in pertinent topics associated with OWS. Guidelines are presented for the organisation of open water events to minimise risk, and it is concluded that more information on the responses to immersion in cold and warm water, the causes of the individual variation in these responses and the precursors to the cardiac events that appear to be the primary cause of death in OWS events will help make this enjoyable sport even safer.

  8. Digital Learning Network Education Events of NASA's Extreme Environments Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather; Guillory, Erika

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLN) reaches out to thousands of students each year through video conferencing and web casting. The DLN has created a series of live education videoconferences connecting NASA s Extreme Environment Missions Operations (NEEMO) team to students across the United States. The programs are also extended to students around the world live web casting. The primary focus of the events is the vision for space exploration. During the programs, NEEMO Crewmembers including NASA astronauts, engineers and scientists inform and inspire students about the importance of exploration and share the impact of the project as it correlates with plans to return to the moon and explore the planet Mars. These events highlight interactivity. Students talk live with the aquanauts in Aquarius, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration s underwater laboratory. With this program, NASA continues the Agency s tradition of investing in the nation's education programs. It is directly tied to the Agency's major education goal of attracting and retaining students in science, technology, and engineering disciplines. Before connecting with the aquanauts, the students conduct experiments of their own designed to coincide with mission objectives. This paper describes the events that took place in September 2006.

  9. An Overview of SBIR Phase 2 Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR Phase II projects from 2007-2012 specifically addressing Areas in Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments which is one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. There are twenty three technologies featured with emphasis on a wide spectrum of applications such as fine-filament superconductor wire, composite oxide cathode materials, nano-composites, high radiation solar cell, wrapped multilayer insulation, thin aerogel, and much more. Each article in this booklet describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA personnel including engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn of NASA SBIR's capabilities that might be crosscutting into this technology area. As the result, it would cause collaborations and partnerships between the small companies and NASA Programs and Projects resulting in benefit to both SBIR companies and NASA.

  10. Disease transmission in an extreme environment: nematode parasites infect reindeer during the Arctic winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anja M; Justin Irvine, R; Wilson, Kenneth; Piertney, Stuart B; Halvorsen, Odd; Coulson, Stephen J; Stien, Audun; Albon, Steve D

    2012-07-01

    Parasitic nematodes are found in almost all wild vertebrate populations but few studies have investigated these host-parasite relationships in the wild. For parasites with free-living stages, the external environment has a major influence on life-history traits, and development and survival is generally low at sub-zero temperatures. For reindeer that inhabit the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, parasite transmission is expected to occur in the summer, due to the extreme environmental conditions and the reduced food intake by the host in winter. Here we show experimentally that, contrary to most parasitic nematodes, Marshallagia marshalli of Svalbard reindeer is transmitted during the Arctic winter. Winter transmission was demonstrated by removing parasites in the autumn, using a novel delayed-release anthelmintic bolus, and estimating re-infection rates in reindeer sampled in October, February and April. Larval stages of nematodes were identified using molecular tools, whereas adult stages were identified using microscopy. The abundance of M. marshalli adult worms and L4s increased significantly from October to April, indicating that reindeer were being infected with L3s from the pasture throughout the winter. To our knowledge, this study is the first to experimentally demonstrate over-winter transmission of a gastro-intestinal nematode parasite in a wild animal. Potential mechanisms associated with this unusual transmission strategy are discussed in light of our knowledge of the life-history traits of this parasite.

  11. Adaptation to extreme environments: structure-function relationships in Emperor penguin haemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, M; Condò, S G; di Prisco, G; Giardina, B

    1994-04-15

    The functional properties of the single haemoglobin (Hb) of Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) have been investigated at different temperatures as a function of proton and organic phosphate concentration. The complete amino acid sequence has been established. Comparison with that of human HbA shows 12 substitutions in the contact regions of alpha beta dimers. In addition to overall similarities shared with most of the avian Hbs previously described, this Hb shows significant differences, which could be related to the peculiar behaviour of this penguin. In particular we may consider that: (1) the shape of the Bohr effect curve seems well adapted for gas exchange during very prolonged dives, preserving penguin Hb from a sudden and not controlled stripping of oxygen; (2) the very minor enthalpy change observed at lower pH could be an example of molecular adaptation, through which oxygen delivery becomes essentially insensitive to exposure to the extremely low temperatures of the environment. Moreover, the small alkaline Bohr effect has been found to be only chloride-linked, since the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity is totally abolished in the absence of this ion. These functional characteristics are discussed on the basis of the primary structure of alpha and beta-chains.

  12. Present knowledge of the bacterial microflora in the extreme environment of sugar thick juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justé, Annelies; Lievens, Bart; Frans, Ingeborg; Klingeberg, Michael; Michiels, Chris W; Willems, Kris A

    2008-09-01

    The diversity of the bacterial population in sugar thick juice, an intermediate product in the production of beet sugar, which exhibits an extreme, osmophilic environment with a water activity value (a(w)) less than 0.86, was assessed with both culture-dependent and -independent 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based analyses. In comparison with previous studies, the number of different thick juice bacterial species increased from 29 to 72. Remarkably, a limited, gram-positive, culturable flora, encompassing species of Bacillus, Staphylococcus and mainly Tetragenococcus dominated thick juice during storage, while a more heterogeneous and unculturable fraction of Acinetobacter, Sporolactobacillus and Thermus species could be detected in freshly produced thick juice. Notably, almost all bacteria detected in the thick juice were also detected in the air, emphasising the importance of further investigation and assessment of strategies to reduce (air) contamination during processing and storage. The discovery of the contamination source may be used for the development of management strategies for thick juice degradation resulting from microbial activity.

  13. Time-of-flight Extreme Environment Diffractometer at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhnenko, Oleksandr; Stein, Wolf-Dieter; Bleif, Hans-Jürgen; Fromme, Michael; Bartkowiak, Maciej; Wilpert, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer (EXED) is a new neutron time-of-flight instrument at the BER II research reactor at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany. Although EXED is a special-purpose instrument, its early construction made it available for users as a general-purpose diffractometer. In this respect, EXED became one of the rare examples, where the performance of a time-of-flight diffractometer at a continuous source can be characterized. In this paper, we report on the design and performance of EXED with an emphasis on the unique instrument capabilities. The latter comprise variable wavelength resolution and wavelength band, control of the incoming beam divergence, the possibility to change the angular positions of detectors and their distance to the sample, and use of event recording and offline histogramming. These features combined make EXED easily tunable to the requirements of a particular problem, from conventional diffraction to small angle neutron scattering. The instrument performance is demonstrated by several reference measurements and user experiments.

  14. Reaction Product Identification in Extreme Chemical Environments by Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    Molecular rotational spectroscopy has several advantages for detection of reaction intermediates and products under extreme laboratory conditions. Rotational spectroscopy has high sensitivity to the molecular structure and provides high spectral resolution in low pressure environments. Furthermore, quantum chemistry provides accurate estimates of the spectroscopic parameters. As a result, rotational spectroscopy can identify molecular species in complex reaction mixtures without the need for chromatographic separation and without the need for a previously recorded ``library spectrum'' of the molecule. The application of chirped pulse Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy methods for the identification of molecules of astrochemical interest formed in pulsed discharge sources will be described including recent advances for high-throughput mm-wave spectroscopy. The set of reaction products created in the experiment can provide insight into the reaction mechanism. Reactions involving the CN radical will be discussed. These reactions can be barrierless making them candidates for interstellar gas reactions. The possibility that interstellar cyanomethanimine is produced by gas phase radical-neutral reactions instead of surface chemistry on grain-supported ices will be discussed using recent spatially resolved chemical images in Sagittarius B2 observed with the Jansky Very Large Array. This work supported by NSF CHE 1213200.

  15. Planetary protection in the extreme environments of low-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A; Morin, J; Donati, J -F; Lang, P; Russell, A J B

    2013-01-01

    Recent results showed that the magnetic field of M-dwarf (dM) stars, currently the main targets in searches for terrestrial planets, is very different from the solar one, both in topology as well as in intensity. In particular, the magnetised environment surrounding a planet orbiting in the habitable zone (HZ) of dM stars can differ substantially to the one encountered around the Earth. These extreme magnetic fields can compress planetary magnetospheres to such an extent that a significant fraction of the planet's atmosphere may be exposed to erosion by the stellar wind. Using observed surface magnetic maps for a sample of 15 dM stars, we investigate the minimum degree of planetary magnetospheric compression caused by the intense stellar magnetic fields. We show that hypothetical Earth-like planets with similar terrestrial magnetisation (~1G) orbiting at the inner (outer) edge of the HZ of these stars would present magnetospheres that extend at most up to 6.1 (11.7) planetary radii. To be able to sustain an E...

  16. 沸石分子筛膜苛刻环境有机物脱水的研究进展%Research advances in zeolite membranes for pervaporation dehydration of organics in harsh environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金渠; 杨建华; 陈赞; 殷德宏

    2011-01-01

    Dehydration of organics in harsh conditions is highly demanded in industrials. Although the per-vaporation dehydration of bio-ethanol using NaA zeolite membrane has been industrialized, the dehydration of organics in strong acidic conditions is only at the early-stage in international membrane community, facing key issues being the poor acid resistance and flow flux of the membrane. In the present review the international research advances in development of zeolite membranes for the dehydration of organic mixtures in acidic conditions were summarized. Especially our attempts and achievements in developments of high performance MOR and ZSM-5 zeolite membranes by novel approaches of functional defects repair and micro-structural optimization respectively for pervpaoration dehydration of acetic acid were shown. The future outlook of zeolite membrane for liquid molecular mixtures is also given.%苛刻环境酸性条件下有机物的脱水在工业上有重大需求.尽管NaA沸石分子筛膜渗透蒸发在中性温和条件下乙醇等有机物脱水已经实现了工业化,但沸石分子筛膜有机酸的脱水或强酸性条件下(pH<3)的有机物的脱水在国际上刚刚起步,面临的关键技术问题是沸分子筛膜的耐酸性和膜的通量极低.对国际上酸性条件下有机物脱水沸石膜的研究现状进行了简要的概述和分析,介绍了功能化修补法高性能MOR沸石膜的研制等,及我们在这领域所做的各种尝试和取得的成果,指出沸石膜微结构的调控是高性能乙酸脱水分离膜制备的关键,对未来发展予以展望.

  17. Effect of environment on extremely severe road traffic crashes:retrospective epidemic analysis during 2000-2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃华丽; 赵新才; 周继红; 邱俊; 杨在亮; 蒋志泉; 朱秉忠

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To make an epidemiological analysis of the effect of environment on extremely severe road traffic crashes (RTCs). Methods: Epidemiologic data of extremely severe RTCs associated with environmental factors, including weather, topography, road conditions and other traffic conditions in Mainland China during 2000-2001, were collected and analyzed. Results: (1) During 2000-2001, there were 3 365 extremely severe RTCs with 13 666 deaths, 12 204 injuries and a direct economical loss of 136 million RMB. (2) Most extremely severe RTCs occurred in fine weather days and in the daytime. The high occurrence sites were plain areas, horizontal and straight roads, Grade B and C roads, ordinary road segment, and asphalt, smooth and mixed roads. (3) Compared with other RTCs, extremely severe RTCs were more likely to happen under following conditions: on cloudy, snowing, misty and blustering days; in hill and mountainous areas; on crooked and sloping roads; on freeway, Grade A, B, and C roads; mixed roads; ordinary, bridge, narrow and transitional roads; sand and dirt-roads; without traffic control measures; night without lighting. (4) Extremely severe RTCs of mountainous area or crooked and sloping roads were most severe in terms of deaths and injures per crash. Conclusions: Extremely severe RTCs are closely related with environmental factors. Rational road programming, enhancing road establishment and improving road conditions are probably effective measures to reduce the road traffic injuries.

  18. Intergenerational Continuity and Discontinuity in Harsh Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Rand D.; Schofield, Thomas J.; Neppl, Tricia K.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The Family Transitions Project began in 1989 to see how rural families in Iowa were coping with the severe economic downturn in agriculture at that time. In this report we show that cohort members who were treated harshly by their parents tended to emulate these behaviors with their children. However, if they co-parented with a partner who demonstrated a warm and supportive parenting style, intergenerational continuity was disrupted. PMID:22754400

  19. Four newly isolated fuselloviruses from extreme geothermal environments reveal unusual morphologies and a possible interviral recombination mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bo Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Spindle-shaped virus-like particles are abundant in extreme geothermal environments, from which five spindle-shaped viral species have been isolated to date. They infect members of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus, and constitute the Fuselloviridae, a family of double-stranded DNA...

  20. Environmental harshness, latitude and incipient speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jason T

    2014-02-01

    Are rates of evolution and speciation fastest where diversity is greatest - the tropics? A commonly accepted theory links the latitudinal diversity gradient to a speciation pump model whereby the tropics produce species at a faster rate than extra-tropical regions. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Botero et al. () test the speciation pump model using subspecies richness patterns for more than 9000 species of birds and mammals as a proxy for incipient speciation opportunity. Rather than using latitudinal centroids, the authors investigate the role of various environmental correlates of latitude as drivers of subspecies richness. Their key finding points to environmental harshness as a positive predictor of subspecies richness. The authors link high subspecies richness in environmental harsh areas to increased opportunities for geographic range fragmentation and/or faster rates of trait evolution as drivers of incipient speciation. Because environmental harshness generally increases with latitude, these results suggest that opportunity for incipient speciation is lowest where species richness is highest. The authors interpret this finding as incompatible with the view of the tropics as a cradle of diversity. Their results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that reproductive isolation and speciation occur fastest at high latitudes.

  1. Determinants of harsh parenting in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-Armenta, M; McCloskey, L A

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a structural model of the determinants of harsh parenting among Mexican mothers. One hundred five mothers (46 from the community; 59 referred to agencies for child maltreatment) were recruited from Sonora (Northern) Mexico and interviewed. In this model the use of physical punishment was explained by (1) authoritarian parenting style (mothers' beliefs concerning the effective use of physical punishment and mothers' lack of disciplinary skills) and (2) family dysfunction (a latent variable constructed from reports of interspousal violence and the parents' use of alcohol and drugs). In addition, the indirect effects of demographic and historical variables on harsh parenting was included. The findings show that the most important factor influencing the use of physical punishment in these families was authoritarian parenting style, exerting a significant direct effect on the mothers' reports of their use of harsh punishment. Family dysfunction had an indirect effect through parenting style. Some sociodemographic variables also indirectly influenced the use of beliefs maternal punishment It is concluded that cultural beliefs play a major role in parenting within the framework of Mexican family relations.

  2. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    uptake systems could reflect their obligatory occupation of extremely low pH environments where high concentrations of soluble iron may always be available and were oxidized sulfur species might not compromise iron speciation dynamics. Presence of bacterioferritin in the Acidithiobacilli, polyphosphate accumulation functions and variants of FieF-like diffusion facilitators in both Acidithiobacilli and Leptospirilla, indicate that they may remove or store iron under conditions of variable availability. In addition, the Fe(II-oxidizing capacity of both A. ferrooxidans and Leptospirilla could itself be a way to evade iron stress imposed by readily available Fe(II ions at low pH. Fur regulatory sites have been predicted for a number of gene clusters including iron related and non-iron related functions in both the Acidithiobacilli and Leptospirilla, laying the foundation for the future discovery of iron regulated and iron-phosphate coordinated regulatory control circuits. Conclusion In silico analyses of the genomes of acidophilic bacteria are beginning to tease apart the mechanisms that mediate iron uptake and homeostasis in low pH environments. Initial models pinpoint significant differences in abundance and diversity of iron management mechanisms between Leptospirilla and Acidithiobacilli, and begin to reveal how these two groups respond to iron cycling and iron fluctuations in naturally acidic environments and in industrial operations. Niche partitions and ecological successions between acidophilic microorganisms may be partially explained by these observed differences. Models derived from these analyses pave the way for improved hypothesis testing and well directed experimental investigation. In addition, aspects of these models should challenge investigators to evaluate alternative iron management strategies in non-acidophilic model organisms.

  3. Modular SiGe 130 nm Cell Library for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA space missions utilizing application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) under extreme conditions have a critical need for high performance analog cell...

  4. Nutritional Assessment During a 14-d Saturation Dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation V Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Fesperman, J. V.; Smith, M. D.; Rice, B. L.; Zwart, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiological and nutritional changes associated with space travel, particularly since exploration missions are anticipated, and flight research opportunities are limited. A clinical nutritional assessment of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation V (NEEMO) crew (4 M, 2 F) was conducted before, during, and after the 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before (D-12 and D-1), during (MD 7 and MD 12), and after (R + 0 and R + 7) the dive. The foods were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiological changes were reported both during the dive and post dive that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Serum hemoglobin and hematocrit were decreased (P less than 0.05) post dive. Serum ferritin and ceruloplasmin significantly increased during the dive, while transferring receptors tended to go down during the dive and were significantly decreased by the last day (R + 0). Along with significant hematological changes, there was also evidence for increased oxidative damage and stress during the dive. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was elevated (P less than 0.05) during the dive, while glutathione peroxidase and superoxide disrnutase activities were decreased (P less than 0.05) during the dive. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration also tended to increase during the dive, suggesting the presence of a stress-induced inflammatory response, Decreased leptin during the dive (P less than 0.05) may also be related to the increased stress. Similar to what is observed during spaceflight, subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to further define the physiological effects of spaceflight and investigate potential countermeasures.

  5. A 200 C Universal Gate Driver Integrated Circuit for Extreme Environment Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature power converters (dc-dc, dc-ac, etc.) have enormous potential in extreme environment applications, including automotive, aerospace, geothermal, nuclear, and well logging. For successful realization of such high-temperature power conversion modules, the associated control electronics also need to perform at high temperature. This paper presents a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based high-temperature gate driver integrated circuit (IC) incorporating an on-chip low-power temperature sensor and demonstrating an improved peak output current drive over our previously reported work. This driver IC has been primarily designed for automotive applications, where the underhood temperature can reach 200 C. This new gate driver prototype has been designed and implemented in a 0.8 {micro}m, 2-poly, and 3-metal bipolar CMOS-DMOS (Double-Diffused Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) on SOI process and has been successfully tested for up to 200 C ambient temperature driving a SiC MOSFET and a SiC normally-ON JFET. The salient feature of the proposed universal gate driver is its ability to drive power switches over a wide range of gate turn-ON voltages such as MOSFET (0 to 20 V), normally-OFF JFET (-7 to 3 V), and normally-ON JFET (-20 to 0 V). The measured peak output current capability of the driver is around 5 A and is thus capable of driving several power switches connected in parallel. An ultralow-power on-chip temperature supervisory circuit has also been integrated into the die to safeguard the driver circuit against excessive die temperature ({ge}220 C). This approach utilizes increased diode leakage current at higher temperature to monitor the die temperature. The power consumption of the proposed temperature sensor circuit is below 10 {micro}W for operating temperature up to 200 C.

  6. A milestone toward understanding PDR properties in the extreme environment of LMC-30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevance, M.; Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V.; Godard, B.; Cormier, D.; Galliano, F.; Hony, S.; Indebetouw, R.; Le Bourlot, J.; Lee, M.-Y.; Le Petit, F.; Pellegrini, E.; Roueff, E.; Wu, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. More complete knowledge of galaxy evolution requires understanding the process of star formation and the interaction between the interstellar radiation field and interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic environments traversing a wide range of physical parameter space. We focus on the impact of massive star formation on the surrounding low metallicity ISM in 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). A low metal abundance, which can characterizes some galaxies of the early Universe, results in less ultraviolet (UV) shielding for the formation of the molecular gas necessary for star formation to proceed. The half-solar metallicity gas in this region is strongly irradiated by the super star cluster R136, making it an ideal laboratory to study the structure of the ISM in an extreme environment. Aims: Our goal is to construct a comprehensive, self-consistent picture of the density, radiation field, and ISM structure in the most active star-forming region in the LMC, 30 Doradus. Our spatially resolved study investigates the gas heating and cooling mechanisms, particularly in the photodissociation regions (PDR) where the chemistry and thermal balance are regulated by far-UV photons (6 eV parallel geometry and a uniform medium, we find a total extinction AVmax of 1-3 mag, which corresponds to a PDR cloud size of 0.2 to 3pc with small CO depth scale of 0.06 to 0.5 pc. At least 90% of the [C ii] originates in PDRs in this region, while a significant fraction of the LFIR (up to 70% in some places) can be associated with an ionized gas component. The high [O iii]/[C ii] ratio (2 to 60) throughout the observed map, correlated with the filling factor, reveals the porosity of the ISM in this region, which is traversed by hard UV photons surrounding small PDR clumps. We also determine the three-dimensional structure of the gas, showing that the clouds are distributed 20 to 80 pc away from the main ionizing cluster, R136. The reduced images are only available at the CDS

  7. Development of in-vessel neutron flux monitor equipped with microfission chambers to withstand the extreme ITER environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Masao, E-mail: ishikawa.masao@jaea.go.jp; Takeda, Keigo; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The in-vessel components of MFC system must withstand the extreme ITER environment. • To verify this, the thermal cycle test and the vibration tests were conducted. • Both tests were conducted under much severer conditions than ITER environment. • Soundness verification tests after the tests indicated that no problemswere found. • It is shown that the in-vessel component is sufficiently robust ITER environment. - Abstract: Via thermal cycling and vibration tests, this study aims to demonstrate that the in-vessel components of the microfission chamber (MFC) system can withstand the extreme International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) environment. In thermal cycle tests, the signal cable of the device was bent into a smaller radius and it was given more bends than those in its actual configuration within ITER. A faster rate of temperature change than that under the typical ITER baking scenario was then imposed on in-vessel components. For the vibration tests, strong 10 G vibrational accelerations with frequencies ranging from 30 Hz to 2000 Hz were imposed to the detector and the connector of the in-vessel components to simulate various types of electromagnetic events. Soundness verification tests of the in-vessel components conducted after thermal cycling and vibration testing indicated that problems related to the signal transmission cable functioning were not found. Thus, it was demonstrated that the in-vessel components of the MFC can withstand the extreme environment within ITER.

  8. Life in extreme environments: single molecule force spectroscopy as a tool to explore proteins from extremophilic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Hoffmann, Toni; Batchelor, Matthew; Hughes, Megan L; Kendrick, Katherine E; Walsh, Danielle L; Wilson, Michael; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2015-04-01

    Extremophiles are organisms which survive and thrive in extreme environments. The proteins from extremophilic single-celled organisms have received considerable attention as they are structurally stable and functionally active under extreme physical and chemical conditions. In this short article, we provide an introduction to extremophiles, the structural adaptations of proteins from extremophilic organisms and the exploitation of these proteins in industrial applications. We provide a review of recent developments which have utilized single molecule force spectroscopy to mechanically manipulate proteins from extremophilic organisms and the information which has been gained about their stability, flexibility and underlying energy landscapes.

  9. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The high, dry valleys of the Ross Desert of Antarctic, characterized by extremely low temperatures, aridity and a depauperate biota, are used as an analog of the postulated extreme climates of other planetary bodies of the Solar System to test the hypothesis that if life could be supported by Ross, it might be possible where similar conditions prevail. The previously considered sterility of the Ross Desert soil ecosystem has yielded up an indigenous yeast, Cryptoccus vishniacci, which is able to resist the extremes of cold, wet and dry freezing, and long arid periods, while making minimal nutritional demands on the soil.

  10. Extreme Environment Circuit Blocks for Spacecraft Power & Propulsion System & Other High Reliability Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Chronos Technology (DIv of FMI, Inc.) proposes to design, fabricate, and deliver a performance proven, and commercially available set of extreme high operating...

  11. A Miniature Extreme Environment Powder Delivery System (M-PoDS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovation is a low mass, low volume, gas based system that will acquire size selective powdered samples from the extreme ambient (such as Mars or Venus...

  12. A lesson from science in polar extreme environments: ethics and social values for primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Longa, Federica; Crescimbene, Massimo; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Romano, Vincenzo; Cesaroni, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    experiences (doing); to develop civics path linked to "sense of belonging and citizenship", that will make the children aware that Antarctica does not belong to anyone but it belongs to everybody: it is a common and unique good (being). The proposed work is an example of how it is possible, by means of educational paths, promote and support integration values between human beings and nature also in extreme environments as the Antarctic continent.

  13. Fabrication of Silica Nanospheres Coated Membranes: towards the Effective Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsion in Extremely Acidic and Concentrated Salty Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuning; Liu, Na; Cao, Yingze; Lin, Xin; Xu, Liangxin; Zhang, Weifeng; Wei, Yen; Feng, Lin

    2016-09-06

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic surface is fabricated by simply coating silica nanospheres onto a glass fiber membrane through a sol-gel process. Such membrane has a complex framework with micro and nano structures covering and presents a high efficiency (more than 98%) of oil-in-water emulsion separation under harsh environments including strong acidic and concentrated salty conditions. This membrane also possesses outstanding stability since no obvious decline in efficiency is observed after different kinds of oil-in-water emulsions separation, which provides it candidate for comprehensive applicability.

  14. Fabrication of Silica Nanospheres Coated Membranes: towards the Effective Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsion in Extremely Acidic and Concentrated Salty Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuning; Liu, Na; Cao, Yingze; Lin, Xin; Xu, Liangxin; Zhang, Weifeng; Wei, Yen; Feng, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic surface is fabricated by simply coating silica nanospheres onto a glass fiber membrane through a sol-gel process. Such membrane has a complex framework with micro and nano structures covering and presents a high efficiency (more than 98%) of oil-in-water emulsion separation under harsh environments including strong acidic and concentrated salty conditions. This membrane also possesses outstanding stability since no obvious decline in efficiency is observed after different kinds of oil-in-water emulsions separation, which provides it candidate for comprehensive applicability.

  15. How Do Modern Extreme Hydrothermal Environments Inform the Identification of Martian Habitability? The Case of the El Tatio Geyser Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Barbieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success in knowledge gained by the Mars missions in the last two decades, the search for traces of life on Mars is still in progress. The reconstruction of (paleo- environments on Mars have seen a dramatic increase, in particular with regard to the potentially habitable conditions, and it is now possible to recognize a significant role to subaerial hydrothermal processes. For this reason, and because the conditions of the primordial Earth—when these extreme environments had to be common—probably resembled Mars during its most suitable time to host life, research on terrestrial extreme hydrothermal habitats may assist in understanding how to recognize life on Mars. A number of geological and environmental reasons, and logistics opportunities, make the geothermal field of El Tatio, in the Chilean Andes an ideal location to study.

  16. Four newly isolated fuselloviruses from extreme geothermal environments reveal unusual morphologies and a possible interviral recombination mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim;

    2009-01-01

    Spindle-shaped virus-like particles are abundant in extreme geothermal environments, from which five spindle-shaped viral species have been isolated to date. They infect members of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus, and constitute the Fuselloviridae, a family of double-stranded DNA ...... that the spacers of the Sulfolobus CRISPR antiviral system are not biased to the highly similar regions of the fusellovirus genomes....

  17. Development of a Temperature Sensor for Jet Engine and Space Missions Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Culley, Dennis E.; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems in aerospace and in space exploration missions are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings. To address the needs for extreme temperature electronics, research efforts exist at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop and evaluate electronics for extreme temperature operations, and to establish their reliability under extreme temperature operation and thermal cycling; conditions that are typical of both the aerospace and space environments. These efforts are supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics/Subsonic Fixed Wing Program and by the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. This work reports on the results obtained on the development of a temperature sensor geared for use in harsh environments.

  18. Feeding behavior and nutrient intake in spiny forest-dwelling ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) during early gestation and early to mid-lactation periods: compensating in a harsh environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa; Power, Michael L; Ellwanger, Nicholas; Rambeloarivony, Hajamanitra

    2011-07-01

    Strong resource seasonality in Madagascar has led to the evolution of female feeding priority and weaning synchrony in most lemur species. For these taxa, pregnancy/early lactation periods coincide with low food availability, and weaning of infants is timed with increased resources at the onset of the rainy season. Reproductive females experience high metabolic requirements, which they must accommodate, particularly when food resources are scarce. Female ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) residing in spiny forest habitat must deal with resource scarcity, high temperatures (∼36-40°C) and little shade in early to mid-lactation periods. Considered "income breeders," these females must use resources obtained from the environment instead of relying on fat stores; thus, we expected they would differ from same-sized males in time spent on feeding and in the intake of food and nutrients. We investigated these variables in two groups (N = 11 and 12) of Lemur catta residing in spiny forest habitat during early gestation and early to mid-lactation periods. Focal animal data and food plant samples were collected, and plants were analyzed for protein, kcal, and fiber. We found no sex differences for any feeding or nutrient intake variable for the top five food species consumed. Females in early gestation spent more time feeding compared with early/mid-lactation. Physiological compensation for spiny forest-dwelling females may be tied to greater time spent resting compared with gallery forest conspecifics, consuming foods high in protein, calories, and water, reduced home range defense in a sparsely populated habitat, and for Lemur catta females in general, production of relatively dilute milk compared with many strepsirrhines. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Sialyte(TM)-Based Composite Pressure Vessels for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While traveling to Venus, electronics and instruments go through enormous pressure, temperature, and atmospheric environment changes. In the past, this has caused...

  20. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter

  1. HotSense: a high temperature piezoelectric platform for sensing and monitoring in extreme environments (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tim; Wines, Thomas; Martin, David; Vickers, William; Laws, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Effective monitoring of asset integrity subject to corrosion and erosion while minimizing the exposure of personnel to difficult and hazardous working environments has always been a major problem in many industries. One solution of this problem is permanently installed ultrasonic monitoring equipment which can continuously provide information on the rate of corrosion or cracking, even in the most severe environments and at extreme temperatures to prevent the need for shutdown. Here, a permanently installed 5 MHz ultrasonic monitoring system based on our HotSense® technology is designed and investigated. The system applicability for wall thickness, crack monitoring and weld inspection in high temperature environments is demonstrated through experimental studies on a range of Schedule 40 pipes at temperatures up to 350 °C continuously. The applicability for this technology to be distributed to Aerospace and Nuclear sectors are also explored and preliminary results discussed.

  2. Geochemistry meets Biochemistry: Minimal Metabolic Systems in Extremely Thermophilic Bacteria from Geothermal Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, F. T.; DiRuggiero, J.; Davila, J.; Schwartz, M.

    2002-05-01

    A growing body of research confirms that extreme thermophiles can grow at temperatures of at least 113.5oC, at elevated pressures. Other archaeal isolates can thrive in hostile chemical conditions, for example pH 0.8. We, and others have shown that hyperthermophiles have novel heat shock proteins and other chaperonins that permit them to maintain native protein structures in unfavorable conditions. They are also able to survive using individual gases and gas mixtures We have determined the complete genome sequence of a bacterial isolate from thermal mats on the Kamchatka Peninsula that grows on a salts medium with carbon monoxide as its sole energy and carbon source. It forms hydrogen in proportion with CO consumption. The minimal size of its genome, 2.1 megabase pairs, and its ability to form spores have led us to propose that this autotrophic bacterium can serve as a model for ancestral microbial cells. We have isolated a new class of thermophilic, extremely radiation resistant bacteria from Yellowstone National Park that can withstand space vacuum for extended periods. In collaboration with NASA Goddard, we have exposed filters coated with one of these isolates to space vacuum and to extreme UV during a sounding rocket flight at White Sands. Deinococcus radiodurans, the most desiccation and radiation resistant organism characterized so far, was exposed as a control. The new isolate was slightly more desiccation resistant than D. radiodurans, and significantly more resistant than D. radiodurans to extreme UV at 34 nm. These studies may provide insights into the potential for viable bacterial cells to survive transmission through space, a phenomenon usually referred to as panspermia.

  3. Survival in extreme environments – on the current knowledge of adaptations in tardigrades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møbjerg, Nadja; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2011-01-01

    of the tardigrades and highlight species that are currently used as models for physiological and molecular investigations. Tardigrades are uniquely adapted to a range of environmental extremes. Cryptobiosis, currently referred to as a reversible ametabolic state induced by e.g. desiccation, is common especially...... to below )20 C, presumably relying on efficient DNA repair mechanisms and osmoregulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on adaptations found among tardigrades, and presents new data on tardigrade cell numbers and osmoregulation....

  4. Survival in extreme environments - on the current knowledge of adaptations in tardigrades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møbjerg, N; Halberg, K A; Jørgensen, A; Persson, D; Bjørn, M; Ramløv, H; Kristensen, R M

    2011-07-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic animals found worldwide in aquatic as well as terrestrial ecosystems. They belong to the invertebrate superclade Ecdysozoa, as do the two major invertebrate model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We present a brief description of the tardigrades and highlight species that are currently used as models for physiological and molecular investigations. Tardigrades are uniquely adapted to a range of environmental extremes. Cryptobiosis, currently referred to as a reversible ametabolic state induced by e.g. desiccation, is common especially among limno-terrestrial species. It has been shown that the entry and exit of cryptobiosis may involve synthesis of bioprotectants in the form of selective carbohydrates and proteins as well as high levels of antioxidant enzymes and other free radical scavengers. However, at present a general scheme of mechanisms explaining this phenomenon is lacking. Importantly, recent research has shown that tardigrades even in their active states may be extremely tolerant to environmental stress, handling extreme levels of ionizing radiation, large fluctuation in external salinity and avoiding freezing by supercooling to below -20 °C, presumably relying on efficient DNA repair mechanisms and osmoregulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on adaptations found among tardigrades, and presents new data on tardigrade cell numbers and osmoregulation.

  5. Women and Couples in Isolated Extreme Environments: Applications for Long-Duration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, G. R.; Sandal, G. M.

    four women from Greenland, Denmark, UK and Russia who traversed the Greenland ice by ski. The participants did not know each other prior to the expedition. Three were classified as "the right stuff' based on PCI findings. Diary and post-expedition reports indicated that incidents of interpersonal tension were often related to fatigue, homesickness, pain or cold. The participants also indicated that respect and tolerance for differences between them, as weIl as mutual emotional support were crucial factors for the successful completion of the expedition. Group 3 consisted of 3 married couples and the 2 1/2 year old child of the leader and his wife. Five of the crew sailed a small boat from Norway to the Canadian High Arctic; the leader's wife and child joined the team in Greenland. Over a 9 month period, the icelocked boat was ilie center of habitation, scientific, and other activities. Three of the group carried out a 6 week exploratory trek at the end of the winter-over. Participants completed the MPQ prior to the expedition, a WRF over the entire Arctic period, and a semi-structured personality interview at the close of the interval during which the entire group was together. AlI participants scored relatively highest on the Absorption scale, manifested in the salutory experience of enjoying and becoming engrossed in the beauty of the environment. WRF and interview findings indicated that team members consistently reported that the emotional support of and ability to confide in their partner were extremely important in alleviating interpersonal tensions with other team members, and contributed to the overall effective functioning of the group. Reported level of emotional response to stress and coping patterns used while in the stationary habitat were consistent with WRF responses during the later exploratory trek. The woman team member on the trek reported more discomfort regarding personal hygiene issues and fear of injury .In alI groups, the salience of the

  6. Correction factors for assessing immersion suits under harsh conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jonathan; Tikuisis, Peter; Ré, António Simões; Barwood, Martin; Tipton, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Many immersion suit standards require testing of thermal protective properties in calm, circulating water while these suits are typically used in harsher environments where they often underperform. Yet it can be expensive and logistically challenging to test immersion suits in realistic conditions. The goal of this work was to develop a set of correction factors that would allow suits to be tested in calm water yet ensure they will offer sufficient protection in harsher conditions. Two immersion studies, one dry and the other with 500 mL of water within the suit, were conducted in wind and waves to measure the change in suit insulation. In both studies, wind and waves resulted in a significantly lower immersed insulation value compared to calm water. The minimum required thermal insulation for maintaining heat balance can be calculated for a given mean skin temperature, metabolic heat production, and water temperature. Combining the physiological limits of sustainable cold water immersion and actual suit insulation, correction factors can be deduced for harsh conditions compared to calm. The minimum in-situ suit insulation to maintain thermal balance is 1.553-0.0624·TW + 0.00018·TW(2) for a dry calm condition. Multiplicative correction factors to the above equation are 1.37, 1.25, and 1.72 for wind + waves, 500 mL suit wetness, and both combined, respectively. Calm water certification tests of suit insulation should meet or exceed the minimum in-situ requirements to maintain thermal balance, and correction factors should be applied for a more realistic determination of minimum insulation for harsh conditions. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation Hardened High Speed Fiber Optic Transceivers for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program develops fiber optic transceivers that offer wide bandwidth (1 Mbps to 10 Gbps) and operate in space environments targeted by NASA for robotic...

  8. Perspectives of extreme sample environment in neutron scattering and consequences for instrumentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Steiner

    2008-11-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate bulky pieces of matter, increasingly complex sample environment is requested by the users of neutron beams. This corresponds to the ever-growing complexity of the scientific problems addressed by neutron scatterers. Until now such requirements could be satisfied by sample environment, which could be added to the instruments without major modifications. Now it becomes evident, that for certain applications further progress is possible only by bringing the neutrons to the sample environment instead of bringing the sample environment to the neutrons. As one of the first examples of this concept we will discuss the high field magnet (HFM), which Hahn-Meitner-Institute Berlin (HMI) and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Tallahassy (NHFML) are constructing jointly for BENSC at HMI. At BENSC the HMI has built in the meantime a dedicated instrument based on the TOF principle to be equipped with the HFM to enable experiments at fields up to 25 T.

  9. Radiation Hardened High Speed Fiber Optic Transceivers for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of transceiver offering wide bandwidth (1 Mbps to 10 Gbps) that operates in space environments targeted by NASA for robotic exploration....

  10. Damping MEMS Devices in Harsh Environments Using Active Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-17

    natural motion of domain walls and twin boundaries to absorb the energy. Therefore, the focus of this research is to develop new microscale damping...film is placed in tension the twin boundaries move and when the tension is released the residual stresses in the film produce a restoring force to move

  11. New Wireless Sensors for Diagnostics Under Harsh Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-temperature passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are highly desirable for improving safety and efficiency in aviation and space vehicles. This...

  12. Sensing Biological, Chemical, and Radiation Hazards in Harsh Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    0. doi: 10.1557/mrs2010.568 05/07/2013 9.00 Lihong Bao, Zhi-Hui Xu, Rui Li, Xiaodong Li. Catalyst-Free Synthesis and Structural and Mechanical...whereas the stacking faulted CBO nanogrooves, with the absence of hydrated H2O, exhibited 99% loss in elastic modulus, compared to bulk CBO. (3) ZnO ...areas. We observed the entire melting process of individual ZnO nanobelts in situ by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy

  13. Nanostructured sapphire optical fiber for sensing in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Kai; Ma, Yiwei; Tian, Fei; Du, Henry

    2017-05-01

    We describe an innovative and scalable strategy of transforming a commercial unclad sapphire optical fiber to an allalumina nanostructured sapphire optical fiber (NSOF) that overcomes decades-long challenges faced in the field of sapphire fiber optics. The strategy entails fiber coating with metal Al followed by subsequent anodization to form anodized alumina oxide (AAO) cladding of highly organized pore channel structure. We show that Ag nanoparticles entrapped in AAO show excellent structural and morphological stability and less susceptibility to oxidation for potential high-temperature surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). We reveal, with aid of numerical simulations, that the AAO cladding greatly increases the evanescent-field overlap both in power and extent and that lower porosity of AAO results in higher evanescent-field overlap. This work has opened the door to new sapphire fiber-based sensor design and sensor architecture.

  14. Instrument developments for chemical and physical characterization, mapping and sampling of extreme environments (Antarctic sub ice environment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, S. W.; Powell, R. D.; Griffith, I.; Lawson, T.; Schiraga, S.; Ludlam, G.; Oen, J.

    2009-12-01

    A number of instrumentation is currently under development designed to enable the study of subglacial environments in Antarctica through narrow kilometer long boreholes. Instrumentation includes: - slim line Sub-Ice ROV (SIR), - Geochemical Instrumentation Package for Sub Ice Environments (GIPSIE) to study geochemical fluxes in water and across the sediment water interface (CO2, CH4, dO, NH4, NO3, Si, PO4, pH, redox, T, H2, HS, O2, N2O, CTD, particle size, turbidity, color camera, current meter and automated water sampler) with real-time telemetry for targeted sampling, - long term energy-balance mooring system, - active source slide hammer sediment corer, and - integration of a current sensor into the ITP profiler. The instrumentation design is modular and suitable for remote operated as well as autonomous long-term deployment. Of interest to the broader science community is the development of the GIPSIE and efforts to document the effect of sample recovery from depth on the sample chemistry. The GIPSIE is a geochemical instrumentation package with life stream telemetry, allowing for user controlled targeted sampling of water column and the water sediment interphase for chemical and biological work based on actual measurements and not a preprogrammed automated system. The porewater profiler (pH, redox, T, H2, HS, O2, N2O) can penetrate the upper 50 cm of sediment and penetration is documented with real time video. Associated with GIPSIE is an on-site lab set-up, utilizing a set of identical sensors. Comparison between the insitu measurements and measurements taken onsite directly after samples are recovered from depth permits assessing the effect of sample recovery on water and sediment core chemistry. Sample recovery related changes are mainly caused by changes in the pressure temperature field and exposure of samples to atmospheric conditions. Exposure of anaerobic samples to oxygen is here a specific concern. Recovery from depth effects in generally p

  15. STRUCTURAL SCALE LIFE PREDICTION OF AERO STRUCTURES EXPERIENCING COMBINED EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    superiority of tomorrow’s USAF. These platforms experience long-duration, combined and intense, thermo-mechanical-acoustic loads over significant...analysts’ past experience , a heavy reliance on testing, and limited choices to tailor material attributes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS lifing, combined environment...6 Figure 3. Correlation Between Mean Life and Deviation of Mean life with the Addition of New Metallic Systems of

  16. Parental harsh discipline in mainland China: prevalence, frequency, and coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meifang; Liu, Li

    2014-06-01

    The study examined the prevalence, frequency, and coexistence of psychological aggression (PA), corporal punishment (CP), and severe physical abuse (SPA) in mainland China. Using a sample of 2,518 father-mother dyads of 3-15-year-old children, the findings revealed that parental harsh discipline was prevalent in mainland China. The rates of harsh discipline in the current study fell in the middle of the ranges of rates found in other studies. Harsh discipline was most likely directed at boys or children aged 7 years and committed by mothers, young fathers, or high and low socioeconomic status (SES) parents. The prevalence of maternal and paternal PA and CP declined with the children's age. Maternal and paternal SPA first increased and then decreased with child age. The frequency of the three types of maternal and paternal harsh discipline fluctuated depending on the age of the children. In addition, approximately 50% of the mothers and fathers who reported using severe forms of disciplinary practices also engaged in less severe forms of harsh disciplinary practices against their children. SPA generally coexisted with CP and PA, and CP was usually accompanied by PA; however, PA was more likely to occur independently compared with CP and SPA. Moreover, maternal harsh discipline coexisted with paternal harsh discipline to some extent. The coexistence decreased with increasing severity of parental harsh discipline and differed according to child gender. These findings highlight the importance of studying these three types of parental harsh discipline simultaneously and intervening in harsh discipline by mothers and fathers within the same family.

  17. Defining Population Health Vulnerability Following an Extreme Weather Event in an Urban Pacific Island Environment: Honiara, Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natuzzi, Eileen S; Joshua, Cynthia; Shortus, Matthew; Reubin, Reginald; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Ferran, Karen; Aumua, Audrey; Brodine, Stephanie

    2016-08-03

    Extreme weather events are common and increasing in intensity in the southwestern Pacific region. Health impacts from cyclones and tropical storms cause acute injuries and infectious disease outbreaks. Defining population vulnerability to extreme weather events by examining a recent flood in Honiara, Solomon Islands, can help stakeholders and policymakers adapt development to reduce future threats. The acute and subacute health impacts following the April 2014 floods were defined using data obtained from hospitals and clinics, the Ministry of Health and in-country World Health Organization office in Honiara. Geographical information system (GIS) was used to assess morbidity and mortality, and vulnerability of the health system infrastructure and households in Honiara. The April flash floods were responsible for 21 acute deaths, 33 injuries, and a diarrhea outbreak that affected 8,584 people with 10 pediatric deaths. A GIS vulnerability assessment of the location of the health system infrastructure and households relative to rivers and the coastline identified 75% of the health infrastructure and over 29% of Honiara's population as vulnerable to future hydrological events. Honiara, Solomon Islands, is a rapidly growing, highly vulnerable urban Pacific Island environment. Evaluation of the mortality and morbidity from the April 2014 floods as well as the infectious disease outbreaks that followed allows public health specialists and policy makers to understand the health system and populations vulnerability to future shocks. Understanding the negative impacts natural disaster have on people living in urban Pacific environments will help the government as well as development partners in crafting resilient adaptation development.

  18. Adaptation strategies of endolithic chlorophototrophs to survive the hyperarid and extreme solar radiation environment of the Atacama Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek eWierzchos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is one of the driest deserts on Earth and, as such, a natural laboratory to explore the limits of life and the strategies evolved by microorganisms to adapt to extreme environments. Here we report the exceptional adaptation strategies of chlorophototrophic and eukaryotic algae, and chlorophototrophic and prokaryotic cyanobacteria to the hyperarid and extremely high solar radiation conditions occurring in this desert. Our approach combined several microscopy techniques, spectroscopic analytical methods, and molecular analyses. We found that the major adaptation strategy was to avoid the extreme environmental conditions by colonizing cryptoendolithic, as well as, hypoendolithic habitats within gypsum deposits. The cryptoendolithic colonization occurred a few millimeters beneath the gypsum surface and showed a succession of organized horizons of algae and cyanobacteria, which has never been reported for endolithic microbial communities. The presence of cyanobacteria beneath the algal layer, in close contact with sepiolite inclusions, and their hypoendolithic colonization suggest that occasional liquid water might persist within these sub-microhabitats. We also identified the presence of abundant carotenoids in the upper cryptoendolithic algal habitat and scytonemin in the cyanobacteria hypoendolithic habitat. This study illustrates that successful lithobiontic microbial colonization at the limit for microbial life is the result of a combination of adaptive strategies to avoid excess solar irradiance and extreme evapotranspiration rates, taking advantage of the complex structural and mineralogical characteristics of gypsum deposits – conceptually called rock’s habitable architecture. Additionally self-protection by synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites likely produces a shielding effect that prevents photoinhibition and lethal photooxidative damage to the chlorophototrophs, representing another

  19. Adaptation strategies of endolithic chlorophototrophs to survive the hyperarid and extreme solar radiation environment of the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchos, Jacek; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne; Vítek, Petr; Artieda, Octavio; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Škaloud, Pavel; Tisza, Michel; Davila, Alfonso F.; Vílchez, Carlos; Garbayo, Inés; Ascaso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is one of the driest deserts on Earth and, as such, a natural laboratory to explore the limits of life and the strategies evolved by microorganisms to adapt to extreme environments. Here we report the exceptional adaptation strategies of chlorophototrophic and eukaryotic algae, and chlorophototrophic and prokaryotic cyanobacteria to the hyperarid and extremely high solar radiation conditions occurring in this desert. Our approach combined several microscopy techniques, spectroscopic analytical methods, and molecular analyses. We found that the major adaptation strategy was to avoid the extreme environmental conditions by colonizing cryptoendolithic, as well as, hypoendolithic habitats within gypsum deposits. The cryptoendolithic colonization occurred a few millimeters beneath the gypsum surface and showed a succession of organized horizons of algae and cyanobacteria, which has never been reported for endolithic microbial communities. The presence of cyanobacteria beneath the algal layer, in close contact with sepiolite inclusions, and their hypoendolithic colonization suggest that occasional liquid water might persist within these sub-microhabitats. We also identified the presence of abundant carotenoids in the upper cryptoendolithic algal habitat and scytonemin in the cyanobacteria hypoendolithic habitat. This study illustrates that successful lithobiontic microbial colonization at the limit for microbial life is the result of a combination of adaptive strategies to avoid excess solar irradiance and extreme evapotranspiration rates, taking advantage of the complex structural and mineralogical characteristics of gypsum deposits—conceptually called “rock's habitable architecture.” Additionally, self-protection by synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites likely produces a shielding effect that prevents photoinhibition and lethal photooxidative damage to the chlorophototrophs, representing another level of

  20. Adaptation strategies of endolithic chlorophototrophs to survive the hyperarid and extreme solar radiation environment of the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchos, Jacek; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne; Vítek, Petr; Artieda, Octavio; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Škaloud, Pavel; Tisza, Michel; Davila, Alfonso F; Vílchez, Carlos; Garbayo, Inés; Ascaso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is one of the driest deserts on Earth and, as such, a natural laboratory to explore the limits of life and the strategies evolved by microorganisms to adapt to extreme environments. Here we report the exceptional adaptation strategies of chlorophototrophic and eukaryotic algae, and chlorophototrophic and prokaryotic cyanobacteria to the hyperarid and extremely high solar radiation conditions occurring in this desert. Our approach combined several microscopy techniques, spectroscopic analytical methods, and molecular analyses. We found that the major adaptation strategy was to avoid the extreme environmental conditions by colonizing cryptoendolithic, as well as, hypoendolithic habitats within gypsum deposits. The cryptoendolithic colonization occurred a few millimeters beneath the gypsum surface and showed a succession of organized horizons of algae and cyanobacteria, which has never been reported for endolithic microbial communities. The presence of cyanobacteria beneath the algal layer, in close contact with sepiolite inclusions, and their hypoendolithic colonization suggest that occasional liquid water might persist within these sub-microhabitats. We also identified the presence of abundant carotenoids in the upper cryptoendolithic algal habitat and scytonemin in the cyanobacteria hypoendolithic habitat. This study illustrates that successful lithobiontic microbial colonization at the limit for microbial life is the result of a combination of adaptive strategies to avoid excess solar irradiance and extreme evapotranspiration rates, taking advantage of the complex structural and mineralogical characteristics of gypsum deposits-conceptually called "rock's habitable architecture." Additionally, self-protection by synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites likely produces a shielding effect that prevents photoinhibition and lethal photooxidative damage to the chlorophototrophs, representing another level of adaptation.

  1. Mild perinatal adversities moderate the association between maternal harsh parenting and hair cortisol: Evidence for differential susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, Dafna A; Rippe, Ralph C A; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Verhulst, Frank C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Noppe, Gerard; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; van den Akker, Erica L T; Tiemeier, Henning; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2017-03-13

    It has been shown that following exposure to mild perinatal adversity, children have greater susceptibility to both the negative and positive aspects of their subsequent environment. In a large population-based cohort study (N = 1,776), we investigated whether mild perinatal adversity moderated the association between maternal harsh parenting and children's hair cortisol levels, a biomarker of chronic stress. Mild perinatal adversity was defined as late preterm birth (gestational age at birth of 34-37 weeks, 6 days) or small for gestational age (birth weight between the 2.5th and 10th percentile for full term gestational age). Harsh parenting was assessed by maternal self-report at 3 years. Children's hair cortisol concentrations were measured from hair samples collected at age 6. There were no significant bivariate associations between mild perinatal adversities and harsh parenting and hair cortisol. However, mild perinatal adversities moderated the association between maternal harsh parenting and hair cortisol levels. Children with mild perinatal adversity had lower cortisol levels if parented more harshly and higher cortisol levels in the absence of harsh parenting than children who did not experience mild perinatal adversity. These results provide further evidence that mild perinatal adversity is a potential marker of differential susceptibility to environmental influences.

  2. Toward Advanced Human Reliability Programs. Structural Development Considerations and Options for Extreme Risk Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    performance inefficiency psychopathy errors/accidents self-destructive behavior target (non)detection sleeping disturbanco-s reduced productivity suicide...levels sufficiently high to warrant treatment (Rahe, 1988; Steinglass and Gerrity, 1990; GTA 21-3-6, 1986). D. DECISION MAKING IN EXTREMF RISK ENVIRONMENTS...warning mechanism for the individual and the organization that help was or would be needed (with a clear focus on treatment vice separation). 4. It could

  3. Characterization and antimicrobial potential of extremely halophilic archaea isolated from hypersaline environments of the Algerian Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Inès; Hassani, Imene Ikrame; l'Haridon, Stéphane; Chalopin, Morgane; Hacène, Hocine; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea were isolated from different chotts and sebkha, dry salt lakes and salt flat respectively, of the Algerian Sahara and characterized using phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. From 102 extremely halophilic strains isolated, forty three were selected and studied. These strains were also screened for their antagonistic potential and the production of hydrolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis allowed the identification of 10 archaeal genera within the class Halobacteria: Natrinema (13 strains), Natrialba (12 strains), Haloarcula (4 strains), Halopiger (4 strains), Haloterrigena (3 strains), Halorubrum (2 strains), Halostagnicola (2 strains), Natronococcus, Halogeometricum and Haloferax (1 strain each). The most common producers of antimicrobial compounds belong to the genus Natrinema while the most hydrolytic isolates, with combined production of several enzymes, belong to the genus Natrialba. The strain affiliated to Halopiger djelfamassilliensis was found to produce some substances of interest (halocins, anti-Candida, enzymes). After partial purification and characterization of one of the strains Natrinema gari QI1, we found similarities between the antimicrobial compound and the halocin C8. Therefore, the gene encoding halocin C8 was amplified and sequenced.

  4. Numerical implementation of time-dependent density functional theory for extended systems in extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, DFT-MD has been shown to be a useful computational tool for exploring the properties of WDM. These calculations achieve excellent agreement with shock compression experiments, which probe the thermodynamic parameters of the Hugoniot state. New X-ray Thomson Scattering diagnostics promise to deliver independent measurements of electronic density and temperature, as well as structural information in shocked systems. However, they require the development of new levels of theory for computing the associated observables within a DFT framework. The experimentally observable x-ray scattering cross section is related to the electronic density-density response function, which is obtainable using TDDFT - a formally exact extension of conventional DFT that describes electron dynamics and excited states. In order to develop a capability for modeling XRTS data and, more generally, to establish a predictive capability for rst principles simulations of matter in extreme conditions, real-time TDDFT with Ehrenfest dynamics has been implemented in an existing PAW code for DFT-MD calculations. The purpose of this report is to record implementation details and benchmarks as the project advances from software development to delivering novel scienti c results. Results range from tests that establish the accuracy, e ciency, and scalability of our implementation, to calculations that are veri ed against accepted results in the literature. Aside from the primary XRTS goal, we identify other more general areas where this new capability will be useful, including stopping power calculations and electron-ion equilibration.

  5. PRTs and Their Bonding for Long-Duration, Extreme-Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Cucullu, Gordon C., III; Mikhaylov, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Research was conducted on the qualification of Honeywell platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) bonding for use in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This is the first time these sensors will be used for Mars-related projects. Different types of PRTs were employed for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project, and several reliability issues were experienced, even for a shortduration mission like MER compared to MSL. Therefore, the development of a qualification process for the Honeywell PRT bonding was needed for the MSL project. Reliability of the PRT sensors, and their bonding processes, is a key element to understand the health of the hardware during all stages of the project, and particularly during surface operations on Mars. Three extreme temperature summer season cycles and three winter season cycles (total: 1983 thermal cycles) were completed, and no Honeywell PRT failures associated with the bonding process were found. Seventy-eight PRTs were bonded onto six different substrate materials using four different adhesives during the thermal cycling, which included a planetary protection cycle to +125 C for two hours, three protoflight/qualification cycles (-135 to 70 C), 1,384 summer cycles (-105 to 40 C), and 599 winter cycles (-130 to 15 C). There were no observed changes in PRT resistances, bonding characteristics, or damage identified from the package evaluation as a result of the qualification tests.

  6. Polar Microalgae: New Approaches towards Understanding Adaptations to an Extreme and Changing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Barbara R; Mock, Thomas

    2014-01-28

    Polar Regions are unique and highly prolific ecosystems characterized by extreme environmental gradients. Photosynthetic autotrophs, the base of the food web, have had to adapt physiological mechanisms to maintain growth, reproduction and metabolic activity despite environmental conditions that would shut-down cellular processes in most organisms. High latitudes are characterized by temperatures below the freezing point, complete darkness in winter and continuous light and high UV in the summer. Additionally, sea-ice, an ecological niche exploited by microbes during the long winter seasons when the ocean and land freezes over, is characterized by large salinity fluctuations, limited gas exchange, and highly oxic conditions. The last decade has been an exciting period of insights into the molecular mechanisms behind adaptation of microalgae to the cryosphere facilitated by the advancement of new scientific tools, particularly "omics" techniques. We review recent insights derived from genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics studies. Genes, proteins and pathways identified from these highly adaptable polar microbes have far-reaching biotechnological applications. Furthermore, they may provide insights into life outside this planet, as well as glimpses into the past. High latitude regions also have disproportionately large inputs into global biogeochemical cycles and are the region most sensitive to climate change.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of the Dukhan sabkha: identification of geological and biogeological molecules in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Sadooni, Fadhil; Vítek, Petr; Jehlicka, Jan

    2010-07-13

    The characterization of minerals and biogeological deposits in a terrestrial Arabian sabkha has a direct relevance for the exploration of Mars since the discovery by the NASA rovers Spirit and Opportunity of evaporate minerals on Mars that could have arisen from aquifers and subsurface water movement. The recognition of carbonates and sulphates in Gusev Crater has afforded an additional impetus to these studies, as relict or extant microbial extremophilic organisms could have colonized these geological matrices, as has been recorded on Earth. Here, we describe the Raman spectroscopic analysis of specimens of evaporitic materials sampled from the Dukhan sabkha, the largest inland sabkha in the Persian Gulf. With daily temperatures reaching in excess of 60 degrees C and extreme salinity, we have identified the characteristic Raman signatures of key biomolecular compounds in association with evaporitic minerals and geological carbonate and sulphate matrices, which indicate that extremophilic cyanobacterial colonies are existent there. This evidence, the first to be acquired spectroscopically from such a region, establishes a platform for further studies using remote, portable Raman instrumentation that will inform the potential of detection of similar systems on the Martian surface or subsurface in future space missions. A comparison is made between the results from this study and the previous analysis of a gypsum/halite sabkha where the extremophilic molecular signatures were better preserved.

  8. Thermal-Acoustic Fatigue of a Multilayer Thermal Protection System in Combined Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure integrity of thermal protection system (TPS structure for hypersonic vehicles exposed to severe operating environments, a study is undertaken to investigate the response and thermal-acoustic fatigue damage of a representative multilayer TPS structure under combined thermal and acoustic loads. An unsteady-state flight of a hypersonic vehicle is composed of a series of steady-state snapshots, and for each snapshot an acoustic load is imposed to a static steady-state TPS structure. A multistep thermal-acoustic fatigue damage intensity analysis procedure is given and consists of a heat transfer analysis, a nonlinear thermoelastic analysis, and a random response analysis under a combined loading environment and the fatigue damage intensity has been evaluated with two fatigue analysis techniques. The effects of thermally induced deterministic stress and nondeterministic dynamic stress due to the acoustic loading have been considered in the damage intensity estimation with a maximum stress fatigue model. The results show that the given thermal-acoustic fatigue intensity estimation procedure is a viable approach for life prediction of TPS structures under a typical mission cycle with combined loadings characterized by largely different time-scales. A discussion of the effects of the thermal load, the acoustic load, and fatigue analysis methodology on the fatigue damage intensity has been provided.

  9. Extreme Environment Effects on Cognitive Functions: A Longitudinal Study in High Altitude in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaszi, Irén; Takács, Endre; Czigler, István; Balázs, László

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of long-term Antarctic conditions on cognitive processes. Behavioral responses and event-related potentials were recorded during an auditory distraction task and an attention network paradigm. Participants were members of the over-wintering crew at Concordia Antarctic Research Station. Due to the reduced partial pressure of oxygen this environment caused moderate hypoxia. Beyond the hypoxia, the fluctuation of sunshine duration, isolation and confinement were the main stress factors of this environment. We compared 6 measurement periods completed during the campaign. Behavioral responses and N1/MMN (mismatch negativity), N1, N2, P3, RON (reorientation negativity) event-related potential components have been analyzed. Reaction time decreased in both tasks in response to repeated testing during the course of mission. The alerting effect increased, the inhibition effect decreased and the orienting effect did not change in the ANT task. Contrary to our expectations the N2, P3, RON components related to the attentional functions did not show any significant changes. Changes attributable to early stages of information processing were observed in the ANT task (N1 component) but not in the distraction task (N1/MMN). The reaction time decrements and the N1 amplitude reduction in ANT task could be attributed to sustained effect of practice. We conclude that the Antarctic conditions had no negative impacts on cognitive activity despite the presence of numerous stressors.

  10. Psychological Adaptation to Extreme Environments: Effects of Team Composition on Individual Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J.; Hysong, S. J.; Lugg, D. J.; Harm, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing program of research examining the psychological effects of isolation and confinement on individual adaptation, productivity and group relations in Antarctic winter personnel. This environment is used as an analogue for long-duration space mission scenarios, such as a space station sojourn, or a mission to Mars. Earlier results from this and other environments have demonstrated that: (1) most changes in psychological well-being are event-related and of relatively short duration; and (2) the greatest problem facing most individuals is interpersonal conflict. Content analysis of responses to open-ended questions has identified the numerous enjoyable aspects of Antarctic living, and confirmed that many of the problems reported were interpersonal in nature, and that problems varied significantly by station. Current work is exploring the effects of team assignment on the self-reported psychological changes and self-evaluations of members of isolated teams. This work includes identifying the dimensions by which subjects determine how well they are functioning. These dimensions (e.g., work, social life, internal emotional state) appear to play an important role in how subjects evaluate many aspects of life in isolation.

  11. Reliability of CCGA 1152 and CCGA 1272 Interconnect Packages for Extreme Thermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages of high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performance, and compatibility with standard surface-mount packaging assembly processes. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logics and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, flight avionics, and payload electronics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief than leaded packages, the reliability of CCGA packages is very important for short- and long-term space missions. Certain planetary satellites require operations of thermally uncontrolled hardware under extremely cold and hot temperatures with large diurnal temperature change from day to night. The planetary protection requires the hardware to be baked at +125 C for 72 hours to kill microbugs to avoid any biological contamination, especially for sample return missions. Therefore, the present CCGA package reliability research study has encompassed the temperature range of 185 to +125 C to cover various NASA deep space missions. Advanced 1152 and 1272 CCGA packaging interconnects technology test hardware objects have been subjected to ex treme temperature thermal cycles from 185 to +125 C. X-ray inspections of CCGA packages have been made before thermal cycling. No anomalous behavior and process problems were observed in the x-ray images. The change in resistance of the daisy-chained CCGA interconnects was measured as a function of increasing number of thermal cycles. Electrical continuity measurements of daisy chains have shown no anomalies, even until 596 thermal cycles. Optical inspections of hardware have shown a significant fatigue for CCGA 1152 packages over CCGA 1272 packages. No catastrophic failures have been observed yet in the results. Process qualification and assembly are required to optimize the CCGA assembly processes. Optical inspections of CCGA boards have been made after 258 and 596 thermal

  12. Galactic Dark Matter Halos and Globular Cluster Populations. III. Extension to Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Harris, Gretchen L. H.

    2017-02-01

    The total mass {M}{GCS} in the globular cluster (GC) system of a galaxy is empirically a near-constant fraction of the total mass {M}h\\equiv {M}{bary}+{M}{dark} of the galaxy across a range of 105 in galaxy mass. This trend is radically unlike the strongly nonlinear behavior of total stellar mass M ⋆ versus M h . We discuss extensions of this trend to two more extreme situations: (a) entire clusters of galaxies and (b) the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) recently discovered in Coma and elsewhere. Our calibration of the ratio {η }M={M}{GCS}/{M}h from normal galaxies, accounting for new revisions in the adopted mass-to-light ratio for GCs, now gives {η }M=2.9× {10}-5 as the mean absolute mass fraction. We find that the same ratio appears valid for galaxy clusters and UDGs. Estimates of {η }M in the four clusters we examine tend to be slightly higher than for individual galaxies, but more data and better constraints on the mean GC mass in such systems are needed to determine if this difference is significant. We use the constancy of {η }M to estimate total masses for several individual cases; for example, the total mass of the Milky Way is calculated to be {M}h=1.1× {10}12 {M}ȯ . Physical explanations for the uniformity of {η }M are still descriptive, but point to a picture in which massive dense star clusters in their formation stages were relatively immune to the feedback that more strongly influenced lower-density regions where most stars form.

  13. Evaluation of unmanned airborne vehicles and mobile robotic telesurgery in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Brett M; Doarn, Charles R; Rosen, Jacob; Hannaford, Blake; Broderick, Timothy J

    2008-08-01

    As unmanned extraction vehicles become a reality in the military theater, opportunities to augment medical operations with telesurgical robotics become more plausible. This project demonstrated an experimental surgical robot using an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) as a network topology. Because battlefield operations are dynamic and geographically challenging, the installation of wireless networks is not a feasible option at this point. However, to utilize telesurgical robotics to assist in the urgent medical care of wounded soldiers, a robust, high bandwidth, low latency network is requisite. For the first time, a mobile surgical robotic system was deployed to an austere environment and surgeons were able to remotely operate the systems wirelessly using a UAV. Two University of Cincinnati surgeons were able to remotely drive the University of Washington's RAVEN robot's end effectors. The network topology demonstrated a highly portable, quickly deployable, bandwidth-sufficient and low latency wireless network required for battlefield use.

  14. 'Extreme mass spectrometry': the role of mass spectrometry in the study of the Antarctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Emanuele; Tanwar, Shivani

    2014-11-01

    A focus on the studies of the Antarctic environment that have been performed by mass spectrometry is presented herein; our aim is to give evidence of the essential role of this instrumental technique in the framework of the scientific research in Antarctica, with a comprehensive review on the main literature of the last two decades. Due to the wideness of the topic, the present review is limited to the determination of organic pollutants, natural molecules and biomarkers in Antarctica, thus excluding elemental analysis and studies on inorganic species. The work has been divided into five sections, on the basis of the considered environmental compartment: air; ice and snow; seawater, pack ice and lakes; soil and sediments; and organisms and biomarkers.

  15. Converging Indicators for Assessing Individual Differences in Adaptation to Extreme Environments: Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; DeRoshia, Charles W.; Taylor, Bruce; Hines, Seleimah; Bright, Andrew; Dodds, Anika

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a new methodology for assessing the deleterious effects of spaceflight on crew health and performance. It is well known that microgravity results in various physiological alterations, e.g., headward fluid shifts which can impede physiological adaptation. Other factors that may affect crew operational efficiency include disruption of sleep-wake cycles, high workload, isolation, confinement, stress and fatigue. From an operational perspective, it is difficult to predict which individuals will be most or least affected in this unique environment given that most astronauts are first-time flyers. During future lunar and Mars missions space crews will include both men and women of multi-national origins, different professional backgrounds, and various states of physical condition. Therefore, new methods or technologies are needed to monitor and predict astronaut performance and health, and to evaluate the effects of various countermeasures on crew during long duration missions. This paper reviews several studies conducted in both laboratory and operational environments with men and women ranging in age between 18 to 50 years. The studies included the following: soldiers performing command and control functions during mobile operations in enclosed armored vehicles; subjects participating in laboratory tests of an anti-motion sickness medication; subjects exposed to chronic hypergravity aboard a centrifuge, and subject responses to 36-hours of sleep deprivation. Physiological measurements, performance metrics, and subjective self-reports were collected in each study. The results demonstrate that multivariate converging indicators provide a significantly more reliable method for assessing environmental effects on performance and health than any single indicator.

  16. Massive stars dying alone: The extremely remote environment of SN 2009ip

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    We present late-time HST images of the site of supernova (SN) 2009ip taken almost 3 yr after its bright 2012 luminosity peak. SN 2009ip is now slightly fainter in broad filters than the progenitor candidate detected by HST in 1999. The current source continues to be dominated by ongoing late-time CSM interaction that produces strong H-alpha emission and a weak pseudo-continuum, as found previously for 1-2 yr after explosion. The intent of these observations was to search for evidence of recent star formation in the local (1kpc; 10 arcsec) environment around SN 2009ip, in the remote outskirts of its host spiral galaxy NGC 7259. We can rule out the presence of any massive star-forming complexes like 30 Dor or the Carina Nebula at the SN site or within a few kpc. If the progenitor of SN 2009ip was really a 50-80 Msun star as archival HST images suggested, then it is strange that there is no sign of this type of massive star formation anywhere in the vicinity. A possible explanation is that the progenitor was the...

  17. Genetic differentiation and selection against migrants in evolutionarily replicated extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Martin; Pfenninger, Markus; Lerp, Hannes; Riesch, Rüdiger; Eschenbrenner, Christoph; Slattery, Patrick A; Bierbach, David; Herrmann, Nina; Schulte, Matthias; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Rimber Indy, Jeane; Passow, Courtney; Tobler, Michael

    2013-09-01

    We investigated mechanisms of reproductive isolation in livebearing fishes (genus Poecilia) inhabiting sulfidic and nonsulfidic habitats in three replicate river drainages. Although sulfide spring fish convergently evolved divergent phenotypes, it was unclear if mechanisms of reproductive isolation also evolved convergently. Using microsatellites, we found strongly reduced gene flow between adjacent populations from different habitat types, suggesting that local adaptation to sulfidic habitats repeatedly caused the emergence of reproductive isolation. Reciprocal translocation experiments indicate strong selection against immigrants into sulfidic waters, but also variation among drainages in the strength of selection against immigrants into nonsulfidic waters. Mate choice experiments revealed the evolution of assortative mating preferences in females from nonsulfidic but not from sulfidic habitats. The inferred strength of sexual selection against immigrants (RI(s)) was negatively correlated with the strength of natural selection (RI(m)), a pattern that could be attributed to reinforcement, whereby natural selection strengthens behavioral isolation due to reduced hybrid fitness. Overall, reproductive isolation and genetic differentiation appear to be replicated and direct consequences of local adaptation to sulfide spring environments, but the relative contributions of different mechanisms of reproductive isolation vary across these evolutionarily independent replicates, highlighting both convergent and nonconvergent evolutionary trajectories of populations in each drainage. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Textile technology for the vital signs monitoring in telemedicine and extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Ferratini, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    This paper illustrates two extensive applications of a smart garment we previously developed for the monitoring of ECG, respiration, and movement. In the first application, the device, named Maglietta Interattiva Computerizzata (MagIC), was used for the home monitoring of cardiac patients. The used platform included MagIC for signals collection, a touchscreen computer with a dedicated software for data handling, and a universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) dongle for data transmission, via email, to three cardiologists. Three patients daily-performed 3-min telemonitoring sessions for 30 days by using the platform. The whole system behaved correctly in 85 out of 90 sessions. In five instances, a second session was required due to UMTS traffic congestion. Only in three sessions, cardiologists asked the patient to repeat the acquisition because of poor signal quality. In the second application, MagIC was used to evaluate the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on sleep and 24 h daily life in 30 healthy subjects at 3500 and 5400 m above sea level on Mount Everest slopes. The use of MagIC garment was reported to be simple and requiring short instrumentation time even in the demanding expedition environment. The signal quality was adequate in 111 out of 115 recordings and 90% of the subjects found the vest comfortable.

  19. Molecular adaptation to an extreme environment: origin of the thermal stability of the pompeii worm collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicot, F X; Mesnage, M; Masselot, M; Exposito, J Y; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    2000-09-29

    The annelid Alvinella pompejana is probably the most heat-tolerant metazoan organism known. Previous results have shown that the level of thermal stability of its interstitial collagen is significantly greater than that of coastal annelids and of vent organisms, such as the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila, living in colder parts of the deep-sea hydrothermal environment. In order to investigate the molecular basis of this thermal behavior, we cloned and sequenced a large cDNA molecule coding the fibrillar collagen of Alvinella, including one half of the helical domain and the entire C-propeptide domain. For comparison, we also cloned the 3' part of the homologous cDNA from Riftia. Comparison of the corresponding helical domains of these two species, together with that of the previously sequenced domain of the coastal lugworm Arenicola marina, showed that the increase in proline content and in the number of stabilizing triplets correlate with the outstanding thermostability of the interstitial collagen of A. pompejana. Phylogenetic analysis showed that triple helical and the C-propeptide parts of the same collagen molecule evolve at different rates, in favor of an adaptive mechanism at the molecular level. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Millimeter waves or extremely high frequency electromagnetic fields in the environment: what are their effects on bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soghomonyan, Diana; Trchounian, Karen; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-06-01

    Millimeter waves (MMW) or electromagnetic fields of extremely high frequencies at low intensity is a new environmental factor, the level of which is increased as technology advance. It is of interest that bacteria and other cells might communicate with each other by electromagnetic field of sub-extremely high frequency range. These MMW affected Escherichia coli and many other bacteria, mainly depressing their growth and changing properties and activity. These effects were non-thermal and depended on different factors. The significant cellular targets for MMW effects could be water, cell plasma membrane, and genome. The model for the MMW interaction with bacteria is suggested; a role of the membrane-associated proton FOF1-ATPase, key enzyme of bioenergetic relevance, is proposed. The consequences of MMW interaction with bacteria are the changes in their sensitivity to different biologically active chemicals, including antibiotics. Novel data on MMW effects on bacteria and their sensitivity to different antibiotics are presented and discussed; the combined action of MMW and antibiotics resulted with more strong effects. These effects are of significance for understanding changed metabolic pathways and distinguish role of bacteria in environment; they might be leading to antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The effects might have applications in the development of technique, therapeutic practices, and food protection technology.

  1. Strain response of thermal barrier coatings captured under extreme engine environments through synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Siddiqui, Sanna F.; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings in operation holds the key to understanding durability of jet engine turbine blades. Here we report the results from experiments that monitor strains in the layers of a coating subjected to thermal gradients and mechanical loads representing extreme engine environments. Hollow cylindrical specimens, with electron beam physical vapour deposited coatings, were tested with internal cooling and external heating under various controlled conditions. High-energy synchrotron X-ray measurements captured the in situ strain response through the depth of each layer, revealing the link between these conditions and the evolution of local strains. Results of this study demonstrate that variations in these conditions create corresponding trends in depth-resolved strains with the largest effects displayed at or near the interface with the bond coat. With larger temperature drops across the coating, significant strain gradients are seen, which can contribute to failure modes occurring within the layer adjacent to the interface.

  2. Two-dimensional resonant magnetic soft X-ray scattering set-up for extreme sample environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, Stefan; Mocuta, Cristian; Merlet, Frederic; Barbier, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The newly built MagSAXS (magnetic small-angle X-ray scattering) set-up dedicated to the direct two-dimensional measurement of magnetic scattering using polarized synchrotron radiation in extreme sample environments is presented. Pure optical transport of the image is used to record the magnetic scattering with a two-dimensional CCD visible-light camera. The set-up is able to probe magnetic correlation lengths from the micrometer down to the nanometer scale. A detailed layout is presented along with preliminary results obtained at several beamlines at Synchrotron SOLEIL. The presented examples underline the wide range of possible applications spanning from correlation lengths determination to Fourier transform holography.

  3. Strain response of thermal barrier coatings captured under extreme engine environments through synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Siddiqui, Sanna F; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-07-31

    The mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings in operation holds the key to understanding durability of jet engine turbine blades. Here we report the results from experiments that monitor strains in the layers of a coating subjected to thermal gradients and mechanical loads representing extreme engine environments. Hollow cylindrical specimens, with electron beam physical vapour deposited coatings, were tested with internal cooling and external heating under various controlled conditions. High-energy synchrotron X-ray measurements captured the in situ strain response through the depth of each layer, revealing the link between these conditions and the evolution of local strains. Results of this study demonstrate that variations in these conditions create corresponding trends in depth-resolved strains with the largest effects displayed at or near the interface with the bond coat. With larger temperature drops across the coating, significant strain gradients are seen, which can contribute to failure modes occurring within the layer adjacent to the interface.

  4. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej, E-mail: maciej.bartkowiak@helmholtz-berlin.de; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-11

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  5. Extreme Environments Facilitate Hybrid Superiority – The Story of a Successful Daphnia galeata × longispina Hybrid Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Johanna; Gießler, Sabine; Poxleitner, Monika; Navas Faria, Amanda; Yin, Mingbo; Wolinska, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization within the animal kingdom has long been underestimated. Hybrids have often been considered less fit than their parental species. In the present study, we observed that the Daphnia community of a small lake was dominated by a single D. galeata × D. longispina hybrid clone, during two consecutive years. Notably, in artificial community set-ups consisting of several clones representing parental species and other hybrids, this hybrid clone took over within about ten generations. Neither the fitness assay conducted under different temperatures, or under crowded and non-crowded environments, nor the carrying capacity test revealed any outstanding life history parameters of this hybrid clone. However, under simulated winter conditions (i.e. low temperature, food and light), the hybrid clone eventually showed a higher survival probability and higher fecundity compared to parental species. Hybrid superiority in cold-adapted traits leading to an advantage of overwintering as parthenogenetic lineages might consequently explain the establishment of successful hybrids in natural communities of the D. longispina complex. In extreme cases, like the one reported here, a superior hybrid genotype might be the only clone alive after cold winters. Overall, superiority traits, such as enhanced overwintering here, might explain hybrid dominance in nature, especially in extreme and rapidly changing environments. Although any favoured gene complex in cyclic parthenogens could be frozen in successful clones independent of hybridization, we did not find similarly successful clones among parental species. We conclude that the emergence of the observed trait is linked to the production of novel recombined hybrid genotypes. PMID:26448651

  6. Temporal changes of a macrobenthic assemblage in harsh lagoon sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Como, Serena; Magni, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    An opportunistic macrobenthic assemblage was studied from 2001 to 2003 in a central area of the Cabras lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy), known to be affected by environmental disturbances (i.e. organic over-enrichment of sediments, and episodic events of hypoxia/anoxia and sulphide development). We identified recurrent seasonal changes in this macrobenthic assemblage, with a general impoverishment in summer and a recovery in winter/spring. The nereids Neanthes succinea and Hediste diversicolor were found to replace the spionid Polydora ciliata as the most dominant species in the summer for 3 consecutive years. Occasional, unsynchronized appearances of small-sized deposit feeders, such as Tubificidae, Capitella cf. capitata, chironomid larvae and Hydrobia spp., were observed in winter/spring. We suggest that these changes are driven by the interplay of environmental conditions (worse in summer) with numerous biotic factors. This includes different tolerance levels of taxa to low oxygen concentrations and sulphides, variability in larval supply and post-larval transport, as well as competition for space and food between and within different functional groups, and facilitation through animal bioturbation and sediment reoxidation. A conceptual model is proposed to demonstrate how environmental conditions and biotic interactions may control the benthic assemblage in such a harsh lagoon environment.

  7. Seasonal variations in microbial populations and environmental conditions in an extreme acid mine drainage environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, K J; Gihring, T M; Banfield, J F

    1999-08-01

    Microbial populations, their distributions, and their aquatic environments were studied over a year (1997) at an acid mine drainage (AMD) site at Iron Mountain, Calif. Populations were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridizations with group-specific probes. Probes were used for the domains Eucarya, Bacteria, and Archaea and the two species most widely studied and implicated for their role in AMD production, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Results show that microbial populations, in relative proportions and absolute numbers, vary spatially and seasonally and correlate with geochemical and physical conditions (pH, temperature, conductivity, and rainfall). Bacterial populations were in the highest proportion (>95%) in January. Conversely, archaeal populations were in the highest proportion in July and September ( approximately 50%) and were virtually absent in the winter. Bacterial and archaeal populations correlated with conductivity and rainfall. High concentrations of dissolved solids, as reflected by high conductivity values (up to 125 mS/cm), occurred in the summer and correlated with high archaeal populations and proportionally lower bacterial populations. Eukaryotes were not detected in January, when total microbial cell numbers were lowest (numbers of prokaryotes (10(8) to 10(9) cells/ml). T. ferrooxidans was in highest abundance (>30%) at moderate pHs and temperatures ( approximately 2.5 and 20 degrees C) in sites that were peripheral to primary acid-generating sites and lowest (0 to 5%) at low-pH sites (pH approximately 0.5) that were in contact with the ore body. L. ferrooxidans was more widely distributed with respect to geochemical conditions (pH = 0 to 3; 20 to 50 degrees C) but was more abundant at higher temperatures and lower pHs ( approximately 40 degrees C; pH approximately 0.5) than T. ferrooxidans.

  8. Massive stars dying alone: the extremely remote environment of SN 2009ip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Mauerhan, Jon C.

    2016-12-01

    We present late-time Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the site of supernova (SN) 2009ip taken almost 3 yr after its bright 2012 luminosity peak. SN 2009ip is now slightly fainter in broad filters than the progenitor candidate detected by HST in 1999. The current source continues to be dominated by ongoing late-time circumstellar material interaction that produces strong Hα emission and a weak pseudo-continuum, as found previously for 1-2 yr after explosion. The intent of these observations was to search for evidence of recent star formation in the local (˜1 kpc; 10 arcsec) environment around SN 2009ip, in the remote outskirts of its host spiral galaxy NGC 7259. We can rule out the presence of any massive star-forming complexes like 30 Dor or the Carina nebula at the SN site or within a few kpc. If the progenitor of SN 2009ip was really a 50-80 M⊙ star as archival HST images suggested, then it is strange that there is no sign of this type of massive star formation anywhere in the vicinity. A possible explanation is that the progenitor was the product of a merger or binary mass transfer, rejuvenated after a lifetime that was much longer than 4-5 Myr, allowing its natal H II region to have faded. A smaller region like the Orion nebula would be an unresolved but easily detected point source. This is ruled out within ˜1.5 kpc around SN 2009ip, but a small H II region could be hiding in the glare of SN 2009ip itself. Later images after a few more years have passed are needed to confirm that the progenitor candidate is truly gone and to test for the possibility of a small H II region or cluster at the SN position.

  9. Yeast diversity in the extreme acidic environments of the Iberian Pyrite Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanho, Mário; Libkind, Diego; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2006-10-01

    In the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), acid rock drainage gives rise to aquatic habitats with low pH and high concentrations of heavy metals, a situation that causes important environmental problems. We investigated the occurrence and diversity of yeasts in two localities of the IPB: São Domingos (Portugal) and Rio Tinto (Spain). Yeast isolation was performed on conventional culture media (MYP), acidified (pH 3) media (MYP3), and on media prepared with water from the study sites (MYPw). The main goal of the study was to determine the structure of the yeast community; a combination of molecular methods was used for accurate species identifications. Our results showed that the largest fraction of the yeast community was recovered on MYPw rather than on MYP and MYP3. Twenty-seven yeast species were detected, 48% of which might represent undescribed taxa. Among these, an undescribed species of the genus Cryptococcus required low pH for growth, a property that has not been observed before in yeasts. The communities of S. Domingos and R. Tinto showed a considerable resemblance, and eight yeast species were simultaneously found in both localities. Taking into consideration the physicochemical parameters studied, we propose a hierarchic organization of the yeast community in terms of high-, intermediate-, or low-stress conditions of the environment. According to this ranking, the acidophile yeast Cryptococcus sp. 5 is considered the most tolerant species, followed by Cryptococcus sp. 3 and Lecytophora sp. Species occurring in situations of intermediate environmental stress were Candida fluviatilis, Rhodosporidium toruloides, Williopsis californica, and three unidentified yeasts belonging to Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus.

  10. Use of harsh physical discipline and developmental outcomes in adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    BENDER, HEATHER L.; ALLEN, JOSEPH P.; McELHANEY, KATHLEEN BOYKIN; ANTONISHAK, JILL; MOORE, CYNTHIA M.; KELLY, HEATHER O’BEIRNE; DAVIS, STEVEN M.

    2012-01-01

    A history of exposure to harsh physical discipline has been linked to negative outcomes for children, ranging from conduct disorder to depression and low self-esteem. The present study extends this work into adolescence, and examines the relationship of lifetime histories of harsh discipline to adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing symptoms and to their developing capacities for establishing autonomy and relatedness in family interactions. Adolescent and parent reports of harsh discipline, independently coded observations of conflictual interactions, and adolescent reports of symptoms were obtained for 141 adolescents at age 16. Both parents’ use of harsh discipline was related to greater adolescent depression and externalizing behavior, even when these effects were examined over and above the effects of other parenting measures known to account for these symptoms. Adolescents exposed to harsh discipline from mothers were also less likely to appear warm and engaged during an interaction task with their mothers. It is suggested that a history of harsh discipline is associated not only with social and emotional functioning, but also with the developmental task of autonomy and relatedness. PMID:17241492

  11. Insights from the metagenome of an acid salt lake: the role of biology in an extreme depositional environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Chevrette, Marc Gerard; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Benison, Kathleen Counter

    2015-01-01

    The extremely acidic brine lakes of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia are home to some of the most biologically challenging waters on Earth. In this study, we employed metagenomic shotgun sequencing to generate a microbial profile of the depositional environment associated with the sulfur-rich sediments of one such lake. Of the 1.5 M high-quality reads generated, 0.25 M were mapped to protein features, which in turn provide new insights into the metabolic function of this community. In particular, 45 diverse genes associated with sulfur metabolism were identified, the majority of which were linked to either the conversion of sulfate to adenylylsulfate and the subsequent production of sulfide from sulfite or the oxidation of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate via the sulfur oxidation (Sox) system. This is the first metagenomic study of an acidic, hypersaline depositional environment, and we present evidence for a surprisingly high level of microbial diversity. Our findings also illuminate the possibility that we may be meaningfully underestimating the effects of biology on the chemistry of these sulfur-rich sediments, thereby influencing our understanding of past geobiological conditions that may have been present on Earth as well as early Mars.

  12. Efficacy of scallop shell powders and slaked lime for inactivating avian influenza virus under harsh conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammakarn, Chanathip; Tsujimura, Misato; Satoh, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Tamura, Miho; Kawamura, Akinobu; Ishida, Yuki; Suguro, Atsushi; Hakim, Hakimullah; Ruenphet, Sakchai; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    The efficacy and stability of scallop shell powder (SSP) were investigated, in terms of its capacity to inactivate avian influenza virus (AIV), and compared with slaked lime (SL). An environmental simulation was conducted by emulating sunlight and wet-dry conditions. The powders were collected at consecutive 2-week intervals under sunlight and upon every resuspension. These materials were tested by mixing them with AIV and incubating the mixture for 3 min or 20 h, followed by AIV titration. At the same time, a pH buffering test was conducted by neutralization with Tris-HCl. The results revealed that SSP and SL have high alkalinity and excellent ability to inactivate AIV. In a simulated harsh environment, SSP and SL retained a satisfactory ability to inactivate AIV within 20 h throughout the experimental procedure. However, SSP was able to inactivate AIV during a short contact period (3 min), even under harsh conditions, and it was more resistant than SL to neutralization.

  13. Extreme Temperature Motor and Drill System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the need for motors, actuators and drilling systems that can operate in the harsh venusian environment for extended periods of time, on the order of...

  14. Computer game-based upper extremity training in the home environment in stroke persons: a single subject design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to assess whether computer game-based training in the home setting in the late phase after stroke could improve upper extremity motor function. Methods Twelve subjects with prior stroke were recruited; 11 completed the study. Design The study had a single subject design; there was a baseline test (A1), a during intervention test (B) once a week, a post-test (A2) measured directly after the treatment phase, plus a follow-up (C) 16–18 weeks after the treatment phase. Information on motor function (Fugl-Meyer), grip force (GrippitR) and arm function in activity (ARAT, ABILHAND) was gathered at A1, A2 and C. During B, only Fugl-Meyer and ARAT were measured. The intervention comprised five weeks of game-based computer training in the home environment. All games were designed to be controlled by either the affected arm alone or by both arms. Conventional formulae were used to calculate the mean, median and standard deviations. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test was used for tests of dependent samples. Continuous data were analyzed by methods for repeated measures and ordinal data were analyzed by methods for ordered multinomial data using cumulative logistic models. A p-value of game time and changes in the outcomes investigated in this study. Conclusion The results indicate that computer game-based training could be a promising approach to improve upper extremity function in the late phase after stroke, since in this study, changes were achieved in motor function and activity capacity. PMID:24625289

  15. Two spatial scales in a bleaching event: Corals from the mildest and the most extreme thermal environments escape mortality

    KAUST Repository

    Pineda, Jesús

    2013-07-28

    In summer 2010, a bleaching event decimated the abundant reef flat coral Stylophora pistillata in some areas of the central Red Sea, where a series of coral reefs 100–300 m wide by several kilometers long extends from the coastline to about 20 km offshore. Mortality of corals along the exposed and protected sides of inner (inshore) and mid and outer (offshore) reefs and in situ and satellite sea surface temperatures (SSTs) revealed that the variability in the mortality event corresponded to two spatial scales of temperature variability: 300 m across the reef flat and 20 km across a series of reefs. However, the relationship between coral mortality and habitat thermal severity was opposite at the two scales. SSTs in summer 2010 were similar or increased modestly (0.5°C) in the outer and mid reefs relative to 2009. In the inner reef, 2010 temperatures were 1.4°C above the 2009 seasonal maximum for several weeks. We detected little or no coral mortality in mid and outer reefs. In the inner reef, mortality depended on exposure. Within the inner reef, mortality was modest on the protected (shoreward) side, the most severe thermal environment, with highest overall mean and maximum temperatures. In contrast, acute mortality was observed in the exposed (seaward) side, where temperature fluctuations and upper water temperature values were relatively less extreme. Refuges to thermally induced coral bleaching may include sites where extreme, high-frequency thermal variability may select for coral holobionts preadapted to, and physiologically condition corals to withstand, regional increases in water temperature.

  16. Cooccurrence patterns of plants and soil bacteria in the high-alpine subnival zone track environmental harshness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. King

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants and soil microorganisms interact to play a central role in ecosystem functioning. To determine the potential importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distributions of these organisms in a high-alpine subnival landscape, we examine cooccurrence patterns between plant species and bulk-soil bacteria abundances. In this context, a cooccurrence relationship reflects a combination of several assembly processes: that both parties can disperse to the site, that they can survive the abiotic environmental conditions, and that interactions between the biota either facilitate survival or allow for coexistence. Across the entire landscape, 31% of the bacterial sequences in this dataset were significantly correlated to the abundance distribution of one or more plant species. These sequences fell into 14 clades, 6 of which are related to bacteria that are known to form symbioses with plants in other systems. Abundant plant species were more likely to have significant as well as stronger correlations with bacteria and these patterns were more prevalent in lower altitude sites. Conversely, correlations between plant species abundances and bacterial relative abundances were less frequent in sites near the snowline. Thus, plant-bacteria associations became more common as environmental conditions became less harsh and plants became more abundant. This pattern in cooccurrence strength and frequency across the subnival landscape suggests that plant-bacteria interactions are important for the success of life, both below- and above-ground, in an extreme environment.

  17. Extremophiles and extreme environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rampelotto, Pabulo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades, the study of extremophiles has providing ground breaking discoveries that challenge the paradigms of modern biology and make us rethink intriguing questions such as "what is life...

  18. The Harsh Destiny of a Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    least) two giant planets, cf. ESO Press Release 07/01. Like most extra-solar planets ("exoplanets") found to date, the orbits of the objects orbiting HD 82943 are quite unlike those expected from traditional theories of the formation and evolution of such systems [3]. Contrary to the giant planets in the Solar System, those at HD 82943 have rather elongated orbits, and they are unsually close to the central star. Astronomers believe that giant planets must form in comparatively cool environments, as this was the case in the solar system. The existence of systems in which the giant planets are much closer to the central star can only be explained by certain dynamical processes, e.g. significant orbital changes with time ("orbital migration") or the effects of strong gravitational interaction between several planets. These processes can explain the short-period planetary systems found to date, in which planets are very close to the central star, and also the very elongated orbits found in some cases. These theories also predict that it may be the fate of some planets to fall into their host star. The significance of Lithium Unlike most other elements lighter than Iron, the light nuclei of Lithium (both the Lithium-6 and Lithium-7 isotopes [2]), Beryllium and Boron are not produced in significant amounts in the stellar spheres of fire. In fact, Lithium-6 is extremely "fragile", being easily destroyed by proton collisions at a temperature of "only" 1.5 million degrees - by comparison, the fusion of Hydrogen to Helium takes place at about 10 million degrees. In the case of solar-like stars , any Lithium-6 atoms present in a newborn star will be ``burnt'' during the early evolutionary stages. Strong internal motions will thoroughly mix the outer (cooler) and inner (hotter) stellar layers, and Lithium-6 will completely disappear in just a few million years. We would therefore not expect to find any Lithium-6 in a developed solar-type star. However, during the later

  19. Preschoolers' emotion knowledge and the differential effects of harsh punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzenski, Sara R; Yates, Tuppett M

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the influence of caregiver-reported harsh physical and verbal punishment on children's behavioral and self-system adjustment. Children's emotion knowledge was evaluated as a heretofore unrecognized moderator of these relations. We assessed 250 preschool-aged children (50% female; Mage = 49.06 months) from diverse backgrounds (50% Hispanic, 18% African American, 10.4% Caucasian, 21.6% multiracial/other) using various instruments through teacher, caregiver, self, and observer report in the domains of harsh punishment, conduct problems, self-concept, and emotion knowledge. Emotion knowledge moderated the relation between harsh punishment and child adjustment. Harsh physical punishment was associated with conduct problems for children with higher emotion knowledge, especially for boys. Harsh verbal punishment was associated with self-concept deficits among children with higher emotion knowledge, especially for girls. These relations were also specifically applicable to non-Hispanic children. These results highlight the importance of investigating hypothesis-driven interactive effects and the specificity of experience to understand the psychosocial sequelae of parenting practices broadly, and to clarify the mixed evidence in the punishment literature specifically. Clinical implications point to the salience of emotion processes in parent-child disciplinary interventions for understanding the prevalence and pattern of child behavioral adjustment and self-concept, as well as more broadly to the role of individual differences in children's responses to adversity and subsequent therapeutic needs.

  20. Early Determinants of Maternal and Paternal Harsh Discipline: The Generation R Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Pauline W.; Raat, Hein; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J.; van IJzendoorn, M. H.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Tiemeier, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Research described risk factors for maternal use of harsh discipline, but knowledge about determinants of paternal harsh discipline is lacking. This study aimed to identify determinants of harsh discipline and whether this differed between mothers and fathers. Harsh disciplining practices were self-reported by Dutch parents of 3-year-old children.…

  1. Environmental harshness shapes life-history variation in an Australian temporary pool breeding frog: a skeletochronological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, Jane; Brendonck, Luc; Roberts, J Dale; Verlinden, Wim; Vanschoenwinkel, Bram

    2015-07-01

    For many amphibians, high temperatures and limited precipitation are crucial habitat characteristics that limit species ranges and modulate life-history characteristics. Although knowledge of the ability of amphibians to cope with such environmental harshness is particularly relevant in the light of ongoing environmental change, relatively little is known about natural variation in age, maturation and associated life-history traits across species' ranges. We used the analysis of growth rings in bones to investigate the link between environmental harshness and life-history traits, including age and body size distribution, in specimens from 20 populations of the Australian bleating froglet, Crinia pseudinsignifera. Despite the short lifespan of the species, bone slides revealed geographic variation in average age, body size and reproductive investment linked to variation in temperature and rainfall. We found no difference in age at maturation in different climatic harshness regimes. Frogs from harsher environments invested less in their first reproductive event but grew older than their counterparts in more benign environments, thereby allowing for more reproductive events and buffering them against the increased chance of reproductive failure in the harsher environments. For individual frogs, climatic harshness experienced during an individual's life promoted larger body size. Overall, these results illustrate how bone structure analyses from preserved specimens allow both the testing of ecogeographic hypotheses and the assessment of the adaptive potential of species in the light of environmental change.

  2. Dormant stages of crustaceans as a mechanism of propagation in the extreme and unpredictable environment in the Crimean hypersaline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, Nickolai V.; Anufriieva, Elena V.; Amat, Francisco; Eremin, Oleg Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A pool of dormant stages of planktonic organisms in saline lakes is a substantial component in the plankton communities; we need to take it into account to understand plankton dynamics. Hypersaline water bodies in Crimea, the largest peninsula in the Black Sea, constitute a very characteristic and peculiar habitat type in the region. We examined the presence of crustacean resting stages in sediments of dried up sites of the Crimean hypersaline lakes. Sediment samples were taken in 9 different lakes. Experiments performed on the hatching of these resting stages showed the presence of Moina salina (Cladocera), parthenogenetic Artemia and Artemia urmiana (Anostraca), Eucypris mareotica ( inflata) (Ostracoda), and Cletocamptus retrogressus (Harpacticoida). Comparing the experimental results obtained with clean dried brine shrimp cysts and those kept in sediment samples, it was noted that clean cysts hatched much faster than those from sediments did. Some components in bottom sediments slow down and desynchronize hatching from resting eggs in different groups of crustaceans. The sediments of different lakes inhibited the nauplii output from Artemia and ostracod resting eggs to different degrees. More data are needed before we can discuss the reasons of this inhibition. The nonsynchronous output of active stages from the bottom resting ones may be an adaptation that allows crustacean species to exist in extreme and unpredictably changing environments, avoiding the risk that all may emerge at once under unsuitable conditions.

  3. Understanding the Adaptation of Halobacterium Species NRC-1 to Its Extreme Environment through Computational Analysis of Its Genome Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sean P.; Ng, Wailap Victor; Salzberg, Steven L.; Hood, Leroy; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2001-01-01

    The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and predicted proteome have been analyzed by computational methods and reveal characteristics relevant to life in an extreme environment distinguished by hypersalinity and high solar radiation: (1) The proteome is highly acidic, with a median pI of 4.9 and mostly lacking basic proteins. This characteristic correlates with high surface negative charge, determined through homology modeling, as the major adaptive mechanism of halophilic proteins to function in nearly saturating salinity. (2) Codon usage displays the expected GC bias in the wobble position and is consistent with a highly acidic proteome. (3) Distinct genomic domains of NRC-1 with bacterial character are apparent by whole proteome BLAST analysis, including two gene clusters coding for a bacterial-type aerobic respiratory chain. This result indicates that the capacity of halophiles for aerobic respiration may have been acquired through lateral gene transfer. (4) Two regions of the large chromosome were found with relatively lower GC composition and overrepresentation of IS elements, similar to the minichromosomes. These IS-element-rich regions of the genome may serve to exchange DNA between the three replicons and promote genome evolution. (5) GC-skew analysis showed evidence for the existence of two replication origins in the large chromosome. This finding and the occurrence of multiple chromosomes indicate a dynamic genome organization with eukaryotic character. PMID:11591641

  4. Comparing the Consumption of CPU Hours with Scientific Output for the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Richard; Börner, Katy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that compares resource usage with publication output using data about the consumption of CPU cycles from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) and resulting scientific publications for 2,691 institutions/teams. Specifically, the datasets comprise a total of 5,374,032,696 central processing unit (CPU) hours run in XSEDE during July 1, 2011 to August 18, 2015 and 2,882 publications that cite the XSEDE resource. Three types of studies were conducted: a geospatial analysis of XSEDE providers and consumers, co-authorship network analysis of XSEDE publications, and bi-modal network analysis of how XSEDE resources are used by different research fields. Resulting visualizations show that a diverse set of consumers make use of XSEDE resources, that users of XSEDE publish together frequently, and that the users of XSEDE with the highest resource usage tend to be "traditional" high-performance computing (HPC) community members from astronomy, atmospheric science, physics, chemistry, and biology.

  5. Nutritional status changes in humans during a 14-day saturation dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Smith, Myra D.; Rice, Barbara L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiologic and nutritional changes associated with space travel, and the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V (NEEMO) is such an analog. To determine whether saturation diving has nutrition-related effects similar to those of spaceflight, we conducted a clinical nutritional assessment of the NEEMO crew (4 men, 2 women) before, during, and after their 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after the dive. The foods consumed by the crew were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiologic changes were observed, during and after the dive, that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were lower (P < 0.05) after the dive. Transferrin receptors were significantly lower immediately after the dive. Serum ferritin increased significantly during the dive. There was also evidence indicating that oxidative damage and stress increased during the dive. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase decreased during and after the dive (P < 0.05). Decreased leptin during the dive (P < 0.05) may have been related to the increased stress. Subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive, similar to what is observed during spaceflight. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to use in further defining the physiologic effects of spaceflight and investigating potential countermeasures.

  6. Silicified virus-like nanoparticles in an extreme thermal environment: implications for the preservation of viruses in the geological record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, X; Xu, H; Jones, B; Chen, S; Zhou, H

    2013-11-01

    Biofilms that grow around Gumingquan hot spring (T = 71 °C, pH = 9.2) in the Rehai geothermal area, Tengchong, China, are formed of various cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Aquificae, Thermodesulfobacteria, Desulfurococcales, and Thermoproteales. Silicified virus-like nanoparticles, 40-200 nm in diameter, are common inside the microbial cells and the extracellular polymeric substances around the cells. These nanoparticles, which are formed of a core encased by a silica cortex, are morphologically akin to known viruses and directly comparable to silicified virus-like particles that were produced in biofilms cultured in the laboratory. The information obtained from examination of the natural and laboratory-produced samples suggests that viruses can be preserved by silicification, especially while they are still encased in their host cells. These results expand our views of virus-host mineral interaction in extreme thermal environments and imply that viruses can be potentially preserved and identified in the geological record.

  7. Plant functional traits and phylogenetic relatedness explain variation in associations with root fungal endophytes in an extreme arid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Mónica A; Reinhart, Kurt O; Menoyo, Eugenia; Crespo, Esteban M; Urcelay, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Since root endophytes may ameliorate drought stress, understanding which plants associate with endophytes is important, especially in arid ecosystems. Here, the root endophytes were characterized of 42 plants from an arid region of Argentina. Colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSEs) was related to plant functional type (PFT), family, and phylogenetic relatedness. Overall, three main findings were observed. Firstly, only moderate levels of endophyte associations were found across all taxa (e.g., most Poaceae were not colonized by endophytes despite numerous accounts of colonization by AMF and DSEs). We determined 69% of plant taxa associated with some form of root endophyte but levels were lower than other regional studies. Secondly, comparisons by PFT and phylogeny were often qualitatively similar (e.g., succulents and Portulacineae consistently lacked AMF; variation occurred among terrestrial vs. epiphytic bromeliads) and often differed from comparisons based on plant family. Thirdly, comparisons by plant family often failed to account for important variation either within families (e.g., Bromeliaceae and Poaceae) or trait conservatism among related families (i.e., Rosidae consistently lacked DSEs and Portulacineae lacked AMF). This study indicates the value of comparing numerous taxa based on PFTs and phylogenetic similarity. Overall, the results suggest an uncertain benefit of endophytes in extremely arid environments where plant traits like succulence may obviate the need to establish associations.

  8. Comparing the Consumption of CPU Hours with Scientific Output for the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Knepper

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study that compares resource usage with publication output using data about the consumption of CPU cycles from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE and resulting scientific publications for 2,691 institutions/teams. Specifically, the datasets comprise a total of 5,374,032,696 central processing unit (CPU hours run in XSEDE during July 1, 2011 to August 18, 2015 and 2,882 publications that cite the XSEDE resource. Three types of studies were conducted: a geospatial analysis of XSEDE providers and consumers, co-authorship network analysis of XSEDE publications, and bi-modal network analysis of how XSEDE resources are used by different research fields. Resulting visualizations show that a diverse set of consumers make use of XSEDE resources, that users of XSEDE publish together frequently, and that the users of XSEDE with the highest resource usage tend to be "traditional" high-performance computing (HPC community members from astronomy, atmospheric science, physics, chemistry, and biology.

  9. Reinforced Feedback in Virtual Environment for Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Dysfunction after Stroke: Preliminary Data from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kiper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study whether the reinforced feedback in virtual environment (RFVE is more effective than traditional rehabilitation (TR for the treatment of upper limb motor function after stroke, regardless of stroke etiology (i.e., ischemic, hemorrhagic. Design. Randomized controlled trial. Participants. Forty-four patients affected by stroke. Intervention. The patients were randomized into two groups: RFVE (N=23 and TR (N=21, and stratified according to stroke etiology. The RFVE treatment consisted of multidirectional exercises providing augmented feedback provided by virtual reality, while in the TR treatment the same exercises were provided without augmented feedbacks. Outcome Measures. Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale (F-M UE, Functional Independence Measure scale (FIM, and kinematics parameters (speed, time, and peak. Results. The F-M UE (P=0.030, FIM (P=0.021, time (P=0.008, and peak (P=0.018, were significantly higher in the RFVE group after treatment, but not speed (P=0.140. The patients affected by hemorrhagic stroke significantly improved FIM (P=0.031, time (P=0.011, and peak (P=0.020 after treatment, whereas the patients affected by ischemic stroke improved significantly only speed (P=0.005 when treated by RFVE. Conclusion. These results indicated that some poststroke patients may benefit from RFVE program for the recovery of upper limb motor function. This trial is registered with NCT01955291.

  10. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: measuring below the noise floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Roger M; Gallun, Frederick J; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels.

  11. Reaction of Basaltic Materials under High-Fidelity Venus Surface Conditions using the Glenn Extreme Environment Rig: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoman-Shaw, Brandon; Harvey, Ralph; Costa, Gustavo; Nakley, Leah Michelle; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Both historical and current investigations of Venus suggest that atmosphererock interactions play a critical role in the evolution of its atmosphere and crust. We have begun a series of systematic experiments designed to further our understanding of atmosphere-driven weathering and secondary mineralization of basaltic materials that may be occurring on Venus today. Our experiments expose representative igneous phases (mineral, glasses and rocks) to a high-fidelity simulation of Venus surface conditions using the NASA Glenn Extreme Environment Rig (GEER) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. GEER is a very large (800L) vessel capable of producing a long-term, high fidelity simulation of both the physical conditions (750 K and 92 bar) and atmospheric chemistry (down to the ppb-level) asso-ciated with the Venusian surface. As of this writing we have just finished the first of several planned experiments: a 42-day exposure of selected mineral, rocks and volcanic glasses. Our goal is to identify and prioritize the reactions taking place and better our understanding of their importance in Venus' climate history.

  12. Exascale Co-Design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx) Annual Report - Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germann, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McPherson, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Belak, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-25

    All activities of the Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (Ex- MatEx) are focused on the two ultimate goals of the project: (1) demonstrating and delivering a prototype scale-bridging materials science application based upon adaptive physics refinement, and (2) identifying the requirements for the exascale ecosystem that are necessary to perform computational materials science simulations (both single- and multi-scale). During the first year of ExMatEx, our focus was on establishing how we do computational materials science, by developing an initial suite of flexible proxy applications. These “proxy apps” are the primary vehicle for the co-design process, involving assessments and tradeoff evaluations both within the ExMatEx team, and with the entire exascale ecosystem. These interactions have formed the basis of our second year activities. The set of artifacts from these co-design interactions are the lessons learned, that are used to re-express the applications and algorithms within the context of emerging architectures, programming models, and runtime systems.

  13. Harsh parenting and fearfulness in toddlerhood interact to predict amplitudes of preschool error-related negativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Brooker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperamentally fearful children are at increased risk for the development of anxiety problems relative to less-fearful children. This risk is even greater when early environments include high levels of harsh parenting behaviors. However, the mechanisms by which harsh parenting may impact fearful children's risk for anxiety problems are largely unknown. Recent neuroscience work has suggested that punishment is associated with exaggerated error-related negativity (ERN, an event-related potential linked to performance monitoring, even after the threat of punishment is removed. In the current study, we examined the possibility that harsh parenting interacts with fearfulness, impacting anxiety risk via neural processes of performance monitoring. We found that greater fearfulness and harsher parenting at 2 years of age predicted greater fearfulness and greater ERN amplitudes at age 4. Supporting the role of cognitive processes in this association, greater fearfulness and harsher parenting also predicted less efficient neural processing during preschool. This study provides initial evidence that performance monitoring may be a candidate process by which early parenting interacts with fearfulness to predict risk for anxiety problems.

  14. The role of crown architecture for light harvesting and carbon gain in extreme light environments assessed with a structurally realistic 3-D model

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Main results from different studies of crown architecture adaptation to extreme light environments are presented. Light capture and carbon gain by plants from low (forest understory) and high (open Mediterranean-type ecosystems) light environments were simulated with a 3-D model (YPLANT), which was developed specifically to analyse the structural features that determine light interception and photosynthesis at the whole plant level. Distantly related taxa with contrasting architectures exhibi...

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of Hot Springs in Central India Reveals Hydrocarbon Degrading Thermophiles and Pathways Essential for Survival in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Rituja; Dhakan, Darshan B.; Mittal, Parul; Waiker, Prashant; Chowdhury, Anirban; Ghatak, Arundhuti; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2017-01-01

    Extreme ecosystems such as hot springs are of great interest as a source of novel extremophilic species, enzymes, metabolic functions for survival and biotechnological products. India harbors hundreds of hot springs, the majority of which are not yet explored and require comprehensive studies to unravel their unknown and untapped phylogenetic and functional diversity. The aim of this study was to perform a large-scale metagenomic analysis of three major hot springs located in central India namely, Badi Anhoni, Chhoti Anhoni, and Tattapani at two geographically distinct regions (Anhoni and Tattapani), to uncover the resident microbial community and their metabolic traits. Samples were collected from seven distinct sites of the three hot spring locations with temperature ranging from 43.5 to 98°C. The 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of V3 hypervariable region and shotgun metagenome sequencing uncovered a unique taxonomic and metabolic diversity of the resident thermophilic microbial community in these hot springs. Genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation pathways, such as benzoate, xylene, toluene, and benzene were observed to be abundant in the Anhoni hot springs (43.5–55°C), dominated by Pseudomonas stutzeri and Acidovorax sp., suggesting the presence of chemoorganotrophic thermophilic community with the ability to utilize complex hydrocarbons as a source of energy. A high abundance of genes belonging to methane metabolism pathway was observed at Chhoti Anhoni hot spring, where methane is reported to constitute >80% of all the emitted gases, which was marked by the high abundance of Methylococcus capsulatus. The Tattapani hot spring, with a high-temperature range (61.5–98°C), displayed a lower microbial diversity and was primarily dominated by a nitrate-reducing archaeal species Pyrobaculum aerophilum. A higher abundance of cell metabolism pathways essential for the microbial survival in extreme conditions was observed at Tattapani. Taken together

  16. Diamond-Dispersed Fiber-Reinforced Composite for Superior Friction and Wear Properties in Extreme Environments and Method for Fabricating the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth (Inventor); Voronov, Oleg A (Inventor); Kear, Bernard H (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems, methods, and articles of manufacture related to composite materials are discussed herein. These materials can be based on a mixture of diamond particles with a matrix and fibers or fabrics. The matrix can be formed into the composite material through optional pressurization and via heat treatment. These materials display exceptionally low friction coefficient and superior wear resistance in extreme environments.

  17. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Demina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly—the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase—placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion.

  18. Young Mother-Father Dyads and Maternal Harsh Parenting Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yookyong; Guterman, Neil B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined whether the age of parents predicted maternal harsh parenting behavior, specifically whether younger mothers might be at higher risk than older mothers, and which paternal characteristics might be associated with maternal parenting behavior. Methodology: This study used data from the Fragile Families and Child…

  19. Maternal Executive Function, Harsh Parenting, and Child Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Nan; Bell, Martha Ann

    2012-01-01

    Background: Maternal executive function and household regulation both are critical aspects of optimal childrearing, but their interplay is not understood. We tested the hypotheses that (a) the link between challenging child conduct problems and harsh parenting would be strongest for mothers with poorer executive function and weakest among those…

  20. Screening for Harsh Punishment in a Pediatric Primary Care Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelman, Susan; Dubowitz, Howard; Lane, Wendy; Prescott, Leslie; Meyer, Walter; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Kim, Jeongeun

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine: (1) the prevalence of harsh punishment among parents in a pediatric clinic, and (2) the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and stability of a brief screening measure. Methods: A subset of families involved in a study of child maltreatment prevention were recruited for this study. Two items in a parent screening…

  1. Harsh Corporal Punishment of Yemeni Children: Occurrence, Type and Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahri, Abdullah; Goodman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the occurrence, type and associations of harsh corporal punishment in Yemen. Methods: Caregiver and teacher reports were obtained on 1,196 Yemeni 7-10-year olds obtained by systematic random sampling of children in the 1st to 4th grades of urban and rural schools. Caregivers (86% mothers) reported on disciplinary practices,…

  2. Maternal Executive Function, Harsh Parenting, and Child Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Nan; Bell, Martha Ann

    2012-01-01

    Background: Maternal executive function and household regulation both are critical aspects of optimal childrearing, but their interplay is not understood. We tested the hypotheses that (a) the link between challenging child conduct problems and harsh parenting would be strongest for mothers with poorer executive function and weakest among those…

  3. Extreme environments in the critical zone: Linking acidification hazard of acid sulfate soils in mound spring discharge zones to groundwater evolution and mantle degassing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Paul; Gotch, Travis; Love, Andrew; Raven, Mark; Priestley, Stacey; Grocke, Sonia

    2016-10-15

    A decrease in flow from the iconic travertine mound springs of the Great Artesian Basin in South Australia has led to the oxidation of hypersulfidic soils and extreme soil acidification, impacting their unique groundwater dependent ecosystems. The build-up of pyrite in these systems occurred over millennia by the discharge of deep artesian sulfate-containing groundwaters through organic-rich subaqueous soils. Rare iron and aluminium hydroxysulfate minerals form thick efflorescences due to high evaporation rates in this arid zone environment, and the oxidised soils pose a significant risk to local aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The distribution of extreme acidification hazard is controlled by regional variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. Geochemical processes fractionate acidity and alkalinity into separate parts of the discharge zone allowing potentially extreme environments to form locally. Differences in groundwater chemistry in the aquifer along flow pathways towards the spring discharge zone are related to a range of processes including mineral dissolution and redox reactions, which in turn are strongly influenced by degassing of the mantle along deep crustal fractures. There is thus a connection between shallow critical zone ecosystems and deep crustal/mantle processes which ultimately control the formation of hypersulfidic soils and the potential for extreme geochemical environments.

  4. Multidimensional extremal dependence coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Extreme values modeling has attracting the attention of researchers in diverse areas such as the environment, engineering, or finance. Multivariate extreme value distributions are particularly suitable to model the tails of multidimensional phenomena. The analysis of the dependence among multivariate maxima is useful to evaluate risk. Here we present new multivariate extreme value models, as well as, coefficients to assess multivariate extremal dependence.

  5. Data Converters Performance at Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeshuni, Rarnesham; Kumar, Nikil; Mao, James; Keymeulen, Didier; Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Stoica, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Space missions often require radiation and extreme-temperature hardened electronics to survive the harsh environments beyond earth's atmosphere. Traditional approaches to preserve electronics incorporate shielding, insulation and redundancy at the expense of power and weight. However, a novel way of bypassing these problems is the concept of evolutionary hardware. A reconfgurable device, consisting of several switches interconnected with analog/digital parts, is controlled by an evolutionary processor (EP). When the EP detects degradation in the circuit it sends signals to reconfgure the switches, thus forming a new circuit with the desired output. This concept has been developed since the mid-90s, but one problem remains - the EP cannot degrade substantially. For this reason, extensive testing at extreme temperatures (-180' to 120(deg)C) has been done on devices found on FPGA boards (taking the role of the EP) such as the Analog to Digital and the Digital to Analog Converter. Analysis of the results has shown that FPGA boards implementing EP with some compensation may be a practical solution to evolving circuits. This paper describes results on the tests of data converters at extreme temperatures.

  6. Research Progress of Adaptation Mechanism and Application of Extreme Microbes Toward Extreme Environment%极端微生物对极端环境的适应机理及应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟素香; 曹健

    2014-01-01

    Extreme microbes grow in the extreme environments,so they must own special cell structure,physiological mechanism and gene etc.In this paper,the latest studies on the survival mechanism,classification and application of six kinds of extreme microbes were reviewed,which can provide some theoretical basis for utilization and metabolites exploitation of extreme microbes strains resource.%极端微生物在极端环境中生长繁殖,其必然有适应恶劣环境下的特殊细胞结构、生理机制、遗传基因等。对近几年的六大类极端微生物在分类、生存机制和应用方面的最新研究进展进行综述,为极端微生物菌种资源利用及代谢产物开发提供了一些理论依据。

  7. A Motor Drive Electronics Assembly for Mars Curiosity Rover: An Example of Assembly Qualification for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth; Chen, Yuan; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Tudryn Weber, Carissa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the technology development and infusion of the motor drive electronics assembly, along with the technology qualification and space qualification, is described and detailed. The process is an example of the qualification methodology for extreme environmen

  8. Structural and Mechanical Characterization of Nanocrystalline Tungsten and Tungsten-Based Alloy Thin Films for Extreme Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gustavo

    Extreme environments associated with nuclear applications often results in degradation of the physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the materials. Tungsten (W) exhibits unique physical and mechanical properties, which makes tungsten a good candidate for nuclear applications; however, intrinsic W exhibits low fracture toughness at all temperatures in addition to a high ductile to brittle transition. In the present work, nanocrystalline W, W-Y and W-Mo alloys were nanoengineered for nuclear applications. Nanocrystalline tungsten coatings with a thickness of 1 microm were deposited onto Silicon (100) and Sapphire (C-plane) using RF and DC sputtering techniques under various growth conditions. Yttrium content in W-Y alloys has been varied to enhance the irradiation tolerance under optimum concentration. The W, W-Y coatings were characterized to understand the structure and morphology and to establish a mapping of conditions to obtain phase and size controlled materials. The samples were then subjected to depth-controlled irradiation by neutrons and Au3+ ions. Solid solution strengthening was achieved by doping molybdenum (Mo) solute atoms to W matrix under varied sputtering pressures and temperatures with the intention of creating interstitial point defects in the crystals that impede dislocation motion, increasing the hardness and young modulus of the material. The effect of PAr (3-19 mTorr) was also investigated and associated microstructure are significant on the mechanical characteristics; the hardness (H) and modulus of elasticity (Er) of the nc W-Mo thin films were higher at lower pressures but decreases continuously with increasing PAr. Using nano-indentation and nano-scratch technique, mechanical characterization testing was performed before and after irradiation. The structure, mechanics and irradiation stability of the W and W-Y coatings will be presented and discussed to demonstrate that Y-addition coupled with nano-scale features

  9. Food web structure in a harsh glacier-fed river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clitherow, Leonie R; Carrivick, Jonathan L; Brown, Lee E

    2013-01-01

    Glacier retreat is occurring across the world, and associated river ecosystems are expected to respond more rapidly than those in flowing waters in other regions. The river environment directly downstream of a glacier snout is characterised by extreme low water temperature and unstable channel sediments but these habitats may become rarer with widespread glacier retreat. In these extreme environments food web dynamics have been little studied, yet they could offer opportunities to test food web theories using highly resolved food webs owing to their low taxonomic richness. This study examined the interactions of macroinvertebrate and diatom taxa in the Ödenwinkelkees river, Austrian central Alps between 2006 and 2011. The webs were characterised by low taxon richness (13-22), highly connected individuals (directed connectance up to 0.19) and short mean food chain length (2.00-2.36). The dominant macroinvertebrates were members of the Chironomidae genus Diamesa and had an omnivorous diet rich in detritus and diatoms as well as other Chironomidae. Simuliidae (typically detritivorous filterers) had a diet rich in diatoms but also showed evidence of predation on Chironomidae larvae. Food webs showed strong species-averaged and individual size structuring but mass-abundance scaling coefficients were larger than those predicted by metabolic theory, perhaps due to a combination of spatial averaging effects of patchily distributed consumers and resources, and/or consumers deriving unquantified resources from microorganisms attached to the large amounts of ingested rock fragments. Comparison of food web structural metrics with those from 62 published river webs suggest these glacier-fed river food web properties were extreme but in line with general food web scaling predictions, a finding which could prove useful to forecast the effects of anticipated future glacier retreat on the structure of aquatic food webs.

  10. Food web structure in a harsh glacier-fed river.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie R Clitherow

    Full Text Available Glacier retreat is occurring across the world, and associated river ecosystems are expected to respond more rapidly than those in flowing waters in other regions. The river environment directly downstream of a glacier snout is characterised by extreme low water temperature and unstable channel sediments but these habitats may become rarer with widespread glacier retreat. In these extreme environments food web dynamics have been little studied, yet they could offer opportunities to test food web theories using highly resolved food webs owing to their low taxonomic richness. This study examined the interactions of macroinvertebrate and diatom taxa in the Ödenwinkelkees river, Austrian central Alps between 2006 and 2011. The webs were characterised by low taxon richness (13-22, highly connected individuals (directed connectance up to 0.19 and short mean food chain length (2.00-2.36. The dominant macroinvertebrates were members of the Chironomidae genus Diamesa and had an omnivorous diet rich in detritus and diatoms as well as other Chironomidae. Simuliidae (typically detritivorous filterers had a diet rich in diatoms but also showed evidence of predation on Chironomidae larvae. Food webs showed strong species-averaged and individual size structuring but mass-abundance scaling coefficients were larger than those predicted by metabolic theory, perhaps due to a combination of spatial averaging effects of patchily distributed consumers and resources, and/or consumers deriving unquantified resources from microorganisms attached to the large amounts of ingested rock fragments. Comparison of food web structural metrics with those from 62 published river webs suggest these glacier-fed river food web properties were extreme but in line with general food web scaling predictions, a finding which could prove useful to forecast the effects of anticipated future glacier retreat on the structure of aquatic food webs.

  11. Life under multiple extreme conditions: diversity and physiology of the halophilic alkalithermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2012-06-01

    Around the world, there are numerous alkaline, hypersaline environments that are heated either geothermally or through intense solar radiation. It was once thought that such harsh environments were inhospitable and incapable of supporting a variety of life. However, numerous culture-dependent and -independent studies revealed the presence of an extensive diversity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and archaea that survive and grow under these multiple harsh conditions. This diversity includes the halophilic alkalithermophiles, a novel group of polyextremophiles that require for growth and proliferation the multiple extremes of high salinity, alkaline pH, and elevated temperature. Life under these conditions undoubtedly involves the development of unique physiological characteristics, phenotypic properties, and adaptive mechanisms that enable control of membrane permeability, control of intracellular osmotic balance, and stability of the cell wall, intracellular proteins, and other cellular constituents. This minireview highlights the ecology and growth characteristics of the extremely halophilic alkalithermophiles that have been isolated thus far. Biochemical, metabolic, and physiological properties of the extremely halophilic alkalithermophiles are described, and their roles in resistance to the combined stressors of high salinity, alkaline pH, and high temperature are discussed. The isolation of halophilic alkalithermophiles broadens the physicochemical boundaries for life and extends the boundaries for the combinations of the maximum salinity, pH, and temperature that can support microbial growth.

  12. Remote, Real-time Investigations of Extreme Environments Using High Power and Bandwidth Cabled Observatories: The OOI Regional Scale Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrate deposits and hydrothermal vents are two of the most extreme environments on Earth. Seismic events and flow of gases from the seafloor support and modulate novel microbial communities within these systems. Although studied intensely for several decades, significant questions remain about the flux of heat, volatiles and microbial material from the subsurface to the hydrosphere in these dynamic environments. Quantification of microbial communities, their structure and abundances, and metabolic activities is in an infant state. To better understand these systems, the National Science Foundation's Ocean Observatory Initiative has installed high power (8 kW), high bandwidth (10 Gb/s) nodes on the seafloor that provide access to active methane seeps at Southern Hydrate Ridge, and at the most magmatically robust volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge - Axial Seamount. The real-time interactive capabilities of the cabled observatory are critical to studying gas-hydrate systems because many of the key processes occur over short time scales. Events such as bubble plume formation, the creation of collapse zones, and increased seepage in response to earthquakes require adaptive response and sampling capabilities. To meet these challenges a suite of instruments will be connected to the cable in 2013. These sensors include full resolution sampling by upward-looking sonars, fluid and gas chemical characterization by mass spectrometers and osmo samplers, long-term duration collection of seep imagery from cameras, and in situ manipulation of chemical sensors coupled with flow meters. In concert, this instrument suite will provide quantification of transient and more stable chemical fluxes. Similarly, at Axial Seamount the high bandwidth and high power fiber optic cables will be used to communicate with and power a diverse array of sensors at the summit of the volcano. Real-time high definition video will provide unprecedented views of macrofaunal and microbial communities

  13. Understanding Adaptive Capacity in Real Estate and the Built Environment: Climate Change and Extreme Weather in New York City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keenan, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    With climate change well underway, cities worldwide are struggling to develop and apply knowledge that will help advance social, environmental and economic adaptation to extreme weather and changing ecologies. Nowhere is this need more pressing than in the design, development and management of the b

  14. Harsh Parenting and Child Externalizing Behavior: Skin Conductance Level Reactivity as a Moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, Stephen A.; El-Sheikh, Mona; Cummings, E. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) was examined as a moderator of the association between harsh parenting and child externalizing behavior. Participants were 251 boys and girls (8-9 years). Mothers and fathers provided reports of harsh parenting and their children's externalizing behavior; children also provided reports of harsh parenting.…

  15. Trajectories of Maternal Harsh Parenting in the First 3 Years of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun K.; Pears, Katherine C.; Fisher, Philip A.; Connelly, Cynthia D.; Landsverk, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite the high prevalence rates of harsh parenting, the nature of developmental change in this domain early in life and the factors that contribute to changes in harsh parenting over time are not well understood. The present study examined developmental patterns in maternal harsh parenting behavior from birth to age 3 years and their…

  16. Rain Characteristics and Large-Scale Environments of Precipitation Objects with Extreme Rain Volumes from TRMM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaping; Lau, William K M.; Liu, Chuntao

    2013-01-01

    This study adopts a "precipitation object" approach by using 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Feature (PF) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data to study rainfall structure and environmental factors associated with extreme heavy rain events. Characteristics of instantaneous extreme volumetric PFs are examined and compared to those of intermediate and small systems. It is found that instantaneous PFs exhibit a much wider scale range compared to the daily gridded precipitation accumulation range. The top 1% of the rainiest PFs contribute over 55% of total rainfall and have 2 orders of rain volume magnitude greater than those of the median PFs. We find a threshold near the top 10% beyond which the PFs grow exponentially into larger, deeper, and colder rain systems. NCEP reanalyses show that midlevel relative humidity and total precipitable water increase steadily with increasingly larger PFs, along with a rapid increase of 500 hPa upward vertical velocity beyond the top 10%. This provides the necessary moisture convergence to amplify and sustain the extreme events. The rapid increase in vertical motion is associated with the release of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in mature systems, as is evident in the increase in CAPE of PFs up to 10% and the subsequent dropoff. The study illustrates distinct stages in the development of an extreme rainfall event including: (1) a systematic buildup in large-scale temperature and moisture, (2) a rapid change in rain structure, (3) explosive growth of the PF size, and (4) a release of CAPE before the demise of the event.

  17. Extinction risk and eco-evolutionary dynamics in a variable environment with increasing frequency of extreme events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Simone

    2014-08-06

    One of the most dramatic consequences of climate change will be the intensification and increased frequency of extreme events. I used numerical simulations to understand and predict the consequences of directional trend (i.e. mean state) and increased variability of a climate variable (e.g. temperature), increased probability of occurrence of point extreme events (e.g. floods), selection pressure and effect size of mutations on a quantitative trait determining individual fitness, as well as the their effects on the population and genetic dynamics of a population of moderate size. The interaction among climate trend, variability and probability of point extremes had a minor effect on risk of extinction, time to extinction and distribution of the trait after accounting for their independent effects. The survival chances of a population strongly and linearly decreased with increasing strength of selection, as well as with increasing climate trend and variability. Mutation amplitude had no effects on extinction risk, time to extinction or genetic adaptation to the new climate. Climate trend and strength of selection largely determined the shift of the mean phenotype in the population. The extinction or persistence of the populations in an 'extinction window' of 10 years was well predicted by a simple model including mean population size and mean genetic variance over a 10-year time frame preceding the 'extinction window', although genetic variance had a smaller role than population size in predicting contemporary risk of extinction.

  18. Recent developments on surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for harsh conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, Paul; Chilibon, Irinela; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    The results of research into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) devices have been recognized for their efficiency and versatility in the electrical signals processing. Actual progress in the industrial application of piezoelectric materials such as Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3), Langasite (LGS), Lanthanum-Gallium Silicate La3Ga5SiO14 and Gallium Orthophosphate (GaPO4), allows the manufacturing of devices with piezoelectric performances, which overcome the limits obtained with quartz crystals. The single crystal materials have a long term high stability - near to infinite - and moreover, some of these have an excellent behavior with temperature variation. Today, GaPO4 with its properties is by far the best suited piezoelectric material to be used in sensor applications for machine monitoring and pressure measurements, at high temperatures. SAW micro devices based on GaPO4 operate at temperatures of up to 8000C. For a particular case, of harsh-environment applications, additional challenges need to be overcome, relating to substrate integrity and operation, thin film electrode fabrication, device packaging, and sensor interrogation. This paper reviews the novel progres in the area of (SAW) sensors for harsh conditions.

  19. Extreme rainfall events in karst environments: the case study of September 2014 in the Gargano area (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Maria Elena; Pisano, Luca; Trabace, Maria; Marchesini, Ivan; Peruccacci, Silvia; Rossi, Mauro; Amoruso, Giuseppe; Loiacono, Pierluigi; Vennari, Carmela; Vessia, Giovanna; Parise, Mario; Brunetti, Maria Teresa

    2015-04-01

    In the first week of September 2014, the Gargano Promontory (Apulia, SE Italy) was hit by an extreme rainfall event that caused several landslides, floods and sinkholes. As a consequence of the floods, two people lost their lives and severe socio-economic damages were reported. The highest peaks of rainfall were recorded between September 3rd and 6th at the Cagnano Varano and San Marco in Lamis rain gauges with a maximum daily rainfall (over 230 mm) that is about 30% the mean annual rainfall. The Gargano Promontory is characterized by complex orographic conditions, with the highest elevation of about 1000 m a.s.l. The geological setting consists of different types of carbonate deposits affected by intensive development of karst processes. The morphological and climatic settings of the area, associated with frequent extreme rainfall events can cause various types of geohazards (e.g., landslides, floods, sinkholes). A further element enhancing the natural predisposition of the area to the occurrence of landslides, floods and sinkholes is an intense human activity, characterized by an inappropriate land use and management. In order to obtain consistent and reliable data on the effects produced by the storm, a systematic collection of information through field observations, a critical analysis of newspaper articles and web-news, and a co-operation with the Regional Civil Protection and local geologists started immediately after the event. The information collected has been organized in a database including the location, the occurrence time and the type of geohazard documented with photographs. The September 2014 extreme rainfall event in the Gargano Promontory was also analyzed to validate the forecasts issued by the Italian national early-warning system for rainfall-induced landslides (SANF), developed by the Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection (IRPI) for the Italian national Department for Civil Protection (DPC). SANF compares rainfall measurements and

  20. Variations of the Stellar Initial Mass Function in the Progenitors of Massive Early-type Galaxies and in Extreme Starburst Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrier, Gilles; Hennebelle, Patrick; Charlot, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    We examine variations of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in extreme environments within the formalism derived by Hennebelle & Chabrier. We focus on conditions encountered in progenitors of massive early-type galaxies and starburst regions. We show that, when applying the concept of turbulent Jeans mass as the characteristic mass for fragmentation in a turbulent medium, the peak of the IMF in such environments is shifted toward smaller masses, leading to a bottom-heavy IMF, as suggested by various observations. In very dense and turbulent environments, we predict that the high-mass tail of the IMF can become even steeper than the standard Salpeter IMF, with a limit for the power-law exponent α ~= -2.7, in agreement with recent observational determinations. This steepening is a direct consequence of the high densities and Mach values in such regions but also of the time dependence of the fragmentation process, as incorporated in the Hennebelle-Chabrier theory. We provide analytical parameterizations of these IMFs in such environments to be used in galaxy evolution calculations. We also calculate the star-formation rates and the mass-to-light ratios expected under such extreme conditions and show that they agree well with the values inferred in starburst environments and massive high-redshift galaxies. This reinforces the paradigm of star formation as being a universal process, i.e., the direct outcome of gravitationally unstable fluctuations in a density field initially generated by large-scale, shock-dominated turbulence. This globally enables us to infer the variations of the stellar IMF and related properties for atypical galactic conditions.